Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Sal.e Street, Chicano, Ill.
APRIL 1918
An Ideal Southern Home just to the East of Bunnell Colony
This Charming Home Is the Residence of Mr. Knox, Who Is the Owner of one of the Most Beautiful Orange Groves in the State of Florida. This Grove Covers More Than a Hundred Acres, and Its Value Is Estimated at Over a Hundred Thousand Dollars.
LIFE IS INDEED WORTH LIVING HERE.




,BUNNELL ]ROME BUILDER
I want you to subscribe for the Flagler Tribune Bunnell's Wide-Awake Weekly Newspaper
Because, This Issue of the Home Builder is the Last One We Shall Publish
(BY THE EDITOR)
Since December, 1912, a little over five day, and thus the Bunnell Development year-in the month of November-he years ago, I have had the pleasure of Company is rapidly turning over its lands moved to Bunnell. He realized the great
editing the BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. to the purchasers of contracts. Although opening for a good countrynwppri
The need was felt at that time of having a our buyers have always had the privilege our colony, and the folloing February, monthly publication for our land owners of taking possession of their farms as soon the first issue of his paper, called the St. and the hundreds of others who were, inter- as they have made but a single monthly Johns Tribune, was issued. Mr. Boaz called ested in securing farm-homes in the Bun- payment on same, I have advised all to be his paper the St. Johns Tribune because nell colony, conservative and pay for their land in full at that time Bunnell was located in the
When we began the publication of this and secure a deed for same and then to go southern part of St. Johns county. Howlittle magazine we thought that it would to Bunnell and settle on their farms for ever, when our new county was created, be for but a short period of time. How- good, and I am glad to say that my advice he accordingly changed the name of his ever, it met with such a hearty welcome has been followed by most of our buyers. paper to the Flagler Tribune. This paper from our buyers and other friends, that we This is, perhaps, one of the reasons why is published each week and it is an up-tohave continued its publication for now over some of our buyers have not settled on date country newspaper. Mr. Boaz is one five years. At the time the first issue was their land before this, and why so many of the most able editors in Florida and he mailed there were about twelve hundred have moved to the colony this last winter can supply his subscribers with the news land contracts issued and very few people after they have secured their deeds, of Flagler county in a more intelligent
had located on their farms. Our buyers We have, today, buyers, or let me call manner than we can from our Chicago
were scattered all over the United States them members of the big Bunnell family, office, for he is right on the ground, while and Canada. Some time later a few more in Alaska, Canada, in every state in the we have to get our information secondbuyers came to settle on their lands, and Union, in South America and several in hand. The fact of the matter is, I do not soon they were clearing their farms, build- Europe. Numbers of buyers are fighting in know of another country paper that is so ing homes, planting and harvesting crops the trenches in Europe, and we could ap- wide-awake and up-to-date as the Flagler and beginning to demonstrate the great preciate the desire of all to hear from Tribune. opportunities of the Bunnell colony. Then Bunnell-the place where they expected to I want you to subscribe for this paper, there came a great influx of people to Bun- make their future home-and that is the first, because you should know all that is nell, and naturally our sales increased, so reason why the HOME BUILDER has going on in Bunnell-your future home;
during that first year of the HOME been published for such a long period of second, because I want you to help a BunBUILDER'S existence we sold about five time. I now want to give you the reason nell industry. The subscription price is hundred contracts for land in our old tract. why we think we should discontinue the $2.00 a year. If you are now ready to A little later on our new tract of land to the publication of same. Not because our land subscribe, I wish you would fill out the south, known as the Volusia tract, was is nearly sold and not because we have order blank below, send it to Mr. Verplaced on the market and the highest con- issued so many deeds lately-No! No! But, denius, who will forward it at once to Mr. tract number to date of which we have, a Bunnell has grown by leaps and bounds. Boaz. If you prefer to send in your subrecord here in our Chicago office is No. From an undeveloped large body of land scription for but six months, send $1.00; 4266. a few years ago, it has become a prosperous if you desire to subscribe for a full year,
You who have been reading the HOME farming community, and the town of Bun- send $2.00. I am confident that if once you
BUILDER from month to month have no nell is now the county seat of a new, Flag- become a reader of this weekly paper you
doubt noticed that from time to time we ler, county. will never willingly be without it. Mr.
have mentioned the fact that we had only Several years ago Bunnell became an Boaz has assured us that he will keep his
a limited amount of land left for sale. A incorporated town and since that time her subscribers posted as to what is going on great number of those who contracted for growth has been very rapid. New homes in Bunnell, and by having in your homes land are paying in full for their farms and stores were built; new enterprises were this publication published weekly, not these days and asking for their deeds, started, and the first thing we knew a monthly, you will be in-close touch with Naturally, every man and woman who con- weekly newspaper was being published, affairs politically, what the churches and
tracted for one of our farm-homes has With Mr. J. B. Boaz as Editor. This schools are doing, what developments are
been looking forward anxiously to the day weekly publication is known as the Flagler taking place and what the farmers are when he or she could send in the final Tribune. Mr. Boaz was born in Calhoun, accomplishing. payment on the purchase and receive a Georgia. He has long been a newspaper I trust each one of you who is interested
warranty deed, so that he could say in man. At one time he was buyer and repre- in Bunnell will at once send Mr. Thomas truth, "I own a farm-home in the Bunnell sentative of one of the large New York A. Verdenius the application below, propcolony and I have received my warranty produce houses, and was sent to Florida erly filled out, so that you may begin redeed for same, after having been properly to buy Irish potatoes. He first went to ceiving the Flagler Tribune at an early recorded." In fact, a great number of our Hastings and later to Bunnell, and when date. people have sent in their last payment he visited our little town it was "love at Ithnyooeadalfryuriees amounting to $50.00 or $100.00 just to finish first sight" with him. That year he bought itakyuoeadal o oritrs
paying for their land as soon as possible, practically all the potatoes there were for i, and words of appreciation for, our little and the Company has always allowed the sale in the Bunnell -colony and then re- messenger. the BUNNELL H.OM E
liberal discount of 10% on all amounts of turned to Georgia. BUILDER, and wishing each of you an
$100.00 or over when these amounts are However, Mr. Boaz had seen the won- abundant success, I am,
paid in advance. derful opportunities in Florida and he had Sincerely yours,
There have been days lately when as a great desire to become a resident of our
many as twenty deeds were issued in one section of the state. In the fall of that S. HOW ARD, Editor.
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
108 South La Salle Street, Chicago,, Ill.
You will find enclosed_____________________________ Dollars for years
Si1.00 for Olne-half Year. 52.00 for Full Year.
Subscription to the FLAGLER TRIBUNE, published weekly at Bunnell, Florida; my subscription to start at once.
NAME_____________________ ADDRESS IN FULL__________________




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
WHAT THE "OTHER FELLOWS" SAY ABOUT BUNNELL
Idaho Man Writes of the Wonderful Development that has taken place in the Bunnell A Good Example set by one of our British Colony in the last three years, and of his delightful visit to the great State of Florida. Columbia Buyers Who Makes a Payment on His Land Every Four Months.
March 20th, 1918. opinion you have much better soil than is Dear Mr. Verdenius: Dear Mr. Verdenius: to be found in the southern part of the I received the HOME BUILDER, and
My wife and I just returned from our state. thank you very much for it. I am greatly
trip to Florida, and as per my promise, I I spent one Sunday in Miami and while interested in reading the wonderful things
will now write you a letter for the HOME visiting in the little park that day, I was some of the people are doing in Florida, BUILDER and tell what we think of surprised to see a great number of people, which shows what can be done by those
Florida in general and Bunnell in par- perhaps about three thousand in all, stand- that are willing to work, and it also shows ticular. ing and sitting around the band-stand, and that you have the climate and the soil
As you know, we left Chicago the early Mr. William Jennings Bryan, ex-Secretary in which to grow the crops. I only wish part of January, when the weather in the of State was teaching the International that I were down there, but it is impossible North was most disagreeable with plenty Sunday School lesson in the park. I was thet peopl could todbytepepethtM. raddt at present to get away from here as there
of snow and ice and all the people could told by the people that Mr. Bryan did this is very little property changing hands at talk about was the coal situation, and the practically every Sunday when he is at the present time. thermometer at zero. We felt we must be home. Undoubtedly you know that Mr. I also appreciate your liberal offer to
living in another world when we arrived in Bryan has a beautiful home in Miami; in those sending the twelve monthly payments Jacksonville, thirty-six hours after we had fact, I have never seen prettier homes thone tie t t coty pany
left Chicago, for the weather there was anywhere than I found in Florida, and I a gre dea of m ost for Cmpand delightful. We found Jacksonville very predict that Florida has only begun to de- a great deal of money for stamps and stationery and also time which could very
crowded. as a great number of northern velop. although there are some of the most often be saved. That is one thing I have tourists had come South to get away from beautiful mansions in that state that I have been doing myself the last year. I send the disagreeable cold weather of the North. ever seen. Take for instance the Deering my book and money every four months, as After spending a few days in Jacksonville Harvester people, who 2re spending I find it quite a saving to me as well as the we went to St. Augustine, here also the millions of dollars on their estate in Florida, Company. If other buyers would do the weather was fine-everything was nice and and a great number of wealthy people and same it would help you folks a great deal. green; the flowers were in bloom, the millionaires of the eastern states have their Hoping it will not be long before I birds were singing, and it was warm winter homes in your beautiful country. have the pleasure of meeting you in
enough for us to go bathing in the ocean. To really appreciate Florida, one has to Florida, I remain,
In and around Hastings they were very see it for himself. Yours very truly,
busy planting their potatoes, and we could I shook hands with Mr. Bryan and talked very l
not help but remark over and over again with him in regard to the wonderful pos- JOHN LEVETT.
the great advantages the farmers in the sibilities of that state. I told him I was South have over the farmers here in the from Idaho and, as you know, Mr. Bryan North. Florida certainly has a wonderful has forty acres of land not very far from DES MOINES, IOWA, BUYER PRkIqES climate and I have never been any place here. I am, of course, the owner of con- THE BUNNELT. DEVELOPMENT where I liked the climate nearly as well siderable property here in the Twin Fall- COMPANY.
as I do in that state. Many people in the country, but if I were foot loose, it would 3307 W. 7th Street,
potato belt were busy manufacturing bar- not take me long to make up my mind to Des Moines, Iowa.
rels to use for shipping their potato cron. go to Florida and make it my home. I Dear Mr. Verdenius: and when we started back for the North, see great possibilities in that state and Your letter received, and also the Bunnell the potatoes were already quite a little especially for the farmers of the potato Colony "Movies" which I read with a great above the ground and the fields looked belt. I have told the people here many deal of interest. I know Mr. W. A. Mack. very promising. I am talking about po- times about my pleasant journey and esve- I am always glad to receive your literature tatoes because I know that this is the main cially about the wonderful growth of Bun- and I owe you a letter of thanks for the crop in and around Bunnell, but I also nell. Nature is so much kinder to the man good treatment accorded me by you and ,aw a great variety of other things grow- in Bunnell who has to make a living out the Company. I also feel that there is a ing not only in Bunnell but all over the of the soil than she is to us here. I talked great deal of praise due the Bunnell Destate: for instance, I talked with one man with people in Bunnell who had harvested velopment Company. I wrote your Comwho has twenty acres of the finest straw- three crons each year from their land, for pany and asked if I naid the balance due berries I ever tasted or ever laid my eyes on. the last five or six years. on my farm if I would be. entitled to any
He told me he sold his berries mostly I could go on and write you a lengthy discount. Since writing them I have reright in the field to the tourists who passed letter, but I feel that I should not take up ceived the HOME BUILDER and the by and received sixty-five cents a quart for any more space at this time. Let me assure Company also wrote and told me that I same. His field adioins the hard road and vou that I am as ever a big booster for would be entitled to a discount, therefore, be had been picking berries ever since the state of Florida in general and for I am going to make a payment in full for Christmas and would continue doing so for Flagler county in particular. my land within the next few days.
some time. Wishing you and your associates great I have my ten acres of land all cleared
I talked with one of the truckers in that success, I am, and I had a good crop of potatoes on it
nart of the country who had quite a large Sincerely yours, last year, and it is now again planted to
farm of cabbaL-e and all kinds of vegetables
which he sold to the large hotels and HENRY C. GETTERT, spuds.
Idah Trusting I may soon receive a deed for
hiedmy land, and with best wishes and respect, ticillar man had been in Florida for sev- m an
eral years, and he stated that he would not "Perfectly Satisfied" Says Mr. Slier as He I Yours very truly, C. C. HOUSE. Co back to the North under any considera- Makes the Final Payment on His Eighty Acres tion.
Bunnell has certainly grown wonderfully Ontario, Oregon, March 26th, 1918.
since I sAw it three years ago. I could Dear Mr Verdenius-I enclose herewith my IBER Ti B ON IS
hardly believe that it was the same town- check for sixty dollar, balance payment on land. new buildings everywhere, and certainly Thiswill entitle me to warranty deeds to all my If you possess any Liberty Bonds, the Dixie highway is a great improvement land there, clearing up all four contracts, and desire to apply them on your land to the colony. The new bank building was Mr. Verdenius, it arfords me great pleasure payments, we will accept your bonds just about completed, and I found every- to ray that I have found everyone connected one there very enthusiastic and speaking with the Bunnell Development Company perfect and credit you with the par value of very highly about the new county which gentlemen. The treatment I have received from same. was created last year. While I was in all of you has been perfectly satisfactory and Florida I went farther South, but in my square. Sincerely yours, Wade Siler. BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY




One BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Some Worth-While Facts Concerning the Irish Potato Crop
The question has frequently beej, 6ke d
why the subject of IRISH PO E
plays such an important part in the BUNNELL HOME BUILDER and our other
literature. Because of this fact some have
formed the impression that the Irish potato
is about all that can be grown in the Bunnell colony. However, we are convinced
that such a thought is not in the minds
of any of those who have visited the
Bunnell colony or who have read the
HOME BUILDER regularly, and we desire to explain to all others how widely
varied our Bunnell crops are and may be.
It is an established fact that practically
anything and everything can be grown in
the Bunnell colony that can be grown in
northern states, with the exception of
apples and wheat. Also, our climate and
soil is adapted to the growing of a great
variety of tropical and semi-tropical fruits, POTATO FARM IN THE BUNNELL COLONY THAT NETTED THE OWNER MORE THAN none of which could be grown here in the $200.00 PER ACRE.
North.
Why, then, do we discuss so frequently fruit in one year. The owner of this grove we believe that the prices for same will be the possibilities of Irish potatoes and say has at different times refused offers of very good. There will be a great demand so little about the growing of oranges, $100,000.00 for the grove. for new potatoes, and while it seems almost
grape-fruit and other citrus f r u i t s ?
"THERE'S A REASON." It takes a Although the growing of citrus fruits is unreasonable to expect such high prices
comparatively small outlay of money to usually a profitable industry, and every for potatoes this year as we received last, plant, grow and harvest a money-making Florida farm and city home should have yet if our farmers receive but half the Irish potato crop in the Bunnell colony. at least a few orange and grape-fruit trees; prices of last year they will still be making On the other hand, the man who purposes the potato industry is a more staple and big money. to grow orange and grape-fruit trees must certain one. A man who owns good potato T be a man with money, for it takes from land need not wait very long before getting I want to relate to you three very pertisix to eight years until the orange grove returns from his labors. nent potato stories, none of which have
is a producing, profitable business. The Usually in the Bunnell colony our po- ever yet appeared in the pages of the land must be cleared, good trees purchased tatoes are planted in January and February HOME BUILDER; in fact, I do not think and set out and the grove must be given and harvested about one hundred days they have ever appeared in print before. constant care for a number of years. Dur- later. During the latter part of April and They were told to me by a man whose ing the first four or five years one should all through the month of May thousands home is in St. Augustine and who pernot expect any profit from his trees, for of barrels of potatoes are shipped out of sonally knows each of the individuals about they will be better and hardier trees if Flagler county. Last year approximately whom the stories center. Therefore, we they are not allowed to bear while young. five million dollars worth of Irish potatoes should hardly call them stories at all, but Because of these facts, the number of men were shipped from Florida's potato belt, just further facts pertaining to last year's who can afford to enter into this line of and judging from indications to the pres- potato crop. They furnish additional proof endeavor and wait so long for returns are ent date, we never had a better chance for of the great opportunities and possibilities practically few. However, we wish to a big crop yield than we have this year. that the potato belt of Florida (of which state that some of the most beautiful The plants are vigorous looking, and with the Bunnell colony is a part) offers the orange groves in Florida are located near the additional land that has been cleared farmers of today. These are echoes of the the Bunnell colony, in fact there is one since the last potato crop was harvested, 1917 Irish potato crop, and you will please grove of 106 acres which practically adjoins we shall undoubtedly ship a great many bear in mind that since this crop was harour colony lands and from which have been more barrels of potatoes from our potato vested the Flagler county farmers grew shipped as high as ten thousand boxes of belt this season than we did last year, and two more crops on the same land that year.
POTATO FIELD OF ONE OF OUR SUCCESSFUL FARMERS, LOCATED ABOUT THREE MILES SOUTH OF BUNNELL.
FIRST CROP ON NEW LAND, SEVENTY-FIVE BARRELS TO THE ACRE.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
i$ ?~~Y,2K~ <7Down Where the South Begins
1 (With apologies to Arthur Chapmnan of Denver. author
of 'Where the West Begins.")
Down where the welcome is a little
stronger,
Down where the sun shines a little longer,
That's where the South begins;
Down where the moon shines a little
brighter,
Down where the cotton makes the world
seem whiter,
And they clasp your hand a wee bit tighter,
That's where the South begins.
Down where the darkies are always singing,
Where the. birds in winter their way are
winging,
That's where the South begins;
Where trees are green and flowers bloomin g,
Where the people are kind and not assumin g,
'4 With open hearts await your coming,
That's where the South begins.
POTATO FIELD OF MR. COUNCIL. ABOUT THREE MILES'SOUTH OF' BUNNELL. Down where there's pleasure each day in
living,
Every one posted on Florida, knows that Be that as it may, but to the wonder of Where all are eager in serving and giving, the season of 1917 was the most successful .all his friends, he is still sticking to his job That's where the Souith begins, among the Irish potato growers in .St. and running his beloved locomotive. Where friends are loyal and hearts are
Johns and Flagler counties. The prices When asked one day why he did not true,
received were approximately double those retire now that he had "made his pile," he Where birds are singing the whole year of any previous season. The prosperity replied: "I have known a good many through,
thus created manifested itself in various wealthy men and they all have their hob- And a hearty welcome awaits me and you, ways among the farmers. One thing noted bies, some play golf, some play the stock That's where the Sotuth begins. in particular, was the purchase of auto- market while some do not play at all. I~ L. LARSON.
mobiles, and not the cheap cars either, but get more real enjoyment out of running the more expensive styles or makes, this engine, and I am going to stick to it Wonderful Tribute Paid the State of Florida Among the farmers in the Hastings dis- a while." B a h si oiint DWwa ei
trict are a few prosperous negroes. One Btaalkwo sing bouito.oko ei
of these, Mrs. Jackson, had received about Hon. W. A. McRae, Commissioner of
fifteen thousand dollars for her crop, and Agriculture of Florida, has truly said:
like the "white folks" she also ordered a "ohr nteAeia otnn a
car. The dealer was ignorant as to her RAPID GROWTH OF THE "Nhedrinus th rica-lvng confinn ca
colothe inusrius rihtliin man findodlvehecr coor had whmen hfcut wen toodeliver the car, BUNNELL STATE BANK better country, a more congenial climate
cher a Hoe disffclyinl loctg te par or a more responsive soil, nowhere can
hasbe Heoin wase finl dithed folloia As shown by the large increase in the amount he make as good a living and create a
conerstio tok pac: "oesMrs Jak-of its deposits. competence for the future with less labor
convrsaton ook lace "Des Ms. Jck-and personal effort than in Florida, if 'he son live here?" "Yes, sah!" "Is she at Tue1193 -$2872 btosrvshelw ofcm nsne
home?" "Yes, sah, I'se Mrs. Jackson!" ue1 93 $2872 u bevstelw fcmo es
"Did you order that car out there?"~ 6t June 1, 1915 -$81,554.13 and ordinary business requirements."
sho' did!" Thereupon she went down into
her stocking and brought up a roll and $120 .7
counted out $2,000. June 1, 1917u -$120 .7
The Station Agent at a prominent ship- But few words need be added to the
ping point in the Hastings potato section above figures. They speak for themselves. was a very busy man during the shipping It's a wonderful story they tell, too, of the season of 1917. He was Agent, Operator, growth of the Bunnell district from a bankand Express Agent. Naturally he got be- ing standpoint. When a bank prospers the hind with some of the correspondence and people of its community must be prosperoffice work and was called down for it, ing, for a bank is the thermometer by but paid no attention, until one day upon which a community is gauged. Figures
receiving a letter from the Express Coin- speak louder than words, and these figures "And the Star Spangled Banner
pany in which the company said if he did not only speak for themselves but they Forever shall wave
not attend to a certain matter they would show a ratio of growth of almost 100%/ O'er the land of the free
have to make a change in the Agency. He every two years. And the home of the brave."
turned up the corner of the letter and Bunnell's watchword, both from the
wrote: "I should worry! I have just sold standpoint of the banker and the citizen my Irish potato crop for twenty thousand is, "Watch Us Grow." dollars. If you want any more work done, __________________send me an assistant." At the end of the S V
season he resigned and "retired" to his Abuhloretecisdesntpyfraof
farm.Abuhloretrcitdosntpyfraof of bread. Ho~w much rent have you paid your
It is told on good authority that one of landlord? Just stop and figure Jor a minute-so w oS
the oldest Engineers on the Florida East many months, so many years. rou could have ISSTED SYTATE
Coast Railway cleared what would be con- bought severol ten acre farms in our Colony for GVRMN
sidered a fortune to most people, on his teaon fmnyyuhv adoti et
Irish potato crop from his farm near East teaon jmnyyuhv adoti et
Palatka during 1917, The amount has been Don't you believe tbat"no'w"is the time to begin 6SMV
variously given at from $75,000 to $90,000. paying for-a ten acre chicken ranch at Bunnell ?




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Widely Scattered Were The Individuals From Whose Letters We Quote Below,
But All Were Of One Opinion Regarding The Bunnell Colony.
Extracts from Thirty-two Letters Written by Men and Women in Thirty-one Different States and One in Canada.
We have on file in our Chicago office a J. E. Vaught-Tennessee. Thomas A. Stone--Ohio.
great many letters written by people after "I found things as represented and "Three or four years ago, some people
their inspection of our Bunnell colony think there is a great future for Bunnell." here in the North said I was foolish for lands, in which they state their satisfaction Chas. C. House-New Mexico. thinking of buying land in Florida. Those
with the colony and the lands allotted to "I purchased a twenty acre farm in people think differently now, for three of them. We should like to publish all these Bunnell colony without seeing it. I made them are now living near Bunnell. I visited letters in the HOME BUILDER, but as an inspection of my land later and was them recently and they are pleased with
this is impossible we have selected thirty- more than pleased." their farms and the climate there, just as
two written from thirty-one different states W. H. McInturff-Georgia. [ was pleased."
of the Union and one from Canada, and "We picked out our land and started C. D. Parmater-Iowa.
will give you one or two sentences from for home, happy with the thought that I "Our expectations were more than
each of these letters. They should be had at last got a home in Florida." realized after our first visit to our land."
sufficient to convince any individual of the H. T. Hotchkin-rIinoit
general satisfaction of our buyers, some of C. Louis Barzee-Montana. H T H hm I meilevtn
"came back home the owner not only "hs hmImtwievstn
whom since writing these letters have "Icm akhm h we o ny Bunnell seemed even more enthusiastic
moved to Florida. of ten acres, but bought another ten acres. over the future of the colony than the
at Bunnell. This tells you whether or not over elling the ond." J. F. Von Hoene-Washington. [ was satisfied." company selling the land."
"I am satisfied that everyone who has G. C. Gates-Colorado. Con. Kelleher-Michigan.
bought land or who will buy in the Bunnell "I have been to Bunnell and am well the can cheerfully recommend not only colony will have a good investment." pleased with my holdings. I have ten acres land and climate, but also the Bunnell
Mrs. R. Baird-Oldahoma. of the finest land that lays out of doors, Development Co."
"We had the privilege of changing our and I would not take double the amount G. Morse-New Jersey.
land for another location, but we were f have paid for it." "I wish with all my heart that I was
satisfied with our selection as it was." Nils M. Hageli--Wisconsin. there now. Bunnell is IDEAL."
Wiliam Claude Wells-California. "Have just returned from a trip to Bun- W. H. Brown-New York.
Wi nell. I bought twenty acres of land there "I am more than pleased with my little
"I am glad that I have a farm in this a year ago without seeing it, and I am farm, and can recommend your land." colony, and I hope to improve it as soon thoroughly satisfied with same and with H. Kruger.-Florida. as possible." the climate and people." "Ah, what a future there will be to this
J. B. Parker-Alberta, Canada. H. Gilbertson-Minnesota. colony and to this state. We will lower
"I decided to take twenty acres more. "The climate is the best in the world- the price of foodstuff, and our land will be I was very much surprised at the prices the a nice breeze every day with cool, restful worth $500 an acre." people were getting for their products. nights." W.J. Appleby-Maryland.
Everybody there seemed happy and con- E. E. Miller-Oregon. "People are in the dark if they do not
tented." "I do not know of a place on God's buy at Bunnell. Please send me some of
L. S. Russell-Idaho. foot-stool where you can buy land on such your literature to give to my friends, for
"There are fine farms in the Bunnell easy terms as at Bunnell and where a small I want them to know all about this wontract that can now be bought on very easy amount of land will make you so inde- derful colony." terms, which in a few years will be worth pendent. The men connected with the Anton Berest-Alabama. many times what they are now." company will treat you on the square." "I am glad we bought our land. I
L. J. Coulston-Mississippi. R. A. Crie-Maine. hope to buy ten acres more, so that later
"I visited your colony expecting to "We spent three days looking the col- on each of my boys may have at least a
find some objections, but I can con- ony over and found everything exactly as ten acre farm."
scientiously say that my admiration over- described, only much more attractive than F. J. Winn-New Hampshire. ran any objections." written description could be. We are satis- "Bunnell is good enough for us. We
Andrew A. Allan-Missour fled that it is a good investment." have twenty acres at Black Point."
"Bunnell soil could not be beaten in
any part of the country."
Dr. L. H. Bussen-North Dakota.
"If people could see and study conditions as I have done, I am sure they would
be pleased to settle in a community like
Bunnell."
L. E. Springer-Pennsylvania.
"I cannot praise Bunnell enough."
C. W. Weatherington-Kentucky.
"I thought just enough of your country
to buy ten acres more. I took a friend
with me and he bought ten acres."
R. A. Hawkins-Massachusetts.
"I think Bunnell has a great future. It
is all you say and what is more, the company there is reliable and will do justice to
anyone."
LeRoy N. Walling-Kansas.
"My son who visited Bunnell brings
good reports for Florida and especially so
for Bunnell. He says that Bunnell is the
prettiest little town that he saw in Florida."
J. J. Sutherland-Indiana.
"I was at Bunnell last September and
found Florida 0. K. Good soil and everything just as it was represented." PARTY OF BUYERS VISITING THE BUNNELL COLONY




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Everyday Happenings in and around Bunnell as Contributed by
our Bunnell Correspondent during the Month.
A party composed of Mr. and Mrs. Jor- Bunnell was honored Wednesday evendan, Mr. and Mrs. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. ing and Thursday by the presence of four
Weber, Miss Lambert and Mr. Joyce, spent of Florida's most distinguished men, GovWednesday and Thursday at Ocean City, ernor Sidney J. Catts, Adjutant General J.
fishing. They had a good time and caught B. Christian, State's Attorney Rivers H.
plenty of fish. Buford and Major Buckner Lanier. While
in Bunnell they were the guests of Mr.
The town council has just erected a fine Moody, and while here the party called at
concrete "Go-to-the-Right" sign at the the Bunnell high school where short talks
intersection of Moody Boulevard and Main were made by them.
Street. This is built of reinforced concrete
and weighs one thousand pounds. Mr. Stone is building a large up-to-date
sales stable. His business has grown to
Corn planting commenced this week. such an extent that he was forced to build
Practically all of the potato land will be larger quarters for his live stock business.
planted in corn. This is our second crop When completed his new building will be
this year. Corn is always planted between large enough for three car-loads of mules.
the rows of potatoes.
Quite a large crowd attended the literary The W. C. T. U. held a Frances E. Wilmeeting last Friday evening at the Haw lard memorial service at the home of Mrs
Creek school house. They had a splendid Kendrick,
program and all seemed to enjoy it.
The Bunnell Chapter of the Red Cross
The DuPont Ry. Co. is hauling barrel gave an oyster and fish dinner. The meal
material to the Haw Creek farms' cooper was served in cafeteria style.
shop.
A special school district election was Mr. 1. L Moodv, Pres. of the Bunnell The Bunnell Boy Scouts have enlisted
held Tuesday. Bunnell and Haw Creek State Bank. in the War Saving Stamp campaign and
districts were created but St. Johns Park will call on all the residents of Bunnell
district lost by two votes. It is probable At the solicitation of his numerous with a view of getting each one to purthat within a short time now the voters of friends throughout Flagler county, Mr. I. chase stamps. the Bunnell district will vote bonds and I. Moody, President of the Bunnell Deerect a magnificent high school building. velopment Co., has consented to enter the The W. C. T. U. held a business meetrace for State's Representative of Flagler ing last Tuesday afternoon in the M. E. Mr. J. B.' Boaz has resigned as mayor county in the coming primary. Without church. of Bunnell, and a new election will be held doubt Mr. Moody will be elected, and if the early part of April. so, Flagler county will have one of the Mr. Geo. E. Cooper is j erecting a nice
most able representatives of any county in bungalow in Bunnell. Mr. J. H. Pratt, District Manager of the the state.
Woodmen of the World. has organized a A great number of people attended
camp of the W. 0. W. at Bunnell. He Dr. A. W. Underwood, State Physician, the oyster supper and dance at Ocean
has secured quite a number of names on was in Bunnell examining the pupils of the City last Wednesday evening. the charter petition. Bunnell public school. He reports finding
A memorial service for Elder A. H. Evers the children in the best of health. The potato growers of Flagler County are
was held at the Seventh Day Adventist all wearing smiles that won't come off, the
church in Bunnell. reason for these smiles is that the entire potato
belt has been visited by heavy showers which
The Standard Oil Co. has purchased lots insure a large yield of potatoes.
in the south end of town and are now To date the prospects are much better for a
busy erecting two large storage tanks, one larger yield than they were last year and indifor kerosene and one for gasoline. They nations are now that Uncle Sam can dispose of
have had a side track built which will hold a ltrge amount of Liberty Bonds and War Sayfive cars, and in the, future instead of ings Stamps in Flagler County within the next
shipping oil and gasoline to Bunnell in two months.
barrels and drums, it will be shipped in Several of the large growers will begin digtank cars. ging about April 15th and from 1hen on the poOf much interest to our community was tatoes will roll from Flagler County to the
the recent marriage of Miss Deborah northern markets in large quantity, s.
Brown and Reverend Ralph Ramsey, pas- The farmers hope for high prices to prevail
tor of the Methodist church of Bunnell. but with a large 3ield and normal prices the
Flagler County farmers wi'l bank la-ge sums of
It is said that mules never die, but Mr. money within the next sixty days.
Howard Irvin had the misfortune to lose
one last week.
Mr. Haris A. Marks, assistant truck crop
The Haw Creek Farm Co. recently pur- specialist with the United States Department of
chased a farm motor truck. Agriculture, Bureau of Crop Estimates, was in
Mr. W. B. Lebaw has just purchased Bunnell Wednesday, getting an estimate of the
a lot of new farm implements. potato crop of Flagler County.
The Farmers' meeting at the school- The work on Burrell Bros., shipping shed
house last Tuesday night was well attended began last Monday.
and many questions of importance were
discussed. Mr. W. A. Mack has recently purchased a
The Haw Creek farmers have been Mr. Verdeniua and three-year-old orave potato digger to be used on his farm this
hn cawr-as ofarcabb ae e fruit tree. Picture taken on his last trip to
shipping car-loads of cabbages. Florida. spring.




20Z-eBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
PROCRASTINATION IS THE, THIEF OF TIME
By THOMAS A VERDENIUS
owner of the abode tilted back in a splint- farms left for sale near DuPont or Codybottom chair busily engaged in whittling yulle. We are now coming in on the "home a stick, while the rain came through the stretch" and the few farms which we have roof in a score of places. The traveler left for sale will practically sell themcould scarcely find a spot in the one-room selves. We do not need to advertise our cabin where the rain did not fall upon him, lands any more for they are so well adverand finally he said to his contented looking tised by the people who live there'that we host. "Why don't you mend your roof?" need not go to the trouble of conducting a
J'ie latter calmly replied, "Well, you see selling campaign any longer. Of course, when it's raining 1 can't fix it, and when there will be a farm here and there which it's not raining it don't need fixing.." will be for sale, but within the next four Sentiments similar to this seem to per- or five months we expect that all of our vade tuie minds of many of the people who land in the Bunnell colony will be dishave been writing me tor months, some of posed of. them even for years. When times are We expect to raise the price of our land
prosperous and they are making good again, possibly within the next two months
wages they are quite content and give but or so and when that time comes we will little thought to providing for a "rainy not sell another acre of land for less than day," but inevitably hard times will come $50.00 in the old tract and $40.00 in the sooner or later and then the man who is new tract. I feel confident that the price working for wages is the first one to suffer, of all Bunnell lands will be two or three If you have not enough money with times higher than it is today in a very
which to 'Move to Florida and begin im- few years, and you may rest assured that S provements at once on a little farm, you if times were normal and we were not at
can at least buy that farm today and begin war these lands would no doubt have been making your small monthly. payments selling by this time for $75.00 an acre.
thereon, and every payment you make will Improved farms around us are selling for bring you just that much nearer your goal from $200.00 to $300.00 an acre, and some of providing a real home for the coming land in Florida is selling for as high as "rainy day." Many people are never able $1,000.00 an acre; in fact, some of the raw MR. THOS. A. VERDEIUS, to save anything unless they contract debts land adjoining us has been sold for $100.00
The Pioneer .Small harm.Man of Florida. or assume obligations and know that they 'an acre and higher.
I have found considerable pleasure in my must meet their obligations regularly. To No doubt a great number of people have life in reading and telling stories, and such people the Bunnell Development written me merely out of curiosity. They among the stories I have chanced to read Company offers great opportunities, and never meant business. If they did they were some relating to the Arkansas Trav- the sooner you begin to realize this the would have bought long before this, but eler; in fact, the particular story regarding better off you will be. It is never too late if you are not one of these and if you the Arkansas Traveler which I shall here to begin saving money nor too early, but ever expect to own'a. farm in our colony, relate is one that I have told many times, there is no time like the present. now is the time to buy and take, advantage
and one of those times was in a former This is the last HOME BUILDER you of the present low prices, and if you will
issue of the HOME BUILDER. will receive. You have been on our mail- do this you will make money from year
Individuals of this type are not confined ing li st perhaps for a few months, possibly to year as land 'values advance.
to the state of Arkansas by any means, but for years. You have written me and asked This will be absolutely the last time I they are to be found all over our country, me where I could locate you. I have sent will ask you to buy. If you do not write and I submit this little narrative to you, you my maps and I have sent you all my me again it will be up to you. Think this not for the purpose of criticis Ing any indi- literature, my booklets and my banners, matter over. Make up your mind that, vidual but simply as a reminder to one and but many have never taken advantage of come what may, you are going to be one All that PROCRASTINATION IS THE the opportunities that were offered you, of the fortunate ones to secure a farmTHIEF OF TIME. When we started our colony a few years home at Bunnell. Send your order for 10,
On one occasion the Arkansas Traveler ago we could have located you close to 20 or 40 acres to,
was caught in a heavy rainstorm and sought Bunnell. All of these locations have been THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
shelter in a near-by, cabin. He found the sold, still we have some very desirable 108 So. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill.
A BIRD'S VIEW OF A PORTION OF~ BUNNELL*S RESIDENCE SECTION. A few years ago a virgin woodand-today a modern, up-to-date town, Bunnell is an incorporated town, the county seat of Flagler county. It has a public school, two-year high school, two churches, Methodist and Seventh Day Adventist, general stores, state bank, two good hotels, city waterworks, electric light Plant, cement sidewalks doctor, druggist, meat market, well equipped blacksmith shop, building supply house, city garage, ice plant, weekly newspaper, two rural routes, telephone system, Dixie highway, Masonic hall, barber shop. etc. Is not this a phenomenal showing for a town only a few years old? Bunnell is indeed justly called. "the biggest little town in, Florida." Can you show me another community in the whole State of Fllorida which offers you such opportunities as are to be found in our Colony? Then where should you invest? (We have a Catholic Church in Korona. Besides a school ip-Bunnell, we have good schools and stores at Ocean City, Dupont, Codyville and Korona.)




Full Text

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The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll APRIL 1918 An Ideal Southern Home just to the East of Bunnell Colony This Charming Home Is the Residence of Mr. Knox, Who Is the Owner of one of the Most Beautiful Orange Groves in the State of Florida. This Grove Covers More Than a Hundred Acres, and Its Value Is Estimated at Over a Hundred Thousand Dollars. LIFE IS INDEED WORTH LIVING HERE.

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_Sftc BUNNELL HOME BUILDER_ I want you to subscribe for the Flagler Tribune—Bunnell’s Wide-Awake Weekly Newspaper Because, This Issue of the Home Builder is the Last One We Shall Publish Since December, 1912, a little over five years ago, I have had the pleasure of editing the BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. The need was felt at that time of having a monthly publication for our land owners and the hundreds of others who were inter ested in securing farm-homes in the Bun nell colony. When we began the publication of this little magazine we thought that it would be for but a short period of time. How ever, it met with such a hearty welcome from our buyers and other friends, that we have continued its publication for now over five years. At the time the first issue was mailed there were about twelve hundred land contracts issued and very few people had located on their farms. Our buyers were scattered all over the United States and Canada. Some time later a few more buyers came to settle on their lands, and soon they were clearing their farms, build ing homes, planting and harvesting crops and beginning to demonstrate the great opportunities of the Bunnell colony. Then there came a great influx of people to Bun nell, and naturally our sales increased, so during that first year of the HOME BUILDER'S existence we sold about five hundred contracts for land in our old tract. A little later on our new tract of land to the south, known as the Volusia tract, was placed on the market and the highest con tract number to date of which we have a record here in our Chicago office is No. 4266. You who have been reading the HOME BUILDER from month to month have no doubt noticed that from time to time we have mentioned the fact that we had only a limited amount of land left for sale. A great number of those who contracted for land are paying in full for their farms these days and asking for their deeds. Naturally, every man and woman who con tracted for one of our farm-homes has been looking forward anxiously to the day when he or she could send in the final payment on the purchase and receive a warranty deed, so that he could say in truth, “I own a farm-home in the Bunnell colony and I have received my warranty deed for same, after having been properly recorded.” In fact, a great number of our people have sent in their last payment amounting to $50.00 or $100.00 just to finish paying for their land as soon as possible, and the Company has always allowed the liberal discount of 10% on all amounts of $100.00 or over when these amounts are paid in advance. There have been days lately when as many as twenty deeds were issued in one {BY THE EDITOR) day, and thus the Bunnell Development Company is rapidly turning over its lands to the purchasers of contracts. Although our buyers have always had the privilege of taking possession of their farms as soon as they have made but a single monthly payment on same, I have advised all to be conservative and pay for their land in full and secure a deed for same and then to go to Bunnell and settle on their farms for good, and I am glad to say that my advice has been followed by most of our buyers. This is, perhaps, one of the reasons why some of our buyers have not settled on their land before this, and why so many have moved to the colony this last winter after they have secured their deeds. We have, today, buyers, or let me call them members of the big Bunnell family, in Alaska, Canada, in every state in the Union, in South America and several in Europe. Numbers of buyers are fighting in the trenches in Europe, and we could ap preciate the desire of all to hear from Bunnell—the place where they expected to make their future home—and that is the reason why the HOME BUILDER has been published for such a long period of time. I now want to give you the reason why we think we should discontinue the publication of same. Not because our land is nearly sold and not because we have issued so many deeds lately—No! No! But, Bunnell has grown by leaps and bounds. From an undeveloped large body of land a few years ago, it has become a prosperous farming community, and the town of Bun nell is now the county seat of a new, Flag ler, county. Several years ago Bunnell became an incorporated town and since that time her growth has been very rapid. New homes and stores were built; new enterprises were started, and the first thing we knew a weekly newspaper was being published, with Mr. J. B. Boaz as Editor. This weekly publication is known as the Flagler Tribune. Mr. Boaz was born in Calhoun, Georgia. He has long been a newspaper man. At one time he was buyer and repre sentative of one of the large New York produce houses, and was sent to Florida to buy Irish potatoes. He first went to Hastings and later to Bunnell, and when he visited our little town it was “love at first sight” with him. That year he bought practically all the potatoes there were for sale in the Bunnell colony and then re turned to Georgia. However, Mr. Boaz had seen the won derful opportunities in Florida and he had a great desire to become a resident of our section of the state. In the fall of that year—in the month of November—he moved to Bunnell. He realized the great opening for a good country newspaper in our colony, and the following February, the first issue of his paper, called the St. Johns Tribune, was issued. Mr. Boaz called his paper the St. Johns Tribune because at that time Bunnell was located in the southern part of St. Johns county. How ever, when our new county was created, he accordingly changed the name of his paper to the Flagler Tribune. This paper is published each week and it is an up-todate country newspaper. Mr. Boaz is one of the most able editors in Florida and he can supply his subscribers with the news of Flagler county in a more intelligent manner than we can from our Chicago office, for he is right on the ground, while we have to get our information second hand. The fact of the matter is, I do not know of another country paper that is so wide-awake and up-to-date as the Flagler Tribune. I want you to subscribe for this paper, first, because you should know all that is going on in Bunnell—your future home; second, because I want you to help a Bun nell industry. The subscription price is $2.00 a year. If you are now ready to subscribe, I wish you would fill out the order blank below, send it to Mr. Verdenius, who will forward it at once to Mr. Boaz. If you prefer to send in your sub scription for but six months, send $1.00; if you desire to subscribe for a full year, send $2.00. I am confident that if once you become a reader of this weekly paper you will never willingly be without it. Mr. Boaz has assured us that he will keep his subscribers posted as to what is going on in Bunnell, and by having in your homes this publication published weekly, not monthly, you will be in close touch with affairs politically, what the churches and schools are doing, what developments are taking place and what the farmers are accomplishing. I trust each one of you who is interested in Bunnell will at once send Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius the application below, prop erly filled out, so that you may begin re ceiving the Flagler Tribune at an early date. I thank you one and all for your interest in, and words of appreciation for, our little messenger the BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, and wishing each of you an abundant success, I am, Sincerely yours, S. HOWARD, Editor. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. You will find enclosed__Dollars for __years SI.00 for One-half Year. $2.00 for Full Year. Subscription to the FLAGLER TRIBUNE, published weekly at Bunnell, Florida; my subscription to start at once. NAME ADDRESS IN FULL

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E% BUNNELL HOME BUILDER WHAT THE “OTHER FELLOWS” SAY ABOUT BUNNELL Idaho Man Writes of the Wonderful Development that has taken place in the Bunnell Colony in the last three years, and of his delightful visit to the great State of Florida. March 20th, 1918. Dear Mr. Verdenius: My wife and I just returned from our trip to Florida, and as per my promise, I will now write you a letter for the HOME BUILDER and tell what we think of Florida in general and Bunnell in par ticular. As you know, we left Chicago the early part of January, when the weather in the North was most disagreeable with plenty of snow and ice and all the people could talk about was the coal situation, and the thermometer at zero. We felt we must be living in another world when we arrived in Jacksonville, thirty-six hours after we had left Chicago, for the weather there was delightful. We found Jacksonville very crowded, as a great number of northern tourists had come South to get away from the disagreeable cold weather of the North. After spending a few days in Jacksonville we went to St. Augustine, here also the weather was fine—everything was nice and green; the flowers were in bloom, the birds were singing, and it was warm enough for us to go bathing in the ocean. In and around Hastings they were very busy planting their potatoes, and we could not help but remark over and over again the great advantages the farmers in the South have over the farmers here in the North. Florida certainly has a wonderful climate and I have never been any place where I liked the climate nearly as well as I do in that state. Many people in the potato belt were busy manufacturing bar rels to use for shipping their potato crop, and when we started back for the North, the potatoes were already quite a little above the ground and the fields looked very promising. I am talking about po tatoes because I know that this is the main crop in and around Bunnell, but I also =aw a great variety of other things grow ing not only in Bunnell but all over the state: for instance, I talked with one man who has twenty acres of the finest straw berries I ever tasted or ever laid my eyes on. He told me he sold his berries mostlv right in the field to the tourists who passed bv and received sixty-five cents a quart for same His field adioins the hard road and bp had been picking berries ever since Christmas and would continue doing so for some time. I talked with one of the truckers in that nart of the country who had quite a large farm of cabbage and all kinds of vegetables which he sold to the large hotels and shipoed to the northern markets. This par ticular man had been in Florida for sev eral vears, and he stated that he would not no back to the North under any considera tion. Bunnell has certainly grown wonderfullv sincp T saw it three years ago. I could hardlv believe that it was the same town— new buildings everywhere, and certainly the Dixie highway is a great imorovement to the colony. The new bank building was just about completed, and I found every one there very enthusiastic and speaking very highly about the new county which was created last year. While I was in Florida I went farther South, but in my opinion you have much better soil than is to be found in the southern part of the state. I spent one Sunday in Miami and while visiting in the little park that day, I was surprised to see a great number of people, perhaps about three thousand in all, stand ing and sitting around the band-stand, and Mr. William Jennings Bryan, ex-Secretary of State was teaching the International Sunday School lesson in the park. I was told by the people that Mr. Bryan did this practically every Sunday when he is at home. Undoubtedly you know that Mr. Bryan has a beautiful home in Miami; in fact, I have never seen prettier homes anywhere than I found in Florida, and I predict that Florida has only begun to de velop. although there are some of the most beautiful mansions in that state that I have ever seen. Take for instance the Deering Harvester people, who are spending millions of dollars on their estate in Florida, and a great number of wealthy people and millionaires of the eastern states have their winter homes in your beautiful country. To really appreciate Florida, one has to see it for himself. I shook hands with Mr. Bryan and talked with him in regard to the wonderful pos sibilities of that state. I told him I was from Idaho and, as you know, Mr. Bryan has forty acres of land not very far from here. I am, of course, the owner of con siderable property here in the Twin Fal's country, but if I were foot loose, it would not take me long to make up my mind to go to Florida and make it my home. I see great possibilities in that state and especially for the farmers of the potato belt. I have told the people here many times about my pleasant journey and espe cially about the wonderful growth of Bun nell. Nature is so much kinder to the man in Bunnell who has to make a living out of the soil than she is to us here. I talked with people in Bunnell who had harvested three crons each year from their land, for the last five or six years. I could go on and write you a lengthy letter, but I feel that I should not take up any more space at this time. Let me assure vou that I am as ever a big booster for the state of Florida in general and for Flagler county in particular. Wishing you and your associates great success, I am, Sincerely yours, HENRY C. GETTERT, Idaho. “Perfectly Satisfied” Says Mr. Siler as He Makes the Final Payment on His Eighty Acres Ontario, Oregon, March 26th, 1918. Dear Mr Verdenius—I enclose herewith my check for sixt.v dollars, balanre payment on land. Thiswill entitle me to warranty deeds to all my land there, clearing up all four contracts. Mr. Verdenius, it affords me great pleasure to sav that I hve found everyone connected with the Bunnell Development Company perfect gentlemen. The treatment I have received from all of you has been perfectly satisfactory and squire. Sincerely yours, Wade Siler. A Good Example set by one of our British Columbia Buyers Who Makes a Payment on His Land Every Four Months. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I received the HOME BUILDER, and thank you very much for it. I am greatly interested in reading the wonderful things some of the people are doing in Florida, which shows what can be done by those that are willing to work, and it also shows that you have the climate and the soil in which to grow the crops. I only wish that I were down there, but it is impossible at present to get away from here as there is very little property changing hands at the present time. I also appreciate your liberal offer to those sending the twelve monthly payments at one time, as it must cost your Company a great deal of money for stamps and stationery and also time which could very often be saved. That is one thing I have been doing myself the last year. I send my book and money every four months, as I find it quite a saving to me as well as the Company. If other buyers would do the same it would help you folks a great deal. Hoping it will not be long before I have the pleasure of meeting you in Florida, I remain, Yours very truly, JOHN LEVETT. B. C., Canada. DES MOINES, IOWA. BUYER PRAISES THE BUNNELT. DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 3307 W. 7th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. Dear Mr. Verdenius: Your letter received, and also the Bunnell Colony “Movies” which I read with a great deal of interest. I know Mr. W. A. Mack. I am always glad to receive your literature and I owe you a letter of thanks for the good treatment accorded me by you and the Company. I also feel that there is a great deal of praise due the Bunnell De velopment Company. I wrote your Com pany and asked if I naid the balance due on my farm if I would be. entitled to any discount. Since writing them I have re ceived the HOME BUILDER and the Company also wrote and told me that I would be entitled to a discount, therefore, I am going to make a payment in full for my land within the next few days. I have my ten acres of land all cleared and I had a good crop of potatoes on it last year, and it is now again planted to spuds. Trusting I may soon receive a deed for my land, and with best wishes and respect. I am, Yours very truly, C. C. HOUSE. LIBERTY BONDS If you possess any Liberty Bonds, and desire to apply them on your land payments, we will accept your bonds and credit you with the par value of same. BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

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&h@ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Some Worth-While Facts Concerning the Irish Potato Crop POTATO FIELD OF ONE OF OUR SUCCESSFUL FARMERS, LOCATED ABOUT THREE MILES SOUTH OF BUNNELL. FIRST CROP ON NEW LAND; SEVENTY-FIVE BARRELS TO THE ACRE. The question has frequently been asked why the subject of IRISH POTATOES plays such an important part in the BUN NELL HOME BUILDER and our other literature. Because of this fact some have formed the impression that the Irish potato is about all that can be grown in the Bun nell colony. However, we are convinced that such a thought is not in the minds of any of those who have visited the Bunnell colony or who have read the HOME BUILDER regularly, and we de sire to explain to all others how widely varied our Bunnell crops are and may be. It is an established fact that practically anything and everything can be grown in the Bunnell colony that can be grown in northern states, with the exception of apples and wheat. Also, our climate and soil is adapted to the growing of a great variety of tropical and semi-tropical fruits, none of which could be grown here in the North. Why, then, do we discuss so frequently the possibilities of Irish potatoes and say so little about the growing of oranges, grape-fruit and other citrus fruits? “THERE’S A REASON.” It takes a comparatively small outlay of money to plant, grow and harvest a money-making Irish potato crop in the Bunnell colony. On the other hand, the man who purposes to grow orange and grape-fruit trees must be a man with money, for it takes from six to eight years until the orange grove is a producing, profitable business. The land must be cleared, good trees purchased and set out and the grove must be given constant care for a number of years. Dur ing the first four or five years one should not expect any profit from his trees, for they will be better and hardier trees if they are not allowed to bear while young. Because of these facts, the number of men who can afford to enter into this line of endeavor and wait so long for returns are practically few. However, we wish to state that some of the most beautiful orange groves in Florida are located near the Bunnell colony, in fact there is one grove of 106 acres which practically adjoins our colony lands and from which have been shipped as high as ten thousand boxes of POTATO FARM IN THE BUNNELL COLONY THAT NETTED THE OWNER MORE THAN $200.00 PER ACRE. fruit in one year. The owner of this grove has at different times refused offers of $100,000.00 for the grove. Although the growing of citrus fruits is usually a profitable industry, and every Florida farm and city home should have at least a few orange and grape-fruit trees; the potato industry is a more staple and certain one. A man who owns good potato land need not wait very long before getting returns from his labors. Usually in the Bunnell colony our po tatoes are planted in January and February and harvested about one hundred days later. During the latter part of April and all through the month of May thousands of barrels of potatoes are shipped out of Flagler county. Last year approximately five million dollars worth of Irish potatoes were shipped from Florida’s potato belt, and judging from indications to the pres ent date, we never had a better chance for a big crop yield than we have this year. The plants are vigorous looking, and with the additional land that has been cleared since the last potato crop was harvested, we shall undoubtedly ship a great many more barrels of potatoes from our potato belt this season than we did last year, and we believe that the prices for same will be very good. There will be a great demand for new potatoes, and while it seems almost unreasonable to expect such high prices for potatoes this year as we received last, yet if our farmers receive but half the prices of last year they will still be making big money. I want to relate to you three very perti nent potato stories, none of which have ever yet appeared in the pages of the HOME BUILDER; in fact, I do not think they have ever appeared in print before. They were told to me by a man whose home is in St. Augustine and who per sonally knows each of the individuals about whom the stories center. Therefore, we should hardly call them stories at all, but just further facts pertaining to last year’s potato crop. They furnish additional proof of the great opportunities and possibilities that the potato belt of Florida (of which the Bunnell colony is a part) offers the farmers of today. These are echoes of the 1917 Irish potato crop, and you will please bear in mind that since this crop was har vested the Flagler county farmers grew two more crops on the same land that year.

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&f>e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER POTATO FIELD OF MR. COUNCIL. ABOUT THREE MILES SOUTH OF BUNNELL. Every one posted on Florida, knows that the season of 1917 was the most successful among the Irish potato growers in St. Johns and Flagler counties. The prices received were approximately double those of any previous season. The prosperity thus created manifested itself in various ways among the farmers. One thing noted in particular, was the purchase of auto mobiles, and not the cheap cars either, but the more expensive styles or makes. Among the farmers in the Hastings dis trict are a few prosperous negroes. One of these, Mrs. Jackson, had received about fifteen thousand dollars for her crop, and like the “white folks” she also ordered a car. The dealer was ignorant as to her color, and when he went to deliver the car, he had some difficulty in locating the pur chaser. He was finally directed to a humble looking home and the following conversation took place: “Does Mrs. Jackson live here?” “Yes, sah!” “Is she at home?” “Yes, sah, I’se Mrs. Jackson!” “Did you order that car out there?” “I sho’ did!” Thereupon she went down into her stocking and brought up a roll and counted out $2,000. The Station Agent at a prominent ship ping point in the Hastings potato section was a very busy man during the shipping season of 1917. He was Agent, Operator, and Express Agent. Naturally he got be hind with some of the correspondence and office work and was called down for it, but paid no attention, until one day upon receiving a letter from the Express Com pany in which the company said if he did not attend to a certain matter they would have to make a change in the Agency. He turned up the corner of the letter and wrote: “I should worry! I have just sold my Irish potato crop for twenty thousand dollars. If you want any more work done, send me an assistant.” At the end of the season he resigned and “retired” to his farm. It is told on good authority that one of the oldest Engineers on the Florida East Coast Railway cleared what would be con sidered a fortune to most people, on his Irish potato crop from his farm near East Palatka during 1917. The amount has been variously given at from $75,000 to $90,000. Be that as it may, but to the wonder of all his friends, he is still sticking to his job and running his beloved locomotive. When asked one day why he did not retire now that he had “made his pile,” he replied: “I have known a good many wealthy men and they all have their hob bies, some play golf, some play the stock market while some do not play at all. I get more real enjoyment out of running this engine, and I am going to stick to it a while.” RAPID GROWTH OF THE BUNNELL STATE BANK As shown by the large increase in the amount of its deposits. June I, 1913 $42,857.20 June 1, 1915 $81,554.13 June 1, 1917 $172,022.72 But few words need be added to the above figures. They speak for themselves. It’s a wonderful story they tell, too, of the growth of the Bunnell district from a bank ing standpoint. When a bank prospers the people of its community must be prosper ing, for a bank is the thermometer by which a community is gauged. Figures speak louder than words, and these figures not only speak for themselves but they show a ratio of growth of almost 100% every two years. Bunnell’s watchword, both from the standpoint of the banker and the citizen is, “Watch Us Grow.” A bushel of rent receipts does not pay for a loaf of bread. How much rent have you paid your landlord? Just stop and figure for a minute—so many months, so many years. You could have bought several ten acre farms in our Colony for the amount of money you have paid out in rent. Don't you believe that“now"is the time tobegin paying for"a ten acre chicken ranch at Bunnell ? Down Where the South Begins (With apologies to Arthur Chapman of Denver, author of Where the West Begins "! Down where the welcome is a little stronger, Down where the sun shines a little longer, That’s where the South begins; Down where the moon shines a little brighter, Down where the cotton makes the world seem whiter, And they clasp your hand a wee bit tighter, That’s where the South begins. Down where the darkies are always singing, Where the birds in winter their way are winging, That’s where the South begins; Where trees are green and flowers bloom ing, Where the people are kind and not assum ing, With open hearts await your coming, That’s where the South begins. Down where there’s pleasure each day in living, Where all are eager in serving and giving, That’s where the South begins, Wherei friends are loyal and hearts are true, Where birds are singing the whole year through, And a hearty welcome awaits me and you, That’s where the South begins. L. LARSON. Wonderful Tribute Paid the State of Florida By a Man who is in position to know what he is talking about. Hon. W. A. McRae, Commissioner of Agriculture of Florida, has truly said: “Nowhere in the American continent can the industrious, right-living man find a better country, a more congenial climate or a more responsive soil, nowhere can he make as good a living and create a competence for the future with less labor and personal effort than in Florida, if Tie but observes the laws of common sense and ordinary business requirements.” 44 And the Star Spangled Banner Forever shall wave O’er the land of the free And the home of the brave. ’

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UhQ BUN NELL HOME BUILDER Widely Scattered Were The Individuals From Whose Letters We Quote Below, But All Were Of One Opinion Regarding The Bunnell Colony. Extracts from Thirty-two Letters Written by Men and Women in Thirty-one Different States and One in Canada. We have on file in our Chicago office a great many letters written by people after their inspection of our Bunnell colony lands, in which they state their satisfaction with the colony and the lands allotted to them. We should like to publish all these letters in the HOME BUILDER, but as this is impossible we have selected thirtytwo written from thirty-one different states of the Union and one from Canada, and will give you one or two sentences from each of these letters. They should be sufficient to convince any individual of the general satisfaction of our buyers, some of whom since writing these letters have moved to Florida. J. F. Von Hoene—Washington. “I am satisfied that everyone who has bought land or who will buy in the Bunnell colony will have a good investment.” Mrs. R. Baird—Oklahoma. “We had the privilege of changing our land for another location, but we were satisfied with our selection as it was.” William Claude Wells—California. “I am glad that I have a farm in this colony, and I hope to improve it as soon as possible.” J. B. Parker—Alberta, Canada. “I decided to take twenty acres more. I was very much surprised at the prices the people were getting for their products. Everybody there seemed happy and con tented.” L. S. Russell—Idaho. “There are fine farms in the Bunnell tract that can now be bought on very easy terms, which in a few years will be worth many times what they are now.” L. J. Coulston—Mississippi “I visited your colony expecting to find some objections, but I can con scientiously say that my admiration over ran any objections.” Andrew A. Allan—Missouri. “Bunnell soil could not be beaten in any part of the country.” Dr. L. H. Bussen—North Dakota. “If people could see and study condi tions as I have done, I am sure they would be pleased to settle in a community like Bunnell.” L. E. Springer—Pennsylvania. “I cannot praise Bunnell enough.” C. W. Weatherington—Kentucky. “I thought just enough of your country to buy ten acres more. I took a friend with me and he bought ten acres.” R. A. Hawkins—Massachusetts. “I think Bunnell has a great future. It is all you say and what is more, the com pany there is reliable and will do justice to anyone.” LeRoy N. Walling—Kansas. “My son who visited Bunnell brings good reports for Florida and especially so for Bunnell. He says that Bunnell is the prettiest little town that he saw in Florida.” J. J. Sutherland—Indiana. “I was at Bunnell last September and found Florida O. K. Good soil and every thing just as it was represented.” J. E. Vaught—Tennessee. “I found things as represented and think there is a great future for Bunnell.” Chas. C. House—New Mexico. “I purchased a twenty acre farm in Bunnell colony without seeing it. I made an inspection of my land later and was more than pleased.” W. H. Mclnturff—Georgia. “We picked out our land and started for home, happy with the thought that I had at last got a home in Florida.” C. Louis Barzee—Montana. “I came back home the owner not only of ten acres, but bought another ten acres* at Bunnell. This tells you whether or not 1 was satisfied.” G. C. Gates—Colorado. “I have been to Bunnell and am well pleased with my holdings. I have ten acres of the finest land that lays out of doors, and I would not take double the amount I have paid for it.” Nils M. Hagen.—Wisconsin. “Have just returned from a trip to Bun nell. I bought twenty acres of land there a year ago without seeing it, and I am thoroughly satisfied with same and with the climate and people.” H. Gilbertson—Minnesota. “The climate is the best in the world— a nice breeze every day with cool, restful nights.” E. E. Miller—Oregon. “I do not know of a place on God’s foot-stool where you can buy land on such easy terms as at Bunnell and where a small amount of land will make you so inde pendent. The men connected with the company will treat you on the square.” R. A. Crie—Maine. “We spent three days looking the col ony oyer and found everything exactly as described, only much more attractive than written description could be. We are satis fied that it is a good investment.” Thomas A. Stone—Ohio. “Three or four years ago, some people here in the North said I was foolish for thinking of buying land in Florida. Those people think differently now, for three of them are now living near Bunnell. I visited them recently and they are pleased with their farms and the climate there, just as 1 was pleased.” C. D. Parmater—Iowa. “Our expectations were more than realized after our first visit to our land.” H. T. Hotchkin—Illinois. “Those whom I met while visiting Bunnell seemed even more enthusiastic over the future of the colony than the company selling the land.” Con. Kelleher—Michigan. “I can cheerfully recommend not only the land and climate, but also the Bunnell Development Co.” G. Morse—New Jersey. “I wish with all my heart that I was there now. Bunnell is IDEAL.” W. H. Brown—New York. “I am more than pleased with my little farm, and can recommend your land.” H. Kruger.—Florida. “Ah, what a future there will be to this colony and to this state. We will lower the price of foodstuff, and our land will be worth $500 an acre.” W. J. Appleby—Maryland. “People are in the dark if they do not buy at Bunnell. Please send me some of your literature to give to my friends, for I want them to know all about this won derful colony.” Anton Berest—Alabama. “I am glad we bought our land. I hope to buy ten acres more, so that later on each of my boys may have at least a ten acre farm.” F. J. Winn—New Hampshire. “Bunnell is good enough for us. We have twenty acres at Black Point.” /

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_ B U N N E 1 LL, HOME BUILDER Everyday Happenings in and around Bunnell as Contributed by our Bunnell Correspondent during the Month. A party composed of Mr. and Mrs. Jor dan, Mr. and Mrs. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Weber, Miss Lambert and Mr. Joyce, spent Wednesday and Thursday at Ocean City, fishing. They had a good time and caught plenty of fish. The town council has just erected a fine concrete “Go-to-the-Right” sign at the intersection of Moody boulevard and Main Street. This is built of reinforced concrete and weighs one thousand pounds. Corn planting commenced this week. Practically all of the potato land will be planted in corn. This is our second crop this year. Corn is always planted between the rows of potatoes. Quite a large crowd attended the literary meeting last Friday evening at the Flaw Creek school house. They had a splendid program and all seemed to enjoy it. The DuPont Ry. Co. is hauling barrel material to the Flaw Creek farms' cooper shop. A special school district election was held Tuesday. Bunnell and Haw Creek districts were created but St. Johns Park district lost by two votes. It is probable that within a short time now the voters of the Bunnell district will vote bonds and erect a magnificent high school building. Mr. J. B.' Boaz has resigned as mayor of Bunnell, and a new election will be held the early part of April. Mr. J. H. Pratt, District Manager of the Woodmen of the World, has organized a camp of the W. O. W. at Bunnell. He has secured quite a number of names on the charter petition. A memorial service for Elder A. H. Evers was held at the Seventh Day Adventist church in Bunnell. The Standard Oil Co. has purchased lots in the south end of town and are now busy erecting two large storage tanks, one for kerosene and one for gasoline. They have had a side track built which will hold five cars, and in the future instead of shipping oil and gasoline to Bunnell in barrels and drums, it will be shipped in tank cars. Of much interest to our community was the recent marriage of Miss Deborah Brown and Reverend Ralph Ramsey, pas tor of the Methodist church of Bunnell. It is said that mules never die, but Mr. Howard Irvin had the misfortune to lose one last week. The Haw Creek Farm Co. recently pur chased a farm motor truck. Mr. W. B. Lebaw has just purchased a lot of new farm implements. The Farmers’ meeting at the schoolhouse last Tuesday night was well attended and many questions of importance were discussed. The Haw Creek farmers have been shipping car-loads of cabbages. Mr. I. I. Moody, Pres, of the Bunnell State Bank. At the solicitation of his numerous friends throughout Flagler county, Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell De velopment Co., has consented to enter the race for State’s Representative of Flagler county in the coming primary. Without doubt Mr. Moody will be elected, and if so, Flagler county will have one of the most able representatives of any county in the state. Dr. A. W. Underwood, State Physician, was in Bunnell examining the pupils of the Bunnell public school. He reports finding the children in the best of health. Mr. Verdenius and three-year-old orapa fruit tree. Picture taken on his last trip to Florida. Bunnell was honored Wednesday even ing and Thursday by the presence of four of Florida’s most distinguished men, Gov ernor Sidney J. Catts, Adjutant General J. B. Christian, State’s Attorney Rivers H. Buford and Major Buckner Lanier. While in Bunnell they were the guests of Mr. Moody, and while here the party called at the Bunnell high school where short talks were made by them. Mr. Stone is building a large up-to-date sales stable. His business has grown to such an extent that he was forced to build larger quarters for his live stock business. When completed his new building will be large enough for three car-loads of mules. The W. C. T. U. held a Frances E. Wil lard memorial service at the home of Mrs. Kendrick. The Bunnell Chapter of the Red Cross gave an oyster and fish dinner. The meal was served in cafeteria style. The Bunnell Boy Scouts have enlisted in the War Saving Stamp campaign and will call on all the residents of Bunnell with a view of getting each one to pur chase stamps. The W. C. T. U. held a business meet ing last Tuesday afternoon in the M. E. church. Mr. Geo. E. Cooper is j erecting a nice bungalow in Bunnell. A great number of people attended the oyster supper and dance at Ocean City last Wednesday evening. The potato growers of Flagler C ounty are all wearing smiles that won’t come off, the reason for these smiles is that the entire potato belt has been visited by heavy showers which insure a large yield of potatoes. To date the prospects are much better for a larger yield than they were last year and indi cations are now that Uncle Sam can dispose of a l arge amount of Liberty Bonds and War Sav ings Stamps in Flagler County within the next two months. Several of the large growers will begin dig ging about April 15th and from ’hen on the po tatoes will roll from Flagler County to the northern markets in large quantitl s. The farmers hope for high prices to prevail but with a large jield and normal prices the Flagler County farmers wi 1 bank la r ge sums of money within the next sixty days. Mr. Hariis A. Marks, assistant truck crop specialist with the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Crop Estimates, was in Bunnell Wednesday, getting an estimate of the potato crop of Flagler County. The work on Burrell Bros., shipping shed began last Monday. Mr. W. A. Mack has recently purchased a potato digger to be used on his farm this | spring.

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A BIRD'S VIEW OF A PORTION OF BUNNELLS RESIDENCE SECTION. A few years ago a virgin wood’and—today a modern, up-to-date town, Bunnell is an incorporated town, the county seat of Flagler county. It has a public school, two-year high school, two churches, Methodist and Seventh Day Adventist, general stores, state bank, two good hotels, city waterworks, electric light plant, cement sidewalks doctor, druggist, meat market, well equipped blacksmith shop, building supply house, city garage, ice plant, weekly newspaper, two rural routes, telephone system, Dixie highway. Masonic hall, barber shop, etc. Is not this a phenomenal showing for a town only a few years old? Bunnell is indeed justly called, ‘the biggest little town in. Florida.” Can you show me another community in the whole State of Florida which offers you such opportunities as are to be found in our Colony? Then where should you invest ? (We have a Catholic Church in Korona. Besides a school in Bunnell, we have good schools and stores at Ocean City, Dupont, Codyville and Korona.) PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME By THOMAS A VERDENIUS owner of the abode tilted back in a splintbottom chair busily engaged in whittling a stick, while the rain came through the roof in a score of places. The traveler could scarcely find a spot in the one-room cabin where the rain did not fall upon him, and finally he said to his contented looking host. "Why don’t you mend your roof? the latter calmly replied, “Well, you see when it’s raining I can’t fix it, and when it’s not raining it don’t need fixing..” Sentiments similar to this seem to per vade tne minds of many of the people who have been writing me tor months, some of them even for years. When times are prosperous and they are making good wages they are quite content and give but little thought to providing for a “rainy day,” but inevitably hard times will come sooner or later and then the man who is working for wages is the first one to suffer. If you have not enough money with which to move to Florida and begin im provements at once on a little farm, you can at least buy that farm today and begin making your small monthly payments thereon, and every payment you make will bring you just that much nearer your goal of providing a real home for the coming “rainy day.” Many people are never able to save anything unless they contract debts or assume obligations and know that they must meet their obligations regularly. To such people the Bunnell Development Company offers great opportunities, and the sooner you begin to realize this the better off you will be. It is never too late to begin saving money nor too early, but there is no time like the present. This is the last HOME BUILDER you will receive. You have been on our mail ing list perhaps for a few months, possibly for years. You have written me and asked me where I could locate you. I have sent you my maps and I have sent you all my literature, my booklets and my banners, but many have never taken advantage of the opportunities that were offered you. When we started our colony a few years ago we could have located you close to Bunnell. All of these locations have been sold, still we have some very desirable farms left for sale near DuPont or Cody ville. We are now coming in on the “home stretch” and the few farms which we have left for sale will practically sell them selves. We do not need to advertise our lands any more for they are so well adver tised by the people who live there that we need not go to the trouble of conducting a selling campaign any longer. Of course, there will be a farm here and there which will be for sale, but within the next four or five months we expect that all of our land in the Bunnell colony will be dis posed of. We expect to raise the price of our land again, possibly within the next two months or so and when that time comes we will not sell another acre of land for less than $50.00 in the old tract and $40.00 in the new tract. I feel confident that the price of all Bunnell lands will be two or three times higher than it is today in a very few years, and you may rest assured that if times were normal and we were not at war these lands would no doubt have been selling by this time for $75.00 an acre. Improved farms around us are selling for from $200.00 to $300.00 an acre, and some land in Florida is selling for as high as $1,000.00 an acre; in fact, some of the raw land adjoining us has been sold for $100.00 an acre and higher. No doubt a great number of people have written me merely out of curiosity. They never meant business. If they did they would have bought long before this, but if you are not one of these and if you ever expect to own a farm in our colony, now is the time to buy and take advantage of the present low prices, and if you will do this you will make money from year to year as land values advance. This will be absolutely the last time I will ask you to buy. If you do not write me again it will be up to you. Think this matter over. Make up your mind that, come what may, you are going to be one of the fortunate ones to secure a farmhome at Bunnell. Send your order for 10, 20 or 40 acres to, THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. MR. THOS. A. VERDENIUS, The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. I have found considerable pleasure in my life in reading and telling stories, and among the stories I have chanced to read were some relating to the Arkansas Trav eler; in fact, the particular story regarding the Arkansas Traveler which I shall here relate is one that I have told many times, and one of those times was in a former issue of the HOME BUILDER. Individuals of this type are not confined to the state of Arkansas by any means, but they are to be found all over our country, and I submit this little narrative to you, not for the purpose of criticising any indi vidual but simply as a reminder to one and all that PROCRASTINATION IS THE THIEF OF TIME. On one occasion the Arkansas Traveler was caught in a heavy rainstorm and sought shelter in a near-by cabin. He found the