Citation
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell Development Company Papers and Manuscripts
Alternate title:
Bunnell Home Builder papers and manuscripts
Alternate title:
"The High Cost of Living"
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Housing development -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Real property -- History -- Florida -- Bunnell ( lcsh )
Housing development ( fast )
Real property ( fast )
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
History. ( fast )
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
History ( fast )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Miscellaneous text and documents from the Bunnell Development Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10469 ( NOTIS )
1046991505 ( OCLC )
on1046991505
Classification:
F319.B92 B86 ( lcc )

Related Items

Related Item:
Bunnell home builder

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
THE HIGH COST OF LIVING
WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT?
Get on the "Other Side of the Fence"
You see my point, I am sure. If you were on the "OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE," if you were a producer yourself you would have no objection to receiving these high prices for the products of your farm, and even though such high prices may not continue to exist, you would be able to supply the food necessary to yourself and your family and always have something to sell. Isn't this a feature worth your earnest consideration? If you agree with me, then let me show you how it is possible for you to get on the "OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE," and the particular side of the fence where the pastures seem the greenest and success the surest.
Then, where shall you go? If I should say'to a farm in one of our middle-western states you would at once think of an eighty or a hundred and sixty-acre farm that would cost you anywhere from $I25.00 to $250.00 an acre, and you would say "IT IS IMPOSSIBLE." And to become-the owner of
such a farm is impssible for the man who does not possess a large bank account. But, conditions are entirely different in Florida, and particularly in our own BUNNELL COLONY, and it gives me the keenest pleasure to tell youbriefly why this is true.
In the first place you do not require such a large farm at Bunnell, for there you will grow three crops on your land every year; in othr words you can grow as much on twenty L acres of land in Florida as youcan on sixty acres in Illinois.
Again, our climate is so delightful that a home-a place THOMAS ALBERT VERDENIUS of shelter-may be built at a cost of one-third or one-half
the price of a home in a northern climate. Fuel bills are there Doubtless there is no question that is so generally agi- reduced to almost nothing, little fuel being required any time taking the minds of the American people today as that of the of the year, and plenty of timber to be had for the cutting. ever-increasing HIGH COST OF LIVING. Thinking men The necessity for warm winter clothing is also eliminated.
and women are startled over existing conditions, and the Furthermore, Florida's soil is unequalled for trucking and
question is being asked on all sides, "WHERE IS IT GOING for the production of citrus fruits, besides being ideally adapted
TO END?" Not only are the poorer people suffering because to the growing of staple crops, such as corn, rye, forage crops of the high prices of the necessities of life, but the great middle of all kinds, sugar cane, cotton, etc. class is finding it impossible to go on in this nanner and they are earnestly seeking a remedy by which they may rid Would that I had the voice of a trumpet to arousefrom
themselves of their heavy burden. their lethargy the men and women everywhere, throughout
the length and breadth of this great country of ours, and Hard coal is selling in Chicago at $io.oo a ton; soft coal to show them that they are wasting the best years of their lives (mine run) at $7.50 per ton; flour, $9.50 a barrel; butter, in working for others, when by a little effort on their part 45 cents a pound; eggs, 6o cents a dozen; potatoes from $2.25 they might become the owners of little farms of their own in to $2.50 per bushel-and so I could go on enumerating other Florida, and there escape the hardships of the HIGH COST necessities of life that are being sold at almost prohibitive OF LIVING. prices. This BANNER is written for the thoughtful consideration
It is useless for me to here attempt to discuss the cause of every individual who is interested in bettering his condition, or causes of these conditions. It is enough for us that they who would like to live in a country where there are 365 growexist. The question now is, WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT ing days in the year, where the sun shines almost all the time,
IT? The sole purpose of this BANNER is to present to earnest where three crops are raised annually and where life takes men and women a way of escape from the hardships attend- on a new, a different meaning from what it has under the
ant to the HIGH COST OF LIVING. present struggle for existence. This Banner will tell you about
the BUNNELL colony where just these conditions prevail, Most of you who read this are on the "WRONG SIDE where you may become a PRODUCER INSTEAD OF A
OF THE FENCE." The great mass of people are consumers, CONSUMER, where you may grow and sell some of these
not producers, and it is the consumer who is suffering today. high-priced articles of food instead of buying them, and where So again I would give you the oft-repeated slogan "BACK you may become independent within a few years' time. This
TO THE LAND." I realize of course that everyone could colony was established some six years ago. It has long since
not or would not leave the cities to engage in the occupation passed the experimental stage, for here men and women have of farming, and it would not be wise for them to do so; but set up their homes; they are making money, and are happy if YOU are one who can do this I trust you will take my advice and content. Here hundreds and hundreds of others have deeply to heart, for it may be the means of changing the whole bought farms and expect to locate on them permanently, and course of your life into brighter, happier, healthier channels, notwithstanding all this, the land is still very reasonable in price and may be purchased under the most satisfactory terms. Let us here for a moment consider the reasons why any
commodity should go up or down in price. The answer is If you sincerely desire to get away from the struggle
easy-it is the demand and supply which regulate the price incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. of any commercial article. If there is an over-production of What will you do about it?
a certain article,, the price of that article goes down at once;Veysnrlyou, if there is a shortage, the price goes up. Now, most men areVeysnrlyou, practically only consumers, as pertains to the things that
go to nourish human life, while THE FARMER IS THE ONE GREAT PRODUCER.




14 Acres of Iri~sh Potatoes grown
at Bunnell sold for $3.00000
This is Mr. W. A. Mack Here are the Deposit Slips
BANK BUNNELL STATE BANK BUNNELL STATE BA1k
-EPWITL By At. BANK.
BUNNELL TAT B VE!!mB
Befoe me +, a aryPuiC,+A n. a n the count and -2 s
sto,+,+e a loresa, pesolyapae esn ]h~ ,duly sworn...eposes and says,
'nt Eans ihswd he eoisi hsb, to
. .. .. . ... .. .
CL---el~isle++++ Co unty or. S t. hn .,)
tecr"Sta te of Florida. ,
Hefe re me, a Notary Public, in asd fo r the county ai d
.aes aforeatd, personally appeare t G. u Andorof the Bunnell State Bank, o f Bunnell, Fla., who, after being
duly sOrn, deposes and ease,
That isre~ Hiis haStoryre eo3eI ti ant
the credit of' W. A. Mack, Aggregating Thr'ee-Thousand Dollars
Here i His S ory f3,000) f+or potatoes purchaed from tile aforesaid W. A.
L ack, and that the above three deposit altos are true an'd corMr. W. A. Mack is one of Bunnell's successful
farmers. On fourteen acresof land which he bought,,,...... + d s o e tP h
from our Company, he raised $3000.00 worth of e. t. U 'ifoay, Ninte n Hundred and Sixteen
Irish potatoes in one season, and this was but one h otarial sea.
of his three annual ci.-3ps. This man is a farmer, J_, ,a producer, and he does not object to the high V..--..
price of potatoes. Neither will you if you follow his example. He is now planting his entire forty acres to Irish potatoes, which he will harvest early this spring. Here is Mr. Mack's Letter
Mr. Mack came to Bunnell on October 31, 1911,
he being one of our first settlers. He had less than (J. 2 O4
one thousand dollars when he left California.
He began clearing his land on December 18,1911. (" f2,.-d-- //
Built his little home without the aid of a carpenter.
Put down his well, and has fine drinking water at a
depth of 21 feet. 4 &C-1
He has all of his 40 acres now cleared and under
cultivation. -V ra / zx
Mr. Mack has raised fourteen crops on his land S / 4 # I
since he came to Bunnell, and if this winter's crop is as 1 /-' .. -7
good as his last year's potato crop, Mr. Mack will sell a.Z-Z& / C7c/ / 4_ N-$9000.00 worth of potatoes from his forty acre farm.
The above is the story of one ordinary man's success.
It is one that can be verified in the experience of any man A 41-<, Jawt ,4 a( / --y
who will do as Mr. Mack has done. The climate, soil and ca transportation facilities are available to every man who c'
desires to take advantage of them, and if he will go seriously _- &'-. 5'
about his business of making dollars from Bunnell soil, HE v WILL ARRIVE AT EASY STREET AS WELL, and will Y i(- -J ,
avoid the pitfalls of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. -. o
This is not a tale of romance or fancy, but it simply sets ell.eq .Z i..forth the hard, cold figures of facts, taken from the trans- "' "'-'action of a Bunnell colony farmer and a commission man ''-'-1 _-/ X'-'".--,
who wanted to buy what the farmer had to sell. On this page Z ZS C.IA
you will find a letter written by Mr. Mack regarding this J ~. -4 ,
I could tell you of a good many other successful farmers / ty2/ jzxy- c+, I ",-+/
in the Bunnell colony, and could relate many other incidents of a similar nature, that should be sufficient to convince any- 6 '----
one that the Bunnell colony is a good place in which to iake-/ a home, and to provide for the future with the least amount _/
cf expense and the greatest promise of profit. (




Why th is Man Moved to Bunnell
The Story is bid in His Own Words
_________- negro had made $505.00 in the same length of ing just moved to Bunnell the yearprevious. I
time, besides he was at home with his family recall that he hauled his potatoes in on a wagon 'all tle time, while I was traveling all over the drawn by two oxen. Today Mr. Mack has as c isntry l fine a farm as there is in this section.
this little incident put me to thinking, and After the potato crop was shipped I went up I made up my mind that day, that sooner or into Georgia and worked the peach deal; from later, 1 would be a resident of St. Johns County. there I went to Birmingham, Alabama. From After traveling for four years, all over the 3irmingham I wrote Mr. Moody that I had United States, with the exception of the extreme quit the road and wanted to make Bunnell my western coast, I quit the road and returned to my home. I asked him if there was anything open old home town, Calhoun, Georgia, where I be- that I could get into. He immediately replied: gan the publication of a weekly newspaper, "Come to Bunnell and we will open something which I published for four years. I liked this On November 5, 1912, 1 landed in Bunnell business all right during the summer months, I immediately realized that there was an openbut when the weather began to turn cold I would
lon fo llordasowhe th frstfrot ellin ing for a newspaper here, as there was somelong for lorida, so when the first frost fell InI thing like three thousand people who had bought the fall of 1911, 1 wired John Nix & Company, land here, and I felt sure that I could get every Aew 'York, telling them I was ready to go back one hem t sure fra weekly paper on the road. To this wire I received a reply that telegraphed the printers supply people to send my Florida territory was open. their man here at once as I wanted to buy a
I immediately disposed of my newspaper and plant. Everything arrived and on February 6,
came to Florida. I worked down the Florida 1913, I launched the St. Johns rebuna 6 East Coast during the months of December, Jan- have been publishing it ever since. uary, February and March, where I was shipping string beans. I remember that year we had I have now been a resident of Bunnell fur car load after car load of beans to sell in New forty-nine months, and expect to make it forty'ork for $5.00 to $6.00 per hamper, and we had nine years, provided I live that long. a few that sold as high as $7.50 per hamper. I have driven over practically every part of J. B. Boaz, Editor of The St. Johns Trib,,ne After the bean crop was shipped I received the colony, and I know that this dirt cannot be orders to report at Hastings for the potato crop. beat for farming. Although I am not a farmer I note that a number of people who have On account of the potato industry having myself, I have been in nearly every field and
come to Bunnell have written vou letters from grown to such an extent, Mr. Nix had to move orange grove in the State of Florida. I have time to time giving you their views of Bunnell his office force to Hastings, going there him- [-ought fruits and vegetables in nearly every as a farming community, and as my experience self, to be able to handle it. Upon arriving in shipping point in the State, besides having in Florida covers practically the entire state, Hastings, Mr. Nix said: "Boaz, I want you to b _ught them in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, during a period of approximately twelve years, handle the Dupont and Bunnell crops this year. North and South Carolina, Mississippi, VirI thought that possibly you would like to know We have made arrangements at Dupont with ginia, Missouri and New York State, and I conwhat I think of Florida, and more especially of the Dupont Railway and Land Company tohan- scientiously believe that Florida is the BEST St. Johns County and Bunnell. dle their crop. I want you to go to Bunnell state in the Union; St. Johns County the BEST
where you will meet a man named Moody. He county in Florida, and Bunnell the BEST town To give you my experience I will have to be- is as fine a fellow as you ever met, and he will in the county.
gin in the year 1904, at which time I accepted make you enjoy yourself while there. He is Since publishing the St. Johns Tribune I a position with Robert T. Cochran & Company, president of a big land company, and those fel- have tried very hard to give my readers the facts a wholesale produce house of New York City, lows have quite a large amount of potatoes ready in regard to what the farmers are doing here, with instructions to go immediately to Hastings, to dig. When you get there, see Moody and you but sometimes I feel a delicacy about publishing Florida, to buy Irish potatoes. Upon arrival and he take his Cadillac roadster and go out and reports of some of the wonderful crops that are at Hiastings the first day of April I found sev- buy every potato you can. You can contract at grown here, as they seem like impossibilities, eral farmers who had their fields planted to $4.00 f. o. b." and I know that some of my readers would not
potatoes that were ready to dig. The acreage I arrived in Bunnell, met Mr. Moody and believe them; in fact I would not believe these that year was about five hundred,. the yield from we immediately got busy and bought every reports myself, if I did not KNOW them to be the entire acreage being about one hundred cars potato there was in this section of the county, facts. for the season. The price per barrel received paving from $3.7S to $4.00 per barrel for numby the growers was on an average of $4.50 f. o. b er ones and twos. We bought one man's crop I am very optimistic in regard to the future I remember one old negro who owned a five acre by the field. He had ten acres of potatoes for prosperity of the Bunnell Colony and feel that tract of land. On this five acres he had his which we paid him $1,500.00, delivered to Bun- it will some day in the near future be one of house and barn, which left him four acres to nell. This was what he wanted for them, s the largest shipping points, of all kinds of fruits plant to potatoes. I bought this crop of potatoes we paid him his price. For this crop of potatoes and vegetables, there is in the State. from the old negro, and after deducting the cash we got a little over $2,400.00. Thanking you for your patience with me in
to) pay for the seed, fertilizer and barrels that he Mr. R. MT. Cody had seventeen acres planted this lengthyletter,allow me to subscribe myself. had used, I g 'ye him a check for $505.00. that year which I handled for him, and after he Yours very truly,
When I gave him this check I realized then naid up all expenses, he had a little over three that he had made more clear money off of four thousand dollars left. Right then I said: "Bunacres of land within four months, than I had nell, St. Johns County, Florida, will be my made during the same four months, as mv salary future home." at that time was $100.00 per month; conse- I remember buying Mr. W. A. Mack's crop
quently I had made $400.00 while this ignorant of potatoes that year. He only had a few, hayMR. J. B. BOAZ SPECIAL OFFER OF THE ST. JOHNS TRIBUNE
Author of the preceding most interesting letter, is the Free of Cost for One Month.
Editor of the St, Johns Tribune, a weekly newspaper pub- THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, lished by him in Bunnell. We consider Mr. Boaz one of 108 South La Salle Street, the most able newspaper men in Florida, and his paper is Chicago, Illinois. up to date in every respect. DEAR SIR:If you have bought land in the Bunnell colony and are I am interested in the Bunnell colony, and would like to receive for one month, not already a subscriber to this weekly paper, you should by free of all cost to me, the St. Johns Tribune, published in Bunnell, Florida. all means have it in your home during the present year.
You cannot, in fact, afford to be without it, for it will Name____________________________keep you closely in touch with the rapid developments
taking place in the community. The price is but $2.00 Street and No.______________________per year.Town or City|
If you have not as yet purchased a farm at Bunnell, State___________________________but would like a copy of this paper for one month, free of ...
all cost, fill out the adjoining coupon and mail it at once.




HERE IS THE STORY OF BUI NEL
These men and women have already become producers, or are making thei
HIGH COST OF LIVING Means, and are determi
NOTE: The letters on these two LIKES FLORIDA BETTER RIIAN' AV' AU) 1(1' Oil~ A CHICAGO'i N 1)1 DLIIFFI) llIt Ii'UMMERS ASx WE""I'I
pages are from satisfied men and women We' tal toiE B tII a Illci id), L, cii' AN~ti', txi, otlli INI'i' T ltN
w o have bought land in the Bunll it ver wil !:r1, 1,us' 1vi :o lan t it I I iit's on1 1 'r "'1, ry.%, Itid i t xrer t
colony. Thirg n l a e o i e a th Is o r s.,tis ii 1d V t Ia I( I -I O~ I, ver lit I 1,f Tis I Ir It Ir' f, IIcII1' of tlit oI Ii tiz i i t t o y a. i offic, Cfhcago, nllos Weelom int thiomete.in 11..1 n ALL 'rolitiian lidI i rilern rli'.dil-%; iiills11 I'Srr' u, x I sii, hr
pailt, Chiago Il'inoii We omi t'heir iraii r:Intlt ilieli .1 1i' 1i.ilioi \ili .r~ Iitol, Flrrr
full addresses in order that the writers lona.,i r' I'liit :ii y to tilegrri0tiy rolrri rgiariie'
may not be annoyed by quantities of mail NEW V ORK BA.NKE E. 'ESI. lityiiiitill i.'' ilICIit' WIOiRDS'PRIEIOt tN~.I IUI
from interested people, or from other AiIi 1.NEL iitii.''II:(Ni ZONil.
land companies. 1111 ArNt Ptv Wvi tt %er, .i1r it ito.'.T At rrr rrrv'CE'-stil s e Isalil un'
If any prospective buyer would like to byN( tvheit ;111x i ll Ilini fIrS ilo yrrt CAN DIA iU t IE T WI.T (R' n te eririFfr'Ilrvi rtrii rt. have one or more of thesz addresses, we 1, li!t 1,i ger. r i tlti 1111 rtv fI-' e l oi ee I i i 0 hrr faitll itI) oIiri i'no rtV I vI'lil iiit I 'rr 11rI[ 111 -J
shall be pleased to furnish same on ap- trt i ivlor1 1tof -rn Ii tle 1111, rrmd29 Mli af It Inli ... f-, thie'ru I tir ol iy xlt i ve iii 5 il lj' a n ir0'li V' plication. 1r 11:' Nits amtg elttiito i lr ritier ill' tI Iv', wthr te oilo qu li of.lAl .i.''''i i
Bunnell Developmen t Company. Ill..nry. IOSE will A~ WOR. 01 VIitS Jrl' U011 i%. A1, \re ih te 11 iii fr' 114
BUtNNE11I, BANKER 11 I.ll 01" I 'iSVI I 1 -) -tt a II irr' dr ijltne :- fll r riv r itr s toisrling ''W' iavi han it lilt l ilrr' iir rr r ('I IZENs, IN IPN N EIJrC IO (( I1 -,l 11- ral t a Irig jill' (if nlt iny. for find 11 o li t.. ttrur lt r ;i tiii. ft,'lw irom tri iit ''Mr .)etut, yrrT" It iv m n'l "rrtr I -1 -1 ra 1 111I 1, irii,,Ii Ir, go fill ill lrl' very grr rt~'il,~ lr it t ng' ir xi ri i "I('ressfl i n i1 v'lIlrig Ir o r,1,-',vot I'lil,~ i~ lt trl '' il l'orrt has -r,,1 i' Its arrt ll t 10 : r11 1 1 IItil tt liIInI- II ( I .-liln frtr X0 trlJt' vi 11i'. it. I ARIKNElIZ.Ca'imnrli. WV A. WA('. %,i1ihng 1tt toti t 10 'y ll' %our. vti' iilli' l li
iitnor itil yor), git y. I it. yrto r viltiii IINN LI, (I1MA'II' lBi':r'1 IN TH1E W1ORIR ___111051 nif till'5t PI'ldt are( mdIi'l...i'r 11,1i it is 1\1 AlitR. GILBERTS N. A (,ItE'j' F I" 'II AT 111 1LI 01, 'I I E ynnt I I oy ften 511,1k o h gil v rIf 'I I ty'rl i er' lx r i til li'. ii tR[-'xviAViii itAA ItA INMI' It A A lt F]~ tN, rut tuu'l r til t' I e i', ittr il III it t'-, 'Tl!'"',ixe ..''l 'itii O atr ~ nrt5tr
A WINTER IN A TENT NOT 0111ECT'ION'- rvllIinnir xiii liii :m4t Iry at Ilt'l. rl' t'I liol'tn ilrtllttl rliiiir' i ABLIE TO This MAiiN, there.'"i ~ I tiiist'irlrivlincr 'lltI'. I ~l'lI'l'S ''I
'"I hiave lived ill ii 11el1 alt1 vilitl'VI ;iiiri 11-1',r It4',il''n N r' Ig t hn .' ( R . 1'. I~~I xvere onl' i fewN niP ima i h nt a 1i'II t.'.11.li i 1 :IItil ii
ini ou r little Io k so e ii miii it oil ty ..t ... -l
orr metl. I Inrofer: in ir, itt I.'ltinll ultIri '"W E AltE IN'R JIE LAND) 01" IROSI'I':tj'l'I. __________________ _____liook :itt ith( phif tre ;', 1rit-1 titti I r WI' KNOW NO I%1( It WORDI AS hi u vded tiriril .1 a I ox', ititio e It, innt ...t Fi it titl FA111 U1 E.' snoxx and In,' 'tilti lt tir nri~yl' Whi 0 Wallis a
WAL R t~l.I\' lil~ic xvlttrr' ltt'iil i s i t III 'tl r'ilt ittl it Isnn
Ii~ Irtt~ th lahiti '"rrrrr so im '. 1,V' Iir bei ]il n11. I '''ir'r rii Ilt
MAKES (.' ()Oi) I"It IJ) VF A I' t NNI':LL. an !utrItu goo her W frIlteilrd four ~~~~Th (eu'rr arr bu a rris i/rrmoeivnst, ltn ~ 11 111:101, .1 trt rlil, 1 rrij ni t lu Wr 1)5 (ifit t I' y. We I'lN ti, 11rr itn irtI (
fortyea,1. f Iti s 'donill ttid itll li f ~ If V oi rrl i. .. 5' N I I N Il O '.'' I xln r' jit ri
at____ Otean I'ttl Itivel litl "iy iI t ol~l I. I'.:.li A At 'I~ AI. '11111% h." N
OF TLE t UEL COLONY ATI, I5il to1 tirur it. utri I' t \. utni jtnt w a
spe t ltee x'ry tlIglifti x'eh it li litlell utility li5l it\,x Int sat,'. T t l (itu I N- ltir I fo;
CI CArOtet t, ht ti W O'A n1( 11 ur nIZ t t 'IV ii.E -hA wi e fIi A Vit It; I,.I I'''. It.
I~ Iti' I'stnn Ettttnl Y lie. tlo illr' sit'. lit'. ha A%
VIili t I I T l it soi Ott t' fu rtti itt 111. 111-$ 000 S I I'le s II O t 1i. :,Ie o 8 1)N 'I
itch fiit, tettutitil gt'trw w iilingt Io itt's. ,' i :11 th 11 T M E N kill
,.I~~~~~im reure 11,111" on1tn'n'iint ain lt ed t''nn $f00.0 Nl pop rtsI C'an1proyeIluit tlit notn IdNin fill itllwl bitit tl isLI N Tgl'nnxxWE GHT
t w ; T ~lE IV. C) :t ( ,OI 1 L t RI A 1i I 'tr ha o It_ __ fiv turn i'srn ueen' icti
th t e nu l c l ii I t -iii flii $2t0 ren alte nitd liav' Ii~ ti r lI O E N V M N E t h U I S I abouto..e paidd $fill.ti l 'ttnIIl ~l t f r i i
tent. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ sc it mighti I i lr v iliIt rni frI ______________________Se lu' isI re ite ill.n Noug it islf t l'i rtt lvx I n' uti lnli n hurt, lit I in'ws lleIftr
W ORDtttSl layTiniauty ritiNs n11:Not only.tin'an.'I],I*!-'fill, it, fill(] itrIin's it
AL C S O T B OT'I' As I, I T i lvii. It ii t their xt bx'' y sat time OWit1i til I nlri
Tit ~ Elutio 11 C.rilta "I CAL 0U N L T11 CIT OF o115 ti
that~~~~~~~~~irutg gwennn col o ~~m i-li oteitB FI A D W .V N H SA TCd tini at500 %, 111(+ :11r ,utm I t'.' I a 1t t1i -ItS
tallil'fieii tiess a"i hiopI flowt) ;111f ;t'!i andM Aon iIUIIit IN T:o ilE I"R teN( past i yo ul t e riV'l t [,If- the i~ in Itttg' nlolltn' I 'iv te
stateI and eriat trtm(o itiebtsITh ii B i't -.jlly eLI).o h v yu pro a ~ l l' .1 -I J'
do hi k s o i (i't~iu II', conie Beautiful .on 'j fo iItt-it 1,iL [f ill' ti' lito t i l i'xk tin tl.. fnut Itiint xii it t orr' rf ian r'lr inr
tof ourriid littfu IluSi ii 13 l dstl ~fr d y it t l '. i11 a ot I stutr r tuI ilting s til hI x. I,(t. ail utut h s lt- gr nlin n nI i
they came as~~~ wrcn ift I Ii~ In lit, my rmany itio, t ny il
"hem Wltott it itug fru a. C'n. niY OL S Ia xxii ,touh ~V lt' 'i. A. ii t~'K N. 'Fil ON,1 1,4,
ter~it11' ar In c aiimgan larng it Iolw. I Ivnl "TEN A1tE 1; T"1E ,II LAA T 'I it htI I~ r:iit' Ns~. Sx
tit luoctte toe e I ovrtnn ii t e It ilu I 'I t of.' tRI nCRui ou it. iH hUrt',' A I lii i 'rn'sII inI .'I Ir :,tthttu'un -11 % oish to'r s I' 'i ~ ilt'' nl n 4O p ru iis'" tCA A I I. Ii~ Ei. tle ilt't ld tlut hi's EF IRLD.o-nn rs t'l l fex trI m w i 11 W'n i. 1 i h1i' Slu li, til ii it Iituti
Buniurnl. L"Iri'itirr mill' ,rl If l vt. 'Ii n ot s ti'i e til t e ah eritl t1l. tt'lnIii '.h inn Il,(,'t to :1 tiuilId n'Iilt1117'
''LAND ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ al OFtt ROS Sr' foril runtor I III- tiwall ight"d t fnr i :tI i tti. (hi xt '11,1,'S 1'~ "us WIit 'ou I mit KN OiN l l r e' I' I ',N Ih peitI lven'tug tI Nv "rtiinuii isi ,tultt oll itli : IN t i 'it its.' ''.'r'Iit.'t I avdm i FwiriI 11t1 i ii.t r t ihr. onoly iille urr HENDIIC ;I. FAINsS on Ittn is 1
lilcum I t'e uti Bu'njll nyl ri Itt I fnili i ~l n i ~ '~~~i '' Ii l
go rsoes. in :1, tint tlat' if1 I, hill'l tin inw l le s loIl
"ot hesitate to In l1 oliilolt I p h fr i. I h v on iee ra sIIUNNELL~ il.:1i CO t NY.~ 111ti it.1:1.'ni '',11 I~i itrI. ot'(I' Iulr I~w Irn ite olon nele tog be happyi w o iruld It. inn( tilt its Olin
IIAS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ln TREATEI)ls. II' donTAL'tIEhA IE N 'lIE C L N "t't~ r, 'tniii ti 'oirlut'le' 'vtilo ii..it th (.iri, I''V ti'"
'olanti, N i he flu n tnl righ f ue t ii it tl et'tr li lug Uo I It
IVAY ~ ~ ~ ~ h p toII U I",' iEnIS AND e NEVER l X I'E '' i y wn'rol be ttetr. Intn ll tuiit iutmnu'i t
lie, iiu I oi I tn' 1ruh to Sil ii nil i ri 'I a x'eo tins' I irle "0 V1 ihilt In1 I iltit tn i i s~la ,ill IIItitstu' it151'' 5 fr l IW
that~~ te tiur I t''o tn'it ttiiriI'hit slar r ch.d 1913 i t wl10 tit Ilil itit.l I 1 ''I xvioU I'Ini
4B N E L ;E LF NIE'N C. 0t Si'31 Pi ii A Nt' oin iVin IJt',Ili:,ftIsf'i ttot"IIN SI' CL SS." 1E-'I: 1111A'I
I boria yo d lntse tt'I iitus-hi'-4t 1 SN~li tilt :11) 11'r ARE AT BUN EL "(( Vll IE ItN'l
IA xx' ihj I1, ala heL thE uHAS5 tIVED AlItINF T1I i I I Etr. J cosn LOn'rrte r's O Nm1rn' I'1 lltm I isttn tllteliii "' nnuIt'll
IiC ~ ~ ~ EA S NN NELL.Iit ulI nltid _______ pronl'' I tiit titito l Ii :mtlh t I itt m Int 'di I.n i uisn i
"I hadk aI t,t i' ftn in to f- l ... i ll l e LIV' kjsiii.t tE
SATI SF1 I': W Tl II LANl )l ,:I, :i :,t' lit'o "I ti'e nof Its-i Iiz t-~ hi itmm TI Aii 81'0' n't'i'Vl Stin uni 1i I 1) 1u l Fi r 1'.
Chana a tli e otntr in ', iiO io ri Itmr 1 sinc "Larel)A A1"1A. )i doF I ii~i t o N ~ j )U S E ie, anid. h rs nfrt I il St to:1 [1, n' 1,; I' I u1 0. riI't T I 1 0i m
I xl outi1h ig"-i~t I ,'lidrii itr ;In'orlrt ''eNlt t tuitel tv l tli u'. 'rlln l'mxiriin uhiii mnflnr~ ugr. it i ti here.i it, NNI It, tI I",til l11 11ir li- irtI lf n'11n l. tai tur i'nnuti'
North.''~ litlida y o f notll th e 1 1 itt As, 1 i1 11 10 il 1- 11 '.t' 4 LAS rsi -in: lj 'hu I5 I.A lul till l, E Rtu e itvu ~ M n
Ir.~~~ C.wh 51 ,ittg pll make tis ashiri ii i- I .I nli ill' i l "r 1,11 t1 toS. i1't VI Binil'j is iIItn'd in 'mtI iichInx''"""a"' r' '
112L t ,.0115 I II. til itui tIt'r, InIrmh.'I
U ~ ~ Ihtos N I ,lllI.II'I o,
everthig w s hl (, I, in t ,tUNNEI~.- MAKE TRII'nll 111,\1 NEWi, MEIIC TO,1 i1. t !
'' wrou gimhi,_ t% i II' ti tobsif 111li' ihth i itt. N I' E' 1:11 I N I'L I 13
"xWieit bugh. ttt it In I'itn ln I n it huin. i, :,,( it.' -il ''It latl Vin'itl unsr'n mu tojl 1,'u 11111 1t~i fitd VII ll tio
;itnlnrIuo fityn acrhestr'iltlt'fnii Ihttn' n' ~ tt tbuitt thtilli :1,4'1'-'l xx'iti lull' uli tt
th e un ry :il tiiN lii i 1;, : a in mor thti ullt: lit Int'l' ore ItI, it inity I Iumrni -1,o tiil' full.u ll i I '0 1 J lii
dIuu e i I,,I) I itvl l x re F o i a i tte is tigh itt-)' hr.er( Il n ( a I :Ia
1111r Vt It. I'~ xv hurls of 'mil lit) IN-l
hi1tirt M, he T I ih' 01] Tj :jic
C. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I JN1.,N In prpsiin FlIil IS110 o a o 11111 no % tl e EN." ttii uso t h ll'.I
'I ~ ~ ~ ~ 1. Vll l'n'iIV thern soon."ni t itti tt
""hrI Irt iauum ittt IIo ii I ,1 r I i iii sj~j
s; oi fisri Jt i. utr, I NIh i r
One~~ tN/, INV ST ATo Illinn n~ Oi Oeons
UINNPLL




'TOLD BY AFEW OF MY BUYERS
plans to become such in the near, future. They have realized what the
to get on the "OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE."1
%t'I I I. i1fI'LA.lI N%. I itE 10 (tll DIDN '. 10RU 1) NOT hN 0 1. 0 11- WIN N I T 1. r T ES0NG T1 "IMl'10NYV FOR THLE )I~l VIJ GOODI I'LAVE' IN %%I I I (II T1. I1 V E."
-AI-I 1'EC4N I IN II0N, TE ]N IEARUA4O. 1 ARItIL love to he-ar fromi flunil1. 1 va tw
It I I. hav Ia returned fro I tkn 11 lll rei- V ore e Io farml here. I t ause, I therel last MAty aovd roudI i i4- got p
0 a-i-it I tim ii x I nsjeirtottitt'the Ituoellcoixtty iin ii camIatosaIlo If.yelI. lilkedd inl lacew. 1)to liv.,5'1.bughtleo acre ]I
:,11 Ih 11"~ hn o hosn o. toy ,11 fuur I1ot1 for" it iWt th Iih kin 1,f t :,mtgem It be- t ip ntilad 1Xiutj I I hav to Io' o
iiliy ttsiittd sas ietiil ii l o li %al V. C. P1 LLIPS,11
Ni % II N I Iuo I It I- 0 NNt e I ItIl tel ye Is It t 1 t ldo Ii itr, In 'I' "1 Bit itt neil ,l1rw dt AStE T AN L S i Ti"I
MR S. IU. S'rill~s, Ittdltsna. UNITUEII 11N ONE OPINION. ielittt oot tteittti.ccrt
ri I fI I iIc iI~rii Ir Iot bo it
:a1o xxinxtv i, l1 lit- :l i11 :- 11 'til h wit it Iit Ei ott ll coloI I e har of tt itt. mi cl i it ter' a
k~ ~ ZNI I f ,l iiN E .I -(11E1E.) %Nt Iti ti frtI IL.-I C Ittiti :i tt f t' t 1; tsts titi ott it I .ti get ) ttt liIiile i r It
jtiiit ttoi I -'eitll 1iit 1 .,1t 1iit "t tie tlces lti I titIi rti tlr te t ll s i 1 1 w it CIIt list bitl they11;1 iti b :,git or ii t t r- t liti' 1, 1liitt 1t ti xiit
4-1 1 1tt r:,tt ~.t t it ~ Ixi iTt I],, Ii y Iiti It Ii ivel ji st xvi It It t IXle t I o t hac itottt it ot s loI s ]ItI tI gil, itVs Iteilt t1 !: ie li iii
'i liA xitlo it :I itI IIv: o_ f I I I, _____I_ii~~~~ Et Ii Ii Alt 11111 Blf ti11' 1t 1~ttii Cii It:tiek 1. 111 BEItR Ch I S IM S."XXtiitg i.
II, h~~iII I'~ E IN (lIVES I11 IESIMNI hitl tieli thrug IiN- fe et otf sttoi to
l-.~~ ~ Xlii: ''hic uu i I, irit d:1 ti l it I 1 11ttll ge I hilolty is titil is uhj to turn
oni It I. li I I i r ~ it there :t itl t lutes of t li y.. mItIII to naide lwdne I visited1 t'liirilt Ilist ,%ItI ktiiix I t 1ic 11iti li i iii mit t Hii the' glttil ws ith aIIll oy heat, I %Ias theret'
1 1 1 It 1 .IIIII It I C0l AtL EI( M EN? III R N tt)tIsI IxtrItI lIt !Iitter I tut t i Itil i t IIltr 11 iti Iitine IIIIS I DE1AL.''"
1 .4 1, 111I'le i liI it1 t'u :iti 1: II ttxI Is it goo 1ts "?t Gi it MORSE, -New Jetrsey.
it.Ii-x- .xii i- ttl x l i-oe] 1 olti tI''2ott t itr. ENTIRE PA1RTY SATISF"IED).
out ilislit it iau tItierfiily t. t. XI-I5ii'N~t ''Iu-is at Bunnell last September anid fotundi t~l-ti I tO i ii' itltat ttiiliuitirititil'' irialt. Ploriti ~ (). K. good soil and everything' >. il. ll itI I I-l>iist ti; it Nvas represented. Four of us went
7 lii itil IiuruIIIH N NELL'S SU)MMEltS AlI, IGI frouiiti- erena(t all were sattisfied. I hioughit
"'I lii vi i- ctIo ie trt Ii liii. I ira. tetij ticrs ti td plait to go downt there tiext
______________________ I e' it Al~g~st ivhen iti tilu ist titttt It f'll], 11tit1prove tMy land, an(] malke my tiotte
ti itrt hiIlt I Ineve fi'l th ltt in ltt-ila there'. I int di fort me 1
),.e ii li m t Iti' Nurthi AXll the three ,J. J. SUTHER1LANDI ,
I- l l ii'/ iiii Ir I h',(i l I ,i ilt ul it l I htrt, fotutid Tuiti niita ifI] ,Iit ts ii T h ie stIIIlt t ie xii alirays fitnd
l~ XI'I-t Ii ~I IX h-ct-li. uth iii'tligIt it always cooli ADVICE TO RE1,NTERS 0O' FARMIS.'11) STX A. VX'AI l,1,1 i on'.. "Itii tis lttt. W i lii'rei heya pay thti
h'etiuI'llvittike her.d orx-t tem Ivt y Ofit he lit t innl, wt
J.rt xA.ie thai:lit Ittil han toii Io,,'In. \it1 the ren tire a ,: gra7n Ihit ilt itil litttI 0 va ill.FRI l-4 0\\-it hI I iii' r t-ei hot I i t h Caknell N,1(.i
N'S ENUCI EXPIE IttENCE A'T etiy iir they litid irotiiIt their litnid tutdr
ut-i tivir -~t iii ti-er IFNN ELI.. ilit 1 ivxt it. I hijtii Co go hutck to Bunntiell I f6'it/ e ....et. i i....i h ot Itil
xi i. 11 NE I I' ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~Itt til r n ild. I fitit nl. I It hit h, '1 1 1 -i-it1 lnd tIlt' rit f life.'" ie h ltis/s. a/ tr .'ti'ii tt1 .i i
titiiitt-i0is ii,' re s tit xvlie\*l r.i li it', i- tttt id1 t W ICLL IAM l'A IKI,eI~u im t'it
Mt1 )it I I-I I'tli, I" Itt lit'' tii 1!hmc;i,,utth iill ('ALILOICNIAN (;tNLA ) if] HA~S A
I FIll 1,NNlI. )s ittti 1i iltt1g-. ti I't oltilty lI" Iit BUNNELL I- I 1X 31.i
It ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ II it. ll tiii- t-i1ll' tuti' ink a fi'th xti ii tti'1 am lt ''II l it I' aI 1ttit III,, llii wn'll
\VI .ki II ','.ol y, 'tInd I ittulr tI itpv i-c i :I, sqi t its
,ti'I t- ii i lIi' X.X 'lt''It N T) .p ssibtle. I wanit to C GitiiI y oi u oml fit ir
Ii, i--issii-ih for ai good itittity yiar, ii tti ely ; I t lie
'telx .ic..t-x ~WHAT A NEWY YORK TEAIL~OR BOU GHT AT' atil atll lo- faltily t, l~rie~ ,Itieso icing
BUNNELL IVITIIOF' SE ANI;. tlost tpt'ight itit ill all IIeIi itittgs findt
, 1 1 EI N'I 1.E->-..'' it Flrd fo tii1, o t y-sP e of it -1j- aiy hiopultut h y liii tilu' iott tie
tisI l1t i>i iiti li-i ill ty latt ill tt lii 111' Iio toi cotony whitl 11 stri-C l h tte t. I 'thi o Ii ertihli'ti I itp yiii-''' tilt- ~ lit-- I hiall tituglt iWithtout settg. I 1-i1:0i1 'v tx Itl l ft 'lli i CIII t near w ill"",
Ithimity tlle, andi I was veiry ttlva-Its withlil XX'lI.IA 'AIIN Xht: ~
I -'i11 it i~ii It.ii1 ott- is, nicelyt loca-teid andtl hei Oitiite is WHIATI 'THE OWINER 01- TEIHI'Y AIRES
iN~~~e Yo-rk.IE~ .i~tdt: A. . .K OF RUNNEL LAIND SAYSI~ ABOUT
MdllalNx ok TOP: COLONY.OKiLA BOMA P'URCHASER 0O' TWENTY "T'he miore I se f itt Cuetolry tile better
IsI NI:E.. EN 1CF NIISI EECIOY I like it. In tutet, I lihe it so xwell tat I
ACE VIIT EH. COLON.hae prchasedl telli acres more, Ithits making liii ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o than you Itr ti-e many eouIrtt t-tin hMe/ /at, tottaila of txliitl, tii t'xa ftu yssiacadres.uif il Ii'ithinttako are.here Iliisi
it ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,! ,u',' it whil ate/ Bunnell .Ix L Itx gre, futurie it. tht secio ofs-h. the -country.iu, ~ t t li k yl or ti nin -utreis hi
I lot, bolt1- t he 'iS ''lilS~t- hhii st utci tie forcibily while t heir' i tiit
j i I 1,1ctxvxs.I I EI iI AS~lW'oidIlsTN CF tansportition faiiuties. ffrdd the nort ie baying cold, snowy weather, while
ivate dIwa here we are sitting oil tite porch entut1u') 1111 Il --I, k- ''." -otthitrttis'ely IONN- freight rates to Newr York. joyiuig tile ivarun sunhinue."t
at li,' ,~-'i tit -c' x' I t a xii i ttsrl x it 1i t; tel I-.t'5 t'hl tdel phia,' etc'. MNrs.N. anid I ivith be xwiith E. VA( /HT,
al' Ixi .. I li t h i t i tiiv rgi' 5 ili iii ii ii -t its soon as we caln a rio nge business Mtot- Onte of the cozy fe'iti hoties soth of Bunrnell- Bouilell, Flori,l li'ns" C-.J. AIAIS. niona t/ie Palms
h'i-ttti5~~~~K~k Ii~fN ittN(; TtO tar itT liNi xxiILL- ii ih ra ntztg lHAVE TO GO A LONG WAY TO
- i htix ii-~u-xittsfu oAtttiIiiy IANA IMNlOG IOBkA1 AEWL BEAT BUNNELL.
'110'A( A eE.'' lilliitti Hu 1iel i '~i I) 1.,t 1tiucI' fun I iN N Vr,I. ''tOne, siill have to go ai lonig ivay to heat
MAN. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ d,' tin t,,. a ttv t httml oi~tili~~b~tiluu u I fttu- XeIts-c, id~~ ro Btineil tnt'n patid for. 111tunneli ini growling stuff. There ate hots .11h for -one -m iitti-. itt% husan w sd n Oftings t hatt cialt he 11)0/e a great success5
VNI Itti to' iti~ii sl-tl ________d oil it
xl ''it,> 'tilt' 'I liii ii hud e foundii it adIll C h ii t s velts'i t sitter this a pitradhise for the manl wvho untdenI I- 0- A NO ItE I I EAKA Ii)ilt'. it, itd it01Ait 11111111011 iits a tIntit, I lith'Ii twt. s tanuds pool try praising. There are gootd openWI i-S xxi-e itt til faEt thatI. N,. ike ovuri like Ito l lie n u' il e t iiti It ig for Cite noun who wxiii get a move on hi
livtlilitI''lii' ,u-t'-t lii' htiltitrv uhtxi i s not pretty ciulid Itei', iti xie witult ''tllt out here.ti S. J. HARRISON, 'II- i. lt, i ts-itgitutlulty rdotgan like to get to .ti uvanier climate, where fruits St. Augustine, Florida lxi tiuiI-' xi xxiiI lit tt.' iii i'ery e- llo hiiers~ grox.''______I.Titt teitttnreiol (iy I iduii PR D XAt1ZN hl' FFYIER CENT BETTER" IS THIE TES
01\100 I ( 0 41-I I Isi~ --- ui ihi e 1. 1v 11 ito Kansas._ TIMONY 0O' TIlS BUYER.
'MENE~~~~~~~M tri to'A Floid ivittlu ita ver fitini onet.t itflrd
Ic -t t xii tt I -cti ii siti yi-ill li lll ti tthWINTERi ur BINSMMRE OLF sid I wvas very wvell pleased wvith my land
in frae ieto1ep t raotbl f theu." 11. DABRUCK,
tI-.Xi:h AN'.D. I., ItI. t 1:NN the delightful days spent at Btineli, aittd ',ti- W isconsini. uxttxssa-h ti sels. Niut ii Diikt~ti tiu'i a he ith pleastre ou r tetiin I r''
ITI NSt ER.-AS~, "N 11 ER Ol I 4E i TI lEA iute LAWYER-EV'AN6ELIST SAYS BUNNRLL
N 0 1; IA 1' 1 it 1 1,1NU (, 1FtTAOLONY SURPASSES STATEMENTS
I.I''tSEIGINT IE BLUHIE\I., OLONY." SAYS MADE IN LITERATURE CONLI 1-IM MOit.. LAWER, sot "I has-a read mucih of the literature tht '-
tutu1~ I, 1i- r-t iutiy iii't-. It 1 Cite gu ptr lthitli- xu It p osse's- thhuipty tas sent out, tand I etail say
Ifu h lF itu ''tttt'Ftiiliiiuui iisit a 010 l svisu e'xaggeralted; It) fact, the favorable con-0 utnu ---' I it l,.,.., The" litiois there have actually gotten iaheadh Of Ilt'.e an/ttinOaevxl.i' i texitYit ilix hh1i tilt- gi Itiruatiiull'gur-u x tx toit hu0 ,f titr liturtuture. Thle lnd the Companty biadi xlenty o/ duck.'ui-e n .tt- 'h abv ptad
A. 'G~tM. htive 11et it." for. I wvas greattly pleased with toy trat; in of Biunnuetll
NiYork C. Lt 1UIf_B7JA, Iloiautil. f "ch mouucht so that I immtediately bought
the adujoining tract.t' FORMER CANADIAN SAY ,%Iy LAND)
SE ~ IE %ARt WVORDS OF NEBRASKA RAILROAD MAN. (E.D AD IllioiEEs.A INCREASE 10017
-AN 1) 1iLARS wharri ttt C could learn from the various Ilinis am ivl saisie wihii, IN ALE.
sol sClii il i i-l tll Ilt iriis4 ytc tay sotat aunll thIti A /EWy WORDS FRO1 THE MAYOR this glorious 8ln'te itt e'aIella
'Clii" ~ ltnitiit C u hunnel D/evelopmtent Company 0'BNEI.insvalid tand amuivlt'lhyauleity ii
- %, Ainnstt is t o 1,,o)ls,, etc., is' very conservative. The knowv this community's past records, anul would tiot go tIa( k Nortit to live, -Ath'? lilly
-Coliihaiy is5 strictly honest in all its deal- -I knowv its present staninig, but my minid is ciru'tmstanceis. Mvy 1:ut1 has1 ilicri:tieulo 00 li
NO CTY IFEFOR iits. LON DCKISONnot comuprehlensive enough, nor is mty Cntugi- cent In value." .1. D). CURRAN.
CIYLIEFO EO .IKNebraska. Piturie of thero turu' aad The Buntneltl colony is 3pten- niltion vivid enough to attempt to tell you of Bunnell, F'loriht.
-- ty ivestxteth (AN OT diuiaptnu/ tloc-k roisittu. Note the 1) its possiilities or to predict its future. All
li-j xi tit-seplthe bau'k-ta'oiunt I can saly is, I tat at this young age, the Bun- RP STAB RIS ICE INB
111 I l" kNNTMAEAMISTAKE BY BUYING nelcln tnswtotape ntee-NELL ON JANUARY 23rd.
1,u lIft. If I kzti LAND IN THlE BUNNELL COLONY. 4('ANADIAN BUYS MORE LAND, tire 1Etis;t Coast of Florida among couiutti.- "C wvas agreueably stut-hriseil at the, ieiesl
nutrt. iu Icutiiuer -' tuveheurte tou pope hohav cme '-gu ctiututat ty high oiidon ad ties of te same aeonithetreste and fertility of te land ill the 1,nbi cl I~ ~~1 c1thu-ttu.Hee t Bunnell from other sections of Florida that mtutttu t eirs tuuisdaother of Florida for that matter, antd you xxvould ol.Ibugttenu;li I i
y, ~ ~ ~ ~ tl it g rdn tlls is Cite n tc or an aih-yeur-ruuu com- I 'i' %tII- i ll., -sxtr until hive to hiunt a long time to find tier eqaii l in onyt sein bogt tivtiy tcies iyr tuo illIt ux:Jt frshiialiles tuttte clitniute, and good hand iiith it, s0o u~ Ciish~ina. I inut ilteruiitiet o spetid 'W ne fteSuh'a h ssmtm s with sauna. I xwats suir to Ltv o cxtebuh
-Iliefrte' yo cannot inulke a nmistake by buyin hand to tWistcofnsiy'n aggahepinsiXno 'IroflitlSoth'1s:seds"smehues o is
iei-i'I E.t~tIIN lv Cie Butuueh coony" J XI L N, uttiks ofI lhituell1 for my first Christmas in called by those wxhio knows her best, is by 110 stayed whuileli agllio 'h kedt xvii IIivuit rIlhuxriil'i. keltiuiky. '.- eauis a misnomer." stra herreo ,inua 23rde andhei ht lyst rihlu
1'id ,T, iasts ii beautiful dtreaml to a mail W. C. HEATH, Bunnell, Florida. tawberrdie tst onL Jaitr 23d nd e v uv'xrid vihtill hetulth aI htlein for -____ atyddtsefu. ISA.HUN
rest." WILLIAM M 00 FORMER IOWA RESIDENT PREFERSWscnii
Canada. BUNNELL TO ANY OTHER LOCALITY.
GR.E.1TLY~~~~ SRRSDO ARIVL T 'It suits me 0. K. CuI Florida. I find this BUNNTL SRPIELLNARIALA. coitntry is far lullead of ainy of the northern
"X~enI anedintNNEL. asgeal state s for Chie tman who wants Co work. It is
"Wrhni. I ladi n expe to s a modl the Butelt colony for me anud mine. I s'th surpried. I ik oe to lae cimdes hue to say to the hoioteseeker who desires to up-to-dtie townlk u lre is, bt hixe !aago oalt-lm o unl hr
this is sihat I found B~unnell to lie. W~as xx'ell von il afgod loality-cma, toodnni sheols, oheaset ivith liy tract of ld, anxd expect to s-iludgochregodcols




Community Builders, Not Land Promoters
Are the Men Back of This Enterprise
And this is the Reason WHY Bunnell is Better
Go where you will throughout the great WHY BUNNELL IS REALLY
state of Florida, you cannot find a better BETTER
proposition, all things considered, than
our magnificent Bunnell colony. Investigate other land companies.
I know whereof I speak, for I have not Notice, if you will, where their headquargained my knowledge of Florida from t
books, nor from railroad guides. I have terms are to be found. Usually in some
not merely made a flying trip through large city, are they not? Where are the
the state, but I LIVED in Florida for headquarters of the Bunnell Development
the tat, bt ILIVE inFloidaforCompany? Right in our colony -- at
two years, and have traversed it from the Bonn Ra g ou own pole. There
norh t th suth an frm ts astrnBunnell-- among our own people. There north to the south, and from its eastern is where the President, the Secretary and
boundary to its west coast. 1
Let etllyuseootheosEt weoffr Treasurer have their homes. These men HY the Bunnell colony is better than have lived in that country for years; they
o-her colonies. TRANSPORTATION are there to stay, and they have invested
...HY .. the .... Bunllcloyisthousands upon thousands of dollars in
This feature, so essential to the success the colony. of any community, is most satisfactory
in the Bunnell colony. The main trunk .line of the Florida East Coast railroad
passes through the heart of our colony
lands, while just to the east of our colony
is the Florida East Coast canal, giving
our colonists cheap water transportation
facilities.
Our principal town, Bunnell, is up-todate in every respect. Although it has
Pine .W-e Mn-oe of k tw,,o iol,, a ou i ',a,,inr co,, t been in existence but a few years, it has an
while vi~inri Buwnell
electric light plant, city water works, ceSOIL ment sidewalks, public school, church, state Otte of Bunnell' beautiful bit it
bank, stores, shops, commodious hotels,
After visiting sections of Florida where ice plant, etc.
farms are selling for from $ioo.oo to They are COMMUNITY BUILD$iooo.oo cash per acre, I do not hesitate ERS, not land promoters, and mark
to say that I believe the soil in the Bunnell PORT, ,"" my words, there is a vast difference
tolsay th at Ioo b ase the s in the Bunnelc MRIU N~ between those two classes. WE CAN'T
and I make no exceptions whatever. The PROM"O'Seva AFFORD THE LUXURY OFA SINGLE
scores of letters I have on file in my office r ownersofPROMOTER IN OUR MIDST. The
will bear me out in the statement that ownrs o.
our land is as good as that found infar 49L OT, nothing about promoting. They live and
famed Hastings, Sanford, Lakeland, Stark .work right with the colonists, for they adeehr believe that what is good enough for other
and e. 0 LI folks is good enough for them.
A ST.AU6 U SINE Because I do not know of another colony
LOCATION 1 .0" QaIF _I in Florida, and am sure that there is not
SEHanother one exists, with such EXCELOur location is most favorable. We are RD- LENT SOIL IDEAL LOCATION VERY
near the great metropolis of the South- ,,LENT S ,ALOATION, VE RY
EW VOA BEST TRANSPORTATION, UP TO
Jacksonville, with its many advantages. D TWwe thonrofh
Our land almost touches the Atlantic ocean, C A DATE TOWN, where the owners of the
which gives us its cooling breezes through- ln arthe community, and where they are spendout the summer months, and is a great A .. C, ing their mny f re from ar tear
feature to be considered when seeking a I IAU in thed money freely from year to year
permanent home in Florida. We are far 0 awAN in the development of their colony, that
permanent~~~~~G hoei1lrd.W r a feel free to say that Bunnell is entirely
enough south to be safe in raising all kinds .t--"l Ioe
of ihr' ,C )m different from the other land propositions o f c it r u s fr u it s a n d t h e fr u it s r a is e d in for ,. ., ,,o t h m a k a n I a m c n i e t h t our section are more delicious than those o tah
grown in the southern part of the state. iumt thoughtful, intelligent readers of this BanThe U. S. Bulletin on citrus fruits for ME WI OW ner will readily see "WHY BUNNELL
TA *OU P ..--or.%. IS BETTER.
19o6 verifies this statement. GL IS BoT,
1 '/ %2;
OUR LOCATION IS IDEAL
We are but 87 miles aouth cf Florida's great metropolis
--Jacksonville. Our tranaportation facilities are the beat, and_________the ocean breezes prevail at all times.__Ol~mpee of i~e b~auti.ful Dixie hlohwav Olut ~e of the b~ttul Dixe hiuawa
Be Satisfied With Nothing But T h e "B e s t




Are You Ready to Talk Business?
Now is the time to make your plans for getting away from the
HIGH COST of LIVING if you ever intend to do it!
Are you ready to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, since I can show you how you may
secure a ten-acre tract with a saving of only SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY? And better
still, when you have brought this farm under cultivation, you can live on it with your family, in a free and independent manner.
.How We Allot Our Land
TJHE plat below represents one section-640 acresof land divided into four quarter sections or blocks
each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each,
and 4 tracts of 20 acres each.
Sri,; ~~ ~ la ieno gteiB K BLC CK
Sunday a oternoon gathering in one of the homes lo thy Beautiful home east oj Bunnell, surrounded by a 106 acre orange
southern part of tke co0ny, N I grove. About 10.000 boxes o delicionus fruit are sJ d
C) from this grove annu4y,
'If you are roughlyy satisfied with your I
present surroundings, with your position, F But, most of all is my message to the
with your .home, with your climate and ,o1/9z/c -man who not only has to work for his
with the environments for your family, I --- living, but who works mighty hard for
have nothing more to say to you. But, it. My heart goes out to such a man,
if you are a wage-earner, or a renter, I
want to ask you three questions, not to be ( BL CK BL9CK for I well remember the days when Iearned
answredto e, bt t yorsel. Tey __ __ $6o.oo a month working for a big steel
are asked to set you thinking. corporation, paying one-fourth of this sum
for house rent. However, I managed
1. What have y o u accomplished to save a little each month and bought
during the time you have been wor- -Z/R ,oA Land on the Installment Plan- just as
king for wages? I am asking you to do now.
This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each
2. How large is y our bank ac- farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permit- Surely you would rather work on your
count. ting every owner to enter and leave his land in the
easiest possible manner. own farm at Bunnell than in some other
3. What do you own today? On the opposite page you will find a map of Florida, man's shop or store. Surely you would
indicatingoao the deposit ion page eu nell Color rather work for yourself than for the Even though you should not have the indicating theexact position oftheBunnell Colony. Mighty Captains of Industry, knowing means to pay for your farm at once and that each hard day's labor on your own
move on to your land immediately, don't farm is for you and your family, and that
you think it would be wise to begin plan- every furrow you plow, every tree or shrub
ning for a few years hence? Do you real- you plant, adds just that much more
ize that one of these days you are going value to your PERMANENT HOME.
to be "old" as the term is known in an
employee's life? That one of these days Some folks have said to me, "I believe
you won t have that good job, for a younger you are all right and that the Bunnell
fellow will step in and take your place, or colony is all you claim it to be. I wanted
thatsome day you won't be able to stand to buy one of your farms, but these hard
the exposure to the long, cold winters? times and the European war have come
.. What then? Have you provided for up." I hope no more people will offer
such days? this as an excuse. No' doubt you, haive%
This is the way the new land looks. When you arrive at Bunnell been affected more or less by the hard Possibly you are a man with a farm of we will take you to your farm in the Company's
automobile, without, esoyo,,. times, but this should awaken you to the your own in the North or Northwest, fact that so long as you depend on a salwhere you may have to feed your stock If you are a man with sufficient means ary, or on the whims and caprices of other six months out of twelve, and where you to gratify your desires, then surely you people, you may at any time be subcan raise but one crop annually, and can would like a home in Florida for a part of jected to hard times. Learn your lesson neverbequitesureofthatonecrop. Would the year at least. Our colony is ideally before it is too late, get away from the it not appeal to you to go to a country located, very near the great ocean, where Uncertainties of City Life and be a where there are 365 growing days and you may enjoy surf bathing at any time. Producer instead of a Consumer. It is where you can raise three crops a year? Here you will find the very finest hunting not the Farmer who feels the hard Would it not be a relief to you to know and fishing, with many of the famous times today, for he is getting high that if one crop failed you had two more East Coast's winter resorts but a few miles prices for everything he raises. OPPORTUNITIES? away.
An inexpensive, pretty home on the Dixie highway, about twoo miles east of Bunnell. Potato farm a few miles south of Bunnell.




Get on The "ther Side of The Fence"
Here is Your Opportunity -What Will You DO With It?
I have been perfectly frank with you. I have told you of
our colony as fully as I possibly can do. If there are any Do you want to
questions remaining unanswered in your mind, won't you, in know more
fairness to me, write me what they are?
The greatest favor you could do me would be to go to about our
Bunnell and substantiate all I have said. I would never again B
have to ask you to buy a tarm, for you would have made a Bunnell
payment on one before you ever left the colony. That has Colony
been my experience with almost every individual who ever visi d Bunnell. However, I want you to know that you may
be sure of having a *first-class -farm allotted to you, if you
cannot visit the colony at once, it you will send me your order pj)omptly. "
The Bunnell Development Company is financially responaWe i1i every respect. Its titles, are perfect. If you order your
farm by mail the company gives you ninety days in which to /
inspect same, and it you are not satisfied with our allotment you may select another farm, or if you cannot be pleased, If so, send for our copyrighted illustrated bookletour mony lbe rfndt e darm, you ithc6aent nerlest "A Little Farm-A Big Living."
our money will be refunded to you with 6 per cent interest Also for our monthly magazine, "The Home Builder."
per annum for the time used. You can think of no more You may have them for the asking.
They will be sent you free of cost.
fair and square Plan of doing business than this. These have shown thousands of people how to get away from
the congested cities, from rented farms, and from the chilly blasts
Our terms are within the reach of every one, only fifty of long northern winters. They have been messengers of hope
cents an acre down and fifty cents an acre each month. No and good cheer.
Interest, No Taxes, or other Fees whatever, and we will Here is The Book
give you a Residence Lot in Du Pont with every ten Cut out THIS COUPON
acre youbuy.and mail today. acres you buy I do'not bind myself to buy, but
You will find a special order blank below for your con- will gladly read your free
venience. Fill it out, attach your first monthly payment and literature.
i tBunnell Development Co.,
108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, II.
Don't you think you have waited long enough to I am interested in your colony and
would like to receive a copy of your book
purchase your Florida Farm? If you sincerely desire to -"A Little Farm-A Big Living."
get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of Also your Magazine-"The Home
Builder" for a few months.
Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do with it? NAME
Very sincerely yours, .AND NOt .....................................
CT ---------------------------------------I~youn hve" ctoaintanc e ho are ine o
____iv c us their names and ad esses also.
GRASP YOUR OPPORTUNITY TODAY. This is Our Agreement
S8ig..the cquponhbelowa s rd il lv;'h remittance as ynrfirst-tep t-w'wd indoependt~w -a s-on':;Iv'-n e~t- I fc 1, 1 r
1 ,Gd you the story-I Live given you the proof. Now it's lir you to decide. Think it over! Don't let 17 cents a day 'stand between you and success-a home for yourself and loved ones-independence. Are you going to lose this opportunity? Make up your W ith Yo u mind NOW. Sign this coupon and mail it to me tonight. We give a free lot in the town of Du Pont, which is located about three miles south of Bunnell with every ten acres you buy.
Du P nt Fee i~ilEver ie Acrs ~Read carefully the following extracts from the
Du Point Lot Free with Every Ten Acres You Buy Contract which the Bunnell DevelopUse This Order Blank to Take Advantage of This Offer ment Company makes with
each purchaser of land.
No Interest No Recording Fees
Price $35.00 Per Acre No Taxes No Brokerage We pay all taxes on the propVOLUSIA TRACT erty until you have paid in full for the
land and warranty deed is delivered to you.
Date 1917 We charge no interest on deTHOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Illinois. ferred payments.
Please enter my order for a farm of__ Acres
(Insert here the number of res you wish to purchase, whether 00o0o, In event of sickness, we give you of land in Bunnell Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of
________________________________________Dollars per month thirteen weeks' grace for your payments, and
(Write in here the amount to be paid each month-$.& 0 a. month for ten acres. $10.00 a wonth for twenty acres. Slena motth for forty cres. etc., in te event ofdeath yo heirs s SUCEnclosed find $ as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of $8n heo ou hl
hereafter until my land is paid for: Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment c dvs eed to all your rights in the property. m which tract has been allotted to me. Name ...... .....................Street Town__ ___We give you ninety days for the
F.'D. No.___________County State__ ____ inspection of the land allotted to you, and if
Age Married or Single Occupation -you should not be satisfied with it, for any reason whatsoever, and will notifyus to that effect
Terms $ 500 : mouth for 10 acres Allotment: Section ____Tp._______ ONE LOT FREE in within the allotted time, we will return to you
10.00 a month for 40 acres Rg. ____BIk. Tr.___ Du Pont with every alonyyueadonyu
200 ot o 0ars(Do not write in thes sspaces' Acres you buy. althe mnyouhave pado orland,
THUS. A.W'iENIUS, WOMAN'S TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. plus interest at the rate of 6qh per annum.
"PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME" w! ACT NOW! Im




Full Text

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THE HIGH COST OF LIVING WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT IT? Get on the Other Side of the Fence” THOMAS ALBERT VERDENIUS Doubtless there is no question that is so generally agi tating the minds of the American people today as that of the ever-increasing HIGH COST OF LIVING. Thinking men and women are startled over existing conditions, and the question is being asked on all sides, “WHERE IS IT GOING TO END?” Not only are the poorer people suffering because of the high prices of the necessities of life, but the great middle class is finding it impossible to go on in this nanner and they are earnestly seeking a remedy by which they may rid themselves of their heavy burden. Hard coal is selling in Chicago at $10.00 a ton; soft coal (mine run) at $7.50 per ton; flour, $9.50 a barrel; butter, 45 cents a pound; eggs, 60 cents a dozen; potatoes from $2.25 to $2.50 per bushel—and so I could go on enumerating other necessities of life that are being sold at almost prohibitive prices. It is useless for me to here attempt to discuss the cause or causes of these conditions. It is enough for us that they exist. The question now is, WHAT CAN YOU DO ABOUT IT? The sole purpose of this BANNER is to present to earnest men and women a way of escape from the hardships attend ant to the HIGH COST OF LIVING. Most of you who read this are on the “WRONG SIDE OF THE FENCE.” The great mass of people are consumers, not producers, and it is the consumer who is suffering today. So again I would give you the oft-repeated slogan “BACK TO THE LAND.” I realize of course that everyone could not or would not leave the cities to engage in the occupation of farming, and it would not be wise for them to do so; but if YOU are one who can do this I trust you will take my advice deeply to heart, for it may be the means of changing the whole course of your life into brighter, happier, healthier channels. Let us here for a moment consider the reasons why any commodity should go up or down in price. The answer is easy—it is the demand and supply which regulate the price of any commercial article. If there is an over-production of a certain article,the price of that article goes down at once; if there is a shortage, the price goes up. Now, most men are practically only consumers, as pertains to the things that go to nourish human life, while THE FARMER IS THE ONE GREAT PRODUCER. You see m y point, I am sure. If you were on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE,” if you were a producer yourself you would have no objection to receiving these high prices for the products of your farm, and even though such high prices may not continue to exist, you would be able to supply the food necessary to yourself and your family and always have some thing to sell. Isn’t this a feature, worth your earnest con sideration? If you agree with me, then let me show you how it is possible for you to get on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE,” and the particular side of the fence where the pas tures seem the_greenest and success the surest. Then, where shall you go? If I should say'to a farm in one of our middle-western states you would at once think of an eighty or a hundred and sixty-acre farm that would cost you anywhere from $125.00 to $250.00 an acre, and you would say IT IS IMPOSSIBLE.” And to becomethe owner of__ such a farm is impossible for the man who does not possess a large bank account. But, conditions are entirely different in Florida, and particularly in our own BUNNELL COLONY, and it gives me the keenest pleasure to tell you^briefly why this is true. In the first place you do not require’such a large farm at Bunnell, for there you will grow three crops on your land every year; in other words you can grow as much on twenty acres of land in Florida as you^can on sixty acresjn Illinois. Again, our climate is so delightful that a home—a place of shelter—may be built at a cost of one-third or one-half the price of a home in a northern climate. Fuel bills are there reduced to almost nothing, little fuel being required any time of the year, and plenty of timber to be had for the cutting. The necessity for warm winter clothing is also eliminated. Furthermore, Florida’s soil is unequalled for trucking and for the production of citrus fruits, besides being ideally adapted to the growing of staple crops, such as corn, rye, Jbrage crops of all kinds, sugar cane, cotton, etc. Would that I had the voice of a trumpet to arouse from their lethargy the men and women everywhere, throughout the length and breadth of this great country of ours, and to show them that they are wasting the best years of their lives in working for others, when by a little effort on their part they might become the owners of little farms of their own in Florida, and there escape the hardships of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. This BANNER is written for the thoughtful consideration of every individual who is interested in bettering his condition, who would like to live in a country where there are 365 grow ing days in the year, where the sun shines almost all the time, where three crops are raised annually and where life takes on a new, a different meaning from what it has under the present struggle for existence. This Banner will tell you about the BUNNELL colony where just these conditions prevail, where you may become a PRODUCER INSTEAD OF A CONSUMER, where you may grow and sell some of these high-priced articles of food instead of buying them, and where you may become independent within a few years’ time. This colony was established some six years ago. It has long since passed the experimental stage, for here men and women have set up their homes; they are making money, and are happy and content. Here hundreds and hundreds of others have bought farms and expect to locate on them permanently, and notwithstanding all this, the land is still very reasonable in price and may be purchased under the most satisfactory terms. If you sincerely desire to get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do about it? Very sincerely yours,

PAGE 2

14 Acres of Irish Potatoes grown at Bunnell sold for $3,000.00 Here is His Story Mr. W. A. Mack is one of Bunnell’s successful farmers. On fourteen acresofland which he bought from our Company, he raised $3000.00 worth of Irish potatoes in one season, and this was but one of his three annual ci ops. This man is a farmer, a producer, and he does not object to the high price of potatoes. Neither will you if you fol low his example. He is now planting his entire forty acres to Irish potatoes, which he will har vest early this spring. Mr. Mack came to Bunnell on October 31, 1911, he being one of our first settlers. He had less than one thousand dollars when he left California. He began clearing his land on December 18,1911. Built his little home without the aid of a carpenter. Put down his well, and has fine drinking water at a depth of 21 feet. He has all of his 40 acres now cleared and under cultivation. Mr. Mack has raised fourteen crops on his land since he came to Bunnell, and if this winter’s crop is as good as his last year’s potato crop, Mr. Mack will sell $9000.00 worth of potatoes from his forty acre farm. The above is the story of one ordinary man’s success It is one that can be verified in the experience of any mar who will do as Mr. Mack has done. The climate, soil anc transportation facilities are available to every man whc desires to take advantage of them, and if he will go seriously a ut business of making dollars from Bunnell soil, HE MLL ARRIVE AT EASY STREET AS WELL, and will avoid the pitfalls of the HIGH COST OF LIVING. { J h L 1S \ s n i t a ta K?* romance or fancy, but it simply sets forth the hard, cold figures of facts, taken from the trans action of a Bunnell colony farmer and a commission man who wanted to buy what the farmer had to sell. On this page you will, find a letter written by Mr. Mack regarding this transaction. 6 %  J C £ uld ^ OU of a good man y other successful farmers in the Bunnell colony, and could relate many other incidents of a similar nature, that should be sufficient to convince any one that the Bunnell colony is a good place in which to lake a home, and to provide for the future with the least amount ct expense and the greatest promise of profit. Here are the Deposit Slips — in<> / ^c4 rfrf A*** / ^ &^ A*/ if ^ %  'owrf CL 0/y ( C (.

PAGE 3

Why this Man Moved to Bunnell The Story is Told in His Own Words J. B. Boa/., Editor of The St. Johns Tribune I note that a number of people who have come to Bunnell have written you letters from time to time giving you their views of Bunnell as a farming community, and as my experience in Florida covers practically the entire state, during a period of approximately twelve years, I thought that possibly you would like to know what I think of Florida, and more especially of St. Johns County and Bunnell. To give you my experience I will have to be gin in the year 1904, at which time I accepted a position with Robert T. Cochran & Company, a wholesale produce house of New York City, with instructions to go immediately to Hastings, Florida, to buy Irish potatoes. Upon arrival at Hastings the first day of April I found sev eral farmers who had their fields planted to potatoes that were ready to dig. The acreage that year was about five hundred,, the yield from the entire acreage being about one hundred cars for the season. The price per barrel received by the growers was on an average of $4.50 f. o. b. I remember one old negro who owned a five acre tract of land. On this five acres he had his house and barn, which left him four acres to plant to potatoes. I bought this crop of potatoes from the old negro, and after deducting the cash to pay for the seed, fertilizer and barrels that he had used, I give him a check for $505.00. When I gave him this check I realized then that he had made more clear money off of four acres of land within four months, than I had made during the same four months, as my salary at that time was $100.00 per month; conse quently I had made $400.00 while this ignorant MR. J B. BOAZ Author of the preceding most interesting letter, is the Editor of the St. Johns Tribune, a weekly newspaper pub lished by him in Bunnell We consider Mr. Boaz one of the most able newspaper men in Florida, and his paper is up to-date in every respect. If you have bought land in the Bunnell colony and are not already a subscriber to this weekly paper, you should by all means have it in your home during the present year. You cannot, in fact, afford to be without it, for it will keep you closely in touch with the rapid developments taking place in the community. The price is but $2.00 per year. If you have not as yet purchased a farm at Bunnell, but would like a copy of this paper for one month, free of all cost, fill out the adjoining coupon and mail it at once. negro had made $505.00 in the same length of time, besides he was at home with his family all the time, while I was traveling all over the country. Ihis little incident put me to thinking, and I made up my mind that day, that sooner or later, I would be a resident of St. Johns County. After traveling for four years, all over the United States, with the exception of the extreme western coast, 1 quit the road and returned to my old home town, Calhoun, Georgia, where I be gan the publication of a weekly newspaper, which I published for four years. I liked this business all right during the summer months, but when the weather began to turn cold I would long for Florida, so when the first frost fell in the fall of 1911, I wired John Nix & Company, New York, telling them 1 was ready to go back on the road. To this wire I received a reply that my Florida territory was open. I immediately disposed of my newspaper and came to Florida. I worked down the Florida East Coast during the months of December, Jan uary, February and March, where I was ship ping string beans. I remember that year we had car load after car load of beans to sell in New York for $5.00 to $6.00 per hamper, and we had a few that sold as high as $7.50 per hamper. After the bean crop was shipped I received orders to report at Hastings for the potato crop. On account of the potato industry having grown to such an extent, Mr. Nix had to move his office force to Hastings, going there him self, to be able to handle it. Upon arriving in Hastings, Mr. Nix said: “Boaz, I want you to handle the Dupont and Bunnell crops this year. We have made arrangements at Dupont with the Dupont Railway and Land Company to han dle their crop. I want you to go to Bunnell where you will meet a man named Moody. He is as fine a fellow as you ever met, and he will make you enjoy yourself while there. He is president of a big land company, and those fel lows have quite a large amount of potatoes ready to dig. When you get there, see Moody and you and he take his Cadillac roadster and go out and buy every potato you can. You can contract at $4.00 f. o. b.” I arrived in Bunnell, met Mr. Moody and we immediately got busy and bought every potato there was in this section of the county, paying from $3.75 to $4.00 per barrel for num ber ones and twos. We bought one man’s crop by the field. He had ten acres of potatoes for which we paid him $1,500.00, delivered to Bun nell. This was what he. wanted for them, so we paid him his price. For this crop of potatoes we got a little over $2,400.00. Mr. R. W. Cody had seventeen acres planted that year which I handled for him, and after he Daid up all expenses, he had a little over three thousand dollars left. Right then I said: “Bun nell, St. Johns County, Florida, will be my future home.” I remember buying Mr. W. A. Mack’s crop of potatoes that year. He only had a few, hav ing just moved to Bunnell the year previous. 1 recall that he hauled his potatoes in on a wagon drawn by two oxen. Today Mr. Mack has as fine a farm as there is in this section. After the potato crop was shipped I went up into Georgia and worked the peach deal; from there I went to Birmingham, Alabama. From Birmingham I wrote Mr. Moody that I had quit the road and wanted to make Bunnell my home. I asked him if there was anything open that I could get into. He immediately replied: “Come to Bunnell and we will open something.” On November 5, 1912, 1 landed’in Bunnell 1 immediately realized that there was an open< ing for a newspaper here, as there was someI thing like three thousand people who had bought land here, and I felt sure that I could get every one of them to subscribe for a weekly paper. I telegraphed the printers supply people to send their man here at once as I wanted to buy a plant. Everything arrived and on February 6, 1913, I launched the St. Johns Tribune an d — — have been publishing it ever since. I have now been a resident of Bunnell for forty-nine months, and expect to make it fortynine years, provided I live that long. I have driven over practically every part of the colony, and I know that this dirt cannot be beat for farming. Although I am not a farmer myself, I have been in nearly every field and orange grove in the State of Florida. I have bought fruits and vegetables in nearly every shipping point in the State, besides having bought them in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Mississippi, Vir ginia, Missouri and New York State, and I con scientiously believe that Florida is the BEST state in the Union; St. Johns County the BEST county in Florida, and Bunnell the BEST town in the county. Since publishing the St. Johns Tribune I have tried very hard to give my readers the facts in regard to what the farmers are doing here, but sometimes I feel a delicacy about publishing reports of some of the wonderful crops that are grown here, as they seem like impossibilities, and I know that some of my readers would not believe them; in fact I would not believe these reports myself, if I did not KNOW them to be facts. I am very optimistic in regard to the future prosperity of the Bunnell Colony and feel that it will some day in the near future be one of the largest shipping points, of all kinds of fruits and vegetables, there is in the State. Thanking you for your patience with me in this lengthy letter,allow me to subscribe myself. Yours very truly, SPEGIAL OFFER OF THE ST. JOHNS TRIBUNE Free of Cost for One Month. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Sir; — I am interested in the Bunnell colony, and would like to receive for one month, free of all cost to me, the St. Johns Tribune, published in Bunnell, Florida. Name_____ ; —-; Street and No. __—>—-— -——: Town or City _:-----~ v ~ State _______—

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HERE IS THE STORY OF BUNNELI These men and women have already become producers, or are making thei HIGH COST OF LIVING Means, and are determii NOTE: The letters on these two pages are from satisfied men and women who have bought land in the Bunnell colony. The originals are on file at the office of the Bunnell Development Com pany, Chicago, Illinois. We omit their full addresses in order that the writers may not be annoyed by quantities of mail from interested people, or from other land companies. If any prospective buyer would like to have one or more of these addresses, we shall be pleased to furnish same on ap plication. Bunnell Development Company. LIKES FLORIDA BETTER THAN ANY OTHER STATE. “We came to Bunnell December 24th, 1914, and were very much pleased with our land, also our son’s land. We have lived in several different states, but think that this has them all beaten.” MR. and MRS. J. F. BALL. Du Pont, Florida. BUNNELL BANKER TELLS OF SATISFIED CITIZENS IN BUNNELL COLONY. “Mr. Verdenius, you have been wonderfully successful in helping to develop this country and in finding homes for people, who are thanking you today for your efforts, your honor and your integrity. It is you to whom most of these people are indebted, and it is you they often speak so highly of.” G. A. ANDERSON, Bunnell, Florida. winter. Every day we praise God from whom all blessings flow, and are happy and con tent. He might have made a more beautiful state and climate than we have here, but I don’t think so. I hope everyone who comes r beautiful little city may be as glad “The opportunities in the South greater than they are in the North, and I .. told my friends this, and hope many of them will locate there. I call Bunnell the ‘City of Opportunities.’ ” RICHARD T. GARNER, -than comfortable and give him luxuries. Florida, like Canaan of old. is a land of ‘milk and honey.’ As a health-giv ing proposition, Florida is unequalled; no zero temperature,-but tropical conditions ob tain in lavish abundance” cause my father and two bought. My eldest brother L„„ colony and takes the paper from there. I be lieve if he missed getting his paper he woult be ready to start for Bunnell right awav. Hi T ——* *-Bunnell in the fall, fo: -— ....;I northern winds, sinci :1 of Florida.” RALEIGH BAILEY, Illinois. “S 11 ; Our plans are all made and our place all laid out In our minds; In fact, it is already named Little Eden,’ after a place in our old home.” MRS. ADA E. BEIGLE Ohio. ADVICE OF A CHICAGO MAN. “I decided to buy before it was too late, and my advice to those who have not bought yet is to act at once, as I understand there is very little of this tract yet for sale. I have investigated the Bunnell Development Company, and find the officers of this com pany reliable men and abundantly able finan cially to make good any contract or guarantee they may make.” H. T. HOTCHKIN. Illinois. FROM A BUYER IN THE FRENCH TRENCHES ON THE EUROPEAN BATTLEFIELD. “I am sorry we have not the fine weathe of Florida in this country. It is snowint and pretty hard for the poor soldiers, hope if I live through it, I will see our col ony after the war.” L. HENRY, France. n well plea ke double iTISFIED WITH LAND BOUGHT UNSEEN. I bought land of the Bunnell Development as I found them’there. I consider the land first-class and the climate ideal. My advice to everyone is to buy a home at Bunnell now while you can still get the land so cheap. 1 am preparing and looking forward to making 9th of June and my allottment, the colony. i, ready to do anything _„_ with the .1 as the winter." W. BROWN. arm in Section ail thoroughly, __| _? adjoining it. I was very much pleased with the quality of the soil, and I found the location of the col ony ideal. I believe the mau who doesn’t get a piece of Bunnell colony laud is missing a great treat and a big piece of money, for that land is bound to go up in price very rapidly.” J. B. PARKER, Canada. WORDS OF PRAISE FOR BUNNELL FROM THE CANAL ZONE. “As soon as I can, I shall buy more land in the colony, for Ihave implicit faith in Bunnell’s future, and predict great things for the colony. I wish that every young man n-nnirt saw his money and buy land from CARL A. SWIGER. Canal Zone. e fee? that abundantly in 1916.” W. A. MACK, Bunnell, Florida. you personally before long do things o~ -” CLfFFO “FINEST CLASS OF PEOPLE I HAVE EVER MET ARE AT BUNNELL.” “I paid a visit to Bunnell in February and am well pleased with my little piece of land there. I think that Bunnell is the prettiest place of its size that I have ever seen, and the finest class of people I have ever met are at Bunnell. They have the right spirit and are the kind of people to make a good c-munity. Everyone I met-— spoke well o* the colony.” I. M. DOUGLAS. WORDS OF ADVICE TO SCANDINAVIANS IN PARTICULAR. "I am a Scandinavian, and wish to say a few words of advice to other Scandinavians who would like to move to a milder climate. I don’t think you could do better than to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony. Ten acres will be all right for a small family, but twenty would be better. The Bunnell Development Company is square in all its dealings.” HENDRICK C. FADNESS, Iowa. You need NOT fear Old Age, Hard Times, Strikes or Loss c

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TOLD BY A FEW OF MY BUYERS plans to become such in the near future. They have realized what the d to get on the “OTHER SIDE OF THE FENCE” Employment when you have a Bunnell Farm Under Cultivation

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Community Builders, Not Land Promoters Are the Men Back of This Enterprise And this is the Reason WHY Bunnell is Better Go where you will throughout the great state of Florida, you cannot find a better proposition, all things considered, than our magnificent Bunnell colony. I know whereof I speak, for I have not gained my knowledge of Florida from books, nor from railroad guides. I have not merely made a flying trip through the state, but I LIVED in Florida for two years, and have traversed it from the north to the south, and from its eastern boundary to its west coast. Let me tell you some of the reasons VHY the Bunnell colony is better than o^her colonies. Pine Grove Inn—one of the two hotels where you may find comfort while mjm.no Bunnell SOIL After visiting sections of Florida where farms are selling for from $100.00 to $1000.00 cash per acre, I do not hesitate to say that I believe the soil in the Bunnell colony is as good as the best in the state, and I make no exceptions whatever. The scores of letters I have on file in my office will bear me out in the statement that our land is as good as that found in far famed Hastings, Sanford, Lakeland, Stark and elsewhere. LOCATION Our location is most favorable. We are near the great metropolis of the South— Jacksonville, with its many advantages. Our land almost touches the Atlantic ocean, which gives us its cooling breezes through out the summer months, and is a great feature to be considered when seeking a permanent home in Florida. We are far enough south to be safe in raising all kinds of citrus fruits, and the fruits raised in our section are more delicious than those grown in the southern part of the state. The U. S. Bulletin on citrus fruits for 1906 verifies this statement. Glimpse of the beautiful Dixie highway Elegant Bunnell home of former Iowan TRANSPORTATION This feature, so essential to the success of any community, is most satisfactory in the Bunnell colony. The main trunk line of the Florida East Coast railroad passes through the heart of our colony lands, while just to the east of our colony is the Florida East Coast canal, giving our colonists cheap water transportation facilities. Our principal town, Bunnell, is up-todate in every respect. Although it has been in existence but a few years, it has an electric light plant, city water works, ce ment sidewalks, public school, church, state bank, stores, shops, commodious hotels, ice plant, etc. WHY BUNNELL IS REALLY BETTER Investigate other land companies. Notice, if you will, where their headquar ters are to be found. Usually in some large city, are they not? Where are the headquarters of the Bunnell Development Company? Right in our colony — at Bunnell — among our own people. There is where the President, the Secretary and Treasurer have their homes. These men have lived in that country for years; they are there to stay, and they have invested thousands upon thousands of dollars in the colony. One of Bunnell'8 beautiful bungalows They are COMMUNITY BUILD ERS, not land promoters, and mark my words, there is a vast difference between those two classes. WE CAN’T AFFORD THE LUXURY OF A SINGLE PROMOTER IN OUR MIDST. The owners of the Bunnell colony lands know nothing about promoting. They live and work right with the colonists, for they believe that what is good enough for other folks is good enough for them. Because I do not know of another colony in Florida, and am sure that there is not another one exists, with such EXCEL LENT SOIL, IDEAL LOCATION, VERY BEST TRANSPORTATION, UP-TODATE TOWN, where the owners of the land are actual and permanent citizens of the community, and where they are spend ing their money freely from year to year in the development of their colony, that I feel free to say that Bunnell is entirely different from the other land propositions on the market, and I am confident that thoughtful, intelligent readers of this Ban ner will readily see “WHY BUNNELL IS BETTER.” Glimpse of the beautiful Dixie highway Be Satisfied With Nothing But The “Best”

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Are You Ready to Talk Business? Now is the time to make your plans for getting away from the HIGH COST of LIVING if you ever intend to do it! Are you ready to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, since I can show you how you may secure a ten-acre tract with a saving of only SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY? And better still, when you have brought this farm under cultivation, you can live on it with your family, in a free and independent manner. Sunday afternoon gathering in one of the homes in the southern part of the colony. 'If you are thoroughly satisfied with your present surroundings, with your position, with your .home, with your climate and with the environments for your family, I have nothing more to say to you. But, if you are a wage-earner, or a renter, I want to ask you three questions, not to be answered to me, but to yourself. They are asked to set you thinking. 1. W hat have you accomplished during the time you have been wor king for wages? How We Allot Our Land 'T'HE plat below represents one section—640 acres— of land divided into four quarter sections or blocks each block being divided into 8 tracts of 10 acres each, and 4 tracts of 20 acres each. ICK 1 r 1 3 ICK — } \ —J CQ ICK 1 % \ CK l Beautiful home east of Bunnell, surrounded by a 106 acre orange grove. About 10.000 boxes of delicious fruit are shipped i from this grove annua^fy, But, most of all is my message to the man who not only has to work for his living, but who works mighty hard for it. My heart goes out to such a man, for I well remember the days when I earned $60.00 a month working for a big steel corporation, paying one-fourth of this sum for house rent. However, I managed to save a little each month and bought Land on the Installment Plan—just as I am asking you to do now. This diagram shows how we allot our land. Each 2. How large is your bank ac count. 3. What do you own today? Even though you should not have the means to pay for your farm at once and move on to your land immediately, don’t you think it would be wise to begin plan ning for a few years hence? Do you real ize that one of these days you are going to be “old” as the term is known in an employee’s life? That one of these days you won’t have that good.job, for a younger fellow will step in and take your place, or that s ome day you won’t be able to stand the exposure to the long, cold winters? What then? Have you provided for such days? Possibly you are a man with a farm of your own in the North or Northwest, where you may have to feed your stock six months out of twelve, and where you can raise but one crop annually, and can never be quite sure of that one crop. Would it not appeal to you to go to a country where there are 365 growing days and where you can raise three crops a year? Would it not be a relief to you to know that if one crop failed you had two more OPPORTUNITIES? farm faces upon a thirty-foot roadway, thereby permit ting every owner to enter and leave his land in the easiest possible manner. On the opposite page you will find a map of Florida, indicating the exact position of the Bunnell Colony. 1 1 L 'A ft ,3 rs S'\. %  • %  • n %  : { This is the way the new land looks. When you arrive at Bunnell we will take you to your farm in the Company’s automobile, without expense to you. If you are a man with sufficient means to gratify your desires, then surely you would like a home in Florida for a part of the year at least. Our colony is ideally located, very near the great ocean, where you may enjoy surf bathing at any time. Here you will find the very finest hunting and fishing, with many of the famous East Coast’s winter resorts but a few miles away. Surely you would rather work on your own farm at Bunnell than in some other man’s shop or store. Surely you would rather work for yourself than for the Mighty Captains of Industry, knowing that each hard day’s labor on your own farm is for you and your family, and that every furrow you plow, every tree or shrub you plant, adds just that much more value to your PERMANENT HOME. Some folks have said to me, “I believe you are all right and that the Bunnell colony is all you claim it to be. I wanted to buy one of your farms, but these hard times and the European war have come up.” I hope no more people will offer this as an excuse. No' doubt youhajv^ been affected more or less by the hard times, but this should awaken you to the fact that so long as you depend on a sal ary, or on the whims and caprices of other people, you may at any time be sub jected to hard times. Learn your lesson before it is too late, get away from the Uncertainties of City Life and be a Producer instead of a Consumer. It is not the Farmer who feels the hard times today, for he is getting high prices for everything he raises. An inexpensive, pretty home on the Dixie highway, about two miles east of Bunnell. Potato farm a few miles south of Bunnell.

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Get on The “Other Side ot The Fence” Here is Your Opportunity—What Will You DO With It? I have been perfectly frank with you. I have told you of our colony as fully as I possibly can do. If there are any questions remaining unanswered in your mind, won’t you, in fairness to me, write me what they are? The greatest favor you could do me would be to go to Bunnell and substantiate all I have said. I would never again have to ask you to buy a farm, for you would have made a payment on one before you ever left the colony. That has been my experience with almost every individual who ever vis ited Bunnell. However, I want you to know that you may be sure of having a first-class farm allotted to you, if you cannot visit the colony at once, if you will send me your order promptly. The Bunnell Development Company is financially responin every respect. Its titles are perfect. If you order your farm by mail the company gives you ninety days in which to inspect same, and if you are not satisfied with our allotment you may select another farm, or if you cannot be pleased, your money will be refunded to you with 6 per cent interest per annum for the time used. You can think of no more fair and square Plan of doing business than this. Our terms are within the reach of every one, only fifty cents an acre down and fifty cents an acre each month. No Interest, No Taxes, or other Fees whatever, and we will give you a Residence Lot in Du Pont with every ten acres you buy. You will find a special order blank below for your con venience. Fill it out, attach your first monthly payment and mail to me at once. Don’t you think you have waited long enough to purchase your Florida Farm? If you sincerely desire to get away from the struggle incident to the High Cost of Living, this is your opportunity. What will you do with it? Very sincerely yours, You may have them for the asking. They will be sent you free of cost. These have shown thousands of people how to get away from the congested cities, from rented farms, and from the chilly blasts of long northern winters. They have been messengers of hope and good cheer. Here is The Book Cut out THIS COUPON and mail today. I do not bind myself to buy, but will gladly read your free literature. Bunnell Development Co., 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, HI. I am interested in your colony and would like to receive a copy of your book —“A Little Farm—A Big Living.” Also vour Magazine —“The Home Builder” for a few months. NAME... ST. AND NO.-. CITY. STATE.....fl Iflyou have" acquaintances who are interested give us their names and addresses also. GRASP YOUR OPPORTUNITY TODAY iSift-i the coupon below a. d mail wi*h remittance as vmtr first :*ep toward independent**—a. sound investment—a home for i’ i a. ve toid you the story—I iuve given you the proof. Now it’s f jr you to decide. Think it over! Don’t let 17 cents a day stand between you and success—a home for yourself and loved ones—independence. Are you going to lose this opportunity? Make up your mind NOW. Sign this coupon and mail it to me tonight. We give a free lot in the town of Du Pont, which is located about three miles south of Bunnell with every ten acres you buy. Du Pont Lot Free with Every Ten Acres You Buy Use This Order Blank to Take Advantage of This Offer This is Our Agreement With You Read carefully the following extracts from the Contract which the Bunnell Develop ment Company makes with each purchaser of land. tic nn p nr A No Interest No Recording Fees x lice f JJ.UU rer rvere No Taxes No Brokerage VOLUSIA TRACT Date_1917 THOS. A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Co., Chicago, Illinois. Please enter my order for a farm of_Acres (Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchase, whether 10. 20 or to acres) of land in Bunnell Colony, Florida, for which I agree to pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of ____Dollars per month (Write in here the amount to be paid each month—$d.( 0 a month for ten acres. $10.00 a month for twenty acres. $20.00 a month for forty acres, etc.) Enclosed find $_as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make monthly payments of $_ hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment and advise me which tract has been allotted to me. Name_ Street_Town_ R F. D. No._____ County_State_ Ajge_Married or Single_Occupation T^Wmc $ 5 00 8 mon,h for 10 acres Allotment: Sectio n Tp._ONE LOT FREE in 1 erms lO.OO a mouth for 20 acre. R g Blk. Tr Du Pont with every Ten : 20.00 a month for 40 acre. | (Do not write in these spaces' I Acres you buy. THOS. A. VERDENIUS, WOMAN’S TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. We pay all taxes on the prop erty until you have paid in full for the land and warranty deed is delivered to you. We charge no interest on de ferred payments. In event of sickness, we give you thirteen weeks’ grace for your payments, and in the event of death your heirs shall suc ceed to all your rights in the property. We give you ninety days for the inspection of the land allotted to you, and if you should not be satisfied with it, for any rea son whatsoever, and will notify us to that effect within the allotted time, we will return to you all the money you have paid on your land, plus interest at the rate of 6i> per annum. “PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME” ACT NOW!