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The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

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Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by3 S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
SEPTEMBER 1917
ONE OF OUR MOST DISTINGUISHED BUYERS
HON. SIDNEY JOHNSTON CATTS
Governor of the State of Florida
"I feel sure that Flagler county will eventually rank among the best in the State, and I feel so positive of this that I have purchased a forty acre tract of land here, that I will immediately put under cultivation by planting it to Irish potatoes the coming
season." (Flagler Tribune.)
(The above is an extract from the address delivered by Governor Catts while in Bunnell at the time of the celebration of
the new county.)




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
WHAT ARE FARMS REALLY WORTH AT BUNNELL
By THOS. A. VERDENIUS
; estimating below the average price when I say that land in Illinois or Iowa is selling on an average of $150.00 an acre. i=:" I A far in either of these two states, or for that matter, in any of the Middle
Western states is considered a most conservative investment, but what does such a farm produce, and what net income does it bring the owner? I talked, yesterday, with a gentleman who owns 180 acres of land in Du Page county, Illinois, and he told me that the money invested in his farm brought him about 2 per cent. A few years ago the Government published statistics which showed that the average production on an acre- of land in Missouri yielded the farmer about $9.38; land in Illinois, $12.48; Iowa, $12.22, and in Ohio, $13.36. These amounts, no doubt, have been increased within the last couple of years, as all farm products have gone up considerably, but even if these profits should have increased 50 per cent, how would they compare with the farm lands in our Mr. T. A. Verdenius Bunnell colony?
The Pioneer Small Farm Alan of Florida. Here in the Middle West the farmer grows one crop a year on his land, and How to Put a Conservative Value on sometimes that one crop proves to be a
Land in the Bunnell Colony. failure, and in such a case he has to
wait another whole year before he gets if one were to ask you how to put a another chance. Last year I saw thoui:nservative value on some real estate, sands upon thousands of acres of grainin Afeid ofuar caneintYeBunnellcolony. Afcroo of s a n d s~s g a u p o n t h o u a n d o ft a c ros o fa m 0 0 0 0 t o s O u 0 ) -pe r a c 'e
2: would you go about it, and in what the Dakotas which the farmers did not nearcae faemer $25.00 o acre, andr ahis
-ay would you determine its actual even consider worth their while to net the farmer $25.00 an acre, and ,this
-laue? For instance, if a man were to harvest. Our farmers in Bunnell la sl form 0 or $Bunnell colony 2cme to you and ask you the value of a raise three crops a year, and if worh, where the farmer can first gow home or a flat building, a store or ware- one of these crops should be a w house, in one of our large or small cities, failure, they hav-two more chances that a crop of potatoes and then a crop of 7 fai urethey haveco rn and then a crop of good hay ? Or,
presume you would find out first of all same year. We have farmers in our col- or an mther a ment, let us double :he amount of income such a building or ony who have cleared over $200.00 an for a matter of arguent, tius db sore was bringing its present owner, acre, net, on their potato crop this year, net the farmer $50.00 an acre, and then would you not? and they still have two more crops to net the farmer $50.00 annacre, anethe
For example, say that some one had ~ nterln hssm er e- cut the profit of our farmer in Bunnell,
r raise on their land this same year, per- one-half, and make his net profit only
a six family apartment building. After haps a crop of corn and a crop of hay. $150.00 an acre. We now leave it to our you had inspected the building and the These two crops may not net them more readers to put their own value on a farm way it was constructed, the surround- than $50.00 each to the acre, as our in Bunnell. "ngs, etc., you would figure out how much potato crop is our big money crop, but We consider buying a farm in our Buneach tenant paid per month, and then I am sure if our Summer and Fall crops nell colony one of the best and most exmultiply this amount by twelve, which are up to the average this year, our cellent real estate investments, not only would give you the gross income of the farmers should net at least $300.00 to in Florida but n this entire country of building for one year. After deducting the acre on their land. the amount of taxes, insurance and other ours. If land in the Middle West is
expenses, such as repairs, etc., from the Now, with these facts before you, viz., worth $250.00 an acre, based on the above gross income, you would then have the if a farm in Illinois will produce per- facts, our cultivated farms would be net income of the building, and then fig- haps one splendid crop of corn which may cheap at twice the amount. uring the amount at 6 per cent, you would be able to estimate the value of that property in an intelligent manner.
What I mean to demonstrate is this: You would value a piece of property ac- I cording to what it would produce, and ":
that is correct. A building that produces $2,000 a year, net, is worth twice as much Ka
as a building that produces only onehalf the amount, or $1,000 a year. What is true of a fiat building is also true of an office building or a sky-scraper, and it also holds good in determining the value of farm lands in Illinois or Iowa, a ranch in the West, or a potato farm in Bunnell, Florida.
Now, what is a farm in Illinois or Iowa or any other Middle Western state worth today? I have seen some good farms in the Middle West which have sold for as high as $300.00 an acre. Of course, I do not mean to say that this is the average price paid for farms here in the Middle West; but I believe I am Potato farm -n the Bunnell colony that netted th.e owner.300.0ooan acre.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A resume of the addresses of three of the most prominent men in the State of Florida
Delivered at Bunnell last month when the People of that Section so fittingly Dedicated their new FLAGLER COUNTY
These three men are, the Hon. Sidney
.. Catts, Governor of the great State of
Florida, Senator TV. A. McWilliams and
111'r. J. E. hngrahanz, Vice-President of the
Florida East Coast Railway Company
(Flagler System), and also layor of the
city of St. Augustine. On the front page F
of this issue appears the photograph of
Governor Catis, and this page contains the
pictures of the other two speakers.
Bunnell had made great preparations for
this celebration. Several thousand people
- gathered early in the morning to attend
- I the festivities and proinent -men throughout the state of Florida were guests of
Flagler County that day.
There was just one thing to mar the
pleasure of those gathered on this mer-
orable occasion, and that was the-weather.
There was a pouring rain for three or four
hours, and not until four o'clock in the
afternoon did it cease. After that time a
Inumnber of splendid addresses were given,
but for lack of space we shall only be able
to give a resume of what was said by three
of the most prominent speakers.
Governor Catts says that Flagler
County is Destined to be the
Leading Farming CounSenator W, A. J a Wiliame ty in Florida J. E. Inorahan. Mayor or St. Aetitine and Fiee- President of the Floida East Coast Pail'oad
Senator W. A. MacWilliams was given Governor Catts was greeted with ap- Mayor Ingraham said in part: "When
a great ovation. He stated that it was plause by the large crowd of men, women the question of establishing Flagler counwith peculiar emotions he appeared be- and children. In his speech he took the ty was discussed, I told the gentlemen fore such a large audience, because he re- occasion to pay a fitting tribute to late who came to see me about it that Mr. called the old site of Bunnell when A. A. Mr. Flagler, for whom the county was Flagler was a man of high ideals and Bunnell erected a saw mill and a few named. He expressed it as being quite a one whose standards of all kinds were
shacks for the shelter of his employes. pleasure for him to sign the bill creating high, so much so that he would not perNo one would then have dared dream of Flagler County, for he felt sure that the mit a poor piece of work to stand. To the Bunnell of the present day, and he new county would eventually rank among my own knowledge I have heard of work prophesied that none present now would the best in the state and he felt so Posi- being torn down and done over again venture to forecast the extent of the de- tive of this that he had purchased a forty because it did not come up to his standvelopment and progress that are sure acre tract of land here that he will im- ards, and in establishing the county that
to mark the next ten years in Flagler. mediately put under cultivation by plant- would be named after him that you must He mentioned Escambia and St. Johns ing it to Irish potatoes the coming season. set your standards high to realize his
as the two mother counties of Florida. He depicted the great future that is ideals, which I am sure you will; for
This youngest daughter of old St. Johns in store for Flagler County by all pulling those of us who loved him deeply, I want starts out with a promise of great pros- together. He said that with co-operation to thank you for honoring his memory. perity. Some have said that Flagler Flagler County was destined to be the "I hand you, Mr. Chairman, copy of a
County is too small, but he reminded, leading -farming county of Florida. He little booklet which was published after
his hearers that it is half the size of concluded his address in a very impres- his death, which gives a great many inDelaware and that Volusia county with sive and beautiful way appealing to the cidents of his life; it is accompanied with the portion taken out and given to Flag- nobler, purer and better things in men. a small picture of him, which is an exler still remains in area the- size of Dela- cellent one, and which I think you might
ware. He mentioned this to indicate the like to file among the archives of Flagler
great possibilities that Flagler and other 1 S county
counties of Florida possess in the way ncle am needs y "
of development and providing of food to say a very few words to you on ansupplies not only for our nation but for Our country needs food other subject, but one which has much
our brothers across the seas. He said
that Flagler County would be just what Are you doing your share? to do with your future. Flagler county
is peculiarly an agricultural county, with
its people made it-nothing else-but he If you can't good lands, good men, good drainage,
felt spure there -was a united sentiment for abundant rainfall, well located between
the building up of the community with sea and river, good transportation faall the best things of life and just as AR M FARM cilities with whom you are on most
few as possible of the bad things., friendly terms. and every physical reColonel MacWilliams concluded his elo- finl emadeeypyia e
source is at your disposal. Your lands
quent address with a stirring patriotic The best place to buy a farm are peculiarly adapted to cultivating at
appeal, in which he expressed the hope la the
that he would live to see the banner of is in the Bunnell colony, Bun- least thee crops a year; potatoes, corn
or other grains and hay, all of which are
democracy floating over the whole world. nell, Florida. needed and sorely needed.
He stated the time had come when there "The South can raise millions upon
are only two classes of citizens in the There you can raisemillions of bushels of cor for food for
United States, patriots and traitors. crops a year. man and beast, but millions of people
That all the audience were in the first must be educated to its use, and by so
class was evident from the applause THOS. A. VERDENIUS doing supplement the food supply of the
which greeted him upon the conclusion world, and I hope that Flaeler county will
of his splendid address. 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. make its efforts in this direction."




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
Mr. C. A. Whitaker, who owns a nice Mr. J. J. Buckles has purchased a fine Mr. Chas. Welti, living west of Buntract of land near Codyville, harvested pair of mules. Mr. Pellicer,. Mr. Ed. nell brought in three fine pigs this mornone hundred'barrels of- potatoes from Johnson and Mr. John Durrance each ing which he shipped to Jacksonville.
two acres this season for which he re- purchased a mule from the sale stable The pizs were half-breed 0. L C.'s, and ceived $889.00 f. o. b. the cars at Cody- of Mr. M. Stone. were in fine condition. They were thirville. On this same land he now has a teen months old and weighed 1,175
fine crop of corn. The farmers in this section of the coun- pounds. He sold them for 14Y2 cents
Mr. Whitaker is one of our newcomers, try have been very busy planting sweet per pound, the three pigs bringing him he arriving here last fall. He now has potatoes for the fall crop. At the $170.37. twelve and one-half acres of his farm present price of sweet potatoes, they cleared and expects to plant his entire will realize good profits. Hon. I. I. Moody is home from Maine,
acreage to potatoes next season. where he went to inspect the Rose No. 4
The recent report of the condition of seed potatoes and contracted for the
Mr. Jackson has been busy the past the Bunnell State Bank shows that the purchase of a large quantity of seed to wreek hauling watermelons to Bunnell. bank is in a more prosperous condition be used by the Flagler county farmers Heek ha lng xetronally tne this than it has ever been before. The bank in planting their 1918 potato crop. He has an exceptionally fine gardenthis has considerably more than $150,000.00 year and it would pay anyone to take a -i dststdy
look at it. eposis, today. The acreage planted in Flagler county
the coming season will be practically
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baird, of Elk City, double what was planted this lear, as
Okla., arrived in Bunnell Sunday and there are numbers of large tracts of
were registered at the Halcyon. Mr. land being cleared and put under cultiBaird owns a nice thirty acre tract of nation.
land just west of the home of Mr. Mack,
which he will have cleared as soon as Mr. C. C. Jordon, better known as
possible. "Happy Charlie," planted one-quarter
of an acre of new ground to watermelons
Mr. John Henide has erected a mce this spring from which he has already
bungalow on his farm, which is situated sold a fraction over two hundred dollars'
just south of the far of Mr. W.A. worth of melons and he has several hunMack.- dred melons left. He also planted be-MA t % een each melon hill a tomato plant
Mr. N. E. Leitzel, of Dupont, is a pur- which are yielding a fine crop of tomachaser of a new Max-well touring car toes.
which he bought from the Bunnell
Garage & Auto Co.
Mr. J. A. Hunter brought into town
**a sweet potato measuring 11/ inches in
Mrs. Henry Heubner, one of the most length and weighing 2% pounds. He has
industrious women in the Bunnell Col- in an acre of sweet potates and has no
ony, has purchased 500 cans which she trouble in disposing of them at good
expects to fill this summer. She has prices as fast as gathered.
already put up a large number of cans
of tomatoes and sauer kraut.
Realizing that Flagler County is very
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Perry, of Des V much in need of a court house, the Bunnell Development Co., has agreed to give
Moines, LI3., arrived in Bunnell recently t h onyta ag rc fln
and will make Bunnell their future home. to the county that large tract of land
They are doing light housekeeping at lying just north of the home of Mr. Win.
the home of Mrs. C. A- Whitaker. Mr. Hardesty, which consists of approxmatePerry owns a nice tract of land near ly ten acres, provided the county will
Codyville which he will put under culti- erect a nice court house thereon.
This piece of property is very desirable
nation. for a court house site as it is covered
with large trees which will furnish
According to official records, the Irish n.!7 i ats Oce tan Bll! Co o y may n jo Y!irfa- plenty of shade not only for the court potato growers of the St. Johns, Flagler W'"ork on the construction of ab house but for large grounds around the
and Putnam county potato belt realized ful bungalow by nr. George aboodu on building. more than five million dollars from the hil bgowy r g Moody on This can be made one of the prettiest
his property on Mtoody Boulevard was gonsi h tt n h iieso
sale of their potatoes last spring. Fol- begun this week and will be rushed to grounds in the State and the citizens of lowinp, are the statistics: Total number of completion in time for him to move his Flagler County should appreciate very acres planted, 12,000; total yield in bar- family here before school onens. much the generosity of the Bunnell
rels, 750,000; highest price obtained per -_ Development Co. in giving this valuable
barrel, $10.00; average price obtained per Col. C. G. Varn has been appointed property to them free of cost. barrel, $7.50; average yield per acre, 60 local attorney for the Florida East Coast Now that we have the building site barrels; average total receipts per acre, Railway and will have charge of all the the next move is to get busy and make $450.00; average profit per acre, $350.00. matr fteFalrSse n some kind of arrangements for the erecThe report shows that the date of plant- legal erCounty. e tion of a court house that will be in keeping crops was from January 1st to Feb- ing with the best county in Florida.
rurary 1st; date of harvesting crop, from Ir. Paul Soguel, of Hilhurs. Calgaiy, It has been rumored that the Flagler April 25th to May 25th. Canada, is spending several days here estate will donate such a court house for
From at least ten thousand acres of looking over the Bunnell Colony. He the county named for Mr. Flagler. the above land, the farmers are now ready has land here which he bought some time 1 to harvest their second crop, and at sev- ago. Mr. Soguel is very much pleased Mr. A. J. Vafed, of Hurley, South eral places the second crop (corn) has with our county. Dakota, is building a beautiful bungalow
already been harvested. Considerable and other farm buildings on his 640 acre
more acreage has been cleared, and it is MKr. Tore Aasen. of Montana. who has farm. Mr. "Vafed has shipped a carload predicted that next year's potato plant- ten acres of land in the Bunnell Colony, of farm implements and mules, and as ing will be the heaviest in the history of was a visitor here last week. Before he soon as the buildings are completed, he the potato belt. left he bought an additional 10 acres. will move to Bunnell.




i6e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
One Saturday, while six of the Scouts farmers from $250.00 to $400.00 per acre. were busy cleaning the streets, Mr. These potatoes were the first crop of the
W. R. Diamond, of East Chicago, In- season. Corn planted in the potato fields
diana, chanced to be touring through is now from two to three feet high. This Florida, and passed through Bunnell on will yield all the way from 35 to 70 that day. He took the picture of the bushels per acre. After the corn comes boys, which we here reproduce, and was hay, consisting of crab-grass and cowkind enough to send it to the Scout peas, making three crops on the same
MIaster in Bunnell. ground inside of eight months.
This boy subject is a mighty important "Hogs, cattle and poultry are profitable, one, and we could have many things to and dairying is one of the industries we say about our Bunnell colony boys, for are especially advocating. One of the there are some very bright, interesting leading dairies in my county, milking fellows there, not alone in the towns by seventy-six cows this winter, sold its any means, but out on the farms. There milk at the cars, f. o. b., for forty cents is a real boy genius down in the Korona a gallon and cream for $1.60 a gallon, district, who has made electricity his and they could not begin to supply the hobby and has studied a great deal about demand
wireless telegraphy. Some months ago "Water is pure; rainfall abundant, and
he- installed his own wireless station in the climate is the healthiest I have ever Korona, which was the only one in the lived in.
"If you have any friends who want to
Bunnell colony. He was able to get mv oapaeweete a aea
messages every day and each afternoon move to a place where they can make as received the correct time as it was sent much money in one year, if they work Ducks raised in the Bunnell colony
from Wasingtn, C Howver as and apply sensible methods, as they can
from Washington, D. C. However, as in your section in five years, refer them In breeding pure bred poultry insist on
has been the experience of alL other wire- to me." the "royal blue."
less operators at the present time, he Spray your roosting rooms once a week
received word from the War Department with a solution of two parts water to
at Washington, D. C., a few weeks ago Poultry Raising in the Bunnell Col- one of carbolic acid and coal oil.
that he would have to detach his instru- ony. working and you will produce more and
ment until further notice. better chicks.
The farmer boys throughout the colony There is no industry which offers betfind a happy diversion with their own ter returns and larger profits than does Utility means more to the farmer than particular pets. that of poultry raising. As a matter of Remember, good blood counts for uch.
Study your boys, parents, and make fact, the demands of the home market in their life in the country- so attractive Florida are so great that the local supply that they will hesitate long before leav- falls far short of meeting the require- WHAT A KORONA BUYER
ing it. ments. As a result, there is an enormous SAYS ABOUT THE BUNimport, principally from Georgia and NELL COLONY
ST. JOHNS COUNTY, FLORIDA, Tennessee. While the exact figures showing how much is sent out of Florida for
BUSINESS MAN WRITES LET- poultry to these two States are unavail- Dear Sir:
TER TO A NORTH DA- able, it is known to be an amount that I was in Bunnell, Florida, from June 3,
KOTA MAN is ahnost beyond belief. With proper care 1917, to July 14, 1917, and during that
the industry is one that means great time I built my house and cleared soen The following extract from a letter wealth to parties who engage in it. It of my land, so I shall have my ground
will be many years before the Florida ready for planting this coming December. w n bre cany riearsufiet qtiy Fora I expect to go to Bunnell with my written by a business man of St. farmner can raise a sufficient quantity of mother in October, to live there permaJohns county, Florida, to another poultry and eggs to meet the demands nently on my farm.
of North Dakota will prove of in. right at his own door. I wish to say that all the people I met
terest to the readers of the HOME Don't allow yourself to become negli- while there from the North are satisfied
BUILDER. gent about your poultry duties. with their land, because they all had
"In the United States we have all kinds Have some object in view, and work good crops this year and they all like of climate and all kinds of soil-the rich- it. that climate.
est on earth, and it should not be neces- Nothing under the sun is better for Yours truly,
sary for any one to forsake this country fowls, both young and old, than dry bran. JOHN J. MARCINKOSKI,
when looking for a farm-home. I was Keep your breeding fowls active and Chicago, Illinois.
raised on a farm in Wisconsin, lived in
Minnesota for twelve years, and for the $7,906.21 Cleared on a 36-Acre
past twenty-four years my home has ~Fr
been in Florida. I enclose herewith a, wr. Far
map, issued by the U. S. Department of Messrs. Burrell Brothers, who own a
Agriculture showing the 'Crop-growing h nice farm in the Haw Creek section conSeason in Days' in all parts of our sisting of 36 acres, make the following
country. You will note that around / statement in regard to their crop for the
Grand Forks, North Dakota, it is 120 June 1, 1917:
days. Beginning at Jacksonville, Florida, Potatoes sold f. o. b. packing
and to the south end of the state, it is shed ....................$12,00079
from 300 to 365 days. Cabbage, onions and corn sold
"We grow our money crops from De- during the year ............ 1,582.47
cember to May, and have the benefit of __ Total for the year .......... 13,583.26
quick railroad transportation to the Paid out for expenses for the
center of population of the United States. year ...................... 4,427.05
From 24 to 36 hours brings our products --Net profits for year .......... 9,156.21
to all the big markets of the country.- Paid out for addition to barn,
There is practically no competition. Most purchase of live stock and
of the big crops in Florida are sold by I- I w0 farm implements and living
our farmers f. o. b., that is, delivered on expenses.................1,250.00
- T talexp ne ......... ....... 79 62
the cars. The farmers get their money Total balance for year.......7,906.21
when the cars are loaded. It will be noted that they cleared
"In my home county this year we had S7,906.21 after paying all expenses in16,000 acres in Irish potatoes. They --cluding their living expenses, besides
brought double the price of any previous Baby farmer west of I unnell with ten-ceek's old buying stock and constructing new buildyear; in other words, they netted the or ,,rgtons ings.




Me BUNNEL HOMLE BUILDER
A NATURE LOVER'S DESCRIPTION What a Woman I ccomplisgin
in the Bunnill Colony
of his Surroundings in the Bunnell colony Dear Verdenius:
As you have requested me to do so, I
The following description, written by Mr. A. V. Folsom, is a masterpiece in its line. am writing you to tell you how we are
It rivals the descriptions of another nature-lover, Thoreau, and will be a delight getting along on our farm at Bunnell.
to the readers of the Home Builder who also have "eyes to see and ears to hear." If you see fit to do so, you may publish this letter in the HOME BUILDER.
dove and the cherry "bob white" of the As you may perhaps recall, we arrived quail. The little ground dove finds a nest- in Bunnell September 1, 1916. It was a ing place close to the house. Nearly any little late for us to get the 20 acre farm time of the day you can hear the bust- we bought from you in readiness for a ness-like tap, tap of the woodpecker. I crop of potatoes, but we were very fornotice one variety with red head and tunate in being able to rent a twenty acre black-speckled back; then I have the little farm near our pla We planted about sap-suckers. Up near the double twelve acres of tiffs" land to Irish potabridge the other day I saw an "ivory bill" toes, which I sold for $2,135.80. We now
-woodpecker, the first I have ever. seen have a fine stand of corn and cowpeas on alive. I had read about them when a boy this same land.
in Audubon's delightful bird notes. These I also grew some of the finest onions are the largest of the woodpeckers and you ever saw, and we received ten cents comparatively rare. The goat-sucker a pound for all we had to sell. Some of family seem to have two representatives them were exceptionally large and three here, one commonly called "night hawk" of these largest sized onions alone poorwill, but with a different cry. Sand- see that the onions we sent you were comScranes pass and repass overhead, paratively small when you take into conclipper-built hawks wheel and scream, sideration the larger ones grown. Had the familiar owl comes nightly with his I known that you wanted some onions weird c-y, and last but not least are the so that you could show what can be buzzards. grown in our colony, I should have sent
When clouds bank up the sky in huge you larger ones than I did, but the fact formations and you look up into the blue is we already shipped the largest onions of the zenith, you can see these birds, about a month before I received your mere specks, describing great curves and letter.
evolutions. Nearly every tree harbors a Besides the onions, potatoes, corn and tree-toad and .when it threatens rain cowpeas, we have our garden with cabthese elfs and the rain-crows make a bage, tomatoes, beans and carrots and Mr. A. T Fosorn great to-do. When the sun is shining have sold quite a lot of these. We have
There is possibly an acre of high ham- the cicadae, the crickets and others keep all the watermelons we want to eat bechere ld ponsibly the n rse of mygh ten up an orchestral accompaniment. At sides a number of others that we have arch land on the no h side of my ten night time in the season these hammocks for sale. acres, and here in a setting of tall cab- become a fairy-land where thousands of Taking everything into consideration, bage palns, oaks draped in Spanish moss, fire-flies make and break the circuit. my children and I are well pleased here and long-leaved pine I have built my un- I haven't time to go into. detail about and I believe- this is the best place in pretentious little house. the native flora which is rich and abund- which to make money. You will rememFrom my windows I look into a garden ant, how the grapes, the five-fingered ivy, ber that I came from the state of Caligreenery-palmettoes, shrubs, vine-clad the honeysuckle, the thorny bamboo, the fornia, and I have never been any place trees-mysterious, darksome and inviting, scarlet trumpet -rine and a host of other where a person could make a better living From my' door I look over the cleared vines festoon the trees; drape the old than right here in the Bunnell colony. field and can see the travel on the road snags and climb over the fences. I must One has no difficulty 'to raise three crops on su sie leave a little to the imagination. a year on their land here.
on my south side. To the Nature-lover Florida has much At the present time we have most of
I have a variety of soils on my place to offer. A. V. FOLSOM, our twenty acres cleared, and next year
and each soil has its characteristic vege- Bunnell, Florida. I expect to ,plant not only this twenty
tation. I have noted four kinds of oaks, acres to potatoes, but I will have about
sabal palmetto, and saw-tooth, maple, "WHY ARE WE STAYING thirty-five acres in potatoes. If a woman
ash, elm, hickory, red cedar, cypress, mul- like myself can make a success in the
berry, persinmmon, willow sumach, pine; HERET' Bunnell colony, I can see no reason why
and on land adjoining magnolia grandi- ASKS OREGON MAN, AS HE COM- a man should not do so. I believe that
flora and magnolia glauca or white bay, PARES CONDITIONS IN THAT I any farmer who has ten acres of this
the latter having creamy blossoms two STATE WITH THOSE IN BUN- land under cultivation, will not only be
or three inches across. The former every- NELL COLONY TODAY. able to make a good living on'it, but will
one knows. be able to put money in the bank.
The mere enumeration of varieties con- Dear Mr. Verdenius: (mrs.) STELLA JONES,
veys but a faint idea of their beauty and I have received the July number of th( Bunnell, Florida.
infinite charn. There are 200 varieties Bunnell Home Builder, and I consider it of trees native to this state and 100 varie- about the best I have yet received. Have you read what Governor ties found in no other state. Inhabiting We are having a considerable drought these thickets and fields are a great va- in this immediate section of Oregon and Catts says about our county? iety of birds whose gay songs and in- the unfortunate farmers will have to wait If not, turn to page three of this issue. teresting antics I find vastly entertaining, a whole twelve-months for the next crop, Governor Catta and several other virominent Not having access to "Who's Who in Bird- and that crop will have to pay for a large men of Florida have bought land in our land" I can only count as acquaintances part of the expenses of this crop and the colony. What better endorsement of the about one-half my visitors. Near neigh- one twelve months from now. In Florida value of our lands could you ask for? bors are a pair of Cardinal Grossbeaks, they have had one crop with large profitI the male simply gorgeous in Chinese and two more crops to come this year. i Sendyour order today-RIGHT NOW
vermilion. They have a pleasant song. It would take us here three years (36 -for a farm in our colony, and we will locate you
Another fine singer is the Meadow Lark, months) to get the same number of crops close tO the forty acre farm which Governor Cat but they are not plentiful. Then I have you will get in Bunnell this year. WHY Lrad in ou Voluia tract. blue birds, phoebe birds, and finches with- ARE WE STAYING HERE? Land in the Valusia tractisellingforonly$35.00
out number. Respectfully, an acre an the monthly installment plan.
When I sit in my door at evening I T. H. McGHEE, THOMAS A. VERDENIUS.
hear the minor notes of the mourning (Oregon). 1 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
D a i' eying In Bunnell WHYNOT RAISESHEEP?
It is scarcely necessary to prove by
statistics that the consumption of mut... .. .__ .. .. ._ ton in the United States is steadily in- creasing each year, and the demand for
-. .wool is increasing more rapidly than
______---- ____ ._it can be produced. It therefore follows,
__ -~ that the raising of sheep should be
_ _..._ profitable.
. There are very few states in the
- -......Union which are better adapted to sheep
raising than Florida. This is the opinion
of experienced sheep men, who are meeting with good success in this business
- in Florida at the present time.
-A Land owners who are now living on
: , .- -. ;, sheep, as there is considerable land
nearby which has not yet been brought
under cultivation. Many of the men
- and women who have 'contracted for
. .farms in the Bunnell colony, and who "are paying for same on the monthly inI .stallment plan, are scattered throughout 7- the United States, and will not move
.. .1 on to their farms until they are fully
paid for. The land contracted for is
now lying idle, and if an actual settler would buy a few sheep, he could have
.-4 great acquisition io the St.- Peter jaimvty. free grazing for some time to come, and
no harm whatever could come to such
Where a number of dairy cows are these- three cows would yield $4.00 worth uncultivated land.
kept on farms and made a regular part of milk each day, while the owner told of the farm business, one usually will me that. they. cost him about '75 cents a find the farmers out of debt, with nice day, for feed outside of the pasture, or homes, and the other things that go 25 cents daily for each cow.
toward making life really worth living. This merely gives an idea of what inBy keeping several cows and giving them come one might derive from half a
proper attention, the farmer has a steady dozen cows. After the local market has ......
and sure income, just as if he had a been supplied there are many opportusalary in addition to his principal crops, nities for selling good milk and cream whether they be potatoes, citrus fruits to the large hotels of Daytona, Ormond, or truck. St. Augustine, Palatka, etc.
It would seem that the South is the Ice for keeping milk can be purchased
coming stock country, for Uncle Sam reasonably at Bunnell, as an ice-plant
said, in the Year Book of the United that manufactures from two to three tons States Department of Agriculture for of ice daily has been installed in Bun1913--"THERE IS ONE SECTION THAT nell. Picture of land in its natural state in the
CAN PRODUCE MORE CATTLE AND Just figure for yourself how much can Bunnell Colony, sheep grazing thereon.
MORE CHEAPLY THAN ANY OTHER be realized in one month from a few
SECTION OF THE WHOLE COUNTRY, good milch cows. The above is a picture taken in the
FOR THE LANDS ARE STILL CHEAP, There is another very important fea- Bunnell colony, showing some sh:,p
THE GRAZING IS GOOD, THE PAS- ture to be considered in keeping cows grazing on unimproved land.
TURE SEASON IS LONG, FEEDS CAN on one's farm, for there is more in farmBE PRODUCED AT A MINIMUM COST ing than the single problem of seeing
AND INEXPENSIVE SHELTER ONLY how large a crop can be harvested from "Why Put Off for Tomorrow
IS REQUIRED. THAT SECTION OF an acre of ground. Every bale of cot- What You Should Do Today"
THE COUNTRY IS THE SOUTH. ton, every ton of corn, every car of W
There is no place in Florida where cantaloupes takes from the soil a large there are better opportunities for keep- amount of plant food or soil fertility. You have been Wanting a Farm in the ing a few cows on each farm than in For instance, when the cotton farmer
the Bunnell colony. As to the annual sells a ton of seed cotton, for which he
income from each cow-that depends on obtains about $120.00, he at the same Bunne
the kind of a cow and the care and feed- time sells from his farm $12.00 to $15.00 o
ing she receives. worth of fertility. But the dairyman, Send Us Your Order for It NOW.
The above Is a picture of Dr. St. when he sells a ton of butter, worth
Peters' fine Jersey cow. The cow gives $500.00 or $600.00, sells from his farm Day, or $5.00 a
very rich milk, and the doctor finds her only about 50 cents' worth of fertility. a profitable investment, although they While the dairyman is producing the ton1 c 'Month Pays for a
keep the cow just for their own family of butter, his animals have produced 1 10-Acre Farm in the Bunnell use. Another resident of Bunnell has or 20 tons of good fertilizer, worth altothree good milch cows which give him gether $30.00 or $40.00. The cotton about 40 quarts of milk daily. After his grower who sells his seed cotton returns Only $35 ..0 an A cre
family has used all they require the re- no fertility to his fields, but his crop
mainder of the milk is sold for 10 cents has robbed his soil at the rate of $12.00 a quart, which is the regular price for to $15.00 for every ton of seed cotton THOS. A VERDENIUS
milk in the Bunnell colony. At this rate which leaves his fan. 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Il1.
YOU WILL REGRET IT SOME DAY I




Ce BUNNE LL 1H O4ME BUILD]E
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell As
CITY DIRECTORY Mr. E. Kinney, of New Jersey, who arCHURCH SERVICES: rived in our midst several days ago, has
FIRST M. E. CHURCH. become a Bunnell convert, and will
Sunday School every Sunday-10:00 A.M. stretch his leave of absence to the limit
Preacbi 1:00 A- M. and 7:30 P. ,i.
Ladies' Aid Society- first Monday each so as to remain here as long as possible.
month. While he is putting in his last year's
Rev. L. D. Haynes, Pastor. work in New Jersey he will have his
CATHOLIC CHUtICH-KORONA. Bunnell farm put in a state of cultivaMass-9:30 A. M. tion, and next year at this time Mr. KinRev. A. Baczyk, Pastor. ney expects to be a Bunnell "spud"
WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE grower.
UNION.
Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays in month. Mr. W. A. Mack certainly has done
Alice Scott-Abbott, President. himself credit this year, and can show as
SECRET ORDERS: fine a twenty acre field as lays in St.
A. F. & A. M., No. 200. Johns county, all planted in Irish potaMeets every second and Fourth Tuesday at toes.
7:00 P. 2,L in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank
Building.
All visiting brothers invited to attend. Mr. C. F. Turner has not only planted
D. L Deen. W. Mf. potatoes on his own farm, but has also
ORDER EASTERN STAR. rented another farm for the same purMeets every first and third Tuesday at 7:00 pose, and can show a fine crop, which
P. Al. in the Masonic Hall. will be ready to harvest April 1st.
Mrs. Hagadorn (Matron).
FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY CO. Mr. Fred Horton of Wisconsin, who
Trains leave Jackson- Arrive in Bunnell- Rev. C. D. Haynes was the owner of ten acres of land near
ville: Daily:
9:30 A. M. 12:45 P. M. of the A. E. Church of Bunnell. Gore Lake, was so well pleased that he
1:30 P. '. 4:23 P.:11. bought fifteen acres additional on his re8:00 P.M. 11:46 P. M.
Leave Bunnell: Arrive in Jacksonville The many Bunnell friends of Rev. and cent visit.
-Daily: Mrs. L. D. Haynes, learn with much
5:29 A. At. 9:00 A- M. pleasure that Mr. Haynes has been re- Considerable money has already been
10:26 A. M_ 1:30 P.A tun0dntd swl.a n ude eui
4:38 P. M. 7:50 P. M. turned to Bunnell for another year to donated, as well as one hundred beautiserve as pastor of the Bunnell Methodist ful palm trees, for a city park for Bunchurch. nell, which will be known as Flagler
Park, and when completed it will be one
The annual convention of Bunnell of the most attractive parks along the
Lodge No. 200, Free and Accepted Ma- East Coast Railroad. sons, was considered a very successful Practically everyone in the Bumell
one.
The attendance was quite large. colony is through planting potatoes, and
the field aret inaieronit.n
Newly elected and appointed officers the fields are in fine condition. for the ensuing year took their chairs.
B e o e s n y Mr. J. F. Lambert has one acre of cu.- Bunnell Lodge enters the new year
with an increased membership, which is cumbers, and anticipates touching the full of enthusiasm, and the prospects for high water mark for Bunnell in regards
its future are exceedingly bright, to returns per acre.
A New York commission house has Dr. St. Peter has a fine sample of sweet
asked for a price on the entire output of corn in his garden. It stands shoulder the Irish potato crop in the colony. An.- high at this date. other commission house wants 20,000 barrels, and will pay $5.00 per barrel for
number ones, twos and threes.
Mr. F. Vincent is planting his home
place to grapes of the Concord variety,
and also 150 orange trees.
The January issue of the "Florida Farmer and Homeseeker" contained a very
interesting article on "How I Grew My
Mayor Heath of Bunnell. Tomatoes," by Myrtle Marie Brock, a St.
Johns County- Canning Club girl, whose
home is at Bunnell. Miss Brock is the
The municipal election held in Bunnell daughter of one of our land owners, Mr. passed off very quietly. The following W. A. Brock, and it is indeed gratifying were elected: to see that the sons and daughters of the
The aldermen elected to serve for two colonists are taking such an active interyears were: E. W. Johnston and J. H. est in the development of the community.
McKnight. Aldermen elected to serve
one year were: J. F. Lambert, W. H. Mr. Harry Sessions, formerly of New
Cochran and W. C. Sullivan. Mayor W. York, has as fine a garden spot here as
C. Heath was re-elected to serve as anyone in Florida. His watermelons are
Mayor for the next year. looking fine.
THE FARMER IS THE ONLY MAN WHO FINDS IT PROFITABLE TO RUN HIS BUSINESS INTO THE GROUND. eof on. I. I Moody, Pre;idet




6/e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
ibuted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Mr. E. Baxter and Mr. J. Greer of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tittsworth, ol
Idaho, who owns 20 acres of very desir- Hawthorn, N. J., are in Bunnell this
able land near Bunnell, are busy these week. Mr. Tittsworth owns a forty-acre
days clearing their land and putting it farm here which he values very much.
under cultivation. He and Mrs. Tittsworth will remain in
Bunnell some time. They are stopping
The Professor of the Bunnell Public at the Halcyon.
and High School writes as follows:
"This week marks the end of the Mr. Lewis E. Fisher, of Linton, Ind.,
fourth month of school, and we feel sure who owned a nice twenty acres just east
that it is by far the best of our work. of the farm of Mr. J. C. Miller, arrived
The work has been regular and the at- in Bunnell last Friday morning.
tendance has been exceptionally good. Mr. Fisher drove out Friday afternoon
The number of pupils is increasing to look over his land and while out
steadily. Last Wednesday we enrolled there he met Mr. Miller. In conversation
four new students, and the total number I with Mr. Fisher, Mr. Miller asked him
has now reached 110. Let us all work what he would take for the land, wherefor our school, and secure a fourth upon Mr. Fisher priced the land to Mr.
teacher before this term is out. We must Miller at exactly twice the original cost,
begin to work now if the institution is whereupon Mr. Miller immediately
to have the best results n;-t year. bought the twenty acres.
Including this twenty acres, Mr. MilMrs. Cisco, east of Bunnell, writes the ler now owns as nice a forty-five acre
Editor as follows: "Up to the present farm as can be found in the county.
time, Mr. Cisco has shot over 200 squir- Rev. A. Bac-yk Mr. Fisher returned to his home in
rels. He goes out before breakfast and of the Catholic Church, Korona, Bunnell Colony Indiana Saturday evening realizing that brings in plenty for the day. He shot _Florida land (especially land that is lotwo wild turkeys for Christmas, and also The Korona section of the colony has betld i n the u r ptao bet)
caught a 30-lb. bass a few days ago. received its share of the new sts is not a drug on the market, and we
One does not need to go without game who have been arriving in the colony n predict that another year will not pass
and fish in this country." large numbers this winter. A number Johns County land.
of new homes have been erected at KoMr. J. L. Council is after the "Potato rona, and a large amount of acreage has Mr. W. C. Phillips haa f
Pennant" this year with a high average been cleared and planted to potatoes. Bermuda onions, and should repeat his
on his 35 acres of potatoes. The Rev. Father Baczyk reports a good- past successes in this line.
ly number of new parishioners in his
1Hon. I. I. Moody and family are now parish.
living in their new home, which is one
of the most beautiful homes in St. Johns The Modern Woodmen gave a dance County. It is situated in a grove of in their hall in the Tribune Building last
fine water-oaks, on the Dixie Highway, Thursday evening. The dance was well one and a half miles east of Bunnell. attended and everyone appeared to have
Mr. Moody's home, garage, and other a good time.
buildings are equipped with electric
lights and water, from a private light Contractors Kuhn & Anderson have and water plant which he has had in- just completed a nice bungalow on the stalled. The yard is now being seeded farm of Mr. Oscar Buckley south of
to grass and an abundance of flowers are Bunnell.
being planted. __Over one hundred automobiles passed
through Bunnell Sunday en-route to different parts of the state. These autos
came fr-om. almost every state in the
Union and we suppose are headed for almost every town on the East Coast of
Florida.
J. C. Miller is supplying the Bunnell merchants with nice turnips grown on
his farm at Black Point.
Under the management of Mr. A. F.
Beaujon the Farmer's Manufacturing
Co., have opened up the barrel shop in
Bunnel. Postmaster Deen.
As the weather conditions have been
ideal for a bumper crop of potatoes this Postmaster D. Al. Deen has just added season this shop will have to turn out thirty-six more lock boxes to the post about twenty-five thousand barrels' to office equipment. The increase in popmeet the demand. ulation in Bunnell has caused lock boxes
to be in demand and as "Uncle Dan" is
Our new meat market is nearly corn-. always on the job, wanting to serve his pleted, and will present an attractive patrons, he immediately met their de.-Lfront the Dixie Highway when fin- mands by installing the new boxes.
ished. Mr. Osborne expects to handle all With this new section installed the State Bank. This picture was taken kinds of meats, also to take and deliver postoffice now has a total of one hundred
finished. orders. and fifty-three boxes.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
BUNNELL NO LONGER AN LETTER FROM ANOTHER WANTS HIS FRIENDS IN
EXPERIMENT," OF OUR SATISFIED BUY- THE NORTH TO KNOW
Says Satisfied Land Owner, ERS IN THE UNITED THAT HE IS WELL
Who Has Spent Considerable STATES NAVY. PLEASED WITH
Time in the Colony. Dear Mr. Verdenius:
I am not able to give an opinion of THE BUNNELL
the Bunnell colony as I should like, as
I have never seen Bunnell, but I have COLONY.
conversed with people who have-visited Dear Sir: the colony and the little city of Bunnell, As I am well pleased with this counand they praise they both very highly. t-y, I should be glad to have you publish As to the men comprsing the Bunnell this letter in.the HOME BUILDER, so Development Company, I find them all that my friends may read it. to be as square as any people I have ever I have been in Bunnell a little over dealt with. thirteen months, and have built the
I can, with much pleasure,sY some- Pine Grove Inn. I have six city lots
___ thing about the climate of the state of and twenty acres of farming land.
Florida, as I was bor on a Florida farm I am satisfied that it is a good investand lived in that state until four years ment, and can cheerfully recommend ago, when I enlisted in the Navy. But, both the climate and the land. like most boys brought up on the farm, Yours sincerely,
I thought that there was a much better S. M. BORTREE,
chance for a young man to get a start Bunnell, Florida.
in the world by leaving the farm and
working for someone else. I did not
have any special trade or profession, so
in four or five years I found myself
worse off than when I left the farm; and
being dissatisfied with the way I was
earning my living, and not being in a
position to earn it otherwise, I decided
that I would enlist in the Navy.
Rev F. 3. 47iliiams. After spending two cold winters in
the North, I began to realize the adDear S":I vantages of Florida's climate over the
The. HOME BUILDER received, and climate of the Northern states, and I
-a 4 d'read with much pleasure. also began to realize the comforts one Conditions-in and around Bunnell are can have on the farm. I came to the becoming interesting, and I expect them conclusion that I would purchase a farm to grow in interest from now on until in Florida and settle down. I now have those who have purchased land have a twenty acre farm in the Bunnell colgone and built their homes. ony, and although I have never seen it,
It appears to me that with the pres- I am satisfied with it, as it was selected ent stage of that country properly pre- for me by my brother, who is also a seated, you will have but little trouble farmer. And, believe me, I expect to be in disposing of all the land you have for living in the colony some time in the sale. There is no longer any need of future. guesswork about what that country has Yours truly,
and will produce. You can now refer IRVING M. DOUGLAS.
with pride to the tangible results of Mr..S.M. Bortree.
what the Bunnell section of Florida has
produced.
With the present price of the land, "BUNNELL THE CITY OF
the easy terms of payment, and the certainty that the land will double in OPPORTUNITIES."
value within the next year or two, placed
beside what the land will produce, I be- Dear Mr. Verdenius:
lieve no farmer will hesitate very long I I thought I would write you a few
before making an investment, lines and tell you what I think of the
Personally, I have greater faith in Bunnell colony. I visited the colony
the possibilities of that country than I in October, 1913, and although the colever had before. It is no longer an ex- ony was still so very young, it looked
periment for a man to go to the Bunnell better to me than anything I had read
section to make a home. Any one go- about it, indeed the reports concerning
ing down expecting to build up a home it were in no manner overdrawn.
need not be disappointed. A man can 'Within a few years now I expect to
raise enough in one year to pay for make Bunnell my home.
his land, two, three or four thnes over, The opportunities in the South are
hence it is only a matter of a very short much greater than they are in the
time until a man may have a home of North, and I have told my friends this,
his own. Hundreds and thousands of and hope many of them will locate there.
people would invest if these facts, to- I call Bunnell the "City of Opportugether with all the conditions of that nities."
cou-ti Yours very truly,
count-y, could be placed before them. Y v
But why should I be telling you some- RICHARD T. GARNER,
thing you already kmow. 3r. Richrd T. Garner. Missouri.
I wish I could send you a hundred
buyers. I think I would be doing them
a favor by so doing. NO EARLY MORNING WHISTLE TO DRIVE YOU TO
Your friend, WORK WHEN YOU ARE WORKING YOUR FARM IN THE
F. M. WILL oOWMS,
Chicago, Illinois. BUNNELL COLONY. YOU ARE YOUR OWN BOSS THERE.




_6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
BOY LIFE IN THE BUNNELL COLONY
It is a serious undertaking, this breaking home-ties, and going out into new and untried paths, and one has many things to consider before definitely making the step. If one contemplates moving to a new locality, he should inform T
himself carefully regarding the -home sur- roundings, the climate, the productivity of the soil, transportation facilities, markets, etc., etc.
These are all tremendously important
features to be considered, and yet to my Oil
way of thinking, the greatest question for parents at least, is that of the social life, the moral atmosphere that will surround their boys and girls.
From time -to time we have given the
readers of the HOME BUILDER much "
information regarding the wonderful, climate in the Bunnell colony, we have I
carefully discussed the productivity of the soil, our fine location and, our excellent shipping facilities for all crops ..
grown, but we fear we have given far too ....g. ',
little attention to the vital feature which : ..I wish to discuss at this time.
Scout-itaster Ramsay andsome of the Boy Scouts cleaidna the streets of Buniell on Saturda afternoon
..be given an interest in the chickens, those parents were making their children
ducks, turkeys, etc. They can raise their partners. squabs, grow tomatoes, belong to the "All work and no play makes Jack
canning clubs, and find other interesting a dull boy" we have been told, but the occupations. The ordinary boy and girl Boy Scouts of Bunnell can tell you that is very happy to be considered a partner they have learned to combine play and
of his parents, and if the.- fathers and work On this page you will see a picmothers will take time to consider this ture of six of the Boy Scouts of Bunnell feature of the home-life, they will be with their Scout Master. They make S. able to keep their sons and daughters themselves very useful in our little city,
I much longer in the "home nest," and see and each Saturday they may be found
them grow up contented men and women. busily engaged in cleaning up the town.
41There is one family in the Bunnell On March 15th, the contract was awarded
- colony which I have in mind just now, the 'Boy Scouts of keeping the streets
- and which I greatly admire. The boys clean within a certain limit. This work
in that family are real men. They are is done under the supervision of their steady, hard-working, but they take an Scout Master. This is not a money-makinterest in the home and stay close by- ing scheme for the boys, for they took it. I think I lear-ned the secret of their the contract from the city fathers for a contentment, or some of it at least, when very low figure, but they are learning SI visited them at one time. One of the the great lesson of neatness and cleanlisons showed me his two acres of water- ness, and the citizens of the town, seeing
- .melons; another pointed out his field of the work being done by the boys, are
John azurew Jr., and his pet calf sweet potatoes-and then I realized that trying to co-operate with them.
Where, in truth, is the best place in which to rear the -boy and the girl? "
Opinions iay differ on this subject, but. I firmly believe that that place is the. country, and that there are great opportunities for the average lad today on the farm. In a new and growing
community like the Bunnell colony is this particularly true, and every parent should study the question of holding the l y on the farm with him as long as ki
possible. The home life there should be made just as attractive as possible, JLJ and the love of Nature should be instilled into every young heart.
Parents who move with their children "-'
to their Bunnell farms should give them some opportunity of making a bit of money that is all their own, and let them feel a personal interest in the things of the home. If this be done, the boys are not so liable to leave for the cities, where ,
success for them is often fleeting. "-My plea is not for the boys alone, but ..
for the girls as well. They may not be able to work in the fields, but they should Little son o.f Dr. Carter, enjoying the out door life of Bunnell




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDEI
by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
-. At the regular meeting of the Town
- Council Wednesday evening Col. Geo. B.
" Everson was employed as city attorney, he to have charge of all the legal affairs of the city.
Mr. J. W. Moore, of Fort Morgan, Colo., arrived in Bunnell last week and has purchased 20 acres of land from the Bunt nell Development Company east of Bunnell. He states that he expects to re.. main here and will begin the cultivation
of his farm.
That Flagler county is patriotically inclined is proven by the fact that the people were asked to donate at least five hundred dollars as their share towards the Red Cross Fund. Rev. Ramsey took the matter in charge, along with some
-f-the-other-prominent men, and in one Af day they collected $681.00 for this
worthy cause.
.. The farmers of Flagler County are requested to meet in the Woodman Hall in Several thousand people oathered early in the morning to attend.the festivities and prominent men throughout Bunnell Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock the State of Florida cere guests of Flagler county that day for the purpose of making arrangements for a barrel factory for the coming seaMany prominent men throughout While attending the big celebration in son
Florida were visitors in Bunnell at the honor of the creation of Flagler county, Every grower of potatoes should be time of the celebration of the creation of Governor Catts, of the State of Florida, present at this meeting and help to orFlagler county, among them being bought forty acres of Bunnell potato ganize a company for the purpose of Governor Catts, Adjutant General Chris- land. The Governor stated, while he was manufacturing barrels and avoid the tian, Senators W. A. McWilliams, of St. in Bunnell, that he liked our colony very shortage they had to contend -with the Augustine, and James E. Alexander, of much, and may consider the erection of past season. Deland; Representatives Amos Lewis, of a winter home here. Senator W. E. McJackson County, David Schultzs of Vo- Williams bought one hundred acres, and Mr. M. C. Reynolds and family, of lusia, and Frank M. Corbett, of St. Mr. D. D. Corbett, Superintendent of Jacksonville,' who own a nice twenty
Johns, J. A. Riley, of Ormond, Judge J. Public Instruction, as well as several acre tract just south of the home of Mr. H. Mackey, K. F. Pederick, David May- others, purchased farms near that of Durrance on Moody boulevard, have arfield Attorney General Frank Dancy, Governor Catts. These farms total four rived and are having their land cleared
and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville; hundred and forty acres, and -ill be with the expectations of planting it this Sheriff Joe Perry, A. W. Corbett, Clerk cleared and fenced and immediately put winter. Obe P. Goode, Vice-President J. E. under cultivation. Ingraham, John T. Dismukes, H.W. Mr. G. A. Anderson, who has been the
Davis, Rev. D. H. Rutter, D. D. Corbett. Three very prominent men have or- cashier of the Bunnell State Bank for
Tax Assessor B. Edmister, County ganized an abstract company known as the past three years, has severed his reDemonstrator Cheatham, Commissioners the Flagler County Abstract Co. The lations with the bank, and has left for
Mahr and Roberts and Editor Harry L. company's main office will be located in Baxley, Georgia, to assume his duties Brol, of St. Augustine; T. E. Cobb, of Bunnell, and the capital stock of the com- with a new bank which is being organized ville, a Hd J. L. Middleton of Elk-ton. pany will be fifteen thousand dollars. by Mr. Moody.
The watermelon season in Bunnell i. almost over. The farmers have furnishec our merchants with a great number of fine watermelons this season.
Mr. R. L. Hendricks has accepted the position as cashier of the Bunnell State Bank, and has moved his family to Bunnell. He is building a beautiful home, which is almost completed.
The town of Bunnell is going to install I
new water works, as the present water supply is inadequate for fire protection. The City Council took the matter up, which met with the approval of all.
Mr. W. E. Kudrna, who purchased an .
interest in the Bunnell Garage and Auto ,Co., has assumed entire charge as manager. The beach at Ocean cuy. -4 good Place for our buyers who visitt our colony this summer to spend their vacation




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The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. SEPTEMBER 19 17 ONE OF OUR MOST DISTINGUISHED BUYERS HON. SIDNEY JOHNSTON CATTS Governor of the State of Florida “I feel sure that Flagler county will eventually rank among the best in the State, and I feel so positive of this that I have purchased a forty acre tract of land here, that I will immediately put under cultivation by planting it to Irish potatoes the coming SeaSOn. (Flagler Tribune.) (The above is an extract from the address delivered by Governor Catts while in Bunnell at the time of the celebration of the new county.)

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_ TOg BUMHELL HOME BUILDER WHAT ARE FARMS REALLY WORTH AT BUNNELL By THOS. A. VERDENIUS Mr. T A. Verdenias The Pioneer Small Farm Alan of Florida. How to Put a Conservative Value on Land in the Bunnell Colony. If one were to ask you how to put a .: nservative value on some real estate, how would you go about it, and in what way would you determine its actual alue? For instance, if a man were to jome to you and ask you the value of a home or a flat building, a store or ware house, in one of our large or small cities, i presume you would find out first of all "he amount of income such a building or store was blunging its present owner, would you not? For example, say that some one had a six family apartment building. After you had inspected the building and the way it was constructed, the surround ings, etc., you would figure out how much each tenant paid per month, and then multiply this amount by twelve, which would give you the gross income of the building for one year. After deducting rhe amount of taxes, insurance and other expenses, such as repairs, etc., from the gross income, you would then have the net income of the building, and then fig uring the amount at 6 per cent, you would be able to estimate the value of that property in an intelligent manner. What I mean to demonstrate is this: You would value a piece of property ac cording to what it would produce, and that is correct. A building that produces $2,000 a year, net, is worth twice as much as a building that produces only onehalf the amount, or $1,000 a year. What is .true of a flat building is also true of an office building or a sky-scraper, and it also holds good in determining the value of farm lands in Illinois or Iowa, a ranch in the West, or a potato farm in Bunnell, Florida. Now, what is a farm in Illinois or Iowa or any other Middle Western state worth today? I have seen some good farms in the Middle West which have sold for as high as $300.00 an acre. Of course, I do not mean to say that this is the average price paid for farms here in the Middle West, but I believe I am estimating below the average price w T hen I say that land in Illinois or Iowa is selling on an average of $150.00 an acre. A farm in either of these two states, or for that matter, in any of the Middle Western states is considered a most con servative investment, But what does such a farm produce, and what net income does it bring the owner ? I talked, yesterday, with a gentleman who owns 180 acres of land in Du Page county, Illinois, and he told me that the money invested in his farm brought him about 2 per cent. A few years ago the Government published statistics w T hich showed that the average production on an acre of land in Missouri yielded the farmer about $9.38; land in Illinois, $12.48; Iowa, $12.22, and in Ohio, $13.36. These amounts, no doubt, have been in creased within the last couple of years, as all farm products have gone up con siderably, but even if these profits should have increased 50 per cent, how would they compare with the farm lands in our Bunnell colony? Here in the Middle West the farmer grows one crop a year on his land, and sometimes that one crop proves to be a failure, and in such a case he has to wait another whole year before he gets another chance. Last year I saw thou sands upon thousands of acres of grain in the Dakotas which the farmers did not even consider w T orth their while to harvest. Our farmers in Bunnell raise three crops a year, and if one of these crops should be a failure, they have two more chances that same year. We have fanners in our col ony who have cleared over $200.00 an acre, net, on their potato crop this year, and they still have two more crops to raise on their land this same year, per haps a crop of com and a crop of hay. These two crops may not net them more than $50.00 each to the acre, as our potato crop is our big money crop, but I am sure if our Summer and Fall crops are up to the average this year, our fanners should net at least $300.00 to the acre on their land. Now, with these facts before you, viz., if a fann in Illinois will produce per haps one splendid crop of com which may Afield of sugar cane inthe Bunnell colony. A crop of sugar cane often nets from $300.00 to $50o on per acre net the farmer $25.00 an acre, andthis land sells for $150.00 to $250.00 air acre, what is a farm in our Bunnell colony worth, where the farmer can first grow a crop of potatoes and then a crop of corn and then a crop of good hay? Or, for a matter of argument, let us double the income of an Illinois fann, making it net the farmer $50.00 an acre, and then cut the profit of our fanner in Bunnell, one-half, and make his net profit only $150.00 an acre. We now leave it to our readers to put their own value on a farm in Bunnell. We consider buying a fann in our Bun nell colony one of the best and most ex cellent real estate investments, not only in Florida but m this entire country of ours. If land in the Middle West is worth $250.00 an acre, based on the above facts, our cultivated farms would be cheap at twice the amount. Potato farm in the Bunnell colony that netted the owner $ 200.00 an acre.

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S Vta BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, A resume of the addresses of three of the most prominent men in the State of Florida Delivered at Bunnell last month when the People of that Section so fittingly Dedicated their new FLAGLER COUNTY Senator TV, A. Mac Williams Senator W. A. Mac Williams was given a great ovation. He stated that it was with peculiar emotions he appeared be fore such a large audience, because he re called the old site of Bunnell when A. A. Bunnell erected a saw mill and a few shacks for the shelter of his employes. No one would then have dared dream of the Bunnell of the present day, and he prophesied that none present now would venture to forecast the extent of the de velopment and progress that are sure to mark the next ten years in Flagler. He mentioned Escambia and St. Johns as the two mother counties of Florida. This youngest daughter of old St. Johns starts out with a promise of great pros perity. Some have said that Flagler County is too small, but he reminded his hearers that it is half the size of Delaware and that Volusia county with the portion taken out and given to Flag ler still remains in area the size of Dela ware. He mentioned this to indicate the great possibilities that Flagler and other counties of Florida possess in the way of development and providing of food supplies not only for our nation but for our brothers across the seas. He said that Flagler County would be just what its people made it—nothing else—but he felt sure there was a united sentiment for the building up of the community with all the best things of life and just as few as possible of the bad things. Colonel MacWilliams concluded his elo quent address with a stirring patriotic appeal, in which he expressed the hope that he would live to see the banner of democracy floating over the whole world. He stated the time had come when there are only two classes of citizens in the United States, patriots and traitors. That all the audience were in the first class was evident from the applause which greeted him upon the conclusion of his splendid address. These three men are, the Hon. Sidney J. Catts, Governor of the great State of Florida, Senator IV. A. McWilliams and Mr. J. E. Ingraham, Vice-President of the Florida East Coast Railway Company (Flagler System), and also Mayor of the city of St. Augustine. On the front page of this issue appears the photograph of Governor Catts, and this page contains the pictures of the other two speakers. Bunnell had made great preparations for this celebration. Several thousand people gathered early in the morning to attend the festivities and prominent men through out the state of Florida were guests of Flagler County that day. There was just one thing to mar the pleasure of those gathered on this mem orable occasion, and that was the — weather. There was a pouring rain for three or four hours, and not until four o’clock in the afternoon did it cease. After that time a number of splendid addresses were given, but for lack of space we shall only be able to give a resume of what was said by three of the most prominent speakers. Governor Catts says that Flagler County is Destined to be the Leading Farming Coun ty in Florida Governor Catts was greeted with ap plause by the large crowd of men, women and children. In his speech he took the occasion to pay a fitting tribute to late Mr. Flagler, for whom the county was named. He expressed it as being quite a pleasure for him to sign the bill creating Flagler County, for he felt sure that the new county would eventually rank among the best in the state and he felt so posi tive of this that he had purchased a forty acre tract of land here that he will im mediately put under cultivation by plant ing it to Irish potatoes the coming season. He depicted the great future that is in store for Flagler County by all pulling together. He said that with co-operation Flagler County was destined to be the leading fanning county of Florida. He concluded his address in a very impres sive and beautiful way appealing to the nobler, purer and better things in men. Uncle Sam needs you Our country needs food Are you doing your share? If you can’t ARM—FARM. The best place to buy a farm is in the Bunnell colony, Bun nell, Florida. There you can raise three crops a year. THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. J. E. Inara ham. Mayor of St. Augustine and VicePresident of the Florida East Coast Eailroad Mayor Ingraham said in part: “When the question of establishing Flagler coun ty was discussed, I told the gentlemen who came to see me about it that Mr. Flagler was a man of high ideals and one whose standards of all kinds were high, so much so that he would not per mit a poor piece of work to stand. To my own knowledge I have heard of work being tom down and done over again because it did not come up to his stand ards, and in establishing the county that would be named after him that you must set your standards high to realize his ideals, which I am sure you will; for those of us who loved him deeply, I want to thank you for honoring his memory. “I hand you, Mr. Chairman, copy of a little booklet which was published after his death, which gives a great many in cidents of his life; it is accompanied with a small picture of him, which is an ex cellent one, and which I think you might like to file among the archives of Flagler county. “Now, if I am permitted, I would like to say a veiy few words to you on an other subject, but one which has much to do with your future. Flagler county is peculiarly an agricultural county, with good lands, good men, good drainage, abundant rainfall, well located between sea and river, good transportation fa cilities with whom you are on most friendly terms, and every physical re source is at your disposal. Your lands are peculiarly adapted to cultivating at least three crops a year; potatoes, com or other grains and hay, all of which are needed and sorely needed. “The South can raise millions upon millions of bushels of com for food for man and beast, but millions of people must be educated to its use, and by so doing supplement the food supply of the world, and I hope that Flaerler county will make its efforts in this direction.”

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed Mr. C. A. Whitaker, who owns a nice tract of land near Codyville, harvested one hundred barrels of. potatoes from two acres this season for which he re ceived $889.00 f. o. b. the cars at Cody ville. On this same land he now has a fine crop of com. Mr. Whitaker is one of our newcomers, he arriving here last fall. He now has twelve and one-half acres of his farm cleared and expects to plant his entire acreas-e to potatoes next season. Mr. Jackson has been busy the past week hauling watennelons to Bunnell. He has an exceptionally fine garden this year and it would pay anyone to take a look at it. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baird, of Elk City, Okla., arrived in Bunnell Sunday and were registered at the Halcyon. Mr. Baird owns a nice thirty acre tract of land just w T est of the home of Mr. Mack, which he will have cleai’ed as soon as possible. Mr. John Henkle has erected a nice bungalow on his farm, which is situated just south of the farm of Mr. W. A. Mack. Mr. N. E. Leitzel, of Dupont, is a pur chaser of a new Maxwell touring car which he bought from the Bunnell Garage & Auto Co. Mrs. Henry Heubner, one of the most industrious women in the Bunnell Col ony, has purchased 500 cans which she expects to fill this summer. She has already put up a large number of cans of tomatoes and sauer kraut. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Perry, of Des Moines, la., arrived in Bunnell recently and will make Bunnell their future home. They are doing light housekeeping at the home of Mrs. C. A. Whitaker. Mr. Perry owns a nice tract of land near Codyville, which he will put under culti vation. According to official records, the Irish potato growers of the St. Johns, Flagler and Putnam county potato belt realized more than five million dollars from the sale of their potatoes last spring. Fol lowing are the statistics: Total number of acres planted, 12,000; total yield in bar rels, 750,000; highest price obtained per barrel, $10.00; average price obtained per barrel, $7.50; average yield per acre, 60 barrels; average total receipts per acre, $450.00; average profit per acre, $350.00. The report shows that the date of plant ing crops was from January 1st to Februrary 1st; date of harvesting crop, from April 25th to May 25th. From at least ten thousand acres of the above land, the farmers are now ready to harvest their second crop, and at sev eral places the second crop (com) has already been harvested. Considerable more acreage has been cleared, and it is predicted that next year’s potato plant ing -will be the heaviest in the history of the potato belt. Mr. J. J. Buckles has purchased a fine pair of mules. Mr. Pellicer,. Mr. Ed. Johnson and Mr. John Durrance each purchased a mule from the sale stable of Mr. M. Stone. The farmers in this section of the coun try have been very busy planting sweet potatoes for the fall crop. At the present price of sweet potatoes, they will realize good profits. The recent report of the condition of the Bunnell State Bank shows that the bank is in a more prosperous condition than it has ever been before. The bank has considerably more than $150,000.00 in deposits, today. ^Residents of the Bunnell colony may enjoy surf bath ing at Ocean City any day in the year Work on the construction of a beauti ful bungalow by Mr. George Moody on his property on Moody Boulevard was begun this week and will be rushed to completion in time for him to move his family here before school opens. Col. C. G. Yam has been appointed local attorney for the Florida East Coast Railway and will have charge of all the legal matters of the Flagler System in Flagler County. Mr. Paul Soguel, of Hilhurs, Calgary, | Canada, is spending several days here j looking over the Bunnell Colony. He has land here which he bought some time ago. Mr. Soguel is very much pleased I with our county. Mr. Tore Aasen. of Montana, who has ten acres of land in the Bunnell Colony, was a visitor here last week. Before he left he bought an additional 10 aci'es. Mr. Chas. Welti, living west of Bun nell brought in three fine pigs this morn ing which he shipped to Jacksonville. The pigs were half-breed O. I. C.’s, and were in fine condition. They were thir teen months old and weighed 1,175 pounds. He sold them for 14% cents per pound, the three pigs bringing him $170.37. Hon. I. I. Moody is home from Maine, where he went to inspect the Rose No. 4 seed potatoes and contracted for the purchase of a large quantity of seed to be used by the Flagler county fanners in planting their 1918 potato' crop. The acreage planted in Flagler county the coming season will be practically double what was planted this year, as there are numbers of large tracts of land being cleared and put under culti vation. Mr. C. C. Jordon, better known as “Happy Charlie,” planted one-quarter of an acre of new ground to watermelons this spring from which he has already sold a fraction over two hundred dollars’ worth of melons and he has several hun dred melons left. He also planted be tween each melon hill a tomato plant which are yielding a fine crop of toma toes. Mr. J. A. Hunter brought into town a sweet potato measuring 11% inches in length and weighing 2% pounds. He has in an acre of sweet potates and has no trouble in disposing of them at good prices as fast as gathered. Realizing that Flagler County is veiy much in need of a court house, the Bun nell Development Co., has agreed to give to. the county that large tract of land hung just north of the home of Mr. Wm. Hardesty, which consists of approximate ly ten acres, provided the county will erect a nice court house thereon. This piece of property is very desirable for a court house site as it is covered with large trees which wall furnish plenty of shade not only for the court house but for large grounds around the building. This can be made one of the prettiest grounds in the State and the citizens of Flagler County should appreciate very much the generosity of the Bunnell Development Co. in giving this valuable property to them free of cost. Now that we have the building site the next move is to get busy and make some kind of arrangements for the erec tion of a court house that will be in keep ing with the best county in Florida. It has been rumored that the Flagler estate will donate such a court house for the county named for Mr. Flagler. Mr. A. J. Vafed, of Hurley, South Dakota, is building a beautiful bungalow and other farm buildings on his 640 acre farm. Mr. Yafed has shipped a carload of farm implements and mules, and as soon as the buildings are completed, he will move to Bunnell.

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BUNHELE HOME BUILDER One Saturday, while six of the Scouts were busy cleaning the streets, Mr. W. R. Diamond, of East Chicago, In diana, chanced to be touring through Florida, and passed through Bunnell on that day. He took the picture of the boys, which we here reproduce, and w r as kind enough to send it to the Scout Master in Bunnell. This boy subject is a mighty important one, and w 7 e could have many things to say about our Bunnell colony boys, for there are some very bright, interesting fellows there, not alone in the towns by any means, but out on the farms. There is a real boy genius down in the Korona district, who has made electricity his hobby and has studied a great deal about wireless telegraphy. Some months ago he installed his ovm wireless station in Korona, which was the only one in the Bunnell colony. He was able to get messages every day and each afternoon received the correct time as it was sent from Washington, D. C. However, as has been the experience of all, other wire less operators at the present time, he received word from the War Department at Washington, D. C., a few weeks ago that he would have to detach his instru ment until further notice. The fanner boys throughout the colony find a happy diversion with their own particular pets. Study your boys, parents, and make their life in the country so attractive that they will hesitate long before leav ing it. ST. JOHNS COUNTY, FLORIDA, BUSINESS MAN WRITES LET TER TO A NORTH DA KOTA MAN The following extract from a letter written by a business man of St. Johns county, Florida, to another of North Dakota will prove of in terest to the readers of the HOME BUILDER. “In the United States we have all kinds of climate and all kinds of soil—the rich est on eai’th, and it should not be neces sary for any one to forsake this country when looking for a farm-home. I was raised on a farm in Wisconsin, lived in Minnesota for twelve years, and for the past twenty-four years my home has been in Florida. I enclose herewith a* map, issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture showing the ‘Crop-growing Season in Days’ in all parts of our country. You will note that around Grand Forks, North Dakota, it is 120 days. Beginning at Jacksonville, Florida, and to the south end of the state, it is from 300 to 365 days. “We grow our money crops from De cember to May, and have the benefit of quick railroad transportation to the center of population of the United States. From 24 to 36 hours brings our products to all the big markets of the country. There is practically no competition. Most of the big crops in Florida are sold by our farmers f. o. b., that is, delivered on the cars. The farmers get their money when the cars are loaded. “In my home county this year we had 16,000 acres in Irish potatoes. They brought double the price of any previous year; in other words, they netted the farmers from $250.00 to $400.00 per acre. These potatoes were the first crop of the season. Com planted in the potato fields is now from turn to three feet high. This null yield all the way from 35 to 70 bushels per acre. After the com comes hay, consisting of crab-grass and cowpeas, making three crops on the same ground inside of eight months. “Hogs, cattle and poultry are profitable, and dairying is one of the industries we are especially advocating. One of the leading dairies in my county, milking seventy-six cows this winter, sold its milk at the cars, f. o. b., for fortycents a gallon and cream for $1.60 a gallon, and they could not begin to supply r the demand. “Water is pure; rainfall abundant, and the climate is the healthiest I have ever lived in. “If y 7 ou have anyfriends who want to move to a place wdiere they can make as much money in one year, if they work and apply sensible methods, as they can in your section in five years, refer them to me.” Poultry Raising in the Bunnell Col ony. There is no industry which offers bet ter returns and larger profits than does that of poultry 7 raising. As a matter of fact, the demands of the home market in Floi’ida are so great that the local supply falls far short of meeting the require ments. As a result, there is an enormous import, principally from Georgia and Tennessee. While the exact figures show ing how much is sent out of Florida for poultry to these two States are unavail able, it is known to be an amount that is almost beyond belief. With proper care the industry is one that means great wealth to parties who engage in it. It will be many years before the Florida fanner can raise a sufficient quantity 7 of poultry 7 and eggs to meet the demands light at his own door. Don’t allow y r ourself to become negli gent about your poultry duties. Have some object in view 7 and w r ork to it. Nothing under the sun is better for fowls, both y r oung and old, than dry bran. Keep your breeding fowis active and Baby farmer west of Bunnell with ten-iceek's old Orpingtons Buck's raised in the Bunnell colony In breeding pure bred poultry 7 insist on the “royal blue.” Spray y r our roosting rooms once a week with a solution of two parts water to one of carbolic acid and coal oil. working and y 7 ou will produce more and better chicks. Utility 7 means more to the farmer than fancy points. Remember, good blood counts for much. WHAT A KORONA BUYER SAYS ABOUT THE BUN NELL COLONY Dear Sir: I was in Bunnell, Florida, from June 3, 1917, to July 7 14, 1917, and during that time I built my house and cleared some of my land, so I shall have my 7 ground ready for planting this coming December. I expect to go to Bunnell with my mother in October, to live there perma nently on my farm. I wish to say that all the people I met wiiile there from the North are satisfied with their land, because they 7 all had good crops this year and they all like that climate. Yours trulv, JOHN J. MARCINKOSKI, Chicago, Illinois. $7,906.21 Cleared on a 36-Acre Farm Messrs. Burrell Brothers, who own a nice farm in the Haw Creek section con sisting of 36 acres, make the following statement in regard to their crop for the year ending June 1, 1917: Potatoes sold f. o. b. packing shed $12,000.79 Cabbage, onions and com sold during the year... 1,582.47 Total for the y 7 ear 13,583.26 Paid out for expenses for the year 4,427.05 Net profits for year. 9,156.21 Paid out for addition to bam, purchase of live stock and farm implements and living expenses 1,250.00 Total balance for y 7 ear 7,906.21 It will be noted that they cleared $7,906.21 after paying all expenses in cluding their living expenses, besides buying stock and constructing new build ings.

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me BUNHR1L HOMLE BUILDER A NATURE LOVER’S DESCRIPTION of his Surroundings in the Bunnell colony The following description, written by Mr. A. V. Folsom, is a masterpiece in its line. It rivals the descriptions of another nature-lover, Thoreau, and will be a delight to the readers of the Home Builder who also have “eyes to see and ears to hear.” Mr. A. F Folsom There is possibly an acre of high hammoch land on the north side of my ten acres, and here in a setting of tall cab bage palms, oaks draped in Spanish moss, and long-leaved pine I have built my un pretentious little house. From my windows I look into a garden of the Lord’s own planting, a tangle of greenery—palmettoes, shrubs, vine-clad trees—mysterious, darksome and inviting. From my door I look over the cleared field and can see the travel on the road on my south side. I have a variety of soils on my place and each soil has its characteristic vege tation. I have noted four kinds of oaks, sabal palmetto, and saw-tooth, maple, ash, elm, hickory, red cedar, cypress, mul berry, persimmon, willow sumach, pine; and on land adjoining magnolia grandiflora and magnolia glauca or white bay, the latter having creamy blossoms two or three inches across. The former every one knows. The mere enumeration of varieties con veys but a faint idea of their beauty and infinite charm. There are 200 varieties of trees native to this state and 100 varie ties found in no other state. Inhabiting these thickets and fields are a great va riety of birds whose gay songs and in teresting antics I find vastly entertaining. Not having access to “Who’s Who in Birdland” I can only count as acquaintances about one-half my visitors. Near neigh bors are a pair of Cardinal Grossbeaks, the male simply gorgeous in Chinese vermilion. They have a pleasant song. Another fine singer is the Meadow Lark, but they are not plentiful. Then I have blue birds, phoebe birds, and finches with out number. When I sit in my door at evening I hear the minor notes of the mourning dove and the cherry “bob white” of the quail. The little ground dove finds a nest ing place close to the house. Nearly any time of the day you can hear the busi ness-like tap, tap of the woodpecker. I notice one variety with red head and black-speckled back; then I have the little sap-suckers. Up near the double bridge the other day I saw an “ivory bill” woodpecker, the first I have ever, seen alive. I had read about them when a boy in Audubon’s delightful bird notes. These are the largest of the woodpeckers and comparatively rare. The goat-sucker family seem to have two representatives here, one commonly called “night hawk” and another a close relation of the whip poorwill, but with a different cry. Sand hill cranes pass and repass overhead, clipper-built hawks wheel and scream, the familiar owl comes nightly with his weird cry, and last but not least are the buzzards. When clouds bank up the sky in huge formations and you look up into the blue of the zenith, you can see these birds, mere specks, describing great curves and evolutions. Nearly every tree harbors a tree-toad and when it threatens rain these elfs and the rain-crows make a great to-do. When the sun is shining the cicadae, the crickets and others keep up an orchestral accompaniment. At night time in the season these hammocks become a fairy-land where thousands of fire-flies make and break the circuit. I haven’t time to go into, detail about the native flora which is rich and abund ant, how the grapes, the five-fingered ivy, the honeysuckle, the thorny bamboo, the scarlet trumpet vine and a host of other vines festoon the trees, drape the old snags and climb over the fences. I must leave a little to the imagination. To the Nature-lover Florida has much to offer. A. V. FOLSOM, Bunnell, Florida. “WHY ARE WE STAYING HERE?” ASKS OREGON MAN, AS HE COM PARES CONDITIONS IN THAT STATE WITH THOSE IN BUN NELL COLONY TODAY. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I have received the July number of the Bunnell Home Builder, and I consider it about the best I have yet received. We are having a considerable drought in this immediate section of Oregon and the unfortunate farmers will have to wait a whole twelve-months for the next crop, and that crop will have to pay for a large part of the expenses of this crop and the one twelve months from now. In Florida they have had one crop with large profit and two more crops to come this year. It would take us here three years (36 months) to get the same number of crops vou will get in Bunnell this year. WHY ARE WE STAYING HERE? Respectfullv, T. H. McGHEE, (Oregon). What a Woman Accomplishing in the Bunnell Colony Dear Mr. Verdenius: As you have requested me to do so, I am writing you to tell you how we are getting along on our farm at Bunnell. If you see fit to do so, you may publish this letter in the HOME BUILDER. As you may perhaps recall, we arrived in Bunnell September 1, 1916. It was a little late for us to get the 20 acre farm we bought from you in readiness for a crop of potatoes, but we were very for tunate in being able to rent a twenty acre farm near our pla L*. We planted about twelve acres of this' land to Irish, pota toes, which I sold for $2,135.80. We now have a fine stand of com and cowpeas on this same land. T also grew some of the finest onions you ever saw, and we received ten cents a pound for all we had to sell. Some of them were exceptionally large and three of these largest sized onions alone brought me 65 cents. You can therefore see that the onions we sent you were com paratively small when you take into con sideration the larger ones grown. Had I known that you wanted some onions so that you could show what can be grown in our colony, I should have sent you larger ones than I did, but the fact is we already shipped the largest onions about a month before I received your letter. Besides the onions, potatoes, com and cowpeas, we have our garden with cab bage, tomatoes, beans and carrots and have sold quite a lot of these. We have all the watermelons we want to eat be sides a number of others that we have for sale. Taking everything into consideration, my children and I are well pleased here and I believe this is the best place in which to make money. Y'ou will remem ber that I came from the state of Cali fornia, and I have never been any place where a person could make a better living : than right here in the Bunnell colony. One has no difficulty to raise three crops a year on their land here. At the present time we have most of our twenty acres cleared, and next year I expect to jrlant not only this twenty acres to potatoes, but I will have about thirty-five acres in potatoes. If a woman like 'myself can make a success in the Bunnell colony, I can see no reason why a man should' not do so. I believe that any fanner who has ten acres of this land under cultivation, will not only be able to make a good living on it, but will be able to put money in the bank. (Mrs.) STELLA JONES, Bunnell, Florida. Have you read what Governor Catts says about our county? If not, turn to page three of this issue, j Governor Catts and several other prominent men of Florida have bought land in our colony. What better endorsement of the value of our lands could you ask for? j Send your order today —RIGHT NOW —for a farm in our colony, and we will locate you close to the forty acre farm which Governor Catts purchased in our Volusia tract. Land in theVolusia tract is selling for only $35.00 an acre on the monthly installment plan. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS. I 10S So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Dairying In Bunnell A great acquisition fo the St. Peter family. Where a number of dairy cows are kept on farms and made a regular part of the farm business, one usually will find the farmers out of debt, with nice homes, and the other things that go toward making life really worth living. By keeping several cows and giving them proper attention, the farmer has a steady and sure income, just as if he had a salary in addition to his principal crops, whether they be potatoes, citrus fruits or truck. It would seem that the South is the coming stock country, for Uncle Sam said, in the Year Book of the United States Department of Agriculture for 1913—“THERE IS ONE SECTION THAT CAN PRODUCE MORE CATTLE AND MORE CHEAPLY THAN ANY OTHER SECTION OF THE WHOLE COUNTRY, FOR THE LANDS ARE STILL CHEAP, THE GRAZING IS GOOD, THE PAS TURE SEASON IS LONG, FEEDS CAN BE PRODUCED AT A MINIMUM COST AND INEXPENSIVE SHELTER ONLY IS REQUIRED. THAT SECTION OF THE COUNTRY IS THE SOUTH. There is no place in Florida where there are better opportunities for keep ing a few cows on each farm than in the Bunnell colony. As to the annual income from each cow—that depends on the kind of a cow and the care and feed ing she receives. The above is a picture of Dr. St. Peters’ fine Jersey cow. The cow gives very rich milk, and the doctor finds her a profitable investment, although they keep the cow just for their own family use. Another resident of Bunnell has three good milch cows which give him about 40 quarts of milk daily. After his family has used all they require the re mainder of the milk is sold for 10 cents a quart, which is the regular price for milk in the Bunnell colony. At this rate these three cows would yield $4.00 worth of milk each day, while the owner told me that they cost him about 75 cents a day for feed outside of the pasture, or 25 cents daily for each cow. This merely gives an idea of -what in come one might derive from half a dozen cows. After the local market has been supplied there are many opportu nities for selling good milk and cream to the large hotels of Daytona, Ormond, St. Augustine, Palatka, etc. Ice for keeping milk can be purchased reasonably at Bunnell, as an ice-plant that manufactures from two to three tons of ice daily has been installed in Bun nell. Just figure for yourself how much can be realized in one month from a few good milch cows. There is another very important fea ture to be considered in keeping cows on one’s farm, for there is more in farm ing than the single problem of seeing how large a crop can be harvested from an acre of ground. Every bale of cot ton, every ton of com, every car of cantaloupes takes from the soil a large amount of plant food or soil fertility. For instance, when the cotton farmer sells a ton of seed cotton, for which he obtains about $120.00, he at the same time sells from his farm $12.00 to $15.00 worth of fertility. But the dairyman, when he sells a ton of butter, worth $500.00 or $600.00, sells from his farm only about 50 cents’ worth of fertility. While the dairyman is producing the ton of butter, his animals have produced 15 or 20 tons of good fertilizer, worth alto gether $30.00 or $40.00. The cotton grower who sells his seed cotton returns no fertility to his fields, but Iris crop has robbed Iris soil at the rate of $12.00 to $15.00 for every ton of seed cotton which leaves his farm. WHY NOT RAISE SHEEP? It is scarcely necessary to prove by statistics that the consumption of mut ton in the United States is steadily in creasing each year, and the demand for wool is increasing more rapidly than it can be produced. It therefore follows, that the raising of sheep should be profitable. There are very few states in the Union which are better adapted to sheep raising than Florida. This is the opinion of experienced sheep men, who are meet ing with good success in this business in Florida at the present time. Land owners who are now living on their Bunnell faims would find it es pecially profitable to maintain a few sheep, as there is considerable land nearby which has not yet been brought under cultivation. Many of the men and women who have ‘contracted for farms in the Bunnell colony, and who are paying for same on the monthly in stallment plan, are scattered throughout the United States, and will not move on to their faims until they are fully paid for. The land contracted for is now lying idle, and if an actual settler would buy a few sheep, he could have free grazing for some time to come, and no harm whatever could come to such uncultivated land. Picture of land in its natural state in the Bunnell Colony sheep grazing thereon. The above is a picture taken in the Bunnell colony, showing some slrtep grazing on unimproved land. “Why Put Off for Tomorrow What You Should Do Today ” You have been Wanting a Farm in the Bunnell Colony Send Us Your Order for It NOW. A Day, or $5.00 a Month Pays for a 10-Acre Farm in the Bunnell Colony. Only $ 35.2S an Acre THOS. A VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, III. YOU WILL REGRET IT SOME DAY**

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MJHHELL HOME BUiLBER. Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell As CITY DIRECTORY CHURCH SERVICES: FIRST M. E. CHURCH. Sunday School every Sunday—10:00 A. M. Preaching—11:00 A. H. and 7:30 P. M. Ladies’ Aid Society — first Monday each month. Rev. L. D. Haynes. Pastor. CATHOLIC CHURCH—KORONA. Mass—9 :30 A. M. Rev. A. Baczyk, Pastor. WOMAN’S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays in month. Alice Scott-Abbott, President. SECRET ORDERS: A. F. & A. M., No. 200. Meets every second and Fourth Tuesday at 7 :00 P. M. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. All visiting brothers invited to attend. D. M. Deen. W. M. ORDER EASTERN STAR. Meets every first and third Tuesday at 7 :00 P. M. in the' Masonic Hall. Mrs. Hagadorn (Matron). FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY CO. Trains leave Jackson ville : 9 :30 A. M. 1:30 P. M. 8 :00 P. M. Leave Bunnell: 5:29 A. M. 10 :26 A. M. 4 :38 P. M. Arrive in Bunnell— Daily: 12 :45 P. M. 4 :23 P. M. 11 :46 P. M. Arrive in Jacksonville —Daily : 9:00 A. M. 1:30 P. M. 7 :50 P. M. Mayor Heath of Bunnell. The municipal election held in Bunnell passed off very quietly. The following were elected: The aldermen elected to serve for two years were: E. W. Johnston and J. H. McKnight. Aldermen elected to serve one year were: J. F. Lambert, W. H. Cochran and W. C. Sullivan. Mayor W. C. Heath was re-elected to serve as Mayor for the next year. Rev. C. D. Haynes of the M. E. Church of Bunnell. The many Bunnell friends of Rev. and Mrs. L. D. Haines, leam with much pleasure that Mr. Haynes has been re turned to Bunnell for another year to serve as pastor of the Bunnell Methodist church. The annual convention of Bunnell Lodge No. 200, Free and Accepted Ma sons, was considered a very successful one. The attendance was quite large. Newly elected and appointed officers for the ensuing year took their chairs. Bunnell Lodge enters the new year with an increased membership, which is full of enthusiasm, and the prospects for its future are exceedingly bright. A New York commission house has asked for a price on the entire output of the Irish potato crop in the colony. An other commission house wants 20,000 bar rels, and will pay S5.00 per barrel for number ones, twos and threes. Mr. F. Vincent is planting Ms home place to grapes of the Concord variety, and also 150 orange trees. The January issue of the “Florida Farm er and Homeseeker” contained a very interesting article on “How I Grew My Tomatoes,” by Myrtle Marie Brock, a St. Johns County Canning Club girl, -whose home is at Bunnell. Miss Brock is the daughter of one of our land owners, Mr. W. A. Brock, and it is indeed gratifying to see that the sons and daughters of the colonists are taking such an active inter est in the development of the community. Mr. Harry Sessions, formerly of New York, has as fine a garden spot here as anyone in Florida. His watermelons are looking fine. THE FARMER IS THE ONLY MAN WHO FINDS IT PROF ITABLE TO RUN HIS BUSINESS INTO THE GROUND. Mr. E. Kinney, of New Jersey, who ar rived in our midst several days ago, has become a Bunnell convert, and will stretch Ms leave of absence to the limit so as to remain here as long as possible. While he is putting in Ms last year’s work in New Jersey he will have Ms Bunnell farm put in a state of cultiva tion, and next year at tMs time Mr. Kin ney expects to be a Bunnell “spud” grower. Mr. W. A. Mack certainly has done himself credit this year, and can show as fine a twenty acre field as lays in St. Johns county-, all planted in Irish pota toes. Mr. C. F. Turner has not only planted potatoes on his own farm, but has also rented another farm for the same pur pose, and can show 7 a fine crop, wdiich will be ready 7 to harvest April 1st. Mr. Fred Horton of Wisconsin, who was the owner of ten acres of land near Gore Lake, was so well pleased that he bought fifteen acres additional on Ms re cent visit. Considerable money has already been donated, as well as one hundred beauti ful palm trees, for a city park for Bun nell, wffiich will be known as Flagler Park, and wffien completed it wall be one of the most attractive parks along the East Coast Railroad. Practically eveiyone in the Bunnell colony is through planting potatoes, and the fields are in fine condition. Mr. J. F. Lambert has one acre of cu cumbers, and anticipates toucMng the Mgh w r ater mark for Bunnell in regards to returns per acre. Dr. St. Peter has a fine sample of sweet Ms garden. It stands shoulder at this date. Home of Hon. I. I. Moody, President before the

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_ B U H H E .ILL HOME BUILDER ibuted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Mr. E. Baxter and Mr. J. Greer of Idaho, who owns 20 acres of very desir able land near Bunnell, are busy these days clearing their land and putting it under cultivation. The Professor of the Bunnell Public and High School writes as follows: “This week marks the end of the fourth month of school, and we feel sure that it is by far the best of our work. The work has been regular and the at tendance has been exceptionally good. The number of pupils is increasing steadily. Last Wednesday we enrolled four new students, and the total number I has now reached 110. Let us all work | for our school, and secure a fourth teacher before this term is out. We must begin to work now if the institution is to have the best results next year. Mrs. Cisco, east of Bunnell, writes the Editor as follows: “Up to the present time, Mr. Cisco has shot over 200 squir rels. He goes out before breakfast and brings in plenty for the day. He shot two wild turkeys for Christmas, and also caught a 30-lb. bass a few days ago. One does not need to go without game and fish in this country.” Mr. J. L. Council is after the “Potato Pennant” this year with a high average on his 35 acres of potatoes. Hon. I. I. Moody and family are now living in their new home, which is one of the most beautiful homes in St. Johns County. It is situated in a grove of fine water-oaks, on the Dixie Highway, one and a half miles east of Bunnell. Mr. Moody’s home, garage, and other buildings are equipped with electric lights and watei from a private light and water plant which he has had in stalled. The yard is now being seeded to grass and an abundance of flowers are being planted. State Bank. This picture was taken finished. Rev. A. Bacsyk of the Catholic Church Korona, Bunnell Colony The Korona section of the colony has received its share of the new settlers who have been arriving in the colony in large numbers this winter. A number of new homes have been erected at Ko rona, and a large amount of acreage has been cleared and planted to potatoes. The Kev. Father Baczyk reports a good ly number of new parishioners in his parish. The Modem Woodmen gave a dance in their hall in the Tribune Building last Thursday evening. The dance was well attended and everyone appeai-ed to have a good time. Contractors Kuhn & Anderson have just completed a nice bungalow on the farm of Mr. Oscar Buckley south of Bunnell. Over one hundred automobiles passed through Bunnell Sunday en-route to dif ferent parts of the state. These autos came from almost every state in the Union and we suppose are headed for almost every town on the East Coast of Florida. J. C. Miller is supplying the Bunnell merchants with nice turnips grown on his farm at Black Point. Under the management of Mr. A. F. Beaujon the Farmer’s Manufacturing Co., have opened up the barrel shop in BunnelL. As the weather conditions have been ideal for a bumper crop of potatoes this season this shop will have to turn out about twenty-five thousand barrels to meet the demand. Our new meat market is nearly com pleted, and will present an attractive front to the Dixie Highway when fin ished. Mr. Osborne expects "to handle all kinds of meats, also to take and deliver orders. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tittsworth, oi Hawthorn, N. J., are in Bunnell this week. Mr. Tittsworth owns a forty-acre farm here which he values very much. He and Mrs. Tittsworth null remain in Bunnell some time. They are stopping at the Halcyon. Mr. Lewis E. Fisher, of Linton, Ind., who owned a nice twenty acres just east of the farm of Mr. J. C. Miller, arrived in Bunnell last Friday morning. Mr. Fisher drove out Friday afternoon to look over his land and while out there he met Mr. Miller. In conversation with Mr Fisher, Mr. Miller asked him what he would take for the land, where upon Mr. Fisher priced the land to Mr. Miller at exactly twice the original cost, whereupon Mr. Miller immediately bought the twenty acres. Including this twenty acres, Mr. Mil ler now owns as nice a forty-five acre farm as can be found in the county. Mr. Fisher returned to his home in Indiana Saturday evening realizing that Florida land (especially land that is lo cated in the famous Irish potato belt) is not a drug on the market, and we predict that another year will not pass by without Mr. Fisher buying more St. Johns County land. Mr. W. C. Phillips has a fine stand, of Bermuda onions, and should repeat his past successes in this line. Postmaster Dcen. Postmaster D. M. Deen has just added thirty-six more lock boxes to the post office equipment. The increase in pop ulation in Bunnell has caused lock boxes to be in demand and as “Uncle Dan” is always on the job, wanting to serve his patrons, he immediately met their de mands by installing the new boxes. With this new section installed the postoffice now has a total of one hundred and fifty-three boxes.

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me BUMHELL HOME BUILDER. BUNNELL "‘NO LONGER AN EXPERIMENT,” Says Satisfied Land Owner, Who Has Spent Considerable Time in the Colony. Rev. F. M. Williams. Dear Sir: The HOME BUILDER received, and every word read with much pleasure. Conditions in and around Bunnell are becoming interesting, and I expect them to grow in interest from now on until those who have purchased land have gone and built their homes. It appears to me that with the pres ent stage of that country properly pre sented, you will have but little trouble in disposing of all the land you have for sale. There is no longer any need of guesswork about what that country has and wall produce. You can now refer with pride to the tangible results of what the Bunnell section of Florida has produced. With the present price of the 'land, the easy terms of payment, and the certainty that the land will double in value within the next year or two, placed beside what the land wall produce, I be lieve no farmer will hesitate very long before making an investment. Personally, I have greater faith in the possibilities of that country than I ever had before. It is no longer an ex periment for a man to go to the Bunnell section to make a home. Any one go ing down expecting to build up a home need not be disappointed. A man can raise enough in one year to pay for liis land, two, three or four times over, hence it is only a matter of a very short time until a man may have a home of Ms own. Hundreds and thousands of people would invest if these facts, to gether with all the conditions of that country, could be placed before them. But why should I be telling you some thing you already knowY I wish I could send you a hundi’ed buyers. I tMnk I would be doing them a favor by so doing. Your friend, F. M. WILLIAMS, CMcago, Illinois. LETTER FROM ANOTHER OF OUR SATISFIED BUY ERS IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY. Dear Mr. Verdemus: I am not able to give an opirnon of the Bunnell colonyas I should like, as I have never seen Bunnell, but I have conversed with people who have visited the colony and the little cityof Bunnell, and they 7 praise they both very Mghly. As to the men comprising the Bunnell Development Company, I find them all to be as square as any people I have ever dealt with. I can, with much pleasure, say sometliing about the climate of the state of Florida, as I was bom on a Florida farm and lived in that state until four years ago, when I enlisted in the Navy. But, like most boys brought up on the farm, I thought that there was a much better chance for a y 7 oung man to get a start in the world by leaving the farm and working for someone else. I did not have any 7 special trade or profession, so in four or five y 7 ears I found my r self worse off than when I left the farm; and being dissatisfied with the way I was earning my living, and not being in a position to earn it otherwise, I decided that I would enlist in the Navy 7 After spending two cold winters in the North, I began to realize the ad vantages of Florida’s climate over the climate of the Northern states, and I also began to realize the comforts one can have on the farm. I came to the conclusion that I would purchase a farm in Florida and settle down. I now have a twenty 7 acre farm in the Bunnell col ony 7 and although I have never seen it, I am satisfied with it, as it was selected for me by my brother, who is also a farmer. And, believe me, I expect to be living in the colony some time in the future. Yours truly, IRVING M. DOUGLAS. Mr. Richard T. Garner. WANTS HIS FRIENDS IN THE NORTH TO KNOW THAT HE IS WELL PLEASED WITH THE BUNNELL COLONY. Dear Sir: As I am well pleased with this coun try, I should be glad to have you publish this letter in the HOME BUILDER, so that my friends may read it. I have been in Bunnell a little over thirteen months, and have built the Pine Grove Inn. I have six city lots and twenty acres of farming land. I am satisfied that it is a good invest ment, and can cheerfully recommend both the climate and the land. Yours sincerely, S. M. BORTREE, Bunnell, Florida. Mr. S. M. Bortree. “BUNNELL — THE CITY OF OPPORTUNITIES.” Dear Mr. Verdemus: I thought I would write y 7 ou a few lines and tell you what I tlnnk of the Bunnell colony. I visited the colony in October, 1913, and although the col ony 7 was still so very young, it looked better to me than anything I had read about it, indeed the reports concerning it were in no manner overdrawn. WitMn a few years now I expect to make Bunnell my 7 home. The opportunities in the South are much greater than they are in the North, and I have told my friends this, and hope many 7 of them 11011 locate there. I call Bunnell the “City of OpportuMties.” Yours very truly, RICHARD T. GARNER, Missouri. NO EARLY MORNING WHISTLE TO DRIVE YOU TO | WORK WHEN YOU ARE WORKING YOUR FARM IN THE | BUNNELL COLONY. YOU ARE YOUR OWN BOSS THERE.

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_ B U H H E L L HOME BUILDER, BOY LIFE IN THE BUNNELL COLONY It is a serious undertaking, this break ing home-ties, and going out into new | and untried paths, and one has many things to consider before definitely maki ing the step. If one contemplates mov; ing to a new locality, he should inform himself carefully regarding the home sur roundings, the climate, the productivity of the soil, transportation facilities, mai'kets, etc., etc. These are all tremendously important features to be considered, and yet to my way of thinking, the greatest question for parents at least, is that of the social life, the moral atmosphere that will sur round their boys and girls. From time to time we have given the readers of the HOME BUILDER much information regarding the wonderful climate in the Bunnell colony, we have carefully discussed the productivity of the soil, our fine location and. our excel lent shipping facilities for all crops grown, but we fear we have given far too little attention to the vital feature which I wish to discuss at this time. Scout-Master Ramsay and some of the Boy Scouts cleaning the streets of Bunnell on Saturday afternoon Where, in truth, is the best place in which to rear theboy and the girl? Opinions may differ on this subject, but I firmly believe that that place is the country, and that there are great op portunities for the average lad today on the farm. In a new and growing community like the Bunnell colony is tliis particularly true, and every parent should study the question of holding the hfiy on the farm with him as long as possible. The home life there should be made just as attractive as possible, and the love of Nature should be in stilled into every young heart. Parents w r ho move with their children to their Bunnell farms should give them some opportunity of making a bit of money that is all their own, and let them feel a personal interest in the things of the home. If this be done, the boys are not so liable to leave for the cities, where success for them is often fleeting. My plea is not for the boys alone, but for the girls as well. They may not be able to work in the fields, but they should Little son of Dr. Carter, enjoying the out-door life of Bunnell those parents were making their children their partners. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” we have been told, but the Boy Scouts of Bunnell can tell you that they have learned to combine play and work. On this page you will see a pic ture of six of the Boy Scouts of Bunnell with their Scout Master. They make themselves vex*y useful in our little city, and each Saturday they may be found busily engaged in cleaning up the town. On March loth, the contract was awarded the Boy Scouts of keeping the streets clean within a cei-tain limit. This w r ork is done under the supervision of their Scout Master. This is not a money-mak ing scheme for the boys, for they took the contract from the city fathers for a very low figure, but they are learning the great lesson of neatness and cleanli ness, and the citizens of the town, seeing the work being done by the boys, are trying to co-operate with them. John Mazurewicz,Jr., and his pet calf be given an interest in the chickens, ducks, turkeys, etc. They can raise squabs, grow tomatoes, belong to the canning clubs, and find other interesting occupations. The ordinary boy and girl is very happy to be considered a partner of liis parents, and if the fathers and mothers will take time to consider this feature of the home-life, they will be able to keep their sons and daughters much longer in the “home nest,” and see them grow up contented men and women. There is one family in the Bunnell colony which I have in mind just now, and which I greatly admire. The boys in that family are real men. They are steady, hard-working, but they take an intei’est in the home and stay close by it. I think I learned the secret of their contentment, or some of it at least, when I visited them at one time. One of the sons showed me his two acres of water melons; another pointed out his field of sweet potatoes—and then I realized that

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6e BUHHELL HOME BUILDER by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Several thousand people gathered early in the morning to attend the festivities and prominent men throughout the State of Florida tcere guests of Flagler coun ty that day Many prominent men throughout Florida were visitors in Bunnell at the time of the celebration of the creation of Flagler county, among them being Governor Catts, Adjutant General Chris tian, Senators W. A. McWilliams, of St. Augustine, and James E. Alexander, of Deland; Representatives Amos Lewis, of Jackson County, David Schultzs of Vo lusia, and Frank M. Corbett, of St. Johns, J. A. Riley, of Ormond, Judge J. H. Mackey, Iv. F. Pederick, David Mayfield Attorney General Frank Dancy, and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville; Sheriff Joe Perry, A. W. Corbett, Clerk Obe P. Goode, Vice-President J. E. Ingraham, John T. Dismukes, H. W. Davis, Rev. D. H. Rutter, D. D. Corbett, Tax Assessor W. B. Edminster, County Demonstrator Cheatham, Commissioners Mahr and Roberts and Editor Harry L. Brown, of St. Augustine; T. E. Cobb, of Tallahassee, H. C. Cooper, of Jackson ville, and J. L. Middleton of Elkton. The watermelon season in Bunnell is. almost over. The farmers have furnishec our merchants with a great number of fine watermelons this season. Mr. R. L. Hendricks has accepted the position as cashier of the Bunnell State Bank, and has moved his family to Bun nell. He is building a beautiful home, which is almost completed. The town of Bunnell is going to install new water works, as the present water supply is inadequate for fire protection. The City Council took the matter up, which met with the approval of all. Mr. W. E. Kudma, who purchased an interest in the Bunnell Garage and Auto Co., has assumed entire charge as manager. While attending the big celebration in honor of the creation of Flagler county, Governor Catts, of the State of Florida, bought forty acres of Bunnell potato land. The Governor stated, while he was in Bunnell, that he liked our colony very much, and may consider the erection of a winter home here. Senator W. E. Mc Williams bought one hundred acres, and Mr. D. D. Corbett, Superintendent of Public Instruction, as well as several others, purchased farms near that of Governor Catts. These farms total four hundred and forty acres, and will be cleared and fenced and immediately put under cultivation. Three very prominent men have or ganized an abstract company known as the Flagler County Abstract Co. The companyÂ’s main office will be located in Bunnell, and the capital stock of the com pany will be fifteen thousand dollars. At the regular meeting of the Town Council Wednesday evening Col. Geo. B. Everson was employed as city attorney, he to have charge of all the legal affairs of the city. Mr. J. W. Moore, of Fort Morgan, Colo., arrived in Bunnell last week and has purchased 20 acres of land from the Bunr nell Development Company east of Bun nell. He states that he expects to re main here and will begin the cultivation of his farm. That Flagler county is patriotically inclined is proven by the fact that the people were asked to donate at least five hundred dollars as their share towards the Red Cross Fund. Rev. Ramsey took the matter in charge, along with some of'the other prominent men, and in one day they collected S681.00 for this worthy cause. The farmers of Flagler County are re quested to meet in the Woodman Hall in Bunnell Saturday afternoon at 2 oÂ’clock for the purpose of making arrangements for a barrel factory for the coming sea son. Every grower of potatoes should be present at this meeting and help to or ganize a company for the purpose of manufacturing barrels and avoid the shortage they had to contend with the past season. Mr. M. C. Reynolds and family, of Jacksonville, who own a nice twenty acre tract just south of the home of Mr. Durrance on Moody boulevard, have ar rived and are haring their land cleared with the expectations of planting it this winter. Mr. G. A. Anderson, who has been the cashier of the Bunnell State Bank for the past three years, has severed his re lations with the bank, and has left for Baxley, Georgia, to assume his duties with a new bank which is being organized by Mr. Moody. The beach at Ocean City. A good place for our buyers icho visit our colony this summer to spend their vacation