Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edite by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicado, 111.
JANUAR Y 1.918
Farm Yard Scene in the Bunnell Colony
There is no industry that offers greater remuneration on the money invested
than a well-regulated poultry farm. There is no portion of the country where there is a greater demand for the entire products of a poultry farm than on the East Coast
of Florida.
The, entire coast is essentially a winter tourist country, with mammoth hotels
which are filled to overflowing during the winter months. At present these hotels
must depend on frozen poultry purchased in Chicago or other northern cities.
Quite a number of our Bunnell colony women are making plans to engage
in the poultry business on a large Scale, and before long this will be one of the thriving
industries of our Bunnell colony.




SFUNNELL HOME BUTILDER
A New Year Appeal to Thinking Men and Womrn
This Article is of Vital Importance to All Those Who Desire to Better Their Conditions in Life.
a few months ago. For the benefit of and its opportunities made a great those who have received the HOME mistake when you did not buy farms
BUILDER or my literature but recently from me two, three, four and five years I wish to state a few facts regarding ago, for you could have secured your our Bunnell colony, farms then for less money than they
It is but six years since I published will cost you today. But, I doubt not that some of you are saying, "Well,
my first literature concerning the Bun- what is the use of your rubbing it in? nell colony. At that time this colony You know we made a mistake, but give was but little more than a large unde- us another opportunity and we will take veloped body of land, with practically no advantage of it this time." If that is advantages in the way of roads, schools, your attitude, thrifty men and women, towns, farms or the many other things then you will rejoice when you read what that go to make life worth living. But, I have to say to you and learn that you let me tell you briefly what we have still may secure farm-homes in the BunA there today. nell colony at a reasonable price and on
A new county has been created- our extremely reasonable terms. Flagler County, with Bunnell as its However, let me say before I go farcounty seat. Bunnell is an incorporated ther, that for those of you who are percity, with an electric light plant, water fectly satisfied with your present conworks, ice plant, state bank, garages, editions, with your position, your surhotels, stores, lodges, public school with roundings, your home, the environments two years of high school, churches, tele- for your family, the climate in which phone service, weekly newspaper, drug you live, I have nothing further to say store, doctors, lawyers, dentist and last, and you will be wasting your time in but not least, the famous Dixie High- reading this article. But, if you are a way passing through our midst. Bun- wage earner, a city toiler or if you are nell is not our only town, for there is paying high rent for a farm, then my Ocean City, Dupont, Korona, Codyville, letter will be of much interest to you I Favorita and Harwood, and we have a believe. X3(. T oS. A. VERD .EXI VS, number of schools throughout the And now to go back to some of the
The Pioneer Small Farm 2tan, of Florida. cout37" questions I asked you at the outset of
But, what I consider best of all, is the this article. Will you not answer these Before we enter upon that untried, un- fact that we have scores of farmers questions truthfully and sincerely to known period which we shall call the who are making money from their farms. yourselves? What have you accomplished NEW YEAR; before we take upon our- I can bring you to men in our colony in 1917 or during the entire time you
selves the duties and responsibilities of whose profit was from $200.00 to $300.00 have been working for wages? How the year 1918, let us cast a backward an acre on their farms last year. About much money have you saved during the glance at 1917 and consider for a moment three thousand people have bought land past twelve months? What are you what we have accomplished in the year from me, and eventually this part of the worth to-day? Perhaps your answer is forever past. Business firms are taking country will be one of the most thickly that it is impossible to save these days, off iheiIr trial balances to ascertain just settled communities, not only in Ftor- with the cost of living so high, and there wha; tjaey have accomplished in the past ida but in our entire country. is not the shadow of a doubt that this
yeai -and it seems fitting that you and I I dare not undertake to tell you in seems very true. Nevertheless, it proves should take our trial balances, so to detail of the development and successes conclusively that I am right in urging speak, and see if we accomplished what that have been made in different ways you to go "back to the land" where you we set out to do at the beginning of throughout our colony. This entire issue, can eliminate many items from the high 1917. of the HOME BUILDER would not give cost of living and where you can grow
You had planned to have a home- me space for this, but suffice it to say some of the crops that sell for such high
YOUR OWN HOME. You had hoped t6 that those of you who knew of our colony prices these days.
quit working for wages and be earning
Ian independent living from your own
lanA=. You were going to begin living
the simple life, under your own "vine and fig tree," where your children might
have an abundance of fresh air and live
under the open skies and where your "
family need not look forward with dread
to the long cold winter days. -These
were a few of your plans. '"ere they i
not?
But, the twelve months have passed.
Today you are a year older. Are you
any nearer the goal of your ambitions
than you were twelve months ago?
Keep these thoughts before you as you
may read what I shall say further to you
in this talk on "looking backward."
I shall have printed several thousand
copies of the issue of the HOME
BUILDER in which this article -will appear, so I am keeping in mind that my
words will be read by thousands of
earnest, thrifty, ambitious men and
women. Some of you have been on my
mailing list for years, others for only a
few months, while still others possibly
have written me for the first time but A recent Picture of Mrs. Bents Potato farm, located west of Bunneli.




Che BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A NEW YEAR APPEAL TO WHAT THEN? HAVE YOU' PRO- Development Company
THINKING MEN AND WOMEN VIDED FOR SUCH DAYS? is--mrclxasuy-responsible. The titles to
If you are farming in the north, would our lands are perfect. We allow you This Article is of Vital Importance to All it not appeal to you to go to a country ninety days in which to inspect your Those Who Desire to Better Their where there are 365 growing days and land after we have allotted same to you,
Conditions in Life. where you can raise three crops a year, and if at that time you are not satisfied
where if one crop should fail you have with the selection we have made for you, CUontinued) two more chances that same year? you may pick you out another farm, or
Unless you have tried it, you can't I think this one question must make if we cannot please you, your money
realize the satisfaction there is in being a strong appeal to every tiller of the soil. will be refunded to you with six per cent a PRODUCER instead of' a CONSUMER. Is it strong enough to turn your thoughts interest per annum.
I believe if you were living on your farm and your desires Bunnellward? Can you think of a more fair and
today in the Bunnell colony the high cost My message today is especially for the square plan of doing business than this? of living would not bother you very much. man who not only has to work for his Our terms are within the reach of everyI keep my ear pretty close to the ground, living, but has to work mighty hard at one-only 50 cents an acre each month, but I didn't hear any complaints from that. I can readily put myself in such no interest, no taxes or other fees. our Bunnell farmers last spring when a man's place, for I well recall the time For your convenience, you will find an they were receiving such high prices when I earned but $60.00 a month, work- order blank in this issue of the HOME for their Irish potatoes. Some of those ing for a large steel corporation, and BUILDER. Fill it out, attach your first potatoes sold as high as $10.00 a barrel, paying one-fourth of my monthly wage monthly payment and mail to me at once. and I don't imagine that any of you for house rent. However, I managed to In what better way could you end the
who read this would have complained save a little each month and bought old year or begin the new year than by
if you had hd a big crop of potatoes to land on the installment plan-just as I buying a farm-home in the sunny southsell at a high price. As I have said to am advising you to do now. land? If you sincerely desire to better
many of you before, it makes all of the Do not make as your excuse for not your condition in life, now is your opdifference in the world when it comes bettering your condition the high cost portunity. If you do not take advantage to the high cost of living, which side of of living or the great world war. Such of this offer, you will bitterly regret it. the fence you are on-whether -you are conditions as these should make you all IT IS UP TO YOU TO START 1918 a producer or a consumer. the more determined to put yourself in RIGHT. WILL YOU DO IT?
-From my conversation and corre- a position where you will not have to de- Very sincerely yours,
spondence with hundreds, yes, thousands pend upon others for your sustenance. 5
of men and women throughout this land You can have such a home as you have of ours, I have arrived at the conclusion longed for, if you make up your mind that the great and burning desire of you WILL, for "where there's a will, 108 South LaSalle Street,
many hearts is to possess a little farm there's a way." Read on page seven of Chicago, Illinois.
home of their own, free of debt, in a this issue how Mr. Berest is paying for mild climate, from whence a living may his farm. You can do the same. The farmer is the only man who finds
be derived without worry and anxiety. One more question-Could you save 17 it profitable to run his business into the
Still, many of them are fearful and they CENTS A DAY if you had to? You
do not know where or how they can ob- answer YES, I know; and you agree with ground. tain such a home. Do YOU also belong me that every healthy, honest, .industrious Have you treated yourself to a winter to this class, and are you earnestly and man of good habits can do the same, sincerely desirous of obtaining such a without any exceptions whatever. Now inFlorida, where you can spend your time home? Then, let me give you the good if you really want to buy a farm in the and energy outdoors among flowers and and glad news that I can be of help to Bunnell colony, and if you will pay the gardens instead of shoveling snow, thawyou, and that I can with all honesty of Bunnell company but 17 cents a day we purpose show you how and where to ob- will allot you a farm in our new tract ing out water pipes and paying large ta the place of your desires. If you where land is still selling for but $35.00 bills for fuel? will follow the advice I shall give you, an acre. For every ten acres you buy you may practically be the owner of a you must pay us $5.00 a month, which is We are one of the very few land
farm-home in our Bunnell colony before equal to 17 cents a day. If you wish 20 companies in the state located on the you retire this night. acres of land, then all you need do is to grounds, working with and helping our
I AM WILLING TO DO MY PART- pay double the amount. You may take settlers.
WILL YOU DO YOURS? possession of your farm at any time
In the first place, let me tell you that after you have made your first payment Does not this fact show our faith in it is not necessary for you to have such on it. the country?
a large farm at Bunnell, for on the same -land you will grow three different crops
each and every year. In other words,
you can grow as much on twenty acres
in the Bunnell colony as you can on /
sixty in other states, where you have but
one crop each year.
Then, too, our climate is so mild and
delightful that a home may be built at
one-third or one-half the cost of a home
in a northern climate. Your fuel bills
are practically nothing on a Bunnell
farm, while ohe expense of heavy winter
clothing is entirely eliminated.
Do you say that you do not now have
the money with which to build a home or
to begin improving a farm immediately?
That need not deter you from beginning
now to plan for a few years hence. If
you do not begin to save and sacrifice
for such a home, you will never have it.
Do you realize that one of these days
you are going to be old as the term is
known in an emplo:e's life? That one
of these days you will lose your job and
a younger man will' take your place?
And do you realize that some day you
may not be able to stand the long cold A field of suaar cane and irish potatoes owned by Mr. Holland, who lives a few miles west of Bunnell.
northern winters ? These crops were harvested a few days a o.




Ch BUNNEUI LL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
Mr. P. P. Pellicer has commenced the ...
erection of a house on his 20 acre farm.
Elder A. H. Evers, of the Seventh Day
Adventist Church conducted a quarterly
meeting Sunday afternoon in the Church
Beautiful. He also preached at the evening service.
Mr. John N. Shepard, of Cleveland,
Ohio, arrived in Bunnell and will begin .
improvements on the farm he bought ...
two or three years ago. Mr. Shepard is -A 41t
very much pleased with Bunnell's future. =-4 3
Mr. William Campbell, of Lorain, Ohio, has purchased a farm just east of town
near the Dixie highway. He will make 4the necessary improvements on same immed; -tely.
11r. W. J. Sczudlo and family, of Detroit, Mich., who own a nice farm in
Korona, arrived via auto, and "are here .::Li:;
to stay. Mr. Sczudlo will make improve- --- ---=. .... .....
ments on his farm and also build a store Bunnell's Beautiful Xcia Bank Building, taken when building was only partially completed.
and hotel in Korona. We expect soon to
have a post office in Korona and hope to The recital, given under the auspices A party composed of Mr. W. Barnwell, see Mr. Sczudlo the first postmaster of the Parents' and Teachers' Association Prof. and Mrs. Golden, and the Misses
there. of Bunnell, by Mrs. W. H. Gray, who M. Golden and B. Smith motored to
was assisted by some of the best musi- Jacksonville one evening recently to see Mr. Chas. Muzyka, of Detroit, Mich., cans in the community, was a great suc- Ben Hur. is here to settle on his 40 acres of land cess.
near Codyville. Mr. Muzyka was in the The Pine Grove Inn has opened its
colony a year ago and purchased his Mr. G. E. Pickard, of Jacksonville, dining room for the winter season and
forty-acre tract and has just now corn- Florida, together with seven farmers anticipates a large business. pleted the erection of a nice home on from northern states are in Bunnell his farm. and are looking over our farm lands Quite a number of parties have been
Mr. A. E. Edson, of Montana, is in with the idea of purchasing here and going over to Ocean City in the evenings
Bunnell and will make this his future making this their future home. to enjoy the fish frys that Mrs. Wickline
home. Mr. Edson is the owner of a Several attempts have been made to is serving at her home.
splendid 20 acre tract, which he will i- organize a brass band in Bunnell, but Mr and Mrs. A. Eisenbarger and Mr. mediately bring under cultivation, so far without success. However, there
is now another movement on foot, and and Mrs. A. F. Pierson, of Clevelandi
The northern tourists are beginning to we believe that under the leadership of Ohio, are some of the new settlers in come to Florida in large numbers, there Mr. Rich, we shall soon have a fine the colony.
being on an average of seventy-five cars band in Bunnell. passing through Bunnell daily now. _'_Mr. and Mrs. White and two children,
Tof Albany, N. Y., arrived in Bunnell last Supt. Bell, who has been working on Mr. J. B. Lewis, a retired wholesale Saturday and will make their future
the Dixie highway for the past few grocery man of Jacksonville, Florida, has home here.
weeks with his crew of men, has put it purchased 1283 acres of fine land just in good condition for the winter travel, east of Favorita. It is the intention of Mr. Lewis to make a model stock farm Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Wigley and daughWorshipful Master Heath of Bunnell of this land, and in addition he will farm ter, of Canada, aried in Bunnell recentMasonic Lodge delivered a lecture on all a large percentage of it. He is now ly to make this their home. Mr. Wigley three sections of the Masters Degree last erecting a dwelling house and will take bought thirty acres of land last year Tuesday. A great many of the members up his residence on the farm. After from the Bunnell Development Company
te lodge attended. looking over several large tracts in the but has increased his holdings to forty
of the odgea d state, Mr. Lewis decided that the land acres, as he is very much pleased with
The Ladies' Aid Society held their reg- adjacent to Bunnell was the best he could our country. ular monthly meeting last Monday after- find.
noon at 3:00 o'clock. i\'r. and M rs. E. F. Hall and Mr. A.
Mr. A. G. Quinn, of Georgia, one of the W. Drew of North Dakota, who own
Messrs. W. H. Deen and W. H. Coch- first purchasers of land in the Bunnell property in the Bunnell colony, are stopran spent the day fishing on the canal colony, arrived in Bunnell last Friday to ping at the Hotel Halcyon. at Ocean City, and caught a great num- look over his holdings here. He exber of fish. pressed himself as being well pleased Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Flinn, of British
with his land. He said that he hoped to Columbia, Canada, have arrived in BunMr. Geo. Burnsed while fishing Mon- be in a position to soon make Bunnell his nell. They own a nice twenty acre tract day at Ocean City caught a 23-pound home. here which they will immediately havesea bass. cleared and brought under cultivation,
The new bridge across Big Haw Creek The regular weekly dance was given and will erect a home on their farm.
has been completed. The farmers who at the Ocean City Casino Saturday eve- These folks expect to go into t h e
helped in the work or sent their teams ning. There was an unusually large at- poultry business on an extensive scale. deserve much praise, for this bridge will tendance. I
be of great benefit to the neighborhood. The County Tax Collector has opened Mr. George Cooper, of New Jersey,
the tax books in the office of the Cont who owns a 10 acre farm not far from Mr. M. G. Meyers bought a pair of Clerk and is now ready to receive both Bunnell, is in the Bunnell colony to stay,
mr.esfrGm Meers ougt las peka of tand expects to bring his land under culmules from Mike Stone last your state and county taxes.
has started to plow. *e tivatio sl




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Mr. M. Stone, proprietor of the Bun- Mr. John Odum is clearing his 80 acre Mr. and Mrs. H. Graham and daughter, lell Sales Stables, returned from Jack- farm on Middle Haw Creek and prepar- of Minnesota, arrived in Bunnell Wedsonville Wednesday with sixteen fine ing to plant it. He intends to build a nesday evening. Mr Graham bought a head of mules which he will sell to the dwelling house as soon as he can get the farm here a few years ago and expects Bunnell farmers, lumber on the ground. to clear his land and plant it to potatoes
this winter.
Mi. 0. J. Hance and brother, C. D. Mr. Phoda Pellicer is clearing his 20
Chance, are busy this week setting out acre farm, getting it ready for a potato Mr. Richardson, who recently pur:heir fall cabbage. The Hance Brothers crop. chased the valuable business lot just
have only been here a few months but south of the Bunnell State Bank buildare very busy getting their fields in the Mr. Leaston Pellicer is busy hauling ing on Main Street, contemplates erectbest state of cultivation possible. They lumber for the erection of a barn on his ing a large brick apartment building will plant several acres to Irish potatoes. place. on his property. This building will be
modern in every particular, with an upMr. and Mrs. R. L. Hendricks have Mr. M. H. Milliken is setting out to-date cafe on the ground floor.
noved into their beautiful bungalow on strawberry plants this week on his farm MIoody Boulevard. Mr. Hendricks is west of Bunnell t week on his fanm cashier of the Bunnell State Bank.ws f nl. A mass meeting was held in Woodcashier of the Bunnell Sa Des men's Hall at Bunnell for the purpose
Mr. J. S. McGuffin, of Des Moies, of organizing the Flagler County Red
Friday evening the Haw Creek Liter- Iowa, has selected a nice 20 acre tract Cross Chapter. Names of new members ary Society gave an interesting enter- of. land near Codyville, which he will im- were called for, dues paid and names
-ainment at the school house. The house mediately put under cultivation. Mrs. enrolled. Permanent officers for the .as full and all seemed to enjoy them- McGuffin will join her husband in Bun- Chapter were elected. selves. nell in a few weeks.
Mr. T Buzard and family 'have just Mr. R. L. Smith and Mr. Win. Thoma
arrived from Toledo, Ohio, and expect lMr. and Mrs. H. G. Thompson and will immediately enter the sheep-raisinj'
.o make their future home here as soon settled on their farm south of Bunnell. business in Flagler county. as their furniture arrives. Mr. Thompson is very busy getting his They will begin with a flock of fly
farm in readiness for his winter crop. hundred sheep which they will turn loosE Everyone is busy these daysand plant- fin the ranges. Mr. Thomas will havv :ng cabbage seems to be a daily employ- Mr. W. A. Brock, who moved from charge of looking after them. This is
:nent. here to New Castle, Indiana, last spring, one of the best paying businesses i the
has returned to Bunnell. Mr. Brock county and these two gentlemen will n Several of the young people of Bun- knows the value of a good country, and doubt make good money out of it as woo] nell pleased a large audience at the now expects to remain in Bunnell perma- is very high at the present. school house last Thursday evening nently.
.-hen they *presented "Deacon Dubbs" to ______ Mr. A. S. Fowler butchered four fine
packed house. Mr. Halbeck brought into Bunnell a pigs today which he sold to the Hastings
The young people deserve much praise fine sample of rice which he raised on Cold Storage Co., of Hastings.
-or getting up this play as the proceeds his farm. The rice was well headed and Mr. Fowler told us that the expense go towards the piano fund. extra large. of raising these four pigs was $15.00
and that he had sold them for $64.00, a
Messrs. Samuel H. Shapiro and G. net profit of $49.00. The pigs were only
Nelson, two of Uncle Sam's Navy boys A number of farmers of Flagler coun- eight months old.
:rom the U. S. S. Nevada, arrived in ty have organized what is known as the Bunnell this week and are spending Flagler Union, which is a branch of the
-heir vacation here. Farmers' Educational and Co-operative Mr. W. A. Mack is just completing a
They both own some valuable Flagler Union of America. This organization nice dwelling house on his farm on the
-ounty farming land, purchased from the was created for the purpose of bettering Moody road. This building is very at3unnell Development Co., which they the purchasing and selling facilities of tractive and is one among the best to
expect to put under cultivation just as, the farmers. The regular meeting days be found in the county. It adds very soon as the kaiser is licked. They an- of the Union are the first and third Sat- much to the attractiveness of Mr. Mack's
-lcipate planting potatoes next winter. urdays of each month. large farm.
The Bunnell Chapter Order EasternStar held their regular meeting in the
Masonic Hall Tuesday evening. Several
aew members were initiated and the
'meeting was well attended.
WOODS AND FIELDS FULL OF
SPORTSMEN
Messrs. L. M. Boyken, J. E. Forbes
lid J. E. Ives, are camped this week
nd hunting bear and deer. They report
ne success, they having already killed
several fine deer.
Messrs. D. A. and Thomas Deen, to- ,,-.- '
:ether with Mr. McMillian, were out
-agging birds last week. They report
ending many coveys throughout the
)unty.
The local sportsmen are out nearly
-ery day and all report plenty of birds,
22ck, squirrel and deer.
Messrs. Dewey Moody and R. L. Henuicks bagged five large ducks Tuesday z! '
2 ternoon. Mr. W. A. lrac's unfinihed home on his o acre farm south of BunneTI.




6BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
J. B. Boaz, Editor and Proprietor of the Flagler Tribune, Writes Interesting Lettex
of Conditions in Florida Generally and Especially in the Bunnell Colony.
F; ,.elderly mn ad suffered greatly from I first came here you could count the
some unknown disease and within a few reliable farmers of this community on months after he harvested his crop he your fingers, but now they are scattered died, leaving his twenty acres (which all over the colony. They are all buying was not paid for) to his son, Kenneth additional lands, erecting nice homes, R. Brenizer. equipping their farms with the latest
The next year I came don to buy machinery, including tractor engines,
potatoes Kenneth had the twenty acres auto trucks and everything to help faciliplanted to potatoes, which he sold for a tate matters.
good price, in fact, he got enough profit In every direction you go from Bunfrom his potato crop to finish paying for nell you find the farmers clearing new r ....-the twenty acres. Realizing the great ground and getting it ready to plant
profits possible in growing potatoes, another crop of potatoes, in fact, it is Kenneth decided that twenty acres was hustle and bustle all over Flagler counnot enough for him, so he sold his twenty ty, and by the way, the creation of Flagacres for four thousand dollars and pur- ler county is one of the greatest things chased a one hundred acre farm for for us, as we now have our county
which he paid eleven thousand dollars, government in Bunnell, the officers being paying four thousand cash, balance to our own people, which means that good be paid in three yearly payments. The roads will be constructed throughout the following year Kenneth cleared enough entire county. above all expenses to finish paying for I see letters every day from people in his farm and have a nice bank account the North complaining about it being left. The next year he purchased an almost impossible to get sugar, flour,
additional fifty acres, making a total of meat, coal, etc. We "Florida Crackers" one hundred and fifty acres, which he don't know what it is to want, for any of has been farming for the past few years. the above. We grow our own corn and The past season Kenneth sold his crop make our corn meal. We have the finest for around fifty thousand dollars and sugar cane country in the world. In reafter paying all expenses he had a net gard to meat, this is a great cattle and R. J. B. B0-A Z sum of thirty-two thousand dollars to hog country, and besides we have game
his credit. He was offered three hun- galore, which include quail, deer, squirMr. Thomas A. Verdenius, dred dollars an acre for his farm, in rel, turkeys, fish in abundance, and vege108 So. LaSalle Street, other words, he was offered forty-five tables all the year around. We don't use
Chicago, fllinois. thousand dollars for it, but he refused, any coal at all. If it turns a little chilly
Dear Mr. Verdenius: saying, "I know what I can do with this we have plenty of fat pine that don't
farm, but I don't know what I could do cost a cent. All you have to do is cut it While sitting in my office tonight the with the money." Kenneth is now a man and haul in. Why should we worry?
thought struck me "What can I do to let of thirty-one years of age and is worth Thanking you very much for your the people of other states know of the at least seventy-five thousand dollars, time used in reading this, and trusting great possibilities there are in store for and he has made every dollar of it that you will publish it with the hopes those who own a farm in Flagler coun- farming within the past seven years. that some good fellow who i. suffering ty?" Realizing that you publish a bulle- As in the cold north will makeup and realtin every few weeks that you send out As you will remember, last year wa .ntecl ot il aeu n el
election year here when all the officers ize that he is wasting his life away and to your customers throughout the coun- were he n e office that he will move to FLAGLER COUNtry I have decided to write you a letter friends, Mr. S. C. Middleton, (better TY, THE BEST COUNTRY IN THE
and ask that you publish it in your next known to me as "Steve"), aspired to the WORLD, I am, with kindest regards, bulletin, with the hopes that someone Yours very truly, J. B. BOAZ.
will read it and probably move to this tax collector's office. Steve had always wonderful country. been a farmer, he owning a nice fifty The above letter was written by Mr. 1
acre farm here. When Steve came to
I will first give you my reasons for me and told me he was in the race I B. Boaz, editor and proprietor of the Flaglocating in Bunnell after which I will said to him, "What are you going to do ler Tribune, a weekly newspaper published try and tell of the great future that is with your farm if you are elected?" He at Bunnell. Florida. The subscription price in store for the favored sons of Flagler replied, "Well, Boaz, the office of tax of this up-to-date weekly is but $2.oo a county. collector will pay me twenty-five thou- year, and we should like to see each one
I was born and raised in Calhoun, Ga., sand dollars clear in four years and I of our land-owners a subscriber to this where I lived until I was grown. After can rent my farm to my brother George publication. You should help your future I became of age I accepted a position for one thousand dollars a year, which home paper, and it is to your interest to with a New York produce house to go will mean a total of twenty-nine thou- kiow what is going on at Bunniell. If you
to Hastings and buy potatoes. I arrived sand dollars for me during the four once become a subscriber, you will nezer
on the scene about April 1st, and as years." The latter part of the past May wilhngly be without the Tribune. Try it
there was only about five hundred acres I was in Steve's office one day when his for six inonths. planted to potatoes and it seemed to me brother George drove up in a big Challike there was at least one hundred buy- mers auto and came in. After the usual Mr. and Mrs. John Baker, Formerly ers on the ground, there was not much greetings I asked George how he came of Cedarville, Michigan, Express
chance for me to buy many potatoes, out on Steve's fifty acres this year and
especially as I was young at the busi- he replied: "After paying, all expenses Their Satisfaction in Their Bunness. together with the thousand rent I have nell Colony Farm.
I immediately got busy and met Mr. paid Steve, I cleared thirty-four thou- Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius
George C. Middleton, who had consider- sand dollars." George made five thou- Chicago, Illinois.
able acreage planted to potatoes and sand dollars more on the fifty acres Dear Sir:
made a deal with him to handle his within one hundred and twenty days We arrived in the busy little town,
crops, he having several growers whom than Steve will make in his four years in Bunnell, on October 22nd. Mr Loughhe had furnished with potato seed and office, ridge of the Bunnell Development Co.
fertilizer. I remember among his grow- I Since I have resided in Bunnell I have took us to our land, which is located ers was a Mr. Brenizer, who had just j seen farmers who have started in the about two and one-half miles from Bunmoved down from Columbus, 0., the year potato growing business with but a very nell, and we found it much better than previous, who had twenty acres planted. small capital and I have seen them pros- we expected. Respectfully, Mr. Brenizer cleared $1,800.00 on his per until now they are among the best MR. and MRS. JOHN BAKER,
potato crop that season. He was an people; financially, in the county. When Of Cedarville, Michigan.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
THE BEST PAGE OF ALL-What the "Other Fellows" Say About Bunnell.
money with which to buy wire to fence
my ten acres with 48 in. wire fencing. f i After the land was fenced I bought A
a fine Jersey cow and calf. I next built a
small barn, a chicken house and bought
three goats and about thirty chickens. .
I had sown by that time one acre to oats
and c imson clover and cleared some
more land, With the help of my wife,
-.who is my partner and I am proud of
her.
Then I left for Birmingham, Alabama,
where I am today working in the mill.
I am making good money and saving all
I can, enough for fertilizer and seed
potatoes, so that I can plant at least Li x
two or three acres to Irish potatoes. I
hope to go home a few days before
Christmas and stay there for several
- months. I expect to plant my potatoes
. next January.
When I have harvested my potatoes next spring, I shall leave my family
, ; once more and come back to work in the
mill here at Birmingham for the last
* time.. This will be in the latter part of
" May or June, 1918. I shall try to earn
enough money next summer so that I can
S .-buy a good pair of mules and up-to-L date farming implements, wagon, etc.
After that no more mill work for me. I
MR. ANTON BERES the man with "pe" want to work only for myself and not be JB. J. S. McG UFFY, the man who is going to some one's slave. make good.
"HE CAN, WHO THINKS HE Our demands are not so great. We do It is almost useless to try to make
CAN" not expect to get rich. We are satisfied some of the Northern people believe what
with a good living and a comfortable the Florida farmer is doing, but I want
About a year ago Mr. A. Berest came home. I am willing to work hard, but I to quote some things regarding them. I
- my office in Chicago one morning and want to be with my family and live close found one man who dug over thirteen
-_anted ine to tell him about our Bunnell to Nature-nearer to the Almighty God. hundred dollars' worth of potatoes from :)Ilony. He was very much interested in We are the happiest little bunch on this wo acres of ground. His son cleared ::curing a home there, but I could not con- earth. I am glad that we bought our over $1,700.00 from eight acres, and hired
-:ientiously advise him to go at once to land near Favorita, for I believe this all his work done. The enormous sum of zfnell, after he had told me that he had town is going to grow rapidly in the near $12,000.00 from forty acres was another good sized family and only about $400.00 future. I hope to buy ten acres more, so man's work. This same man is going to money. However, he went just the that later on each of my boys may have put in 360 acres this winter.
"*me, with but $3oo.oo, and the best part at least a ten acre farm. I found a man who had purchased 160
j it is he is making good there. I had What we have done has been accom- -acres a little over a year ago for i;nost forgotten our comeersation until I plished in eight months, and I expect to $ cash, raised an enormous crop
":ceived the following letter from Mr. do much better in the next eight months. $f0,000.00scast wise an efus an
_ crest. This letter was an inspiration to My motto is-Don't be afraid. The offer recently of $5,000.00 for his farm. "el ad I am proud to have this man as world belongs to those who dare. For- orfer reetly o 4,. h is farmg
:e~ andI refer to this to show how land is going :e of our buyers. As soon as I received ward march! Yours truly, to advance from year to year.
5s letter, I asked Mr. Berest if he would One of your satisfied buyers, When a man can buy raw land for
- iect to having it published in the HOME ANTON BEREST. 835.00 per acre in a climate like Florida
.UILDER, and also asked him for his has. I can't figure out how he is going
*".oto. I received both his consent and W
:e photo-and here is the letter. It should WHAT AN IOWA MAN WRITES to make any mistake. I find the climate
ICU ulp possibilities to other working men ABOUT BUNNELL wonderful and I am feeling fine, and I
- ho ing ac am happy to think of spending the winter
roe are willing to sacrifice that they iay Bunnell, Florida, Nov. 17, 1917. practically in my shirt-sleeves and see:curc a home--and independence. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, ing potatoes and other money-making
Chicago, Illinois. crops grow while my Northern friends
Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Mr. Verdenius: are burning high priced coal and shovelDear Mr. Verdenius:- I am writing you to let you know that ing snow.
Do you remember, Mr. Verdenius, when I have arrived in Florida, and that I am In conclusion, Mr. Verdenius, I want dropped into your office about a year well pleased with the country, and every- to thank you for the interest you have
-go and asked you if a man with 9400.00 thing in general, and I feel that I owe taken in my welfare, for I do appreciate :*uld settle on his Bunnell land? You you a letter of appreciation. it, and I hope that in a few years you can
Avised me not to go with so little capi- I was born in Iowa and, with the ex- count me as one of your successful
-al, but I had made up my mind to go, ception of about four years, my entire Florida farmers. Again I thank you. :nd so I arrived in the colony with but life has been spent there. About three Sincerely yours,
*300.00, taking with me my mother, my years ago, feeling the call, "back to the J. S. McGUFFIN.
-ife and our two boys six and two years farm," and realizing that the present .:d. prices on Iowa lands made it impossible
I looked around for a few days and for me to get land there, I began looking
-icked out a nice ten acre farm near around for good land at a more reason- H A Big Living?" If not send for it today. 7avorita. I built a little house at a cost able price, and my attention was called It is yours for the asking. It may change the .f $120.00, started to clear my land at to Florida. entire course of your life and be the first step
:nce and soon had one acre ready for the During the three years, I made care- towards independence for you and yours. irt l ow. After that I bought groceries to ful investigations and studied govern- has been a messenger of Good Cheerfor many. st my family for at least three months ment statistics until I was perfectly sure Write for your copy, free of all cost to you. nd went to work in a machine shop in I would make no mistake, and since comDcala, Fla., about 60 miles from Bunnell. ing here, I don't believe I have, as the THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
_n a very short time I had saved enough longer-1-*y the better I feel about it. log South La Salle St., Chicago, 7ll.




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Flagler Tribune Supplies Interesting News Items Found on this Page.
TWO ACRES OF IRISH POTA- section makes it a place of almost un- to the new bank building and the old
TOES BRING MR. O. C. limited opportunities and there is. no bank building will be vacated and turnreason why there should not be fabulous ed over to the county officials. MOSBY $936.00 increase in the value of property in BunMr. 0. C. Mosby, who lives 2 miles nell and Flagler county such as have DEVELOPMENT COMPANY IS COMwest of Bunnell, is now digging his fall taken place in other towns and counties PLIMENTED
crop of Irish potatoes which are turn- not having all the advantages that we ing out very fine. have. That Mr. Edward Tittsworth, of HawHe has five acres planted from which Throughout the entire county large thorne, N. J., is well pleased with his
he expects to dig at least' two hundred acreages of fertile lands are being clear- purchase of Flagler county lands is barrels; this is the third crop from this ed and put under cultivation. There is shown from the following extract from ground this season. hardly a section in the county where a letter just received. Among other
From two acres that he has just dug someone is not clearing up lands, build- things he says: "I want to let you know he got eighty-four barrels and as the ing houses and getting everything in what I think about the Bunnell colony
New York market is from $5 to $6, it is readiness for planting, and the Bunnell Development Co. I have
reasonable to opposee that he will re- In Bunnell numerous business and never been in any city or town that I
ceive at lea.., $5.75 per barrel for these. dwelling houses are under construction, liked as well as Bunnell. I have dealt He sold the spring crop of potatoes off others are contracting for new buildings, with lots of real estate companies but I this same two acres for $453.00 which while others are contemplating building. 'have never run across as good and hontogether with $483.00 for the 84 bar- Since Flagler county has registered est a company as the people that coin-els just dug makes a total of $936.00 herself in the dry column everything is pose the Bunnell Development Comfrom the two acres during the year 1917. on a steady move upward.-(Flagler pany, from the splendid sales manager
After he dug the spring crop he planted Tribune.) to the president. The climate and soil
this two acres to velvet beans which he there is grand and I wish that I was
turned under as a fertilizer before plant- able to get about 160 acres more than
ing his fall crop, making three crops Flagler County Officials to be lo- what I already have there. I now have
from the same ground within eleven cated in old bank building. 40 acres and I would not take double
months. b gthe price that I paid for it. I expect
Incidents like this are what make An agreement was entered into be- to be there by next October to stay."
incident lands the most valuable teen the county commissioners and the Mr. Tittsworth owns forty acres which
Flagler county firm of Lambert & Moody, whereby Lam- he will put under cultivation next year.
in the State and is the main reason that bert & Moody leased to the commission- He was one of the first purchasers from the Tribune is always boosting this coun- ers the upper floor of the bank building the Bunnell Development Co. try trying to get people to purchase this together with the room now used for land and move here where they can make the bank, to be used for courthouse purgood money the year around and not poses until a county building can be Land and Farms are the Safest Securities
have to worry. erected. The Masonic hall will be moved and the Best Investments in THE WORLD
Nine hundred and thirty-six dollars either to the Tribune building or to the
is a good year's salary for the average new bank building. The Masons have From 1492 to 1900 we only earned in farm
maneinbfaktuitdisganTaverageoof thre
man, s fact, it is an average of three not decided as vet which place they will property dollars a day for the entire year omit- rent, but will take the one which is best TWELVE BILLION DOLLARS
ting Sundays, Christmas and New Year equipped for them. The County Clerk From 1900 to 1910 we earned
Day. wi e op hem T h Count Cle
Now that Mr. Mosby has sold his 1917 will occupy the room which is at the SIXTEEN BILLION DOLLARS
present time occupied by the bank, the
crop from this two acres for $936.00 he Masonic hall will be used for a court One and one-third times as much in the last will immediately begin preparing this room, while the Tax Assessor, Collector, 10 years as in the previous 408. The greatest land to plant it to a spring crop of po- County Judge, Sheriff, Supervisor of gain has been in the last 5 years, and will tatoes.-(Flagler Tribune.) Registration, School Superintendent and continue until every acre of good land in the
other county officials will occupy the U. S. will sell for $150 to $500 per acre. POTATO ACREAGE HAS IN- different offices in the building.
CREASED WONDERFULLY Who digs a well, or plants a seed,
WITHIN THE PAST The new bank building is almost coin- A sacred pact he keeps with sun and sod.
pleted and before very long the office of With these he helps refresh and feed TWELVE MONTHS the Bunnell Development Company and The world, and enters partnership with God.
Every day brings more developers and the Bunnell State Bank will be moved -Markham.
more building for Bunnell and Flagler
county. Whether the building goes on
in Bunnell or the surrounding country
it all tends to the benefit of Bunnell, for
the more development on the farms the '..o
more vegetables and other farm prod- .... ....
ucts will pass through Bunnell, the more
money there will be in circulation in
Bunnell and the more demand there will
be not only for the necessities but luxuries and the more business there must
be in Bunnell to take care of these demands.
Not only will the rich farming sections
around Bunnell build up the town but the
attractions of Bunnell as a winter resort
will aid immensely in the rapid progress
of our little city.
Bunnell, as a resort place affords ocean
bathing at all times of the year, boating
on the famous East Coast Canal, fishing, hunting, all outdoor sports and its
mild climate promotes health and long
life.
Bunnell, as a farming country, is busy
the entire year. Its combined advantages as a resort town and the center
of a rich farming and stock producing Ti4.ecanoz Inn at Du Pont.




Full Text

PAGE 1

fllllillllllllllllllllllM | The Truth. About Florida | I The Bunnell Home Builder [ Edited hy S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. JANUARY 1918 Farm Yard Scene in the Bunnell Colony There is no industry that offers greater remuneration on the money invested than a well-regulated poultry farm. There is no portion of the country where there is a greater demand for the entire products of a poultry farm than on the East Coast of Florida. The-entire coast is essentially a winter tourist country, with mammoth hotels which are filled to overflowing during the winter months. At present these hotels must depend on frozen poultry purchased in Chicago or other northern cities. Quite a number of our Bunnell colony women are making plans to engage in the poultry business on a large scale, and before long this will be one of the thriving industries of our Bunnell colony.

PAGE 2

toft FUNNELL HOME BUILDER. A New Year Appeal to Thinking Men and Wome?n This Article is of Vital Importance to All Those Who Desire to Better Their Conditions in Life. MB. TJJOS. A. YERDENIUS, The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. Before we enter upon that untried, un known period which we shall call the NEW YEAR; before we take upon our selves the duties and responsibilities of the year 1918, let us cast a backward glance at 1917 and consider for a moment what we have accomplished in the year foreverpast. Business firms are taking off their trial balances to ascertain just wha; tfiey have accomplished in the past year and it seems fitting that you and I should take our trial balances, so to speak, and see if we accomplished what we set out to do at the beginning of 1917. You had planned to have a home— YOUR OWN HOME. You had hoped to quit working for wages and be earning lan independent living from your own lawk You were going to begin living the simple life, under your own “vine and fig tree,” where your children might have an abundance of fresh air and five under the open skies and where your family need not look forward with dread to the long cold winter days. .These were a few of your plans. Were they not? But, the twelve months have passed. Today you are a year older. Are you any nearer the goal of your ambitions than you were twelve months ago ? Keep these thoughts before you as you may read what I shall say further to you in this talk on “looking backward.” I shall have printed several thousand copies of the issue of the HOME BUILDER in which this article null ap pear, so I am keeping in mind that my words will be read by thousands of earnest, thrifty, ambitious men and women. Some of you have been on my mailing list for years, others for only a few months, while still others possibly have written me for the first time but a few months ago. For the benefit of those who have received the HOME BUILDER or my literature but recently I wish to state a few facts regarding our Bunnell colony. It is but six years since I published my first literature concerning the Bun nell colony. At that time this colony was but little more than a large unde veloped body of land, with practically no advantages in the way of roads, schools, towns, farms or the many other things that go to make life worth living. But, let me tell you briefly what we have there today. A new county has been created— Flagler County, with Bunnell as its county seat. Bunnell is an incorporated city, with an electric light plant, water works, ice plant, state bank, garages, hotels, stores, lodges, public school with two years of high school, churches, tele phone service, weekly newspaper, drug store, doctors, lawyers, dentist and last, but not least, the famous Dixie High way passing through our midst. Bun nell is not our only town, for there is Ocean City, Dupont, Korona, Codyville, Favorita and Harwood, and we have a number of schools throughout the country. But, what I consider best of all, is the fact that we have scores of farmers who are making money from their farms. I can bring you to men in our colony whose profit was from §200.00 to §300.00 an acre on their farms last year. About three thousand people have bought land from me, and eventually this part of the country will be one of the most thickly settled communities, not only in Flor ida but in our entire country. I dare not undertake to tell you in detail of the development and successes that have been made in different ways throughout our colony. This entire issue of the HOME BUILDER would not give me space for this, but suffice it to say that those of you who knew of our colony and its opportunities made a great mistake when you did not buy farms from me two, three, four and five years ago, for you could have secured your farms then for less money than they will cost you today. But, I doubt not that some* of you are saying, “Well, what is the use of your rubbing it in? You know we made a mistake, but give us another opportunity and we will take advantage of it this time.” If that is your rttitude, thrifty men and women, then you will rejoice when you read what I have to say to you and learn that you still may secure farm-homes in the Bun nell colony at a reasonable price and on our extremely reasonable terms. However, let me say before I go far ther, that for those of you who are per fectly satisfied with your present con ditions, with your position, your sur roundings, your home, the environments for vour family, the climate in which you live, I have nothing further to say and you will be wasting your time in reading this article. But, if you are a wage earner, a city toiler or if you are paying high rent for a farm, then my letter will be of much interest to you I believe. And now to go back to some of the questions I asked you at the outset of this article. Will you not answer these questions truthfully and sincerely to yourselves? What have you accomplished in 1917 or during the entire time you have been working for wages? How much money have you saved during the past twelve months? What are you worth to-day? Perhaps your answer is that it is impossible to save these days, with the cost of living so high, and there is not the shadow of a doubt that this seems very true. Nevertheless,_ it proves conclusively that I am right in urging you to go “back to the land” where you can eliminate many items from the high cost of living and where you can grow some of the crops that sell for such high prices these tlays. a recent picture of Mrs. Bent's potato farm located west of Bunnell.

PAGE 3

BUESNOJL HOME BUILDER A NEW YEAR APPEAL TO THINKING MEN AND WOMEN This Article is of Vital Importance to All Those Who Desire to Better Their Conditions in Life. I C ontinued .) Unless you have tried it, you can’t realize the satisfaction there is in being a PRODUCER instead of a CONSUMER. I believe if you were living on your farm today in the Bunnell colony the high cost of living would not bother you very much. I keep my ear pretty close to the ground, but 1 didn’t hear any complaints from our Bunnell farmers last spring when they were receiving such high prices for their Irish potatoes. Some of those potatoes sold as high as $10.00 a barrel, and I don’t imagine that any of you who read this would have complained if you had had a big crop of potatoes to sell at a high price. As I have said to many of you before, it makes all of the difference in the world when it comes to the high cost of living, which side of the fence you are on—whether you are a producer or a consumer. From my conversation and corre spondence with hundreds, yes, thousands of men and women throughout this land of ours, I have arrived at the conclusion that the great and burning desire of many hearts is to possess a little farm home of their own, free of debt, in a mild climate, from whence a living may be derived without worry and anxiety. Still, many of them are fearful and they do not know whei'e or how they can ob tain such a home. Do YOU also belong to this class, and are you earnestly and sincerely desirous of obtaining such a home? Then, let me give you the good and glad news that I can be of help to you, and that I can with all honesty of purpose show you how and where to ob tain the place of your desires. If you will follow the advice I shall give you, you may practically be the owner of a farm-home in our Bunnell colony before you retire this night. I AM WILLING TO DO MY PARTWILL YOU DO YOURS? In the first place, let me tell you that it is not necessary for you to have such a large farm at Bunnell, for on the same land you will grow three different crops each and every year. In other words, you can grow as much on twenty acres in the Bunnell colony as you can on sixty in other states, where you have but one crop each year. Then, too, our climate is so mild and delightful that a home may be built at one-third or one-half the cost of a home in a northern climate. Your fuel bills are practically nothing on a Bunnell farm, while the expense of heavy winter clothing is Entirely eliminated. Do you say that you do not now have the money with which to build a home or to begin improving a farm immediately? That need not deter you from beginning now to plan for a few years hence. If you do not begin to save and sacrifice for such a home, you will never have it. Do you realize that one of these days you are going to be old as the term is known in an employee’s life? That one of these days you will lose your job and a younger man will take your place? And do you realize that some day you may not be able to stand the long cold northern winters? WHAT THEN? HAVE YOU PRO VIDED FOR SUCH DAYS? If you are farming in the north, would it not appeal to you to go to a country where there are 365 growing days and where you can raise three crops a year, where if one crop should fail you have two more chances that same year? I think this one question must make a strong appeal to every tiller of the soil. Is it strong enough to turn your thoughts and your desires Bunnellward? My message today is especially for the man who not only has to work for his living, but has to work mighty hard at that. I can readily put myself in such a man’s place, for I well recall the time when I earned but $60.00 a month, work ing for a large steel corporation, and paying one-fourth of my monthly wage for house rent. However, I managed to save a little each month and bought land on the installment plan—just as I am advising you to do now. Do not make as your excuse for not bettering your condition the high cost of living or the great world wax'. Such conditions as these should make you all the more determined to put yourself in a position where you will not have to de pend upon others for your sustenance. You can have such a home as you have longed for, if you make up your mind you WILL, for “where there’s a will, there’s a way.” Read on page seven of this issue how Mr. Berest is paying for his farm. You can do the same. One more question—Could you save 17 CENTS A DAY if you had to? You answer YES, I know; and you agi*ee with me that evei’y healthy, honest,, industrious man of good habits can do the same, without any exceptions whatever 1 Now if you really want to buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, and if you will pay the Bunnell company but 17 cents a day we will allot you a fann in our new tract where land is still selling for but $35.00 an acre. For every ten acres you buy you must pay us S5.00 a month, which is equal to 17 cents a day. If you wish 20 aci'es of land, then all you need do is to pay double the amount. You may take possession of your farm at any time after you have made your first payment on it. Development Company is imuire rduyresponsible. The titles to our lands are perfect. We allow you ninety days in which to inspect your land after we have allotted same to you, and if at that time you are not satisfied with the selection we have made for you, you may pick you out another farm, or if we cannot please you, your money will be refunded to you with six per cent intei’est per annum. Can you think of a more fair and square plan of doing business than this? Our terms are within the x'each of every one—only 50 cents an acre each month, no interest, no taxes or other fees. For your convenience, you will find an oi’der blank in this issue of the HOME BUILDER. Fill it out, attach your first monthly payment and mail to me at once. In what better way could you end the old year or begin the new year than by buying a farm-home in the sunny south land? If you sincei-ely desire to better your condition in life, now is your op portunity. If you do not take advantage of this offei', you will bitterly regret it. IT IS UP TO YOU TO START 1918 RIGHT. WILL YOU DO IT? Very sincerely yours, 108 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois. The farmer is the only man who finds it profitable to run his business into the ground. Have you treated yourself to a winter inFlorida, where you can spend your time and energy outdoors among flowers and gardens instead of shoveling snow, thaw ing out water pipes and paying large bills for fuel?_ We are one of the very few land companies in the state located on the grounds, working with and helping our settlers. Does not this fact show our faith in the country? Afield Of sugar cane and Irish potatoes owned by Mr. Holland, who lives a few miles west of Bunnell. These crops were harvested a few days ago.

PAGE 4

BUHHELL HOMEBUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed Bunnell's Beautiful Hew Bank Building, taken when building was only partially completed. Mr. P. P. Pellicer has commenced the erection of a house on his 20 acre farm. Elder A. H. Evers, of the Seventh DayAdventist Church conducted a quarterly meeting Sunday afternoon in the Church Beautiful. He also preached at the eve ning service. Mr. John N. Shepard, of Cleveland, Ohio, arrived in Bunnell and will begin improvements on the farm he bought two or three years ago. Mr. Shepard is very much pleased with BunnellÂ’s future. Mr. William Campbell, of Lorain, Ohio, has purchased a farm just east of town near the Dixie highway. He will make the necessary improvements on same immed ; -tely. Mr. W. J. Sczudlo and family, of De troit, Mich., who own a nice farm in Korona, arrived via auto, and are here to stay. Mr. Sczudlo will make improve ments on his farm and also build a store and hotel in Korona. We expect soon to have a post office in Korona and hope to see Mr. Sczudlo the first postmaster there. Mr. Chas. Muzyka, of Detroit, Mich., is here to settle on his 40 acres of land near Codyville. Mr. Muzyka was in the colony a year ago and purchased his forty-acre tract and has just now com pleted the erection of a nice home on his farm. Mr. A. E. Edson, of Montana, is in Bunnell and will make this his future home. Mr. Edson is the owner of a splendid 20 acre tract, which he will im mediately bring under cultivation. The northern tourists are beginning to come to Florida in large numbers, there being on an average of seventy-five cars passing through Bunnell daily now. Supt. Bell, who has been working on the Dixie highway for the past few weeks with his crew of men, has put it in good condition for the winter travel. Worshipful Master Heath of Bunnell Masonic Lodge delivered a lecture on all three sections of the Masters Degree last Tuesday. A great many of the members of the lodge attended. The LadiesÂ’ Aid Society held their reg ular monthly meeting last Monday after noon at 3:00 oÂ’clock. Messrs. W. H. Deen and W. H. Coch ran spent the day fishing on the canal at Ocean City, and caught a great num ber of fish. Mr. Geo. Bumsed while fishing Mon day at Ocean City caught a 23-pound sea bass. The new bridge across Big Haw Creek has been completed. The farmers who helped in the work or sent their teams deserve much praise, for this bridge will be of great benefit to the neighborhood. Mr. M. G. Meyers bought a pair of mules from Mike Stone last week and has started to plow. The recital, given under the auspices of the ParentsÂ’ and TeachersÂ’ Association of Bunnell, by Mrs. W. H. Gray, who was assisted by some of the best musi cians in the community, was a great suc cess. Mr. G. E. Pickard, of Jacksonville, Florida, together with seven farmers from northern states!, are in Bunnell and are looking over our farm lands with the idea of purchasing here and making this their future home. Several attempts have been made to organize a brass band in Bunnell, but so far without success. However, there is now another movement on foot, and we believe that under the leadership of Mr. Rich, we shall soon have a fine band in Bunnell. Mr. J. B. Lewis, a retired wholesale grocery man of Jacksonville, Florida, has purchased 1283 acres of fine land just east of Favorita. It is the intention of Mr. Lewis to make a model stock farm of this land, and in addition he will farm a large percentage of it. He is now erecting a dwelling house and will take up his residence on the farm. After looking over several large tracts in the state, Mr. Lewis decided that the land adjacent to Bunnell was the best he could find. Mr. A. G. Quinn, of Georgia, one of the first purchasers of land in the Bunnell colony, arrived in Bunnell last Friday to look over his holdings here. He ex pressed himself as being well pleased with his land. He said that he hoped to be in a position to soon make Bunnell his home. The regular weekly dance was given at the Ocean City Casino Saturday eve ning. There was an unusually large at tendance. The County Tax Collector has opened the tax books in the office of the County Clerk and is now ready to receive both your state and county taxes. A party composed of Mr. W. Barnwell, Prof, and Mrs. Golden, and the Misses M. Golden and B. Smith motored to Jacksonville one evening recently to see Ben Hur. The Pine Grove Inn has opened its dining room for the winter season and anticipates a large business. Quite a number of parties have been going over to Ocean City in the evenings to enjoy the fish frys that Mrs. Wickline is serving at her home. Mr. and Mrs. A. Eisenbarger and Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Pierson, of Cleveland; Ohio, are some of the new settlers in the colony. Mr. and Mrs. White and two children, of Albany, N. Y., arrived in Bunnell last Saturday and will make their future home here. Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Wigley and daugh ter, of Canada, arrived in Bunnell recent ly to make this their home. Mr. Wigley bought thirty acres of land last year from the Bunnell Development Company but has increased his holdings to forty acres, as he is very much pleased with our country. Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Hall and Mr. A. W. Drew of North Dakota, who own property in the Bunnell colony, are stop ping at the Hotel Halcyon. Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Flinn, of British Columbia, Canada, have arrived in Bun nell. They own a nice twenty acre tract here which they will immediately have" cleared and brought under cultivation, and will erect a home on their farm. These folks expect to go into the poultry business on an extensive scale. Mr. George Cooper, of New Jersey, who owns a 10 acre farm not far from Bunnell, is in the Bunnell colony to stay, and expects to bring his land under culi tivation.

PAGE 5

*s BUHM£LL iOME BUILDER by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Mr. M. Stone, proprietor of the Bun nell Sales Stables, returned from Jack sonville Wednesday with sixteen fine read of mules which he will sell to the 3unnell fanners. Mr. O. J. Hance and brother, C. D. Hance, are busy this week setting out :heir fall cabbage. The Hance Brothers have only been here a few months but are very busy getting their fields in the best state of cultivation possible. They will plant several acres to Irish potatoes. Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Hendricks have moved into their beautiful bungalow on Moody Boulevard. Mr. Hendricks is :ashier of the Bunnell State Bank. Friday evening the Haw Creek Liter ary Society gave an interesting enter:ainment at the school house. The house was full and all seemed to enjoy them selves. Mr. John Odum is clearing his 80 acre farm on Middle Haw Creek and prepar ing to plant it. He intends to build a dwelling house as soon as he can get the lumber on the ground. Mr. Phoda Pellicer is clearing his 20 acre farm, getting it ready for a potato crop. Mr. Leaston Pellicer is busy hauling lumber for the erection of a bam on his place. Mr. M. H. Milliken is setting out strawberry plants this week on his farm west of Bunnell. Mr. J. S. McGuffin, of Des Moines, Iowa, has selected a nice 20 acre tract of. land near Codyville, which he will im mediately put under cultivation. Mrs. McGuffin will join her husband in Bun nell in a few weeks. Mr. and Mrs. H. Graham and daughter, of Minnesota, arrived in Bunnell Wed nesday evening. Mr. Graham bought a farm here a few years ago and expects to clear his land and plant it to potatoes this winter. Mr. Richardson, who recently pur chased the valuable business lot just south of the Bunnell State Bank build ing on Main Street, contemplates erect ing a large brick apartment building on his property. This building will be modem in every particular, -with an upto-date cafe on the ground floor. A mass meeting was held in Wood men’s Hall at Bunnell for the purpose of organizing the Flagler County Red Cross Chapter. Names of new members were called for, dues paid and names enrolled. Permanent officers for the Chapter were elected. Mr. T. Buzard and family have just arrived from Toledo, Ohio, and expect :o make their future home here as soon as their furniture arrives. Everyone is busy these days and plant ing cabbage seems to be a daily employ ment. Several of the young people of Bun nell pleased a large audience at the school house last Thursday evening when they presented “Deacon Dubbs” to a packed house. The young people deserve much praise for getting up this play as the proceeds zo towards the piano fund. Messrs. Samuel H. Shapiro and G. Nelson, two of Uncle Sam’s Navy boys from the U. S. S. Nevada, arrived in Bunnell this week and are spending their vacation here. They both own some valuable Flagler ?ounty fanning land, purchased from the Bunnell Development Co., which they expect to put under cultivation just as soon as the kaiser is licked. They an ticipate planting potatoes next winter. Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Thompson and little son, of Spear Lake, Iowa, have settled on their farm south of Bunnell. Mr. Thompson is very busy getting his farm in readiness for his winter crop. Mr. W. A. Brock, who moved from here to New Castle, Indiana, last spring, has returned to Bunnell. Mr. Brock knows the value of a good country, and now expects to remain in Bunnell perma nently. Mr. Halbeck brought into Bunnell a fine sample of rice which he raised on his farm. The rice was well headed and extra large. A number of farmers of Flagler coun ty have organized what is known as the Flagler Union, which is a branch of the Farmers’ Educational and Co-operative Union of America. This organization was created for the purpose of bettering the purchasing and selling facilities of the farmers. The regular meeting days of the Union are the first and third Sat urdays of each month. Mr. R. L. Smith and Mr. Wm. Thomas' will immediately enter the sheep-raisin; business in Flagler county. They wall begin with a flock of fiv hundred sheep which they will turn loose in the ranges. Mr. Thomas will have charge of looking after them. This is one of the best paying businesses in the county and these two gentlemen will nc doubt make good money out of it as wool is very high at the present. Mr. A. S. Fowler butchered four fine pigs today which he sold to the Hastings Cold Storage Co., of Hastings. Mr. Fowler told us that the expense of raising these four pigs was $15.00 and that he had sold them for $64.00, a net profit of $49.00. The pigs were only eight months old. Mr. W. A. Mack is just completing a nice dwelling house on his farm on the Moody road. This building is very at tractive and is one among the best to be found in the county. It adds very much to the attractiveness of Mr. Mack’s large farm. The Bunnell Chapter Order Eastern Star held their regular meeting in the Masonic Hall Tuesday evening. Several new members were initiated and the meeting was well attended. WOODS AND FIELDS FULL OF SPORTSMEN Messrs. L. M. Boyken, J. E. Forbes and J. E. Ives, are camped this week and hunting bear and deer. They report me success, they having already killed several fine deer. Messrs. D. A. and Thomas Deen, to gether with Mr. McMillian, were out agging birds last week. They report ending many coveys throughout the -ounty. The local sportsmen are out nearly wery day and all report plenty of birds, mck, squirrel and deer. Messrs. Dewey Moody and R. L. Hen an c ks bagged five large ducks Tuesday afternoon. Mr. TT. A. Mach's unfinished home on his 40 acre farm south of Bunnell.

PAGE 6

me BUHH£LL HOME. BUILDER. J. B. Boaz, Editor and Proprietor of the Flagler Tribune, Writes Interesting Lettei of Conditions in Florida Generally and Especially in the Bunnell Colony. MB. J. B. BOAZ Mr. Thomas A. Vei'denius, 108 So. LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Mr. Verdenius: While sitting in my office tonight the thought struck me “What can I do to let the people of other states know of the great possibilities there are in store for those who own a farm in Flagler coun ty?” Realizing that you publish a bulle tin every few weeks that you send out to your customers throughout the coun try I have decided to write you a letter and ask that you publish it in your next bulletin, with the hopes that someone will read it and probably move to this wonderful country. I will first give you my reasons for locating in Bunnell after which I will try and tell of the great future that is in store for the favored sons of Flagler county. I was bom and raised in Calhoun, Ga., where I lived until I was grown. After I became of age I accepted a position with a New York produce house to go to Hastings and buy potatoes. I arrived on the scene about April 1st, and as there was only about five hundred acres planted to potatoes and it seemed to me like there was at least one hundi'ed buy ers on the ground, there was not much chance for me to buy many potatoes, especially as I was young at the busi ness. I immediately got busy and met Mr. George C. Middleton, who had consider able acreage planted to potatoes and made a deal with him to handle his crops, he having several growers whom he had furnished with potato seed and fertilizer. I remember among his grow ers was a Mr. Brenizer, who had just moved down from Columbus, 0., the year pi’evious, who had twenty acres planted. Mr. Brenizer cleared Si,800.00 on his potato crop that season. He was an elderly man and suffered greatly from some unknown disease and within a few months after he haiwested his crop he died, leaving his twenty aci’es (which was not paid for) to his son, Kenneth R. Brenizer. The next year I came down to buy potatoes Kenneth had the twenty aci'es planted to potatoes, which he sold for a good pince, in fact, he got enough profit from his potato crop to finish paying for the twenty acres. Realizing the great profits possible in growing potatoes, Kenneth decided that twenty acres was not enough for him, so he sold his twenty acres for four thousand dollars and purchased a one hundred acre farm for which he paid eleven thousand dollars, paying four thousand cash, balance to be paid in three yearly payments. The following year Kenneth cleai'ed enough above all expenses to finish paying for his faiin and have a nice bank account left. The next year he purchased an additional fifty acres, making a total of one hundred and fifty acres, which he has been fanning for the past few years. The past season Kenneth sold his crop for ai'ound fifty thousand dollars and after paying all expenses he had a net sum of thirty-two thousand dollars to his ex-edit. He was offered three hun di'ed dollars an acre for his farm, in other words, he was offered foi’ty-five thousand dollars for it, but he refused, saying, “I know what I can do with this farm, but I don’t know what I could do with the money.” Kenneth is now a man of thirty-one years of age and is worth at least seventy-five thousand dollars, and he has made every dollar of it farming within the past seven years. As you will remember, last year was election year here when all the officers wex-e to be elected. One of my best friends, Mr. S. C. Middleton, (better known to me as “Steve”), aspired to the tax collector’s office. Steve had always been a farmer, he owning a nice fifty acre farm here. When Steve came to me and told me he was in the race I said to him, “What are you going to do with your faim if you ai-e elected?” He l-eplied, “Well, Boaz, the office of tax collector will pay me twenty-five thou sand dollar's clear in four years and I can rent my farm to my brother George for one thousand dollars a year, which will mean a total of twenty-nine thou sand dollars for me duiing the four years.” The latter part of the past May I was in Steve’s office one day when his brether George di’ove up in a big Chal mers auto and came in. After the usual greetings I asked George how he came out on Steve’s fifty acres this year and he l-eplied: “After paying all expenses together -with the thousand rent I have paid Steve, I cleared thii'ty-four thou sand dollais.” Geoi'ge made five thou sand dollars more on the fifty acres within one hundred and twenty days than Steve will make in his four years in office. Since I have l’esided in Bunnell I have seen farmers who have started in the potato grewing business with hut a very small capital and I have seen them pros per until now they are among the best people, financially, in the county. When I first came here you could count the reliable fannei'S of this commxmity on your fingers, but now they are scattered all over the colony. They are all buying additional lands, erecting nice homes, equipping their faims with the latest machinery, including tractor engines, auto trucks and everything to help facili tate matters. In eveiy direction you go from Bun nell you find the farmers clearing new ground and getting it ready to plant another crop of potatoes, in fact, it is hustle and bustle all over Flagler coun ty, and by the way, the creation of Flag ler county is one of the greatest things for us, as we now have our county government in Bunnell, the officers being our own people, which means that good roads will be constructed throughout the entire county. I see letters every day from people in the North complaining about it being almost impossible to get sugai-, floui-, meat, coal, etc. We “Florida Crackers” don’t know what it is to want, for any of the above. We grow our own com and make our com meal. We have the finest sugar cane country in the world. In re gal'd to meat, this is a great cattle and hog country, and besides we have game galoi'e, which include quail, deer, squir rel, turkeys, fish in abundance, and vege tables all the year around. We don’t use any coal at all. If it turns a little chilly we have plenty of fat pine that don’t cost a cent. All you have to do is cut it and haul in. Why should we worry? Thanking you veiy much for your time used in reading this, and trusting that you will publish it with the hopes that some good fellow who is suffering in the cold north will wake up and real ize that he is wasting his life away and that he will move to FLAGLER COUN TY, THE BEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD, I am, with kindest regai'ds, Yours veiy truly, J. B. BOAZ. The above letter was written by Mr. I. B. Boas, editor and proprietor of the Flag ler Tribune, a %  weekly newspaper published at Bunnell, Florida. The subscription price of this up-to-date weekly is but $2.00 a year, and we should like to see each one of our land-owners a subscriber to this publication. You should help your future home paper, and it is to your interest to know what is going on at Bunnell. If you once become a subscriber, you will never willingly be without the Tribune. Try it for six months. Mr. and Mrs. John Baker, Formerly of Cedarville, Michigan, Express Their Satisfaction in Their Bun nell Colony Farm. Sir. Thomas A. Vei'denius Chicago, Illinois. Dear Sir: We arrived in the busy little town, Bunnell, on October 22nd. Mr Loughridge of the Bunnell Development Co. took us to our land, which is located about two and one-half miles from Bun nell, and we found it much better than we expected. Respectfully, MR. and MRS. JOHN BAKER, Of Cedarville, Michigan.

PAGE 7

Sfc BUNNELL HOME BUILDER THE BEST PAGE OF ALL—What the “Other Fellows” Say About Bunnell. MR. ANTON BEREST, the man with "pep' "HE CAN, WHO THINKS HE CAN” About a year ago Mr. A. Berest came my office in Chicago one morning and -anted me to tell him about our Bunnell ilony. He was very much interested in during a home there, but I could 7iot con:ientiously advise him to go at once to Bunnell, after he had told me that he had : good sized family and only about $400.00 : money. However, he went fust the nne, with but $300.00, and the best part f it is he is making good there. I had -.'most forgotten our conversation until I cceived the following letter from Mr. : crest. This letter was an inspiration to :e, and I am proud to have this man as :e of our buyers. As soon as I received is letter, I asked Mr. Berest if he would ifect to having it published in the HOME UILDER, and also asked him for his :oto. I received both his consent and e photo—and here is the letter. It should xn up possibilities to other working men who arc willing to sacrifice that they may :cure a home—and independence. .homas A. Verdenius, Dear Mr. Verdenius:— Do you remember, Mr. Verdenius, when dropped into your office about a year -go and asked you if a man with $400.00 •>uld settle on his Bunnell land? You .dvised me not to go with so little capi•al, but I had made up my mind to go, nd so I arrived in the colony with but : 300.00, taking with me my mother, my rife and our two boys six and two years Id. I looked around for a few days and ricked out a nice ten acre farm near Tavoi'ita. I built a little house at a cost 1 $120.00, started to clear my land at :nce and soon had one aci’e ready for the :Iow. After that I bought groceries to ast my family for at least three months ind went to work in a machine shop in Jcala, Fla., about 60 miles from Bunnell. In a very short time I had saved enough xxxoney with which to buy wire to fence my ten aci’es with 48 in. wire fencing. After the land was fenced I bought a fine Jersey cow and calf. I next built a small bam, a chicken house and bought three goats and about thirty chickens. I had sown by that time one acre to oats and ciimson clover and cleared some more land, with the help of my wife, who is my paitner and I am proud of her. Then I left for Birmingham, Alabama, where I am today woi'king in the mill. I am making good money and saving all I can, enough for fertilizer and seed potatoes, so that I can plant at least two or thx-ee acres to Irish potatoes. I hope to go home a few days before Christmas and stay there for several months. I expect to plant my potatoes next January. When I have harvested my potatoes next spiing, I shall leave my family once more and come back to work in the mill here at Birmingham for the last time. This will be in the latter part of May or June, 1918. I shall try to earn enough money next summer so that I can buy a good pair of mules and up-todate fanning implements, wagon, etc. After that no more mill work for me. I want to work only for myself and not be some one's slave. Our demands are not so gi’eat. We do not expect to get rich. We are satisfied with a good living and a comfortable home. I am nulling to work hard, but I want to be with my family and live close to Nature—nearer to the Almighty God. We are the happiest little bunch on this earth. I am glad that we bought our land near Favoiita, for I believe this town is going to grow rapidly in the near future. I hope to buy ten acres more, so that later on each of my boys may have at least a ten acre farm. What we have done has been accom plished in eight months, and I expect to do much better in the next eight months. My motto is—Don’t be afi’aid. The woiid belongs to those who dare. For ward march! Yours truly. One of your satisfied buvers, ANTON BEREST. WHAT AN IOWA MAN WRITES ABOUT BUNNELL Bunnell, Florida, Nov. 17, 1917. Mr. Thomas A. Vei'denius, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I am writing you to let you know that I have arrived in Floiida, and tlxat I am well pleased with the country, and every thing in general, and I feel that I owe you a letter of appreciation. I was bom in Iowa and, with the ex ception of about four years, my entire life has been spent there. About three years ago, feeling the call, “back to the farm,” and realizing that the present prices on Iowa lands made it impossible for me to get land there, I began looking around for good land at a more reason able price, and my attention was called to Florida. During the three years, I made care ful investigations and studied govern ment statistics until I was perfectly sure I would make no mistake, and since com ing here, I don’t believe I have, as the longer I stay the better I feel about it. MR. J. S. McG TIFFIN, the man who is going to make good. It is almost useless to try to make some of the Northern people believe what the Florida farmer is doing, but I want to quote some things regarding them. I found one man who dug over thirteen hundred dollars’ worth of potatoes from two acres of ground. His son cleared over $1,700.00 from eight acres, and hired all his work done. The enormous sum of $12,000.00 from forty acres was another man’s work. This same man is going to put in 360 acres this winter. I found a man who had purchased 160 acres a little over a year ago for $30,000.00 cash, raised an enormous crop of potatoes last winter, and refused an offer recently of $45,000.00 for his farm. I refer to this to show how land is going to advance from year to year. When a man can buy raw land for $35.00 per acre in a climate like Florida has, I can’t figure out how he is going to make any mistake. I find the climate wonderful and I am feeling fine, and I am happy to think of spending the winter practically in my shirt-sleeves and see ing potatoes and other money-making crops grow while my Northern friends are burning high priced coal and shovel ing snov. T In conclusion, Mr. Verdenius, I want to thank you for the interest you have taken in my welfare, for I do appreciate it, and I hope that in a few years you can count me as one of your successful Florida farmers. Again I thank you. Sincerely yours, J. S. McGUFFIN. TJAVE you read my book, “A Little Farm— A Big Living?” If not send for it today. It is yours for the asking. It may change the entire course of your life and be the first step towards independence for you and yours. It has been a messenger of Good Cheer for many. Write for your copy, free of all cost to you. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle St., Chicago, HI.

PAGE 8

BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Flagler Tribune Supplies Interesting News Items Found on this Page TWO ACRES OF IRISH POTA TOES BRING MR. O. C. MOSBY $936.00 Mr. 0. C. Mosby, who lives 2 miles west of Bunnell, is now digging his fall crop of Irish potatoes which ax e turn ing out very fine. He has five acres planted from which he expects to dig at least two hundred barrels; this is the third crop from this ground this season. From two acres that he has just dug he got eighty-four barrels and as the New York mark' 1 is from §5 to $6, it is reasonable to .appose that he will re ceive at leak' $5.75 per barrel for these. He sold the spring crop of potatoes off this same two acres for $453.00 which together with $483.00 for the 84 bar rels just dug makes a total of $936.00 from the two acres during the year 1917. After he dug the spring crop he planted this two acres to velvet beans which he turned under as a fertilizer before plant ing his fall crop, making three crops from the same ground within eleven months. Incidents like this are what make Flagler county lands the most valuable in the State and is the main reason that the Tribune is always boosting this coun try trying to get people to purchase this land and move here where they can make good money the year around and not have to worry. Nine hundred and thirty-six dollars is a good year’s salary for the average man, in fact, it is an average of three dollars a day for the entire year omit ting Sundays, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Now that Mr. Mosby has sold his 1917 crop from this two acres for $936.00 he will immediately begin preparing this land to plant it to a spring crop of po tatoes.—(Flagler Tribune.) POTATO ACREAGE HAS IN CREASED WONDERFULLY WITHIN THE PAST TWELVE MONTHS Every day brings more developers and more building for Bunnell and Flagler county. Whether the building goes on in Bunnell or the surrounding country it all tends to the benefit of Bunnell, for the more development on the farms the more vegetables and other farm prod ucts will pass through Bunnell, the more money there will be in circulation in Bunnell and the more demand there will be not only for the necessities but lux uries and the more business there must be in Bunnell to take care of these de mands. Not only will the rich farming sections around Bunnell build up the town but the attractions of Bunnell as a winter resort will aid immensely in the rapid progress of our little city. Bunnell, as a resold; place affords ocean bathing at all times of the year, boating on the famous East Coast Canal, fish ing, hunting, all outdoor sports and its mild climate promotes health and long life. Bunnell, as a farming country, is busy the entire year. Its combined advan tages as a resort town and the center of a rich farming and stock producing section makes it a place of almost un limited opportunities and there is no reason why there should not be fabulous increase in the value of property in Bun nell and Flagler county such as have taken place in other towns and counties not having all the advantages that we have. Throughout the entire county large acreages of fertile lands are being clear ed and put under cultivation. There is hardly a section in the county where 1 someone is not clearing up lands, build ing houses and getting everything in readiness for planting. In Bunnell numerous business and dwelling houses are under construction, others are contracting for new buildings, while others are contemplating building. Since Flagler county has registered herself in the dry column everything is on a steady move upward.—(Flagler Tribune.) Flagler County Officials to be lo cated in old bank building. An agreement was entered into be tween the county commissioners and the firm of Lambert & Moody, whereby Lam bert & Moody leased to the commission ers the upper floor of the bank building together with the room now used for the bank, to be used for courthouse pur poses until a county building can be erected. The Masonic hall will be moved either to the Tribune building or to the new bank building. The Masons have not decided as yet which place they will rent, but will take the one which is best equipped for them. The County Clerk will occupy the room which is at the present time occupied by the bank, the Masonic hall will be used for a court room, while the Tax Assessor, Collector, County Judge, Sheriff, Supervisor of Registration, School Superintendent and other county officials will occupy the different offices in the building. The new bank building is almost com pleted and before very long the office of the Bunnell Development Company and the Bunnell State Bank will be moved to the new bank building and the old bank building will be vacated and turn ed over to the county officials. DEVELOPMENT COMPANY IS COM PLIMENTED That Mr. Edward Tittsworth, of Haw thorne, N. J., is well pleased with his purchase of Flagler county lands is shown from the following extract from a letter just received. Among other things he says: “I want to let you know w T hat I think about the Bunnell colony and the Bunnell Development Co. I have never been in any city or town that I liked as well as Bunnell. I have dealt with lots of real estate companies but I have never run across as good and hon est a company as the people that com pose the Bunnell Development Com pany, from the splendid sales manager to the president. The climate and soil there is grand and I wish that I was able to get about 160 acres more than what I already have there. I now have 40 acres and I would not take double the price that I paid for it. I expect to be there by next October to stay.” Mr. Tittsworth owns forty acres winch he will put under cultivation next year. He was one of the first purchasers from the Bunnell Development Co. Land and Farms are the Safest Securities and the Best Investments in THE WORLD From 1492 to 1900 we only earned in farm property TWELVE BILLION DOLLARS From 1900 to 1910 we earned SIXTEEN BILLION DOLLARS One and one-third times as much in the last 10 years as in the previous 408. The greatest gain has been in the last 5 years, and will continue until every acre of good land in the U. S. will sell for Sl50 to $500 per acre. Who digs a well, or plants a seed, A sacred pact he keeps with sun and sod. With these he helps refresh and feed The world, and enters partnership with God. —Markham. Tippecanoe Inn at Du Toni.