Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicasio, 1ll.
FEBRUARY 1918
P A TRIOTS. ALL'
The above is a reproduction of a photograph taken some time ago, of one of the potato fields in the Bunnell colony. Below it the artist has drawn a group of our boys in khaki following the grand old American flag wheresoever it may lead them.
Many will go to the battle front and return again, as heroes; other brave souls will lay down their lives for their country, but the call today is just as imperative for men to go into the fields and grow the food with which to feed our soldiers and the nations depending upon us for food.
Whether we shall be here., or there, let us keep in mind that we are serving our
-country and that we may be "'PATRIOTS ALL."




S'e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
The Greatest Movement for Peace.
(By THE EDITOR)
More than half the world is today in ing one's own bit of earth, is it not a I have never yet seen the time when the throes of a terrible war, and all the wonder that more people do not take farmers in that locality could not find a world is suffering, more or less, as a re- this step toward peace? There are a ready market for their Irish potato sult of same. Since our own country has great many individuals who will never crops. During the shipping season there entered this contest, we are beginning to find themselves, who will never be con- may be seen commission men from Chikeenly feel on all sides the effects of the tented until they are able to say, "This cago, New York, Boston, Cincinnati, Balwar. We have our "meatless" our "wheat- is my farm," or "This is my plot of land."1 timore, Philadelphia and other large less" and our "porkless" days. We are With such a possession a man may face cities hurrying hither and thither much concerned over the fuel shortage, the future with calm confidence. through the country in an endeavor to
and there is talk of having to close purchase the farmers' potatoes.
schools and churches because of the lack I believe that almost every man is at of coal. heart a farmer. He loves to turn over I would not have you think that Irish
with his plow or his spade the warm, potatoes are all that can be grown in In Europe blood has been flowing moist earth, to plant his seeds and watch the Bunnell colony, for with but few exfreely for the past three years, and as the green shoots springing, as if by ceptions all northern crops can be raised yet there seems to be no end to this magic, from the. ground. If you are not tljere as well as the majority of southern dreadful conflict. While the United an exception to this rule, you too have crops. Fine orange groves are to be States declared war several months ago, that longing in your heart, and you owe found in our locality adjoining the Bunwe have in reality not yet entered this it to yourself, to your family-your boys nell colony, while a hundred various struggle. and. your girls-to become the owner of crops can be grown there besides citrus
Just now we are passing through a a farm as soon as possible, fruits. The primary reason why the
period of reorganization and a time of editor is such an ardent advocate of
great unrest. Some individuals have If you are not able at the present time Irish potatoes for Bunnell farmers is bemade large fortunes because of this to buy a large farm, then secure a cause this is a staple crop, like wheat in
world calamity, by furnishing war sup- smaller one. If it is impossible for you the north, and because grown at the time plies, money, food, etc. Others have !o move to a farm, and if you are living of year they are, there is always a good made vast sums by speculating in food, in a city, seek out and buy- or rent a market for Irish potatoes. If necessary, for almost every commodity or necessity little home in a suburb where you may human beings can dispense with the luxof life has increased from 50 to 200 per have one or two large lots whereon you uries in food, but they must need have cent. Some lines of industry are work- may grow things. If you are contem- the staples.
ing day and night in an endeavor to sup- plating the purchase of a small farm,
plytheme ofou gratarm ad nvy but are undecided as to where you Then, too, aside from the fact that
ply the men of our great army and navy btaeudced stowreyuthere is always a demand for Irish otawith clothing, food, shoes, guns, ammuni- should locate, then let me ask you to there is als a dea fo is u tation, etc. At the same time, many lines give your careful consideration to the toes, it is also true that it is usually a of business are entirely at a standstill. Bunnell colony. Some years they have a much better
For the past two or three years living I would not have you think that I con- crop than others, due to the seed potaexpenses have been increasing at a ter- sider Bunnell the only desirable place in toes or climatic conditions, but I have rific rate and men and women every- which to locate; for I fully realize that Yet to hear of an absolute croP failure.
where are finding it hard to stand up every locality has its advantages and its Another most desirable feature about under the strain of it all. Throughout disadvantages. There are drawbacks to our Potatoes, is that they do not require these trying times there has been one every state in the Union, but I say this the investment nor do our farmers have class -of individuals which has stood to you candidly, after traveling exten- to wait so long for returns. If a person uraeticallv alone, and that is the AMER- sively over this country, and after a desires to set out an orange grove, he TCAN FAYMER. Ife is the eiat figure comprehensive study of farming com- must expect to wait from six to ten ypars
on which thr sun of prosperity has con- unities, markets, transportation facili- for any commercial returns, and there tinned to shine, ties, etc., that I do not believe, taking are comparatively few who are able or
everything into consideration, that there willing to wait so long a time. In the He has steady. profitable and pleasant is a. better place for a man who wishes Bunnell colony the farmers plant their employment, a home for himself and his to buy a farm than in the Bunnell potatoes in January and February. About
family from which no landlord can eject colony. one hundred. days later they harvest
him. His cellars are stored with vege- their potato crop, and soon after ulant
tables and fruit for the winter; he has Naturally. the choice of such a loca- a second crop, which is later followed plenty of wood for fuel to insure com- tion depends largely on the individual by a third. fort and warmth; his barns are bulging taste. If a person prefers snow and e, thrs with the crons from his own fields, and There are other features in connecnotwithstanding this great war and all large fuel bills, frozen water nipes and tion with this subject which could be its effects, the American Farmer is able blizzard weather, Florida would not be discussed, but this I will say, that if one to live like a prince in Peace and secure. the place for him. For such an individ- wishes to have an orange grove he can ity. He has a never-endinz source of ual I would recommend Canada. On the niant his trees in the midst of his potato income, one that will continue indefi- other hand, if a man desires to grow fields and grow the potatoes between the nitely, amidst surroundings that are sn- three crous annually, if 365 growing days rows of trees so long as they are small. nerlor to any other form of endeavor, a year aDneal to him- if he likes to grow He is more independent than any other crops during the winter months and pre- If your heart has been set on buying class of men. fers to pick oranges from the trees in a piece of land, do not hesitate longer
January or February instead of shovel- about taking the step. There is no time What does such independence mean? ing snow, then I should recommend like the Present for doing the thing that
What does it mean to have the assurance Florida to such a man. you ought to do. As to where you shall
that your livelihood Is guaranteed, your locate must dennd on your own taste.
independence protected, whether our If the decision is once reached that a No one can decide that for you; but,
country is in the midst of peace or war? farm in Florida is- what is desired, then wherever vou go, be It North. East, It Is well for us to note the signs of the most emphatically I say that I do not South or West, if you buy good land at times and learn our lesson from present know of a better place In which to locate a fair price you can never make a misconditions. than somewhere in the famous Irish take. You are bound to double the
potato district of Florida, which is amount of your original Investment When It means so much to actually largely embraced by the southern por- within a few years. Locate on your
possess a piece of Mother Earth, when tion of St. Johns county, Flagler county farm a% soon as possible. for we believe such peace and- security can be felt by and the northern portion of Volusla that "Raelr to tba Tsnfawis. after all. the setting foot on one's own land and till- county. GREATEST MOVERENT FOR PEACE.,




Vhe BUNNXLL HOME BUILDER
The Story of a Woman Who Became a Successful Potato Grower
Two Hundred Ton Dollar Gold Pieces ($2000.00) Received from One Car Load of Potatoes.
AN ECHO FROM THE 1917,POTATO CROP.
- also in the prices obtained for same.
-~ -rice for a single carload of potatoes.
She and a neighbor shipped together one carload from their adjoining farms, and
- received as payment for same the sum of
TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS IN GOLD from the commission firm of John Nix
-. & Company of New York. Three hours
-. after the car had been dispatched the
money was delivered to them in the form of 200 gold coins of $10.00 denomination. This payment was part of a special contract made with this well known firm, by which they undertook to handle. all the digging of one week of these two successful farmers and to pay them at
- ~ ~the rate of $9.00, $8.00 and $7.00, respectively, for No. V's, 2's and 3's, and
-$10.00 a barrel for the first carload,.,,o
- No. I's shipped. The crop averaged 76
- barrels to the acre.
-. ~it gives us much pleasure to reproduce on this page three pictures of hfrs~ Dinkins' farm and 1917 crop. The ffi's Digging epouds at farm of Mrs. 0. C. Dinkins-MIrs. Dinkins in the foreground is a view of the farm while the potatoes were being dug. The second shows the While many instances of remarkable the gross sales from that year's crop car containing the 200 barrels for which agricultural successes are frequently amounting to $13,149.00. The following $2,000.00 in gold was paid-200 tenrecorded and reported by the farmers of year the total yield from her farm was dollar gold pieces. The third shows the the Florida potato district, a somewhat not quite so large, being about 3000 bar- same field three weeks after her potatoes unusual case is that of Mrs. 0. C. Din- Irels, yet her total receipts were consider- were dug.- Mrs. Dinkins grew three
-V1 crops on her land last year. So did our Bunnell colony farmers. In. the next issue of the HOME BUILDER we hope to write rather fully of one of our successful Bunnell farmers. We have farms in our colony, in par-- ticular we would mention those in the
famous Haw Creek section, that will produce equally as well as Mrs. Dinkins' land. We have the farms-the right kind of soil; all we need is more men
- and women of thrift and energy, who will buy this land, clear and cultivate it, and turn their crops into gold dollars.
- --- ~Don't you think you should have one Carload Of 200 barrels of Irish potatoes that sold for $2,000 in gold. of these farmsT'
Don't you think you could do as well kins, who has about 60 acres of fine po- ably better on account of the higher as this womahl tato land between Bunnell and Hastings. market price-for spuds. If so, the farm is waiting for you, and
Mrs. Dinkins' farm is located in St. Her 1917 crop surpassed all her pre- the price is but $35.00 an acre, payable
Johns county, the same county in which vious potato crops, not only in yield, but on the monthly payment plan. Bunnell was located before it became the county seat of the new (Flagler) county. We have spoken in the HOME BUILDER before of this remarkable woman and the wonderful success she has achieved. In our new tract we have -'x* -Kat least three thousand acres of this fine potato land, with identically the same soil and sub-soil as is to be found on Mrs. Dinkins' farm.
Mrs. Dinkins is a 'native of West Virginia and came to Florida in March, 1912. 'A year later she lost her husband
and was left entirely on her own re-
sources, with her farm but partially paid ~
for. Realizing that it was up to her to 4 ,
make good, she began a careful study 7,
and experiment in the growing of potatoes and was rewarded with most encouraging results. Each year since that time this woman-farmer has grown fine crops of Irish potatoes, and in many instances has far excelled the men in our potato belt.
Three years ago Mrs. Dinkins dug 3415 barrels from her 60 acres of potatoes, Same field as shown in upper .picture taken about three weeks after potatoes were dug- This corn was
previously planted between the rows of potatoes.




Che BUNNELL NOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
Mr. J. J. Buckles has two acres of land planted to cabbage- and will soon have some ready for market.
Rev. RL L. Ramsey, who has been pastor of the Methodist Church in Bunnell for the last two years, was returned by
the annual conference for another year. Mr. Ramsey has many warm friends in the Bunnell colony who welcome his return.
Petitions have been circulated and the
necessary. signatures have been secured, KU
asking the Flagler County School Board to .call an election and to divide the county into three school districts.
)Ir. W. A. Brock and family have ied into their new home just opposite
Seventh Day Adventist Church. __Mr. Mark Gilpin, of Pennsylvania, has One of the bussyrlaces in Bunnel.
z ed in Bunnell and expects to re- Mr. C. V. Brown has just received word Mr. Arthur Buckles had quite a thrillhere. that his son Floyd, who enlisted in the ing experience a tew days ago. While
army, has arrived in France. uriving his mules home from the field
The new bank building is almost corn- where he had been plowing, he met a
pleted. The fixtures have arrived and Holden's Pharmacy have just installed young lady driving a car. He was so are installed, a new lighting system, which will give interested in the lady that he forgot the
them both light and electric power night mules. They became frightened, turned
The beautiful new home of Mr. W. H. and day. around, ran over him and knocked him
Deen is nearly completed, and adds much down. When he recovered sufficiently
to the attractiveness of Moody Boule- Mr. and Mrs. Foster, of Kirkwood, to get up, the car, lady and mules were yard. Georgia, who own a farm on the Moody all gone. Watch the mules next time,
Road about one and one-half miles Arthur; the lady will tend to the car.
Mr. C. B. Hendy has purchased an in- southwest of Bunnell, have moved here terest in the Bunnell Sales Stable from permanently. At the regular city election, Mr. J. B.
Mr. M. Stone. Boaz, editor of the Flagler Tribune, was
r..Stn.Mr. I. I. Moody was elected Worship- elected Mayor of Bunnell. Messrs. J. E.
Mrs. J. Robinson, of Dover Center, On- ful Master of Bunnell Lodge, No. 200, Jones, J. H. McKnight and Mr. Stone rs, C.aRbns, a f Dver Cnternn-. Free and Accepted Masons. After the were the three aldermen elected. taro, Canada, has arrived in Bunnell. installation of the new offers a nice
twoemils west ofrnth Bunnell wich e supper was served to all in attendance. Seed potatoes for the farmers throughtwo miles west of Bunnell, which sh The lodge is in a flourishing condition, out Flagler county have arrived and are sping crop pltend. unew members being taken in at almost ready for delivery at the different loadspring crop planted. every communication, the present mem- ing points in the county. Daily the
bership being around seventy-five. There farmers may be seen hauling their seed Mr. A. M. Scott, of Calhoun, Georgia, is talk of erecting a three-story temple potatoes to their farms. will open an up-to-date cafe in Bunnell during 1918, on the corner lot east of within the next few weeks. the Tribune office. Mr. and Mrs. Holden have .begun the
erection of a fine bungalow on their property east of the Pine Grove Inn.
-~-.Mr. D. H. Joyce, of Iowa, who owns a 20 acre farm on the Moody Road south .e ..of Mr. Mack, has arrived. He will imme....diately have his land broken and planted /..to potatoes this winter.
Mr. E. Weber and family, of Toledo, Ohio, have arrived in Bunnell and expect to make their future home on their farm, which is located about four miles south d of Bunnell.
. There was quite a "hog killing" time
at J. J. Buckles last Tuesday, he having killed six porkers. When one has.plenty of pork and sweet potatoes he need not worry about the high cost of living. He can have his meatless days and not go hungry, either.
Mrs. I. I. Moody entertained the Bunnell Women's Club and outside friends at her home, east of town, last Saturday Two nei' bunyalows in the town of Dupont. evening.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Mrs. George Reading, of Pennsylvania, IT COULD NOT BE DONE proximately four thousand acres ready to
arrived in Bunnell Tuesday and is look- plant to potatoes and practically every
rng over her lands here. She says she Somebody said that it couldn't be done, available acre will be planted to potatoes and Mr. Reading are making prepara- But .he, with a chuckle, replied the coming season.
-ions to move down next September. That "maybe it couldn't" but he would With this large acreage planted, farmbe one ing life in Flagler is becoming the leadWho wouldn't say so till he'd tried. ing business of the county. Work on the addition to the Tribune So he buckled right in, with the trace :.mce is being rushed as fast as possible. of a grin There is approximately one hundred
This brick building is 20 by 40 feet. On his face. If he worried, he hid it, and fifty thousand acres of as fine farmWVith this additional space, Bunnell's He started to sing as he tackled the ing land in Flagler county as there is
_rogressive newspaper will have plenty thing in the State and the settlers are rapidly
: f room and will be in a better position That couldn't be done, and he did it. putting it under cultivation. Within the .o do good work. past three years the cleared acreage has
Somebody scoffed: "0, you'll never do jumped from five hundred acres to four The Membership Committee of the that, thousand acres and the work of clearing
Flagler County Red Cross Chapter is At least no one ever has done it." goes merrily on. It is a safe estimate
doing great work. The drive is for 300 And he took off his coat and he took off that there will be from one to fifteen
members, which they have undoubtedly his hat, thousand acres cleared each year until
by this time. And the first thing we knew he'd be- the entire acreage is under cultivation.
gun it; The next move is to build hard roads
With the lift of his chin, and a bit of a throughout the entire farming section. The farmers in and around DuPont grin, It will take sixty miles of hard surare very busy getting ready for their Without any doubting or quibbling; faced roads to cover this farming seespring potato planting. The acreage He started to sing as he tackled the tion properly. These roads will cost
Dianted around DuPont, including Kor- thing seven thousand dollars a mile, therefore
ina, this year will be more than twice That couldn't be done, and he did it. it will require approximately four hundiat of last year. New people have come dred and fifty thousand dollars to comin and all the old settlers will plant There are thousands to tell you it cannot plete the work. The best and only way arger crops, as many of them cleared done, to secure this money is by bonding the
ew laud last summer. There are thousands to prophesy fail- county. It is being talked all over the
el l sm ure; county that a bond issue for building
There are thousands to point out to us, the roads must be called. These farmers Mr. P. Pellicer has just completed his one by one, need the roads and want them. They
aew home and has moved into same. The dangers that wait to assail you; are willing to pay for them so it is up
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin to those in authority to investigate the Messrs. J. J. Buckles and Malphurs Then take off your coat and go to it; matter.
lave just finished grinding their sugar Just start in to sing as you tackle the The Dupont Florida Central railroad cane. Both obtained nice quantities of thing together with the Florida East Coast
s yrup. That "cannot be done," and you'll do it. railroad covers 'practically all of this
It Can Be Done farming section and with good hard surMr. and Mrs. Doty, of Manchester, faced roads to the different shipping
iowa, who were among the first purchas- points the farmers of Flagler county will
rs of Bunnell property, have arrived in The young people of the Seventh Day not be handicapped in transporting their Bunnell. Adventist Church (also known as the. fertilizer and seed to the farms or haulnnel. AdvBnutifhurl") enod a st de ing their products to the cars, which is ".Church Beautiful") enjoyed a most de- a great saving, one which very few comThe profits realized from the dinner lightful evening recently at the home of munities enjoy. given by the Parent-Teacher's Associa- Mrs. Abbott. We already have the best land in the
:ion were applied to the indebtedness on State; the railroads are already here.
-he school piano. The farmers of Flagler county will With a system of hard surfaced roads
plant approximately -four thousand acres throughout this entire farming section The Order of the Eastern Star held a to Irish-potatoes this winter. Flagler county will stand at the top of
very beautiful and impressive ceremony Within-ithe past few years the new the list of farming counties, not only in )n Tuesday, the occasion being the in- settlers in this section have been rapidly the State of Florida but throughout the
-tallation of officers. clearing lands until they now have ap- entire United States.--(Flagler Tribune.)
Glimpse of 106 acre orange arove just east of the Bunnell colony- Note the maonitient palnt trees in the back around.
Ten acres of oranges or" aaef, uit will oire one an independent living in the Sunny Southland.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDJIR
Eternal Springtime in the heart of this man, who Finds his
Keenest Joy in the Things of Nature About Him.
is bounded by a fringe of pine trees, not the sounds I love to hear and they are very large nor very close together. The newcomers. I hear the caw of the crows. country is interspaced with clearings Flocks of robins are going south. They and the effect is decidedly park-like, are your true tourists. I have noticed Stray cattle and small flocks of sheep the brown thrasher, the ground robin, are constantly passing back and forth. meadow larks and blue birds, the sumTo the north of me lies Black Branch- mer yellow birds and the diminutive not much of a stream, but its banks are house wren, and I haven't exhausted my a perfect jungle of underbrush and trees, list by any means. making an ideal barrier from the north Winter is supposed to be at its height
wind. I have a notion to call my place now, but Saturday I saw two butterflies Great Barrier Ranch on that account. I that had lately emerged from their cofeel sure that behind its protecting walls coons, and today I saw a palmetto white I can grow oranges with safety, with buds. I suppose I could pick a
Being thrown on my own resources dozen varieties of wildflowers on my
.7 socially, no neighbors being near, I find place.
exhaustless pleasure in noting the com-' A. V. FOLSOM, Bunnell, Florida. ings and goings of the wild life about IOWA IA- HAPPY IN THE THOUGHT me. I am as pleased when I have dis- THAT HE HAS BOUGHT LAND IN
covered a new bird that is domiciled on
my premises as a collector when he has THE BUNNELL COLONY.
made a new "find." Such a pleasure was Dear Mr. Verdenius: mine the other day when a new variety As you will recall, I bought two small of woodpecker put in an appearance on farms from your company last February, the palm at my back door. He was the and I wish to tell you that I am mighty smallest of the birds of this variety I glad I made that investment. have yet seen, had no red on the top of I visited Florida and the Bunnell colhis head as most of these birds do. Had ony last spring and the country looked a glossy black back, with minute specks good to me. I saw a great variety of MR. A. T-.VOLSOM. of gray, and gray margined his wings. crops growing throughout the colony.
While I was hacking away at a pal- I shall never forget that trip and what Since I came to live on my Bunnell metto log recently I noticed a pair of I saw there.
farm I have become an advocate and ex- ivory-bill woodpeckers on the big dead it gives me pleasure to recommend ponent of the simple life. Elemental pine at the edge of my field. This tree your lands and your company to any things somehow appeal to me. I use has been pre-emnpted by a sparrow hawk prospective buyers.
daily the tools of the pioneer-the axe, and he promptly took possession. They J. McPHERSON, Prairie City, Iowa. the cross-cut saw and the grubbing hoe. stood not upon the order of their going I cook my meals before an open fire- and as they passed overhead 1 had an NEW ENGLAND MAN VERY PLEASED place, and bake my bread in one of those opportunity .; to observe them closely. WITH THE LAND SELECTED FOR old-fashioned skillets with three legs and They are strikingly marked birds, one- IM IN THE BUNNELL COLONY. an iron lid, whereon coals are laid. I half of their wings are black, the other Mr. T. A. Verdenius. have found it quite an art to get a good half pure white. They had exaggerated Dear Sir:--My father, Mr. Stromwall, bake. The fuel question never troubles crests of deepest red, their voices were wishes me to write and tell you that he me, as ten minutes' work a day with the loud and strident, and they have a nerv- has been down to Florida and that he is axe supplies my needs. ous, abrupt way about them. very much pleased with the farm you
I take great comfort with my open Some of the birds of last summer have selected for him. He hopes that by next
fire. It is very cheerful of evenings. I gone further south. The cardinal bird fall he will be able to go down to the generally cut an oak stick for a back is one, the two night birds, and the swal- colony and make his home there permalog, then some pitch pine and top off lows, but others have come to take their nently. with a double armful of red cedar. This places. You can hear the catbirds mew- He went to Florida and came back by is felled timber, cut many years ago for ing in the thickets mornings and even- boat, and all in ill, he had a very pleasshingles, and the heart wood is as bright ings, you can hear the blue jays quarrel- ant time. He wants to thank you for all in color and spicily fragrant as if cut ing in the pines, and the kingfisher you have done for him. yesterday. springing his rattle at all times of day. EDW. STROMWELL,
I work in an open field and my horizon The piping of the kildee plover is one of Springfield, Mass.
Picture of orange arove near Bunnell A Winter Scene in Michigan. Picking oranues near Bunnell
taken in December. in January.
Which do you prefer? "Winter Snows" or "Sunny Skies."




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Two Letters of Particular Interest to Every Buyer of Land
in the Korona Section of the Bunnell Colony.
for his seven acres of potatoes. For four
acres Mr. Trojanowski received $1,280.00. "
Mr. Michalski received $1,200.00 for four
acres of potatoes-and so on, each one
realizing according to the number of
acres he planted. This coming season ,
the Polish settlers will plant at least -"
250 acres to potatoes, and we feel confident that we shall obtain good results
from same.
I have been back here nine weeks now
and have a nice little garden. I have
set out 800 cabbage plants, 100 strawberry plants and 1000 onion sets. I have
planted everything that can be planted
at this season of the year and all of it
is growing very nicely. I expect to plant
eight acres to Irish potatoes. Of course,
you understand that I had my land
cleared before.
What we need now, Mr. Verdenius, is
more settlers-enough of them to develop every acre of Flagler county land.
In this way we should be able to help
our county grow, develop and increase . ..
the value of our colony lands, and by I .
supplying more food for the markets,
help our country win the war. MR. H. KACZA -OW,,KI
As a loyal citizen of the United States,
MR. W. ,T. SCZUDLO. I would urge every buyer of Bunnell and Rev. A. Baczyk of- Minnesota,- beDevelopment Company land to come and came the pastor and built a beautiful lit:y dear Mr. Verdenius: locate on same just as soon as possible- tle bungalow. A railroad station was built,
As you know, I have now returned to Start at once clearing your land and a school house, and a number of nice farm
-=e Korona colony to make this my per- raise the very largest amount of food- homes were erected on the farms put-anent home. stuff possible. If you do this, you will chased by Polish people from various parts
My first visit to this colony was in the have the joy of living in the best state of the United States. :ring of 1913, when I came here to in- in the Union, in the best county in the she Aat time t Pois fas
iect the land the company was selling, state, in the midst of the most desirable spring. At that time the Polish farmers
-. of Korona were very busy harvesting their
There were not many houses at that time neighbors, and your earnest efforts here o
Bunnell and but very few farmers in will help win the war,- for we all know potato crop, and all of them made big that it is food that will win the war. money. Some of the men whom I myself e surrounding country. The field man-, thapersuaded to buy farms near mine have
-er of the Bunnell Development Coin- W. J. SCZUDLO, already settled on their land, have built
:any took me, on my arrival, over the Du Pont, Korona Farms, Florida. for themselves nice little homes and have
lony and showed me the place where cleared -a considerable amount of their
-orona was going to be located. When lands. Last year a particular friend of
-e arrived at the spot where I am now Dear 'Mr. Verdenius:- mine. Mr. John Mazurewicz, realized
Wing there was no development to be In the year 1911 my brother and I went $2,100.00 net from seven acres of pota:=.und for miles. There were none of the on a pleasure trip to Florida. We fell in toes. This was quite a sum when one :resent progressive Polish people, and love with the climate and the general con- realizes that it was clear profit on these
was hard to believe then that this ditions throughout the state, and I saw at eight acres after deducting all expenses untry would ever be developed for once that there were unlimited opportuni- of the potato crop. Another friend of
--any years to come. However, Florida's ties there. I saw settlers of almost every mine, Mr. Trojanowski, had four acres o nderful climate and my conversations other nationality, but ";found hardly no in potatoes and he cleared $1,280.00 from
-ith the people of Bunnell, caused me to farmers of my own (Polish) nationality, same. My friend, Mr. Michalski, cleared :slieve in this part of Florida, so I After a pleasant journey we returned to almost $2,000.00 on his potato crop, and
-ought a 20 acre tract, and am very glad Chicago. Two years later I noticed an several others with whom I am personally
-day that I did so. advertisement of a Polish colony in Flor- acquainted did equally as well.
Because of the fact that this colony ida, named the Korona colony. As soon If any of my countrymen are looking
:as been growing all the time, we now as possible I purchased twenty acres of for a place where they can buy farms,
_ave our own railroad station at Korona, their land. I had such implicit faith in I feel that they should investigate this
country school, a beautiful Catholic the Korona colony that I bought this 20 colony. I am convinced that there is no iurch and two buildings are now being acre tract without seeing it. Seven months better place in the United States for the
-7ected. In one of these will be located later my business called me to Florida, and Polish people than the Korona colony. One general merchandise store, while the I decided that I would see the land I had of the great advantages in buying a farm .:her will be the post-office. Last. but contracted for. I was so well pleased with at Korona is that it is not necessary to :t least, there is a fine class of Polish my farm and with the colony in general have such a large acreage as is needed in
-=.ttlers here and many more will come that I increased my holdings to 40 acres. a northern climate, where but one crop
-:on. Since that time I have visited the Korona a year can be grown. The Korona farmers
We are very pleased over the fact that colony every year, and each time finds me raise at least three crops each year. Their ze now have a new county, with the more strongly convinced that I made a biggest crop is the one grown during the
county seat. Bunnell, but five miles from good investment. I like the Korona col- winter months and is generally known as Corona. We are sure now of getting a ony in particular, and Florida in general, the "money. crop." nod drainage system through all of our better every time I go there. It is my In my opinion, within a few years from
nlony, and everybody seems satisfied great ambition to locate on my own farm now, the Korona colony will all be set:.d In good- hope for the future; as soon as possible; tled up with good Polish people, who will
Last year's crop was very good In our I have watched the growth of Korona be good American citizens, and who will
-3lony, and all who planted Irish pota- from its very beginning. I recall the time be a credit to our country. tes received good prices for their crops, when there was scarcely a house there. H. KACZANOWSKI,
r Mazurewicz realized over $2,000.00 Later I s;iw a nice Catholic church built 2030 W. Division Street, Chicago, Illinois.




6a BUNINELL HOME BUILDER
"Buy a Farm in Bunnell and Become Independent"
SAYs-THOMAS A. VERDENIUS
of which Bunnell is a part, prospered land, but he must consider well the locaand made good money before this pres- 'ion of same, its surroundings, shipping ent world war. Many of them made facilities, markets, etc. The Bunnell
fortunes last spring from their potato colony offers unusual advantages in all crop, and I believe they will do just as these lines. well this year. NOW IS THE TIME FOR YOU TO
WHY ARE YOU-NOT ONE OF THE BUY A BUNNELL FARM. The contract
AND ENJOYING SO-E OF THIS I will give you is extremely liberal. It PROSPERITY? allows you ninety days in which to make
Last spring it was my pleasure to be a personal inspection of the allotment in the Bunnell colony at the time the made you. If you go to the colony farmers were digging and shipping their within that time, look your farm over Irish potatoes. It was a bumper crop carefully and find that it is not satisand exceeded their fondest expectations, factory, we shall be glad to change you An average of sixty barrels to the acre to another tract of land which you may was not unusual, while many fields sur- select, or if we are not able to please passed this amount considerably. you, your money will be cheerfully reI saw days when an average of 130 funded to you. carloads of potatoes were shipped daily Let me again assure you that our land from. our famous Florida potato district, is all that we represent it to be. Under and it goes without saying that not only our liberal payment plan it is not necesdid our farmers harvest big crops, but sary for you to invest the full amount they also received big prices for their of the purchase price, but by paying 50 potatoes cents per acre each month you have
At that time the Hastings Bank seventy months, or almost six years, in doubled the number of its force and the which to pay for your farm, without any total deposits of this bank reached the extra charges whatever. N'o Interestmillion dollar mark. On one particular No Taxes-No Extra Fees. MR. THOS. A. VERDEVIU Saturday more than forty thousand dol- From a climatic standpoint alone, the
The Pioneer Small Farm Mfan of Florida. lars were checked out for pay rolls and land is well worth double the price we
For months past, through the pages of other expenses incident to the harvest- ask for it; but, taking into consideration the HOME BUILDER, we have endeav- ing of the potato crop. Truly the potato its wonderful productive qualities, and
ored to show you some of the oppor- was King in our section of the country the fact that they grow three crops a tunities that may be yours in the those days, and it is confidently pre- year, this land is worth hundreds of dolBunnell Colony. You have been told how dicted that similar conditions will pre- lars an acre. You will not question this you may buy land in our colony at the vail within a hundred days from now statement when you figure out the revery low price of $35.00 an acre, with when we ship our 1918 potato crop to turns per acre from $35.00 an acre land, almost six years in which to pay for the north. and the returns per acre from $200.00
same. We have showed you how you In view of all these facts, it is only to $300.00 an acre land in some of our
may obtain a farm there on our monthly natural that Florida potato land is in- northern states. payment plan, without any interest, creasing in value. You will find an order-blank printed
taxes or other charges, and that even Even though it would be impossible below for your convenience. Fill it out with so small a tract as ten acres it is for you to move to your farm now, from and mail to me at once. Do not put this possible for you to become in a measure an investment standpoint you could not master off. ACT TODAY. The sooner I independent. go wrong by purchasing one of these receive your order the better location I
If you have read our booklet, "A LIT- choice pieces of land. Bear in mind that can give you.
TLE FAR--A BIG LIVLNG," if you when you secure such land as this for 31Y S NCERE ADVI E TO TOV THIS
have read the letters from satisfied buy- $35.00 an acre, you are getting it at a DAY IS. 11TY A FAR3M AT RUNNELL ers in each issue of the HOME mighty low figure, in my estimation. It AND BECO3rE J-DEPENJDEN'T. BUILDER, and if you will read this is not only that one must have choice TH03LAS A. VERDENIUS.
issue carefully, you surely will be convinced that you too may become the ORDER BLANK FOR YOUR BUNNELL ,FARM (VOLUSIA TRACT.)
owner of a farm at Bunnell and make .
a good living from your land just as
those who are already there have done. Date 1918
Here is a thought well worth your
consideration this winter day. While THOMAS A. VERDENIUS-Bunnell Development Co.
you are reading about our wonderful 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.
country, our farmers at Bunnell are busy
in their fields, planting their potatoes, Please enter mv order for a farm of acres of land, for which I agree to
although possibly most of them will have .Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchase, whether 10. 20 or 40)
finished planting by this time. They pay $35.00 per acre, at the rate of DllnrR per month, until paid for.
have been busy right along preparing (Write in here the amount to be paid each month--Q%*On a month fnr 10 acres. $10.00 a month for
their soil, planting and cultivating their 20 acres. $20.00 a month for 40 acres. etc.
crops, while here in the north we have Enclosed find $ as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make
been kept busy with our snow shovels
and coal shovels. When the Bunnell monthly payments of $ hereafter until my land is paid for.
farmers have harvested their first crop, Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment and advise me which tract
yes, and even after they have planted has been allotted to me.
their second crop, the unfortunate
farmer of the north will not yet have Name__ __begun to plow his land for his first and
only crop. Street No. Town Stat
Farmers in the famous potato country;
$5.00 a Month for 10 Acres. $10.00 a Month for 20 Acres..- $20.00 a Month for 40 Acres.







Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. FEBRUARY 1918 PATRIOTS ALL The above is a reproduction of a photograph taken some time ago, of one of the potato fields in the Bunnell colony. Below it the artist has drawn a group of our boys in khaki following the grand old American flag wheresoever it may lead them. Many will go to the battle front and return again, as heroes; other brave souls will lay down their lives for their country, but the call today is just as imperative for men to go into the fields and grow the food with which to feed our soldiers and the nations depending upon us for food. Whether we shall be here, or there, let us keep in mind that we are serving our country and that we may be tc P ATRIOTS ALL.”

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Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER The Greatest Movement for Peace. More than half the world is today in the throes of a terrible war, and all the world is suffering, more or less, as a re sult of same. Since our own country has entered this contest, we are beginning to keenly feel on all sides the effects of the war. We have our “meatless” our “wheat less” and our “porkless” days. We are much concerned over the fuel shortage, and there is talk of having to close schools and churches because of the lack of coal. In Europe blood has been flowing freely for the past three years, and as yet there seems to be no end to this dreadful conflict. While the United States declared war several months ago, we have in reality not yet entered this struggle. Just now we are passing through a period of reorganization and a time of great unrest. Some individuals have made large fortunes because of this world calamity, by furnishing war sup plies,' money, food, etc. Others have made vast sums by speculating in food, for almost every commodity or necessity of life has increased from 50 to 200 per cent. Some lines of industry are work ing day and night in an endeavor to sup ply the men of our great army and navy with clothing, food, shoes, guns, ammuni tion. etc. At the same time, many lines of business are entirely at a standstill. For the past two or three years living expenses have been increasing at a ter rific rate and men and women every where are finding it hard to stand up under the strain of it all. Throughout these trying times there has been one class of individuals which has stood nracticallv alone, and that is the AMER ICAN FAFMER. He is tlm eriant figure on which the sun of prosperity has con tinued to shine. He has steady, profitable and pleasant employment, a home for himself and his family from which no landlord can eject him. His cellars are stored with vege tables and fruit for the winter; he has plenty of w r ood for fuel to insure com fort and warmth; his barns are bulging with the crons from his own fields, and notwithstanding this great war and all its effects, the American Farmer is able to live like a prince in peace and secur ity. He has a never-ending source of income, one that will continue indefi nitely, amidst surroundings that are su perior to any other form of endeavor. He is more independent than any other class of men. What does such independence mean? What does it mean to have the assurance that your livelihood is guaranteed, your independence protected, whether our country is in the midst of peace or war? It is well for us to note the signs of the times and learn our lesson from present conditions. When it means so much to actually possess a piece of Mother Earth, when such peace and security can be felt by setting foot on one’s own land and till(By THE EDITOR) ing one’s own bit of earth, is it not a wonder that more people do not take this step toward peace? There are a great many individuals who will never find themselves, who will never be con tented until they are able to say, “This is my farm,” or “This is my plot of land.” With such a possession a man may face the future with calm confidence. I believe that almost every man is at heart a farmer. He loves to turn over with his plow or his spade the warm, moist earth, to plant his seeds and watch the green shoots springing, as if by magic, from the ground. If you are not an exception to this rule, you too have that longing in your heart, and you owe it to yourself, to your family—your boys and your girls—to become the owner of a farm as soon as possible. If you are not able at the present time to buy a large farm, then secure a smaller one. If it is impossible for you to move to a farm, and if you are living in a city, seek out and buy or rent a little home in a suburb where you may have one or two large lots whereon you may grow things. If you are contem plating the purchase of a small farm, but are undecided as to where you should locate, then let me ask you to give your careful consideration to the Bunnell colony. I would not have you think that I con sider Bunnell the only desirable place in which to locate, for I fully realize that every locality has its advantages and its disadvantages. There are drawbacks to every state in the Union, but I say this to you candidly, after traveling exten sively over this country, and after a comprehensive study of farming com munities, markets, transportation facili ties, etc., that I do not believe, taking everything into consideration, that there is a. better place for a man who 'wishes to buy a farm than in the Bunnell colony. Naturally, the choice of such a loca tion depends largely on the individual taste. If a person prefers snow and ice. large fuel bills, frozen water pipes and blizzard weather, Florida would not, be the place for him. For such an individ ual I wnuld recommend Canada. On the other hand, if a man desires to grow three crons annually, if 355 arrowing days a year anneal to him. if he likes to grow crops during the winter months and pre fers to pick oranges from the trees in January or February instead of shovel ing snow, then I should recommend Florida to such a man. If the decision is once reached that a farm in Florida is what is desired, then most emphatically I say that I do not know of a better place in which to locate than somewhere in the famous Irish potato district of Florida, which is largely embraced by the southern por tion of St. Johns county, Flagler county and the northern portion of Volusia county. I have never yet seen the time when farmers in that locality could not find a ready market for their Irish potato crops. During the shipping season there may be seen commission men from Chi cago, New York, Boston, Cincinnati, Bal timore, Philadelphia and other large cities hurrying hither and thither through the country in an endeavor to purchase the farmers’ potatoes. I would not have you think that Irish potatoes are all that can be grown in the Bunnell colony, for with but few ex ceptions all northern crops can be raised there as well as the majority of southern crops. Fine orange groves are to be found in our locality adjoining the Bun nell colony, while a hundred various crops can be grown there besides citrus fruits. The primary reason why the editor is such an ardent advocate of Irish potatoes for Bunnell farmers is be cause this is a staple crop, like wheat in the north, and because grown at the time of year they are, there is always a good market for Irish potatoes. If necessary, human beings can dispense with the lux uries in food, but they must need have the staples. Then, too, aside from the fact that there is always a demand for Irish pota toes, it is also true that it is usually a sure crop for the farmers of our section. Some years they have a much better crop than others, due to the seed pota toes or climatic conditions, but I have yet to hear of an absolute crop failure. Another most desirable feature about our potatoes, is that they do not reouire the investment nor do our farmers have to wait so long for returns. If a person desires to set out an orange grove, he must expect to wait from six to ten years for any commercial returns, and there are comparatively few who are able or willing to wait so long a time. In the Bunnell colony the farmers plant their potatoes in January and February. About one hundred ^ days later they harvest their potato crop, and soon after Plant a second crop, which is later followed by a third. There are other features in connec tion with this subiect which could be discussed, but this I will say. that if one wishes to have an oranare grove he can plant his trees in the midst of his potato fields and grow the potatoes between the rows of trees so long as they are small. If your heart has been set on buying a piece of land, do not hesitate longer about taking the step. There is no time like the present for doing the thing that you ought to do. As to where you shall locate must depend on your own taste. No one can decide that for you; but, wherever you go. be it North. East, South or West, if you buy good land at a fair price you can never make a mis take. You are bound to double the amount of your original investment within a few years. Locate on your farm as soon as possible, for we believe that
PAGE 3

Sftc BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. The Story of a Woman Who Became a Successful Potato Grower Two Hundred Ten Dollar Gold Pieces ($2000.00) Received from One Car Load of Potatoes. AN ECHO FROM THE I9I7J>0TAT0 CROP. Diaaina spuds at, farm Of Mrs. 0. C. Dinkins—Mrs. Dinkins in the foreground. While many instances of remarkable agricultural successes are frequently recorded and reported by the farmers of the Florida potato district, a somewhat unusual case is that of Mrs. 0. C. DinCarload Of 200 barrels of Irish potatoes that sold for $ 2,000 in gold. the gross sales from that year’s crop amounting to $13,149.00. The following year the total yield from her farm was not quite so large, being about 3000 bar rels, yet her total receipts were consider kins, who has about 60 acres of fine po tato land between Bunnell and Hastings. Mrs. Dinkins’ farm is located in St Johns county, the same county in which Bunnell was located before it became the county seat of the new (Flagler) county. We have spoken in the HOME BUILDER before of this remarkable woman and the wonderful success she has achieved. In our new tract we have at least three thousand acres of this fine potato land, with identically the same soil and sub-soil as is to be found on Mrs. Dinkins’ farm. Mrs. Dinkins is a native of West Vir ginia and came to Florida in March, 1912. A year later she lost her husband and was left entirely on her own re sources, with her farm but partially paid for. Realizing that it was up to her to make good, she began a careful study and experiment in the growing of pota toes and was rewarded with most en couraging results. Each year since that time this woman-farmer has grown fine crops of Irish potatoes, and in many in stances has far excelled the men in our potato belt. Three years ago Mrs. Dinkins dug 3415 barrels from her 60 acres of potatoes, ably better on account of the higher market price for spuds. Her 1917 crop surpassed all her pre vious potato crops, not only in yield, but also in the prices obtained for same. Mrs. Dinkins also received the banner price for a single carload of potatoes. She and a neighbor shipped together one carload from their adjoining farms, and received as payment for same the sum of TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS IN GOLD from the commission firm of John Nix & Company of New York. Three hours after the car had been dispatched the money was delivered to them in the form of 200 gold coins of $10.00 denomination. This payment was part of. a special contract made with this well known firm, by which they undertook to handle all the digging of one week of these two successful farmers and to pay them at the rate of $9.00, $8.00 and $7.00, re spectively, for No. l’s, 2’s and 3’s, and $10.00 a barrel for the first carload of No. l’s shipped. The crop averaged 75 barrels to the acre. It gives us much pleasure to repro duce on this page three pictures of Mrs. Dinkins’ farm and 1917 crop. The first is a view of the farm while the potatoes were being dug. The second shows the car containing the 200 barrels for which $2,000.00 in gold was paid—200 tendollar gold pieces. The third shows the same field three weeks after her potatoes were dug. Mrs. Dinkins grew three crops on her land last year. So did our Bunnell colony farmers. In. the next issue of the HOME BUILDER we hope to write rather fully of one of our suc cessful Bunnell farmers. We have farms in our colony, in par ticular we would mention those in the famous Haw Creek section, that will produce equally as well as Mrs. Dinkins’ land. We have the farms—the right kind of soil; all we need is more men and women of thrift and energy, who will buy this land, clear and cultivate it, and turn their crops into gold dollars. Don’t you think you should haYe one of these farms? Don’t you think you could do as well as this woman? If so, the farm is waiting for you, and the price is hut $35.00 an acre, payable on the monthly payment plan. Same field as shown in upper picture taken about three weeks after potatoes were dug—This corn was preciously planted between the rows of potatoes.

PAGE 4

BUHMEIL1L HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed Mr. J. J. Buckles has two acres of land planted to cabbage and will soon have some ready for market. Rev. R. L. Ramsey, who has been pas tor of the Methodist Church in Bunnell for the last two years, was returned by the annual conference for another year. Mr. Ramsey has many warm friends in the Bunnell colony who wmlcome his return. Petitions have been circulated and the | necessary.signatures have been secured, i asking the Flagler County School Board j to call an election and to divide the county into three school districts. Mr. W. A. Brock and family have mfoved into their new home just opposite the Seventh Day Adventist Church. Mr. D. H. Joyce, of Iowa, who owns a 20 acre farm on the Moody Road south of Mr. Mack, has arrived. He will imme diately have his land broken and planted to potatoes this winter. Mr. E. Weber and family, of Toledo, Ohio, have arrived in Bunnell and expect to make their future home on their farm, which is located about four miles south of Bunnell. There was quite a “hog killing” time at J. J. Buckles last Tuesday, he having killed six porkers. When one has.plenty of pork and sweet potatoes he need no.t worry about the high cost of living. He can have his meatless days and not go hungry, either. Mr. Mark Gilpin, of Pennsylvania, has arrived in Bunnell and expects to re main here. The new bank building is almost com pleted. The fixtures have arrived and are installed. The beautiful new home of Mr. W. H. Deen is nearly completed, and adds much to the attractiveness of Moody Boule vard. Mr. C. B. Hendy has purchased an in terest in the Bunnell Sales Stable from Mr. M. Stone. Mrs. J. Robinson, of Dover Center, On tario, Canada, has arrived in Bunnell. She has a farm in the Bunnell colony, two miles west of Bunnell, which she will have put under cultivation and a spring crop planted. Mr. A. M. Scott, of Calhoun, Georgia, will open an up-to-date cafe in Bunnell within the next few weeks. Two new bunoalows in the town of Dupont. Mrs. I. I. Moody entertained the Bun nell Women’s Club and outside friends at her home, east of town, last Saturday evening. One of the busy places in Bunnell. Mr. C. V. Brown has just received word thac his son Floyd, who enlisted .in the army, has arrived in France. Holden’s Pharmacy have just installed a new lighting system, which will give them both light and electric power night and day. Mr. and Mrs. Foster, of Kirkwood, Georgia, who own a farm on the Moody Road about one and one-half miles southwest of Bunnell, have moved here permanently. Mr. I. I. Moody was elected Worship ful Master of Bunnell Lodge, No. 200, Free and Accepted Masons. After the installation of the new officers a nice supper was served to all in attendance. The lodge is in a flourishing condition, new members being taken in at almost every communication, the present mem bership being around seventy-five. There is talk of erecting a three-story temple during 1918, on the corner lot east of the Tribune office. Mr. Arthur Buckles had quite a thrill ing experience a few days ago. While driving his mules home from the field where he had been plowing, he met a young lady driving a car. He was so interested in the lady that he forgot the mules. They became frightened, turned around, ran over him and knocked him down. When he recovered sufficiently to get up, the car, lady and mules were all gone. Watch the mules next time, Arthur; the lady will tend to the car. At the regular city election, Mr. J. B. Boaz, editor of the Flagler Tribune, was elected Mayor of Bunnell. Messrs. J. E. Jones, J. H. McKnight and Mr. Stone were the three aldermen elected. Seed potatoes for the farmers through out Flagler county have arrived and are ready for delivery at the different load ing points in the county. Daily the farmers may be seen hauling their seed potatoes to their farms. Mr. and Mrs. Holden have begun the erection of a fine bungalow on their property east of the Pine Grove Inn.

PAGE 5

Uf>e BUHNELL HOME BUILDER by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Mrs. George Reading, of Pennsylvania, arrived in Bunnell Tuesday and is look ing over lier lands here. She says she and Mr. Reading are making prepara tions to move down next September. Work on the addition to the Tribune %  Sice is being rushed as fast as possible. This brick building is 20 by 40 feet. With this additional space, Bunnell’s progressive newspaper will have plenty of 100 m and will be in a better position :o do good work. The Membership Committee of the Flagler County Red Cross Chapter is ioing great work. The drive is for 300 members, which they have undoubtedly secured by this time. The farmers in and around DuPont are very busy getting ready for their spring potato planting. The acreage planted around DuPont, including Kor:na, this year will be more than twice mat of last year. New people have come in and all the old settlers will plant larger crops, as many of them cleared new land last summer. Mr. P. Pellicer has just completed his new home and has moved into same. Messrs. J. J. Buckles and Malphurs aave just finished grinding their sugar ;ane. Both obtained nice quantities of syrup. Mr. and Mrs. Doty, of Manchester) Iowa, who were among the first purchas ers of Bunnell property, have arrived in 3unnell. The profits realized from the dinner given by the Parent-Teacher’s Associa tion were applied to the indebtedness on the school piano. The Order of the Eastern Star held a very beautiful and impressive ceremony on Tuesday, the occasion being the in stallation of officers. IT COULD NOT BE DONE Somebody said that it couldn’t be done. But he, with a chuckle, replied That “maybe it couldn’t” but he would be one Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried. So he buckled right in, with the trace of a grin On his face. If he worried, he hid it, He started to sing as he tackled the thing That couldn’t be done, and he did it. Somebody scoffed: “0, you’ll never do that, At least no one ever has done it.” And he took off his coat and he took off his hat, And the first thing we knew 7 he’d be gun it; With the lift of his chin, and a bit of a grin, Without any doubting or quibbling; He started to sing as he tackled the thing That couldn’t be done, and he did it. There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done. There are thousands to prophesy failui’e; There are thousands to point out to us, one by one, The dangers that wait to assail you; But just buckle in with a bit of a grin Then take off your coat and go to it; Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it. It Can Be Done The young people of the Seventh Day Adventist Church (also known as the “Church Beautiful”) enjoyed a most de lightful evening recently at the home of Mrs. Abbott. The farmers of Flagler county will plant approximately four thousand acres to Irish-potatoes this winter. %  Within-The past few years the new settlers in this section have been rapidly clearing lands until they now have ap proximately four thousand acres ready to plant to potatoes and practically every available acre will be planted to potatoes the coming season. With this large acreage planted, farm ing life in Flagler is becoming the lead ing business of the county. There is approximately one hundred and fifty thousand acres of as fine farm ing land in Flagler county as there is in the State and the settlers are rapidly putting it under cultivation. Within the past three years the cleared acreage has jumped from five hundred acres to four thousand acres and the work of clearing goes merrily on. It is a safe estimate that there will be from one to fifteen thousand acres cleared each year until the entire acreage is under cultivation. The next move is to build hard roads throughout the entire farming section. It will take sixty miles of hard sur faced roads to cover this farming sec tion properly. These roads will cost seven thousand dollars a mile, therefore it will require approximately four hun dred and fifty thousand dollars to com plete the work. The best and only way to secure this money is by bonding the county. It is being talked all over the county that a bond issue for building the roads must be called. These farmers need the x-oads and want them. They are willing to pay for them so it is up to those in authority to investigate the matter. The Dupont Florida Central railroad together with the Florida East Coast railroad covers practically all of this farming section and with good hard sur faced roads to the different shipping points the fanners of Flagler county will not be handicapped in transporting their fertilizer and seed to the farms or haul ing their products to the cars, which is a great saving, one which very few com munities enjoy. We already have the best land in the State; the l'ailroads are already here. With a system of hard surfaced roads throughout this entire farming section Flagler county wall stand at the top of the list of farming counties, not only in the State of Florida but throughout the entii'e United States.—(Flagler Tribune.) Glimpse of 10G acre orange grove just east of the Bunnell colony—Note the magnidcient palm trees in the background. Ten acres of oranges or grapefruitwill give one an independent living in the Sunny Southland.

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&ft<9 BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Eternal Springtime in the heart Keenest Joy in the Things of this man, who Finds his of Nature About Him. MR. A. T. FOLSOM. Since I came to live on my Bunnell farm I have become an advocate and ex ponent of the simple life. Elemental things somehow appeal to me. I use daily the tools of the pioneer—the axe, the cross-cut saw and the grubbing hoe. I cook my meals before an open fire place, and bake my bread in one of those old-fashioned skillets with three legs and an iron lid, whereon coals are laid. I have found it quite an art to get a good bake. The fuel question never troubles me, as ten minutes’ work a day with the axe supplies my needs. I take great comfort with my open fire. It is very cheerful of evenings. I generally cut an oak stick for a back log, then some pitch pine and top oft j with a double armful of red cedar. This 1 is felled timber, cut many years ago for i shingles, and the heart wood is as bright j in color and spicily fragrant as if cut yesterday. I work in an open field and my horizon is bounded by a fringe of pine trees, not very large nor very close together. The country is interspaced with clearings and the effect is decidedly park-like. Stray cattle and small flocks of sheep are constantly passing back and forth. To the north of me lies Black Branch— not much of a stream, but its banks are a perfect jungle of underbrush and trees, making an ideal barrier from the north wind. I have a notion to call my place Great Barrier Ranch on that account. I feel sure that behind its protecting walls I can grow oranges with safety. Being thrown on my own resources socially, no neighbors being near, I find exhaustless pleasure in noting the com ings and goings of the wild life about me. I am as pleased when I have dis covered a new bird that is domiciled on my premises as a collector when he has made a new “find.” Such a pleasure was mine the other day when a new variety of woodpecker put in an appearance on the palm at my back door. He was the smallest of the birds of this variety I have yet seen, had no red on the top of his head as most of these birds do. Had a glossy black back, with minute specks of gray, and gray margined his wings. While I was hacking away at a pal metto log recently I noticed a pair of ivory-bill woodpeckers on the big dead pine at the edge of my field. This tree has been pre-empted by a sparrow hawk and he promptly took possession. They stood not upon the order of their going and as they passed overhead 1 had an opportunity to observe them closely. They are strikingly marked birds, onej half of their wings are black, the other half pure white. They had exaggerated crests of deepest red, their voices were loud and strident, and they have a nervj ous, abrupt way about them. Some of the birds of last summer have gone further south. The cardinal bird is one, the two night birds, and the swal lows, but others have come to take their places. You can hear the catbirds mew ing in the thickets mornings and even ings, you can hear the blue jays quarrel ing in the pines, and the kingfisher springing his rattle at all times of day. The piping of the kildee plover is one of the sounds I love to hear and they are newcomers. I hear the caw of the crows. Flocks of robins are going south. They are your true tourists. I have noticed the brown thrasher, the ground robin, meadow larks and blue birds, the sum mer yellow birds and the diminutive house wren, and I haven’t exhausted my list by any means. Winter is supposed to be at its height now, but Saturday I saw two butterflies that had lately emerged from their co coons, and today I saw a palmetto white with buds. I suppose I could pick a dozen varieties of wildflowers on my place. A. V. FOL SOM, Bunn ell, Florida. IOWA MAN HAPPY IN THE THOUGHT THAT HE HAS BOUGHT LAND IN THE BUNNELL COLONY. Dear Mr. Verdenius: As you will recall, I bought two small farms from your company last February, aud I wish to tell you that I am mighty glad I made that investment. I visited Florida and the Bunnell col ony last spring and the country looked good to me. I saw a great variety of crops growing throughout the colony. I shall never forget that trip and what I saw there. It gives me pleasure to recommend your lands and your company to any prospective buyers. J. McPHERSON, Prairie City, Iowa. NEW ENGLAND MAN YERY PLEASED WITH THE LAND SELECTED FOR HDI IN THE BUNNE LL COLONY. Mr. T. A. Verdenius. Dear Sir:—My father, Mr. Stromwall, wishes me to write and tell you that he has been down to Florida and that he is very much pleased with the farm you selected for him. He hopes that by next fall he will be able to go down to the colony and make his home there perma nently. He went to Florida and came back by boat, and all in all, he had a very pleas ant time. He wants to thank you for all you have done for him. EDW. STROMWELL, Springfield, Mass. Picture of orange prove near Bunnell taken in December. Which do you prefer? A Winter Scene in Michigan. ricking oranges near Bunnell in January. “Winter Snows” or “Sunny Skies.”

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UhQ BUMNEEL, HOME BUILDER Two Letters of Particular Interest to Every Buyer of Land in the Korona Section of the Bunnell Colony. MR. W. J. SCZUDLO. Ty dear Mr. Verdenius: As you know, I have now returned to ce Korona colony to make this my per manent home. My first visit to this colony was in the -pring of 1913, when I came here to in ject the land the company was selling, .here were not many houses at that time Bunnell and but very few farmers in me surrounding country. The field man ner of the Bunnell Development Com pany took me, on my arrival, over the jlony and showed me the place where corona was going to be located. When ~e arrived at the spot where I am now wing there was no development to be ::und for miles. There were none of the :resent progressive Polish people, and %  was hard to believe then that this :untry would ever be developed for many years to come. However, Florida's -onderful climate and my conversations ~ith the people of Bunnell, caused me to relieve in this part of Florida, so I %  o ught a 20 acre tract, and am very glad oday that I did so. Because of the fact that this colony :as been growing all the time, we now oave our own railroad station at Korona, country school, a beautiful Catholic Lurch and two buildings are now being -rected. In one of these will be located general merchandise store, while the :her will be the post-office. Last, but pot least, there is a fine class of Polish rattlers here and many more will come -:oon. We are very pleased over the fact that ~e now have a new county, with the cunty seat. Bunnell, but five miles from Zorona. We are sure now of getting a rood drainage system through all of our olony, and everybody seems satisfied md in good hope for the future. Last year’s cron was very good in our :olony, and all who planted Irish pota toes received good prices for their crops. Zr. Mazurewicz realized over $2,000.00 for his seven acres of potatoes. For four acres Mr. Trojanowski received $1,280.00. Mr. Michalski received $1,200.00 for four acres of potatoes—and so on, each one realizing according to the number of acres he planted. This coming season the Polish settlers will plant at least 250 acres to potatoes, and we feel confi dent that we shall obtain good results from same. 1 have been back here nine weeks now and have a nice little garden. I have set out 800 cabbage plants, 100 straw berry plants and 1000 onion sets. I have planted everything that can be planted at this season of the year and all of it is growing very nicely. I expect to plant eight acres to Irish potatoes. Of course, you understand that I had my land cleared before. What we need now, Mr. Verdenius, is more settlers—-enough of them to de velop every acre of Flagler county land. In this way we should be able to help our county grow, develop and increase the value of our colony lands, and by supplying more food for the markets, help our country win the war. As a loyal citizen of the United States, I would urge every buyer of Bunnell Development Company land to come and locate on same just as soon as possible. Start at once clearing your land and raise the very largest amount of food stuff possible. If you do this, you will have the joy of living in the best state in the Union, in the best county in the state, in the midst of the most desirable neighbors, and your earnest efforts here will help win the war,' for we all know that it is food that will win the war. W. J. SCZUDLO, Du Pont, Korona Farms, Florida. Dear Mr. Verdenius :— In the year 1911 my brother and I went on a pleasure trip to Florida. We fell in love with the climate and the general con ditions throughout the state, and I saw at once that there were unlimited opportuni ties there. I saw settlers of almost every other nationality, but 'found hardly no farmers of my own (Polish) nationality. After a pleasant journey we returned to Chicago. Two years later I noticed an advertisement of a Polish colony in Flor ida, named the Korona colony. As soon as possible I purchased twenty acres of their land. I had such implicit faith in the Korona colony that I bought this 20 acre tract without seeing it. Seven months later my business called me to Florida, and I decided that I would see the land I had contracted for. I was so well pleased with my farm and with the colony in general that I increased my holdings to 40 acres. Since that time I have visited the Korona colony every year, and each time finds me more strongly convinced that I made a good investment. I like the Korona col ony in particular, and Florida in general, better every time I go there. It is my great ambition to locate on my own farm as soon as possible. I have watched the growth of Korona from its very beginning. I recall the time when there was scarcely a house there. Later I saw a nice Catholic church built MR. II. KA CZAXO WSKL and Rev. A. Baczyk of Minnesota,' be came the pastor and built a beautiful lit tle bungalow. A railroad station was built, a school house, and a number of nice farm homes were erected on the farms pur chased by Polish people from various parts of the United States. The last time I was in Korona was last spring. At that time the Polish farmers of Korona were very busy harvesting their potato crop, and all of them made big money. Some of the men whom I myself persuaded to buy farms near mine have already settled on their land, have built for themselves nice little homes and have cleared a considerable amount of their lands. Last year a particular friend of mine. Mr. John Mazurewicz, realized $2,100.00 net from seven acres of pota toes. This was quite a sum when one realizes that it was clear profit on these eight acres after deducting all expenses of the potato crop. Another friend of mine, Mr. Trojanowski, had four acres in potatoes and he cleared $1,280.00 from same. My friend, Mr. Michalski, cleared almost $2,090.00 on his potato crop, and several others with whom I am personally acquainted did equally as well. If any of my countrymen are looking for a place where they can buy farms, I feel that they should investigate this colon}'. I am convinced that there is no better place in the United States for the Polish people than the Korona colony. One of the great advantages in buying a farm at Korona is that it is not necessary to have such a large acreage as is needed in a northern climate, where but one crop a year can be grown. The Korona farmers raise at least three crops each year. Their biggest crop is the one grown during the winter months and is generally known as the “money crop.” In my opinion, within a few years from now, the Korona colony will all be set tled up with good Polish people, who will be good American citizens, and who will be a credit to our country. H. KACZANOWSKI, 2030 W. Division Street, Chicago, Illinois.

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WftQ BUKHELL HOME BUILDER “Buy a Farm in Bunnell and Become Independent’ says-THOMAS A. VERDENiUS MR. THOS. A. VE/M)EXITS. The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. For months past, through the pages of the HOME BUILDER, we have endeav ored to show you some of the oppor tunities that may be yours in the Bunnell Colony. You have been told how you may buy land in our colony at the very low price of $35.00 an acre, with almost six years in which to pay for same. We have showed you how you may obtain a farm there on our monthly payment plan, without any interest, taxes or other charges, and that even with so small a tract as ten acres it is possible for you to become in a measure independent. If you have read our booklet, “A LIT TLE FARM—A BIG HYING,” if you have read the letters from satisfied buy ers in each issue of the HOME BUILDER, and if you will read this issue carefully, you surely will be con vinced that you too may become the owner of a farm at Bunnell and make a good living from your land just as those who are already there have done. Here is a thought well worth your consideration this winter day. While you are reading about our wonderful country, our farmers at Bunnell are busy in their fields, planting their potatoes, although possibly most of them will have finished planting by this time. They have been busy right along preparing their soil, planting and cultivating their crops, while here in the north we have been kept busy with our snow shovels and coal shovels. When the Bunnell farmers have harvested their first crop, yes, and even after they have planted their second crop, the unfortunate farmer of the north will not yet have begun to plow his land for his first and only crop. Farmers in the famous potato country, $5.00 a Month for 10 Acres. — of which Bunnell is a part, prospered and made good money before this pres ent world war. Many of them made fortunes last spring from their potato crop, and I believe they will do just as well this yeai\ WHY ARE YOU NOT ONE OF THEM AND ENJOYING SOME OF THIS PROSPERITY! Last spring it was my pleasure to be in the Bunnell colony at the time the farmers were digging and shipping their Irish potatoes. It was a bumper crop and exceeded their fondest expectations. An average of sixty barrels to the acre was not unusual, while many fields sur passed this amount considerably. I saw days when an average of 130 carloads of potatoes were shipped daily from our famous Florida potato district, and it goes without saying that not only did our farmers harvest big crops, but they also received big prices for their potatoes At that time the Hastings Bank doubled the number of its force and the total deposits of this bank reached the million dollar mark. On one particular Saturday more than forty thousand dol lars were checked out for pay rolls and other expenses incident to the harvest ing of the potato crop. Truly the potato was King in our section of the country those days, and it is confidently pre dicted that similar conditions will pre vail within a hundred days from now when we ship our 1918 potato crop to the north. In view of all these facts, it is only natural that Florida potato land is in creasing in value. Even though it would be impossible for you to move to your farm now, from an investment standpoint you could not go wrong by purchasing one of these choice pieces of land. Bear in mind that when you secure such land as this for $35 00 an acre, you are getting it at a mighty low figure, in my estimation. It is not only that one must have choice land, but he must consider well the loca tion of same, its surroundings, shipping facilities, markets, etc. The Bunnell :olony offers unusual advantages in all these lines. NOW IS THE TIME FOR YOU TO BUY A BUNNELL FARM. The contrac: I will give you is extremely liberal. It allows you ninety days in which to make a personal inspection of the allotment made you. If you go to the colony within that time, look your farm over carefully and find that it is not satis factory, we shall be glad to change you to another tract of land which you may select, or if we are not able to please you, your money will be cheerfully re funded to you. Let me again assure you that our land is all that we represent it to be. Under our liberal payment plan it is not neces sary for you to invest the full amount of the purchase price, but by paying 50 cents per acre each month you have seventy months, or almost six years, in which to pay for your farm, without any extra charges whatever. No Interest— No Taxes—No Extra Fees. From a climatic standpoint alone, the land is well worth double the price we ask for it; but, taking into consideration its wonderful productive qualities, and the fact that they grow three crops a year, this land is worth hundreds of dol lars an acre. You will not question this statement when you figure out the re turns per acre from $35.00 an acre land, and the returns per acre from $200.00 to $300.00 an acre land in some of our northern states. Y'ou will find an order-blank printed below for your convenience. Fill it out and mail to me at one” 1 Do not put this master off. ACT TODAY’. The sooner I receive your order the better location I can give you. Ml’ SINCERE ADYIfE TO YOr THIS DAY IS. R U Y A FARM AT BUNNELL AND BECOME INDEPENDENT. • THOMAS A. YERDENIUS. ORDER BLANK FOR YOUR BUNNELL FARM (VOLUSIA TRACT. 1 Date. .1918 THOMAS A. VERDENIUS—Bunnell Development Co. 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. Please enter mv order for a farm of arres of land, for which I agree to Insert here the number of acres you wish to purchase, whether 10, 20 or to) pay 535.00 per acre, at the rate of_ .TAolInrs per month, until paid for. (Write in here the amount to he paid each month—?5.on a month for 10 acres. $10.00 a month for 20 acres. 820.00 a month for 40 acres, etc.) Enclosed find $_ -as first payment on my farm, and I agree to make _hereafter until my land is paid for. Upon receipt of this, please send me your legal acknowledgment and advise me which tract, has been allotted to me. monthly payments of $_ Name. Street No.. Town. .State. $10.00 a Month for 20 Acres. $20.00 a Month for 40 Acres.