Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD 1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicado, Ill.
JULY 1917
THIS IS ONE OF THE MANY MEN WHO HAS MADE GOOD IN THE BUNNELL COLONY
/
Here is what he says in his own V16 handwriting
Read his entire letter on page six, column three




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
What One Man in the Bunnell Colony is Doing with His Little Farm
By THOS. A. VERDENIUS
in the growing of Irish potatoes in our even though he obtain but half the price colony, but because we have dwelt on he mentioned, he would still sell $750.00 this particular crop, it was no indication worth of cucumbers from his one acre .. .. .. .that various other crops could not be of land, and will grow two more crops
grown. on the same land this year. With these
Mr. Turner had told me of Mr. Worgis' greatly reduced figures in -mind I am splendid showing before we went out to inclined to believe that, after all, he will his farm, still I was not prepared for not be doing so very badly if he sells JA what I saw; and when the Company's $750.00 worth of produce from one acre
4 automobile stopped in front of the corn- of land, for which he paid us $35.00 an
fortable home, I could scarce believe my acre, (and bear in mind this will be but eyes. one of his three annual crops on the
Mr. Worgis came to Bunnell from same acre). However, I sincerely trust
Michigan, and was in very poor health that Mr. Worgis will receive $3000.00 for when he left his northern home; in fact, his acre of cucumbers, and more too. he told me, he had not done a day's work A little north of his cucumber patch for ten years before he came to Bunnell. he has planted one acre to watermelons. He has fully recovered his strength and *His vines are looking very healthy inis a healthy man. No one would ever deed, and give promise of a big crop.
take him to be sixty-seven years of age. If his expectations are realized, he will The Worgis family consists of father, sell from $500.00 to $600.00 worth of melmother, daughter and two grandchildren, ons from his acre of land. and each of them seemed to be happy Mr. Worgis has by no means neglected
and contented in their Florida home. to grow some of our spuds, and had one
Mr.T. VrdeiusAs Mr. Worgis conducted me over his of the finest fields of potatoes I saw
Th Mioer. Smal am VMrdnuForda farm he told me that he did not believe while in the colony. His potatoes were
ThePioeerSmll 'ar l~n f Foria. in "putting all the eggs in one basket," not quite ready to dig when I was there.
(The following article was written by and for this reason has planted some- He also had growing as great a variety Mr. Verdenius upon his return from the thing of almost everything that will grow of various products as I have ever seen Bunnell colony, and was to have appeared in the colony. "If one crop should be a grown in Florida. They comprised in the June issue of the HOME BUILD- failure" he continued, "I will make it up tomatoes, corn, cabbage, squash, lettuce,
ER. As there was not space for it in on something else; or if one article is strawberries, carrots, peas, mustard,
that issue we have had to hold it over cheap another may bring a big price." radishes, andive, dill, snap-beans, poleuntil the present issue.) I first visited Mr. Worgis' cucumber beans, onions, kohlrabi, and perhaps sevpatch. He has about one acre in cucum- eral other vegetables which I do not reHave you ever had any doubts as to hers, and I do not believe anyone could call just at this writing. Mr. Worgis
whether a man can make a living on a grow better ones than he. He told me expects to plant five acres to sweet poten acre farm in our Bunnell colony? If he figured that he would get at least 500 tatoes as a second crop. you belong to the class of individuals hampers of cucumbers from this one acre, He has about sixty hens and about who believe that it is necessary for a and he further told me that cucumbers seventy-five little chicks. He obtained man to have 160 acres of land on which were selling in New York that week for on an average from 35 to 40 eggs a day, to make a good living and keep him busy, $6.00 a hamper. This would figure $3000 for which there was a ready market at then I wish with all my heart that you worth of cucumbers from one acre for 50 cents a dozen, while at the present could have been with me when I paid a Mr. Worgis. But, even though he should time eggs are selling for 30 cents a visit to the farm of Mr. Worgis during have only half the yield he figures, and dozen. my recent visit to the Bunnell colony.
Mr. Worgis is one of the settlers in
our Volusia tract, and I must confess that
I myself could scarcely have believed a
report of the wonderful things he has
accomplished in so short a time, had I
not seen them with my own eyes. Candidly, I never before saw such crops
grown in my life. After an hour or so
spent with this congenial family, and
after a careful inspection of their farm, I left more convinced that I had ever
been before, that the right man, using
good judgment and knowing how to farm,
and one who is willing to work cannot
help but make a good living in our colony. In fact, such a man as this, if he
has good health, cannot know failure.
I wish that every reader of the HOME
BUILDER could have been with me and
seen for himself just what Mr. Worgis
has accomplished since moving onto his
Bunnell colony farm. I realize, however,
that only a very small per cent of our
readers wiill visit the colony during the
next few months, and I shall therefore
attempt to give you as nearly as I can
an idea of what I saw on the Worgis
farm.
In the various literature we have
issued, as well as in the HOME BUILDER, we have written a great deal about
the profits being made and to be made Mr!,. WTorqis' Cucumber Field [Volusia Tract]




159ye BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
FLORIDA, THE LAND OF
PROMISE
Some of the Reasons Why There Is Such
a Rush to This State and Why
It Will Continue.
"Florida is the only tropical portion of
the United States. It lies almost surrounded by water; it is approached on
both sides by the gulf stream which has
V a tendency to purify the air which filters
"V ~ over and through the lands of Florida, 4 and its ports are open to vessels from all
parts of the world, thereby giving it the
very best of transportation facilities. It
is tapped by the great railroad systems
of the continent, which open up to it
more than fifty millions of people.
"And, as to climate, Florida has a climate that is unsurpassed, which every
man of medical science admits is ideal
for almost every form of health building.
It has long been the playground of the
rich, and within its borders are located
the palaces and country estates of America's most wealthy and aristocratic set.
Mr. Worgis' Potato Field (Volueta tract) Florida positively feeds the North and
East during the winter months, and so
The Worgis family have erected a very Another Bunnell Colony Man Who Has far as the delicacies consumed in the
comfortable seven room house that is a "Made Good," Tells What He Thinks North and East are concerned, Florida
credit to our colony. In their yard they of the Bunnell Colony is, because of its geographical location
have about six stands of bees, which sup- In regard to Bunnell as a farming and its nearness to those markets, the ply them with honey. country, I think it is second to none, as only available section of this country for
After my visit with these good people, everything I plant seems to grow and such suppl y.
and as I rode through the Volusia tract yield abundantly-in fact, it is hard to "If one will but take a map of the on my return to Bunnell, I thought again realize that there is such a country as United States and glance at it, he will and again of the great contrast in the this, where everything grows. bat gogrpcal o viewoits falone Them
manner in which men and women in I am a Missourian by birth and, as you agerphclvwoit ln.Te
different sections of our country live, know, all people from Missouri have "to great transportation lines of Florida have I had just left a family, happy and con- be shown." I have been here now almost done much to enhance the value of Flortent, living close to Nature, with an four years, and I am convinced that this ida products, and to furnish swift transabundance of fresh air, the blue sky is the country for everyone who wants portation for such products to the great above them, surrounded by the most to farm-in fact, I have been "shown," markets of the country, as well as to see
wholesome influences in which to rear and now I am here, settled for life. I that they are kept in the highest state of their children. These people were grow- Own fifty acres of land and I value my perfection during such a journey. ing most of their own food and knew farm at $8,000.00, and I am not willing "The question is frequently asked why
nothing of the worries incident to life to sell at that. I believe you are doing Florida products bring a higher price to in our great cities. Then my mind sped a great deed when you let the people the producers than other farm products back to Chicago, where thousands of of the United States know about this in this country. The answer is simply
families are existing in thickly settled wonderful farming country, so that they ths Flrdpoucsaeavsedt
disrics, rigin upther hilrenin he may move here and make farm life worth a time when the remainder of this counmost unnatural surroundings, in apart- the living. Yours very truly, tyi eeal nilnsadcne
ment houses or tenement buildings, with 0. C. MOSBY, Bunnell, Florida. quently the Florida products reach the
market when there is absolutely no comno place to play but in the busy streets. __________________ petition and prices are the very highest.
I thought of the wage-earners toiling The only competitor of Florida, if it may
long hours in shops and factories in a be called such, is California, and that
futile endeavor to make ends meet. I State lies so far away from the Northern
thought of the exorbitant prices of food, and Eastern markets that, with the inand what a terrific struggle life is to all creased cost of delivering its products to
such, and I wondered again as I have these markets, it is placed absolutely bewondered many times before, why men vond the limits of competing with Florand women will not get away from it all, ida. It is also a fact, that, as a rule,
and go "back to the land." Florida products mature from thirty to
There is room for others in the Volusia, sixty days earlier than those of Califortract who may become neighbors of Mr. nia.
Worgis, and share in the bountiful har- "These are some of the reasons why
vest that awaits them there. 1'Florida is having such a rush of settlers
to her idle lands. So great is the demand
t for Florida lands that some of the great
HOME BUILDER A WELCOME ,capitalists of the country are purchasing
large tracts of land in various parts of
VISITOR. the State. They know that the rush to
Aistrecive inthiseveings milFlorida will continue now that it has Justrecive inthiseveings milstarted so strongly, and that it will be the HOME BUILDER, and I assure you ,here in Florida like it was in the West,
it is a welcome little visitor. The, only Kwhere great fortunes were made by the thing wrong about it is that it makes land grabbers.
all have the "blues" thinking of the great 4."But, at the present time there are contrast in the two climates and wishing thousands and hundreds of thousands of
we were down there now. After reading 4 acres of good land in Florida that can be
the HOME BUILDER one feels Ike you ,~bought in small tracts. This is certainly
say you felt on your way back from your 4the day of opportunity in Florida. The
visit to the colony. time to buy a farm tract in Florida is
(A Buyer) Mr, Mfoby with Potautoes Ready to .Ship now." -(Jacksonville Metropolis.)




MeBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
One of the most successful potato Approximately five hundred autos Elder Branson of Atlanta, Georgia,
seasons in the history of the Bunnell passed through Bunnell last Sunday, Vpreached in the Seventh Day Adventist colony has come to a close. Messrs. some enroute for Ocean City, some to IChurch last Sunday. Deen and Johnson shipped the last car. Daytona, while others were headed for Weather conditions during the entire St. Augustine and Jacksonville. Bunnell feels the need of more adeseason have been excellent, in fact, they quate fire protection, and the City Councould -not have been better. The yields At the election which was held in corn- cil and Mayor are advocating the issuwere far in excess of what our farmers pliance with the requirements of the bill ance of thirty year 6%y town bonds, so expected, and high prices prevailed creating Flagler county, which passed that they may be able to put in a pumpthroughout the shipping season. The the State Legislature in April, the voters ing station and lay pipe from Gore Lake, prices opened up at $9.00 per barrel, go- of the section of St. Johns and Volusia a distance of two and one-half miles, for ing as high as $10.00 a barrel, and were counties, which -now comprise Flagler furnishing water sup-ply. This would not never less than $7.00 a barrel, f. o. b. county, voted solid in favor of it, with only mean a protection to the property, shipping point. The sums of money the exception of but one single vote. but it would be a good investment fromn
cleared by some of our farmers, after Thus Flagler county has been created, the point of view of a reduced rate of all expenses were paid, were quite as- and it will become a new county, offi- insurance. It is also their desire to open tonishing and almost unbelievable, when cially, on July 2nd. up more streets in the town and lay
one takes into consideration the fact _____more sidewalks, all of which goes to
thain theid lnt begnthe wonurk, ofd Col. and Mrs. C. G. Varn, of Deland, prove conclusively that we are merging brinthehpirnd nti Juay, andhe arrived Monday and have moved into from a Village into a real town and to fnishe shiping ion May, an theame the Moody residence, corner Moody an increased population in the near fuilnwhvd.iecrnco ntesm boulevard and Main street. Col. Yarn ture.
land.has opened a law office in the Tribune
building. He comes to us very highly The young men of Bunnell and vicinWe are proud to state that one of our recommended, being a graduate of Stet- ity responded gladly to their country's local boys, Charles Brown, son of Mr. son University. For the past few years demands on Registration Day. The day and Mrs. C. B. Brown, has won the Uni- he has been associated with the law firm here was set apart for a holiday and versity Scholarship. Mr. Brown has in- of Landris & Fish, of Deland, where he was so observed. The returns compiled deed distinguished himself by the win- gained a reputation as an attorney of by the, County Registration Board ning of this scholarship, and he has the ability. We welcome Col. Yarn and fain- showed that 114 young men in Bunnell privilege of choosing from seven differ- ily to our city. had registered.
ent schools throughout the country, as_________to where he may continue his education. Thursday afternoon a fire was discov- As quite a number of new merchants ered in the lumber mill of Ford & Lam- are considering engaging in business in Mr. 0. C. Mosby, of Black Point, has bert, at DuPont. Pumps were immedi- Bunnell, there is going to be a great completed the harvesting and marketing ately put to work, but the magnificent demand for more store buildings. Plans of his thirty acres of potatoes and is very dwelling house known as "The Man- have been made for the erection of two much pleased with the results of same, sioni," in DuPont, was destroyed, also new store buildings just north of the he having sold his spuds for $6,600.00. the dwelling house just west of it. which new bank building. His corn on this same thirty is looking was occupied by Mr. Miller. Through exceptionally fine, the heroic work of the fire fighters, sev- Mr. E. B. Hanson, residing near Codyeral buildings were saved. The beauti- Ville, cleared $4,000.00 on twenty acres Mr. F. S. Crowson is now 'harvesting ful Tippicanoe Inn was saved, although of potatoes this season. He has thirty his crop of fine sweet corn, which is be- for awhile it looked as though it would acres under cultivation, and will immeing loaded into cars and shipped to go also in sn~ite of the work of the fight- diately begin the clearing of thirty acres
northern markets. ers. A telephone call to Bunnell for additional. He expects, to plant 60 acres
help was rapidly responded to, every to potatoes next season. He now has A large crew of men have begun the auto and man available going imme- 25 acres of fine corn, besides chufas, work of cleaning out Black Branch. On diately to DuPont to help extinguish the peanuts, velvet beans and a splendid account of the accumulation of fallen flames, garden. He also has a fine field of
trees, it has been practically impossible watermelons and will plant seven acres
for the water to navigate the natural The most successful term of school ever to sweet potatoes.
course, and during heavy storms the taught in Bunnell ended Monday evening. water has naturally backed over some of The commencement exercise of the High Mr. W. B. Lanier, of Tallahassee, who the adjacent territory. It is the inten- School was excellent indeed; the reception has served as reading clerk of the House tion of those in charge of this work to Saturday night being a grand success. of Representatives for the past several have all the timber removed from the The baccalaureate sermon was preached terms, realizing the great future of Buncourse, and after this is done the Branch by Rev. Ramsey on Sunday evening. At nell and Flagler county, has moved to will be straightened out and widened, the close of the commencement exercises Bunnell. He will be associated with the giving that part a perfect drainage. Prof. Hayes, in his impressive manner. Bunnell State Bank.
reminded his pupils to ever keep in mind
Several of the young people of Bun- the principles of character that he has Mr. W. H. Poff, formerly of the State nell went surf-bathing last Sunday. taught them during the school year just o enyvna u o iigna u
past, and commended them for the splen- Pont in the southwestern portion of FlagThat our farmers in Flagler county did work which they had done. ler county, informs us that he has already
are making good money is proved by the sold a fraction over twenty-two thousand
fact that during the past sixty days the Since Flagler County has become a dollars' worth of cabbage and potatoes following -parties have Purchased auto- reality, the editor of the St. Johns Trib- from his farm this year. This farm mobiles: Crowson, Tomchuch, Frier, Ho- une has chian~red the -name of his 13aper comprises one hundred acres. Out of the gzan. Kendrick, Malphurs, Pellicer, Hen- to the FLAGLER TRIBUNE, and you hundred acres he had approximately
drickcson, Jones, Knox, Deen, Cody, will find this paper always full of up-to- eighty acres planted to cabbage and poHamilton, Johnston, Burnsed and Mack. date news concerning the colony. tatoes, which he has already harvested,
the balance of his farm being planted to
Mr. Fernside contemplates opening a One of the largest net returns per oats. From the land from which he harhaberdashery here, acre received for potatoes this season vested his cabbage and potatoes, he now
Was from a two acre field belonging to has fifty-eight acres in fine corn, fifteen We need twenty-five new dwelling Mr. Eatman. he having sold from his acres of fine crab grass and pea-vine hay,
houses in Bunnell to accommodate the two acres $684.00 worth of potatoes, and will plant the balance to sweet potanewcomers. f. o. b. depot. toes and a fall Irish potato crop.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Dr. L. M. Dixon, an experienced dentist WHAT DOES IT ALL SIGNIFY? Can you not realize that what others
of Jacksonville, is a recent arrival in Bun- are doing, you may do also, but that the
nell. He has rented offices in the Tribune The editor has just re-read the news longer you delay the less your chances building where he will open an up-to- items that have come to this office since are for obtaining just what you woul date dental parlor, the last HOME BUILDER was published, like to have there? Read these news
and before sending them over to the items once again, if you will, and then The Bunnell State Bank has just let a printing office for the next issue of the resolve that not another day will pass contract for the erecting of a new bank paper.rIt has afforded most genuine over your heads until you have sent in building, on the corner of Moody Road pleasure, this quiet perusal of the little your orders for farms of your own in this and Railroad Street. The building will items which indicate so much in their -Land of Opportunity. have a forty-six foot front with a depth simple wording.
of eighty feet. It will be two stories And what does it all signify to you, A FEW WORDS CONCERNING
high, the ground floor to be occupied by readers of the HOME BUILDER? Have the Bunnell State Bank and the Bunnell you hurridly scanned these news items FLORIDA'S SUMMER TEMDevelopment Company, while the second and thought perhaps half-indifferently PERATURE
floor will contain twelve up-to-date of- that they sounded pretty good? If you fices. The building will be modern in have read them in this manner, won't every particular, being constructed of the you go back and read them all over Not a summer passes but what many very best brick, with a press brick finish, again-thoughtfully, carefully? And if letters are received at this office asking tiling floor and will cost approximately you will do this, I believe you will, with for complete information regarding Florithirty-six thousand dollars.-Flagler me, catch a new vision of that wonderful da's summer temperature, so a few words Tribune. land of opportunity, that Mecca for the upon this subject, in this issue of the
heart-sick struggling men and women HOME BUILDER, will not come amiss, A great celebration hias been planned throughout this land of ours who are ek- we are sure.
for the 2nd of July on account of the ing out existences on pitifully small I do not expect any contradiction when creation of Flagler County. A number salaries and working under the most try- I state that the winters in Florida are of prominent speakers will be present, ing circumstances. almost perfect, but I wonder if my next
and our especial guest-of-honor on that The Bunnell colony-the Land of Op- statement will be accepted so readily, day will be the Governor of the State of portunity from month to month you when I say that Florida has also an ideal Florida, Sidney J. Catts. The services have been told of what could be accom- summer climate. Nevertheless, this latof the Deland Brass Band have been se- plished there. You have read the words ter statement is also true, and our buyers cured for the entire day and evening, of prophecy from the men who have been who have visited Bunnell during the Bunnell will have one of her famous back of this great proposition, and who summer months will bear me out on this. barbecues on that day, and in the eve- were able to catch a vision of what might True, it gets hot in Florida (luring the ning everyone will be invited to go over be accomplished long before anything summer months, but we all know there to Ocean City, where there will be a big really was done. must be hot weather at some seasons of
dance in the Ocean City casino. But, the dreams, the hopes, the desires the year in every state where land is
of these community builders have become worth anything. It takes heat to grow Mr. H. C. King will open a plumbing actual realities, and the little group of crops, and any country would be a failand heating establishment in Bunnell. News Items in this issue of the HOME ure without the warm growing months; BUILDER, dealing with the homes, the but, bear this in mind, it does not get schools, the churches, the fine farms. the any warmer in Florida in summer than ONE CARLOAD OF 200 BAR- growing towns, the successes that have it does in a great many of our northern
RELS OF POTATOES BRINGS come in such a few years to earnest men states, and it is cooler in Florida than in
and women, who have also had the vision some of them.
OWNERS $2,000.00 THIS and have helped make their "dream come If you wish further proof regarding
SEASON true" are the most conclusive proofs that this, write to your nearest Government
could be given of the real worth and the Weather Bureau and enclose a stamped From time to time the readers of the possibilities of this Land of Opnortunitv. envelope. Ask Uncle Sam for some old HOME BUILDER have been told some- Again I ask. what does it all signify weather reports. Also write to the
thing about a little woman, by the name to you? I believe I can answer that Weather Bureau at Jacksonville or St. of Mrs. Dinkens, who has a potato farm aiiestion for some of our readers at least. Augustine, Florida. However, for your a few miles north of our colony. You If you have already purchased farm- convenience, I will give you below a
will be interested, we know, in learning homes in the Bunnell colony, I believe table showing the average temperature. about her 1917 crop, although the simple these little items will make you more based on a ten-year average, furnished facts regarding same really read like a grateful than voit have ever been before by the United States Weather Bureau, fairy story. that you found this door of Opnortunitv of St. Augustine, Florida, about 30 miles
This year Mr. F. R. Allen and Mrs. and entered therein. If you have not north of our colony, and of Ormond, about Dinkens went into the potato business completed all of the payments on your 25 miles to the south of us. Study these together, and they were fortunate enough farms, I believe you will resolve that figures carefully, and they will give you to ship some of their potatoes when the nothing shall stand in your way toward a comprehensive idea of what to expect top price of the market was reached. aecomplishing this ond as soon as pos- in the way of temperature in the Bunnell One carload of 200 barrels brought them sible, and then making vonr nlans for colony. $2,000.00 f. o. b. Possibly this was the going to the colony and hsving your only car which brought them such high shire in its rapid development. St. Augustine Ornond
returns, anyway, Mr. Allen and Mrs. But, what doe it Pl1 ;,-nifv to you, Degrees Degrees
Dinkens requested their payment for readers of the HOME BUTIL)ER. who January ................ 56 58
same in gold. The purchaser sent to the have read from morth to montb of wvhat February ...............161 58
First National Bank of St. Augustine for is taking alace in the colony, but have March ................. 62 64
$2,000.00 of the yellow metal, and paid never reached the point where vou made April .................. 68 69
them this sum in gold pieces. lip your minds to own your own farm- May ....... ............ 73 77
We have it from most reliable informa- homes there? Can't you too catch the June ................... 78 70
tion, that Mrs. Dinkens' potato field vision of the marvelous opnortu-itieq that July .................. 80 80
netted as high as $800.00 per acre for miy also be yours in the Runnell colony? August ................ 80 80
the 1917 crop. These are the highest re- All of these wonderful things have been September ............. 77 79
turns we have ever known of any farmer accomplished in such a few short years October ................ 65 72
receiving on potatoes in our potato belt, and they are only a foretaste of what will November .............. 62 64
and since potatoes have been exception- take place in the bright futre that iQ December .............. 58 57
ally high this year, the record may never opening up for our people in the Bunnell
be reached again, colony. Av'ge annual temp'ture..68 69




M'e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A GROUP OF INTERESTING LETTERS FROM
much money yearly as he can in the MR. W. A. MACK REALIZES $12,000.00
potato section of Florida. ON HIS POTATO CROP THIS SEASON
My heart aches when I see the em- Dear Mr. Verdenius:
ployees of our large department stores IreivdtelsisuofheHM and factories here in Chicago, and note IreivdtelsisuofheHM intelligent men toiling away day in and BUILDER, which you so kindly sent me, day out on a salary of from twelve to and I am sure that you realize that it twenty dollars a week, knowing as I do made me happy to look over the pictures that it costs them every cent they earn in this issue, which speak so highly of to live, much less save anything for a our colony. If you will send me a dozen rainy day. more copies I shall be glad to send them
While in the colony* I talked with a to my friends in the West and it may set them to thinking and bring you some
number of farmers who started with less new buyers. than five hundred dollars a few years Isyt o gi htIhv ee
ago, and who today own their own farms Iee say oac your a tha Iae naeve and have enough money to tide them- be naypaeweeamncnmk
selves over for a few years if necessary. a good living as easily as he can right Bunell th contysea ofthenew here in Bunnell. We have had an exIcounty of Flagler, just created, is a town ceptionally good year so far, and it can about six years old, with a population of practically be said of all of our farmers about one thousand people. It has ce- htte aemd odmny n o
/ ment walks, brick streets, a cement block day the prospects for a bumper summer and brick business buildings, bank, school,anfllcoarveygdide. churches, hotels, garages, electric light I feel sure that-you would like to know and water works plant; in fact, it is a how I came out with my potato crop model little town, located on the main this year. I wish that I could give you Line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. the final report on same, but will say that It is very evident that all of this perma- MY NET SALES ON POTATOES SO nent development is made possible only FAR THIS SEASON IS $10,541.48, AND by the prosperity of the farmers in the I HAVE AMOST TWO CARLOADS TO MR.HARY MAKERvicinity of Bunnell. HEAR FROM YET, WHICH WILL
MR. ARRYE. MRKERBRING MY SALES UP TO OVER
CHICAGO MAN EXPECTS TIO BUY $12,000.00. You will no doubt recall that
MORE LAND AT BUNNELL AND I purchased a small yoke of oxen five
ENGAGE IN THE POTATO BUSI- years ago, which I used to haul my potato
NESS, AFTER A TRIP OF INSPEC- crop to the station that season. This
TIONTO TE COONY._ ~.U 3 yoke of oxen cost me $70.00, but they fade
'7T into insignificance when compared with
June 14, 1917. my big International Motor Truck which
Dear Mr. Verdenius: PA' I now use to harvest my crop.
After having spent a week in your Bunnell looks better to me today than
Bunnell colony, I feel it my duty to make ever before. The colony is booming, and
to the readers of the HOME BUILDER how could it be otherwise? With the
a brief report of my visit. -very best part of St. Johns county an
I was reared on a farm until I was the best of Volusia county combined, we
eighteen years of age, and since that The Tribun~e Buildino at Bunnell are going to make FLAGLER COUNTY
time I have visited different sections of (Photo taken by Mr. Marker) one of the very best, if not the best
our large country, besides having workedconyithsae.SceIlvbu for a large conservative banking institu- I took several snap-shots of buildings conyith sae.SceIlvbu
tion for the past ten years. I have met and farm scenes, which I enclose here- three miles from Bunnell, which will be quite a few successful men in that time, with. They may be of interest to those the county seat of our new county, this but I can conscientiously say that I never who are unable to see this land with their appeals to me much better than to be saw a community of farmers so prosper- own eyes. lctdffytomlsfo u rsn
ous and independent as those I saw in In closing I will add that I expect to county seat.
the potato section of Florida around Bun- purchase more land and get into the Now, Mr. Verdenius, I want to tell you
nell and Hastings. potato game myself in the near future. in a few words about my present crop.For a small investment and on a pay- With best wishes, I am I now have seventeen acres of corn on
ment plan so reasonable, I don't believe Yours very truly, the old land that looks fine, and eighteen
a man can find another place in the HARRY E. MARKER. acres on the new land which I cleared
United States where he can buy a ten or last year, and this crop looks fair. Furtwenty acre tract of land and net as KORONA FARMER RECEIVES RE- thermnore, I am going to plant about
TURNS OF $2,100.00 FROM EIGHT fifteen acres to rice, a few acres to sweet
ACRES OF IRISH POTATOES. potatoes, and the rest of the land I will
sow to cow peas.
Dear Mr. Verdenius: I expect this will be quite a busy sumIam now through digging my potatoes, mer for me, for I am going to build a '~and am very satisfied with the returns new home, and expect to begin work on
- ~ from same. From the eight acre plot this home within the next few weeks.
of potatoes, which you saw, I realized a After our new home is completed I am
*net profit of $2,100.00. The corn is grow- going to take a little trip to visit some
ing nicely, likewise the vegetables, many of my relatives on the Pacific coast, and of which have already been marketed. take a little outing, which I feel I deN I have let a contract with some colored serve, as I have been working hard for 'Vpeople for the clearing of twenty-eight the last five years. While I am visiting
acres more of land, so that next season with my relatives and friends. I shall tell I expect to plant 45 acres to Irish pota- them about our Bunnell colony, for I toes. These men expect to finish the feel that I do a man a favor by telling
ii $ clearing in August. him of the great opportunity which may
I hope more people will come to Korona be his in our colony. and be as successful as we have been. Yours very truly, W A. MACK,
Mr. Marker in a.Field of Corn in the Bunnell Colony JOHN MAZURAWISZ. Bunnell, Florida.




Mhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
OWNERS OF FARMS IN THE BUNNELL COLONY
out of about one hundred people seen, all denius, that it was entirely by taking but one signed for the new county, and your advice that I am today the owner incidentally the gentleman I was with got of a home in the Sunny Southland, and orders for three new machines. I thank you many times for your good,
I was certainly well pleased with the kind and fatherly advice regarding the country myself and selected twenty acres transaction. Yours truly,
of land. I expect to go down this sum- GEORGE MARLATT,
mer or next fall and build a house and Toronto, Canada.
make my home there.
I thought so much of the country, and COME TO FLORIDA
talked about it so much that I have in- (The following lines were written by terested two or three other people, so Emmett Roberts, fourteen years of age, that they have decided to buy and go of Wyaconda, Missouri, whose mother,
down as soon as they have enough money. Mrs. Mary E. Roberts, is the owner of a For myself, I shall not be satisfied until farm in the Bunnell colony.) I get down there to live, which I hope
will be soon. "If you long for the soft-blowing breezes,
Yours respectfully, WILLIAM K. HOPP. If you long for the cool, blue sea,
If you long for the rippling brook, the
"BUNNELL HAS COME INTO river-to-be,
HER OWN THE LAST YEAR" Then come, oh come, to Florida with me.
Writes a Michigan Man. If you love the birds' happy song,
Dear Mr. Verdenius: If you love the flowers, so delicate and
I am not dead, but very much alive. it free,
is a long time since I have seen you to If you love the days, so sweet and long,
* 4 hold converse with you, but I have fol- Then come, oh come, to Florida with me.
lowed the progress of the Bunnell colony
with much interest, through the medium If you wish to dwell in quiet and repose of the St. Johns Tribune, too,
Bunnell has come into her own the last If you wish to dream under a sky so blue, year. There is no question about it, and If you wish to hunt, fish and other sports MR. WILLIAM K. HOPP' you can safely throw out your chest and do
"I HAL N T E STIFID declare, "I told you so." Then come, oh come, to Florida, won't
THERE L. F. Yours very truly, you?". ____UNTIL I GET DOWN T EELF.HUBBARD, (Michigan.) NO MORE FREE LOTS IN
TO LIVE" DPN
Writes a Chicago Man After a Trip "'WE WILL HAVE ABOUT 3 D PN
of nseciontoth Bnnel olnyTONS OF ONIONS"V We are still receiving inquiries conof Ispetionto he Bnnel Coonycerning free lots in Dupont, and I wish Chicago, Ill., May 30, 1917. Says Mrs. Jones, One of Bunnell to say that there are no more of these
Dr. .A Sir- e his opruiyt Colony's Successful Farmers. lots to be given away. When a man has
DearSir:I tke tis oporunit tobut $10.00 and desires to give $1.00 to tell you something of my trip to Bunnell. Bunnell, Florida, R. F. D. No. 1, ten different people, it is not possible for
I arrived there on March 10th and was May 16, 19:17. him to make eleven or twelve people
certainly surprised with my first sight of Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, hpy ic 1.0wsalta ehdt
the town. In my estimation, Bunnell has Dear Sir:-We are to begin digging giaway. sinc $1.0 wa s llth her hadet
the best start of any town I have ever potatoes tomorrow. You should see our goi away. And y so v it is e wih iurfee seen, and although small as yet, I think onions. We will have about three tons away; hence it is impossible for us to if you keep on as you have started, you of onions, and I venture to say that they give any more free lots to purchasers of will have one of the best towns on the will average three inches across. There farms. East coast. are so few of them that are less than two AlIcnsyt hs nurn bu
Mr. Turner was busy with a party of inches, and so many that are so much freelot Is hat ify ou thaded purgopt people from Detroit when I arrived, so I larger, and any amount of these onions and purchased your farms some time ago, spent several days walking about the will weigh one and a half pounds each. you would have been among the fortunate
country and talking to the farmers. I I am going to have my picture taken ones to receive these lots. May this not
wish to say right here that you have as with some of these onions, for I am proud be a little lesson regarding the value of sociable a set of men in your colony as of them. Yours truly, PROMPTNESS?
one could meet anywhere. I guess I ask- (Mrs.) STELLA JONES. The time is coming, and that before so
ed as many questions of them as I pos- very long, when there will be many people
sibly could, and all seemed pleased to ONE OF OUR CANADIAN BUY- bitterly disappointed because they are
answer them, and they all praised the ERS WRITES TO SAY HOW not able to purchase a Bunnell colony
land and the climate. HAPPY HE IS THAT HE HAS farm at our present low price. The land
I saw acres and acres of potatoes and HIS BUNNELL FARM FULLY will be sold and the prices will be greatly
inquired what would be the average yield, advanced. I fully believe that I shall see
and they all said it should run from 50 PAID FOR. the day when this very same land will be
to 80 barrels to the acre. The corn was Mr. T. A. Verdenius, selling for $350.00 an acre, and then will
up about two or three inches between the Dear Sir:-I was looking over my con- come the sad lament of many that they rows of potatoes. tract book today and find that I have might have bought ten acres of this fine
All of the farmers seemed very much made the last payment on my ten acre land for but $350.00, at practically their
pleased at the prospect of having the new farm in the Bunnell colony, and you may own terms on the monthly payment plan. county created, and all thought that it be sure that I am pleased to know that If you want some of this fine potato
would be the very best thing that could this is so, and that I can now say that I land in the Bunnell colony, I URGE you happen, as it would mean more and bet- am the owner of a home at Bunnell. to buy it now. Do not forget, that
ter roads and schools for the same amount And now for preparations for getting "OF ALL SAD WORDS OF TONGUE of taxes they now pay. there, but the war conditions are so un- OR PEN,
I guess the people are making money certain at present that a man don't know THE SADDEST ARE THESE -'IT
there. I rode over part of the colony just what to do. However, I hope there MIGHT HAVE BEEN."'
with one of the garage men, who was will be a change before the time I am Write todly to
circulating one of the petitions for the ready to go South. THOS. A. VERDENIUS
new county. We were out all day and It may please you to know, Mr. Ver- 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago. Ill.




Ulm BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
THREE MORE INTERESTING LETTERS FROM BUYERS
~ -There is plenty of hunting and fishing We have twenty acres of land at Black
Shere-'possums, quail, rabbits and squir- Point, which we think is about right.
relIs. Mr. Turner, the able representative When we get a good road out there, it of the Bunnell Development Company, will be one of the best farming districts
called for me yesterday and we drove to in Florida. [
Ocean City, and stopped at the canal, Yours very truly,
where with the assistance of a fisherman FRANK J. WINN,
and net, in half an hour had a bucket (New Hampshiire)
full of nice big fish. Mr. and Mrs. Turn--_____er always have the latch string open, and
their home is a favorite meeting place A FORMER RESIDENT OF TAfor the young folks. COMA, WASHINGTON, TELLS
As you have perhaps noted from the OF SOME OF THE REASONS
Bunnell paper, which I have been mailing W YTE R LDTE
you, there is a movement on foot to cre- CM T0 TH BU NL
ate a new county, with Bunnell as county C M H U NL
seat. If this goes through, and the pros- COLONY. pects at present look very hopeful, ourBunlFoiaApl29117 little city will grow still more in theBunlFoiaApl29117 future than it has in the past. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
What we need here is people with Dear Sir:
energy, to develop the wealth of natural W elta eoeyusm xrs
resources which seem to have been be- W elta eoeyusm xrs
stowd uon hispartof lorda.sion of the satisfactory manner in which And now I must close, dad, and do you selected our twenty acre farm. We
write soon and keep me posted on mat- have been here since early in January, Goodloo-in-001-Manolas ad Ana ers t hme.and in traveling about the colony have Thi Ketucy grl ameto unnll Always your devoted daughter, satisfied ourselves that you could not
Thi Ketucy grl ameto unnllANNA. have made a selection that would have
etin ce onditionf;sh adeoughte awfar P. S.: Enclosed find kodak view of answered our requirements any better,
erisel.Tfoing letteron an ogto hefr some of the magnolias grown around To say that we are pleased is putting
fheref was lobtane by etbte of statey here, with myself in the background. I it mildly. We have good water at thirty fther witertfinl y ving he resin kowyuwlyay-go;ooigoh feet, a shady grove for our house and
thewrier inaly ivig hr prmisio kow ou illsay--"oodlooingof he plenty of open land for farming purto have it published if her name was magnolias." ________poses that is easy to clear. Our garden,
withheld. Surely it is recommendation a spot picked at random, proves that we
enough when a girl from the "Blue A N E W HAMPSHIRE M A N have productive soil.
Grass" State finds the Bunnell colony so WRITES THAT "BUNNELL IS As we arrived here too late to do any
satifacory GOOD ENOUGH FOR US" clearing for a crop of potatoes, we rented some cleared land and planted four
A KENTUCKY GIRL'S LETTER Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, acres, reserving one acre for sweet poFROM BUNNELL TO HER Dear Sir: tatoes later. We will begin digging in
"DAD" IN "OLD KAIN- The old saying that the first impres- about ten days or two weeks, and expect
TU K"sion is most lasting is not true in my an excellent crop. We have corn up six
TUCK",case regarding Florida. When I first saw inches in the rows, that will make a fine
Bunnell, Florida, April 9, 1917. Florida, I did not like it so very much, showing as soon as the spuds are out Dear Dad: :but by and by the climate began to tell of the way.
Here I have been in Bunnell, for two on me, and the longer I stayed the better At the present prices of potatoes and
*whole weeks, and this is the first op- I liked it. the yields per acre that our neighbors
portunity I've had to write you a long We used to have a Dr. Stearns who are getting assures us of a fine start for
letter-so here goes, all about this part thought a great deal 'of Florida. His the short time we have been here. of the East Coast and affairs in general. father at one time had owned several I know of no place in the Pacific NorthYou know we had an idea before I thousand acres in the state of Florida, west, our former home, that has the opcame down here that Florida was mostly but he was not able to appreciate its portunities to offer that this colony afa desert of white sand, with rattlesnakes, worth and sold it out cheap. When his fords. With the drainage project well mosquitoes and flies abounding. But in- son grew older he realized what a ter- under way, a main line railway, the deed, that is a gross misrepresentation; rible mistake they had made, for if brick paved Dixie Highway traversing
and contrary to general report, all sorts they had kept the land, it would have the colony, the formation of a new counof live stock can be raised here quite made them all rich. You see, -it's the ty with Bunnell as county seat, convinces as well as in Kentucky, provided they are same old story "IF." us that we SELECTED THE LIVEST
properly fed and taken care of. In a few more years people will see COMMUNITY IN THE STATE FOR,
I am delighted with the Halcyon hotel land selling for $100.00, $200.00 and OUR HOME.
-Mrs. Byrd sets a fine table, and the $300.00 an acre in Bunnell, according to The Company officials are very courtebuilding faces directly on the Dixie High- location and soil, and will say "Oh, if ous and I have found them ever ready way, a solid brick road which stretches we only had bought some of it for $35.00 to assist the newcomer in whatever way before you for hundreds of miles, and an acre, when we could have done so." they can. invites all sorts of auto trips. To all those who may be in this class In summing up the conditions and adBunnell is located conveniently-eighty- I would say, go down to Bunnell this vantages we find here the most I can five miles from Jacksonville, Florida's year and pick out your land, or haye say is that I am glad we came to Bunnell. metropolis, and south of us Miami and someone do it for you, for I am certainRepcfly Palm Beach a day's drive, this land is going to double in value (ReSpeCtfully, TKER
I went to Daytona with some friends before long. (R. .A HTKR
in a big car last Sunday night. I shall People up here told us that we would R. F. D. No. 1.
not attempt to describe the trip to you, have malaria, that the snakes would bite but leave to your imagination the white us, that the colored people would steal BOTBNEL
beach at Ormond, washed to the smooth- everything, but we found this all talk. BOTBNEL
ness of glass by the tides, a big round Some people say to go down the west The Best Little Town
moon, and a good-looking Southern gen- coast, or down in the central part of the In the Best Little County
tleman by one's side. Could a better state, but we tell them that BUJNNELL In the Grand Old State of Florida
combination be imagined? IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR US. And We Don't Care Who Knows It!




Full Text

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|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH | The Truth About Florida | [ The Bunnell Home Builder | | Edited by S. HOWARD ^ 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll JULY 1917 THIS IS ONE OF THE MANY MEN WHO HAS MADE GOOD IN THE BUNNELL COLONY Read his entire letter on page six, column three

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tShQ BUNMELL HOME BUILDER What One Man in the Bunnell Colony is Doing with His Little Farm By THOS. A. VERDENIUS Mr. T. A. Verdenius The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. (The following article was written by Mr. Verdenius upon his return from the Bunnell colony, and was to have appeared in the June issue of the HOME BUILD ER. As there was not space for it in that issue we have had to hold it over until the present issue.) Have you ever had any doubts as to whether a man can make a living on a ten acre farm in our Bunnell colony? If you belong to the class of individuals who believe that it is necessary for a man to have 160 acres of land on which to make a good living and keep him busy, then 1 wish with all my heart that you could have been with me when I paid a visit to the farm of Mr. Worgis during my recent visit to the Bunnell colony. Mr. Worgis is one of the settlers in our Volusia tract, and I must confess that I myself could scarcely have believed a report of the wonderful things he has accomplished in so short a time, had I not seen them with my own eyes. Can didly, I never before saw such crops grown in my life. After an hour or so spent with this congenial family, and after a careful inspection of their farm, I left more convinced that I had ever been before, that the right man, using good judgment and knowing how to farm, and one who is willing to work cannot help but make a good living in our col ony. In fact, such a man as this, if he has good health, cannot know failure. I wish that every reader of the HOME BUILDER could have been with me and seen for himself just what Mr. Worgis has accomplished since moving onto his Bunnell colony farm. I realize, however, that only a very small per cent of our readers will visit the colony during the next few months, and I shall therefore attempt to give you as nearly as I can an idea of what I saw on the Worgis farm. In the various literature we have issued, as well as in the HOME BUILD ER, we have written a great deal about the profits being made and to be made in the growing of Irish potatoes in our colony, but because we have dwelt on this particular crop, it was no indication that various other crops could not be grown. Mr. Turner had told me of Mr. Worgis’ splendid showing before we went out to his farm, still I was not prepared for what I saw; and when the Company’s automobile stopped in front of the com fortable home, I could scarce believe my eyes. Mr. Worgis came to Bunnell from Michigan, and was in very poor health when he left his northern home; in fact, he told me, he had not done a day’s work for ten years before he came to Bunnell. He has fully recovered his strength and is a healthy man. No one would ever take him to be sixty-seven years of age. The Worgis family consists of father, mother, daughter and two grandchildren, and each of them seemed to be happy and contented in their Florida home. As Mr. Worgis conducted me over his farm he told me that he did not believe in “putting all the eggs in one basket,” and for this reason has planted some thing of almost everything that will grow in the colony. “If one crop should be a failure” he continued, “I will make it up on something else; or if one article is cheap another may bring a big price.” I first visited Mr. Worgis’ cucumber patch. He has about one acre in cucum bers, and I do not believe anyone could grow better ones than he. He told me he figured that he would get at least 500 hampers of cucumbers from this one acre, and he further told me that cucumbers were selling in New York that week for $6.00 a hamper. This would figure $3000 worth of cucumbers from one acre for Mr. Worgis. But, even though he should have only half the yield he figures, and even though he obtain but half the price he mentioned, he would still sell $750.00 worth of cucumbers from his one acre of land, and will grow two more crops on the same land this year. With these greatly reduced figures in mind I am inclined to believe that, after all, he will not be doing so very badly if he sells $750.00 worth of produce from one acre of land, for which he paid us $35.00 an acre, (and bear in mind this will be but one of his three annual crops on the same acre). However, I sincerely trust that Mr. Worgis will receive $3000.00 for his acre of cucumbers, and more too. A little north of his cucumber patch he has planted one acre to watermelons. His vines are looking very healthy in deed, and give promise of a big crop. If his expectations are realized, he will sell from $500.00 to $600.00 worth of mel ons from his acre of land. Mr. Worgis has by no means neglected to grow some of our spuds, and had one of the finest fields of potatoes I saw while in the colony. His potatoes were not quite ready to dig when I was there. He also had growing as great a variety of various products as I have ever seen grown in Florida. They comprised tomatoes, com, cabbage, squash, lettuce, strawberries, carrots, peas, mustard, radishes, andive, dill, snap-beans, polebeans, onions, kohlrabi, and perhaps sev eral other vegetables which I do not re call just at this writing. Mr. Worgis expects to plant five acres to sweet po tatoes as a second crop. He has about sixty hens and about seventy-five little chicks. He obtained on an average from 35 to 40 eggs a day, for which there was a ready market at 50 cents a dozen, while at the present time eggs are selling for 30 cents a dozen. Mr. Worgis' Cucumber Field [Volusia Tract]

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Ufie BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Mr. Worgis' Potato The Worgis family have erected a very comfortable seven room house that is a credit to our colony. In their yard they have about six stands of bees, which sup ply them with honey. After my visit with these good people, and as I rode through the Volusia tract on my return to Bunnell, I thought again and again of the great contrast in the manner in which men and women in different sections of our country live. I had just left a family, happy and con tent, living close to Nature, with an abundance of fresh air, the blue sky above them, surrounded by the most wholesome influences in which to rear their children. These people were grow ing most of their own food and knew nothing of the worries incident to life in our great cities. Then my mind sped back to Chicago, where thousands of families are existing in thickly settled districts, bringing up their children in the most unnatural surroundings, in apart ment houses or tenement buildings, with no place to play but in the busy streets. I thought of the wage-earners toiling long hours in shops and factories in a futile endeavor to make ends meet. I thought of the exorbitant prices of food, and what a terrific struggle life is to all such, and I wondered again as I have wondered many times before, why men and women will not get away from it all, and go “back to the land.” There is room for others in the Volusia tract who may become neighbors of Mr. Worgis, and share in the bountiful har vest that awaits them there. HOME BUILDER A WELCOME VISITOR. Just received in this evening’s mail, the HOME BUILDER, and I assure you it is a welcome little visitor. The only thing wrong about it is that it makes all have the “blues” thinking of the great contrast in the two climates and wishing we were down there now. After reading the HOME BUILDER one feels like you say you felt on your way back from your visit to the colony. (A Buyer) Field (Volusia tract) Another Bunnell Colony Man Who Has “Made Good,” Tells What He Thinks of the Bunnell Colony In regard to Bunnell as a farming country, I think it is second to none, as everything I plant seems to grow and yield abundantly—in fact, it is hard to realize that there is such a country as this, where everything grows. I am a Missourian by birth and, as you know, all people from Missouri have “to be shown.” I have been here now almost four years, and I am convinced that this is the country for everyone who wants to farm—in fact, I have been “shown,” and now I am here, settled for life. I own fifty acres of land and I value my farm at $8,000.00, and I am not willing to sell at that. I believe you are doing a great deed when you let the people of the United States know about this wonderful farming country, so that they may move here and make farm life worth the living. Yours very truly, O. C. MOSBY, Bunnell, Florida. FLORIDA, THE LAND OF PROMISE Some of the Reasons Why There Is Such a Rush to This State and Why It Will Continue. “Florida is the only tropical portion of the United States. It lies almost sur rounded by water; it is approached on both sides by the gulf stream which has a tendency to purify the air which filters over and through the lands of Florida, and its ports are open to vessels from all parts of the world, thereby giving it the very best of transportation facilities. It is tapped by the great railroad systems of the continent, which open up to it more than fifty millions of people. “And, as to climate, Florida has a cli mate that is unsurpassed, which every man of medical science admits is ideal for almost every form of health building. It has long been the playground of the rich, and within its borders are located the palaces and country estates of Amer ica’s most wealthy and aristocratic set. “Florida positively feeds the North and East during the winter months, and so far as the delicacies consumed in the North and East are concerned, Florida is, because of its geographical location and its nearness to those markets, the only available section of this country for such supply. “If one will but take a map of the United States and glance at it, he will be at once convinced of these facts from a geographical viewpoint alone. The great transportation lines of Florida have done much to enhance the value of Flor ida products, and to furnish swift trans portation for such products to the great markets of the country, as well as to see that they are kept in the highest state of perfection during such a journey. “The question is frequently asked why Florida products bring a higher price to the producers than other farm products in this country. The answer is simply this: Florida products are harvested at a time when the remainder of this coun try is generally in idleness, and conse quently the Florida products reach the market when there is absolutely no com petition and prices are the very highest. The only competitor of Florida, if it may be called such, is California, and that State lies so far away from the Northern and Eastern markets that, with the in creased cost of delivering its products to these markets, it is placed absolutely be yond the limits of competing with Flor ida. It is also a fact, that, as a rule, Florida products mature from thirty to sixty days earlier than those of Califor nia. “These are some of the reasons why Florida is having such a rush of settlers to her idle lands. So great is the demand for Florida lands that some of the great capitalists of the country are purchasing large tracts of land in various parts of the State. They know that the rush to Florida will continue now that it has started so strongly, and that it will be here in Florida like it was in the West, where great fortunes were made by the land grabbers. “But, at the present time there are thousands and hundreds of thousands of acres of good land in Florida that can be bought in small tracts. This is certainly the day of opportunity in Florida. The time to buy a farm tract in Florida is now.”—(Jacksonville Metropolis.)

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Uhm BUHHELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed One of the most successful potato seasons in the history of the Bunnell colony has come to a close. Messrs. Deen and Johnson shipped the last car. Weather conditions during the entire season have been excellent, in fact, they could not have been better. The yields were far in excess of what our farmers expected, and high prices prevailed throughout the shipping season. The prices opened up at $9.00 per barrel, go ing as high as $10.00 a barrel, and were never less than $7.00 a barrel, f. o. b. shipping point. The sums of money cleared by some of our farmers, after all expenses were paid, were quite as tonishing and almost unbelievable, when one takes into consideration the fact that they did not begin the work of breaking' their land until January, and finished shipping in May, and that they now have a fine com crop on the same land. We are proud to state that one of our local boys, Charles Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Brown, has won the Uni versity Scholarship. Mr. Brown has in deed distinguished himself by the win ning of this scholarship, and he has the privilege of choosing from seven differ ent schools throughout the country, as to where he may continue his education. Mr. O. C. Mosby, of Black Point, has completed the harvesting and marketing of his thirty acres of potatoes and is very much pleased with the results of same, he having sold his spuds for $6,600.00. His corn on this same thirty is looking exceptionally fine. Mr. F. S. Crowson is now harvesting his crop of fine sweet corn, which is be ing loaded into cars and shipped to northern markets. A large crew of men have begun the work of cleaning out Black Branch. On account of the accumulation of fallen trees, it has been practically impossible for the water to navigate the natural course, and during heavy storms the water has naturally backed over some of the adjacent territory. It is the inten tion of those in charge of this work to have all the timber removed from the course, and after this is done the Branch will be straightened out and widened, giving that part a perfect drainage. Several of the young people of Bun nell went surf-bathing last Sunday. That our farmers in Flagler county are making good money is proved by the fact that during the past sixty days the following parties have purchased auto mobiles: Crowson, Tomchuch, Frier, Ho gan, Kendrick, Malphurs, Pellicer, Hen drickson, Jones, Knox, Deen, Cody, Hamilton, Johnston, Bumsed and Mack. Mr. Fernside contemplates opening a haberdashery here. We need twenty-five new dwelling houses in Bunnell to accommodate the newcomers. Approximately five hundred autos passed through Bunnell last Sunday, some enroute for Ocean City, some to Daytona, while others were headed for St. Augustine and Jacksonville. At the election which was held in com pliance with the requirements of the bill creating Flagler county, which passed the State Legislature in April, the voters of the section of St. Johns and Volusia counties, which now comprise Flagler county, voted solid in favor of it, with the exception of but one single vote. Thus Flagler county has been created, and it will become a new county, offi cially, on July 2nd. Col. and Mrs. C. G. Vam, of Deland, arrived Monday and have moved into the Moody residence, corner Moody boulevard and Main street. Col. Vam has opened a law office in the Tribune building. He comes to us very highly recommended, being a graduate of Stet son University. For the past few years he has been associated with the law firm of Landris & Fish, of Deland, where he gained a reputation as an attorney of ability. We welcome Col. Varn and fam ily to our city. Thursday afternoon a fire was discov ered in the lumber mill of Ford & Lam bert, at DuPont. Pumps were immedi ately put to work, but the magnificent dwelling house known as “The Man sion.” in DuPont, was destroyed, also the dwelling house just west of it, which was occupied by Mr. Miller. Through the heroic work of the fire fighters, sev eral buildings were saved. The beauti ful Tippicanoe Inn was saved, although for awhile it looked as though it would go also in suite of the work of the fight ers. A telephone call to Bunnell for help was rapidly responded to, every auto and man available going imme diately to DuPont to help extinguish the flames. The most successful term of school ever taught in Bunnell ended Monday evening. The commencement exercise of the High School was excellent indeed; the reception Saturday night being a grand success. The baccalaureate sermon was preached by Rev. Ramsey on Sunday evening. At the close of the commencement exercises Prof. Hayes, in his impressive manner, reminded his pupils to ever keep in mind the urinciples of character that he has taught them during the school vear iust past, and commended them for the splen did work which they had done. Since Flagler County has become a reality, the editor of the St. Johns Trib une has chane-ed the name of his uaper to the FLAGLER TRIBUNE, and you will find this paper always full of up-todate news concerning the colony. One of the largest net returns per acre received for potatoes this season was from a two acre field belonging to Mr. Eatman. he having sold from his two acres $684.00 worth of potatoes, f. o. b. depot. Elder Branson of Atlanta, Georgia, preached in the Seventh Day Adventist Church last Sunday. Bunnell feels the need of more ade quate fire protection, and the City Coun cil and Mayor are advocating the issu ance of thirty year 6 % town bonds, so that they may be able to put in a pump ing station and lay pipe from Gore Lake, a distance of two and one-half miles, for furnishing water supply. This would not only mean a protection to the property, but it would be a good investment from the point of view of a reduced rate of insurance. It is also their desire to open up more streets in the town and lay more sidewalks, all of which goes to prove conclusively that we are merging from a village into a real town and to an increased population in the near fu ture. The young men of Bunnell and vicin ity responded gladly to their country’s demands on Registration Day. The day here was set apart for a holiday and was so observed. The returns compiled by the County Registration Board showed that 114 young men in Bunnell had registered. As quite a number of new merchants are considering engaging in business in Bunnell, there is going to be a great demand for more store buildings. Plans have been made for the erection of two new store buildings just north of the new bank building. Mr. E. B. Hanson, residing near Codyville, cleared $4,000.00 on twenty acres of potatoes this season. He has thirty acres under cultivation, and will imme diately begin the clearing of thirty acres additional. He expects to plant 60 acres to potatoes next season. He now has 25 acres of fine com, besides chufas, peanuts, velvet beans and a splendid garden. He also has a fine field of watermelons and will plant seven acres to sweet potatoes. Mr. W. B. Lanier, of Tallahassee, who has served as reading clerk of the House of Representatives for the past several terms, realizing the great future of Bun nell and Flagler county, has moved to Bunnell. He will be associated with the Bunnell State Bank. Mr. W. H. Poff, formerly of the State of Pennsylvania, but now living near Du Pont in the southwestern portion of Flag ler county, informs us that he has already sold a fraction over twenty-two thousand dollars’ worth of cabbage and potatoes from his farm this year. This farm comprises one hundred acres. Out of the hundred acres he had approximately eighty acres planted to cabbage and po tatoes, which he has already harvested, the balance of his farm being planted to oats. From the land from which he har vested his cabbage and potatoes, he now has fifty-eight acres in fine corn, fifteen acres of fine crab grass and pea-vine hay, and will plant the balance to sweet pota toes and a fall Irish potato crop.

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T5h@ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Dr. L. M. Dixon, an experienced dentist of Jacksonville, is a recent arrival in Bun nell. He has rented offices in the Tribune building where he will open an up-todate dental parlor. The Bunnell State Bank has just let a contract for the erecting of a new bank building, on the comer of Moody Road and Railroad Street. The building will have a forty-six foot front with a depth of eighty feet. It will be two stories high, the ground floor to be occupied by the Bunnell State Bank and the Bunnell Development Company, while the second floor will contain twelve up-to-date of fices. The building will be modern in every particular, being constructed of the very' best brick, with a press brick finish, tiling floor and will cost approximately thirty-six thousand dollars.—Flagler Tribune. A great celebration has been planned for the 2nd of July on account of the creation of Flagler County. A number of prominent speakers will be present, and our especial guest-of-honor on that day will be the Governor of the State of Florida, Sidney J. Catts. The services of the Deland Brass Band have been se cured for the entire day and evening. Bunnell will have one of her famous barbecues on that day, and in the eve ning everyone will be invited to go over to Ocean City, where there will be a big dance in the Ocean City casino. Mr. H. C. King will open a plumbing and heating establishment in Bunnell. ONE CARLOAD OF 200 BAR RELS OF POTATOES BRINGS OWNERS $2,000.00 THIS SEASON From time to time the readers of the HOME BUILDER have been told some thing about a little woman, by the name of Mrs. Dinkens, who has a potato farm a few miles north of our colony. You will be interested, we know, in learning about her 1917 crop, although the simple facts regarding same really read like a fairy story. This year Mr. F. R. Allen and Mrs. Dinkens went into the potato business together, and they were fortunate enough to ship some of their potatoes when the top price of the market was reached. One carload of 200 barrels brought them $2,000.00 f. o. b. Possibly this was the only car which brought them such high returns, anyway, Mr. Allen and Mrs. Dinkens requested their payment for same in gold. The purchaser sent to the First National Bank of St. Augustine for $2,000.00 of the yellow metal, and paid them this sum in gold pieces. We have it from most reliable informa tion, that Mrs. Dinkens’ potato field netted as high as $800.00 per acre for the 1917 crop. These are the highest re turns we have ever known of any farmer receiving on potatoes in our potato belt, and since potatoes have been exception ally high this year, the record may never be reached again. WHAT DOES IT ALL SIGNIFY? The editor has just re-read the news items that have come to this office since the last HOME BUILDER was published, and before sending them over to the printing office for the next issue of the paper. It has afforded most genuine pleasure, this quiet perusal of the little items which indicate so much in their simple wording. And what does it all signify to you, readers of the HOME BUILDER? Have you hurridly scanned these news items and thought perhaps half-indifferently that they sounded pretty good? If you have read them in this manner, won’t you go back and read them all over again—thoughtfully, carefully? And if you will do this, I believe you will, with me, catch a new vision of that wonderful land of opportunity, that Mecca for the heart-sick struggling men and women throughout this land of ours who are ek ing out existences on pitifully small salaries and working under the most try ing circumstances. The Bunnell colony—the Land of Op portunity — from month to month you have been told of what could be accom plished there. You have read the words of prophecy from the men who have been back of this great proposition, and who were able to catch a vision of what might be accomplished long before anything really was done. But, the dreams, the hopes, the desires of these community builders have become actual realities, and the little groun of News Items in this issue of the HOME BUILDER, dealing with the homes, the schools, the churches, the fine farms, the growing towns, the successes that have come in such a few years to earnest men and women, who have also had the vision and have helped make their “dreams come true” are the most conclusive proofs that could be given of the real worth and the possibilities of this Land of Opnortunitv. Again I ask. what does it all signify to you? I believe I can answer that onestion for some of our readers at least. If you have alreadv purchased farmhomes in the Bunnell colony, I believe these little items will make you more grateful than von have ever been before that you found this door of Opnortunitv and entered therein. If you have not completed all of the pavments on your farms, I believe vou will resolve tha f nothing shall stand in your way toward accomplishing this end as soon as pos sible, and then making v 0 nr plans for going to the colony and having your share in its rapid development. But, what does it all signify to you, readers of the HOME BUILDER, who have read from month to month of 'vhat is taking place in the colony, hut have never reached the point where vou made up your minds to own your own farmhomes there? Can’t you too catch the vision of the marvelous opportunities that may also he yours in the Bunnell colony? All of these wonderful things have been accomplished in such a few short years and they are onlv a foretaste of what will take place in the bright future that i opening up for our people in the Bunnell colony. Can you not realize that what others are doing, you may do also, but that the longer you delay the less your chances are for obtaining just what you would like to have there? Read these news items once again, if you will, and then resolve that not another day will pass over your heads until you have sent in your orders for farms of your own in this —Land of Opportunity. A FEW WORDS CONCERNING FLORIDA’S SUMMER TEM PERATURE Not a summer passes but what many letters are received at this office asking for complete information regarding Flori da’s summer temperature, so a few words upon this subject, in this issue of the HOME BUILDER, will not come amiss, we are sure. I do not expect any contradiction when I state that the winters in Florida are almost perfect, but I wonder if my next statement will be accepted so readily, when I say that Florida has also an ideal summer climate. Nevertheless, this lat ter statement is also true, and our buyers who have visited Bunnell during the summer months will bear me out on this. True, it gets hot in Florida during the summer months, but we all know there must be hot weather at some seasons of the year in every state where land is worth anything. It takes heat to grow crops, and any country would be a fail ure without the warm growing months; but, bear this in mind, it does not get any warmer in Florida in summer than it does in a great many of our northern states, and it is cooler in Florida than in some of them. If you wish further proof regarding this, write to your nearest Government Weather Bureau and enclose a stamped envelope. Ask Uncle Sam for some old weather reports. Also write to the Weather Bureau at Jacksonville or St. Augustine, Florida. However, for your convenience, I will give you below a table showing the average temperature, based on a ten-year average, furnished by the United States Weather Bureau, of St. Augustine, Florida, about 30 miles north of our colony, and of Ormond, about 25 miles to the south of us. Study these figures carefully, and they will give you a comprehensive idea of what to expect in the way of temperature in the Bunnell colony. St. Augustine Ormond Degrees Degrees January .56 58 February .. .61 58 March .62 64 April .68 69 May. .73 77 June .78 70 July. .80 80 August .80 80 September .. .77 79 October .65 72 November .63 64 December ... .58 57 Av’ge annual temp’ture.. 68 69

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A GROUP OF MR. HARRY E. MARKER CHICAGO MAN EXPECTS TO BUY MORE LAND AT BUNNELL AND ENGAGE IN THE POTATO BUSI NESS, AFTER A TRIP OF INSPEC TION TO THE COLONY. June 14, 1917. Dear Mr. Verdenius: After having spent a week in your Bunnell colony, I feel it my duty to make to the readers of the HOME BUILDER a brief report of my visit. I was reared on a farm until I was eighteen years of age, and since that time I have visited different sections of our large country, besides having worked for a large conservative banking institu tion for the past ten years. I have met quite a few successful men in that time, but I can conscientiously say that I never saw a community of farmers so prosper ous and independent as those I saw in the potato section of Florida around Bun nell and Hastings. For a small investment and on a pay ment plan so reasonable, I donÂ’t believe a man can find another place in the United States where he can buy a ten or twenty acre tract of land and net as Mr. Marker in a Field of Corn in the Bunnell Colony INTERESTING LETTERS FROM much money yearly as he can in the potato section of Florida. My heart aches when I see the em ployees of our large department stores and factories here in Chicago, and note intelligent men toiling away day in and day out on a salary of from twelve to twenty dollars a week, knowing as I do that it costs them every cent they earn to live, much less save anything for a rainy day. While in the colony' I talked with a number of farmers who started with less than five hundred dollars a few years ago, and who today own their own farms and have enough money to tide them selves over for a few years if necessary. Bunnell, the county seat of the new county of Flagler, just created, is a town about six years old, with a population of about one thousand people. It has ce ment walks, brick streets, a cement block and brick business buildings, bank, school, churches, hotels, garages, electric light and water works plant; in fact, it is a model little town, located on the main line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. It is very evident that all of this perma nent development is made possible only by the prosperity of the farmers in the vicinity of Bunnell. The Tribune Buildino at Bunnell (Photo taken by Mr. Marker) I took several snap-shots of buildings and farm scenes, which I enclose here with. They may be of interest to those who are unable to see this land with their own eyes. In closing I will add that I expect to purchase more land and get into the potato game myself in the near future. With best wishes, I am Yours very truly, HARRY E. MARKER. KORONA FARMER RECEIVES RE TURNS OF $2,100.00 FROM EIGHT ACRES OF IRISH POTATOES. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I am now through digging my potatoes, and am very satisfied with the returns from same. From the eight acre plot of potatoes, which you saw, I realized a net profit of $2,100.00. The corn is grow ing nicely, likewise the vegetables, many of which have already been marketed. I have let a contract with some colored people for the clearing of twenty-eight acres more of land, so that next season I expect to plant 45 acres to Irish pota toes. These men expect to finish the clearing in August. I hope more people will come to Korona and be as successful as we have been. JOHN MAZURAWISZ. MR. W. A. MACK REALIZES $12,000 00 ON HIS POTATO CROP THIS SEASON Dear Mr. Verdenius: I received the last issue of the HOME BUILDER, which you so kindly sent me, and I am sure that you realize that it made me happy to look over the pictures in this issue, which speak so highly of our colony. If you will send me a dozen more copies I shall be glad to send them to my friends in the West and it may set them to thinking and bring you some new buyers. I say to you again that I have never been in any place where a man can make a good living as easily as he can right here in Bunnell. We have had an ex ceptionally good year so far, and it can practically be said of all of our farmers that they have made good money, and to day the prospects for a bumper summer and fall crop are very good indeed. I feel sure that*you would like to know how I came out with my potato crop this year. I wish that I could give you the final report on same, but will say that MY NET SALES ON POTATOES SO FAR THIS SEASON IS $10,541.48, AND I HAVE AMOST TWO CARLOADS TO HEAR FROM YET, WHICH WILL BRING MY SALES UP TO OVER $12,000.00. You will no doubt recall that I purchased a small yoke of oxen five years ago, which I used to haul my potato crop to the station that season. This yoke of oxen cost me $70.00, but they fade into insignificance when compared with my big International Motor Truck which I now use to harvest my crop. Bunnell looks better to me today than ever before. The colony is booming, and how could it be otherwise? With the very best part of St. Johns county and the best of Volusia county combined, we are going to make FLAGLER COUNTY one of the very best, if not the best county in the state. Since I live but three miles from Bunnell, which will be the county seat of our new county, this appeals to me much better than to be located fifty-two miles from our present county seat. Now, Mr. Verdenius, I want to tell you in a few words about my present crop.I now have seventeen acres of com on the old land that looks fine, and eighteen acres on the new land which I cleared last year, and this crop looks fair. Fur thermore, I am going to plant about fifteen acres to rice, a few acres to sweet potatoes, and the rest of the land I will sow to cow peas. I expect this will be quite a busy sum mer for me, for I am going to build a new home, and expect to begin work on this home within the next few weeks. After our new home is completed I am going to take a little trip to visit some of my relatives on the Pacific coast, and take a little outing, which I feel I de serve, as I have been working hard for the last five years. While I am visiting with my relatives and friends, I shall tell them about our Bunnell colony, for I feel that I do a man a favor by telling him of the great opportunity which may be his in our colony. Yours very truly, W A. MACK, Bunnell, Florida.

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER OWNERS OF FARMS IN THE BUNNELL COLONY MR. WILLIAM K. BOPP “I SHALL NOT BE SATISFIED UNTIL I GET DOWN THERE TO LIVE” Writes a Chicago Mem After a Trip of Inspection to the Bunnell Colony Chicago, Ill., May 30, 1917. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Dear Sir:—I take this opportunity to tell you something of my trip to Bunnell. I arrived there on March 10th and was certainly surprised with my first sight of the town. In my estimation, Bunnell has the best start of any town I have ever seen, and although small as yet, I think if you keep on as you have started, you will have one of the best towns on the East coast. Mr. Turner was busy with a party of people from Detroit when I arrived, so I spent several days walking about the country and talking to the farmers. I wish to say right here that you have as sociable a set of men in your colony as one could meet anywhere. I guess I ask ed as many questions of them as I pos sibly could, and all seemed pleased to answer them, and they all praised the land and the climate. I saw acres and acres of potatoes and inquired what would be the average yield, and they all said it should run from 50 to 80 barrels to the acre. The com was up about two or three inches between the rows of potatoes. All of the farmers seemed very much pleased at the prospect of having the new county created, and all thought that it would be the very best thing that could happen, as it would mean more and bet ter roads and schools for the same amount of taxes they now pay. I guess the people are making money there. I rode over part of the colony with one of the garage men, who was circulating one of the petitions for the new county. We were out all day and out of about one hundred people seen, all but one signed for the new county, and incidentally the gentleman I was with got orders for three new machines. I was certainly well pleased with the country myself and selected twenty acres of land. I expect to go down this sum mer or next fall and build a house and make my home there. I thought so much of the country, and talked about it so much that I have in terested two or three other people, so that they have decided to buy and go down as soon as they have enough money. For myself, I shall not be satisfied until I get down there to live, which I hope will be soon. Yours respectfully, WILLIAM K. HOPP. “BUNNELL HAS COME INTO HER OWN THE LAST YEAR” Writes a Michigan Man. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I am not dead, but very much alive. It is a long time since I have seen you to hold converse with you, but I have fol lowed the progress of the Bunnell colony with much interest, through the medium of the St. Johns Tribune. Bunnell has come into her own the last year. There is no question about it, and you can safely throw out your chest and declare, “I told you so.” Yours very truly, L. F. HUBBARD, (Michigan.) “WE WILL HAVE ABOUT 3 TONS OF ONIONS” Says Mrs. Jones, One of Bunnell Colony’s Successful Farmers. Bunnell, Florida, R. F. D. No. 1, May 16, 1917. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir:—We are to begin digging potatoes tomorrow. You should see our onions. We will have about three tons of onions, and I venture to say that they will average three inches across. There are so few of them that are less than two inches, and so many that are so much larger, and any amount of these onions will weigh one and a half pounds each. I am going to have my picture taken with some of these onions, for I am proud of them. Yours truly, (Mrs.) STELLA JONES. ONE OF OUR CANADIAN BUYERS WRITES TO SAY HOW HAPPY HE IS THAT HE HAS HIS BUNNELL FARM FULLY PAID FOR. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Dear Sir:—I was looking over my con tract book today and find that I have made the last payment on my ten acre farm in the Bunnell colony, and you may be sure that I am pleased to know that this is so, and that I can now say that I am the owner of a home at Bunnell. And now for preparations for getting there, but the war conditions are so un certain at present that a man don’t know just what to do. However, I hope there will be a change before the time I am ready to go South. It may please you to know, Mr. Ver denius, that it was entirely by taking your advice that I am today the owner of a home in the Sunny Southland, and I thank you many times for your good, kind and fatherly advice regarding the transaction. Yours truly, GEORGE MARLATT, Toronto, Canada. COME TO FLORIDA (The following lines were written by Emmett Roberts, fourteen years of age, of Wyaconda, Missouri, whose mother, Mrs. Mary E. Roberts, is the owner of a farm in the Bunnell colony.) “If you long for the soft-blowing breezes, If you long for the cool, blue sea, If you long for the rippling brook, the river-to-be, Then come, oh come, to Florida with me. If you love the birds’ happy song, If you love the flowers, so delicate and free, If you love the days, so sweet and long, Then come, oh come, to Florida with me. If you wish to dwell in quiet and repose too, If you wish to dream under a sky so blue, If you wish to hunt, fish and other sports do Then come, oh come, to Florida, won’t you?”_ NO MORE FREE LOTS IN DUPONT We are still receiving inquiries con cerning free lots in Dupont, and I wish to say that there are no more of these lots to be given away. When a man has but $10.00 and desires to give $1.00 to ten different people, it is not possible for him to make eleven or twelve people happy, since $10.00 was all that he had to give away. And so it is with our free lots in Dupont. They have all been given away; hence it is impossible for us to give any more free lots to purchasers of farms. All I can say to those inquiring about free lots is that if you had acted promptly and purchased your farms some time ago, you would have been among the fortunate ones to receive these lots. May this not be a little lesson regarding the value of PROMPTNESS? The time is coming, and that before so very long, when there will be many people bitterly disappointed because they are not able to purchase a Bunnell colony farm at our present low price. The land will be sold and the prices will be greatly advanced. I fully believe that I shall see the day when this very same land will be selling for $350.00 an acre, and then will come the sad lament of many that they might have bought ten acres of this fine land for but $350.00, at practically their own terms on the monthly payment plan. If you want some of this fine potato land in the Bunnell colony, I URGE you to buy it now. Do not forget, that “OF ALL SAD WORDS OF TONGUE OR PEN, THE SADDEST ARE THESE — ‘IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN.’ ” Write today to THOS. A. VERDENIUS 108 So. La Salle St.. Chicago. Ill.

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m@ BUMHELL HOME BUILDER THREE MORE INTERESTING LETTERS FROM BUYERS Good looking — (both)—Magnolias and Anna This Kentucky girl came to Bunnell to see for herself; she was delighted with existing conditions and bought a farm herself. The following letter to her father was obtained by a bit of strategy; the writer finally giving her permission to have it published if her name was withheld. Surely it is recommendation enough when a girl from the “Blue Grass” State finds the Bunnell colony so satisfactory. A KENTUCKY GIRL’S LETTER FROM BUNNELL TO HER “DAD” IN “OLD KAINTUCK” Bunnell, Florida, April 9, 1917. Dear Dad: Here I have been in Bunnell, for two whole weeks, and this is the first op portunity I’ve had to write you a long letter—so here goes, all about this part of the East Coast and affairs in general. You know we had an idea before I came down here that Florida was mostly a desert of white sand, with rattlesnakes, mosquitoes and flies abounding. But in deed, that is a gross misrepresentation; and contrary to general report, all sorts of live stock can be raised here quite as well as in Kentucky, provided they are properly fed and taken care of. I am delighted with the Halcyon hotel —Mrs. Byrd sets a fine table, and the building faces directly on the Dixie High way, a solid brick road which stretches before you for hundreds of miles, and invites all sorts of auto trips. Bunnell is located conveniently—eightyfive miles from Jacksonville, Florida’s metropolis, and south of us Miami and Palm Beach a day’s drive. I went to Daytona with some friends in a big car last Sunday night. I shall not attempt to describe the trip to you, but leave to your imagination the white beach at Ormond, washed to the smooth ness of glass by the tides, a big round moon, and a good-looking Southern gen tleman by one’s side. Could a better combination be imagined? There is plenty of hunting and fishing here—’possums, quail, rabbits and squir rels. Mr. Turner, the able representative of the Bunnell Development Company, called for me yesterday and we drove to Ocean City, and stopped at the canal, where with the assistance of a fisherman and net, in half an hour had a bucket full of nice big fish. Mr. and Mrs. Turn er always have the latch string open, and their home is a favorite meeting place for the young folks. As you have perhaps noted from the Bunnell paper, which I have been mailing you, there is a movement on foot to cre ate a new county, with Bunnell as county seat. If this goes through, and the pros pects at present look very hopeful, our little city will grow still more in the future than it has in the past. What we need here is people with energy, to develop the wealth of natural resources which seem to have been be stowed upon this part of Florida. And now I must close, dad, and do write soon and keep me posted on mat ters at home. Always your devoted daughter, ANNA. P. S.: Enclosed find kodak view of some of the magnolias grown around here, with myself in the background. I know you will say—“good looking of the magnolias.” A NEW HAMPSHIRE MAN WRITES THAT “BUNNELL IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR US” Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir: The old saying that the first impres sion is most lasting is not true in my case regarding Florida. When I first saw Florida, I did not like it so very much, but by and by the climate began to tell on me, and the longer I stayed the better I liked it. We used to have a Dr. Stearns who thought a great deal of Florida. His father at one time had owned several thousand acres in the state of Florida, but he was not able to appreciate its worth and sold it out cheap. When his son grew older he realized what a ter rible mistake they had made, for if they had kept the land, it would have made them all rich. You see, it’s the same old story “IF.” In a few more years people will see land selling for $100.00, $200.00 and $300.00 an acre in Bunnell, according to location and soil, and will say “Oh, if we only had bought some of it for $35.00 an acre, when we could have done so.” To all those who may be in this class I would say, go down to Bunnell this year and pick out your land, or have someone do it for you, for I am certain this land is going to double in value before long. People up here told us that we would have malaria, that the snakes would bite us, that the colored people would steal everything, but we found this all talk. Some people say to go down the west coast, or down in the central part of the state, but we tell them that BUNNELL IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR US. We have twenty acres of land at Black Point, which we think is about right. When we get a good road out there, it will be one of the best farming districts in Florida. Yours verv truly, FRANK J. WINN, (New Hampshire) A FORMER RESIDENT OF TA COMA, WASHINGTON, TELLS OF SOME OF THE REASONS WHY THEY ARE GLAD THEY CAME T O THE BUNNELL COLONY. Bunnell, Florida, April 29, 1917. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir: We feel that we owe you some expres sion of the satisfactory manner in which you selected our twenty acre farm. We have been here since early in January, and in traveling about the colony have satisfied ourselves that you could not have made a selection that would have answered our requirements any better. To say that we are pleased is putting it mildly. We have good water at thirty feet, a shady grove for our house and plenty of open land for farming pur poses that is easy to clear. Our garden, a spot picked at random, proves that we have productive soil. As we arrived here too late to do any clearing for a crop of potatoes, we rent ed some cleared land and planted four acres, reserving one acre for sweet po tatoes later. We will begin digging in about ten days or two weeks, and expect an excellent crop. We have corn up six inches in the rows, that will make a fine showing as soon as the spuds are out of the way. At the present prices of potatoes and the yields per acre that our neighbors are getting assures us of a fine start for the short time we have been here. I know of no place in the Pacific North west, our former home, that has the op portunities to offer that this colony af fords. With the drainage project well under way, a main line railway, the brick paved Dixie Highway traversing the colony, the formation of a new coun ty with Bunnell as county seat, convinces us that we SELECTED THE LIVEST COMMUNITY IN THE STATE FOR OUR HOME. The Company officials are very courte ous and I have found them ever ready to assist the newcomer in whatever way they can. In summing up the conditions and ad vantages we find here the most I can say is that I am glad we came to Bunnell. Respectfully, (MRS.) C. A. WHITAKER, R. F. D. No. 1. BOOST BUNNELL! The Best Little Town In the Best Little County In the Grand Old State of Florida And We Don’t Care Who Knows It!