Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
APRIL THE POTATO ISSUE 1917
How Would Mr. Jones Feel if He Owned
Ten Acres of Potatoes in Bunnell?
Mrs. Jones would say that it was "Perfectly Lovely"
er he field r or I p Seao ng.
the tainiig the deposIts o J-bussian ima. "Take em all." he said The more districts of the city where diet have "Every day during all this time bas ad
hePTT T% H
. to JONES FINDS A POTATO IN THE BASEMENT.
lets te
the pMy~d'uy 1,V
the knV c e tk h leo
with o L
that
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ve; PA
_y w
teld G
the a ihe
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he
at
is C
re he
cu- of t
Bcaus we a l t to S
lie admi
e e- t he
o et
DI _____The
IC -afre, 11i grant. bar brought Kt. rtofkulne to Mui- the merrier. Wenl* 4ive tried potatoes been reduced to A kaystem Is. "We can't been for the BrItors a campaign on the tial te, Amae irect transfer to-night. dada l fsrih aff B ea. Now any soldier of experiencewl ciar p8 Cfll tot~hetheptae rto I In
The above interesting cartoon is here reproduced by courtesy of the
Chicago Daily News, it having appeared on the front page of that paper a few weeks ago. This drawing was made by Cartoonist Brown, who is one of the most popular cartoonists connected with any of the great Chicago papers today. Because we are all interested in Bunnell, and because Bunnell is so vitally interested today in potatoes, it affords us great pleasure to reproduce this cartoon on the front page of this, our Potato Issue, of the Bunnell Home Builder.




UaBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
An Invitation to the Readers of The Home Builder to Accompany Mr. Verdenius on His
Trip to Bunnell, Florida, April 17th, 1917.
have not become fully convinced of the where over seventeen thousand Federal merits of our colony or you would have soldiers were laid to rest. In the center purchased a farm ere this. of a beautiful section, built within a cirRealizing that "seeing is believing," I cle of hills, lies Nashville, the state capurge you who are interested in our col- ital. ony, but who have not yet purchased Wednesday afternoon, Murfreesboro,
land, to join me on this trip to Bunnell; former capital of Tennessee, is reached, see for yourself what our land will pro- in the vicinity of which is another faduce, and hear with your own ears the mous national cemetery. The "Dixie stories of success from the lips of our Flyer" then winds its way through the farmers. The opinion given by the great picturesque Tennessee Mountains. Soon majority of those'who have visited the Lookout Mountain comes into view, with Bunnell colony is that conditions there the Tennessee River on the left, and far exceed their fondest expectations, about 4:00 o'clock p. m. Chattanooga is and practically all who felt able to do so, reached. In the vicinity of Chattanooga purchased more land after their visit, are many points of interest. From ChatI feel confident that those who accom- tanooga to Atlanta the train passes pany me on this trip will feel amply re- through battlefields almost the entire dispaid for the time and cost of making the tance. trip. I am- planning that this shall not Passing through Atlanta, the capital only be a business trip, but that it shall of Georgia, we will reach Jacksonville, be a pleasure one as well. If any of you the "Gateway to Florida," Thursday who are making arrangements to visit morning at 7:50 o'clock. We plan to Bunnell at this time would like to have spend a day in Jacksonville, which you
_______________________ your wives accompany you, I want to say will find to be a most beautiful and that we shall be very glad indeed to have charming city, and the fastest-growing Mr. T. A. Verdenius them, and will do our best to make the one in the South. Jacksonville has grown
The Pioneer Small F~arm man of Florida. trip a pleasant one for them. I am al- in the last twelve years from a little city
"6COM E AND SEE"9 ways anxious for the wives and the of 10,000 inhabitants to a city with a
daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so population of almost 100,000 people. Florida for many years has been far- that they will understand something of While in Jacksonville we shall pay a famed for her delightful winter climate, the pleasant surroundings and social life visit to its famous "Ostrich Farm," overand the tourists particularly have flocked to be found there, and I have usually looking the mighty St. Johns river, and to that "Land of Flowers" when the cold found that if the wife is satisfied, the here one could spend an entire day in a winds were raging over the northern husband is sure to be. pleasant and profitable manner. But we
states. It will ever be a delight to spend Let me tell you briefly of this trip, as plan to see some of Jacksonville's parks, the mid-winter days out of doors, under we have mapped it out so far. We shall her beautiful buildings, etc. The followazure skies, reveling in the bright sun- take the "Dixie Flyer," which leaves the ig morning, which will be Friday, April shine and listening to the voice of the Dearborn Street Station, Chicago, April 20th, we shall leave for St. Augustine, mocking-bird as he calls to his mate, and 17th, at 10:25 p. mn. The road over which the county seat of our county, St. Johns, in Florida at this season of the year the the "Dixie Flyer" passes traverses east- and the oldest city in the United States. trees are laden with their wealth Of ern Illinois and western Indiana, crossing Just the visit to St. Augustine alone oranges, grapefruit and other citrus the broad Ohio river at Evansville, and would pay you for your trip to Florida, fruits. entering Kentucky. After sweeping for this quaint old city possesses a charm
However, the idea that Florida is only through the rugged Kentucky foothills for every one, and one never tires of visdesirable as a winter resort is a great for a hundred miles, this famous train iting its points of interest. We plan to fallacy. To realize the real worth of leaves the "Blue Grass" state and enters visit the ocean beach, old Fort Marion, Florida as a home state, and as a place Tennessee. Six miles north of Nashville the far-famed hotels that are located where one may make a good livelihood, the great National Cemetery is passed, there, and many other interesting places. you must see it when the crops are being harvested and when the farmers are
receiving the returns from the combination of soil and marvelous climate. This
feature of Florida, I realize, is of primary interest to those who have bought land in the Bunnell colony, or who contemplate purchasing farms there. I
want you to visit Bunnell in the midst
of her busy season, and therefore I invite you and urge you to join me in a
trip to Bunnell, taking advantage of the
homeseekers' excursion which leaves
Chicago on Tuesday night, April 17th.
Many of our land owners have already
visited the colony, but if you have never
been there at the time of the potato harvest, it will be well worth your while to
take this trip. Those who own land at
Bunnell but who have never visited the
colony, should, if possible, plan to go at
this time, because you cannot form a
clecixrer conception of the possibilities of
your own farm than by making a trip of
inspection at the time of the potato harvest.
My invitation is particularly to all
those who have so far been "halting between two opinions." I assume that you Party of buyers in the Bunnell Colony on their way to Ormond and Daytona (Dixie Hiohway.)
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17TH.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
"'COME AND SEE." Notice to our Bunnell Settlers You say you are dissatisfied with y our
present surroundings, that the climate is
The Bunnell Development Company Mr. Verdenius will be in the Bunnell disagreeable, that business is uncertain,
automobiles will meet us in St. Au- colony for several days, and will be very and that some day you are going to remgustine, and'we shall leave that evening pleased to see all the settlers while there. edy these conditions; but, why do you via the Dixie Highway for Bunnell, Those who have any matters to talk over put off for next week, next month or
passing through Hastings. The next with him, may find him in the office Of next year what you could and should do
day, which will be Saturday, we shall the Bunnell Development Company, in today ?
spend in and around Bunnell, visit and Bunnell, all day Thursday, April 26th.Iamrineagnoftesryf interview the farmers busy with their the_ Ikarnded tagra mia ofe th too
Irish potato crop, see the work of devel- mth Arkansa hs traveler failiauonet
opment going on in the colony, go over most of WeCl h e rc nahayou histravele socughtshle
to Ocean City and the ocean beach, visit WyD eCl h e rc nahayrisomadsuh hle
the 106-acre orange grove nearby, and the Volusia Tract? in a nearby cabin. The owner of this
give you an opportunity to see what the Wehv eevdqieanme f abode was tilted back in a rickety chair,
Bunnell colony is like, what our people lett e r buersind propectivumer cus busily engaged in whittling a stick, while have accomplished, and what wonderful letr rmbyr n rsetv u-the rain came through the roof in a score
thee ae fr tosewho tomers, asking us about the Volusia, tract, of places. The traveler could scarcely opportunities teeaefrhoewo We wish to say that the Volusia tract find a spot in the room where the rain
locate there in the near future. On Sun- and the new tract are one and the same, did not fall upon him, and finally he said day we may possibly take a trip to Day- The Volusia tract is just South of our to his contented host. "Why don't you tona. original tract of land, and is located in mend your roof?" The astonishing reIf you live in the East and would not Volusia county; hence, we speak of it as ply was, "Well, when it's raining I can't go to Florida via Chicago, I want you the Volusia tract. Of course, all of this patch it, and when it's not raining it then to meet me in Jacksonville Thurs- territory will be a part of Flagler county, don't need patching." day morning, and join our party there, if this new county is created, which we May it not be the case with some of and then see Jacksonville, St. Augustine believe will be done.-ouwohvtusriensW n
and other places with us, as I have out- Land in our Volusia tract, or new yuwohv hswitnu? We
lined above. If you will write me at tract, is selling for $35.00 an acre, while times are good, and you are making good once, I will give you the name of the in the old tract the cheapest land which wages you are quite content, and do not hotel at which you can meet us. we have is $40.00 an acre. ithn itecsayoprvd frte
The Homeseekers' Excursions to Flor- "rainy day?" But occasional hard times
ida leave northern cities the 1st and 3rd are inevitable, and the man who is workTuesdays of each month. On these days The April issue of the HOME BUILD- ing for wages is the first one to feel
the rates to Florida are considerably re- ER goes to press a little early this month their sting. duced, and the tickets are good for to give our readers a chance to join Mr. You may not have enough money to
twenty-one days. Verdenius on his special excursion trip, move to Florida tomorrow, and begin
For more complete particulars, I would Hewl ev hcaoo pi 7h improvements on a little farm, but you
suggest that you inquire of your local The next issue wilg be A l latbe can at least buy that farm today and ticket agent. inghel xiup tawit Mr. Vitedes be- begin making your small monthly payIF YOU WANT TO GO TO A tailed report of conditions in the colony. ments thereon. Every payment you make
WARMER, HEALTHIER, MORE you are that much nearer your goal.
IDEAL CLIMATE-TO A COUNTRY A good many people admit that they
WHERE YOU CAN RAISE THREE TeAknaTrvlrare never able to save anything unless
CROPS A YEAR ON THE SAME LAND TeAknaTrvlrAgain, they go in debt, or assume some obliga-COM WIH M, APIL 7TH Dayaftr dy werecivelettrs hat tion, and know that they must meet it
-COM WIH M, APIL 7TH Dayaftr dy werecivelettrs hat regularly. To such people the Bunnell
NEXT, TO OUR BUNNELL COLONY. read about as follows: "I am very much Develop~ment Company offers great opIT WILL BE THE "TRIP OF YOUR interested in the Bunnell colony; I believe portunities, and the sooner you are able
LIFE." WITH ALL MY HEART I it is a great country, and when times get to realize this, the better off you will URGE YOU TO COME AND SEE. better, I am going to buy a farm." Such be.
letters are encouraging; they are always "IisnvrTOL EtobgnaTake care of a little farm in our Bun- gladly received, but we keep wondering it isey nr TOO LATEY to t begi esay
nell colony and the little farm will take what is the use of waiting for better ingmy no r TOOe EARY.Bu there care of you. times?isntielkthPRSN.
When Dreams Come True.
There is all the difference in the
world between a DREAM and a
PLAN. Don't read this magazine
from month to month and dream
about owning a little home of your
own in Florida-some day.
But begin to SAVE and PLAN
for that home right now. Invest
,, $5.00 or more in it, while it may
- L be purchased at a reasonable price.
You can do it. Once you begin
to save for your HOME, a dozen
plans will suggest themselves to
you for saving additional dimes,
quarters and dollars, every week or
every pay-day.
It is all right to have your Day
~< Dreams, but make definite plans to
' I YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE.
(GhIrnpse of our Beautiful Gore Lake. Just East of Bunnell.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A Report on Bunnell's "Banner" Potato Crop.
As given by Mr. 1. 1. Moody, after a trip of Inspection over the Colony.
Being a newcomer, he did not know Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, Washington,
what could or could not be grown in our Cincinnati, etc., send their representacountry, and so said to his wife one day, tives down into St. Johns county each as planting time drew near, "I wonder if year, and never before has the demand a person could grow Irish potatoes in for spuds been as great as it i s now. St. Johns county." "Well, there's noth- The reports of the United States Deing like trying," she replied, and so the partment of Agriculture show a great
remainder of the potatoes were planted. shortage of potatoes this year. There His first crop amounted to sixteen bar- are fewer old potatoes on the market receiving $9.00 a barrel for same. crop than in any previous year, and if
Little at that time did Mr. Brown we add to this the fact that there will
realize that this was the beginning of a be no potatoes imported from other counwonderful industry in St. Johns county, tries, we may understand why our farmwhich was destined to make it famous. ers are warranted in expecting such Hssuccess led others to follow his ex- large returns from their crop. ample, and that spring a couple of my It would not surprise me in the least
friends meeting one another, one of them if some of our farmers should receive remarked, "Do you know, I am going to from $8.00 to $9.00 a barrel for their grow Irish potatoes next year. That potatoes this year, and perhaps even d-d Yankee made more money on his higher prices. I do know, however, that
crop of potatoes than I made all the if our farmers have but an average yield year." any year, and can sell their spring crop
Year after year more land has been from $3.50 to $4.00 a barrel, they will 'IIplanted to Irish potatoes until today it be making good money.
I is one of the largest industries in our Our barrel factory in Bunnell is workState. It is not easy to say, with posi- ing overtime these days, and is turning Mr. 1. I. Moody, Pres. of the Bunnell tive accuracy, just how many acres have out more barrels than in any previous
State Bank. been planted to potatoes in our part of year, and before long now BUNNELL
the county this year, but it is reasonable SPUDS, IN BUNNELL BARRELS, will The potato industry in the southern to assume that it will largely exceed any- be distributed throughout the United portion of St. Johns County is our big thing ever before known in the history of States. money crop, and this is one of the main potato growing in St. Johns county. The Practically all of our farmers have reasons why we are growing so rapidly acreage for the county will be fully 40 some acreage planted to potatoes, some from year to year. Notwithstanding the per cent better than any previous high perhaps have but five acres or less, while splendid results that have already been record mark. The acreage planted to others have as high as fifty acres; for attained by our farmers, I would say potatoes in the Bunnell colony is approx- some of our farmers make this their that this industry is still in its infancy, imately 100 per cent better than last principal crop, while others grow Irish and I predict that the time will come year. There was considerable new land potatoes just as a side line. Our potato when our farmers in the Bunnell colony cleared during the past year. crop this season will be from three to
will ship as many potatoes from Bunnell Potatoes are a staple crop, and each four weeks later than usual. as the farmers in the whole of St. Johns year there is a good demand for our Potatoes are an expensive crop to grow
County are shipping now. This state- crop. Commission men from the large here. It costs from $50.00 to $55.00 an
ment may seem rather extravagant, but cifies, such as New York, Philadelphia, acre to see a crop through from beginI believe that I can prove that this is
not only possible, but that it will be done
in the not-far-distant future.
When I came to this part of the country from Georgia, about sixteen years
ago, I worked for Senator Deen in a turpentine still some twelve miles west of
where Bunnell is now located. I was
what is known as a "wood-rider." The
duties of the "wood-rider," as you may
perhaps know, are to travel on horseback throughout the camp all day long
watching the men who are getting the
turpentine or spirits, or who are scraping the trees. Many a long day have
I ridden from thirty to forty miles in
this manner over St. Johns county, and never in those days did I see an Irish
potato growing in this section of the
country.
The first man, to my knowlege, who
ever tried to grow Irish potatoes in this
county for commercial purposes, was a
Mr. Brown, one of the old settlers at
Hastings. He came here from Ohio, I
believe, a couple of years after I settled
in this county. Mr. Brown, while living
in the North, had been advised by his
physician to seek a milder climate, and
so came to Hastings with a carload of
furniture. Among other things he
brought down with him were about six
bushels of potatoes, and before planting
time arrived he had eaten at least onethir of hem.Loading Irilh Potatoes at Hastings, about Twelve Miles North of Bunnell.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Mrs. 0. C. Dinkins Proves Successful Potato Grower.
OVER AND ABOVE ALL EXPENSES, PLUCKY WOMAN CLEARED OVER $8,000.00 ON 1916 CROP.
This story of Mrs. Din kins' 1916 potato crop not only demonstrates what our lands will produce, but also what a woman may do in Florida. Mrs. D~inkins' farmn is but a few miles north of Bunnell, and we have thousands of acres of equally as good potato land in ou~r Bunnell colony still for sale in our new tract, which is known as the Volusia tract.
While many instances of remarkable agricultural successes are frequently recorded and reported by the farmers of St. Johns county and other sections of the state, a somewhat unusual case is that of Mrs. 0. C. Dinkins, who is successfully operating a sixty-acre farm at Hastings, and shows conclusively even what a woman farmer can accomplish Mr.Uoucil'scon-fett i te Bnnet otoy.Thi pctue as ake aterMr Uoneli ad by careful efforts in the right direction. Mr oucl'scrnfeli haved annel r Co o ofhis pewtae fe r Cucl a Mrs. Dinkins, who is a native of West harvste a binjer cop f Irsh otates.Virginia, came to Florida in March, 1912, fling to end; the main items of expense Mrs. Dinkins $8,000.00 and in the following year mourned the
being seed potatoes, fertilizer, labor and Ptt Copdeath of her husband. She was left
barrels. Barrels cost 35 cents each, oao rp entirely to her own resources, with a
Fifty barrels to an acre is considered a The following article appeared in the farm but partially paid for and without good crop, although from sixty to sev- issue of June 18, 1916, of the Florida any financial assistance. enty-five barrels are frequently har- Times-Union, one' of the leading papers of Realizing the necessity of starting out vested. I have known instances where the State, which is published at Jackson- to further improve her farm and prosome of our farmers have harvested as ville. We had the pleasure of reproducing vide an income she attempted to get
high as ninety barrels from one acre of this article in an issue of the HOME financial backing to put in a crop of
land. BUILDER last year, and no doubt some of Irish potatoes, but her request for credit
Formerly Hastings was the only place our readers will recall having read this was generally refused. as no one felt from which Irish potatoes were shipped tremendously interesting report at that satisfied that she could successfully opin this section of the country, but today time. However, as a great number of new erate a large farm and crop alone. Fiwe have from eight to ten small towns readers have been added to our mnailing nally a large commission firm in the
in the southern portion of our county list within the year, we reprint this article East agreed to supply her with seed and
from which a great many carloads of po- for their particular benefit in this, our fertilizer provided they could handle and tatoes are shipped each year. From 170 POTATO ISSUE, and it will do those who sell her crop and deduct the amount of
to 180 barrels fill an ordinary freight car. have read it, good to read it again, her indebtedness to them from the first Hastings being the oldest district, and If Mrs. Dinkins has as good a crop of sales.
therefore the most developed part of the potatoes this year as she had last, it will With the perplexing financial question southern portion of our county, ships perhaps mean that she will realize twice partially solved for the present, Mrs.
the largest amount of potatoes, and I the amount of net Profit from her 1917 Dinkins started in with determination to
have seen from four to five great train- crop that she had from the crop of 1916. make her potato crop and her farm a
loads of potatoes shipped from that little ______________________________________town in one day. However, I am not able to see why our farmers at Bunnell should -not do equally as well as the farmers at Hastings, or even better, for we have their experience to profit by, and our soil is equally as good as the soilW at Hastings, while we have the same ~
transportation facilities. Our colony is but twelve miles south of Hastings, which is an advantage to us rather than otherwise.
Therefore, these are some of the reasons why I predict that within a few years we shall not be referred to as a "second Hastings," but that we shall have outdistanced that prosperous community, and it will not be so many years before you will see in reality, what I now predict-that we shall be shipping as many potatoes out of the Bunnell colony in one year as we do today from the whole southern portion of St. Johns county.
No News Items in This Issue.
This is rather an unusual issue of the HOME BUILDER, containing as it does so much matter of vital interest to our readers. -It has been hard to eliminate any of the matter, however, our space is limited. It has seemed best to dispense with the small personal items this
month, publishing instead more completePotoofrsDiin$,O.oPotoFe. reports, etc. Prino r.Dnis 8000 oaoFed
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.




Mhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
during the two years she has been operating this sixty-acre farm is due to
several necessary qualifications. In the
first place personal care and supervision,
secondly careful study of soil conditions
and requirements of the seed and growW ing plants, thirdly to co-operating with
weather conditions.
*-"AdoMrs. Dinkins had little or no experience Lo -4,in the growing of Irish potatoes previous to three years ago. That year, after her
husband's death, she planted a few acres
and did well with them and gained considerable knowledge, but the two succeeding years she really planted on a
large scale and made handsome profits.
She is frank to admit that some seasons
she may not make such remarkable
crops, but she contends that there is no
reason for failure if all precautions are
taken with the crops and land.
Back to the Farm
Seems to Be the Trend of Thought in
Many of Our Cities.
"Every farmer boy wants to be a
school teacher; every school teacher
hopes to be an editor; every editor,would
like to be a banker; every banker would
like to be a trust magnate, and every
trust magnate hopes some day to own a
farm and have chickens and cows and
NdFWA9 w-horses to look after. We end where we
Potato D~igging on Mrs, Dinkins' $8,00 00 Potato Field. begin."
Note the young corn, which is the second crop, between the rows of potatoes. Fe osi uotGtigSac
success. On account of a scarcity of small potatoes, known as culls, which is Fe osi uotGtigSac
funds the plucky woman started in and readily disposed of for fall seed, but We have just received notice from the performed most of the farm work her- which do not command a good price for Bunnell office that practically all of the self after absorbing considerable advice table use. free lots in DuPont have been disposed
and instruction from a neighbor. This remarkable farmer is now quite Of. There are but a very few of these
After a season of hard work and study independent financially, having paid off left; therefore, if you wish to obtain one of the potato crop and its requirements, her mortgage and all other indebtedness, of them, we urge you to send in your Mrs. Dinkins was fully awarded with but in spite of this fact she continues to order for a farm at once. We shall have
most encouraging results. This was last do much of the work herself, and she no more lots to give away after these year, or the season of 1915. That sea- finds that her exacting ideas for the few remaining DuPont lots are taken. son she harvested a fine crop of pota- treatment of crops and soil are not thor- So ACT NOW to secure one of them. toes, digging a total of 3,415 barrels oughly carried out if left to the farm from the sixty acres. This crop yielded hands. R siayo
a gross sales account of $13,149, the Almost without her knowledge she has inthe accueil a ton members r
commission agents' commission amounted gradually accumulated a herd of over n
to about $800, leaving Mrs. Dink~ins the thirty fine cows, which she will sell off, '5Potatoes Eighty Cents I sum of $12,374; from this was deducted as she does not attempt to combine a Peck, and Still Rising a
the expense of seed and fertilizer, labor farming with cattle raising. However, ith b___r
and barrels amounting to $4,741, allow- this is where she profits largely from Pota~oes 80 cents a Peck. si
ing her the net sum of $7,633 as~ profits her annual corn crop, which she claims edWith -this new high mark the humble, til from her sixty-acre farm. In addition to pays for all the farm help during the dull -Dsud became a luxury yesterday and an there As a chance the price will go high-.
this Mrs. Dinkins made excellent seasons and supplies ample forage for es, er, Comission men In South Water lb
crop of corn last summer from which she the herd of cows, as well as the horses e. street were not able to recall a time realized considerable cash for help and mules on the place. when potatoes have commanded so high
wages, besides supplying her with plenty Mrs. Dinkins talks most intelligently oka price and declared the extremely short of fed or er ule an stckandinteestngl offar wok ad frm crop responsile for the advance.
ofedfrhrmlsadsok n neetnl ffr okadfr Government reports are sad to show
When interviewed by aTimes-Union life, and she certainly knows every phase -only 60,000.000 bushels. as against a 110
representative, at her farm at Hastings of it. She has made an especial study as usual crop of 106.000,000 bushels. gizr early this week, Mrs. Dinkins very mod- of the potato culture and is considered Butter prices remained firm, but eggs c. estly gave these facts and figures. high authority on the subject by her th erInleddnwd.
She regretted that the final returns neighbors and the growers generally. h
from her Irish potato crop this year are She belittles the argument of some cie
not yet all in. She completed digging growers' that one cannot successfully and shipping last week, but until the cash grow a potato crop and a corn crop on With the High Cost of ILving ever befor the last carload or two has been re- the same land each year and she Droves fore us, the prices of foodstuffs are one ceived she cannot close up her season's her assertion, for she has done both, and of the main topics of conversation everyaccounts. she further claims that her land even where today. The clipping above was
She knows, however, that while the improves under the double crop plan. taken from a recent issue of the Chicago total yield from the sixty acres is not She always grows cow peas after the Daily News; but, prices have soared even quite as large this year as it was last corn crop is put by and this makes ex- higher than those quoted on this date, (being about 3,000 barrels) yet her total cellent' hay in large quantities and the for Chicago housewives have paid as high receipts will be considerably better than heavy stubble is plowed under, making as ninety cents a peck for potatoes this last season on account of the higher humus for succeeding years, which winter. NINETY CENTS A PECK FOR market price for the potatoes. greatly enriches the land. She does not POTATOES! It should not be hard to
She will clear over and above all ex- believe in burning over the stubble as is say which "side of the fence" one would penses, $8,000 "or better. In addition to the practice with some growers. rather be on-on the producer's side, or
this she has several hundred barrels of The remarkable success of this woman the consumer's side.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.




Ube BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
They Are "Doing Things" at Bunnell.
The creation of a new county, to be called Flagler County, with Bunnell as its county seat, will place the Bunnell colony in the foremost ranks and give our land owners advantages of which they have never dreamed.
The creation of a new county in this terri- We have reproduced on this page a small
tory has been under advisement for the past four years. Flag- sectional map of the proposed new county. This map, in ler County will be in extent about twenty-five miles north much larger form, appeared a few weeks ago in the St. and south and twenty-five miles east and west. BUN NELL Johns Tribune, Bunnell's wide-awake weekly newspaper.. almost centrally located in this territory, and known as the On this map we have marked the location of our lands, ap"Biggest Little City "in Florida, will be the County Seat. proximately 65,000 acres, located in the southeastern portion of Flagler County.
________ - In view of all the above facts, we believe
__ ___ -~ that land values are going to very materially advance; not
alone our farm lands, but more particularly town property7>> rw~-.;iithe business and residence lots in Bunnell. I have received
a great many letters lately asking for prices on Bunnell ,T,'>.,,town lots, for people are finding out that Bunnell is growing by leaps and bounds, notwithstanding the fact that it is A merely an "'infant'', a little over six years old. Nevertheless,
Bunnell must continue to grow, situated as it is in the heart 7K"A16R of Florida's richest agricultural district.
few people just at this time to secure choice residence lots + in Bunnell. If you want one or two of these lots, (NOT MORE
~i. ~ ii: 4 i~ ny THAN TWO) in this growing, progressive little city, now is
the time to buy them.
, \ Some of the Bunnell lots which were purSA\ chased but three or four years ago are now held for ten
____ -times their original purchase price.
<-1 We are going to put on the market five adj These sixty lots are located in the southeastern portion of our city, not very far from the heart of Bunnell's business section. These lots will be open for sale on MONDAY APRIL 9th. Bear in mind, there is I but sixty of these lots. The price will be $50.00 each, or $100.00 for
'I'l NVNo one person may purchase more than
-~--two lots of these sixty lots. They are 50x100 feet in size, U 5 C14111and may be purchased on the easy payment plan of $5.00 per month.
just ten months, if you buy one lot, or 20 months for two lots, at $5.00 per month, or
$45.00 FOR EACH LOT IF YOU PAY CASH
Do not permit this opportunity to pass you by. If you. do so, you will regret it, for these
prices and terms are surely most reasonable indeed.
Consider well what the ownership of such lots will mean, when Bunnell becomes the county seat of Flagler County, and I fully believe that this will come to pass within the next few months, possibly weeks. If you want to'make a good investment, take my advice, fill out the order blank below and mail it to me with your first remittance.
60 Lots Only Order Blank for Bunnell Residence Lots 60 Lots Only
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS,
108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois,
Please enter my order for residence lots in Bunnell, for which I agree to pay $50.00 a piece, at
(Fill in Figure 1 or 2)
the rate of $5.00 a month. Enclosed find $5.00 as first payment, and I agree to make monthly payments of $5.00 until said property is paid for. Kindly mail me your legal acknowledgment and contract, advising me which lot or lots have been allotted to me.
Name ....................................................................Town .............................................
County.. ..........................State .............................. Street Address or R. F. D. Route .......................




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The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. APRIL THE POTATO ISSUE 1917 How Would Mr. Jones Feel if He Owned Ten Acres of Potatoes in Bunnell? Mrs. Jones would say that it was “Perfectly Lovely ” The above interesting cartoon is here reproduced by courtesy of the Chicago Daily News, it having appeared on the front page of that paper a few weeks ago. This drawing was made by Cartoonist Brown, who is one of the most popular cartoonists connected with any of the great Chicago papers today. Because we are all interested in Bunnell, and because Bunnell is so vitally in terested today in potatoes, it affords us great pleasure to reproduce this cartoon on the front page of this, our Potato Issue, of the Bunnell Home Builder.

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BUHMELL HOME BUILDER An Invitation to the Readers of The Home Builder to Accompany Mr. Verdenius on His Trip to Bunnell, Florida, April 17th, 1917. Mr. T. A. Verdenius The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. “COME AND SEE” Florida for many years has been farfamed for her delightful winter climate, and the tourists particularly have flocked to that “Land of Flowers” when the cold winds were raging over the northern states. It will ever be a delight to spend the mid-winter days out of doors, under azure skies, reveling in the bright sun shine and listening to the voice of the mocking-bird as he calls to his mate, and in Florida at this season of the year the trees are laden with their wealth of oranges, grapefruit and other citrus fruits. However, the idea that Florida is only desirable as a winter resort is a great fallacy. To realize the real worth of Florida as a home state, and as a place where one may make a good livelihood, you must see it when the crops are be ing harvested and when the farmers are receiving the returns from the combina tion of soil and marvelous climate. This feature of Florida, I realize, is of pri mary interest to those who have bought land in the Bunnell colony, or who con template purchasing farms there. I want you to visit Bunnell in the midst of her busy season, and therefore I in vite you and urge you to join me in a trip to Bunnell, taking advantage of the homeseekers’ excursion which leaves Chicago on Tuesday night, April 17th. Many of our land owners have already visited the colony, but if you have never been there at the time of the potato har vest, it will be well worth your while to take this trip. Those who own land at Bunnell but who have never visited the colony, should, if possible, plan to go at this time, because you cannot form a clearer conception of the possibilities of your own farm than by making a trip of inspection at the time of the potato har vest. My invitation is particularly to all those who have so far been “halting be tween two opinions.” I assume that you have not become fully convinced of the I merits of our colony or you would have | purchased a farm ere this. Realizing that “seeing is believing,” I urge you who are interested in our col ony, but who have not yet purchased land, to join me on this trip to Bunnell; see for yourself what our land will pro duce, and hear with your own ears the stories of success from the lips of our farmers. The opinion given by the great majority of those 'who have visited the Bunnell colony is that conditions there far exceed their fondest expectations, and practically all who felt able to do so, purchased more land after their visit. I feel confident that those who accom pany me on this trip will feel amply re paid for the time and cost of making the trip. I am planning that this shall not only be a business trip, but that it shall be a pleasure one as well. If any of you who are making arrangements to visit Bunnell at this time would like to have your wives accompany you, I want to say that we shall be very glad indeed to have them, and will do our best to make the trip a pleasant one for them. I am al ways anxious for the wives and the daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so that they will understand something of the pleasant surroundings and social life to be found there, and I have usually found that if the wife is satisfied, the husband is sure to be. Let me tell you briefly of this trip, as we have mapped it out so far. We shall take the “Dixie Flyer,” which leaves the Dearborn Street Station, Chicago, April 17th, at 10:25 p. m. The road over which the “Dixie Flyer” passes traverses east ern Illinois and western Indiana, crossing the broad Ohio river at Evansville, and entering Kentucky. After sweeping through the rugged Kentucky foothills for a hundred miles, this famous train leaves the “Blue Grass” state and enters Tennessee. Six miles north of Nashville the great National Cemetery is passed, I where over seventeen thousand Federal | soldiers were laid to rest. In the center of a beautiful section, built within a cir cle of hills, lies Nashville, the state cap ital. Wednesday afternoon, Murfreesboro, former capital of Tennessee, is reached, in the vicinity of which is another fa mous national cemetery. The “Dixie Flyer” then winds its way through the picturesque Tennessee Mountains. Soon Lookout Mountain comes into view, with the Tennessee River on the left, and about 4:00 o’clock p. m. Chattanooga is reached. In the vicinity of Chattanooga are many points of interest. From Chat tanooga to Atlanta the train passes through battlefields almost the entire dis tance. Passing through Atlanta, the capital of Georgia, we will reach Jacksonville, the “Gateway to Florida,” Thursday morning at 7:50 o’clock. We plan to spend a day in Jacksonville, which you will find to be a most beautiful and charming city, and the fastest-growing one in the South. Jacksonville has grown in the last twelve years from a little city of 10,000 inhabitants to a city with a population of almost 100,000 people. While in Jacksonville we shall pay a visit to its famous “Ostrich Farm,” over looking the mighty St. Johns river, and here one could spend an entire day in a pleasant and profitable manner. But we plan to see some of Jacksonville’s parks, her beautiful buildings, etc. The follow ing morning, which will be Friday, April 20th, we shall leave for St. Augustine, the county seat of our county, St. Johns, and the oldest city in the United States. Just the visit to St. Augustine alone would pay you for your trip to Florida, for this quaint old city possesses a charm for every one, and one never tires of vis iting its points of interest. We plan to visit the ocean beach, old Fort Marion, the far-famed hotels that are located there, and many other interesting places. Party of buyers in the Bunnell Colony on their way to Ormond and Daytona (Dixie Highway.) BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17TH

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Uhe BUHNELL HOME BUILDER “COME AND SEE.” The Bunnell Development Company automobiles will meet us in St. Au gustine, and we shall leave that evening via the Dixie Highway for Bunnell, passing through Hastings. The next day, which will be Saturday, we shall spend in and around Bunnell, visit and interview the farmers busy with their Irish potato crop, see the work of devel opment going on in the colony, go over to Ocean City and the ocean beach, visit the 106-acre orange grove nearby, and give you an opportunity to see what the Bunnell colony is like, what our people have accomplished, and what wonderful opportunities there are for those who locate there in the near future. On Sun day we may possibly take a trip to Day tona. If you live in the East and would not go to Florida via Chicago, I want you then to meet me in Jacksonville Thurs day morning, and join our party there, and then see Jacksonville, St. Augustine and other places with us, as I have out lined above. If you will write me at once, I will give you the name of the hotel at which you can meet us. The Homeseekers’ Excursions to Flor ida leave northern cities the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of each month. On these days the rates to Florida are considerably re duced, and the tickets are good for twenty-one days. For more complete particulars, I would suggest that you inquire of your local ticket agent. IF YOU WANT TO GO TO A WARMER, HEALTHIER, MORE IDEAL CLIMATE—TO A COUNTRY WHERE YOU CAN RAISE THREE CROPS A YEAR ON THE SAME LAND —COME WITH ME, APRIL 17TH, NEXT, TO OUR BUNNELL COLONY. IT WILL BE THE “TRIP OF YOUR LIFE.” WITH ALL MY HEART I URGE YOU TO COME AND SEE. Take care of a little farm in our Bun nell colony and the little farm will take care of you. Notice to our Bunnell Settlers Mr. Verdenius will be in the Bunnell colony for several days, and will be very pleased to see all the settlers while there. Those who have any matters to talk over with him, may find him in the office of the Bunnell Development Company, in Bunnell, all day Thursday, April 26th. Why Do We Call the New Tract the Volusia Tract? We have received quite a number of letters from buyers and prospective cus tomers, asking us about the Volusia tract. We wish to say that the Volusia tract and the new tract are one and the same. The Volusia tract is just South of our original tract of land, and is located in Volusia county; hence, we speak of it as the Volusia tract. Of course, all of this territory will be a part of Flagler county, if this new county is created, which we believe will be done. Land in our Volusia tract, or new tract, is selling for $35.00 an acre, while in the old tract the cheapest land which we have is $40.00 an acre. The April issue of the HOME BUILD ER goes to press a little early this month to give our readers a chance to join Mr. Verdenius on his special excursion trip. He will leave Chicago on April 17th. The next issue will be a little late, be ing held up to await Mr. Verdenius’ de tailed report of conditions in the colony. The Arkansas Traveler Again. Day after day we receive letters that read about as follows: “I am very much interested in the Bunnell colony; I believe it is a great country, and when times get better, I am going to buy a farm.” Such letters are encouraging; they are always gladly received, but we keep wondering what is the use of waiting for better times ? You say you are dissatisfied with your present surroundings, that the climate is disagreeable, that business is uncertain, and that some day you are going to rem edy these conditions; but, why do you put off for next week, next month or next year what you could and should do today ? I am reminded again of the story of the Arkansas traveler—a familiar one to most of you. This traveler was caught in a heavy rainstorm and sought shelter in a nearby cabin. The owner of this abode was tilted back in a rickety chair, busily engaged in whittling a stick, while the rain came through the roof in a score of places. The traveler could scarcely find a spot in the room where the rain did not fall upon him, and finally he said to his contented host. “Why don’t you mend your roof?” The astonishing re ply was, “Well, when it’s raining I can’t patch it, and when it’s not raining it don’t need patching.” May it not be the case with some of you who have thus written us? When times are good, and you are making good wages you are quite content, and do not think it necessary to provide for the “rainy day?” But occasional hard times are inevitable, and the man who is work ing for wages is the first one to feel their sting. You may not have enough money to move to Florida tomorrow, and begin improvements on a little farm, but you can at least buy that farm today and begin making your small monthly pay ments thereon. Every payment you make you are that much nearer your goal. A good many people admit that they are never able to save anything unless they go in debt, or assume some obliga tion, and know that they must meet it regularly. To such people the Bunnell Development Company offers great op portunities, and the sooner you are able to realize this, the better off you will be. “It is never TOO LATE to begin sav ing money; nor TOO EARLY. But there is no time like the PRESENT.” When Dreams Come True. There is all the difference in the world between a DREAM and a PLAN. Don’t read this magazine from month to month and dream about owning a little home of your own in Florida—some day. But begin to SAVE and PLAN for that home right now. Invest $5.00 or more in it, while it may be purchased at a reasonable price. You can do it. Once you begin to save for your HOME, a dozen plans will suggest themselves to you for saving additional dimes, quarters and dollars, every week or every pay-day. It is all right to have your Day Dreams, but make definite plans to have YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE. Glimpse of our Beautiful Gore Lake. Just East of Bunnell. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A Report on Bunnell’s “Banner” Potato Crop, As given by Mr. I. I. Moody, after a trip of Inspection over the Golony. Mr. 1. I. Moody, Pres, of the Bunnell State BankThe potato industry in the southern portion of St. Johns County is our big money crop, and this is one of the main reasons why we are growing so rapidly from year to year. Notwithstanding the splendid results that have already been attained by our farmers, I would say that this industry is still in its infancy, and I predict that the time will come when our farmers in the Bunnell colony will ship as many potatoes from Bunnell as the farmers in the whole of St. Johns County are shipping now. This state ment may seem rather extravagant, but I believe that I can prove that this is not only possible, but that it will be done in the not-far-distant future. When I came to this part of the coun try from Georgia, about sixteen years ago, I worked for Senator Deen in a tur pentine still some twelve miles west of where Bunnell is now located. I was what is known as a “wood-rider.” The duties of the “wood-rider,” as you may perhaps know, are to travel on horse back throughout the camp all day long watching the men who are getting the turpentine or spirits, or who are scrap ing the trees. Many a long day have I ridden from thirty to forty miles in this manner over St. Johns county, and never in those days did I see an Irish potato growing in this section of the country. The first man, to my knowledge, who ever tried to grow Irish potatoes in this county for commercial purposes, was a Mr. Brown, one of the old settlers at Hastings. He came here from Ohio, I believe, a couple of years after I settled in this county. Mr. Brown, while living in the North, had been advised by his physician to seek a milder climate, and so came to Hastings with a carload of furniture. Among other things he brought down with him were about six bushels of potatoes, and before planting time arrived he had eaten at least onethird of them. Being a newcomer, he did not know what could or could not be grown in our country, and so said to his wife one day, as planting time drew near, “I wonder if a person could grow Irish potatoes in St. Johns county.” “Well, there’s noth ing like trying,” she replied, and so the remainder of the potatoes were planted. His first crop amounted to sixteen bar rels, which he shipped to Philadelphia, receiving $9.00 a barrel for same. Little at that time did Mr. Brown realize that this was the beginning of a wonderful industry in St. Johns county, which was destined to make it famous. His success led others to follow his ex ample, and that spring a couple of my friends meeting one another, one of them remarked, “Do you know, I am going to grow Irish potatoes next year. That d—d Yankee made more money on his crop of potatoes than I made all the year.” Year after year more land has been planted to Irish potatoes until today it is one of the largest industries in our State. It is not easy to say, with posi tive accuracy, just how many acres have been planted to potatoes in our part of the county this year, but it is reasonable to assume that it will largely exceed any thing ever before known in the history of potato growing in St. Johns county. The acreage for the county will be fully 40 per cent better than any previous high record mark. The acreage planted to potatoes in the Bunnell colony is approx imately 100 per cent better than last year. There was considerable new land cleared during the past year. Potatoes are a staple crop, and each year there is a good demand for our crop. Commission men from the large cities, such as New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, Washington, Cincinnati, etc., send their representa tives down into St. Johns county each year, and never before has the demand for spuds been as great as it is now. The reports of the United States De partment of Agriculture show a great shortage of potatoes this year. There are fewer old potatoes on the market this year to compete with our spring crop than in any previous year, and if we add to this the fact that there will be no potatoes imported from other coun tries, we may understand why our farm ers are warranted in expecting such large returns from their crop. It would not surprise me in the least if some of our farmers should receive from $8.00 to $9.00 a barrel for their potatoes this year, and perhaps even higher prices. I do know, however, that if our farmers have but an average yield any year, and can sell their spring crop from $3.50 to $4.00 a barrel, they will be making good money. Our barrel factory in Bunnell is work ing overtime these days, and is turning out more barrels than in any previous year, and before long now BUNNELL SPUDS, IN BUNNELL BARRELS, will be distributed throughout the United States. Practically all of our farmers have some acreage planted to potatoes, some perhaps have but five acres or less, while others have as high as fifty acres; for some of our farmers make this their principal crop, while others grow Irish potatoes just as a side line. Our potato crop this season will be from three to four weeks later than usual. Potatoes are an expensive crop to grow here. It costs from $50.00 to $55.00 an acre to see a crop through from beginLoading Irish Potatoes at Hastings, about Twelve Miles North of Bunnell. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.

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m BUMNELL HOME BUILDER. Mrs. 0. C. Dinkins Proves Successful Potato Grower. OVER AND ABOVE ALL EXPENSES, PLUCKY WOMAN CLEARED OVER $8,000.00 ON 1916 CROP. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th. This story of Mrs. Dinkins’ 1916 potato crop not only demonstrates what our lands will produce, but also what a woman may do in Florida. Mrs. Dinkins’ farm is but a few miles north of Bunnell, and we have thousands of acres of equally as good po tato land in our Bunnell colony still for sale in our new tract, which is known as the Volusia tract. No News Items in This Issue. While many instances of remarkable agricultural successes are frequently re corded and reported by the farmers of St. Johns county and other sections of the state, a somewhat unusual case is that of Mrs. O. C. Dinkins, who is suc cessfully operating a sixty-acre farm at Hastings, and shows conclusively even what a woman farmer can accomplish by careful efforts in the right direction. Mrs. Dinkins, who is a native of West Virginia, came to Florida in March, 1912, and in the following year mourned the death of her husband. She was left entirely to her own resources, with a farm but partially paid for and without any financial assistance. Realizing the necessity of starting out to further improve her farm and pro vide an income she attempted to get financial backing to put in a crop of Irish potatoes, but her request for credit was generally refused, as no one felt satisfied that she could successfully op erate a large farm and crop alone. Fi nally a large commission firm in the East agreed to supply her with seed and fertilizer provided they could handle and sell her crop and deduct the amount of her indebtedness to them from the first sales. With the perplexing financial question partially solved for the present, Mrs. Dinkins started in with determination to make her potato crop and her farm a This is rather an unusual issue of the HOME BUILDER, containing as it does so much matter of vital interest to our readers. It has been hard to eliminate any of the matter, however, our space is limited. It has seemed best to dispense with the small personal items this month, publishing instead more complete reports, etc. Portion of Mrs. Dinkins' $8,000.00 Potato Field. Mr. CouncilVs corn-field in the Bunnell Colony. This picture was taken after Mr. Councill had harvested a bumper crop of Irish Potatoes. ning to end; the main items of expense being seed potatoes, fertilizer, labor and barrels. Barrels cost 35 cents each. Fifty barrels to an acre is considered a good crop, although from sixty to sev enty-five barrels are frequently har vested. I have known instances where some of our farmers have harvested as high as ninety barrels from one acre of land. Formerly Hastings was the only place from which Irish potatoes were shipped in this section of the country, but today we have from eight to ten small towns in the southern portion of our county from which a great many carloads of po tatoes are shipped each year. From 170 to 180 barrels fill an ordinary freight car. Hastings being the oldest district, and therefore the most developed part of the southern portion of our county, ships the largest amount of potatoes, and I have seen from four to five great train loads of potatoes shipped from that little town in one day. However, I am not able to see why our farmers at Bunnell should not do equally as well as the farmers at Hastings, or even better, for we have their experience to profit by, and our soil is equally as good as the soil at Hastings, while we have the same transportation facilities. Our colony is but twelve miles south of Hastings, which is an advantage to us rather than otherwise. Therefore, these are some of the rea sons why I predict that within a few years we shall not be referred to as a “second Hastings,” but that we shall have outdistanced that prosperous com munity, and it will not be so many years before you will see in reality, what I now predict — that we shall be shipping as many potatoes out of the Bunnell colony in one year as we do today from the whole southern portion of St. Johns county. Mrs. Dinkins $8,000.00 Potato Crop. The following article appeared in the issue of June 18, 1916, of the Florida Times-Union, one of the leading papers of the State, which is published at Jackson ville. We had the pleasure of reproducing this article in an issue of the HOME BUILDER last year, and no doubt some of our readers will recall having read this tremendously interesting report at that time. However, as a great number of new readers have been added to our mailing list within the year, we reprint this article for their particular benefit in this, our POTATO ISSUE, and it will do those who have read it, good to read it again. If M\rs. Dinkins has as good a crop of potatoes this year as she had last, it will perhaps mean that she will realize twice the amount of net profit from her 1917 crop that she had from the crop of 1916.

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me BUNNELL HOME BUILDEIR Potato Digging on Mrs Dinkins' $8,000 00 Potato Field. Note the young corn which is the second crop, between the rows of potatoes. success. On account of a scarcity of funds the plucky woman started in and performed most of the farm work her self after absorbing considerable advice and instruction from a neighbor. After a season of hard work and study of the potato crop and its requirements, Mrs. Dinkins was fully awarded with most encouraging results. This was last year, or the season of 1915. That sea son she harvested a fine crop of pota toes, digging a total of 3,415 barrels from the sixty acres. This crop yielded a gross sales account of $13,149, the commission agents’ commission amounted to about $800, leaving Mrs. Dinkins the sum of $12,374; from this was deducted the expense of seed and fertilizer, labor and barrels amounting to $4,741, allow ing her the net sum of $7,633 as profits from her sixty-acre farm. In addition to this Mrs. Dinkins made an excellent crop of com last summer from which she realized considerable cash for help wages, besides supplying her with plenty of feed for her mules and stock. When interviewed by a Times-Union representative, at her farm at Hastings early this week, Mrs. Dinkins very mod estly gave these facts and figures. She regretted that the final returns from her Irish potato crop this year are not yet all in. She completed digging and shipping last week, but until the cash for the last carload or two has been re ceived she cannot close up her season’s accounts. She knows, however, that while the total yield from the sixty acres is not quite as large this year as it was last (being about 3,000 barrels) yet her total receipts will be considerably better than last season on account of the higher market price for the potatoes. She will clear over and above all ex penses, $8,000 or better. In addition to this she has several hundred barrels of small potatoes, known as culls, which is readily disposed of for fall seed, but which do not command a good price for table use. This remarkable farmer is now quite independent financially, having paid off her mortgage and all other indebtedness, but in spite of this fact she continues to do much of the work herself, and she finds that her exacting ideas for the treatment of crops and soil are not thor oughly carried out if left to the farm hands. Almost without her knowledge she has gradually accumulated a herd of over thh-ty fine cows, which she will sell off, as she does not attempt to combine farming with cattle raising. However, this is where she profits largely from her annual corn crop, which she claims pays for all the farm help during the dull seasons and supplies ample forage for the herd of cows, as well as the horses and mules on the place. Mrs. Dinkins talks most intelligently and interestingly of farm work and farm life, and she certainly knows every phase of it. She has made an especial study of the potato culture and is considered high authority on the subject bv her neighbors and the growers generally. She belittles the argument of some growers that one cannot successfully grow a potato crop and a corn crop on the same land each year and she nroves her assertion, for she has done both, and she further claims that her land even improves under the double crop plan. She always grows cow peas after the corn crop is put by and this makes ex cellent hay in large quantities and the heavy stubble is plowed under, making humus for succeeding years, which greatly enriches the land. She does not believe in burning over the stubble as is the practice with some growers. The remarkable success of this woman during the two years she has been op erating this sixty-acre farm is due to several necessary qualifications. In the first place personal care and supervision, secondly careful study of soil conditions and requirements of the seed and grow ing plants, thirdly to co-operating with weather conditions. Mrs. Dinkins had little or no experience in the growing of Irish potatoes previous to three years ago. That year, after her husband’s death, she planted a few acres and did well with them and gained con siderable knowledge, but the two suc ceeding years she really planted on a large scale and made handsome profits. She is frank to admit that some seasons she may not make such remarkable crops, but she contends that there is no reason for failure if all precautions are taken with the crops and land. Back to the Farm Seems to Be the Trend of Thought in Many of Our Cities. “Every farmer boy wants to be a school teacher; every school teacher hopes to be an editor; every editor,would like to be a banker; every banker would like to be a trust magnate, and every trust magnate hopes some day to own a farm and have chickens and cows and horses to look after. We end where we begin.” Free Lots in Dupont Getting Scarce We have just received notice from the Bunnell office that practically all of the free lots in DuPont have been disposed of. There are but a very few of these left; therefore, if you wish to obtain one of them, we urge you to send in your order for a farm at once. We shall have no more lots to give away after these few remaining DuPont lots are taken. So ACT NOW to secure one of them. the accu9ed as Rnspiracy of £tlon members Potatoes Eighty Cents a Peck, and Still Rising Potatoes 80 cents a peck. With .this new high mark the humble cpud became a luxury yesterday and there 4s a chance the price -will go high er Commission men in South Water street were not able to recall a time when potatoes have commanded so high a price and declared the extremely short crop responsible for the advance. Government reports are skid to show only 60,000,000 bushels, as against a usual crop of 106.000,000 bushels. Butler prices remained firm, but eggs were Inclined downwards. ichuett With the High Cost of Living ever be fore us, the prices of foodstuffs are one of the main topics of conversation every where today. The clipping above was taken from a recent issue of the Chicago Daily News; but, prices have soared even higher than those quoted on this date, for Chicago housewives have paid as high as ninety cents a peck for potatoes this winter. ‘NINETY CENTS A PECK FOR POTATOES! It should not be hard to say which “side of the fence” one would rather be on—on the producer’s side, or the consumer’s side. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 17th.

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&/m BUNMELL HOME BUILDER They Are “Doing Things” at Bunnell. to be called Flagler County, with Bunnell as its county seat, will our land owners advantages of which they have never dreamed. The creation of a new county, place the Bunnell colony in the foremost ranks and give The creation of a new county in this terri tory has been under advisement for the past four years. Flag ler County will be in extent about twenty-five miles north and south and twenty-five miles east and west. BUNNELL almost centrally located in this territory, and known as the “Biggest Little City”\n Florida, will be the County Seat. We have reproduced on this page a small sectional map of the proposed new county. This map, in much larger form, appeared a few weeks ago in the St. Johns Tribune, Bunnell’s wide-awake weekly newspaper.. On this map we have marked the location of our lands, ap proximately 65,000 acres, located in the southeastern por tion of Flagler County. In view of all the above facts, we believe that land values are going to very materially advance; not alone our farm lands, but more particularly town property — the business and residence lots in Bunnell. I have received a great many letters lately asking for prices on Bunnell town lots, for people are finding out that Bunnell is grow ing by leaps and bounds, notwithstanding the fact that it is merely an “infant”, a little over six years old. Nevertheless, Bunnell must continue to grow, situated as it is in the heart of Florida’s richest agricultural district. I am going to give the opportunity to a very few people just at this time to secure choice residence lots in Bunnell. If you want one or two of these lots, (NOT MORE THAN TWO) in this growing, progressive little city, now is the time to buy them. Some of the Bunnell lots which were pur chased but three or four years ago are now held for ten times their original purchase price. We are going to put on the market five ad ditional blocks, of twelve lots each— B UT 60 LOTS IN ALL. These sixty lots are located in the southeastern portion of our city, not very far from the heart of Bunnell’s business section. These lots will be open for sale on MONDAY APRIL 9th. Bear in mind, there is but sixty of these lots. The price will be S50.00 each, or $100.00 for two lots. No one person may purchase more than two lots of these sixty lots. They are 50x100 feet in size, and may be purchased on the easy payment plan of $5.00 per month. Just ten months, if you buy one lot, or 20 months for two lots, at $5.00 per month, or $45.00 FOR EACH LOT IF YOU PAY CASH Do not permit this opportunity to pass you by. If you do so, you will regret it, for these prices and terms are surely most reasonable indeed. Consider well what the ownership of such lots will mean, when Bunnell becomes the county seat of Flagler County, and I fully believe that this will come to pass within the next few months, possibly weeks. If you want to make a good investment, take my advice, fill out the order blank below and mail it to me with your first remittance. 60 Lots Only Order Blank for Bunnell Residence Lots 60 Lots Only THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois, Please enter my order for residence lots in Bunnell, for which I agree to pay $50.00 a piece, at (Fill in Figure 1 or 2 ) the rate of $5.00 a month. Enclosed find $5.00 as first payment, and I agree to make monthly payments of $5.00 until said property is paid for. Kindly mail me your legal acknowledgment and contract, advising me which lot or lots have been allotted to me. Name T own County State Street Address or R. F. D. Route

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15 h BUHNELL HOME BUILDER I WANT YOU TO COME WJTH ME ON THIS TRIP EVEN THOUGH YOU ww|. x, T^ea/tjrf Yuttdo 'yLOXJLf^ PECIDE EARLY WHETHER YOU WILL GO. WRITE ME AT OfJCC All ON BOARD FOR BUNNELL T HQg.A.VERDENIU5l08 So. La Salle St., C HICAGO ILLS