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The Bunnell home builder

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Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

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Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So4 La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
JUNE 1917
Potato Field of Mr. W. E. .Knight, Bunnell, Florida
As we advance in years, we sometimes need spectacles, but a man should need no spectacles to see the
advantage of buying a farm these days




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius Gives a Detailed Report of
His Recent Visit to the Bunnell Colony
This Article Will Be of Vital Interest to Every Reader of the HOME BUILDER
- ~- Korona, Harwood and Favorita. The
residents of this section were especially gratified, for I believe the change is going to mean more to them even than to those living in the old tract., I shall attempt to tell you briefly of some of the advantages of the new county for the people who reside in its territory.
You can well appreciate the advantage of being near the county seat. The farthest farm now from the county seat will be but twelve to fourteen miles, while previous to the creation of this new county, it would be necessary for some to travel almost seventy miles to reach the present county seat, St. Augustine. This change will mean considerable to the property owners and business houses of Bunnell, as the new county officials will reside at the county seat and will no doubt, erect their homes there. However, the chief advantage to the tax-payers of Flagler county is that hereafter they will receive, the full benefit of all taxes they Pot ato Field of Mr. John Councill, about three miles south oJ Bunnell. are required to pay, while heretofore 0 they helped carry the burdens of St.
Because I know that the readers of the decorated, left for the northern bound- Johns and Volusia c6untieg, and much HOME BUILDER, and particularly all ary of the new county, there to meet Mr. of their money was spent where it could
those who own land 4in our colony, are Moody, Senator McWilliams, and others do them personally -no good. We have anxiously awaiting a report of my recent who had spent the previous week or so reasons to believe that the taxes from trip through the colony, I am writing this in Tallahassee. These men had come the county will be equally distributed in at my. very earliest opportunity. With down from Jacksonville by automobile, the future. To go more into detail, I the aid of the camera, I hope to give some of them motoring all the way from wish to give you a few figures just at you quite a complete report of my visit; Tallahassee. Bunnell was the scene of this point: although were I to attempt to tell you much activity that Saturday evening, and The southern portion of St. Johns counall I saw and heard while on this trip, the creation of Flagler county was well ty, which hereafter will be the northern there would not be space in the HOME celebrated. Portion of Flagler county, has an
BUILDER for anything else. Not only were the residents of the assessed tax valuation of approximately,
I shall not attempt to tell you in this town of Bunnell happy over the new one million dollars. Last year the school letter of each individual whom I visited county, but all our other settlers as well, taxes in St. Johns county were seven and or talked with, for that you know would especially did I find those pleased who one-half mills; or, in other words, the be an impossibility. The colony is con- are living in the Volusia tract, around people who are property owners in that stantly growing, more people are settling on their farms, new homes are being erected and I always endeavor to see as many of our people as I can on my short visits there.
One of the most important things which I wish to tell you about is the creation of our new FLAGLER COUNTY. On April 20th, the State Legislature at Tallahassee passed a bill giving authority for the creation of this new county. There were only two votes in the House against the bill, while the Senate had previously unanimously passed it. This new county will comprise, approximately, 510 square miles, and as Bunnell is the principal town in the county, and is also centrally located, it will be the new county seat. The primary election of officials for the new county will be held some time during the month of June, and so far as I know, the first of July is the date set when Flagler county will become one of the counties of the great state of Florida.
On my arrival, I found Bunnell in gala attire. Flags and bunting were in evidence everywhere and on Saturday, April 21st, some dozen automobiles, splendidly Celery Farm o] Mr. Speer, at DuPont
When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "High Cost of Living"




VA-e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
approval of all of the officials of the Florida East Coast Railroad Co., or the Flagler System.
I should like to talk longer about Flagler county, but hope to tell the readers, later on, more complete details as to our plans in regard to this matter.
It is but natural for me to feel happy and enthusiastic about our colony today, even more than I have ever felt be. t fore, for I have lived to see practically
all of my ambitions in regard to our colony, realized. Never in my life have I seen such crops in the Bunnell colony as they have this year. They are "bumper" crops indeed, and it is unnecessary for me to tell you that our farmers are receiving big prices for everything they raise. Many of our readers, no doubt, are helping to pay some of these fancy prices.
In regard to the crops, I wish to refer the reader especially to the photos you will find in this issue. They will tell the story of success more quickly and
A busy scene in the Bunnell Colony, Grading Potatoes and packing in barrels, easily than I can do. While in the colony, I traveled in the Company's autopart of the county paid for educational but very likely there will be a hard road mobile, day after day, and I saw field purposes, $7,500.00 into the county treas- running from Bunnell to St. Johns Park; after field of the very finest potatoes. ury, while the records show that last from Bunnell via the Moody road, through Several of the farmers had begun digyear that part of the county received only the Volusia tract, passing through Cody- ging their potatoes, although most of $3,020.00 for their schools and other edu- ville and going straight to Deland, the them were going to wait a week or ten cational purposes. They were assessed county seat of Volusia county; another days before beginning this work, as the last year for roads andbridge taxes, eight road from Bunnell to DuPont; from Du- season this year has been exceptionally mills; which means that they paid Pont to Korona, from Korona to Favorita late; it being from two to three weeks $8,000.00 taxes for these purposes, while and Harwood, running parallel with the later this year than last year. The poin return they received as their share Florida East Coast railroad, and per- tato story for 'this year in the colony approximately $1,500.00. haps several other roads, which we hope in a nut-shell, would be, THE YIELD IS
By giving a little thought to the above to mention in the HOME BUILDER at EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD, THE QUALfigures one may readily understand why some later date. ITY EXCELLENT AND THE PRICES
the people residing within the boundaries All of our readers undoubtedly know VERY HIGH. The farmers in Flagler of this new county, were so anxious for that the Florida East Coast Railroad county, including our colony, are doing Flagler county to be created, for every (also known as the Flagler System) their share towards, helping our country cent of taxes they pay hereafter will be passes through our colony lands, and out in the potato famine and are helpspent for the benefit of their own par- there are reports that this railroad will ing to relieve the situation very mateticular county. not charge the new county any freight rially.
I have it from good authority, that it on the material which will be used for From the St. Johns county potato belt is very probable that Mrs. Flagler will the building of the hard roads in Flagler we ship as many as 150 carloads of pogive the new county a beautiful county county. It is not only the aim of the tatoes a day. While I was in the colbuilding, one that will not only be a officials of the Bunnell Development Co. ony they shipped, one day, 140 carloads credit to Flagler county, but to the state and all the citizens of Flagler county of potatoes. If each one of these cars of Florida as well. This splendid build- to make this county one of the most' would bring on an average of $1,500.00, ing will be a present to the new county, up-to-date counties in Florida, but this it would mean $210,000.00 worth of powhich bears the name of her deceased high purpose meets the endorsement and tatoes which were shipped to the North husband. More than likely, as soon as matters can be arranged, the name of the town of Bunnell will also be changed, for a great many of our citizens are in favor of having its name changed to FLAGLER CITY. This, of course, would have to be put up to the Post Office officials and the postal department at Washington would have to give their consent to changing the name of the post-office from Bunnell to Flagler City, and all of this will naturally take several months T
to adjust. I, for one, would be glad to see this name changed, for I feel that our enterprising little city could not bear a better name, than to be called after a man who has done more for Florida in general, and the East Coast in particular, than any other one man, the great pioneer road builder of our state-Mr. Henry M. Flagler.
It is planned to build about sixty or seventy miles of new hard roads within the county in the near future, for one of the great essentials in every farming community is GOOD ROADS. It is _perhaps a little early to designate ex- nohrbsscnDgigPtoeonM.Jda'Frm
actly just where these roads will be built Aohrbs cnDgigPtte nM.Jra' am
When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "'High Cost of Living"




I BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
sell his crop--of potatoes this year for, approximately, $10,000.00. With all this evidence of prosperity before me, I could. not help but think how well this man had done since he came to our colony. I recall so vividly the time when I personally took Mr. Mack to his farm in Bunnell for the first time, which will be six years next fall, and he told me he had, approximately, $500.00 with which to start farming in our colony. Today he has fifty acres of land all cleared and in A No. 1 shape. His land is fully paid for, and if this land is worth a cent, it is certainly worth $150.00 an acre. Furthermore, he has all kinds of farming implements, he has built himself a large shed and has two good teams. Mr. Mack was about fifty years of age when he came to our colony, and he had accumulated less than $1,000.00 all his life, while during the last five and one-half years in Bunnell he has accumulated, approximately, from $15,000.00 to $20,000.00. He is now one of our greatest boosters and he took great delight in showing myMr. Mack's 35 horse power Truck, hauling potatoes from his farm to the depot at self and the party with me over his farm.
Dupont-f'wo loads at one time. Among our party was a very conservative
man, a banker from Chicago, and I listened with great interest while Mr. Mack on a single day. That would mean that money then, so one may form some idea told him that he would clear, at least, within five days the farmers would have of what our farmers are making this $200.00 to the acre, net, on his potato
sold more than a million dollars' worth year if he will just stop to consider the crop this year, and would then follow of spud& to the northern markets. present prices, this crop with a crop of corn, and if the
The yield throughout the Bunnell col- corn crop was only an average one, he
ony is far in excess of the anticipation Mr. W. A. Mack shipped his first car would harvest fifty bushels to the acre of the farmers. Some of our farmers of potatoes on April 24th. This was only from this very same land which, at last
are digging as many as 100 barrels to a small car and contained but 163 barrels year's prices, he could sell for $1.00 a the acre while others are digging as for which he received $1,225.00. The bushel; and he would then follow this
few as thirty barrels to the acre. While commission men charged him $38.00, crop up with a third crop of cow-pea hay, I was in the colony I saw one man who leaving $1,187.00 paid to Mr. Mack. Mr. and if he could only raise 21 tons to the originally came from the state of Oregon Mack has a very good crop this year and acre, it would mean another $50.00 an who had only two acres planted to PO- has purchased an International 35-horse acre. After giving these careful figures tatoes. His crop was not up to the power truck. This truck cost him to the banker, Mr. Mack continued, "Now
average, but he sold about $650.00 worth $1,450.00, and it was a pleasure for me Mr. Prebis, can you tell me of another of potatoes from his two acres of land, to watch him hauling his potatoes from country where a man can raise three and he told me he had made a net profit his farm to the railroad station in this crops a year and make $310.00 net to on his two acres, above all expenses, of truck. Usually he had a wagon hooked the acre on general, farming?" (Such $400.00, or $200.00 an acre, and this man onto the truck and in that way he took a question is enough to set any man still has two more crops to raise this year two loads at one time. Mr. Mack will thinking). on the same land. One man, living a little west of Bunnell, had about thirty-five acres planted to potatoes this year. It took about four acres to fill his first car, for which he received f. o. b. Bunnell, $1,650.00. All of his expenses, including fertilizer, seed potatoes, barrels, etc., were paid out of his four acres, and he still had thirty-one acres to dig. If these thirty-one acres should yield as the first four did, this man will net on his thirty- i
five acres of land, approximately, $12,000.00.
While I was in Bunnell, the price paid for No. 1 potatoes was $8.50 a barrel; No. 2's, $7.00 a barrel; No. 3's, $5.00 a barrel, and $4.50 a barrel for the culls. I could not help but marvel at these exorbitant prices, for I well remembered that in previous years the farmers had difficulty in even selling their No. 3's, and no one would buy their culls, and often the farmers left the culls in the fields. Not so today. Every one of these culls is picked up very carefully and shipped to the North. I recalled that a couple of years ago our farmers in Bunnell received only $4.00 a barrel for Mr. Mack's 40 Acre Potato Field.
their No. l's, and they were making good
When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "High Cost of living"




X\ Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Game is very plentiful in the colony
~,this year. Quail were in evidence everywhere, Of course, this is not the hunting season and, therefore, the birds are
very tame, but I scarcely visited any of
the farms that I did not run across some
of these fine birds. While I was in the
/ colony one man caught about 275 mullets
at Ocean City, which weighed around
300 pounds, besides several sea bass.
Two of these sea bass weighed 30 pounds,
an average of 15 pounds each. I took
a picture of two of these bass. I am sure
there are many of our buyers with good
red blood in their veins, who will find
this the sportsman's paradise when they
come to settle on their farms.
The last evening I was in the colony
I spent at Ocean City. Quite a number
of people in automobiles had left Bunnell earlier in the day, going over to the
closing exercises of the school at beautiful Ocean City. We have at the present
time about seventeen pupils enrolled' in,
that school. I very much enjoyed the
Mr. Prebis, Chicago Banker, -visiting the Korona colony. This picture -was taken in splendid entertainment given in the Mr. Mazure-wicz's Potato Field. Ocean City casino, by Miss Shepard and
her pupils. It seemed to me that this
I should like to tell you at length about get a start, need not fear to settle there. last evening was, after all, the most the various crops I saw growing on the' Mr. Prebis has several warm friends in pleasant one I had spent while in the farms of Mr. Mosby, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Korona, some'of whom he knew several colony. I found keen pleasure in standKilpers, Mr. Lambert, Mr. Gray, Mr. years ago, and they would be very pleased ing by the mighty ocean, listening to the
Phillips, Mr. Councill, Mr. Jones, Mr. to see him settle on his farm and help roar of the waves and watching the Parker, Mr. Mazurewicz, and a great in the development of the Korona colony, crowd of people who had come to attend
many others, but I should be repeating the closing exercises. I saw very plainly
practically the same story of big crops', that, although our people in the colony
and space and time prevents my doing are very much in earnest in their desire
this. to develop this part of the country, and
are very much interested in their big
While we are having a bumper crop crops and in making money, still they
of potatoes this year, we are short on have proven that they have a keener inbarrels. It is safe to say that we have terest in the most important work of -all
at least a 30 per cent shortage of barrels. -the proper raising of our boys and
The barrel factory in Bunnell is entirely girls. After the evening's entertainment
out of barrel material and it is very hard was over, a fish fry was given, and we
for the farmers to get any more barrels. returned to Bunnell with many pleasant
The commission men from the northernmeois Itokheranhe ex
markets prefer to have our potatoes ship- meorig. to rturn, via Jaksn le, net
ped n brres, ad brres lat yar oldmy home here in Chicago. As I came for 35c each. At the beginning of this farther north, through Indiana and Tiliseason, the price of these barrels went up nois, I could not help but compare the
to 37c each, and on. account of the short- vast difference between the southern
age they were sold at Hastings for 50c ,farmer and the farmers here in the Midapiece, and I was told that one man deWs.Iswmn ilsi hs w
offeed o pa $100 abarel fr eerystates which had not even been touched barrel he needed. Mr. Moody has as- by the plow for the first and only crop,
sured us that this shortage will not oc- while behind me in Bunnell, some of the
cur again, but that he will provide for fresIhdlf a led avse
the omin yer. Sme o ou farersand marketed their first crop, and others were obliged to ship their potatoes this would soon do so, and in a great number
year in hampers, and the day I left of fields corn had been planted between
Jacksonville, Mr. Mazurewicz, one of our the rows of potatoes and this corn was
farmers in Korona, bought a carload of from one-half to one foot high. Corn
hampers to be shipped to the Korona is the second crop which our farmers
farmers. raise in our colony.
I had the pleasure of spending two
days in Korona in company with Mr. And this, readers of the HOME
Prebis, who is connected with the largest BUILDER, is my report to you of my
Polish bank in Chicago. Mr. Prebis and last visit to the colony, or as much of it
his son are both owners of small farms as space will permit me to have. Isn't
in the Korona colony, and he was not only it thrilling. after all ? And don't you
very much pleased with the farms we lonir to be down in that LAND OF SUNhad selected for himself and son, but he SHINE, to roll up your sleeves and go to
has become very enthusiastic about our work? For I say to you, as I have said
Korona colony. Mr. Prebis looked over many times before, that for the man with
several farms in the Korona section and some money and who can and will work,
told me he was convinced that any man there is an abundant harvest in the great
who was willing to work in an intelligent Bunnell colony, and there you may find
maimer in the Korona colony for a few Bob, The Fisherman. Two sea bass caught at contentment and happiness and live out years, and who had sufficient money to Ocean City, z4;ei.ohing 30 pounds. your life in God's great Out-of-doors.
When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "High Cost of Living"




MeBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Church News From The Bunnell Colony.
The members of this denomination may J be justly proud of their new church edifice, which is not only a credit to them and Bunnell, but we doubt if there is a 77.; W neater little church in all Flagler county
today. We believe this church with its Loyal membership has a great future. The new church building was dedicated a few rn, |days ago, the dedicatory sermon being preached by Elder W. H. Siith, of AtI lanta, Georgia. The officers elected were
Mr. W. A. Mack, Elder; Mr. 0. C. Mosby, Deacon; Mr. L. C. Johnson, Clerk.
In the southern part of our colony, at
4 Korona, we have a very attractive little Catholic church. Rev. A. Baczyk is the
'Is
Interior of the necw Seventh Day Adventist Church at Bunnell. This is the prettiest and neatest church in Flagler county.
Four denominations are represented at School with an enrollment, of from 120 the present time in our colony-the Me- to 130 pupils. Mr. Byrd is their very thodist Episcopal South, the Christian capable Superintendent. church, the Seventh Day Adventist and The Christian church has the smallest
the Catholic church. congregation at the present time, and
The Methodists in Bunnell have a very they have not as yet erected a house of neat little church, which has just re- worship, although they have a very fine cently been repaired, and has a seating lot in Bunnell for that purpose, which capacity of about two hundred. The was given to them by the Bunnell Depastor, the Rev. Ramsey, preaches at 11 velopment Company. They have no reg-, a. m. and 7 p. m. each Sunday and every ular pastor in Bunnell as yet. Mr. and other Sunday afternoon at Ocean City Mrs. Hagadorn are very faithful and in the casino. He is a very active young active members of this church. No man, and surely is the right man for the doubt when other members of this deright place, as he is doing a great work nomination have settled on their farms in Bunnell. Mr. Ramsey has been the in the colony, they will also have. their means of building up his church and in- own church building and resident pastor. creasing the membership very materially. We take great pleasure in reproducHe is much loved by the people of the ing herewith a picture of the interior of community, and those who have read the new Seventh Day Adventist church
Ralph Connor's "Sky Pilot" will see in Bunnell. This church is located near where this title very aptly applies to the Dixie Highway, a few blocks east him. This church has a good Sunday of the central part of our busy town.
-- Scoutmaster o] the Boy Scouts in Bunnell. Rev.
Ramsey of the M. E. Church.
- resident priest, and under his wise and
good leadership, this church is growing and new members are being received. fMass at this church is at 10 a. m. every Sunday morning, and there is usually
z a very good attendance. We are pleased
to reproduce herewith a picture that was taken in front of this church, on April 22nd, after the Sunday morning services.
IMPORTANT NOTICE FREE LOTS IN DUPONT
The Bunnell Development Company has been giving a free lot in Dupont to each purchaser of a ten acre farm in our colony. As most of these lots have been disposed of, we shall be obliged to disC continue the giving away of any more free
lots to purchasers of land. Therefore, after June 10, 1917, no more lots will be given away in Dupont.
Stopping for a chat after the morning services at the Catholic Church in Korona. I. 1. MOODY,
I President, Bunnell Development Company.
When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "High Cost of Living"




%60h-e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell
On account of the yields being far in The DuPont Central Railway had a The school at Ocean City, has been
excess Of what was expected the barrel siding built at Codyville, which was a closed. Miss Corene Shepard left for manufacturers are unable to furnish much needed improvement. Jacksonville, Tallahassee, and other
enough barrels to handle the crop and points before going to her home near
numbers of farmers are shipping in A very interesting event at Codyville Quincy.
hampers and sacks. The buyers are so ___anxious to get the spuds that they don't was the closing of the school with ap- TeRbr ht eeeyi oi
seem to object to what they are packed propriate exercises by the children. There TeRbr ht eeeyi on
in; all they want is the potatoes. were three, graduates from the eighth plete, has a good wooden fence around
grade. it and a good road leading to it. While
________this is a beautiful place and there is
The Keystone Farms Co., with eighty M.JE.ngamvc-rsdtof plenty of room to be had there, still we
acres of fine spuds have just started to the Floid EastngCoast Raile-roa den pay hope there will be no great rush for dig. Mr. Poff, the manager, expects a and Mlrd W as H. as KeneniExor Cofpathe permanent occupancy thereof.
goodyied. ______Flagler estate, rode with Mr. Moody and Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Bunnell, who have
Mr.WabenBoe as egn dggng Mr. Lambert over the colony and inspect- a farm in the Volusia tract and have and indications are that his yield will be edteptt ils hywr ey spent the winter in our city, have returnlarge. much pleased with the bright prospects ed to their home in Mitchellville, Iowa.
_______of the farmers. All the people in Bunnell hope to see
Tfhe Dupont Land Co. dug their fifty them return again next fall.
acres last week which sold f. o. b. the
cars for $11,325.75. CONCERNING TOWN LOTS IN Worshipful Master W. C. Heath, of
Bunnell, Lodge No. 200 F. & A. M., has
Mr. R. W. Cody, who has forty acres BUNNELL AND OCEAN CITY had the furniture of the lodge remodeled
of fine spuds, is digging this week and On account of the rapid growth of which has materially improved the aphis yield is around fifty barrels. He sold Bunnell and owing to the fact that it will pearance of the interior of the lodge his first car which contained one hundred soon be the county seat' of our new Flag- room. and seventy-one barrels, for $1,358.60. Icr County, we wish to announce that In the presence of Mr. Moody, the
This car was dug from four acres which there are no more lots for sale in Bunnell Governor of the state of Florida, signed is a net of $339.65 per acre. at $50.00 apiece; the cheapest lots now with a solid gold pen, the bill authorizing
being $75.00 each. the creation of Flagler county. After
Burrell Bros. are digging an exception- We have several fine lots still for sale signing the bill, the Governor presented ally good crop the yield running as high in Ocean City, the prices of same ranging the pen to Mr. Moody. as seventy-five barrels to the acre. Their from $150.00 to $250.00 apiece. first selling for $8.60. Lots in both Bunnell and Ocean City The Commencement Exercises of the
may be purchased on the monthly pay- Bunnell High School were held on SatThe Haw Creek Farms Co., who are the ment plan of $5.00 each per month. urday evening, May 12th. On the Sunlargest potato growers in Flagler County, For further particulars, write to day evening, following the Baccalaureate
they having one hundred and thirty-one THMSA EDNUSermon was preached by Rev. Ramsey,
acres, are digging this week and are THMSA EDNUat the M. E. church.
getting a good yield and are disposing of 108 South La Salle Street, Asrwblo ilb ae ntevr
them at fancy prices as Mr. Booe, the Chicago, Illinois.. nAr ftre falorth fier ofeni the newy
manager, has the reputation of putting ___________________ coruntrTe following offices are to ew
up as fine a pack as there is put up in Bunnel. mecatTeotta h ild hefolerkin offes iruito ort
the entire potato belt. Bnelmrhnsrpr htte fle:Seif lr fteCrutCut
farmers are not only supplying the town Tax Assessor, Tax Collector, SuperintendMr. M. H. Milliken has had his farm, trade with all the eggs they need, but ent of Public Instruction, Supervisor of Seminole Trace, near Gore Lake, cleared they are bringing in enough so that Registration, five County Commissioners,
and fenced and expects to build there quite a large amount are being shipped three Members of the School Board, and this fall. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken left for out. County Judge, making a total of fifteen.
Chicago, Monday, where they will spend Several good candidates have entered the
the summer. Messrs. Jordan and Lambert have sup- rae
plied Bunnell the past season with lus- The Standard Oil Company has made Mr. George Moody has purchased from cious strawberries. The strawberry sea- application for a permit to erect two Mr. C. A. Smith his seventy-two town son is about over in Bunnell. tanks and a trucking shed on the lots
lots on Moody boulevard. The creation _____adjoining the Bunnell Ice, Light and
of the new county makes the boys re- Mrs. J. L. Jones has one of the finest Water Company.
alize the value of Bunnell property. fields of onions on her farm in the Vo- Throughout the past week, the potato
Mr.A.C. arhal, otao rokris lusia tract. The onions will soon be movement has been very heavy. A total Mkin his heaquartersoato boer, dur ready to ship and will command a fancy of 1805 solid carloads have been shipped ing the potato season. He is shipping pie u fteptt etsneArl1t
several cars of spuds daily. Mr pe a ensipn rmhs The price for the last week, f. o.b. the
MrSerabesipigrmi shipping point, has ranged from $6.50 to
Mr. A. V. Folson, of Bartow, Fla. large celery field, West of Haw Creek. $8.00 a barrel for No. 1's, $6.25 to $6.50
arried n Bnnel, uesayandwil r~ He has been getting at the rate of 500 a barrel for No. 2's and $3.50 to $5.00 main and clear his land in the Bunnell crates to the acre, and he expects that for No. 3's. The weather conditions colony, this celery will net him $3.00 per crate, throughout the week have been favor_______f. o. b. the depot. able, and practically all of the farmers
Mr. 0. C. Mosby is beginning to dig in the entire potato belt are busy digging.
his crop. Others digging around Bun- Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hill, who have spent The yields continue good, the average
nell are: Messrs. C. B. Miller, C. C. the winter months in Bunnell, left for yield being above fifty barrels to the acre. Jordon, John McCormick, George Burn- their home in Massachusetts. We hope It will no doubt, be of interest to know
sid, W. H. Cochran, A. Lambert. that these good folks will return again where all of these potatoes are shipped.
next fall and make their permanent home The principal markets are New York, A black bass weighing eight pounds with us. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are the own- Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincinnati, St.
was caught by Jim Davis in Black Branch ers of several beautiful lots in the town Louis, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Kansas City, last week. of Bunnell. Detroit and Denver.
When you have. your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the "High Cost of IvWng




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
wu-~ Al~~There is just another class -of individ- LET ME TALK THIS OVER WITH
"Patriots A ll"1 uals who, I trust, will lend me a listen- YO ,W O UG T OBY
ing ear-the men and women who have YOW O UG T OBY
A remarkable cartoon appeared on the long been "halting between two opin- A FARM IN THE BUNNELL
front page of one of our great Chicago ions"~ and trying to decide whether it COLONY
dailies recently entitled "Patriots All." would be wise to invest in a little farm There was not another word about the in the Bunnell colony or not. Can't you Billy Sunday said recently in New York, picture, for not another word was needed. see what a mistake you have made by where he is conducting a meeting at the In the foreground was the FARMER, his delaying this long? If you were among present time: hands to the plow, directing the course the happy farmers at Bunnell, who are "You can't win without hard work; you of his faithful horse with the lines fas- harvesting their bountiful crop of po- can't grow crops lying in the field under tened beneath his arms. Just beyond the tatoes this spring, don't you think you the shade of a tree, sipping lemonade fence marking the boundary line of the would feel -you had made a safe invest- through a straw." field were long lines of soldiers, following ment ? The evangelist was right, we must all
in the wake of the American flag, as it If you realize the mistake you have admit. But, if you are willing to work; floated out in the breeze. made by not securing a farm-home 'ere if you have a few hundred dollars with
"Patiot Al' -he mn wo mrch this, won't you decide now to rectify that which to get a start, you can make a "Patiot Al"-te mn wo mrch mistake, and secure your farm without mighty good living in the Bunnell colony to battle and into the thick of the fight, further delay ? on a ten or twenty acre farm, For the
with the hoes! at a beautiful thought Some will go to the battle front and right man success is easier than failure.
wit th hes!Wha abeatifl houht return again, as heroes; other brave You have been receiving the HOME
it is to everyone who longs to serve his souls will lay down their lives for their BUILDER for several months. Have you country, that he may be as loyal and country, but the call today is just as not been impressed with the sincerity and patriotic in tilling the soil as in fighting imperative for the men on the farms truth of the statements madie therein? It in the trenches. and in the fields to grow the food to seems to us that this issue is really better
President Wilson has emphasized this feed the nations. Whether we shall be than any that have preceded it. It is thought in his memorable message to the here or there, let us ever keep in mind brimful of facts concerning the wonderfarmers of America, in which he said, our service to our country, and that we ful developments taking place in the col"I CALL UPON YOUNG MEN AND may be "PATRIOTS ALL." ony, and the pictures it contains are so
OLD ALIKE AND UPON THE ABLE- interesting and convincing.
BODIED BOYS OF THE LAND TO AC- Won't you read this issue thoughtfully
CEPT AND ACT UPON THIS DUTY- and carefully, and then send us your order
TO TURN IN HOSTS TO THE FARMS ~ .for a Bunnell farm without further delay?
AND' MAKE CERTAIN THAT NO Send it today. You are the loser by postPAINS AND NO LABOR IS LACKING poigyu ecsofrevr awe
IN~~~~~~o monGET ATR" ee th you delay means that, just so
before in the history of the world was many more of the choicest farms, and lothe position of the farmer so important, cations are being taken by someone else.
for as President Wlison further says: If you send us your order today we shall
"UPON THE FARMERS OF THIS be able to locate you nearer to a town
COUNTRY, THEREFORE, IN LARGE and closer to a good road than if you
MEASURE, RESTS THE FATE OF -wait for some future time.
THE WAR AND THE FATE OF THE I CONFIDENTLY BELIEVE THAT
NATIONS." SOME DAY WE SHALL SEE THIS LAND
It is a wonderful thing then to be the SELLING FOR AS HIGH AS $3,50.00 AN
owner of a portion of this great OUT- ACRE, and that is just the amount now
OF-DOORS, and to be able to plant the which you will h a ve to pay for TEN
seeds, till the soil and produce some .ACRES in our Volusia tract. We are
of the food stuffs that go to feed the anxious to sell you one of these farms for
nations of the world. Just here I want .. .- only $35.00 an acre, on the monthly into urge every one who has his Bunnell stallment plan.
farm fully paid for to go to the colony, A Boaus Potato Grader at Wor IF YOU SEND IN YOUR ORDER BEif possible, and begin clearing and plant- The above picture of the Boggs potato FOREN JUNRE 10, 1917 YUO WI HB
ighis land. That bit of soil may mean grader will be of great interest to -all GIEN A F RE LOT IN UON WThr so much to you, and it is too bad to have those who contemplate growing potatoes are but a very few of these free lots left it lay idle if you are in a- position to on their Bunnell colony farms. You will to be given away in Dupont,- and as per cultivate it. note that the potatoes can be accurately the notice in this issue, sent 'out by PresNo doubt many who read these words graded into No. Ones, Twos, Threes and ident IL I. Moody, there will be positively have begun to make payments on a little the Culls, and means the saving of a no more lots in Dupont given away after Bunnell farm, but you have not com- great deal of time when the potatoes June 10, 1917.
pleted same. Can you not see that this have to be sorted. Such a machine will Our motto .has ever been: "FIRST
step in your life is one of vital import- soon pay for itself, as one can readily see. COME, FIRST SERVED." ance, and that you should by all means Northern buyers will much more readily It is our aim to please- each and every continue the payments on your farms purchase potatoes that have gone buyer, and to treat everyone 'fair' and
as rapidly as possible, and thus provide through this grader, for they can be cer- square. We have sold farms to thousands for yourselves and families a haven tain that every barrel will be uniform ofpolsh r lae n aife
against the adversities of life? from top to bottom. wit thope hodineslanded ae conifid
Much is already being said in regard that we can satisfy YOU.
to the scarcity of food, and I fear much GET AWAY FROM THE HIGH'COST
more will be said and felt along this line OF LIVING. Grow your own food, your
within the next few years. The cost of potatoes and other vegetables. Have your
living is continually on the upgrade, and 4.own cow, your eggs and -chickens. Make
men and women are seriously asking the a 'home for yourself and family in the
question, "How can we cope with the .Bunnell colony, where you may enjoy a
present situation ?" mnild, healthy _climate, and where LIFE IS
Were I called upon to answer this WORTH LIVING.
question, out of the fullness of my heart IF YOU CAN SAVE 17 CENTS A DAY
I should say, the best solution of the I CAN SELL YOU A TEN ACRE FARM
problem is to buy a piece of land, pay IN THE BUNNELL COLONY.
for it, then put that land under culti- -THOMAS A. VREIS
vation and it will provide the necessities VERDENhIUSale Stre,
of life for you and help you contribute Mr s .,Jones'Splendid Be,',,euda Onion Field in the 18SuhL al tet toward the markets of the world. Folusia Trac't Chicago, Illinois.




Full Text

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illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllillllllllllllllllllH | The Truth About Florida | | The Bunnell Home Builder | M Edited by S. HOWARD ^ 1115—108 So* La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli JUNE 1917 Potato Field of Mr. W. E. Knight, Bunnell, Florida As we advance in years, we sometimes need spectacles, but a man should need no spectacles to see the advantage of buying a farm these days

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15he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius Gives a Detailed Report of His Recent Visit to the Bunnell Colony This Article Will Be of Vital Interest to Every Reader of the HOME BUILDER Potato Field of Mr. John Council /, Because I know that the readers of the HOME BUILDER, and particularly all those who own land in our colony, are anxiously awaiting a report of my recent trip through the colony, I am writing this at my. very earliest opportunity. With the aid of the camera, I hope to give you quite a complete report of my visit; although were I to attempt to tell you all I saw and heard while on this trip, there would not be space in the HOME BUILDER for anything else. I shall not attempt to tell you in this letter of each individual whom I visited or talked with, for that you know would be an impossibility. The colony is con stantly growing, more people are settl ing on their farms, new homes are being erected and I always endeavor to see as many of our people as I can on my short visits there. One of the most important things which I wish to tell you about is the creation of our new FLAGLER COUN TY. On April 20th, the State Legisla ture at Tallahassee passed a bill giving authority for the creation of this new county. There were only two votes in the House against the bill, while the Senate had previously unanimously pass ed it. This new county will comprise, approximately, 510 square miles, and as Bunnell is the principal town in the coun ty, and is also centrally located, it will be the new county seat. The primary election of officials for the new county will be held some time during the month of June, and so far as I know, the first of July is the date set when Flagler county will become one of the counties of the great state of Florida. On my arrival, I found Bunnell in gala attire. Flags and bunting were in evi dence everywhere and on Saturday, April 21st, some dozen automobiles, splendidly about three miles south of Bunnell. decorated, left for the northern bound ary of the new county, there to meet Mr. Moody, Senator McWilliams, and others who had spent the previous week or so in Tallahassee. These men had come down from Jacksonville by automobile, some of them motoring all the way from Tallahassee. Bunnell was the scene of much activity that Saturday evening, and the creation of Flagler county was well celebrated. Not only were the residents of the town of Bunnell happy over the new county, but all our other settlers as well, especially did I find those pleased who are living in the Volusia tract, around Korona, Harwood and Favorita. The residents of this section were especially gratified, for I believe the change is go ing to mean more to them even than to those living in the old tract. I shall attempt to tell you briefly of some of the advantages of the new coun ty for the people who reside in its terri tory. You can well appreciate the advantage of being near the county seat. The far thest farm now from the county seat will be but twelve to fourteen miles, while previous to the creation of this new county, it would be necessary for some to travel almost seventy miles to reach the present county seat, St. Augustine. This change will mean considerable to the property owners and business houses of Bunnell, as the new county officials will reside at the county seat and will no doubt, erect their homes there. However, the chief advantage to the tax-payers of Flagler county is that hereafter they will receive the full benefit of all taxes they are required to pay, while heretofore they helped carry the burdens of St. Johns and Volusia counties, and much of their money was spent where it could do them personally no good. We have reasons to believe that the taxes from the county will be equally distributed in the future. To go more into detail, I wish to give you a few figures just at this point: The southern portion of St. Johns coun ty, which hereafter will be the northern Portion of Flagler county, has an assessed tax valuation of approximately, one million dollars. Last year the school taxes in St. Johns county were seven and one-half mills; or, in other words, the people who are property owners in that Celery Farm of Mr. Speer, at DuPont When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the “High Cost of Living”

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15h BUNNELL HOME BUILDER When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the “High Cost of Living’ A busy scene in the Bunnell Colony Grading Potatoes and packing in barrels. part of the county paid for educational purposes, $7,500.00 into the county treas ury, while the records show that last year that part of the county received only $3,020.00 for their schools and other edu cational purposes. They were assessed last year for roads andbridge taxes, eight mills; which means that they paid $8,000.00 taxes for these purposes, while in return they received as their share approximately $1,500.00. By giving a little thought to the above figures one may readily understand why the people residing within the boundaries of this new county, were so anxious for Flagler county to be created, for every cent of taxes they pay hereafter will be spent for the benefit of their own par ticular county. I have it from good authority, that it is very probable that Mrs. Flagler will give the new county a beautiful county building, one that will not only be a credit to Flagler county, but to the state of Florida as well. This splendid build ing will be a present to the new county, which bears the name of her deceased husband. More than likely, as soon as matters can be arranged, the name of the town of Bunnell will also be changed, for a great many of our citizens are in favor of having its name changed to FLAGLER CITY. This, of course, would have to be put up to the Post Office offi cials and the postal department at Wash ington would have to give their consent to changing the name of the post-office from Bunnell to Flagler City, and all of this will naturally take several months to adjust. I, for one, would be glad to see this name changed, for I feel that our enterprising little city could not bear a better name, than to be called after a man who has done more for Florida in general, and the East Coast in particular, than any other one man, the great pio neer road builder of our state—Mr. Henry M. Flagler. It is planned to build about sixty or seventy miles of new hard roads within the county in the near future, for one of the great essentials in every farming community is GOOD ROADS. It is perhaps a little early to designate ex actly just where these roads will be built but very likely there will be a hard road running from Bunnell to St. Johns Park; from Bunnell via the Moody road, through the Volusia tract, passing through Codyville and going straight to Deland, the county seat of Volusia county; another road from Bunnell to DuPont; from Du Pont to Korona, from Korona to Favorita and Harwood, running parallel with the Florida East Coast railroad, and per haps several other roads, which we hope to mention in the HOME BUILDER at some later date. All of our readers undoubtedly know that the Florida East Coast Railroad (also known as the Flagler System) passes through our colony lands, and there are reports that this railroad will not charge the new county any freight on the material which will be used for the building of the hard roads in Flagler county. It is not only the aim of the officials of the Bunnell Development Co. and all the citizens of Flagler county to make this county one of the most up-to-date counties in Florida, but this high purpose meets the endorsement and approval of all of the officials of the Florida East Coast Railroad Co., or the Flagler System. I should like to talk longer about Flag ler county, but hope to tell the readers, later on, more complete details as to our plans in regard to this matter. It is but natural for me to feel happy and enthusiastic about our colony today, even more than I have ever felt be fore, for I have lived to see practically all of my ambitions in regard to our colony, realized. Never in my life have I seen such crops in the Bunnell colony as they have this year. They are “bump er” crops indeed, and it is unnecessary for me to tell you that our farmers are receiving big prices for everything they raise. Many of our readers, no doubt, are helping to pay some of these fancy prices. In regard to the crops, I wish to refer the reader especially to the photos you will find in this issue. They will tell the story of success more quickly and easily than I can do. While in the col ony, I traveled in the Company’s auto mobile, day after day, and I saw field after field of the very finest potatoes. Several of the farmers had begun dig ging their potatoes, although most of them were going to wait a week or ten days before beginning this work, as the season this year has been exceptionally late; it being from two to three weeks later this year than last year. The po tato story for this year in the colony in a nut-shell, would be, THE YIELD IS EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD, THE QUAL ITY EXCELLENT AND THE PRICES VERY HIGH. The farmers in Flagler county, including our colony, are doing their share towards helping our country out in the potato famine and are help ing to relieve the situation very mate rially. From the St. Johns county potato belt we ship as many as 150 carloads of po tatoes a day. While I was in the col ony they shipped, one day, 140 carloads of potatoes. If each one of these cars would bring on an average of $1,500.00, it would mean $210,000.00 worth of po tatoes which were shipped to the North Another busy scene, Digging Potatoes on Mr. Jordan’s Farm.

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65*0 BtJNHEEL HOME BUILDER sell his crop of potatoes this year for, approximately, $10,000.00. With all this evidence of prosperity before me, I could not help but think how well this man had done since he came to our colony. I re call so vividly the time when I personally took Mr. Mack to his farm in Bunnell for the first time, which will be six years next fall, and he told me he had, ap proximately, $500.00 with which to start farming in our colony. Today he has fifty acres of land all cleared and in A No. 1 shape. His land is fully paid for, and if this land is worth a cent, it is certainly worth $150.00 an acre. Furthermore, he has all kinds of farming implements, he has built himself a large shed and has two good teams. Mr. Mack was about fifty years of age when he came to our colony, and he had accumu lated less than $1,000.00 all his life, while during the last five and one-half years in Bunnell he has accumulated, approxi mately, from $15,000.00 to $20,000.00. He is now one of our greatest boosters and he took great delight in showing my self and the party with me over his farm. Among our party was a very conservative man, a banker from Chicago, and I lis tened with great interest while Mr. Mack told him that he would clear, at least, $200.00 to the acre, net, on his potato crop this year, and would then follow this crop with a crop of com, and if the corn crop was only an average one, he would harvest fifty bushels to the acre from this very same land which, at last year’s prices, he could sell for $1.00 a bushel; and he would then follow this crop up with a third crop of cow-pea hay, and if he could only raise 2% tons to the acre, it would mean another $50.00 an acre. After giving these careful figures to the banker, Mr. Mack continued, “Now Mr. Prebis, can you tell me of another country where a man can raise three crops a year and make $310.00 net to the acre on general farming?” (Such a question is enough to set any man thinking). While I was in Bunnell, the price paid for No. 1 potatoes was $8.50 a barrel; No. 2’s, $7.00 a barrel; No. 3’s, $5.00 a barrel, and $4.50 a barrel for the culls. I could not help but marvel at these exorbitant prices, for I well remem bered that in previous years the farmers had difficulty in even selling their No. 3’s, and no one would buy their culls, and often the farmers left the culls in the fields. Not so today. Every one of these culls is picked up very carefully and shipped to the North. I recalled that a couple of years ago our farmers in Bunnell received only $4.00 a barrel for their No. l’s, and they were making good Mr. Mack's 40 Acre Potato Field. Mr. Mack's 35 horse power Truck, hauling potatoes from his farm to the depot at Dupont—Two loads at one time. on a single day. That would mean that within five days the farmers would have sold more than a million dollars’ worth of spuds to the northern markets. The yield throughout the Bunnell col ony is far in excess of the anticipation of the farmers. Some of our farmers are digging as many as 100 barrels to the acre while others are digging as few as thirty barrels to the acre. While I was in the colony I saw one man who originally came from the state of Oregon who had only two acres planted to po tatoes. His crop was not up to the average, but he sold about $650.00 worth of potatoes from his two acres of land, and he told me he had made a net profit on his two acres, above all expenses, of $400.00, or $200.00 an acre, and this man still has two more crops to raise this year on the same land. One man, living a little west of Bunnell, had about thirty-five acres planted to potatoes this year. It took about four acres to fill his first car, for which he received f. o. b. Bunnell, $1,650.00. All of his expenses, including fertilizer, seed potatoes, barrels, etc., were paid out of his four acres, and he still had thirty-one acres to dig. If these thirty-one acres should yield as the first four did, this man will net on his thirtyfive acres of land, approximately, $12,000 00 money then, so one may form some idea of what our farmers are making this year if he will just stop to consider the present prices. Mr. W. A. Mack shipped his first car of potatoes on April 24th. This was only a small car and contained but 163 barrels for which he received $1,225.00. The commission men charged him $38.00, leaving $1,187.00 paid to Mr. Mack. Mr. Mack has a very good crop this year and has purchased an International 35-horse power truck. This truck cost him $1,450.00, and it was a pleasure for me to watch him hauling his potatoes from his farm to the railroad station in this truck. Usually he had a wagon hooked onto the truck and in that way he took two loads at one time. Mr. Mack will When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the High Cost of Living

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Ufa BUNMELL HOME BUILDER Game is very plentiful in the colony this year. Quail were in evidence every where. Of course, this is not the hunt ing season and, therefore, the birds are very tame, but I scarcely visited any of the farms that I did not run across some of these fine birds. While I was in the colony one man caught about 275 mullets at Ocean City, which weighed around 300 pounds, besides several sea bass. Two of these sea bass weighed 30 pounds, an average of 15 pounds each. I took a picture of two of these bass. I am sure there are many of our buyers with good red blood in their veins, who will find this the sportsman’s paradise when they come to settle on their farms. The last evening I was in the colony I spent at Ocean City. Quite a number of people in automobiles had left Bun nell earlier in the day, going over to the closing exercises of the school at beauti ful Ocean City. We have at the present time about seventeen pupils enrolled in that school. I very much enjoyed the splendid entertainment given in the Ocean City casino, by Miss Shepard and her pupils. It seemed to me that this last evening was, after all, the most pleasant one I had spent while in the colony. I found keen pleasure in stand ing by the mighty ocean, listening to the roar of the waves and watching the crowd of people who had come to attend the closing exercises. I saw very plainly that, although our people in the colony are very much in earnest in their desire to develop this part of the country, and are very much interested in their big crops and in making money, still they have proven that they have a keener in terest in the most important work of all —the proper raising of our boys and girls. After the evening’s entertainment was over, a fish fry was given, and we returned to Bunnell with many pleasant memories. I took the train the next morning to return, via Jacksonville, to my home here in Chicago. As I came farther north, through Indiana and Illi nois, I could not help but compare the vast difference between the southern farmer and the farmers here in the Mid dle West. I saw many fields in these two states which had not even been touched by the plow for the first and only crop, while behind me in Bunnell, some of the farmers I had left had already harvested and marketed their first crop, and others would soon do so, and in a great number of fields corn had been planted between the rows of potatoes and this com was from one-half to one foot high. Cora is the second crop which our farmers raise in our colony. And this, readers of the HOME BUILDER, is my report to you of my last visit to the colony, or as much of it as space will permit me to have. Isn’t it thrilling, after all ? And don’t you loner to be down in that LAND OF SUN SHINE, to roll up your sleeves and go to work? For I say to you, as I have said many times before, that for the man with some money and who can and will work, there is an abundant harvest in the great Bunnell colony, and there you may find contentment and happiness and live out your life in God’s great Out-of-doors. Mr. Prebis, Chicago Banker, ‘visiting the Corona colony. This picture vitas taken in Air. Alazureojcicz's Potato Field. While we are having a bumper crop of potatoes this year, we are short on barrels. It is safe to say that we have at least a 30 per cent shortage of barrels. The barrel factory in Bunnell is entirely out of barrel material and it is very hard for the farmers to get any more barrels. The commission men from the northern markets prefer to have our potatoes ship ped in barrels, and barrels last year sold for 35c each. At the beginning of this season, the price of these barrels went up to 37c each, and on account of the short age they were sold at Hastings for 50c apiece, and I was told that one man offered to pay $1.00 a barrel for every barrel he needed. Mr. Moody has as sured us that this shortage will not oc cur again, but that he will provide for the coming year. Some of our farmers were obliged to ship their potatoes this year in hampers, and the day I left Jacksonville, Mr. Mazurewicz, one of our farmers in Korona, bought a carload of hampers to be shipped to the Korona farmers. I should like to tell you at length about the various crops I saw growing on the farms of Mr. Mosby, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Kilpers, Mr. Lambert, Mr. Gray, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Councill, Mr. Jones, Mr. Parker, Mr. Mazurewicz, and a great many others, but I should be repeating practically the same story of big crops, and space and time prevents my doing this. get a start, need not fear to settle there. Mr. Prebis has several warm friends in Korona, some of whom he knew several years ago, and they would be very pleased to see him settle on his farm and help in the development of the Korona colony. I had the pleasure of spending two days in Korona in company with Mr. Prebis, who is connected with the largest Polish bank in Chicago. Mr. Prebis and his son are both owners of small farms in the Korona colony, and he was not only very much pleased with the farms we had selected for himself and son, but he has become very enthusiastic about our Korona colony. Mr. Prebis looked over several farms in the Korona section and told me he was convinced that any man who was willing to work in an intelligent manner in the Korona colony for a few years, and who had sufficient money to Bob, The Fisherman. Tnxo sea bass caught at Ocean City, weighing 30 pounds. When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the “High Cost of Living’’

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Sftg 1UMMELL HOME BUILDER. Church News From The Bunnell Colony. Stopping for a chat after the morning services at the Catholic Church in Korona. Scoutmaster of the Boy Scouts in Bunnell. Rev. Ramsey of the M. E. Church. resident priest, and under his wise and good leadership, this church is growing and new members are being received. Mass at this church is at 10 a. m. every Sunday morning, and there is usually a very good attendance. We are pleased to reproduce herewith a picture that was taken in front of this church, on April 22nd, after the Sunday morning services. IMPORTANT NOTICE — FREE LOTS IN DUPONT The Bunnell Development Company has been giving a free lot in Dupont to each purchaser of a ten acre farm in our col ony. As most of these lots have been disposed of, we shall be obliged to dis continue the giving away of any more free lots to purchasers of land. Therefore, after June 10, 1917, no more lots will be given away in Dupont. I. I. MOODY, President, Bunnell Development Company. The members of this denomination may be justly proud of their new church edi fice, which is not only a credit to them and Bunnell, but we doubt if there is a neater little church in all Flagler county today. We believe this church with its loyal membership has a great future. The new church building was dedicated a few days ago, the dedicatory sermon being preached by Elder W. H. Smith, of At lanta, Georgia. The officers elected were, Mr. W. A. Mack, Elder; Mr. O. C. Mosby, Deacon; Mr. L. C. Johnson, Clerk. In the southern part of our colony, at Korona, we have a very attractive little Catholic church. Rev. A. Baczyk is the Church at Bunnell. This is the prettiest in Flagler county. School with an enrollment of from 120 to 130 pupils. Mr. Byrd is their very capable Superintendent. The Christian church has the smallest congregation at the present time, and they have not as yet erected a house of worship, although they have a very fine lot in Bunnell for that purpose, which was given to them by the Bunnell De velopment Company. They have no reg ular pastor in Bunnell as yet. Mr. and Mrs. Hagadom are very faithful and active members of this church. No doubt when other members of this de nomination have settled on their farms in the colony, they will also have their own church building and resident pastor. We take great pleasure in reproduc ing herewith a picture of the interior of the new Seventh Day Adventist church in Bunnell. This church is located near the Dixie Highway, a few blocks east of the central part of our busy town. Interior of the nevu Seventh Day and neatest Four denominations are represented at the present time in our colony—the Me thodist Episcopal South, the Christian church, the Seventh Day Adventist and the Catholic church. The Methodists in Bunnell have a very neat little church, which has just re cently been repaired, and has a seating capacity of about two hundred. The pastor, the Rev. Ramsey, preaches at 11 a. m. and 7 p. m. each Sunday and every other Sunday afternoon at Ocean City in the casino. He is a very active young man, and surely is the right man for the right place, as he is doing a great work in Bunnell. Mr. Ramsey has been the means of building up his church and in creasing the membership very materially. He is much loved by the people of the community, and those who have read Ralph Connor’s “Sky Pilot” will see where this title very aptly applies to him. This church has a good Sunday When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the “High Cost of Living”

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J5hm BUMNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell On account of the yields being far in excess of what was expected the barrel manufacturers are unable to furnish enough barrels to handle the crop and numbers of farmers are shipping in hampers and sacks. The buyers are so anxious to get the spuds that they don’t seem to object to what they are packed in; all they want is the potatoes. The Keystone Farms Co., with eighty acres of fine spuds have just started to dig. Mr. Poff, the manager, expects a good yield. Mr. Warben Booe has begun digging and indications are that his yield will be large. The Dupont Land Co. dug their fifty acres last week which sold f. o. b. the cars for $11,325.75. Mr. R. W. Cody, who has forty acres of fine spuds, is digging this week and his yield is around fifty barrels. He sold his first car which contained one hundred and seventy-one barrels, for $1,358.60. This car was dug from four acres which is a net of $339.65 per acre. Burrell Bros, are digging an exception ally good crop the yield running as high as seventy-five barrels to the acre. Their first selling for $8.60. The Haw Creek Farms Co., who are the largest potato growers in Flagler County, they having one hundred and thirty-one acres, are digging this week and are getting a good yield and are disposing of them at fancy prices as Mr. Booe, the manager, has the reputation of putting up as fine a pack as there is put up in the entire potato belt. Mr. M. H. Milliken has had his farm, Seminole Trace, near Gore Lake, cleared and fenced and expects to build there this fall. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken left for Chicago, Monday, where they will spend the summer. Mr. George Moody has purchased from Mr. C. A. Smith his seventy-two town lots on Moody boulevard. The creation of the new county makes the boys re alize the value of Bunnell property. Mr. A. C. Marshall, potato broker, is making his headquarters at Bunnell dur ing the potato season. He is shipping several cars of spuds daily. Mr. A. V. Folson, of Bartow, Fla., arrived in Bunnell, Tuesday, and will re main and clear his land in the Bunnell colony. Mr. 0. C. Mosby is beginning to dig his crop. Others digging around Bun nell are: Messrs. C. B. Miller, C. C. Jordon, John McCormick, George Bumsid, W. H. Cochran, A. Lambert. A black bass weighing eight pounds was caught by Jim Davis in Black Branch last week. The DuPont Central Railway had a siding built at Codyville, which was a much needed improvement. A very interesting event at Codyville was the closing of the school with ap propriate exercises by the children. There were three graduates from the eighth grade. Mr. J. E. Ingraham, vice-president of the Florida East Coast Railroad Company, and Mr. W. H. Kennen, Executor of the Flagler estate, rode with Mr. Moody and Mr. Lambert over the colony and inspect ed the potato fields. They were very much pleased with the bright prospects of the farmers. CONCERNING TOWN LOTS IN BUNNELL AND OCEAN CITY On account of the rapid growth of Bunnell and owing to the fact that it will soon be the county seat of our new Flag ler County, we wish to announce that there are no more lots for sale in Bunnell at $50.00 apiece; the cheapest lots now being $75.00 each. We have several fine lots still for sale in Ocean City, the prices of same ranging from $150.00 to $250.00 apiece. Lots in both Bunnell and Ocean City may be purchased on the monthly pay ment plan of $5.00 each per month. For further particulars, write to THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois. Bunnell merchants report that the farmers are not only supplying the town trade with all the eggs they need, but they are bringing in enough so that quite a large amount are being shipped out. Messrs. Jordan and Lambert have sup plied Bunnell the past season with lus cious strawberries. The strawberry sea son is about over in Bunnell. Mrs. J. L. Jones has one of the finest fields of onions on her farm in the Vo lusia tract. The onions will soon be ready to ship and will command a fancy price. Mr. Speer has been shipping from his large celery field, West of Haw Creek. He has been getting at the rate of 500 crates to the acre, and he expects that this celery will net him $3.00 per crate, f. o. b. the depot. Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hill, who have spent the winter months in Bunnell, left for their home in Massachusetts. We hope that these good folks will return again next fall and make their permanent home with us. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are the own ers of several beautiful lots in the town of Bunnell. The school at Ocean City, has been closed. Miss Corene Shepard left for Jacksonville, Tallahassee, and other points before going to her home near Quincy. The Robert White Cemetery is com plete, has a good wooden fence around it and a good road leading to it. While this is a beautiful place and there is plenty of room to be had there, still we hope there will be no great rush for permanent occupancy thereof. Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Bunnell, who have a farm in the Volusia tract and have spent the winter in our city, have return ed to their home in Mitchellville, Iowa. All the people in Bunnell hope to see them return again next fall. Worshipful Master W. C. Heath, of Bunnell, Lodge No. 200 F. & A. M., has had the furniture of the lodge remodeled which has materially improved the ap pearance of the interior of the lodge room. In the presence of Mr. Moody, the Governor of the state of Florida, signed with a solid gold pen, the bill authorizing the creation of Flagler county. After signing the bill, the Governor presented the pen to Mr. Moody. The Commencement Exercises of the Bunnell High School were held on Sat urday evening, May 12th. On the Sun day evening, following the Baccalaureate Sermon was preached by Rev. Ramsey, at the M. E. church. A straw ballot will be taken in the very near future for the officers of the new county. The following offices are to be filled: Sheriff, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Tax Assessor, Tax Collector, Superintend ent of Public Instruction, Supervisor of Registration, five County Commissioners, three Members of the School Board, and County Judge, making a total of fifteen. Several good candidates have entered the race. The Standard Oil Company has made application for a permit to erect two tanks and a trucking shed on the lots adjoining the Bunnell Ice, Light and Water Company. Throughout the past week, the potato movement has been very heavy. A total of 1805 solid carloads have been shipped out of the potato belt since April 1st. The price for the last week, f. o.b. the shipping point, has ranged from $6.50 to $8.00 a barrel for No. l’s, $6.25 to $6.50 a barrel for No. 2’s and $3.50 to $5.00 for No. 3’s. The weather conditions throughout the week have been favor able, and practically all of the farmers in the entire potato belt are busy digging. The yields continue good, the average yield being above fifty barrels to the acre. It will no doubt, be of interest to know where all of these potatoes are shipped. The principal markets are New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Kansas City, Detroit and Denver. When you have your Bunnell farm under cultivation, you need not fear the ‘‘High Cost of Living”

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SJ*a BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, “Patriots All” A remarkable cartoon appeared on the front page of one of our great Chicago dailies recently entitled “Patriots All.” There was not another word about the picture, for not another word was needed. In the foreground was the FARMER, his hands to the plow, directing the course of his faithful horse with the lines fas tened beneath his arms. Just beyond the fence marking the boundary line of the field were long lines of soldiers, following in the wake of the American flag, as it floated out in the breeze. “Patriots All”—the men who march to battle and into the thick of the fight, and the men at the plow and the men with the hoes! What a beautiful thought it is to everyone who longs to serve his country, that he may be as loyal and patriotic in tilling the soil as in fighting in the trenches. President Wilson has emphasized this thought in his memorable message to the farmers of America, in which he said, “I CALL UPON YOUNG MEN AND OLD ALIKE AND UPON THE ABLEBODIED BOYS OF THE LAND TO AC CEPT AND ACT UPON THIS DUTY— TO TURN IN HOSTS TO THE FARMS AND MAKE CERTAIN THAT NO PAINS AND NO LABOR IS LACKING IN THIS GREAT MATTER.” Never before in the history of the world was the position of the farmer so important, for as President Wlison further says: “UPON THE FARMERS OF THIS COUNTRY, THEREFORE, IN LARGE MEASURE, RESTS THE FATE OF THE WAR AND THE FATE OF THE NATIONS.” It is a wonderful thing then to be the owner of a portion of this great OUTOF-DOORS, and to be able to plant the seeds, till the soil and produce some of the food stuffs that go to feed the nations of the world. Just here I want to urge every one who has his Bunnell farm fully paid for to go to the colony, if possible, and begin clearing and plant ing his land. That bit of soil may mean so much to you, and it is too bad to have it lay idle if you are in a position to cultivate it. No doubt many who read these words have begun to make payments on a little Bunnell farm, but you have not com pleted same. Can you not see that this step in your life is one of vital import ance, and that you should by all means continue the payments on your farms as rapidly as possible, and thus provide for yourselves and families a haven against the adversities of life? Much is already being said in regard to the scarcity of food, and I fear much more will be said and felt along this line within the next few years. The cost of living is continually on the upgrade, and men and women are seriously asking the question, “How can we cope with the present situation?” Were I called upon to answer this question, out of the fullness of my heart I should say, the best solution of the problem is to buy a piece of land, pay for it, then put that land under culti vation and it will provide the necessities of life for you and help you contribute toward the markets of the world. There is just another class of individ uals who, I trust, will lend me a listen ing ear—the men and women who have long been “halting between two opin ions” and trying to decide whether it would be wise to invest in a little farm in the Bunnell colony or not. Can’t you see what a mistake you have made by delaying this long? If you were among the happy farmers at Bunnell, who are harvesting their bountiful crop of po tatoes this spring, don’t you think you would feel you had made a safe invest ment ? If you realize the mistake you have made by not securing a farm-home ’ere this, won’t you decide now to rectify that mistake, and secure your farm without further delay? Some will go to the battle front and return again, as heroes; other brave souls will lay down their lives for their country, but the call today is just as imperative for the men on the farms and in the fields to grow the food to feed the nations. Whether we shall be here or there, let us ever keep in mind our service to our country, and that we may be “PATRIOTS ALL.” A Bonus Potato Grader at Work The above picture of the Boggs potato grader will be of great interest to all those who contemplate growing potatoes on their Bunnell colony farms. You will note that the potatoes can be accurately graded into No. Ones, Twos, Threes and the Culls, and means the saving of a great deal of time when the potatoes have to be sorted. Such a machine will soon pay for itself, as one can readily see. Northern buyers will much more readily purchase potatoes that have gone through this grader, for they can be cer tain that every barrel will be uniform from top to bottom. Mrs. Jones' Splendid Bermuda Onion Field in the Volusia Tract LET ME TALK THIS OVER WITH YOU, WHO OUGHT TO BUY A FARM IN THE BUNNELL COLONY Billy Sunday said recently in New York, where he is conducting a meeting at the present time: “You can’t win without hard work; you can’t grow crops lying in the field under the shade of a tree, sipping lemonade through a straw.” The evangelist was right, we must all admit. But, if you are willing to work; if you have a few hundred dollars with which to get a start, you can make a mighty good living in the Bunnell colony on a ten or twenty acre farm. For the right man success is easier than failure. You have been receiving the HOME BUILDER for several months. Have you not been impressed with the sincerity and truth of the statements made therein? It seems to us that this issue is really better than any that have preceded it. It is brimful of facts concerning the wonder ful developments taking place in the col ony, and the pictures it contains are so interesting and convincing. Won’t you read this issue thoughtfully and carefully, and then send us your order for a Bunnell farm without further delay? Send it today. You are the loser by post poning your decision, for every day, week or month you delay means that just so many more of the choicest farms and lo cations are being taken by someone else. If you send us your order today we shall be able to locate you nearer to a town and closer to a good road than if you wait for some future time. I CONFIDENTLY BELIEVE THAT SOME DAY WE SHALL SEE THIS LAND SELLING FOR AS HIGH AS $350.00 AN ACRE, and that is just the amount now which you will have to pay for TEN ACRES in our Volusia tract. We are anxious to sell you one of these farms for only $35.00 an acre, on the monthly in stallment plan. IF YOU SEND IN YOUR ORDER BE FORE JUNE 10, 1917, YOU WILL BE GIVEN A FREE LOT IN DUPONT WITH EACH TEN ACRES YOU BUY. There are but a very few of these free lots left to be given away in Dupont, and as per the notice in this issue, sent out by Pres ident I. I. Moody, there will be positively no more lots in Dupont given away after June 10,1917. Our motto has ever been: “FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED.” It is our aim to please each and every buyer, and to treat everyone fair and square. We have sold farms to thousands of people who are pleased and satisfied with their holdings, and we are confident that we can satisfy YOU. GET AWAY FROM THE HIGH COST OF LIVING. Grow your own food, your potatoes and other vegetables. Have your own cow, your eggs and chickens. Make a home for yourself and family in the Bunnell colony, where you may enjoy a mild, healthy climate, and where LIFE IS WORTH LIVING. IF YOU CAN SAVE 17 CENTS A DAY I CAN SELL YOU A TEN ACRE FARM IN THE BUNNELL COLONY. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois.