Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Sale Street, Chicaslo, 1ll.
MARCH 1918
Plowing Land in Mid-Winter in Shirt Sleeves
Here is a Bunnell farmer plowing in the month of January. He is preparing his land for the Irish potato crop, which is the first of the three annual crops raised in our colony. This is quite a contrast to the northern farmer, who cannot raise anything during the winter months, but must spend his savings of the summer for feed for his livestock, and for fuel and heavy clothing for himself and family.
WHAT IS YOUR CHOICE?




heBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Just what you want to know about the Bunnell Colony
What kind of people are living in the How much per acre would it cost to while northern and western farmers Bunnell colony at the present time, and set out an orange or grape fruit grove? seldom earn over five per cent on the what is the class of people to whom you Young trees cost about 40 cents apiece, value of their land. have sold land? Bunnell is one of the and one hundred trees should be How do prices of building material most cosmopolitan places you could im- planted to each acre, average with those in the north? With
agine. We have citizens here from al- How soon do these trees begin to lumber mills so near at hand, building most every State in the Union, from bear and when should they begin to material is naturally cheaper here. A
Canada, and countries across the sea. show profits? The trees begin to bear four-room house can be built for about You will find a splendid class of people from three to four years after planting $300.00, the average cost being $75.00 here, no doubt the same that you have and should begin to show profit the a room and- upward, according to the been accustomed to associate with, and sixth or seventh year. finish. Cement houses are practical.
you will find the same churches, schools What is the usual profit from an acre What is the annual mean tempera. and lodges, of oranges or grape fruit? A grove nine ture and rainfall in Bunnell? TemperHow large and how small sized tracts or ten years old should yield the grow- ature, about 68 degrees; rainf all,' do you sell? From ten acres upward. er from $800.00 to $1,200.00 an acre about 48 to 50 inches. We also have a few five acre tracts near each year, according to the amount of When is the heaviest rainfall? In Bunnell, and a few near the town of cultivation and care given it. August and September.
Dupont. When are Irish potatoes planted and Do you ever have any -tornadoes in
Atethelans tmbeedOurland is how long does it take them to mature? that part of the country? No.
wati the w lan s timbered? Our d Irish potatoes are planted in January Are sunstrokes of usual occurrence? whactisal know thasg "ct-oeve bean and February and mature in about one There has never been a case of sunstroke racmicall all the larges tresmave bend hundred days. known of in the state of Florida.
threove butote sumps tremtain hand What is the yield and gross pro- What kind of nights do you have?
grown up since the other timber was ceeds per acre from a crop of Irish Always cool.
potatoes? One acre will produce from When is the best time to move to removed. There is practically no un-~ 40 to 100 barrels, and in normal times Florida? From September to Decemderbrush on our land. these sell for around $4.00 a barrel. ber. Thus one has time to become
Where is your land located? On the Some potatoes in our locality were sold established on his land and get some of Florida East Coast Railroad, eighty- last spring for as high as $10.00 a it prepared, so as to take off his first seven miles south of Jacksonville. barrel. co nteerysrn hnpie r
Is the land rocky? It is entirely free Is poultry raising profitable? Poul- the highest.
of rocks. try raising is one of the most profitable What is the price of your land and
What is the cost of clearing the land? industries in which one can engage. It how do you sell it? .The cheapest The price of clearing our land varies yields the investor quick and sure re- farms we have for sale are at $35.00 an considiably. I believe that the aver- turns. The climate is admirably acre, and we sell these on the monthly age acre of land in our colony can be adapted to the growth of healthy fowls. ar yearly installment plan. dlared at an approximate cost of $15 .00 Eggs sell for from 40 to 50 cents a What discount do you allow for cash? an acre, dozen in the summer and as high as We allow 10 per cent discount for payIs te tmbe onthelan ofany 75 cents a dozen in the winter. Young ments in full. If the payments are Is te tmbe onthelan ofany chickens sell at from 30 to 40 cents made yearly in advance, we allow 6 per value? Yes, if saved for fence posts per pound. cent discount on the payments for the
and uel.Does livestock do well in Florida? year.
is irrigation necessary at Bunnell? This is a great country for livestock. What about wild game and the game No, not in the sense that irrigation is No expensive barns have to be built for laws? There is a great variety of wild known in the western states. Not one shelter, but they may graze out of game, such as turkeys, squirrels, quail,
farm in a hundred is irrigated here. doors all the year. ducks and numerous other birds, inis the Burnell colony in an artesian How many crops do you raise annu- cluding doves, snipes, etc.
belt? Yes, one can strike artesian wa- ally? Three-a fall crop, a spring crop .Howv about the fishing? The finest ter almost any place in the colony, and a summer crop. in the country. Plenty of salt-water
At what depth can artesian water be Where do you sell your products? fish and fresh water species. No liobtained? From 150 to 300 feet. They are shipped to practically all parts cense required, excepting for certain
is the water pure and wholesome? of the United States and into Canada. commercial fishing.
Yes, absolutely. How many growing days do you have Is Bunr ell a healthy place in which
At what depth is good drinking wa- at Bunnell? Practically every day in to live? One of the healthiest commuter obtained? At about a depth of 25 the year is a growing day in our col- nities in the United States. We are feet. ony. very near salt water, and our lands are
What is the cost of such a driven What do you grow in the summer surrounded by pine forests-two imwell? About*$25.00, pump, pipe and months? Hay, sugar cane, sweet pota- portant essentials in creating health. labor included, toes and corn; the latter will yield Bunnell is one of the most pleasant
Do you have good transportation? equally as large a crop per acre, if not places in which to live-summer or winThe Florida East Coast Railroad runs larger, than corn grown in the north, ter. directly through our lands, thus fur- and we raise a dozen other -field crops, How about frosts? Light frosts ocnishing excellent transportation by also pears, peaches, persimmons and cur between December and February, rail. The Florida East Coast Canal is other fruits too numerous to mention, sometimes injuring the tender plants. just to the east of our colony lands, Is it necessary to fertilize? It is not This may happen anywhere in the state affording water freight rates to Jack- necessary, but it pays to fertilize your of Florida. There is absolutely no sonville, and thence to New York and land, just as it pays you to feed corn to f rost-line. other northern points, hogs to fatten them. How much are the taxes on your
What towns are rear your tract of What is the cost of fertilizer? From land? The taxes are all paid by the
land? Bunnell, Dupont, Korona, Fa- $35.00 a ton upward, the cost having Bunnell Development Company until vorita, Harwood, Codyville and Ocean increased considerably since the Euro- our buyers receive deeds for their land; City are located in the Bunnell colony. pean war has been in progress. When after that time the taxes will be about Bunnell is the largest and the county the war is over, we shall probably se- $1.50 to $2.00 on each ten acre tract. seat of Flagler county. cure it at the former prices. .How are -the titles to your land?
Are there people livir-g on this land What is the value of improved land Our titles are perfect. One has the now? A great many settlers are 1o- in your county? From $100.00 to privilege of paying for his land in full catel on their farms throughout the $300.00 an acre, and the. crops we grow- at any time, when we will then give a Bunnell colony and are making many and market In the winter will often Warranty Deed and a perfect title to Improvements, equal the cost of the land in one crop, the land.




5',e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Everyday Happenings in and around Bunnell as Contributed by
our Bunnell Correspondent during the Month.
OVER ONE HUNDRED FARMERS Some of the more recent arrivals in Mr. W. Horn, of New York, who has
PLANTED POTATOES THIS Bunnell are: Mr. W. H. Stutsman, of a large hog ranch here, was here for a
YEAR. Canada; Mrs. Buell, of Wisconsin; few days' inspection.
Mr. Lund, of Canada; Mr. Wilkinson
Over one hundred farmers in Flag- and family, of Ohio; Mr. Wilson and The Bunnell Telephone Exchange has
ler county have planted their 19*18 Mr. Bennett, of Indiana, and Mr. Mike- moved to its new quarters in the TribIrish potato crop. The amount of acre- sel and family, of Canada. With the ex- une building. age planted by each farmer ranges ception of the last mentioned party, all
from five to two hundred acres. Sev- are owners of farms in our Bunnell A new draw bridge will be built
eral of them planted over a hundred colony. Mr. Mikesel is here to look across the East Coast canal at Ocean acres; a large number have from over farming lands In Flagler county City in the near future.
twenty to forty acres in potatoes, while with an idea of purchasing a farm. the remainder have planted from five The bank building is now completed
acres upward. Messrs. W. H. Waterman and M. and the Bunnell State Bank has taken
It is only five or six years ago when Dade, potato buyers of Jacksonville, up its headquarters in its new home. the number of farmers in the Bunnell were in Bunnell this week looking over colony who planted potatoes that year the situation. They stated that every- The work of grading Orange street was less than ten. Within another five thing is favorable for good prices this was ordered by the City Council at its years, it is our prediction, that the season. last meeting.
number of potato growers in the county will exceed a thousand. Col. Varn has moved his law office Mr. Kendrick was employed by the
The weather has been ideal for pre- from the Tribune building into the new city fathers to draw up plans and speciparing the soil and for planting the bank building. fications of what will be needed for the
spuds. installation of a complete water system
The following is a list of the farm- Mr. Pickard of Jacksonville, accom- for the town of Bunnell.
ers who have planted this season. It panied by a party of northern capitalis only partially complete, as there are ists, visited Bunnell Saturday. They Work on the new homes of Messrs. some othe-s whose names we were not were looking over the town with the T. Holden and W. H. Deen is progressable to obtain: view of erecting a large hotel. ing rapidly.
J. J. buckles, Theo. Behling, J. C. Mr. C. H. Davis has arrived in BunBuckles, John Buckles, F. J. Burned, Mrs. S. A. Harris, Grand Matron of nell with a load of nice mules which G. W. Backes, C. V. Brown, J. A. Burn- the Grant chapter of the Order of the he will sell to Flagler county farmers. sed, G. R. Burnsed, F. D. Barmington, Eastern Star, of Florida, made her ofG. W. Barnhart, Bandy & Burnsed, F ficial visit to the Bunnell chapter, BOYS CORN-PIG CLUB OF
G. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ensa W.BrnatBndht.rseF
S. Crowson, J. C. Schwartz, W. G. wednesday night FLAGLER COUNTY.
Campbell, L. A. Carter, W. H. Coch- G. L. Herrington, of Gainesville,
ran, J. L. Council, W. C. Chaplin, G. W. The dance given in the hall at Du- State Agent for the Boys' Club Work, Durrance. 0. R. Dalgren, G. W. Da- Pont for the benefit of the Red Cross, and W. H. Deen, of Bunnell, County vids, R. W. Deen, A. W. Durrance, J. E. was a great success. The people had a Agent, visited the schools in Flagler Deen, Mack Davis, A. J. Eatman, E. A. very enjoyable evening and the net re- county and organized the boys corn Eatman, I. H. Frier, A. S. Fowler, W. ceipts amounted to $37.25, which mon- and pig clubs. H. Gray, Harry Gilbertson, Z. G. Hol- ey was turned over to the Flagler A large number of boys have enlqni. Otto Hogan, Robt. Hamilton, S. J. chapter of the American Red Cross. rolled. Those in the corn club will Harrison, C. D. Hagadorn, A. P. Har- grow an acre of corn, according to
wood, J. A. Hunter, J. R. Henderson, Corn Club Methods. Those in the pig
0. G. Henderson, J. Hading, Henry club will raise pure bred pigs. Where
Huebner, 0. J. Hance, C. C. Jordon, L. a boy has not the money to purchase a
C. Johnson, Ed Johnson, Mrs. Stella pure bred pig, the Bank of Bunnell has
Jones, Cris Kilper, Geo. Keilb, J. E. agreed to loan him money if he can
Ku'rns, A. Lambert, 0. A. Lambert, W. show sufficient evidence that he will
A. Mack, J. C. Miller, J. W. Malphurs, M. make a success of his work.
H. Milliken, M. G. Myers, W. R. Mal- Flagler is purely an agricultural
phurs, C. B. Miller, 0. C. Mosby, I. L. county. Many people are coming here
Mosby, C. F. Miller, Moody & John- to make this their home and many of
ston. N. O'Brien, W. C. Phillips, J. B. them will be farmers. If the farmer
Parker, P. F. Pellicer, Mrs. P. Pellicer, boys will help to demonstrate the posCorwin Pierce, 3. E. Pellicer, P. P. Pel- sibilities of the good lands in Flagler
licer, Mrs. John Richardson, W. V. county, they will do a great thing for
Reynolds, L. S-nge, Henry Salyerds, the entire county.
Gpo. Salyerds, W. 3. Sczudlo, Walter
Schultz. Henry T. Sayers, Nick Schus- The recent meeting held in Woodter, N. Scholen, F. Stach, I. D. Simms, man's hall, at which Mr. Walker, of
B. Tebbe, Turner & Sessions, H. G. Miami, presided, was very Interesting.
Thompson, J. C. Unkifer, S. J. Van- Mr. Walker has a government contract
dyke, A. J. Vafed, F. C. Worges, Chas. to furnish castor beans for the making
P. Wclti, C. A. Whitaker, John Wil- of oil for the government air-planes.
kowski, I. A. Waszewski, G. H. Wig- Seed is furnished through the cmnly, Fr,-nk Zawartowski, Philip Nowak, tractors by the government for 40 cents
E. D. Henson, L. S. Cody, Haw Creek per acre. The beans should be planted
Fa-ms Co.. Keystone Farms Co., Ken- in March and four months are required
dall Brothers, Warbin Booe, Harry to bring the bushes to maturity. The
Bnoe, United Farms Co., 3. E. Hedden, land in Flagler county is well suited for
Win. Richardson, Burrell Brothers, W. the raising of castor beans. Thirty to
D. Long. forty bushels per acre is the average
The Flagler county Sunday school yield and sometimes the yield is inconvention was held in the M. E. Mrs. Nowicki of the Korona district with creased from 25c to 50%1. $3.00 per
church in Bunnell on February 14th. game she brought down. bushel Is the price offered the farmers.
ARE YOU PREPARING FOR OLD AGE AND THE ADVERSITIES OF LIFE?




THE STORY OF ONE MAN'S SUCCESS
AS SHOWN IN "MOVIES". ....
21The Camera Alw
I IL 7 a 1. This man left California with less than $900.00 and
came to Florida hoping here to be able to buy a farm and better his condition.
TRACT,' q-_j-- 6 'B 2. He arrived at Bunnell October 30, 1911, and the folBUJ0K.B.. 8AVE 39lowing day he contracted for the purchase of a 40-acre farm, located about three miles south of Bunnell. This TIT 12 6. R 30 E farm was to cost him $1,000.00 as our land at that time
was selling for but $25.00 an acre, and he agreed to pay A C.4 .for same at the rate of 50 cents an acre a month.
3. He began at once to get ready for the arrival of his family from California. Without the aid of a carpenter he erected a one-room house, 12x14, with shed roof. This house had two good doors and four large windows and cost him $51.08.
4. While waiting for his family he drove a well in a little over a day, doing the work alone, and found a fine flow of water at a depth of 21 feet.
5. His family arrived at Bunnell December 3, 1911, having spent more than $200.00 for railroad fare, reducing their capital to less than $700.00. This is the way the land looked on October 81, 1911. Our field 6. He began clearing his land Dec. 18, 1911.
manager and the happy owner of the 40 acres. .. 7. With the help of his two eldest boys he 'V fenced 20 acres of land. Not being able
to buy wire for a fence, they set good strong posts eight feet apart, and nailed to these posts young trees or thin posts, which they were able to obtain for the cutting. This gave him a good, hog-tight fence, at a total cost of but $5.60 for nails. 8. The next month he built a kitchen, bath room and pantry, as a lean-to on the first room erected, covering a ground space of 10x30 feet. He and the two eldest boys "Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home"-the home did all the work.
he built for $51.08. 9. Not having the money with which to buy
a team of mules, he purchased a yoke of small oxen at a cost of $70.00.
; .
THIS P4
The returns from his first crop-seven acres of potatoes which
sold for $900.00.
- IP -1
BEINIGTH RETURNS OF JM
Z7 '7 1175%.qO
Jo i2ff.20
"Z7 q_,, '. a
1q,, ,'.- / q O.,S
Scene a few days later. Note growing corn which was planted This is the kind of corn j- // /Jo/ .61
between rows of potatoes, also the fence in the background, built his son raised. at a cost of $5.60.
YOU HAVE THE SAME CHANCE AS HE HAD.




ccj THE STORY OF ONE MAN'S SUCCESS
n Me AS SHOWN IN "MOVIES".
y RTRN BI JJT 19' __6Tells the Truth- OF 14 ACRES AS DEPOSJT6D HIS
10. A little over 100 days from the time of his arrival he a.UccUowt ivi th ABUe1 &4 Sate w
had seven acres of Irish potatoes growing, which he sold ifor $900.00 about seven months after he reached Bunnell.
11. He grew twelve crops the first four years. Of these af lt. tqdo 1o00.O0
twelve crops, seven were Irish potatoes. The other five a 257.1,9iq1 qg. LISwere cow-peas and corn. 2[t.1 [f6 1001,55
12. On January 11th, 12th and 13th, 1916, he planted twelve -P7 2
acres to Irish potatoes and began digging this potato To- 300M.00
crop April 24, 1916, or 104 days after the crop was
planted.
13. About the middle of April, 1916, a Mr. Hill, a commission man from the North, bought these twelve acres of
potatoes in the ground for $3,000.00.
14. On April 17, 1916, Mr. Hill deposited in the Bunnell 7
State Bank $1,000.00 to bind the bargain. On April 25, 1916, the first car-load of potatoes was sold for $998.45, and this sum was deposited to the grower's account.
On April 26, 1916, the second car of potatoes was shipped and Mr. Hill paid the balance, or $1,001.55.
15. The commission man stated these potatoes
were among the finest he had handled, and His 1917 potato field of 1,0 acres, for which he received over
that about 90% were No. l's. $12,0000.
16. In January, 1917, this man planted his 40 acres to Irish potatoes and sold this crop for over $12,000.00.
17. This man has now paid in full for his land He has erected a home at a cost of $2,800.00. He has a packing shed, barn, and a good wire fence around his entire 40 acres. All of his land is cleared and is well worth from $200.00 to $250.00 an acre. He has purchased additional land, has up-to-date farm implements and an automobile truck that cost $1,425.00. His His personal packing shed, where his potatoes are graded and put $70.00 yoke of oxen has been replaced by in barrels for shipment.
two good teams of mules.
1E MAN
His $1,425.00 International Harvester truck-a more rapid means of T1conveyance than his $70.00 yoke of oxen.
lflEBUEUIVLBAL!K
7 POTATO CROP OF qOACRES. _:. 2f- / 7I by v'9 /- ~, &0z6.07
717- 7 Z.on7
, o 300.00
7oT"L FECCIPO/.4_ 972. 02, Thi man showing the possibilities of
This soil to a Chicago banker His $2,800.00 home under process of construction.
YOU TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT? IT IS UP TO YOU.




EreBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Florida's Wonderful Possibilities as Enumerated by Mrs. Alice Evans Bennett
who has. made a Comprehensive Study of Florida and the Bunnell Colony.
quently pasture together. However for the best results, it is better to keep a field of forage coming for the dairy cows, and when the cows are turned into the fresh pastures, hogs will clean up pasturage left by the cows. I know of one man who has seventeen dairy cows on 40 acres of land, but I will -not A attempt to give his figures on vegeta- ~> bles raised, as well as hogs, on the
same land inside of one year's time. His cows are almost pure Jersey. The pasturage consists and varies from season to season, of Japanese cane, Natal grass, Chufas, Rhodes and Johnson ti 1 grass.
I could write at much length concerning the raising of livestock, *but Mr.Coucils crn-iel i th Bunel coony Ths ictre as ake aferyou may secure all the most valuable Mr. Council on-ied hnathestnedl ao j bumpe crpofictr poStaoens ftr.r information with figures showing just Council od arvsteda bmpe crp ofIrih ptates.what can be done in this line by writOn my way from Miami to Jackson- but I know of no section of the United ing the State* Agriculture Experiment
yille, Florida, a few weeks ago, I looked States where farming in general fa- Station at Gainesville, Floriia. Floriover farming prospects and possibilities vors the women as Florida does. Rais- da, of all states in the Union, off ers the in the state very carefully, and was ing hogs is highly encouraged by the greatest future, not only for raising particularly impressed with the won- Agriculture Experiment Station of the hogs, but for poultry, -lairying, truckderful progress that has been made in University of Florida, but what appeals ing and last, but not least, for fruit. the Bunnell colony within the past few to me especially in raising hogs is that Natal grass is an especially valuable years comparing it with other sections. they harvest their own crops the year hay crop and bankers do not refuse to
Foiacranyi"cmn toisaround. loan money on this crop in the barn.
Florda ertanlyis "omig toitsI know one man who has a standing own" and in some localities where land Two of the great essentials in rais- order with a large resort hotel for sells for $200.00 an acre and up, many lng average, healthy, fat hogs are good guinea squabs at 95 cents each. Anof the conditions are not nearly so pasture crops and plenty of clean wa- other man makes small .fortunes each favorable to general farming as in ter. I know of no locality where water year growing Bermuda onions, and averFLAGLER COUNTY. can be had as plentifully as in Flagler ages between $500.00 and $1, 000.00 an
Some localities, I find, are adapted county, and what more can anyone acre on these crops, with a considerable
to citrus fruits, some for trucking and want than year-around pasturage and profit on hay and livestock raised on
someforlivstok, wilein he un-water, not only for good Al hogs, but the same land the balance of the year. soe fooy livetokrawhil in thenBun- livestock in general and even dairy nellr colny thes topogarapin genweral farming. The large East Coast resorts I had occasion to attend the Southbavors any del assor-amiung, loalwel asr offer a wonderful field for dairy prod- ern Conference for Education last year,
permanent homes, an l hs e- ucts and Flagler county is an excellent and I wish it were possible for every
turesan goaln a l tarse hoea- distributing point. Florida farmer to attend these annual
making, conferences, for there is so much to be
If properly managed, a dairy and learned of great advantage to the farmWhile in Miami I met a man looking hogs can be made fO pay a very hand- er, his wife and his children. I wonfor land suitable for raising Irish pota- some income, as cattle and hogs fre- der how many Florida farmers know toes, and hogs, for his son who was finishing his last year in an eastern Agriculture College. He spent five :j
weeks looking around southern Florida, but after a thorough analysis of soil, water, shipping facilities and points in general, necessary for a permanent home, he decide-l that Flagler county offered the best all-around features; so when I saw him last he was on his way to Bunnell.
It is only natural that anyone can make the best success individually along the line he or she may be most interested in, and personally I am bending every effort toward raising hogs and livestock in Flagler county, as the general conditions are not only favorable for feed crops and the animals, but the Bunnell colony is well established, and it is a recognized fact that co-operative community work is very essential toward successful farming in any of its various departments.
It is not uncommon to find successful
women farmers anywhere these days, A feuw "mortgage lifters"--Bunnell Porkers. Some of ^these will
make the monthy payment on your farm.
MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
how to make iceless refrigerators, which /r
have proven so successful in Florida; W hatme"O merrelows"say aboutunnel
or how to make homemade fireless "ONE OF YOUR SATISFIED CUSTOcookers at very little cost. MERS WITHOUT A COMPLAINT."
Among the most interesting features, Is the Way This Man Signs His Letter
in my opinion, that demands the atten- When Acknowledging Receipt of
tion of our farmers everywhere today, the Deed for His eunnell Frm.
is the Canning Club for girls and the
Pig and Corn Club for boys, for the Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
reason that these interests make it Dear Sir: Just a line to let you
worth while for the boys and girls to know that I have received the deed for
remain on the farms instead of going my land.
to the cities. I wish to thank you, also the Bunnell
Development Company for the interest
P How maay farmers know it is possi- all of you have shown in my behalf
ble to get nice one-pound square butter and your upright dealings with me.
moulds, also the cartons and oiled pa- All of which causes me to speak in the
per for packing butter, thus placing highest terms to anyone who may ingood, pure homemade butter on the quire of me concerning your company
market and presenting just as attract- and your land. I am sure that I am
ive an appearance as that sold by the well pleased and satisfied with all my
large creameries? In fact, it is hard dealings with you.
to supply the demand for good home- Oae of your satisfied customers withmade butter, when put up in this at- out a complaint.
tractive manner. The farmer can order GEORGE MARLATT,
his name put on the butter cartons, just Toronto, Canada.
as the Girls' Canning Club make it YUKON TERRITORY BUYER WRITES
possible for girls to order their labels FROM THE COLD NORTHLAND.
wiLh their own names printed on the
labels, as well as the Canning Club January 5, 1918.
trade-mark. I hope when the BunneU Mr. Paul Soguel Thomas A. Verdenius:
farmers purchase canned goods, such Dear Sir: I have sold another 20
as tomatoes, beans, etc., they will ask PREFERS BUNNELL'S SUMMER CLI- acres of land to Mr. Frank S. Ishimito.
for hand-packed goods, or better still, MATE TO THAT OF CALGARY, Please locate him as close to my Bunask for goods canned by their local CANADA, WRITES A SAT. nell farm as possible and give him a
Girls' Canning Club. In this way we ISFIED BUYER. strictly first-class farm.
can all help make life more interesting I herewith enclose money order for
to the coming generation who formerly Dear Mr. Verdenius: $50.00-$30.00 as final payments on
went to the cities. You will recall that when I passed my 20-acre farm, and the balance to
through Chicago on my way to Bun- be applied on his twenty acres. Personally, I am choosing Florida for nell last summer, where I was going We have nice weather today but have my future home, where I hope to en- to inspect the farm I had bought from just passed through a spell lasting 33 gage in intensified and diversified you, I promised that I would write you days, when the thermometer registered farming. I have lived the year around and say what I thought of Bunnell and from 50 to 65 degrees below zero all close to Bunnell, and know I am not Flagler county. I regret that I did not the time. Now it is about eight bemaking a mistake in choosing this lo- write. before, and trust you will excuse low. It caused an epidemic here. cality for a year-around home. me, as I have been very busy. There are nineteen people lying at the
It was the month of July when I morgue awaiting burial.
ALICE EVANS BENNETT. arrived at Bunnell, and people had told You can understand why we want
me that it would be very hot there at to leave here for Bunnell, Florila. that time, but I replied that I would Yours truly, S. W. EBBERT.
like to see the country at its worst. I
assure you that I was happily sur- MR. FARMER OF THE NORTH?
-prised to find the weather in Florida
at that time more pleasant and com- How many crops are you going to
fortable than here in Calgary, Canada, grow this year? in fact the heat at Bunnell did not How much will be left from your
bother me at all. I was in the colony last year's work when winter is over? about two weeks and liked it so much Why waste your time feeding stock
there, I was indeed sorry to leave the and shoveling coal (if you can get it to place. shovel), and half freeze to death anyWhen I lived in the old country I way, when you can grow crops and pastraveled extensively through southern ture your stock all winter in the Sunny France, also in Italy, but with all my Southland, in the famous Bunnell colexperiences in these places, I want to onmy?
tell you that I like Bunnell best of all. Why not go where you can grow In regard to the soil, I am satisfied three crops on the same land every that any man who knows a little about year and be making money all the time? farming can make a good living in the Why not be a patriot, help your Bunnell colony on ten or twenty acres country solve the food problem and of land. I saw a lot of good No. 1 win the war, add to your bank roll and land while there, and the people who live in a country where you can enjoy have bought land from you can con- life to its fullest extent? sider themselves fortunate. Talk it over with me, if you want to
I want to thank you for the treat- know more about this great country. meant received from you, the Company But, better still, for "seeing is believand its employees. I found the people ing," take a trip to Bunnell, get away who live in and around Bunnell to be from a few of these zero days, and see very hospitable, just the kind of peo- it all for yourself. Mr. Warner, living west of Bunnell, exhibits ple I want to live among. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
branch from orange tree (Mandarins) broken Yours very truly, PAUL SOGUEL, 108 South La Salle Street,
off by its own weight. Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Chicago, Illinois.
TODAY YOU SHOULD PREPARE FOR THE INEVITABLE TOMORROW




A CHAT WITH YOUWho have been considering the purchase of a Farm from me in the Bunnell Colony.
This is especially for YOU if YOU have been receiving my Literature for more than a year.
ally and I have urged you to send town and the county seat of a new in your order for a farm-home at county. Bunnell has an electric light Bunnell, but up to the present time plant, water works, hotels, churches, I seem to have failed in maki 'ng you a public school with two years of realize that our proposition is No. 1 high school, ice plant, weekly newsin every respect and one which you paper, garage, state bank, stores, Have been looking for. lodges, etc., etc. We have two rural
The severity of our w i n t e r mail routes and the famous Dixie weather, the scarcity of fuel and the Highway passes through our colony high cost of living generally are lands.
turning people's attention to the Better than all this, is the fact that land as never before. The B3umiell ou~r Bunnell famers are making colony, I assure you, is coming in good. I can take you to men in our for its share of attention, and if colony who realized $300.00 an acre present conditions continue much from their last year's potato crop. longer every acre of our land is soon Besides this, they grew two more going to be disposed of. crops on that same land the same
Let me put the matter up to you year. Already our farmers have once more. We have in the neigh- planted their first crop this year. Sborhood of 5,000 acres of choice, They will have sold this first crop
No. 1 land, still for sale. Do you (Irish potatoes) before northern realy want one of our farms, or do farmers have begun plowing their you not? I feel that I have the right land for their first and only crop. to know whether you mean business We have at Bunnell the soil, the or not, and so I am going to ask climate, the location and the shipMR. THOS. A. VERDETI US. you to do this one thing: ping facilities, with commission men
T~ePioeerSmal Frm an f Foria.If you really desire to secure one on the ground at the potato season
There came into my Chicago office of our farms, kindly fill out the at- ready to buy all the potatoes they the other day a Westerner-a man tached inquiry blank and send it to can and pay for same, delivered at from Idaho, who was returning from me at once. Remember, this is not the cars. the Bunnell colony, after having an order blank and by filling it out A farm amidst such surroundings purchased a forty-acre farm there. you 'will. not be placed under any as these is what I am offering you
Among other things he said: obligations. It simply puts us on a today. Our price is most reasonable "How I wish I had bought some of more understanding basis and helps -$35.00,an acre, payable at the rate your land when you had it for sale me to know what you really have in of 50 cents an acre a month. All we at $20.00 an acre, for my farm then your mind, ask of you is $5.00 a month for each
would have Cost me but little more As soon as I receive this filled out ten acres you buy. than half of what I have to pay for inquiry blank, I shall send you a What more could you ask forV I it now and I could have had a more large map of our colony lands. On have satisfied thousands of people choice location. But," lie continued, this map you will find marked in and I know I can satisfy you, if you "despite the fact that I have- been colors the towns, the Dixie Highway will but give me the opportunity. the loser by delaying so long, I am and the principal roads. I will also Believing that you- are seriously happy that I have 40 acres of Bun- tell you where in the colony the interested in locating in the Bunnell nell colony dirt. I am fully con- churches and schools are located and colony, I wish that you would advise vinced that it won't be long now be- where we have some No. 1 land on me just what your plans are and fore every acre will be taken, and which we can locate you. what additional information you
people will be saying, 'Oh, if I had Bear in mind that by filling out need in order to make a definite de-, only bought some of that potato land this inquiry blank you are placing cision to buy. If, for any reason when it was cheap.' "yourself under no obligation to buy you are no longer interested, please
You understand, I am sure, why I a farm, but I believe with the large drop me a card to that effect. This am telling you of this Idaho man. marked map before you and the will save us any further correspondI doubt not that the thought is right detailed information as to choice lo- ence, for I am not in the habit of now in your own mind that you may cations, etc., you will feel that you bothering people with my commumibe making a like mistake, and I cannot let this opportunity slip from cations if I know it. However, if assure you that if you do not make you. you really mean business I know, that
up your mind before very long to Let me remind you that land such you will fill out the, attached inquiry secure one of our farms, you will be as ours cannot be sold at such a low blank and return to Me promptly, in the class of those. who say: "For price much longer. The colony is so* that I can send you the. large of all sad words of tongue or pen, developing too rapidly to permit of marked map. Yours very truly, the saddest are these-it might have this. Six years ago the BunnellBUNLDE LOM TCo
been. colony was but little more than a BNELDVLPVIN 0
You have been receiving my liter- large undeveloped body of land. ature regarding our Bunnell colony Today it is a thriving farming comfarms. I have written you person- munity, with Bunnell as its principal




Full Text

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The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. MARCH 1918 Plowing Land in Mid-Winter in Shirt Sleeves Here is a Bunnell farmer plowing in the month of January. He is preparing his land for the Irish potato crop, which is the first of the three annual crops raised in our colony. This is quite a contrast to the northern farmer, who cannot raise anything during the winter months, but must spend his savings of the summer for feed for his livestock, and for fuel and heavy clothing for himself and family. WHAT IS YOUR CHOICE?

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UhQ BUMMELL HOME BUILDER Just what you want to know about the Bunnell Colony What kind of people are living in the Bunnell colony at the present time, and what is the class of people to whom you have sold land? Bunnell is one of the most cosmopolitan places you could im agine. We have citizens here from al most every State in the Union, from Canada, and countries across the sea. You will find a splendid class of people here, no doubt the same that you have been accustomed to associate with, and you will find the same churches, schools and lodges. How large and how small sized tracts do you sell? From ten acres upward. We also have a few five acre tracts near Bunnell, and a few near the town of Dupont. Aie the lands timbered? Our land is what is known as “cut-over” land. Practically all the large trees have been removed, but the stumps remain and there are some young trees that have gronn up since the other timber was removed. There is practically no un derbrush on our land. Where is your land located? On the Florida East Coast Railroad, eightyseven miles south of Jacksonville. Is the land rocky? It is entirely free of rocks. What is the cost of clearing the land? The price of clearing our land varies consideiably. I believe that the aver age acre of land in our colony can be chared at an approximate cost of $15.00 an acre. Is the timber on the land of any value? Yes, if saved for fence posts and fuel. Is irrigation necessary at Bunnell? No, not in the sense that irrigation is known in the western states. Not one farm in a hundred is irrigated here. Is the Burnell colony in an artesian belt? Yes, one can sirike artesian wa ter almost any place in the colony. At what depth can artesian water be obtained? From 150 to 300 feet. Is the water pure and wholesome? Yes, absolutely. At what depth is good drinking w T ater obtained? At about a depth of 25 feet. What is the cost of such a driven well? About*$25.00, pump, pipe and labor included. Do you have good transportation? The Florida East Coast Railroad runs directly through our lands, thus fur nishing excellent transportation by rail. The Florida East Coast Canal is just to the east of our colony lands, affording water freight rates to Jack sonville, and thence to New York and other northern points. What towns are rear your tract of land? Bunnell, Dupont, Korona, Favorita, Harwood, Codyville and Ocean City are located in the Bunnell colony. Bunnell is the largest and the county seat of Flagler county. Are there people living on this land now? A great many settlers are lo cated on their farms throughout the Bunnell colony and are making many improvements. How much per acre would it cost to set out an orange or grape fruit grove? Young trees cost about 4 0 cents apiece, and one hundred trees should be planted to each acre. How soon do these trees begin to bear and when should they begin to show profits? The trees begin to bear from three to four years after planting and should begin to show profit the sixth or seventh year. What is the usual profit from an acre of oranges or grape fruit? A grove nine or ten years old should yield the grow er from $800.00 to $1,200.00 an acre each year, according to the amount of cultivation and care given it. When are Irish potatoes planted and how long does it take them to mature? Irish potatoes are planted in January and February and mature in about one hundred days. What is the yield and gross pro ceeds per acre from a crop of Irish potatoes? One acre will produce from 40 to 100 barrels, and in normal times these sell for around $4.00 a barrel. Some potatoes in our locality were sold last spring for as high as $10.00 a barrel. Is poultry raising profitable? Poul try raising is one of the most profitable industries in which one can engage. It yields the investor quick and sure re turns. The climate is admirably adapted to the growth of healthy fowls. Eggs sell for from 4 0 to 50 cents a dozen in the summer and as high as 75 cents a dozen in the winter. Young chickens sell at from 30 to 40 cents per pound. Does livestock do well in Florida? This is a great country for livestock. No expensive barns have to be built for shelter, but they may graze out of doors all the year. How many crops do you raise annu ally? Three—a fall crop, a spring crop and a summer crop. Where do you sell your products? They are shipped to practically all parts of the United States and into Canada. How many growing days do you have at Bunnell? Practically every day in the year is a growing day in our col ony. What do you grow in the summer months? Hay, sugar cane, sweet pota toes and corn; the latter will yield equally as large a crop per acre, if not larger, than corn grown in the north, and we raise a dozen other field crops, also pears, peaches, persimmons and other fruits too numerous to mention. Is it necessary to fertilize? It is not necessary, but it pays to fertilize your land, just as it pays you to feed corn to hogs to fatten them. What is the cost of fertilizer? From $35.00 a ton upward, the cost having increased considerably since the Euro pean war has been in progress. When the war is over, we shall probably se cure it at the former prices. What is the value of improved land in your county? From $100.00 to $300.00 an acre, and the crops we grow and market in the winter will often equal the cost of the land in one crop, while northern and western farmers seldom earn over five per cent on the value of their land. How do prices of building material average with those in the north? With lumber mills so near at hand, building material is naturally cheaper here. A four-room house can be built for about $300.00, the average cost being $75.00 a room and upward, according to the finish. Cement houses are practical. What is the annual mean tempera ture and rainfall in Bunnell? Temper ature, about 68 degrees; rainfall, about 48 to 50 inches. When is the heaviest rainfall? In August and September. Do you ever have any tornadoes in that part of the country? No. Are sunstrokes of usual occurrence? There has never been a case of sunstroke known of in the state of Florida. What kind of nights do you have? Always cool. When is the best time to move to Florida? From September to Decem ber. Thus one has time to become established on his land and get some of it prepared, so as to take off his first crop in the early spring when prices are the highest. What is the price of your land and how do you sell it? The cheapest farms we have for sale are at $35.00 an acre, and we sell these on the monthly or yearly installment plan. What discount do you allow for cash? We allow 10 per cent discount for pay ments in full. If the payments are made yearly in advance, we allow 6 per cent discount on the payments for the year. What about wild game and the game laws? There is a great variety of wild game, such as turkeys, squirrels, quail, ducks and numerous other birds, in cluding doves, snipes, etc. How about the fishing? The finest in the country. Plenty of salt-water fish and fresh water species. No li cense required, excepting for certain commercial fishing. Is Bunrell a healthy place in which to live? One of the healthiest commu nities in the United States. We are very near salt water, and our lands are surrounded by pine forests—two im portant essentials in creating health. Bunnell is one of the most pleasant places in which to live—summer or win ter. How about frosts? Light frosts oc cur between December and February, sometimes injuring the tender plants. This may happen anywhere in the state of Florida. There is absolutely no frost-line. How much are the taxes on your land? The taxes are all paid by the Bunnell Development Company until our buyers receive deeds for their land; after that time the taxes will be about $1.50 to $2.00 on each ten acre tract. How are the titles to your land? Our titles are perfect. One has the privilege of paying for his land in full at any time, when we will then give a Warranty Deed and a perfect title to the land.

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UhQ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Everyday Happenings in and around Bunnell as Contributed by our Bunnell Correspondent during the Month. OVER ONE HUNDRED FARMERS PLANTED POTATOES THIS YEAR. Over one hundred farmers in Flag ler county have planted their 19’18 Irish potato crop. The amount of acre age planted by each farmer ranges from five to two hundred acres. Sev eral of them planted over a hundred acres; a large number have from twenty to forty acres in potatoes, while the remainder have planted from five acres upward. It is only five or six years ago when the number of farmers in the Bunnell colony who planted potatoes that year was less than ten. Within another five years, it is our prediction, that the number of potato growers in the coun ty will exceed a thousand. The weather has been ideal for pre paring the soil and for planting the spuds. The following is a list of the farm ers who have planted this season. It is only partially complete, as there are some others whose names we were not able to obtain: J. J. 'Buckles, Theo. Behling, J. C. Buckles, John Buckles, F. J. Burnsed, G. W. Backes, C. V. Brown, J. A. Burn sed, G. R. Burnsed, F. D. Barmington, G. W. Barnhart, Bandy & Burnsed, F. S. Crowson, J. C. Schwartz, W. G. Campbell, L. A. Carter, W. H. Coch ran, J. L. Council, W. C. Chaplin, G. W. Durrance. O. R. Dalgren, G. W. Da vids, R. W. Deen, A. W. Durrance, J. E. Deen, Mack Davis, A. J. Eatman, E. A. Eatman, I. H. Frier, A. S. Fowler, W. H. Gray, Harry Gilbertson, Z. G. Hol land Otto Hogan, Robt. Hamilton, S. J. Harrison, C. D. Hagadorn, A. P. Har wood, J. A. Hunter, J. R. Henderson, O. G. Henderson, J. Hading, Henry Huebner, O. J. Hance, C. C. Jordon, L. C. Johnson, Ed Johnson, Mrs. Stella Jones, Cris Kilper, Geo. Keilb, J. E. Ku-’rnn, A. Lambert, O. A. Lambert, W. A. Mack, J. C. Miller, J. W. Malphurs, M. H. Milliken, M G. Myers, W. R. Malphu^s, C. B. Miller, O. C. Mosby, I. L. Mosby, C. F. Miller, Moody & John ston, N. O’Brien. W. C. Phillips, J. B. Parker, G. F. Pellicer, Mrs. P. Pellicer, Corwin Pierce, J. E. Pellicer, P. P. Pel licer, Mrs. John Richardson, W. V. Reynolds, L. Snge, Henry iSalyerds, Geo. Salyerds, W. J. Sczudlo, Walter SchuPz. Henry T. Sayers, Nick Schus ter, N Scholen, F. Stach, I. D. Simms, B Tebbe, Turner & Sessions, H. G. Thompson, J. C. Unkifer, S. J. Van dyke, A. J. Vafed. F. C. Worges, Chas. P. Wlti, C. A. Whitaker, John Wilkowski, I. A. Waszewski, G. H. Wigley, Frank Zawartowski, Philip Nowak, E. D. Henson, L. S. Cody, Haw Creek Fa-ms Co.. Keystone Farms Co., Ken dall Brothers, Warbin Booe, Harry Booe, United Farms Co., J. E. Hedden, Wm. Richardson, Burrell Brothers, W. D. Long. The Flagler county Sunday school convention was held in the M. E. church in Bunnell on February 14th. Some of the more recent arrivals in Bunnell are: Mr. W. H. Stutsman, of Canada; Mrs. Buell, of Wisconsin; Mr. Lund, of Canada; Mr. Wilkinson and family, of Ohio; Mr. Wilson and Mr. Bennett, of Indiana, and Mr. Mikesel and family, of Canada. With the ex ception of the last mentioned party, all are owners of farms in our Bunnell colony. Mr. Mikesel is here to look over farming lands in Flagler county with an idea of purchasing a farm. Messrs. W. H. Waterman and M. Dade, potato buyers of Jacksonville, were in Bunnell this week looking over the situation. They stated that every thing is favorable for good prices this season. Mr. W. Horn, of New York, who has a large hog ranch here, was here for a few days’ inspection. The Bunnell Telephone Exchange has moved to its new quarters in the Trib une building. A new draw bridge will be built across the East Coast canal at Ocean City in the near future. The bank building is now completed and the Bunnell State Bank has taken up its headquarters in its new home. The work of grading Orange street was ordered by the City Council at its last meeting. Col. Varn has moved his law office from the Tribune building into the new bank building. Mr. Pickard of Jacksonville, accom panied by a party of northern capital ists, visited Bunnell Saturday. They were looking over the town with the view of erecting a large hotel. Mrs. S. A. Harris, Grand Matron of the Grant chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, of Florida, made her of ficial visit to the Bunnell chapter, Wednesday night. The dance given in the hall at Du Pont for the benefit of the Red Cross, was a great success. The people had a very enjoyable evening and the net re ceipts amounted to $37.25, which mon ey was turned over to the Flagler chapter of the American Red Cross. Mrs. Nowicki of the Korona district %  with game she brought down. Mr. Kendrick was employed by the city fathers to draw up plans and speci fications of what will be needed for the installation of a complete water system for the town of Bunnell. Work on the new homes of Messrs. T. Holden and W. H. Deen is progress ing rapidly. Mr. C. H. Davis has arrived in Bun nell with a load of nice mules which he will sell to Flagler county farmers. BOYS CORN-PIG CLUB OF FLAGLER COUNTY. G. L. Herrington, of Gainesville, State Agent for the Boys’ Club Work, and W. H. Deen, of Bunnell, County Agent, visited the schools in Flagler county and organized the boys corn and pig clubs. A large number of boys have en rolled. Those in the corn club will grow an acre of corn, according to Corn Club Methods. Those in the pig club will raise pure bred pigs. Where a boy has not the money to purchase a pure bred pig, the Bank of Bunnell has agreed to loan him money if he can show sufficient evidence that he will make a success of his work. Flagler is purely an agricultural county. Many people are coming here to make this their home and many of them will be farmers. If the farmer boys will help to demonstrate the pos sibilities of the good lands in Flagler county, they will do a great thing for the entire county. The recent meeting held in Wood man’s hall, at which Mr. Walker, of Miami, presided, was very interesting. Mr. Walker has a government contract to furnish castor beans for the making of oil for the government air-planes. Seed is furnished through the con tractors by the government for 40 cents per acre. The beans should be planted in March and four months are required to bring the bushes to maturity. The land in Flagler county is well suited for the raising of castor beans. Thirty to forty bushels per acre is the average yield and sometimes the yield is in creased from 25% to 50%. $3.00 per bushel is the price offered the farmers. ARE YOU PREPARING FOR OLD AGE AND THE ADVERSITIES OF LIFE?

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THE STORY OF ONE MAN’S SUCCESS AS SHOWN IN “MOVIES”. Tmg ftf HZg FORTYTRACT# y_v5~6 BLOCK.B. J?£Cv3V. TP. / 2 £ R&. JO £ 5 ~ 4 BLl 3 ICC 2 T 7 T L* 12 i 5 T BLl W 1 7 IT ^1 l £ This is the way the land looked on October 31, 1911. Our field manager and the happy owner of the 1/0 acres. “Be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home”—the home he built for $51.08. The returns from his first crop—seven acres of potatoes which sold for $900.00. Scene a few days later. Note growing corn which was planted between rows of potatoes, also the fence in the background, built at a cost of $5.60. Bunnell Cok The Camera Aiwa s 1. 2 3. 4. 5. 9. This man left California with less than $900.00 and came to Florida hoping here to be able to buy a farm and better his condition. He arrived at Bunnell October 30, 1911, and the fol lowing day he contracted for the purchase of a 40-acre farm, located about three miles south of Bunnell. This farm was to cost him $1,000.00 as our land at that time Avas selling for but $25.00 an acre, and he agreed to pay for same at the rate of 50 cents an acre a month. He began at once to get ready for the arrival of his family from California. Without the aid of a carpenter he erected a one-room house, 12x14, Avith shed roof. This house had two good doors and four large windoAvs and cost him $51.08. While waiting for his family he drove a Avell in a little over a day, doing the work alone, and found a fine floAv of water at a depth of 21 feet. His family arrived at Bunnell December 3, 1911, having spent more than $200.00 for railroad fare, reducing their capital to less than $700.00. He began clearing his land Dec. 18, 1911. With the help of his tAvo eldest boys he fenced 20 acres of land. Not being able to buy wire for a fence, they set good strong posts eight feet apart, and nailed to these posts young trees or thin posts, Avhich they were able to obtain for the cutting. This gave him a good, hog-tight fence, at a total cost of but $5.60 for nails. The next month he built a kitchen, bath room and pantry, as a lean-to on the first room erected, covering a ground space of 10x30 feet. He and the two eldest boys did all the work. Not having the money Avith which to buy a team of mules, he purchased a yoke of small oxen at a cost of $70.00. THIS /If IK IPOMI SIC IE JEW Gf 11 This is the kind of corn his son raised. /r ~ h 3o — m Truvu V// J / ? // H ZjS’ — // / / 7 S. L/O nw.so nsq.io ib/.y& zzyo.gs /i/ys.os /Jo/.jS' YOU HAVE THE SAME CHANCE AS HE HAD. WLI

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ny “Movies” s Tells the Truth — 10 11 12 13. 14. A little over 100 days from the time of his arrival he had seven acres of Irish potatoes growing, which he sold for $900.00 about seven months after he reached Bunnell. He grew twelve crops the first four years. Of these twelve crops, seven were Irish potatoes. The other five were cow-peas and com. On January 11th, 12th and 13th, 1916, he planted twelve acres to Irish potatoes and began digging this potato crop April 24, 1916, or 104 days after the crop was planted. About the middle of April, 1916, a Mr. Hill, a commis sion man from the North, bought these twelve acres of potatoes in the ground for $3,000.00. On April 17, 1916, Mr. Hill deposited in the Bunnell State Bank $1,000.00 to bind the bargain. • On April 25, 1916, the first car-load of potatoes was sold for $998.45, and this sum was deposited to the grower’s account. On April 26, 1916, the second car of potatoes was shipped and Mr. Hill paid the balance, or $1,001.55. The commission man stated these potatoes were among the finest he had handled, and that about 90% were No. l’s. In January, 1917, this man planted his 40 acres to Irish potatoes and sold this crop for over $12,000.00. This man has now paid in full for his land He has erected a home at a cost ol $2,800.00. He has a packing shed, barn, and a good wire fence around his entire 40 acres. All of his land is cleared and is well worth from $200.00 to $250.00 an acre. He has purchased additional land, has up-to-date farm implements and an automobile truck that cost $1,425.00. His $70.00 yoke of oxen has been replaced by two good teams of mules. 15. 16. 17. IE MAN 7 POTATO CROP OF WACRES oucou 2z~ *77 /6/y. 6$ fyuMe, y„ 727.477 /3 „ zob.oy / TotaJE //. ytjz.o'i. 3 00.0 o TOTAL KEC51PT&/Z.OJZ. OZ This man showing the possibilities of his soil to a Chicago banker. THE STORY OF ONE MAN’S SUCCESS AS SHOWN IN “MOVIES”. RETURNS FROM HIS 1916 POMP' CROP OF IM ACKF S AS -DEPOSITED TO HIS ouccoviAit fivv tA& I3i AAvvizHt fytaXk 't$d/y\Jc 'fry. lAc coYYvrvtA^'uyn/ -mot/TV(Lfoxil \c\\lo 1 0 0 0.00 Cl\Vul2S.\c]ilo cjcjg.ys tlfoxit zlo.Kjllo 1001-55 Tbtcd^ ^OQO^QoT His 1917 potato field of 1/0 acres, for which he received over $ 12 000 00 His personal packing shed, where his potatoes are graded and put in barrels for shipment. His $1 ,!i 25.00 International Harvester truck — a more rapid means of conveyance than his $70.00 yoke of oxen. His $2,800.00 home under process of construction. YOU TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT? IT IS UP TO YOU.

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BUNMELL HOME BUILDER Florida's Wonderful Possibilities as Enumerated by Mrs. Alice Evans Bennett who has made a Comprehensive Study of Florida and the Bunnell Colony. quently pasture together. However* for the best results, it is better to keep a field of forage coming for the dairy cows, and when the cows are turned into the fresh pastures, hogs will clean up pasturage left by the cows. I know of one man who has seventeen dairy cows on 40 acres of land, but I will not attempt to give his figures on vegeta bles raised, as well as hogs, on the same land inside of one year’s time. His cows are almost pure Jersey. The pasturage consists and varies from sea son to season, of Japanese cane, Natal grass, Chufas, Rhodes and Johnson grass. It is only natural that anyone can make the best success individually along the line he or she may be most interested in, and personally I am bend ing every effort toward raising hogs and livestock in Flagler county, as the general conditions are not only favora ble for feed crops and the animals, but the Bunnell colony is well established, and it is a recognized fact that co-op erative community work is very essen tial toward successful farming in any of its various departments. I could write at much length con cerning the raising of livestock, but you may secure all the most valuable information with figures showing just what can be done in this line by writ ing the State ’ Agriculture Experiment Station at Gainesville, Florida. Flori da, of all states in the Union, offers the greatest future, not only for raising hogs, but for poultry, dairying, truck ing and last, but not least, for fruit. Natal grass is an especially valuable hay crop and bankers do not refuse to loan money on this crop in the barn. I know one man who has a standing order with a large resort hotel for guinea squabs at 95 cents each. An other man makes small fortunes each year growing Bermuda onions and aver ages between $500.00 and $1,000.00 an acre on these crops, with a considerable profit on hay and livestock raised on the same land the balance of the year. I had occasion to attend the South ern Conference for Education last year, and I wish it were possible for every Florida farmer to attend these annual conferences, for there is so much to be learned of great advantage to the farm er, his wife and his children. I won der how many Florida farmers know It is not uncommon to find successful women farmers anywhere these days, A few “mortgage lifters"—Bunnell Porkers. Some of‘these will make the monthy payment on your farm. Mr. Council’s corn-field in the Bunnell colony. This picture was taken after Mr. Council had harvested a bumper crop of Irish potatoes. On my way from Miami to Jackson ville, Florida, a few weeks ago, I looked over farming prospects and possibilities in the state very carefully, and was particularly impressed with the won derful progress that has been made in the Bunnell colony within the past few years comparing it with other sections. Florida certainly is “coming to its own’’ and in some localities where land sells for $200.00 an acre and up, many of the conditions are not nearly so favorable to general farming as in FLAGLER COUNTY. Some localities, I find, are adapted to citrus fruits, some for trucking and some for livestock, while in the Bun nell colony the topography in general favors any class of farming, as well as being an ideal year-around locality for permanent homes, and all these fea tures go a long way towards home making. While in Miami I met a man looking for land suitable for raising Irish pota toes, and hogs, for his son who was finishing his last year in an eastern Agriculture College. He spent five weeks looking around southern Florida, but after a thorough analysis of soil, water, shipping facilities and points in general, necessary for a permanent home, he decided that Flagler county offered the best all-around features; so when I saw him last he was on his way to Bunnell. but I know of no section of the United States where farming in general fa vors the women as Florida does. Rais ing hogs is highly encouraged by the Agriculture Experiment Station of the University of Florida, but what appeals to me especially in raising hogs is that they harvest their own crops the year around. Two of the great essentials in rais ing average, healthy, fat hogs are good pasture crops and plenty of clean wa ter. I know of no locality where water can be had as plentifully as in Flagler county, and what more can anyone want than year-around pasturage and water, not only for good A1 hogs, but livestock in general and even dairy farming. The large East Coast resorts offer a wonderful field for dairy prod ucts and Flagler county is an excellent distributing point. If properly managed, a dairy and hogs can be made to pay a very hand some income, as cattle and hogs fre MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES

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Uh@ BUNNELL KIOME BUILDER, how to make iceless refrigerators, which have proven so successful in Florida; or how to make homemade fireless cookers at very little cost. Among the most interesting features, in my opinion, that demands the atten tion of our farmers everywhere today, is the Canning Club for girls and the Pig and Corn Club for boys, for the reason that these interests make it worth while for the boys and girls to remain on the farms instead of going to the cities. f How many farmers know it is possi ble to get nice one-pound square butter moulds, also the cartons and oiled pa per for packing butter, thus placing good, pure homemade butter on the market and presenting just as attract ive an appearance as that sold by the large creameries? In fact, it is hard to supply the demand for good home made butter, when put up in this at tractive manner. The farmer can order his name put on the butter cartons, just as the Girls’ Canning Club make it possible for girls to order their labels wUh their own names printed on the labels, as well as the Canning Club trade-mark. I hope when the Bunnell farmers purchase canned goods, such as tomatoes, beans, etc., they will ask for hand-packed goods, or better still, ask for goods canned by their local Girls’ Canning Club. In this way we can all help make life more interesting to the coming generation who formerly went to the cities. Personally, I am choosing Florida for my future home, where I hope to en gage in intensified and diversified farming. I have lived the year around close to Bunnell, and know I am not making a mistake in choosing this lo cality for a year-around home. ALICE EVANS BENNETT. Mr. Warner, living west of Bunnell, exhibits branch from orange tree (Mandarins) broken off by its own weight. What the “Other Fellows” say about B unnell Mr. Paul Soguel PREFERS BUNNELL’S SUMMER CLI MATE TO THAT OF CALGARY, CANADA, WRITES A SAT ISFIED BUYER. Dear Mr. Verdenius: You will recall that when I passed through Chicago on my way to Bun nell last summer, where I was going to inspect the farm I had bought from you, I promised that I would write you and say what I thought of Bunnell and Flagler county. I regret that I did not write before, and trust you will excuse me, as I have been very busy. It was the month of July when I arrived at Bunnell, and people had told me that it would be very hot there at that time, but I replied that I would like to see the country at its worst. I assure you that I was happily sur prised to find the weather in Florida at that time more pleasant and com fortable than here in Calgary, Canada, in fact the heat at Bunnell did not bother me at all. I was in the colony about two weeks and liked it so much there, I was indeed sorry to leave the place. When I lived in the old country I traveled extensively through southern France, also in Italy, but with all my experiences in these places, I want to tell you that I like Bunnell best of all. In regard to the soil, I am satisfied that any man who knows a little about farming can make a good living in the Bunnell colony on ten or twenty acres of land. I saw a lot of good No. 1 land while there, and the people who have bought land from you can con sider themselves fortunate. I want to thank you for the treat ment received from you, the Company and its employees. I found the people who live in and around Bunnell to be very hospitable, just the kind of peo ple I want to live among. Yours very truly, PAUL SOGUEL, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. “ONE OF YOUR SATISFIED CUSTO MERS WITHOUT A COMPLAINT.” Is the Way This Man Signs His Letter When Acknowledging Receipt of the Deed for His Bunnell Farm. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir: Just a line to let you know that I have received the deed for my land. I wish to thank you, also the Bunnell Development Company for the interest all of you have shown in my behalf and your upright dealings with me. All of which causes me to speak in the highest terms to anyone who may in quire of me concerning your company and your land. I am sure that I am well pleased and satisfied with all my dealings with you. One of your satisfied customers with out a complaint. GEORGE MARLATT, Toronto, Canada. YUKON TERRITORY BUYER WRITES FROM THE COLD NORTHLAND. January 5, 1918. Thomas A. Verdenius: Dear Sir: I have sold another 20 acres of land to Mr. Frank S. Ishimito. Please locate him as close to my Bun nell farm as possible and give him a strictly first-class farm. I herewith enclose money order for $50.00—$30.00 as final payments on my 20-acre farm, and the balance to be applied on his twenty acres. We have nice weather today but have just passed through a spell lasting 33 days, when the thermometer registered from 50 to 65 degrees below zero all the time. Now it is about eight be low. It caused an epidemic here. There are nineteen people lying at the morgue awaiting burial. You can understand why we want to leave here for Bunnell, Florida. Yours truly, S. W. EBBERT. MR. FARMER OF THE NORTH? How many crops are you going to glow this year? How much will he left from your last year’s work when winter is over? Why waste your time feeding stock and shoveling coal (if you can get it to shovel), and half freeze to death any way, when you can glow crops and pas ture your stock all winter in the Sunny Southland, in the famous Bunnell col ony? Why not go where you can grow three crops on the same land every year and he making money all the time? Why not he a patriot, help your country solve the food problem and win the war, add to your bank roll and live in a country where you can enjoy life to its fullest extent? Talk it over with me, if you want to know more about this great country. But, better still, for “seeing is believ ing,” take a trip to Bunnell, get away from a few of these zero days, and see it all for yourself. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois. TODAY YOU SHOULD PREPARE FOR THE INEVITABLE TOMORROW

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A CHAT WITH YOU — Who have been considering the purchase of a Farm from me in the Bunnell Colony. This is especially for YOU if YOU have been receiving my Literature for more than a year. MR. TIIOS. A. VERDENIUS The Pioneer Small Farm, Man of Florida. There came into my Chicago office the other day a Westerner—a. man from Idaho, who was returning from the Bunnell colony, after having purchased a forty-acre farm there. Among other things he said: “How I wish I had bought some of your land when you had it for sale at $20.00 an acre, for my farm then would have cost me but little more than half of what I have to pay for it now and I could have had a more choice location. But,” he continued, “despite the fact that I have been the loser by delaying so long, I am happy that I have 40 acres of Bun nell colony dirt. I am fully con vinced that it won’t be long now be fore every acre will be taken, and people will be saying, ‘Oh, if I had only bought some of that potato land when it was cheap.’ ” You understand, I am sure, why I am telling you of this Idaho man. I doubt not that the thought is right now in your own mind that you may be making a like mistake, and I assure you that if you do not make up your mind before very long to secure one of our farms, you will be in the class of those who say: “For of all sad words of tongue or pen, the saddest are these—it might have been.” You have been receiving my liter ature regarding our Bunnell colony farms. I have written you person ally and I have urged you to send in your order for a farm-home at Bunnell, but up to the present time I seem to have failed in making you realize that our proposition is No. 1 in every respect and one which you have been looking for. The severity of our winter weather, the scarcity of fuel and the high cost of living generally are turning people’s attention to the land as never before. The Bunnell colony, I assure you, is coming in for its share of attention, and if present conditions continue much longer every acre of our land is soon going to be disposed of. Let me put the matter up to you once more. We have in the neigh borhood of 5,000 acres of choice, No. 1 land still for sale. Do you really want one of our farms, or do you not? I feel that I have the right to know whether you mean business or not, and so I am going to ask you to do this one thing: If you really desire to secure one of our farms, kindly fill out the at tached inquiry blank and send it to me at once. Remember, this is not an order blank and by filling it out you will not be placed under any obligations. It simply puts us on a more understanding basis and helps me to know what you really have in your mind. As soon as I receive this filled out inquiry blank, I shall send you a large map of our colony lands. On this map you will find marked in colors the towns, the Dixie Highway and the principal roads. I will also tell you where in the colony the churches and schools are located and where we have some No. 1 land on which we can locate you. Bear in mind that by filling out this inquiry blank you are placing yourself under no obligation to buy a farm, but I believe with the large marked map before you and the detailed information as to choice lo cations, etc., you will feel that you cannot let this opportunity slip from you. Let me remind you that land such as ours cannot be sold at such a low price much longer. The colony is developing too rapidly to permit of this. Six years ago the Bunnell colony was but little more than a large undeveloped body of land. Today it is a thriving farming com munity, with Bunnell as its principal town and the county seat of a new county. Bunnell has an electric light plant, water works, hotels, churches, a public school with two years of high school, ice plant, weekly news paper, garage, state bank, stores, lodges, etc., etc. We have two rural mail routes and the famous Dixie Highway passes through our colony lands. Better than all this, is the fact that our Bunnell fanners are making good. I can take you to men in our colony Avho realized $300.00 an acre from their last year’s potato crop. Besides this, they grew two more crops on that same land the same year. Already our farmers have planted their first crop this year. They will have sold this first crop (Irish potatoes) before northern farmers have begun plowing their land for their first and only crop. We have at Bunnell the soil, the climate, the location and the ship ping facilities, with commission men on the ground at the potato season ready to buy all the potatoes they can and pay for same, delivered at the cars. A farm amidst such surroundings as these is what I am offering you today. Our price is most reasonable —$35.00 an acre, payable at the rate of 50 cents an acre a month. All we ask of you is $5.00 a month for each ten acres you buy. What more could you ask for? I have satisfied thousands of people and I know I can satisfy you, if you will but give me the opportunity. Believing that you are seriously interested in locating in the Bunnell colony, I wish that you would advise me just what your plans are and what additional information you need in order to make a definite de cision to buy. If, for any reason you are no longer interested, please drop me a card to that effect. This will save us any further correspond ence, for I am not in the habit of bothering people with my communi cations if I know it. However, if you really mean business I know that you will fill out the attached inquiry blank and return to me promptly, so that I can send you the large marked map. Yours very truly, BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO.