Citation
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Home Builder papers and manuscripts
Alternate title:
"The High Cost of Living: Get on the 'Other Side of the Fence'"
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Housing development -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Real property -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Housing development ( fast )
Real property ( fast )
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
History. ( fast )
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
History ( fast )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Miscellaneous text and documents from the Bunnell Development Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10469 ( NOTIS )
1046991505 ( OCLC )
on1046991505
Classification:
F319.B92 B86 ( lcc )

Related Items

Related Item:
Bunnell home builder

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
THE HIGH COST OF LIVING
WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT?
Get on the "Other Side of the Fence"
You see my point, I am sure. If you were on the "OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE," if you were a producer yourself you would have no objection to receiving these high prices for the products of your farm, and even though such high prices may not continue to exist, you would be able to supply the food necessary to yourself and your family and always have something to sell. Isn't this a feature worth your earnest consideration? If you agcee with me, then let me show you how it is possible for you to get on the-"OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE," and the particular side of the fence where the pastures seem the greenes, and success the surest.
Then, where shah you go? If I should say to a farm in one of our middle-western states you would at once think of an eighty or a hundred and sixty-acre farm that would cost you anywhere from $izS.OO to $250.00 an acre, and you would say "IT IS IMPOSS'BLE." And to become the owner of
such a farm is impossible for the man who does not possess a large bank account. But, conditions are entirely different in Florida, and particularly in our own BUNNELL COLONY, and it gives me the lkeenest pleasure to tell you briefly why this is true.
In the first place you do not require such a large farm at Bunnell, for there you will grow three crops on your land every year; in other wArds you can grow as much on twenty acres of land in Flori.a as you can on sixty acres in Illinois.
Again, our clima;: is so delightful that a home-a place THOMAS ALBERT VERDi.NIUS of shelter-may be b iilt at a cost of one-third or one-half
the price of a home in northern climate. Fuel bills are there Doubtless there is no question tha is so generally agi- reduced to almost noti ing, little fuel being required any time taking tIe mjn, )f th~ Aerican p- a- that f the of the yer, pl4 be hxd f-rxr ay eutting.ever-increasing HIGH COST OF LIVING. Thinking men The necessity for warm winter clothing is also eliminated.
and women are startled over existing conditions, and the Furthermore, Florida's soil is unequalled for trucking and
question is being asked on all sides, "WHERE IS IT GOING for the production of citrus fruits, besides being ideally adapted
TO END?" Not only are the poorer people suffering because to the growing of staple crops, such s corn, rye, forage crops of the high prices of the necessities of life, but the great middle of all kinds, sugar cane, cotton, etc. class is finding it impossible to go on in this nanner and they are earnestly seeking a remedy by, which they may rid Would that I had the voice of a trumpet to arouse from
themselves of their heavy burden. their lethargy the men and women everywhere, throughout
the length and breadth of this great country of ours, and Hard coal is selling in Chicago at $ o.oo a ton; soft coal to show them that they are wasting the best years of their lives (mine run) at $7.50 per ton; flour, $ 50 a barrel; butter, in working for others, when by a little effort on their part 45 cents a pound; eggs, 6o cents a dozen potatoes from $2.25 they might become the owners of little farms of their own in to $2.5o per bushel-and so I could go enumerating other Florida, and there escape the hardships of the HIGH COST
necessities of life that are being sold a almost prohibitive OF LIVING. prices.
This BANNER is written for the thoughtful consideration It is useless for me to here attempts to discuss the cause of every individual who is interested in bettering his condition, or causes of these conditions. It is eno gh for us that they who would like to live in a country where there are 365 growexist. The question now is, WHAT CA YOU DO ABOUT ing days in the year, where the sun shines almost all the time,
IT? The sole purpose of this BANNER i to present to earnest where three crops are raised annually and where life takes men and women a way of escape from t e hardships attend- on a new, a different meaning from what it has under the
ant to the HIGH COST OF LIVING. present struggle for existence. This Banner will tell you about
the BUNNELL colony where just these conditions prevail, Most of you who read this are on the "WRONG SIDE where you may become a PRODUCER INSTEAD OF A
OF THE FENCE." The great mass of people are consumers, CONSUMER, where you may grow and sell some of these
not producers, and it is the consumer who is suffering today. high-priced articles of food instead of buying them, and where So again I would give you the oft-repeated slogan "BACK you may become independent within a few years' time. This
TO THE LAND." I realize of course that everyone could colony was established some six years ago. It has long since
not or would not leave the cities to engage in the occupation passed the experimental stage, for here men and women have of farming, and it would not be wise for them to do so; but set up their homes; they are making money, and are happy if YOU are one who can do this I trust you will take my advice and content. Here hundreds and hundreds of others have deeply to heart, for it may be the means of changing the whole bought farms and expect to locate on them permanently, and course of your life into brighter, happier, helthier channels, notwithstanding all this, the land is still very reasonable in price and may be purchased under the most satisfactory terms. Let us here for a moment consider the reasons why anyIfyusnelydirtogtayfomhetuge commodity should go up or down in piic. The answer isIfyusnelydirtoeta yfomhetuge
easy-it is the demand and supply whic regulate the price incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. of any commercial article. If there is an ovr-production of What will you do about it?
a certain article, the price of that article gos down at once; Very sincerely yours,
if there is a shortage, the price goes up. No, most men are practically only consumers, as pertains to the things that go to nourish human life, while THE FARMER IS THE t
ONE GREAT PRODUCER.21




14 Acres of Irish Potatoes grown
at Bunnell sold for $3.000.00
This is Mr. W. A. Mack Here are the Deposit Slips
ANELL STATE BANK BUNNELLSTE STE BANK BUNNELL STATE BANK
S7' e ob Fl*s ()o.
CII SEP"'"' *' P EA ST CCtI CE
FLEAS~LS
Before ,a Notary Publc an for the county r
etate aforeatd, personally appeared G. A. Arnerson, Cashier +A,
Beoet.aNtr Pbii n t hecut n
s-of the Bunne I tate Bank, o f Bunnell, Fla., who, after being duly sworn, eposes and ease,ThatEaret i has made three deposits in tls bank, to
Here is Hs Sory I3O o tteprhadrahaoeuo.A
the credit o W. A. Mack, aggregating Three-Thousand Dollars 1$3,000) for potatoes purchased from the aforeeaid W. A. Jack, and tht the a0oe three deposit ali e are true and cort rer J 1ou 2i13s of the same.
Mr. W. A. Mack is one of Bunnell's successful
farmers. On fourteen acresof Ian which heboughtIf. soofe
from our Company, he raised $ 000.00 worth of ..... to Dre:me a:: ,ot ti t
~ ~t{ '" t _'Lyo. N0 inte, Hundred and Sixteenl,
Irish potatoes in one season, and this was but one 1 tn or ea.
of his tree annual co qDs,. Thi an is a farmer, .,..
'" iTucer, and he does not o ject to the high : ,"'j "
price of potatoes. Neither will you if you follow his example. He is now planting his entire forty acres to Irish potatoes, which he will harvest early this spring. Here is Mr. Mack's Letter
Mr. Mack came to Bunnell on October 31, 1911,
he being one of our first settlers. He had less than jd-( Y'k
one thousand dollars when he left California.
He began clearing his land on December 18,1911. (7/~ oa 6? L/4 -- if / 4
Built his little home without the aid of a carpenter. ,
Put down his well, and has fine drinking water at a depth of 21 feet. q O 1
He has all of his 40 acres now cleared and under M
cultivation. u a
Mr. Mack has raised fourteen crops on his land i /
since he came to Bunnell, and if this winter's crop is as ----d .1 c-/ .
good as his last year's potato crop, Mr. Mack will sell $9000.00 worth of potatoes from his forty acre farm. ro
The above is the story of one ordinary man's success. _1L
It is one that can be verified in the experience of any man a tt ( 6k
who will do as Mr. Mack has done. The climate, soil and transportation facilities are available to every man who Cdesires to take advantage of them, and if he will go seriously w -. 1
about his business of making dollars from Bunnell soil, HE WILL ARRIVE AT EASY STREET AS WELL, and will / ,
avoid the pitfalls of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. c- ,
This is not a tale of romance or fancy, but it simply sets g ..,y .,_t
forth the hard, cold figures of facts, taken from the transaction of a Bunnell colony farmer and a commission man ."-.-.& 4 _. /. "- '4 who wanted to buy what the farmer had to sell. On this page you will find a letter written by Mr. Mack regarding this al
transaction. v4 t 4 -.,,o, . #-./,
I could tell you of a good many other successful farmers A '4y'- / "
in the Bunnell colony, and could relate many other incidents / of a similar nature, that should be sufficient to convince any- /
one that the Bunnell colony is a good place in which to lake a home, and to provide for the future with the least amount of expense and the greatest promise of profit. j




Why this Man Moved to Bunnell
The Story is Told in His Own Words
-- negro had made $505.00 in thile same length of ing just moved to Bunnell the year previous. I
tune, besides he was at home with his family recall that he hauled his potatoes in onl a wagon all te time, while I was traveling all over the drawn by two oxen. Today Mr. Mack has as country, fine a farm as there is in this section.
i his little incident put me to thinking, and After the potato crop was shipped I went up I made up my mind that day, that sooner or into Georgia and worked the peach deal; from later I would te a resident ot 6t. Johns County. there 1 went to Birmingham, Alabama. From Alter travcling for lour yeais, all over the Birmingham I wrote MIr. Moody that I had United States, with the exception of the extreme quit the road and wanted to make B3unnell my western coast, I quit the road and returned to my home. I asked him if there was anything open old home town, Calhoun, Georgia, where I be- that I could get into. He immediately replied: gan the publication of a weekly newspaper, "Come to Bunnell and we will open s.)iomething," which 1 puolished for four years. I liked this On November 1912 1 landed n Bunnell.
On oveber5, 1912, 1 landed inl Bunnell
business all right during the summer months, immediately realized that there was an opebut when the weather began to turn cold 1 would o a newspaper here, as there was long for 1' lorida, so when the first frost fell in ing r n sa ee h a uh
thing like three thousand people who had bought
the Iall of 1911, 1 wired John Nix & Company, land here, and I felt sure that I could get every SAw York, telling them I was ready to go back oe of them to subscribe for a weekly paper.
oil he rad T _ils ire recive a rply hatone of them to subscr Ibe for a weekly paper.I on the road. To this wire I received a reply that telegraphed the printers supply people to send telegraphed the printers supply people to send my Florida territory was open. their man here at once as I wanted to buy a
1 umeiatlydisposed of my newspaper and
i immediately disposed of y newspaper and plant. Everything arrived and on February 6, came to Florida. 1 worked down the Florida 1913, I launched the St. Johns Tribune and East Coast during the months of December, Jan- have been publishing it ever since. uary, February and March, where I was shipp.ng string beans. I remember that year we had I have now been a resident of Bunnell for car load after car load of beans to sell in New ferty-nine months, and expect to make it forty_ ork for $5.00 to $6.00 per hamper, and we had nine years, provided I live that long. a few that sold as higl as $7.50 per hamper. I have driven over practically every part of J. B. Boaz, Editor of The St. Johns Tribune After the bean crop was shipped I received the colony, and I know that this dirt cannot be orders to report at Hastings for the potato crop. beat for farming. Although I am not a farmer 1 nute that a number of people who hav On account of the potato industry having myself, I have been in nearly every field and come in BunnCll have written you letters fror grown to such an extent, AIr. Nix had to move orange grove in the State of Florida. I have rime to time giving you their views of Bunnel his office force to Hastings, going there him- Lought fruits and vegetables in nearly every as a tarming community, and as my experience self, to be able to handle it. Upon arriving in sh pping point in the State, besides having in Florida covers practically the entire state, Hastings, MIr. Nix said: "Boaz, I want you to b :ght them in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, during a period of approximately twelve yearr, handle the Dupont and Bunnell crops this year. North and South Carolina, Mississippi, VirI thought that possibly you would like to kno We have made arrangements at Dupont with ginia, Missouri and New York State, and I conwhat I think of Florida, and more especially <; the Dupont Railway and Land Company to han- scientiousvly believe that Florida is the BEST St. Jhns County and Bunnell. dle their crop. I want you to go to Bunnell state in the Union; St. Johns County the BEST
g a where you will meet a man named Moody. He cominty in Florida, and Bunnell the BEST town
1o give 1ou my experience I will have t 8. is as fine a fellow as you ever met, and he will ifr"he county.
gi in ile year 104, at which time 1 accepted make you enjoy yourself while there. He is Since publishing the St. Johns Tribune I
a positi~mwith Rober T. presrndentomofna bingelandicompany, StandothoseibfelSwholesaeitin it h R obert T. Cochran & Company, presusedent of a big land company, and those fel- have tried very hard to give my readers the facts Swhl produce house of New York City lows have quite a large amount of potatoes ready in regard to what the farmers are doing here,
with instructions to go immediately to Hastings, to dig. When you get there, see Moody and you ut sometimes Ithe fdelicacyrmers arebout pubishingere, Florida, to buy Irish potatoes. Upon arrival and he take his Cadillac roadster and go out and ut sometimes I feel a delicacy about publishing at Hastings the first day of April I found sev- buy every potato you can. You can contract at grown here, asof they s eem like impossibilities, eral farmers who had their fields planted to $4.00 f. o. b," grown here, as they seem like impossibilities, potral farmers where had their fields planted to 400 f.. and I know that some of my readers would not
pthatoes that waere ready to dig. The acreage I arrived in Bunnell, met Mr. Moody and believe them; in fact I would not believe these the entire was about five hundred, the yield from we immediately got busy and bought every reports myself, if I did not KNOW them to be rthentire acreage being about one hundred cars potato there was in this section of the county, facts. for the season. The price per barrel received paying from $3.75 to $4.00 per barrel for numbv the grmowers was on an average of $4.50 f. o. b. ber ones and twos. We bought one man's crop I am very optimistic in regard to the future I remember one old negro who owned a five acre by the field. He had ten acres of potatoes for prosperity of the Bunnell Colony and feel that tract of land. On this five acres he had his which we paid him $1,500.00, delivered to Bun- it will some day in the near future be one of house and barn, which left him four acres to nell. This was what he wanted for them, so the largest shipping points, of all kinds of fruits plant to potatoes. I bought this crop of potatoes we paid him his price. For this crop of potatoes and vegetables, there is in the State. from the old negro, and after deducting the cash we got a little over $2,400.00. Thanking you for your patience with me in
to pay for the seed, fertilizer and barrels that he Ir. R. W. Cody had seventeen acres planted this lengthyletter,allow me to subscribe myself, had used, I g we him a check for $50_.00. that year which I handled for him, and after he Yours very truly,
'When I gave him this check I realized then naid up all expenses, he had a little over three that he had made more clear money off of four thousand dollars left. Right then I said: "Bunacres of land within four months, than I had nell, St. Johns County, Florida, will be my made during the same four months, as my salary future home." at that time was ,100.00 per month; conse- I remember buying Mr. W. A. Mack's crop
quently I had made $400.00 while this ignorant of potatoes that year. He only had a few, hayMR. J. B. BOAZ SPECIAL OFFER OF THE ST. JOHNS TRIBUNE
Author of the preceding mbst interesting letter, is the Free of Cost for One Month.
Editor of the St. Johns Tribune, a weekly newspaper pub.THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, lished by him in Bunnell We consider Mr. f -a one of e.. 1108 South La Salle Street,
the most able newspaper men irtn Florida, and his paper is Chicago, Illinois. up to date in every respect.
DEAR SIR:If you have bought land in the unnell colony and are I am interested in the Bunnell colony, and would like to receive for one month, not already a subscriber to this weekly paper, you should by free of all cost to me, the St. Johns Tribune, published in Bunnell, Florida. all means have it in your home during the present year.
You cannot, in fact, afford to be without it, for it will Name
keep you closely in touch with the rapid developments
taking place in the community. The price is but $2.00 Street and No.
per year.
Town or CityIf you have not as yet purchased a farm at Bunnell,
but would like a copy of this paper for one month, free of State
all cost, fill out the adjoining coupon and mail it at once.




HERE IS THE STORY OF BUNNELL
These men and women have already become producers, or are making their
HIGH COST OF LIVING Means, and are determir
NOTE: The letters on these two LIKES FLORCIIA BETTER THI A~ f% NY ADVICEF OF A (CHIC AGO MANlo. DE11IHTED WITHI SUMMERPAS IS Wll
paesar fomstifid enad wo e I OT t.It 1"1 I -eIIded to buy before it was too AM WINTERS AT BUNNEL.L.
page ar fr m stisied menas ome '' e came Io conl eeme 4h 1'], 14 and m, a i ll to thse wIT haent"oagI easej to t -Iolony abouIt III, loth ofr who have bought land in the Bunnell and were very Iw Jiae ihorlnd e st e tone sIudrtn t" r" Febunary. 195 nid haehall theexl ren, colony. The originals are on file at the alsoll our son' og e eelvd svrls I vev lttle or til tract etfrsl.of the li te for theeniryar I m s office of the Bunnell Development Com- ( ratzyte uttiktutti at ia ,,b s sedl I I l we ::,N' .' / r un Il ed iihe.'the pany, Chicago, Illinois. W e omit their Il: InT 11rs J.i lw. iAL, pnnyl relab mTinlaulnl'al at .w.B o
fuladdresses in order that the writers 1u 1ont Florida. ciaflly to mak llod any1 contrat or gua u1,unel lobo may not be annoyed by quantities of mail NEW YORK Bt.1NKER WELL PLEASED 1hey ma ak. .T oTclII ODSO RAS O B'NLLFO1 from interested people, or from other 1% 1i I lit ss Nit*111 THER C1'II A NL O tNE. 1
Ifand co pronpective buyer would like to byw la e w rr.(t leeap\f CAN1,maxA eval Ev,~.s TwENTY %(te As tl/ r :1 1e na @ il ln
If any p p 7 have the si:a o nd imore iren of, 3 itE I-rin tlls futue, and pr, di[ gra1hi o
have one or more of these addresses, we avrI Inelie I Ii~ ilsrey tl I wn to .a Io nIr t r in Ieto Ih rooy I I h tIm Ivr ,on man
shall be pleased to furnish same on ap- inW thle deeMWmn or;uIur noon u nd after examnin tile soil thorn ousebly, wo aehs mny an bu n frn
plc to .Of tim1 flIs fuin iin iis i h eie o tk w n mor :,,joiIn i tI,,.Il uk." C Alt I SWIG-t
plc to -country.,, JOSEPH1 .l, I wif v ery mat 1 ]i l, ae wit the quality of i I'ana l ne
Bunnell Development Company. "t. Yok o r BUNNELL BATIZFNKE LL Ot "NTIAI II e ie ofIMN fonellln.ln smsig W aehd:1ln unir-nttol
rI IZ N INrd il N E lOLN: :- ,rn trI 1nd 11 bi:iee oImnyrfr d notl too muclh rulin. Thle -Iorn ZropI ar "Mr.1- Vedni1-ou h vebe w n ,rul that land i, bound t, :I u1i0rc r *o .eealy n ioehr w elMn
successful i l in in deeo hs c untry rai..ly- thT Ird has hbIe I., lid il itIibt.
and in sliding, '0n1,or pope \h art, it. II.ail PARKlR, Onad- W.A1A K
thanking you l ey fI u effrt1 your- u nll W A, FoI dn
honor aind your Iert,! I i s you1 1 to 11hen1 1I NNELL CIA.11.1TE BEN~iT IN THEl WOii i 1%1111 - lll,1,oi~
mosttlof th b e anl mll n at I< ad it I., "' tya w m sP nwar11 R A F T RL AENN L O H
ov r a ,withi vook restful nights. I wa ,,re t future' lin ti l n fo11 .r thl, rea;l frn A WINTER IN A TENT NOT 0H ECTION- ,elosdw lste oln adth pole r. om to lria llyu utlr: ht t ABLE TO TIS 31 ILN iXw. hscooynes moefres
"I have livedi it, i t 011 wl i ntemir, mnl there II. (I t R~iN hils ind, ( R .C O D N
wer ony a1 f1( niht tlhat we kepIt 11 fire MinsoC _unwl klorida lI .c
1)1)r InOs. Icksr il I IIg i :111 IV E ARE IN THE ,A DOf, PROpERIT;
loo at th uetes ahrti, Ito I) WE KNOW No 801W R Mt
h7 lddled daroat stovi andI seeI uilling imt Thfi:,11i r noewie w ns m m
WALEt HATILEY, Manewhre eilth, is n osdrllnlti
Hiunnell,FIlorila. .h l.w .. 'r Ju!,em y e tu i GI ti s 0 (
aii, t e vihe tha frOe sn ws 0 ierI I I('
MAKES GOOD FI >5ATBE NE L. :ie n ing good lwre., WeN are inthe Illn t \i.i
on o th1bie ol4nh coot ,hichhas "The climalte of In n l I Ielightful th I Irseiy WI kno >I INS r, , 11 is I. NVQ 1,1o1nI \ l
fou techrxadaou r.4 upls Th-raracoolls land Is speni 'nI your- peple ;I\,. 'IS ;I L.1 1.For a u
at Ocean City. 0, Pnt Blackx Int and odyille. reeptin and ,nt mnnn thn[I 1c'uld liardlly Bunnell F iila.n a nt
Ifthpet bil $0.0 aholbuldspi B nnl rle your tc 111I ilntCAmlNAD1liIANll I.N' C N DIN R PE TY I 1> 1IT ii u
see ear itng Our ll littll, ity'. IO 0 1 lEl AFTER A TR1 IIO, IN. d ln-1h
C, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ L I PtA01 1A UI ,111 RIEJ AfLLY.IF ACTION TO BI NNELL.l
CHICAO WOMAN VOICE HERISIs nuh w leat Bunll to sat
OF THEBUNEL OLNY, AFTER iiisfy1 m, tha timlnd is .K n utwa ,10 10NTT
VISITING THEt COLONY ou 0l.i for itwhiepl hr r od1 .1
THREE TIMEI ill thlest 1quality anld willing ogieal s
"I returned horne11l onth I'1th inst., having irfo mki, ase o. M rpry i a 1' 1m vry w
spe t hre ery deig tf l e sIn Bunnell,. :,,I; i- now for 11lI. Thal e nsIu nelf: llrn. I
[Ia ss gre by s rrie 'It thle mIn :iwl Ill Io pai forile -w f an all."
fimprovmentsn t i, n lyin Iunnell, but in WILIA l alAM WHIIT a read for .Il I
the ntie clon. )Yu know, NMr. Verdenius, aaa
I haVe vii I BunII n II ll th ree tiunes since M~r.
lllk i urel ltil 'Irl re I i T il se12 ]iltn- CAS].0 1.1 1 T1 T. zj,:1 OR $121-01) I
Relll I~I ts ) 11 II. MI LI eNe fou Iri k by in1tn her. f1r there is to.
3~~Ios caM In thi iicio butil whath sluifl witrth It rJeNr
that ~~ ll we'udnt nueaote otend IfoTH $25 EN ANDl WOMEN* ENTIUIAS1t *Ecoe fn 2.0,wih acl ui l. n fmy1sI
we ner ve y da we' pr it Go:r m h m..A1UT B N E I'* de tdn s t m r on n I dltt hi k fin l o vncd t
stte an alm te th n we hae er, ut I1,s fil e n th clo y em d to hv' ou er na y freln ,fo yu Ieti Ii A .:ith1 Itl
to d, our beau iful, litle -1 c ity ma b a gtiouellf.nnl sor alo w y readyto 1 el m 500about -h an oC IF llh IB iS Y de t lo l
A-i MEL K s'C1TT AlthOTT.oI CALL, BUN EL THE CITY OF 1No tioi hi i emd eutl I.n1 b.1-k(
IThloioruntiesi theu-_ houth frr ninell l ich sF R E iRAmN H IlslP T
greater tlan they nee in they -11, North andt I harth ig rA rsdnileeein w a in nT
toldS my HriendsIN this, and. hopei many ofb thenl f1or1 At BanYE IN THE FRE l rne goe n a h et eeto w ut i
ALill locatT thBOre, IT T call Bunnell the-r 'Cityi ofl TR NC E ON THEIf EiOE Nen m k rn t of 1t Itx Bifl Irne tI %Nm u 1e-rbh
RICHARD T.D .A NE .R *NZE milR frontlll Hunnell whda Igaeo wo : e tan t i
MisWur are glnd swrr well hav noti the fiew:froehelw ead h od redo nn In r rr nt
IlI WISH Id HAD KNOW ABOUT1- BUNNELLr BO l 3t1E lAND~ri WO1-I to N1 Io 0L IH in w'I o)re, \anah t r ; n,, lol ora on t w
BEFOREr" EvAYS R.y BICHARD* mIy .f.. I1 w rn Lho HENRY .row.r i an stt syth new htw pnIfoi
"Io am ...r. helpedd w th te....y -o he e s of ln ,ta e is po ddL
had ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Lo know about( Bunnel b1oe On1n. LY OTO -OR. "utoewr
not hTsitlt t lct n teB nnl oo y" a o n I l for I t, I'~n have w' t ar o f "I amVSu dn va ,a d ws t n q aedn o 81
D." o p H .t BI HAI Ih i nst h ad 0\(11i ,.I\ t their laying oit- f- oo s Iu y fw lwors o f adI cetIo hrIa d n vin(nl
don't ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ un el Flornd:, Tne I Iotw In t(,I "on (Ime I be I Ip who wo l like to mov to Beuiu milder oelboate.. eeX.rel ~ I, I ilIl'lfItId
MARYLAN BAN LONW TOl hoE INei THE buy, ni,,ne intil init th iilel ooy e ars .g p g-,)'
"LANDij OP O FUROTES.* SOMlor:N wilh l Iht for a 1I'F Umall Aaiy u wny 1RT MT I
j Thes spo ltuis i n e y Souetyh he nv (ihg 'mAny is squar i n ll- lits d\ea ) l ans."
Irearre t Iin Thlorda int e was jut like I n HEN RIC C. FA N S .md s w h i f
to a n w r w rld is an o t m xn reof the Fowa* AarUER IN THi)FLovItin W
plI;1ur andak ;noyitn I foun in thatgp laoa I'a Ig
Grapefruil tr eilrot ee a c r e lH n el I t i lat l t 1h e e I l un l tk 'it y if R N H S O T E E R P A Till M I H IGN :AIS I E W IT I it fewl "
"BUNNELLF ELD DE EL PM NfCM P.y" foundl et poll''l A it s an 1 ug1--1 n 111l' tnwors
usIC AR T. kA N R "uIpil til ve vo 1 10 vilils h v 0 wLS 1av ot tof Iinnnell I or j l :1 r" ;il led 1" 1 1 t1 f r meb W OL4' ]niLL
thato ri the' Hunnellt ilklpm n thnisrt hou try Iinc lush 1913. You (10 noIhvIIsk, N :[ I ill say tha the' ro sp ct for:1 lon Two- 1 11 1 htH
treated ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ meSI rih allD KNh wayI thT II.NEL Wep ime if I, thrmg fatra y imprsse wills thr out frisaeeulya od twa ihr- olntsl
haveI our hol inS nM Rrl Biit HARr. o1 we loo hIe In wh t e I lxpie tor. mak lENRY. U..w t I leto Iunnl.\ k tI y L. c -1, R ikiE CS tho s a d Lur J.
areil anximls toa l \et 1, Colony forn Iur land.liail- Ii myll pem nhtho eaJstg u eas abou M i ia. prd eal h vn
ilm hopin to ch ng too Floid tott~da lil oneag mile frol., town and Ae if to thin F--- -ET1 1 148
IANI er! FIS t thng thert ookrin du rabe u fnor fIa I nt IFN S "LASS ORE PE PL IH HAVES EVET A mitll l RdstN11-LII,1AI
BONNELL, ~~i~o,; I~t u n l nl l lo i a LArY. I lik hi tu nel s h p etiet ee ro s
Canult~~~dth het alll til arild iII\,b lipl FLO Io A110 a'L OFll MILK .INl) SATINFIE WlRND IOUHFieIn t asib ADV I v TvO C N AVIANtrS rn k ( rljl
everythou waskill by frostt in Auius lo-1 HONEY." A f h11 olihtj plfd of' 111 I unnll Dev l o f "tt full. T he hav d th 41 rg to prt d thntw tinet
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ D wHs thikig-ha a "ot st Io Florida "We1 bouht in1- Bunel yw funfadto Iapn vrtw n afyusaeaeew kids of eop-l t eagodcr- ehv n olt
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ B nel amidi here to otw( and n1nk, a horn, and town lots wofl wek haLoaiy e w ut 01terco m naino h etiuiy Evry n v met wore d(' a mil nd crnn o, o up
if ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ll( I kep y eat Iwil ak oothlknkwnfltyne s bt wetyncswiluld utseidotbu o m ecntvi#jsok wll th olny" iv eilunll
the ~~ ~ ~ 3AR N coutry andG IO trul blNv thate ity haf fat al num( moren-1 than co fral and Tive hin- nl Ijt w[%aplIsrrsd wth cn .11 D tOL
' It 'fu tu re .A N I1 h a v e. no lo"ir tol liure lu u r a F lo id a lik e :ru a o fil o ld .il y 1il a" I I 11 U fo lin a th[tirlIlns d r thslI M a y
LI h(pe JtNoN bed > 1 In h til .' wl A I Il l l ul be 1~or till IIIn ,1 imal~in il IHiIS ll l
linnellus Floids s oro t ipr ture b al selt rop Wod ti n h -n whilan yis In ttill Itshe I ud s c e
-- -~ taivin lns 'ol da ihu wit jl8 1i (liMng M.ND IC C. 1 ) hi et Iakn fr ad ot
into~~llnos J. new word. I.1N10LthlINi
BUNNELLU NEL ClLOKY. T-l I Itall, NEW ME Ivao
*I~'M l hoigi legs Ill. ol ]$11110 lan ow lil IN P CT IIN H NN L F1t
Whil0~~~~~~~~~~~~ found Siloo thetoe ielo i ti a e 1 p rhlil a w ny Hr Iftdt 8
"BUNNsL my fatherI-1,T 0 twt brthr hav Nl Y~nnl grolony_ Iitlu seeing iti Till,
"I ~~~ ~o g t Myl Pldest brothtr hlot been inI~ L1VE insportion1- ofin e( ml 10001o ti l In thm :th ofIm .1:I* an w
Im" ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ iv ;[Il I IilI' Im 1 4" :t :i% ~' If he mlow bettn hi lekh erl hef uuld,: ollll, the:le future r' lct Ilf the, N- solon I 11111 tie db e M d sart9 3 f o I t ol ight Iwa II,t foun I finel 'n, of~ then rooml to11 do unt Tln
In Il exp l tO -11o11 toS unnell in thN f ll fr in Ihei te-e- f"r me.'' ol
liv to 1 : ny p rnon-iilhom l I El li no GON 11L T-LI1 IOM OF HE
1I \%il HER _UTUR HOM WIL ,E MIITTL *Floai hAT BU N L "tt1r Elmt tiIa o on:
FORIIII ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ED N. 11 ." isT AT bTAt," mie-n l 1.nt y :tital has: 1 O iiielIi 'lr~ n
"We, hIp i- ano he yanara to-1 "om d wn Ihll ,r p N Ilr: Florid his better 1:tr-i 1
nel F)u tln are alln' mad an1 mIr plu~lv in Fliri inr midd ,to 1,st mu hlt a
C a l tll man 1attra ,ill Ill inl H ll IItle. MRORID A AD A (I- HI G d AN o rat. E. E. .111 It I4 Ioto of th rIiee (to of 1H1anne1111 '\,I WI TI" 11T l ou lurcIII
[,illld~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ n hare -ipubHN Y" i 'lm"l II( ilc ackoL ht rh S1,ner1 : II lS l alorwn. ilnk ., o
I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1aoi hole, mnentil'- 1i aals el'ctri ligh ",lant, garagelill ebt~l nB neli\ofiii tilI,( ad 1 ~
I ~Yo nee NOTilIi ,i~ Itw ot.I ehl fearll oN"Ild AgeI,, Har Times,11 Strke or Losslf old"lIp1




TOLD BY FEW OF MY BUYERS
plans to become such in the near future. They have realized what the
d to get on the "OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE."
MU II I'LEASEI) WITHo THE YO N "'ItIty DID1 NOTr INOW 01' BUNNELL STRONG, TESTIMONY FOR THE SAl ~ 10)PAEI h~ OLV.
tIIE E'liN XI. IPI,I TE 1EA1. It. FARM. i love 1o1er"rm B111,1101. I wiisl down
xi 01t Io nel i i I t hu' J stretrne from. ioua kigille- '1p ehi e y farmi here, 1lotn(s I there, nst )Moy nd hoom tugmI i lei
ml I~~~~~~~~~1 h, ~ :vx-~i t t ". I : 'I', i itit ot "he ,tnul 'kloy Io iemds o yef Itlied til piiaee wIili Ito lv, I o Iv h-1gh telr rsii
tii~~~~~~~'u'~~~~~~~v- att Ix t to Ih i xouti io iti te id l sot or on ly ..... it god -,ople, aid I allm lot Sorry thaut tend to 1ak1 a1 tinitie olt of it. I did wfat bcgxmi io oll it 11v leo inr t.'i tit tmotypn I wud eer bogt, To 1"o dowoi thereo Ifitintrin t nOd
ii Ok il ow ii ~ ~~ ixo vtioosu formy fiu or hom, for it '' ith 1fle r*ight kind of mIa 'm'o tie-- e ll lyx 12iit(d, bitt I vill ie to p t1111 'Ill l. it A H AW K IN ii iii i' r nl1til t I,:,e thre tililnH11t11111 klaIitei ii iCIsont Iiitmilkgna u ke oi goo liv mymy ttripiunntil exte fll." U. It I'. EL
li iSli llSiy5 ti h ll 1i1e ,i tiiid W. C. I'I1tLLips. ___11i it nyll r :i1.i tl 1" tirlit I lie BuntieJii Floridai. WASH ING(TO N MAN L1i VE IN THElI COL~~11 B'iy I't X i'tivv ~I liiil NI1,5 ONY NINE MO0N rils
tob~ x p ee f loid ttr il i Z. STrI 1 1,1. ttiiiana. IUNITED IN ONE OPINION. "It lived in the colony tille monts, eleiireil
iiOO t~ilot i I I Ilexr i' iieilpm' iiit ixsun' 'Ivlill( f wits In the Bunnetll yooit I met tinrt of my inn d. and wvi tie ;i, kI tiere as.,
iibe ii hr 'tt ie xliiiviv Isto Ii w ~ ENI' Ii I WELIL PL~EASED. ion 111 friiti Canada, one from Kaxn'sas, onet, soon us I can get things fithue here t1 p. 1ls i ~a vst o It t i o tok fo oiiill n d"n terfo vi itlois a1 i l eave. I asill siitisfied tha11t evr i I,- will) lilts
I 'iilpaiv tit i- "i'liii iai~i cxx utali' *i ~ I tietellavretoft mitoitioigliaf ;i yo rathy itirsfroitntiIthe est illii I hy liiilolgttuot wiltthel in ue Binnet voiii wiwli lii ii i t I iel vii Iriot iiiox i S xxxi 'ilii ii xii a ot 1111 nil iei set xxi I it sen. W en go hiekIbttwaiisid totei btoshav aagod iivst iett,,orl ti ti ue s c n xxii,,~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~Wl Iii git bac homie andes lvil have ai iiii i tlok odt ie Ietttnthv ioooreddha ido w a t tgwe inrox'elnd like t11in( tit.. Iltili110.1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~: t1 1~~ a, Ii~llIfoee ~r'l''it li ii Ixteettritiyif '[i suit lttaiie, (tey sent int orders fori fifty lieres.'' tit colotly xiii be lit deiiiind.' I,,. WV. SMITH, Iliniois. J. F.' VON IJEN
ii~~~~~~im' t~~~~Niltu IIgr xi o~ i~iittt'y. ''hiHDAY BEFORE CHRIST MA S."O _______________________________I. iii'rl Ti i iiei' [I Tol( NI, N bf'' l''''iu i llizzatird is rnghitg. Whii'il l i
Ii I'rESINGVE 1* TTIMIONY. iii soveled through five fee' of stnowv to
ttiiioeL iolu i l,'tiI er li iiiI tles ii I tie cear. atdi i t aloit'I climes. I visited Floirida ]ist Aiulx i I o-ii iIi ti i ti tie, Iin-y1 it I lii ( il i w ii ishi with nit my hea rt I xviis there W 1.1. ( i E H I [AL.)V It IV( ) 1 1 E ) M t1 'les vi rio. ii iit i'r l, i :nit .'oo ili so itill r itio\\. Bitntnell1 is IDEAL.''
0 10 it .i-lIiii lrt ii ii liii Ii usgo i tiny ill G. MORFSE, Nexw Jersey.
xii iti :,nilel x ltti' l i' uh t'n I xii. Iit it xviiisoiti etu foi' from t
iii'iii~. Iiii x,- ix -lv iil'xiiiit~eil li ii ;oo ti EII~i~l ililor''ENTIRE PARTY SATISItED.
11111 siiihitlui. iii~ miii uiiui't iiii II. it. 'llIBS'iEiI. ''Iwxs nt Itunnell last Seftetillber aitnd fiulld ieli ~ ~ ~ -, wditt Vi, l~ne xo v r iiil''irgitiai. lioriiia I I. K. goodl soil nildi ex'erytlii itig.
liiiiiiii.I~ioi~iI IINNE.I.S SMMER AL RIHT, justr is it was represented. Four of us xvent JIi Ii viitd t i Nti tti AT'i I H i ~ roth here, aitd all were satisfied. I tiotiglit WaS i,-i ,r" tidpla togo down there ne~
"Tgi va i p ii' ll i n ltk I fill. itiron' illy latid, and ak hi mty tonie,Nodiihu t ie',' fet iii t,'it iii Fio)rbid there. Flioriida for toe!"'
I ii, hre in to'Niitii Altlil' ti r'i'j. I1. SUTiEIILANI),
'iii i eue lii ii' iiius lruilxvxiys '.d. ADIVI(E TO RENTERS 0O' FARMyS. %I\ 1 1) 14)l SI'T i'viiti tiiilv town in Flioridai, i"Uit ItOue 'Iti thiis commninity there are ii great until14NEI.L. ~illtires it, liki' 111iiiiei.'' tiet' of tentetrs. maniy of the"i, lixinig from
Ilt'i lii 'I'iod~I A. WAtLBRtDGE., hall( iiiii io luti With ttie rent theu'5 la y they'
Vexixnxiclxxii ill lii' 'i't iisylvxi ii x. coui ld oxvt their own homes at iBunineill where
nei txi ii x it ce.~ EN'U(-IANS EI'EIEN'E 'I they could iive Inidependently anod take life --iii cvAiKEiuxt't'' IvVEXPERIENCELIAT easy ;ifter they had brought ti'c lantd tiider
lhi 'xvli sht oN Er1ti vitIvi I t Io n. I hope to go buckI toi iBuniill Jf. F. Churxch of Bulnnett. '1II i oei,, es o ei'r
I n~~~~t~~~Nt~~~il'~~ I lo iud over lxwi oir thIirioe hl ii lie nri's tibuild tile a ice little hotme, indi live there 100 iicibers. i'e li-cc ,dat for C'l c/c n o l- o
vii f' ill u. I fi ii tit I t Iin k. is- gooit landiu t ii rest of lily life.''ay"/~ t/oif a/ oe /'siu n i Si ;t-I itier' Is, itiny\,hru' in it ilie 04i1i1te. andt4 is WILLIAM t'AtIKER, clih IDay Adventiist.
xi'o ai se ,f iie ..t.i'i 1i' :lu I iryi -(q'. 1""it Ill Ioxvu. ____iw H~t:r I Ii:I' m tI-:' lx ili'.liti I ilie ilel i tiuoi ilatl. ICALIFORN~i GLAD HE 1Ai A
Ills AN I) I .1 lI* iii11io l t.'iiit f you1r rohitly t It BUNNELL FARM.
sisi~~~~~~ ~~ toi ix ...iio' a lii's b I loI ',it I I fiii'1i xx' 11 1 ii, aw :lii" ''I aml glad to htave a farim Ii the Bunni tell
~~~~~~~~~~~i hi-ch at~i I ii' 1i:i,' 1~ 1ii'h si ittia'''fii'' colony, andl I hlope to imiipirox'e it as sioii as
iirti''l~~~C NV, WE' \t I iui' 1'. XXE''IING'(;TON. possible. I xx'ant to thIianik yom for Yottr fair
fl Ket.-y dentaligs xvit ii Iini. I have kiioxx'i M1r.'Moodly
B i'i''i' S llt''I I.for it giood lila Oy years, antid cail say tha t tie
Ni-it tecs~-3 '\t IIA'I A NEW YORR'I'ollO~ BOUGHT'I AT and all his fainily beioar the iilltsof bieiniig
It'NI III II SEEING. most iiprigli t ilimii ii allI thhi deal itigs. antdi
'I' kl1. I 1 iE 1 M xNNint to t ii'i foi' ilt' putrpxse iof fi- ti ny lpropt-ositt t hey iii h igiffr xiould toii'
iiiiiilx'ii. ii't ,~iil- liii'-in ii l y landi inl the Itunti ll Coloniy, xxhichi..C strictly honest. I hope Ili c m itloelmi p 'y~lie md- 0iliii~x. o ii,;1t l o fiii' x ~it xa ... t' plll I iit foun evry me t oil al- farim iii the nea:r ftiore.''
~'irx-i-'tiilli'5. ii II I' aindli that allithi'i to miy frie'iids. We WILCMaLt E W lLfonia
xi so ixi r-'b'xi it xi I ci ii lck. i iv tx innd 'te unitetl xo l fl'iil
ix ~ ~ A isniex'tllEetalt Ii' liiae i WHAT THE OWNER OF THIRTY ACRES
OF BUNNELL LAND SAYS ABOUT
'i~.-ilxxiiiNexv York. THlE COLONY.
A3 PUR'ItA~R OF "'The treI see of the country the better
ACRE VItIT THEI~I COLNY ~it ike it Iti fact, I ]ike it so Axell that I
Eln ACRE calIT Tr"lE COLONb o y ie n yefalo have purchasedl ten ncres more, thus making
ild ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ it"e Iti liii l" 1,,t-li ii'mi / timiiI oo.liu no'il thank f u ofo y txie an oelfis tile ai total of thirty ilcres. I think there is
1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -I Ii 1 c-'/' 'ivI v Sa' noel ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ :t ,I i'-lii' 'x'mex forcibly while thtri0oo, ud iiNvasirmu tileiy Iic Iti'idsd mharlxil ato rieat'lizel thngatts hrduo ealzephalyo pepl inth
huad ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -I inorIii ,,c lld.i li strk 100orcibly xviltes there va thnortb are having cold, soxy xweathier, xwhile
i'u'tixxlul% 1 ttt-I.I HISAEI TE A iieon transpo orton aikte f'irld tit .' down here wea are siflig. -_c fthe pr'ic
no f i ue xirllu. i~ IlS ENACRS. x~la'' ~~'low firlei ii rat t N- utotie joyitlg the xw'rtm sunshiine.,,
ii ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i;,,Iha ftc 'Mrisi.oett 'hx'iM.ud llnaeunx-iti iI '1 wiuill. beipi ilielwlwfrigtraestJNxvYrk E VAUGHT,
lu~ut xtso xilix~vul Ilul, hIit is soon as xxe caiti a irrange tmosi iess mait- One of t/ic cozy.I'arna h omes south of BannelG. I ui iiig idliI itilli i u nl and txxi Oklahoma._____t''mii.3 i iiIx 'l tuu ii x-t tcti k''i', i w t :iu Ire'i tiglxii ONE WILL HAVE TO GO A LONG WAY TO
lxi( Itnu XuI' ulrtilg fur fit No 1i'.illS RKANSAS WOMAN LONGS TO BE AT BEAT BUNNE;LL.
11O it A MA.j R" l TOj;iiigh xel vri. Il'ii tiuii-v ir NELL. "One xviii have to go a lung way to bent
.1 N.lii, liiithu1 it "No"u uhavlu hix iui'furx ilii' '\ u e hiai ouiir HButinell fari i' iud for. Bunnell Ilii groxxing stuff. here are lots
hi~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~1 -f IiIit- ls i xti 1t itxilii l, u om t I iii ti o. Mly hitsl1)( ti xi i Oxx' of things that canl ue made a great success
i'i '1u5Il~t il ilt X I VA tNR. 'i siiiFi h sii shuortly after xve ]l:tl piaidh 00 it. hem'e, besides groxwing Irish potatoes. I coil$1 ~oliui to 1 Iluliliul 1,11 itoh'heii(it 11 it itx'tsrt rceitu side this a pncridise for the man who itndervcupxii~iv I'ulii~u ADVYICE OF" NOmt'rhI IAIkOTA t1,ue 1111 1ta Btichvxsateltletxm. Stands poultry raising. Tiere are good openIII0- iel lllIi,'PlIN VSIIJAN. It. xvoud like to lix'e there. We hope t logs for tile mall xxho xviii get a move on himi
luutxluu's ll tu iilu ''i~xiI ill~eisediii mlos i tue xuc thaxt ikeouir hiotme there in the nexur futu~re. It itnd tackle anything. Suct'h a man xxill xxiii
iiclx i o ii t~tul ii ,l )ix~iut e ttti o u' no nrt ty told hereland xxe xxu t 1 'ucanly13 out hei'e."' J ILARRISON,h'Id ~ ~ 1- i1:11mi"s ui stin xtul tiut they are dolImg till il like to get to a wa'rmer climate, ivhere fruits St. Augtustine, Florida.
lii' r uiitir II i OlP t ui 5'ltiers Itiixlc- c "vr re .' towoers growx."'
Ixuet.'Ihxt s uetninrexlsoi 'thy, I xv uidi MIRS. ADA WARTZENIUFT, FIFTY PER CENT BETTER" IS THIE TESol't N1h) ()1I'1 -TI: xiu lIi,' (xr -ui' )viutiito hl 1.or a tu Kansas. T1IONY OF TIS BUYER.
NJI- EN 0r CONY.ol i kt to Nii xi "I" h beli]' Iin Ito'id a. to "My trip to Florida ivas at very fine otle,
rlisi fth ii iletI stimii3 uiisd'rItiilct.I Ix'tix uli WINTER BRINGS MEMORIES OF sail Ixnveyxiilasdwith my laul
Ilil03- I' ittil t t 'ii'110 5 i uy o litIuiii a xs I dt id. I a.ll Siii 11 e U N NI LL. 'antd lots I bougilt from you1. I found sait u
iliili 'l fii iu te ui ll ii' tie i toli seiL t i ai coul- ''W' tink with gre'it longinig, xvhile fed boilrcn ete b i x e o fn
I. t USN the ideligtful day's spoilt ait Bunell, andi an- tilscHonsiii.K
'itxiui~i i' hit set 15.N ort h I nktot. Iit' ii ti' wxi th hieasti re 001' retu'rx theree.'
____ I-S. ~xO~xC~F, LAWYEB.-EVANGELLST SAYS BUNNELL 7
It1E1, PIt.IED.", 'N BETT EkR soil. IN TILE SOUTIHI 'THAIN Maitne. COLONY SURPASSES STATEMENTS
A1FI 1.E1: 1 1 IN THlE loll 1, N 1 ('1 OLONY," SAYS -MADE IN LITERATURE CONLAI 1-AM 31NTAN LAWYER. CERNING IT.
11i17 10 ii I' ll uit ,I lll '''li, ti-tith iltt iorida isxm nit stl ful- ''I have read mntch of the literature that'
4 1m'u t hi' r ,u 1 Yi t tlli u'3 I-rV- If t -ix' xe i Id piulic~ wei'e fit lulses- thle Company' has sent ot, and I cnn sxiy
I-F I Iti I"iI.i. suui ufh1: t i f d '.Ier Saiili e t iii.0 txiul w'iise exaggerated; Iti fact. the favorable conant irut ii's'I ll lcr. -thiithe nuoittis thereafter. Th'le ~ '- ditions there have actullyI3 gotten ahead ohf l tn n~i/in r ~cdo in 1&/iceoloaut-flu ~ ~ ~ ~ pil~l tkiow i goodC~ yiutt51 -our literuature. The mund the Company had plenty o~f duick, turkey. deem', ete. Thei above pdi'ture
itii't ttiy Iu ill iii this uxisc Oilty xi fewx selectedl for mie xvas exactly xvhat I had asked slw /crsl ~aeilius in ntetemim
A. F 1I' (1"Ol.SOM. tiuv1 s1e it' for. I xwas greatly' plese xxith my tract; Ii of Biunnell.
N,-w 'lrk.LOUS BAZEE Molulkfxact. so much so that I immuediately bought
time adjoining truict. FORMER CANADIAN SAYS. "M3Y LAND)
T1 TN ACRItE FARM WORDS OF NEBRASKA RAILROAD MAN. (EV.) EDWARD Ft. DOW, H-ERE I-AS INCREASED) 100%/
ADDOLR. "h'roiii wh'aiit I tould leari't from thet various Illinois. IN VALUEstsfe ."t y uesiili n
ten ac-relf!uirin for lxvii :1 firer (1uiri1g lily stay3 at Bumnnell I have A' amW WxORD 1h "itsidx'ti13 1 ''hmiotx
soijl is lith itidl( ill clm to this concitisiot-that nil that is A8E OD FRO31 THE MAYOR tis glorious climate. I camel be xi helpless
ajund." climed by the Bunnuell Development Company OIko ti~ F BUNNEL..L. invalid amid am hiowxx hielthly alldi hearty, uIl i(
~AS Minnesotat. asq to crops, etc.. is very conservative. The "Ikoxti ototuunitY"s past record, unit woutlt iot go hack North to live ouder ily
,PCopany Is strictly honest in all its dent- I knowv its piresenit standing, Ilut my mind is ce it stncles. 13' land hils incerease.(] 100 tier
-CITY LIFE F OR ins"LO .DCISNnot compirehlensive enioughu, muor is toy ilnagi-cetnvau. .I.CiAN
-NOing."LEO B DIKISON /-iufnrofherocand Th Bmuntlotoyispta- nation x'ivid entouugh to attempt to tell you of cenuIovlee".i. CURdxN,
of wih myNebraska..jj iily ada/rpted to sotrck ruisia. Note the its possibilities or- to predict its future. All
d ivth y inestentshemp in the barck-uround I can say is, that ait this y'ounlg age, the Bunl
tal left I hav e L AND INATIE tiISAEoYhUINinl colony stands xxithollt a peer on the en" RIPE STRAWBERRIES PICKED IN BUN-.
lad eL f 1:, LNDI TEBUN NELL COLONY. tire Fast Coxist of Florida ahuiong comanat- NEOIAUAY2it
moreCANASIAN UYS ORE LINIT ties of the same age, or fin the entire state a geal urrsi tterciis
forth Is cose I ae laned foron aell-earwhoun have coa o uisu 1'hg pno o o ht~ o xld and fertility of the hand in the Bunnell colbuy fel.i tom- 1l1reu tiry aesresiial It f pred anoth hav tloriuna o tte mator find hiyoeua ii ony. I bougtht twenty acres it youcr ago xxithwith fres vgeututs fortable climate, and good hand with it, so lii tiirtys Ice atti ill.eoifei tore upetid hveyto lun in theUied ttone, so, theil otsengiadnttor aife Ity life for time... You cannot make a mitstakeb ubbuyiaius.Itl dtrie( ospn vryhn n h'nie tte;so.mhidtore Iwssrr ohaet'onebc
'SEI'iI Kh'I-N. ke y land that'n''er of the South,.' its sue is sometimes x'thsu.Ix'ssortouveocoueitk
In time Btunnell colony.", 11 LYNN, ~~ of dlays' among time pines andi called by those who kioxx her best, isaby no to Wisconsin again. The lady ixith xvhota
t_.torlIli. okofBunnell, for my first Christmas in stayed xvhihe ill Bunnmell picked her first ripe
Knuk.waasabeautiful drenm to a mtto strwberie a~ mimusrnordmeurt.y"r
h~irihu x'a a aW, C. HEATH, Bunnell, Florida. staaldi tst iJn."y N3rL, Md thAeNer
____ wailed wvithm ill health and hunigering for tanlidtstin._NLMAGN
rest." WILLIAMi MOODY, FOMR IW EIET PEESWisconsin.
Canada.BUNNELL TO ANY OTHER LOCALITY.
GiREATLY SURPRISED ON ARRIVAL AT c"It suits tie 0. K. fit Florida. I find this
BUNNELL. cumitry is far ahead of tiny iuf the northern
"hnI landed in Bunnell I xvas greatly states for the nil who xvnts to work. It Is surprised. I diil not expect to see a mnodern, h unl ooyfrm n ie ol
- ti-to-atehoxvt, lke ur lrgercites. ut like to say' to the, hommeseeker xvho idesires to




Community Builders, Not Land Promoters
Are the Men Back of This Enterprise
And this is the Reason WHY Bunnell is Better
Go where you will throughout the great WHY BUNNELL IS REALLY
state of Florida, you cannot find a better BETTER
proposition, all things considered, than BETTER
our magnificent Bunnell colony.
I know whereof I speak, for I have not Investigate other land companies.
gained my knowledge of Florida from Notice, if you will, where their headquartei~ re to be found. Usually in some
books, nor from railroad guides. I haveters are to be found. usually in some
not merely made a flying trip through large city, are they not? Where are the
the state, but I LIVED in Florida for headquarters of the Bunnell Development
two years, and have traversed it from the Company? Right in our colony at
i Bunnell among our own people. There
north to the south, and from its eastern _:iuell amon ourownpeople. There boundary to its west coast. is where the President, the Secretary and
E-I ,, uu o,,,o ::,,,.in o f,,,-r lo,,, Treasurer have their homes. These nien Let me tell you some of the reasons Eofo lo"" T Tct hav il 10mes. T 1 eI
WHY the Bunnell colony is better than have lived in that country for years; they
other colonies. TRANSPORTATION are there to stay, and they have invested
thousands upon thousands of dollars in
This feature, so essential to the success the colony. of any community, is most satisfactory
1 in the Bunnell colony. The main trunk
line of the Florida East Coast railroad
passes through the heart of our colony
lands, while just to the east of our colony
is the Florida East Coast canal, giving
...our colonists cheap water transportation
5 facilities.
Our principal town, Bunnell, is up-tol date in every respect. Although it has
P ,o,,:,-oe, ofa ho,(/, 1,,, yowu-rn n A ,, (,,, ,.omot been in existence but a few years, it has an
while riisitin Bunnell
whit, uell electric light plant, city water works, ceSOIL ment sidewalks, public school, church, state
bank, stores, shops, commodious hotels, oo
After visiting sections of Florida wh re ice plant, etc. irnis are' sliding for from $100.00 to hey are COMMUNITY BUILD000oo.oo00 cash per acre, I do not hesitate ERS, not land promoters, and mark
i say that I believe the soil in the Bunnell PRT ,,,, my words, there is a vast difference
lony is as goods the best in the state, _AMERCu between those two classes. WE CAN'T
Aony is as good as the best in the state, ALtEN FFORD" TH LUXURY OFASNL
ad I make no exceptions whatever. The A -dE LL" AFFORD THE LXURY OF A SINGLE
.ores of letters I have on file in my office w n otn PROMOTER IN OUR MIDST. The
ill bear me out in the statement that RIlENS, owners of the Bunnell colony lands know
VAL 1o,,_,0thing about promoting. They live and
tir land is as good as that found in tar o
.med Hastings, Sanford, Lakeland, Siark EANDI.A work right with the colonists, for they
'id elsewhere. believe that what is good enough for other
id elsewhere. 46 v, 0 KSO m.BEAC4
LAoE ... folks is good enough for them.
DRAMP RO V
\ : 'u' TINE Because I do not know of another colony LOCATION I "u.z in Florida, and am sure that there is not
MA .another one exists, with such EXCELOur location is most favorable. We are ... & ENT SOIL, IIDEAL LOCATION, VERY
CEDA l(E-117( 0 0110 NO 1,ENT SOIL, IDEAL LOCATION, VERY ar the great metropolis of the South- BEST TRANSPORTATION, P -TOcksonville, with its many advantages. -DATE TOWN where the owners of th
lrladalos ouhs heAlatiL ...<< DATE TOWN, where the owners of the
r land almost touches the Atlanticocean, and are actual and permanent citizens of
ich gives us its cooling breezes through- ...... the community, and where they are spendISM E COCOA the community, and whlere they are spendt. the summer months, and is a great G EM .. ing their money freely from year to year
ture to be considered when seeking a -aeto be considered when seeking a I in the development of their colony, that
' -manent home in Florida. We are far .n '
)ugh south to be safe in raising all kinds .. I feel free to say that Bunnell is entirely
.... su t different from the other land propositions
citrus fruits, and the fruits raised in I .ifn the and poion
section are more delicious than those on the market, and I am confident that
n scion the repio an oe "' thoughtful, intelligent readers of this Banwn in the southern part of the state. N ,oNT
sothr .y~ stWe PAK6A ncr will readily see "WHY BtTNNELL
U. S. Bulletin on citrus fruits for ,rU Ni rea see WH BNNE
OV-O 1S BETTER.A"
6 verifies this statement. .kP Go
801:A atATONE
. . . . . ........ J 0 . .. .. . . . ..... . .. .. .. .. .
MIAMI
CUTTERA
I;f '. W.
OUR LOCATION IS IDEAL
We are but 87 miles south < f Florida's great metropolis
_____.-Jacksonville. Our transportation facilities are the best, and
the ocean breezes prevail at all times.
Gflim~pie of the &eoutifrl Dixie htdjh wut lipeoft b~ut,, hLha
e Satisfied With Nothing But T he "B e st"




Are You Ready to Talk Business ?
Now is the time to make your plans for getting away from the
HIGH COST of LIVING if you ever intend to do it!
Are you ready to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, since I can show you how you may secure a ten-acre tract with a saving of only SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY? And better
still, when you have brought this farm under cultivation, you can live on it with your family,
in a free and independent manner.
How We Allot Our Land
T HE plat below represents one section-640 acresof land divided into four quarter sections or blocks
each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each,
and 4 tracts of 20 acres each.
Sudy jen 1 rii oeoJ,,e nr L C BL9 CK
Suna~ ~t~~~rnuon garlering in one 1the home in /ite B-autijul home east oj Bunnell, surrounded by a 106 acre orange
southern part of ihe colony. grove. bout 10.000 boxes oJ delicious fruit are shipped
with ~~~~ ~ ~ forrmwt orclmt n uof allis myov mssageltyth
If you are thoroughly satisfied with your Cr
present surroundings, with your position. But most of all is my message to the
with thueviomeith your climate ant PIB/C man who not only has to work for his
living, but who works mighty hard for
have nothing more to say to you. But, it. My heart goes out to such a man,
if you are a wage-earner, or a renter, i
want to ask you three questions, not to be 81 CK BL. ICK for I well remember the days when I earned
r t$6o.oo a month working for a big steel answered to me, but to yourself. They corporation, paying one-fourth of this sum
are asked to set you thinking. for house rent. However, I managed
1. What have y o u accomplished to save a little each month and bought
during the time you have been wor- P/A&Z/C1 Land on the Installment Plan-just as
king or wgesI am asking you to do now.
This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each
2. How large is your bank ac- farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permit- Surely you would rather work on your
count. ting every owner to enter and leave his land in the
-_---- easiest possible manner. ovn farm at Bunnell than in some other
3. What do you own today? On the o you will find a map of Fda man's shop or store. Surely you would
indicatingoao the deposit ion page eu nell Caoflor rather work for yourself than for the Even though you should not have the indicating theexact position of the Bunnell Colony. Mighty Captains of Industry, knowing means to pay for your farm at once and that each hard day's labor on your own
move on to your land immediately, don't farms for you and your family, and that
you think it would be wise to begin plan- every furrow you plow, every tree or shrub
ning for a few years hence? Do you real- you plant, adds just that much more
ize that one of these days you are going value to your PERMANENT HOME.
to be "old" as the term is known in an
employee's life? That one of these days Some folks have said to me, "I believe
vou won't have that good job, for a younger you are all right and that the Bunnell
fellow will step in and take your place, or colony is all you claim it to be. I wanted
that some day you won't be able to stand to buy one of your farms, but these hard
the exposure to the long, cold winters? times and the European war have come
What then? Have you provided for up." I hope no more people will offer
such days? this as an excuse. No doubt you have
This is the way the new land looks. When you arrive at BunnellJ been affected more or less by the hard Possibly you are a man with a farm of we 'will take you to your farm in the Company's
automobile, without expense to you. times, but this should awaken you to the your own in the North or Northwest, fact that so long as you depend on a salwhere you may have to feed your stock If you are a man with sufficient means ary, or on the whims and caprices of other six months out of twelve, and where you to gratify your desires, then surely you people, you may at any time be subcan raise but one crop annually, and can would like a home in Florida for a part of jected to hard times. Learn your lesson neverbequitesureofthatonecrop. Would the year at least. Our colony is ideally before it is too late, get away from the it not appeal to you to go to a country located, very near the great ocean, where Uncertainties of City Life and be a where there are 365 growing days and you may enjoy surf bathing at any time. Producer instead of a Consumer. It is where you can raise three crops a year? Here you will find the very finest hunting not the Farmer who feels the hard Would it not be a relief to you to know and fishing, with many of the famous times today, for he is getting high that if one crop failed you had two more East Coast's winter resorts but a few miles prices for everything he raises. OPPORTUNITIES? away.
dn inexpensive, pretty home on the Dixie highly, about twao miles east oj Bunnell. Potato farm a few miles south of Bunnell.




Get on The "Other Side of The Fence"
Here is Your Opportunity -What Will You DO With It?
I have been perfectly frank with you. I have told you of
our colony as fully as I possibly can do. If there are any Do you want to
questions remaining unanswered in your mind, won't you, in know more
fairness to me, write me what they are?
The greatest favor you could do me would be to go to about our
Bunnell and substantiate all I have said. I would never again have to ask you to buy a tarm, for you would have made a Bunnell
payment on one before you ever lett the colony. That has
been my experience with almost every individual who ever vis- Cony
ited Bunnell. However, I want you to know that you may be sure of having a first-class farm allotted to you, if you cannot visit the colony at once, it you will send me your order promptly. /"/
The Bunnell Development Company is financially responsible in every respect. Its titles are perfect. If you order your farm by mail the company gives you ninety days in which to
inspect same, and it you are not satisfied with our allotment you may select another farm, or if you cannot be pleased, If so, send for our copyrighted illustrated booklet"A Little Farm-A Big Living."
your money will be refunded to you with 6 per cent interest Al for our monthly magazine, "The Home Builder."
per annum for the time used. You can think of no more Y have them for the asking.
T1 -v will be sent you free of cost.
Tof dois ue have shown thousands of people how to get away from fair and square Plan og business than this. thecc igestd cities, from rented farms, and from the chilly blasts
Our terms are within the reach of every one, only fifty of lotg northern winters. They have been messengers of hope
cents an acre down and fifty cents an acre each month. No
Interest, No Taxes, or other Fees whatever, and we will Here is The Book
give you a Residence Lots in Du Pont with every ten Cut out THIS COUPON
acres you bu. and mail today.
e buy. I do not bind myself to buy, but
You will find a special order blank below for your con- will gladly read your free
venience. Fill it out, attach your first monthly payment and mal to me at once. Bunnell Development Co.,
108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, l.
Don't you think you have waited long enough to I am interested in your colony and
purchase your Florida Farm? If you sincerely desire to -"Awuld like to receive a cpy of your bkig Living."
~~~~AloyouusreA -"LiteFrm- ig iin."eHm
get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of ilso our Magazine -"The Home
Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do with it? t e fE
Very sincerely yours, .,T NDN ) ..........................................
ST A p .............................. .................
Vi you hrv e awvp UjI ntanvc who are tnterested
gi z their nams nd address al.
GRASP YOUR OPPORTUNITY TODAY OTuh is Oement
Sign the coupon below and mail with remittance as your frst step toward independence-a sound investment-a home for the future T l is I have told you the story-I have given you the proof. Now it's for you to decide. Think it over! Don't let 17 cents a day stand between you and success-a home for yourself and loved ones-independence. Are you going to lose this opportunity? Make up your W ith Y o u mind NOW. Sign this coupon and mail it to me tonight. We give a free lot in the town of Du Pont, which is located about three miles south of Bunnell with every ten acres you buy.
Read carefully the following extracts from the
Du Pont Lot Free with Every Ten Acres You Buy Contract which the Bunnell DevelopUse This Order Blank to Take Advantage of This Offer ment Company makes with
U_____________________________________________________ each purchaser of land.
No Interest No Recording Fees
Price $35.00 Per Acre No Taxes No Brokerage We pay all taxes on the propVOLUSIA TRACT ert,, until you have paid in full for the
land and warranty deed is delivered to you.
Date- 1917 'ecag ointeresto e
THOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Illinois. re charge no interest on dePlease enter my order for a farm of Acres feared payments.
(n.ertmhere the o number of acres you wishth h ,00c In event of sickness, we give you of land in Bunnell Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of Dollars per month thirteen weeks' grace for your payments, and (Writein here the amount tobhe aid each month-t$.t0amonth fortenriacres. St0.0atmonth for twenty acres. $620.00 at month for forty acres, e. in the event of death your heirs shall SUCEnclosed find $ as first payimenton my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of $ lli
hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, pleas send me your legal acknowledgment and advise cZ :d to alyour rights inthe property. me which tract has been allotted to me.
Name Street Town We gieyounieyd sfoth
R. F. D.No. --County State __ Iin';pection of the land allotted to you, and if
Age__ _Married or Single -- Occupation --yc u should not be satisfied with it, for any reasc ni whatsoever, and will notify us to that effect
5.ms* 00.a month for 10 acres Allotment: Section ______Tp. ____ONE tOT FRaEE in W thin the allotted time, we will return to you Tem I0.00 a :onth for 20 :cres: Rg. Blk.____ Tr.______Du Pont with every Ten temnyyu~ pi nyu au
TH O A mot(1 4 ce I- f) not write in these spaces, Acres you bu.y ali t e m n y ou h v pad n y ur lad
THS .VERDENIUS, WOMAN'S TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. pl]us interest at the rate of 60 per annum.
"PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME" w, ACT NOW!i -




Full Text

PAGE 1

THE HIGH COST OF LIVING WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT? Get on the ‘Other Side of the Fence” THOMAS ALBERT VERDlNIUS Doubtless there is no question tha is so generally agi tating the minds of thf* Arperican peo-.l.jit.oday as that of the ever-increasing HIGH COST OF LIVING. Thinking men and women are startled over existing conditions, and the question is being asked on all sides, “WHERE IS IT GOING TO END?” Not only are the poorer people suffering because of the high prices of the necessities of life, class is finding it impossible to go on they are earnestly seeking a remedy by themselves of their heavy burden. Hard coal is selling in Chicago at $ (mine run) at $7.50 per ton; flour, $c, ; 45 cents a pound; eggs, 60 cents a dozen to $2.50 per bushel—and so I could go necessities of life that are being sold prices. but the great middle in this nanner and which they may rid 0.00 a ton; soft coal 50 a barrel; butter, potatoes from $2.25 1 enumerating other almost prohibitive It is useless for me to here attempt to discuss the cause or causes of these conditions. It is enoigh for us that they exist. The question now is, WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT IT? The sole purpose of this BANNER if to present to earnest men and women a way of escape from the hardships attend ant to the HIGH COST OF LIVING. Most of you who read this are on the “WRONG SIDE OF THE FENCE.” The great mass of people are consumers, not producers, and it is the consumer who is suffering today. So again I would give you the oft-repeated slogan “BACK TO THE LAND.” I realize of course that everyone could not or would not leave the cities to engage in the occupation of farming, and it would not be wise forjthem to do so; but if YOU are one who can do this I trust you will take my advice deeply to heart, for it may be the means of changing the whole course of your life into brighter, happier, healthier channels. Let us here for a moment consider the reasons why any commodity should go up or down in price. The answer is easy—it is the demand and supply'which regulate the price of any commercial article. If there is an over-production of a certain article, the price of that article goes down at once; if there is a shortage, the price goes up. Now, most men are practically only consumers, as pertains to the things that go to nourish human life, while THE FARMER IS THE ONE GREAT PRODUCER. • You see my point, I am sure. If you were on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE,” if you were a producer yourself you would have no objection to receiving these high prices for the products of your farm, and even though such high prices may not continue to exist, [you would be able to supply the food necessary to yourself and your family and always have some thing to sell. Isn’t this a feature worth your earnest con sideration? If you agree with me, then let me show you how it is possible for you to get on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE,” and the particular side of the fence where the pas tures seem the greenest and success the surest. Then, where shalljyou go? If I should say to a farm in one of our mid die-western states you would at once think of an eighty or a hundred and sixty-acre farm that would cost you anywhere from $125.00 to $250.00 an acre, and you would say “IT IS IMPOSSIBLE.” And to become the owner of such a farm is impossible for the man who does not possess a large bank account. But, conditions are entirely different in Florida, and particularly in our own BUNNELL COLONY, and it gives me the keenest pleasure to tell youjmiefly why this is true. In the first place you do not require such a large farm at Bunnell, for there you will grow three crops on your land every year; in other words you can grow as much on twenty acres of land in Florida as you_can on sixty acres in Illinois. Again, our clima*2 is so delightful that a home—a place of shelter—may be b lilt at a cost of one-third or one-half the price of a home in a northern climate. Fuel bills are there reduced to almost not ring, little fuel being required any time of the year, and plenty -of to be had far. cutting,. The necessity for warfri winter \clothing is also eliminated. Furthermore, Florida’s soil is uhequalled for trucking and for the production of citrus fruits, besides being ideally adapted to the growing of staple crops, such as corn, rye, forage crops of all kinds, sugar cane, cotton, etc. Would that I had the voice of a trumpet to arouse from their lethargy the men and women everywhere, throughout the length and breadth of this great country of ours, and to show them that they are wasting the best years of their lives in working for others, when by a little effort on their part they might become the owners of little farms of their own in Florida, and there escape the hardships of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. This BANNER is written for the thoughtful consideration of every individual who is interested in bettering his condition, who would like to live in a country where there are 365 grow ing days in the year, where the sun shines almost all the time, where three crops are raised annually and where life takes on a new, a different meaning from what it has under the present struggle for existence. This Banner will tell you about the BUNNELL colony where just these conditions prevail, where you may become a PRODUCER INSTEAD OF A CONSUMER, where you may grow and sell some of these high-priced articles of food instead of buying them, and where you may become independent within a few years’ time. This colony was established some six years ago. It has long since passed the experimental stage, for here men and women have set up their homes; they are making money, and are happy and content. Here hundreds and hundreds of others have bought farms and expect to locate on them permanently, and notwithstanding all this, the land is still very reasonable in price and may be purchased under the most satisfactory terms. If you sincerely desire to get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do about it? Very sincerely yours,

PAGE 2

14 Acres of Irish Potatoes grown at Bunnell sold for $3,000.00 This is Mr. W. A. Mack Here is His Story Mr. W. A. Mack is one of BunnellÂ’s successful farmers. On fourteen acresof land which he bought from our Company, he raised $1000.00 worth of Irish potatoes in one season, and this was but one of his t h ree annual ciops^ Thurman is a farmer, V producer, and he does not object to the high price of potatoes. Neither will you if you fol low his example. He is now planting his entire forty acres to Irish potatoes, which he will har vest early this spring. Mr. Mack came to Bunnell on October 31, 1911, he being one of our first settlers. He had less than one thousand dollars when he left California. He began clearing his land on December 18,1911. Built his little home without the aid of a carpenter. Put down his well, and has fine drinking water at a depth of 21 feet. He has all of his 40 acres now cleared and under cultivation. Mr. Mack has raised fourteen crops on his land since he came to Bunnell, and if this winterÂ’s crop is as good as his last yearÂ’s potato crop, Mr. Mack will sell $9000.00 worth of potatoes from his forty acre farm. The above is the story of one ordinary manÂ’s success. It is one that can be verified in the experience of any man who will do as Mr. Mack has done. The climate, soil and transportation facilities are available to every man who desires to take advantage of them, and if he will go seriously about his business of makmg dollars from Bunnell soil, HE WILL ARRIVE AT EASY STREET AS WELL, and will avoid the pitfalls of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. This is not a tale of romance or fancy, but it simply sets forth the hard, cold figures of facts, taken from the trans action of a Bunnell colony farmer and a commission man who wanted to buy what the farmer had to sell. On this page you will find a letter written by Mr. Mack regarding this transaction. I could tell you of a good many other successful farmers in the Bunnell colony, and could relate many other incidents of a similar nature, that should be sufficient to convince any one that the Bunnell colony is a good place in which to lake a home, and to provide for the future with the least amount of expense and the greatest promise of profit. Here are the Deposit Slips 1 7 / 4 'jiA (j^A X/ Q/f Ci. Qkcxdc

PAGE 3

Why this Man Moved to Bunnell The Story is Told in His Own Words J. B. Boaz, Editor of The St. Johns Tribune I note that a number of people who have come to Bunnell have written you letters from time to time giving you their views of Bunnell as a farming community, and as my experience in Florida covers practically the entire state, during a period of approximately twelve years, I thought that possibly you would like to know what I think of Florida, and more especially of St. Johns County and Bunnell. To give you my experience I will have tc fee*— gin in the year 1904, at which time I accepted a position with Robert T. Cochran & Company, a wholesale produce house of New York City, with instructions to go immediately to Hastings, Florida, to buy Irish potatoes. Upon arrival at Hastings the first day of April I found sev eral farmers who had their fields planted to potatoes that were ready to dig. The acreage that year was about five hundred, the yield from the entire acreage being about one hundred cars for the season. The price per barrel received by the growers was on an average of $4.50 f. o. b| I remember one old negro who owned a five acre tract of land. On this five acres he had his house and barn, which left him four acres to plant to potatoes. I bought this crop of potatoej from the old negro, and after deducting the cash to pay for the seed, fertilizer and barrels that he had used, I gave him a check for $505.00. When I gave him this check I realized then that he had made more clear money off of four acres of land within four months, than I had* made during the same four months, as my salary at that time was $100.00 per month; conse quently I had made $400.00 while this ignorant negro had made $505.00 in the same length of time, besides he was at home with his family ail tne time, while I was traveling all over the country. ihis little incident put me to thinking, and 1 made up my mind that day, that sooner or later, 1 would be a resident of St. Johns County. After traveling for four years, all over the United States, witn the exception of the extreme western coast, 1 quit the road and returned to my old home town, Calhoun, Georgia, where 1 be gan the publication of a weekly newspaper, which 1 published for four years. I liked this business all right during the summer months, but when the weather began to turn cold I would long for Honda, so when the first frost fell in tbe fall of 1911, I wired John Nix & Company, New York, telling them 1 was ready to go back on the road. To this wire I received a reply that my Florida territory was open. 1 immediately disposed of my newspaper and came to Florida. 1 worked down the Florida East Coast during the months of December, Jan uary, February and March, where I was ship ping string beans. I remember that year we had car load after car load of beans to sell in New 1 ork for $5.00 to $6.00 per hamper, and we had a few that sold as high as $7.50 per hamper. After the bean crop was shipped I received orders to report at Hastings for the potato crop. On account of the potato industry having grown to such an extent, Mr. Nix had to move his office force to Hastings, going there him self, to be able to handle it. Upon arriving in Hastings, Mr. Nix said: “Boaz, I want you to handle the Dupont and Bunnell crops this year. We have made arrangements at Dupont with the Dupont Railway and Land Company to han dle their crop. I want you to go to Bunnell where you will meet a man named Moody. He is as fine a fellow as you ever met, and he will make you enjoy yourself while there. He is president of a big land company, and those fel lows have quite a large amount of potatoes ready to dig. When you get there, see Moody and you and he take his Cadillac roadster and go out and buy every potato you can. You can contract at $4.00 f. o. b.” I arrived in Bunnell, met Mr. Moody and we immediately got busy and bought every potato there was in this section of tne countv, paying from $3.75 to $4.00 per barrel for num ber ones and twos. We bought one man’s crop by the field. He had ten acres of potatoes for which we paid him $1,500.00, delivered to Bun nell. This was what he wanted for them, so we paid him his price. For this crop of potatoes we got a little oyer $2,400.00. Mr. R. W. Cody had seventeen acres planted that year which I handled for him, and after he paid up all expenses, he had a little over three thousand dollars left. Right then I said: “Bun nell, St. Johns County, Florida, will be my future home.” I remember buying Mr. W. A. Mack’s crop of potatoes that year. He only had a few, hav ing just moved to Bunnell the year previous. I recall that he hauled his potatoes in on a wagon drawn by two oxen. Today Mr. Mack has as fine a farm as there is in this section. After the potato crop was shipped I went up into Georgia and worked the peach deal; from there I went to Birmingham, Alabama. From Birmingham I wrote Mr. Moody that I had quit the road and wanted to make Bunnell my home. 1 asked him if there was anything open that I could get into. He immediately replied: “Come to Bunnell and we will open something.” On November 5, 1912, 1 landed in Bunnejl. I immediately realized that there was an ppqjimg for a newspaper here, as there was Yorife thing like three thousand people who had bought land here, and I felt sure that I could get every one of them to subscribe for a weekly paper. I telegraphed the printers supply people to send their man here at once as I wanted to buy a plant. Everything arrived and on February 6, 1913, I launched the St. Johns Tribune and have been publishing it ever since. I have now been a resident of Bunnell for forty-nine months, and expect to make it fortynine years, provided I live that long. I have driven over practically every part of the colony,-and I know that this dirt cannot be beat for farming. Although I am not a farmer myself, I have been in nearly every field and orange groVe in the State of Florida. I have bought fruits and vegetables in nearly every shipping point in the State, besides having b tight them in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Mississippi, Vir ginia, Missouri and New York State, and I con scientiously believe that Florida is the BEST State in the Union; St. Johns County the BEST county in Florida, and Bunnell the BEST town y uAhe county. Since publishing the St. Johns Tribune I have tried very hard to give my readers the facts in regard to what the farmers are doing here^ 2 but sometimes I feel a delicacy about publishing reports of some of the wonderful crops that are grown here, ‘ as they seem like impossibilities, and I know that some of my readers would not believe them; in fact I would not believe these reports myself, if I did not KNOW them to be facts. I am very optimistic in regard to the future prosperity of the Bunnell Colony and feel that it will some day in the near future be one of the largest shipping points, of all kinds of fruits and vegetables, there is in the State. Thanking you for your patience with me in this lengthy letter,allow me to subscribe myself. Yours very truly, MR. J. B. BOAZ Author of the precedingiritTst interesting ..letter, is the Editor of the St. Johns Tribune, a weekly newspaper pub lished him in Bunnell. We consider Mr, one of the most able i\ewsfaper men iif%Florida, and his paper is up to-date in ?verjr respect. Ifjmu have bought land in the Bunnell colony r and are not aftready a subscriber to this weekly paper,-you should by all means have it in your home during the present year. You cannot, in fact, afford to be without it, fotHt will keep you closely in touch with the rapid developments taking place in the community. The price is but $2.00 per year. If you have not as yet purchased a farm at Bunnell, but would like a copy of this paper for one month, free of all cost, fill out the adjoining coupon and mail it at once, SPEGIAL OFFER OF THE ST. JOHNS TRIBUNE Free of Cost for One Month. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Sir : — I am interested in the Bunnell colony, and would like to receive for one month, free of all cost to me, the St. Johns Tribune, published in Bunnell, Florida. Name_ Street and No._ Town or City__ State ___

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HERE IS THE STORY OF BUNNELL These men and women have already become producers, or are making theii HIGH COST OF LIVING Means, and are determim NOTE: The letters on these two pages are from satisfied men and women who have bought land in the Bunnell colony. The originals are on file at the office of the Bunnell Development Com pany, Chicago, Illinois. We omit their full addresses in order that the writers may not be annoyed by quantities of mail from interested people, or from other land companies. If any prospective buyer would like to have one or more of these addresses, we shall be pleased to furnish same on ap plication. Bunnell Development Company. 1 d about V'5 pupils. There art schools c ocean be in Florida and rather than to be and see nothing but MAKES GOOD FRIENDS AT RUNNEL “The climate of Bunnell is delightful; land is splenflid, and your people gave reception and entertainment th“* — be equalled. ...... .. ...ends and acquaintances I made while vis iting your lofely little city." J. S. TALLY. Mississippi. I CALL BUNNELL THE CITY OF OPPORTUNITIES.” ie opportunities in the South are much :r than they are in the North, and I have ny friends this, and hope many of them oeate there. 1 call Bunnell the ‘City of “I WISH I HAD KNOWN ABOUT BUNNELL BEFORE,” SAYS MR. BICHARD. “I am very well pleased with the colony. The climate is capital. The winter here is ideal. What a change from a Canadian win ter! I am clearing more land. I wish I had known about Bunnell before. One can grow something here all the year around. Anyone wishing good climate and soil should not hesitate to locate in the Bunnell colony.” D. H. BICHARD, Bunnell, Florida. MARYLAND MAN LONGS TO BE IN THE "LAND OF ROSES.” “I hope to be in the colony permanently just ns soon as I can sell my property. When I arrived in Florida, it was just like going into a newworld. I cannot express the pleasure and enjoyment 1 found in that land of roses. People are in the dark if they do not buy at Bunnell.” W. J. APPLEBY. HAS LIVED IN THE COLONY YEARS, AND NEVER EXPECTS LIVE ELSEWHERE. “I have now beei since March. 1913. lou do not have to ask me if I am favorably impressed with the out look here, and whether I expect to make this my permanent home. Just go out east about one mile from town, and see if you think things there look durable. But for fear that you do not see!the things there as I see them. I will make this assertion—I AM HERE TO STAY.” ED. JOHNSON, Bunnell, Florida. resident of Bunnell FLORIDA A “LAND "Wc I.. In Bunnell !• MILK AND ve naa a family, w but twenty luxuries. __,__ .. land of ‘milk and honey. — „ 8 ing proposition, Florida is unequalled zero temperature, but tropical-give him -than comfortable a_. Florida, like Canaan of old. is a ’ a health-giv-„„ v -„„ditions o in lavish abundance.” HELEN COMBS, M. D„ “I bought ten acres of Bunnell land a little while ago, and the reason I did this was be cause my father and two brothers have also bought. My eldest brother has been in the colony and takes the paper from there. I be lieve if he missed getting his paper he would be ready to start for Bunnell right away. He and I expect to go to Bunnell in the fall, for I am tired of the cold northern winds, since 1 have heard of Florida.” RALEIGH BAILEY, Illinois. HER FUTURE HOME WILL BE ‘‘LITTLE EDEN.” ‘We hope in another year to come down and make a start on our new home at Bunnell. Our plans are all made and our place —| —r minds; In fact, it is already r old ADVICE OF A CHICAGO MAN. “I decided to buy before it was too late and my advice to those who have not bought yet is to act at once, as I understand there is very little of this tract yet for sale I have investigated the Bunnell Development Company, and find the officers of this com pany reliable men and abundantly able finan cially to make good any contract or guarante,. -H. T. HOTCHKIN Illinois. HASES TWENTY ACRES MORE. i In Section thoroughly, they may make.” 29, and after examining the I decided to take twenty more adjoining s very much pleased with the quality the soil, and I found nnv ideal. I believe _... i piece of Bunnell colony land Is mhfflSg •e of money, for i price | J. B. P ARKER, Canada; BUNNELL CLIMATE BEST IN THE WORLD SAYS M” -“I stayed there est time of the 3 __ climate is the best in the world—a uice every day, with cool, restful nights, well pleased with the colony and the where health 1 — j 7—--j-t consideration; T is jndnnce, rather than frozensnows, "lien ; making^ good^ here. We Rre in the find %  verity. We know no such wonf as ERTY Is E. JOHNSON, Bunnell, Floridl. N’S CANADIAN PRO! ALE, AFTER A TRIP t PECTION TO BUNNELL. enough while at Bunnell t_ at the land is O. K. and just \i for it. The people there ard „. quality and willing to give alftlm 1 asked for. “or sale. ~ [ S Hum • My p $500.00 CASH OFFERED FOR $ INVESTMENT. “I purchased a five acre farm near for 325.00 an acre, and have it about now. I have been offered $500.00 (_ „ this farm, so I consider this mighty good c such a small investment. No one can n ’ a mistake by investing here for there is land in this section but what is worth n than the price asked for it, and it is gr< ring more valuable day by day.” E. A. FOSTER, Bunnell, Florida f AND WOMEN ENTHUSIASTIC found something extremely'to their liking, and were always ready to tell me about it and to answer my many questions. Not only tie men, but their wives seemed equally enthuBATTLEFIELD. 1 am sorry we have not the nne weather of Florida in this country. It is snowing and pretty hard for the poor soldiers I hope if I live through it, I will see our col ony after the war.” L. HENRY, Fran e. “TEN ACRES OF THE FINEST LAND THAT LAYS OUT-OF-DOORS.” “I have been to Bunnell and am well pleased with my land. I would not take double the amount I paid for it. I have ten acres of the finest land that lays out-of-doors. Every one I met in the colony seemed to be happy and prosperous.” G. C. GATES. Colorado. UNSEEN. “I bought land of the Bunnell Develops 0 Company over two and a half years ago, m on the recommendation of the company, wit out seeing it, but on my recent visit to Bui nell I was happily surprised with conditiei as I found them there. I consider the ai first-class and the climate ideal. My arivi to everyone Is to buy a home at Bunnell 10 while you can still get the land so cheap, am preparing and looking forward to ma ;ii my home there soon." ^ J. B. SUMNER, Illlno s. MAKES TRIP FROM NEW MEXICO TO INSPECT HIS BUNNELL FARM. "I purchased a twenty acre farm In the Bunnell colony without seeing it. I mad > an inspection of my land on the 9th of June and was more than pleased with my allptti lent, and the future prospects of the colon’ I found a fine set of men, ready to do anything in their power for me.” CHARLES C. HOUSE New Mexico. SOME OF IKES FLO___ Jimate than_„„„, better vegetable country, and has three crops a year; Florida has better mar kets; there is better transportation facilities in Florida, and it costs much less to clear Oregon, besides l’lorthat Oregon cannot E. E. MILLER, Oregon. DELIGHTED WITH SUMMERS AS WELL AS WINTERS AT BUNNELL. colony abou' jd have had__ __ .. r the entire year. iv that I am more than delighted with th tinnier season here, as well as the winter.” G. W. BROWN. Bunnell, Florida. OKDS OF PRAISE FOR BUNNELL FROM THE CANAL ZONE. 1 the colony, for I have implicit faith ii unnell’s future, and predict great things foi ie colony. I wish that every young mni ould save his money and buy land frou DU.” CARL A. SWIGER, Canal Zone. 1 WORD t and not too much ral good generally, and 1 CHEER FROM W. A. MACK The corn crops are ogether we feel that abundantly in 1916." W. A. MACK, Bunnell, Florida. iREAT FUTURE AT BUNNELL FOR THE REAL FARMER. ‘We have seen enough grand successes to ivince us beyond adoubt that there is a at future in this colony for the real farmCome to Florida all you hustlers; that what this colony needs—more farmers of right kind.” (MRS.) C. C. JORDAN, Bunnell, Florida. Dewey Moody in his water-melon patch. There is good money in raising melons for the early market CANADIAN’S WORDS OF APPRECIATION. “Enclosed find $25.00, which cancels our in debtedness to your company. I wish to thank you most heartily for the generous considera tion you have shown me, and I hope to know you personally before long, for you certainly do things on the square.” CLIFFORD DEMPSEY, Canada. „.j Bunnell far’n am satisfied, “ %  does It provide c against adverr“~ ” SOMETHING ABOUT ORANGES FORMER ARKANSAN. ‘ t a president 1 that he was all fixed l_..._ ing was assured. Can a whet te say the a ill. Flc WORDS OF ADVICE TO SCANDINAVIANS IN PARTICULAR. “I am a Scandinavian, and wish to say a few words of advice to other Scandinavians who would like to move to a milder climate. I don’t think you could do better than to buy a farm In the Bunnell colony. Ten acres will be all right for a small family, but twenty would be better. The Bunnell Development Company is square In all its dealings.” HENDRICK C. FADNES1 Iowi .MICHIGAN FARMER SATISFIED WITH BUNNELL COLONY. potatoes and sugar_ conditions appealed most strongly and I will say that the prospects fo e equally as good. It was with re '*• ”-f r *.. ROGERS, Michigan. gret I left Bunnell.” THE IRISH I potatoes I they would buyers froi ground read eld aftejl realize f| L. J. I A BOSTON L. BUNNELL I “Just 01)1 Developjnen nt Compq und them! il to all, 4 .cull, i WAS DELli COULDN’T BE BE'.j traveled a great di being a Judge of vai „ colony, and the farmers told me that everything else produced In proportion. 1 am a farmer and WOULDN’T SELL II FOR TWO Till “I wouldn’t sell tk thousand dollars. I produce all the yeari PETER H< I HAVE EVER “I paid a visit to Bunnell in February and am well pleased with my little piece of land there. I think that Bunnell is the prettiest place of its size that I have ever >, <>a the finest class of people I 1 GIVE ME BUNNEh farm and there Is 1 any luck I shall t this the best investi we have no coal to, coming o: Give me B’unnell. f A portion of the residence section of Bunnell—our laro\\ have public schools, churches, general stores, bank, two com\ Masonic hall, cement side-walks, electric light plant, garage You need NOT fear Old Age, Hard Times, Strikes or Loss o

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TOLD BY A FEW OF MY BUYERS (plans to become such in the near future. They have realized what the d to get on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE.” Employment when you have a Bunnell Farm Under Cultivation

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Community Builders, Not Land Promoters Are the Men Back of This Enterprise And this is the Reason WHY Bunnell is Better Go where you will throughout the great state of Florida, you cannot find a better proposition, all things considered, than our magnificent Bunnell colony. I know whereof I speak, for I have .not gained my knowledge of Florida from books, nor from railroad guides. I have not merely made a flying trip through the state, but I LIVED in Florida for two years, and have traversed it from the north to the south, and from its eastern boundary to its west coast. Let me tell you some of the reasons WHY the Bunnell colony is better than other colonies. Pine Grove Inn—one of the two hotels where you may find comfort while visiting Bunnell SOIL After visiting sections of Florida whjre Arms are' selling for from $100.00 to '1000.00 cash per acre, I do not hesitate '3 say that I believe the soil in the Bunnell c 3 lony is as good as the best in the state, 3 ad I make no exceptions whatever. The :ores of letters I have on file in my office ill bear me out in the statement that oar land is as good as that found in far .med Hastings, Sanford, Lakeland, Stark a ad elsewhere. LOCATION Our location is most favorable. We are r ar the great metropolis of the South— Jacksonville, with its many advantages. ir land almost touches the Atlantic ocean, hich gives us its cooling breezes throughC .t the summer months, and is a great : ture to be considered when seeking' a : rmanent home in Florida. We are far c )ugh south to be safe in raising all kinds citrus fruits, and the fruits raised in c r section are more delicious than thqse ; awn in the southern part of the state. 2 U. S. Bulletin on citrus fruits for • ) )6 verifies this statement. Glimpse of the beautiful Dixie highway Elegant Bunnell home of former Iowan TRANSPORTATION This feature, so essential to the success of any community, is most satisfactory in the Bunnell colony. The main trunk line of the Florida East Coast railroad passes through the heart of our colony lands, while just to the east of our colony is the Florida East Coast canal, giving our colonists'cheap water transportation facilities. Our principal town, Bunnell, is up-todate in every respect. Although it has been in existence but a few years, it has an electric light plant, city water works, ce ment sidewalks, public school, church, state bank:, stores, shops, commodious hotels, ice plant, etc. WHY BUNNELL IS REALLY BETTER Investigate other land companies. {Notice, if you will, where their headquar ters are to be found. Usually in some large city, are they not? Where are the headquarters of the Bunnell Development Company? Right in our colony — at Bunnell — among our own people. There is where the President, the Secretary and (Treasurer have their homes. These men (have lived in that country for years; they jare there to stay, and they have invested ’thousands upon thousands of dollars in the colony. One. of Bunnell'8 beautiful bungalows —i-They are COMMUNITY BUILD ERS, not land promoters, and mark my words, there is a vast difference between those two classes. WE CAN’T AFFORD THE LUXURY OF A SINGLE PROMOTER IN OUR MIDST. The owners of the Bunnell colony lands know nothing about promoting. They live and work right with the colonists, for they believe that what is good enough for other folks is good enough for them. Because I do not know of another colony in Florida, and am sure that there is not another one exists, with such EXCEL LENT SOIL, IDEAL LOCATION, VERY BEST TRANSPORTATION, UP-TODATE TOWN, where the owners of the ’and are actual and permanent citizens of the community, and where they are spend ing their money freely from year to year in the development of their colony, that I feel free to say that Bunnell is entirely different from the other land propositions on the market, and I am confident that thoughtful, intelligent readers of this Ban ner will readily see “WHY BUNNELL IS BETTER.” Glimpse of the beautiful Dixie highway e Satisfied With Nothing But The “Best

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Are You Ready to Talk Business? Now is the time to make your plans for getting away from the HIGH COST of LIVING if you ever intend to do it! Are you ready to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, since I can show you how you may secure a ten-acre tract with a saving of only SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY? And better still, when you have brought this farm under cultivation, you can live on it with your family, in a free and independent manner. 'T'HE plat below represents one section—640 acres— A of land divided into four quarter sections or blocks each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each, and 4 tracts of 20 acres each. >CK 1 5 BLC )CK — t i BLOCK T %  1 )CK i POBL/C /PO/1D This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each Beautiful home east of Bunnell, surrounded by a 106 acre orange grove. About 10.000 boxes of delicious fruit are shipped from this grove annually, But, most of all is my message to the man who not only has to work for his living, but who works mighty hard for it. My heart goes out to such a man, for I well remember the days when I earned #60.00 a month working for a big steel corporation, paying one-fourth of this sum for house rent. However, I managed to save a little each month and bought Land on the Installment Plan—just as 1 am asking you to do now. How We Allot Our Land Sunday afternoon gathering in one of the homes in the southern part of the colony. If you are thoroughly satisfied with your present surroundings, with your position, with your home, with your climate and with the environments for your family, I have nothing more to say to you. But, if you are a wage-earner, or a renter, I want to ask you three questions, not to be answered to me, but to yourself. They are asked to set you thinking. 1. W hat have you accomplished during the time you have been wor king for wages? 2. How large is your bank ac count. 3. What do you own today? Even though you should not have thi means to pay for your farm at once and move on to your land immediately, don’t you think it would be wise to begin plan] ning for a few years hence? Do you real-! ize that one of these days you are going to be “old” as the term is known in an employee’s life? That one of these dayj you won’t have that good job, for a younge j fellow will step in and take your place, on that some day you won’t be able to stand the exposure to the long, cold winters? What then? Have you provided for such days? Possibly you are a man with a farm of; your own in the North or Northwest, where you may have to feed your stock six months out of twelve, and where you* can raise but one crop annually, and can| never be quite sure of that one crop. Would i it not appeal to you to go to a country 1 where there are 365 growing days and where you can raise three crops a year? Would it not be a relief to you to know that if one crop failed you had two more OPPORTUNITIES? farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permit ting every owner to enter and leave his land in the easiest possible manner. On the opposite page you will find a map of Florida, indicating the exact position of the Bunnell Colony. This is the way the new land looks. When you arrive at Bunnell 3 we will take you to your farm in the Company’s automobile, without expense to you. If you are a man with sufficient means to gratify your desires, then surely you would like a home in Florida for a part of the year at Jeast. Our colony is ideally located, very near the great ocean, where you may enjoy surf bathing at any time. Here you will find the very finest hunting and fishing, with many of the famous East Coast’s winter resorts but a few miles away. Surely you would rather work on your ovjn farm at Bunnell than in some other man’s shop or store. Surely you would rather work for yourself than for the Mighty Captains of Industry, knowing that each hard day’s labor on your own farm is for you and your family, and that evjery furrow you plow, every tree or shrub you plant, adds just that much more value to your PERMANENT HOME. Some folks have said to me, “I believe you are all right and that the Bunnell colony is all you claim it to be. I wanted to buy one of your farms, but these hard times and the European war have come up.” I hope no more people will offer this as an excuse. No doubt you have been affected more or less by the hard times, but this should awaken you to the fact that so long as you depend on a sal ary, or on the whims and caprices of other people, you may at any time be sub jected to hard times. Learn your lesson before it is too late, get away from the Uncertainties of City Life and be a Producer instead of a Consumer. It is not the Farmer who feels the hard times today, for he is getting high prices for everything he raises. An inexpensive, pretty home on the Dixie highway, about miles east of Bunnell. Potato farm a few miles south of Bunnell.

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Get on The ‘Other Side of The Fence” Here is Your Opportunity—What Will You DO With It? I have been perfectly irank with you. I have told you of our colony as fully as I possibly can do. If there are any questions remaining unanswered in your mind, won’t you, in fairness to me, write me what they are? The greatest favor you could do me would be to go to Bunnell and substantiate all I have said. I would never again have to ask you to buy a farm, for you would have made a payment on one before you ever left the colony. That has been my experience with almost every individual who ever vis ited Bunnell. However, I want you to know that you may be sure of having a first-class farm allotted to you, if you cannot visit the colony at once, if you will send me your order promptly. The Bunnell Development Company is financially respon sible in every respect. Its titles are perfect. If you order your farm by mail the company gives you ninety days in which to inspect same, and il you are not satisfied with our allotment you may select another farm, or if you cannot be pleased, your money will be refunded to you with 6 per cent interest per annum for the time used. You can think of no more fair and square Plan of doing business than this. Our terms are within the reach of every one, only fifty cents an acre down and fifty cjents an acre each month. No Interest, No Taxes, or other Fees whatever, and we will give you a Residence Lot in Du Pont with every ten acres you buy. You will find a special order blank below for your con venience. Fill it out, attach your first monthly payment and mail to me at once. Don’t you think you have waited long enough to purchase your Florida Farm? If you sincerely desire to get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do with it? Very sincerely yours, GRASP YOUR OPPORTUNITY TODAY Sign the coupon below and mail with remittance as your first step toward independence—a sound investment—a home for the future I have told you the story—I have given you the proof. Now it’s for you to decide. Think it over! Don’t let 17 cents a day stand between you and success—a home for yourself and loved ones—independence. Are you going to lose this opportunity? Make up your mind NOW Sign this coupon and mail it to me tonight. We give a free lot in the town of Du Pont, which is located about three miles south of Bunnell with every ten acres you buy. Du Pont Lot Free with Every Ten Acres You Buy Use This Order Blank to Take Advantage of This Offer Do you want to know more about our Bunnell If so, send for our copyrighted illustrated booklet“A Little Farm—A Big Living.” for our monthly magazine, “The Home Builder.” may have them for the asking. TMiy will be sent you free of cost. Th :se have shown thousands of people how to get away from thect lgested cities, from rented farms, and from the chilly blasts of lot i northern winters. They have been messengers of hope and g od cheer. Here is The Book Cut out THIS COUPON and mail today. I do not bind myself to buy, but will gladly read your free literature. Bunnell Development Co., 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. I am interested in your colony and would like to receive a copy of your book —“A Little Farm—A Big Living.” Also vour Magazine— “ The Home Builder” for a few months. NAME. ST. AND NO__:.. CITY... STATE.. Iflyou have acquaintances who are interested give us their names and addresses also. is Our Agreement With You Read carefully the following extracts from the Contract which the Bunnell Develop ment Company makes with each purchaser of land. Pckf \ No Interest No Recording Fees JTI1UC fJJ.UU Ter /\cre No Taxes No Brokerage VOLUSIA TRACT Date_1917 THOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Illinois. Please enter my order for a farm of_j_Acres (Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchase, whether 10. 20 or 40 acres) of land in Bunnell Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of —------Dollars per month (Write in here the amount to be paid each month—$5.(0 a month for ten acres. $10.00 a month for twenty acres. $20.00 a month for forty acres, etc.) Enclosed find $-----as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of $ hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment and advise me which tract has been allotted to me. NameStreet_Town R. F. D. No.--County_State_ Age_Married or Single_Occupation T nf m $ 5.00 a month for 10 acr 1 Cl IRS 10.00 a month for 20 acr< e* Allotment: Section Tp ONE LOT FREE in “ R g -_ Blk. Tr. Du Pont with every Ten “1 (Do not write in tbi ese spaces • Acres you buy. — I (Do not write in these spaces' Acres you b THOS. A. VERDENIUS, WOMAN’S TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. We pay all taxes on the prop erty until you have paid in full for the land and warranty deed is delivered to you. We charge no interest on de ferred payments. In event of sickness, we give you thirteen weeks’ grace for your payments, and in the event of death your heirs shall suc ceed to all your rights in the property. We give you ninety days for the inspection of the land allotted to you, and if ycu should not be satisfied with it, for any reasc n whatsoever, and will notify us to that effect w thin the allotted time, we will return to you al, the money you have paid on your land, plus interest at the rate of per annum. “PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME” ACT NOW!