Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
_ The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home BuilderI
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street. Chicago, Ill.
MARCH, 1917
A Field of "Money-Makers" in the Bunnell Colony
US1
-
The above is a picture taken in April, 1915, of an Irish potato field in the Bunncll Colony. Should we have but an average crop this season and the present high prices prevail, we will ship out of St. Johns County more than five million dollars worth of early potatoes. There are, approximately, 20,000 acres of Irish potatoes planted in this part of the country. Our Bunnell farmers market their Irish potato crop, which is the first of their three annual crops, before the farmers of the North have begun plowing for their first and only crop.




S~e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
FLORIDA IS ADVANCING RAPIDLY
The most interesting State in the which sweep the whole State make this tions last fall were almost marvelous.
Union, an for as the real estate worth is country a desirable place in which to livet and with the steady increase otherwise. concerned, is the State of Florida. And during the summer, we have the assurance here that there is
it must be said that when the real estate CLIMATIC CONDITIONS prosperity in the country. We have
people are interested in any particular L C grown until we are forced to hunt larger
locality it is because the locality is grow- The temperature does not get any quarters, but we feel that our n1ew bank ing; also, when the dealers in the homes higher here than it does in New York and is going to meet our needs in every reand farms of a section are interested, it Chicago, andi a sunstroke is never known. spect. means that the peophl- in general art, in- These, climatic conditions are to hebc You know, Mr. Verdenius, that when terested. This is a result that must nec- Inken into rnnsideraion, andl it will be huinks have plenty of money there can be essarily follow, and can be plainly 6evn found that they cannot be equaled in the no better evidence that the people have by any one who stops to think. Vnited States, money, and banks grow only as the
Most everyone whom you meet knows Thousands of people are taking advan- country rows. It is the prosperity of the fact that Florida is a booming State, tage of the chance to get homes and the people that has made the lBunnell and for that reason there must htae. 1 nds in this State, and the next few State Bank about twice the size it was years will .;hony them the value of their four years ago. Let me say again that cause why so much money is bving -spient ftl, fu e4ao.Ltncsyaanta
cause n why so mauch mny is being pent foresight. 'T'his is in rc.lity a young when the development and growth of a
in this section, and why so many settlers country stops, then the growth of every
are coming to it. The reason can he State when its development is taken into
stated coing t o it. The reason can he consideration. The whole South is in anl institution must stop. stlantd i and the desirable location. Yete this undeveloped state. Only about two-lifths I regret that I do not have time to land and the desirable location. Yet this of the tillable land is now under cultiva- write you more at this time, but you still lopen, to-wit: "Whvery imporwas this land noton tion, but why go to Georgia or Alabama mrnust excuse me on the plea that I am open, to-wit: Why was this land not when the same grade of land can be se- a very busy man, and will write again taken up years ago? Why did the Amer- cured here, and in most cases the land when I have more time. ican people go to the far West and over etterpl te most e ma With kindest regards, I am,
into Canada instead of coming to this is better, plus the most ideal climatic Yours very truly,
land of sunshine, if conditions are so conditions that prevail in the whole coun- G. A. ANDERSON,
good here?" try ? Bunnell, Florida.
During the past year over a million
WHY NOT SETTLED BEFORE? acres of land have been sold in Florida,
and the real estate dealers predict as big stAt,-ment or tht (Cunditton out (ihe The reason is this: In the first place a business next year. In time the State
yIears ago slavery existed in this State, of Florida will be completely settled. The 15NN EL. rSTAtE BAN*K and that held back the tide of immigra- West has passed into history, but the At the chwr of Bulnir4, Deeember SO. 11ld41 tion. After that, the Civil War took South is just now in the making. All 1. I. Moody, PresIdent
place, and of course there was not much moving Americans should heed the call G. A. Anderson, Cashier
moving around during that stormy pe- of the South, instead of following the idle tiod; and then there was a third reason, dream of "Westward, ho!"-Jacksonvillec the terrible mistakes of the reconstruc- Metropolis. ....... 87,:..1
tion period. u o i Inm 1... .. .. .. ...... ..s 14,.8 o.
These are the reasons why Florida was (1,."'"r .............. ",314
not fully settled in the years that are t, ,,, .....................u2r
rone. But that does not interest the o n t rn ........ _oiL.
Floridian of today. In fact, it is now Towr. ........ .. $ .t.n0:s.T3
working to his benefit. The money that .i
would have been made two or three gen- .f ........ ....... ano.n
CaD_ pital qtiwk ...... . ,. .t111 ,0.1
erations ago is now being made and the 41sifr-ii oui undid pnts.:; 4,O4T.L
present generation is getting the benefit t.. ...... ......
of it. t'xt q e...... ................
Some of the reasons why Florida is .... .re a lacount ..... ...e I.I
such a great State today are the follow- ,.-d.,t.................... ..
m:; The location is ideal; the climate TorTAL ...................... *I14.0.a73
ia the bcat in the United States; the laws
'are as rood an any in the Union. and the INTERESTING FACTS WORTH
former and grower can raise almost any- N O ING A T
thing on hin Florida land that his KNOWING ABOUT THE
brother can raise in all of the other ORANGE TREE.
State of the Union put together. These "No fruit tree compares with it noaa to
rcasor make a home in Florida a most hardiness and length of life, In Rome
desirable acquisition. is an orange tree that hal reached the
EAE IN POPULATION remarkable age of 716 years.
In Prance is an orange tree with a
At the present time it is a safe guess .r. t a. .vtorA,,,, CAi tI o nIt State la," record of 4i3 years, and it Is still sturdy that there re about one hundred million Cashier of the Bunnell State ain hl with promise of reaching a
people in the United States. This enor- ripe old age.
mouse population must be fed and clothed. Bank Writes of That Institu- In Spain are orange groves 400 years
and for that reason the high price of liv- tion's Splendid Condition old, one tree of which has been growing
ing is, becoming a serious economic ques- for 632 years.
L]nn all over the country. The con,.ump- Ihsr Sir: In the Azores is a tree that pro{Iuced
tron of products is getting ahead of the to write you a let mter relative to thsoe timcon- 20,000 oranges in one season. In Erope protdution. This ig the greatest reason write you a letter relative to the co
hy oniyoneihoid akean ffot ~ dition of the Bunnell State Bank. hu t iOorne vepikdfmontr-.
.hy avery one shouldd make an effort to owing to the increase of business, it has In Florida, to come nearer home, a nedre a home and some land while the been almost impossible for me to write grower gathered 6000 oranges from one
chance is yet here. If a man owns a few any one. of the six hundred trees that comprise
cre e in this State hie it urc of a living, The volume of business during the his grove, and he realized $97.00 from bccausc he can raise all that he needs past fall and present winter surpasses the one tree in one season, ,nd have some left to sell. The climate anything in the history of the bank. We The banner yield in Florida from one it so uniild thul he does not have to mniake now have near eight hundred active tree was 10,000 oranges. There arc few provision for a winter's supply of fuel, checking accounts, and our deposits have like it-. It is a tree si.ty feet high and and,' on the other hand, the sea breezes been growing all the while. Our collec- four feet in diameter.




Chia BUNNLLL HOME BUILDER
THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF SOIL
of their countries to remain idle many is all disposed of. The men amid women months of the year, yet they manage to who have selected this colony as the place live comfortably and at the same time to for their future hoiies may indeed conlay by a little money. However, many gratulate themselves on their good judgof these expert farmers from northern went and their splendid investments, and Europe have made their plans that as within a few years I am sure they will soon as thib war is over, they will come he able to more fully appreciate the truth
- to THE LAND OF THE FREE--TO of ray words.
AMERICA- -wherq greater opportunities Good wages will not always last. When
may be found. the frightful European cataclysm is
During the last ten years farm values ended, there will come a world-wide reall over the United States, and especially adjustment. Natural law will prevail; in Florida, have arisen at tremendous action and reaction are equal. High rates. In some instances Florida lands wages and the height of prosperity will that could have bei-en purchased a few be followed by low wages, little work and years ago for $25.00 per acre, are today the slough of despond. Fortunate will being held at $250.00 to $500.00 an acre, be the men and women who are then preand even higher prices than the.e are pared to cope with the situation. being paid. What arrangements are you making?
Twelve miles to the north of the Bun- Are you preparing yourself for those.nell colony, at Hastings, Florida, I know days ? If you have not already done so, of one particular farm that was sold for then let me tell you once agai that in $350.00 an acre, while I have no doubt my opinion there is no place in the that this land ten years ago might have United States where a man may start been bought for $35.00 an acre. Further- farming under less difficulties, in a commore, I have not the slightest doubt that paratively new country, than in the BunMr. T. A. Verdenius farms in the Bunnell colony ten years nell colony. It will not be long, however,
The Pionter Sinall F'arm Man of Florida. hence will sell for as much per acre as until you will not be able to buy any the one I have mentioned at Hastings. more land, of such excellent quality, at The amount of land in the United Our soil at Bunnell is equally as good as the price and terms offered you by the
States, as well as in other countries, is that at Hastings; our transportation is Bunnell Development Company today. limited, what the land will produce is the same, and our location is as good, if No truer saying was ever uttered than unlimited. In our own Bunnell colony not better. The only difference is that this: the soil will easily produce three crops the Hastings section is older and hence "THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF a year, sometimes more,-but, THERE more developed. LAND."
IS BUT ONE CROP OF SOIL. After There is one farmer in the Bunnell
the soil has been inhabited, man nor natur, or nyothr orc cn ad o tis colony who has grown over $4,000.00 ture, nor any other force can add to this worth of produce on twenty acres last crop. year, besides having supplied the needs
The United States is increasing its of his large family with plenty of eggs. population at a tremendous rate. The meat, chickens, butter, milk, etc. There cities are now over-crowded, and as soon are still other farmers in our colony who as the great war in Europe is over, the have sold more than $1,500.00 worth of peasantry from Europe will flock to our produce from their ten-acre farms; anshores as never before, for they are go- other I shall mention who cleared $204.67 ing to endeavor to get away from future per acre on his one crop of Irish potacalamities and from the countries so toes, followed by two more crnps on the '
deeply in debt, where it will be an almost same land that year. unbearable burden for the tax-payers, These people and many others who
who will have to pay the cost of this have been very successful, are living now V tremendous war. in the Bunnell colony, and I make the K
Judging from co rspondianee I have proposition that I will pay anyone the
rJdived from relatives and friends in price of his return trip ticket from his
Europe, I feel that it is safe to say that home to Bunnell, if I cannot bring you within a couple of yoars there is going to to these people, who will tell you what be the greatest immigration from Europe they haive done. to Ameriea that this country has ever Far-seeing men with visions of the fuknowni. A majority of these people will ture, such as Harriman and Hill, during comec with the avowed determination of their lives, as well as many other noted Battling upon farm lands in America. citizens, have been engaged in the
In Europe, notably in such countries mighty movement of placing citizens of am' Germavy Denmark, France and Hol- this country out upon the virgin land, lend, the larnig owned and worked by where they could become indepenlert. farmers are as a general rule, smaller Surely there could be no more worthy than ton acres. In little Denmark, with undertaking. its poor soil and northern climate, there "IllE IS HT ONE CROl, OF arn 3630,000 farmg each from seven to ten LANI), and ;t I:st the people of our Acres in ara lFrance is gaid to have two country have realized this fact, and they million farm of legs than twelve acres are flocking to Florida by the trainloads. in si2A, and another million farms each This winter the demand for Florida land co,,prising leeg than twenty-five acres. seem. to be greater than ever; even many I am able to ;peak personally of the of our rich men, seeing the value of lands Twicall jiqureof hcaucraoc IGtdt'0 4t9 10 he Ligreat number of small farm in Holland, in Florida advancing so rapidly, are buy- nll t'olot i )l'ntwo rnA,, aiwur le where 1, the son of a farmer, was born. ing large acreages anti holding them for "tiles eouth of Bunnell.
up on these farms families of five and investment purposes, to be sold at large
Si ive find sell a portion of what they increases a few years hence. The persistent advertiser is pretty cerproduce. It Is here that the correct idea Let me remind you that there is but rain to be a man who ig not afraid to of farming is learned. These farmers one crop of Bunnell colony land, and at have tho things he pdverties invest. utilii2 every square inch of ground, and the rate these lands are being sold it will gated. And that is why persistent ad. though they are compelled by the climate be but a matter of time until this crop vertising and success go' had In hand.




t~he BUNF.LL HOM~E iBUIUDEFR
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
CIYDIE~ot ubli hsben sade ncenng it. How planning to soon conme and settle on their
lii il i I l 1, : ever, it has seemed to those most inter- Butinell colony farms, we can judge of
E t'' '.1. (11111111 .1 eslud that this was the year for the the further increase.
.SiI1u Sl'o ~rr ~ta~ii--o ~ A~ iumoeit to ho launched. A number of names were suggested for
,I cill1iig-II :()() Itl.oi 7 :31"1'. NL This nw county, if created by the Ilg- this proposed county, but as a cornpli,l ,Ailit vZ1.11i.~ I*I, islatore as desired, will comprise the inent to the man at the head of the RunSeril,.i YYl ~~:s i vp~r southern end of St. Johns County and the nell Development Company, President
Ii I noI iI~ ~ia'i:1 .i.ri vri vnd of Vol usiat Ci'unty. It will 1. 1. jMloody, who has done so nmuch for
f,'I'ivs~ iI iyr 71 licllze. F'ril y if 3III f :I'U NI IC 1111 idejIs north id lsmiIi, and t 1)is section of the country, many o0th 1(,v. It. L,. Itlwi.,v l'iastIo twenty-live- miles eat.L iiid1 \%est. IL will citizens decided that it should be MOODY
il1 1URCH1 Ill o. e IST i' embrace six hundred and fortyv thotisond CO)U NT1Y. Mr. Moody, of course, appresiliiln 8111"t1 vv..Y 5 I'lb lt- 0:30 M acres of land, a majority iv1 wh Iich is the ciatedl this honor, but in an open letter,
c. 1). Itug';I1nVrn. Slipt. best farming land in the Sitate, Its pop- published in the St. Johns Tribune, lie
S 'II- IAa Al ) I illat ion to Isgnwith will Ile ajpi-ox i- rqetdthat the name ingtnot he
.0101 Boll, 1 Slp th~~eyI~nLousand, with the "Biggest Moody, but 1-LAGLE R, in honor of
i-Ciclittug seryvv. I1:1 A- .. kitll 'IXwn in Plorida" for- it-, county HlenrY M. Flagler, the miaster-builder of Y.1. Mi. V 'i N, \J.- 1.g '-,, I l il m aL hn created it will hv the hiest Florida, and termed by Mr. Moody, "the
VrerNi tevii; Weti.l~it. 7:66 el L iunty in the state. greatest man that ever lived in our beA new county, with a new county scale, loved'( state." CA'il(LJ& 11 ;uii i(IIL~N. ii much to be desired by tLii citizens ol' Wie are sure that out- readers will be
.MILPH-9J:51 A. M.
Rlev. A. linczyk. Potation. this section. Mioany of thiemitire forced cager to know of developments along this
WOMA"S HRISIANto travel great distances to reach their line as they take place.
WUM N' Cit!STIA N ''1MI;. ~ county seat--St. Augustine. With the
Me( tt seclicl :11 toItriil *Iledily, Ill ne-w county cr-eatedl, andi Bunnell the Mr. J. H. Martin, of Island Grove,
iiil.Mrs. F. A. 1.l'0t, 11rCHIdeait. county scat, any one living in the county Florida, has accepted the position of head
I-ey :21.Could reach the county seat within t Itif' bookkeeper of the I Bunnell Development
SFl('1'1 ortyll"Rs. hours a~t the outside. as the fatrthest dis- C01mpany, taking the place of Judge W.
M\lpti vve evtil hull lrtii 'I'IIlV Iac to thRonysa ol eiit *Feath, who has been forced to resign
1 :00 1'. NJ. fi it Mlst'I~'lli 111. ~1liIl,,r1011 twenty-three m~iles. on account of his failing eyesight.
ltulld hug. "'-rd hen the present counties of St. Johns
All 11il~irtu. Derl W. M. and Volusia were laid out, and their M. Stone has entered tlhe horse and
OIIIBR 07ASTT-1N sTrAl county seats chosen, no one ever dreamed mule business in Bunnell. When you
meets9 every firat aini thsiril 'llIsoiy liI 7 :00 of the manner in which this district have one to sell or swap, or when you
P.M: ill tile hMfsocie, Hall.
Airs. Hagiidlorn (N~al it) would he settled. It seenis almost un- want to buy one, see Mike.
co;11OFF'ICIALS: believable when we face the statement
5C. Aliddietou, Taix COllector, that within the past eight years the
W. Ri. UJmlrister. Tax~ Assessor, southern end of St. Johns County, to- A party of five from Bunnell spent
0. P'. Goode, Clerk (if Court. gether with the northern end of Vohusia Wednesda~y afternoon fishing. They re(C. J1. Perry. Sheriff. tune totwcihfrytreln
0i. 1). Corbe'tt, S.iipl. T'llle CI'rolI. ounty, has increased in its population tund o ov wihfryhee ie
All of St. Aii'awstin'. Viol. fromt less t han line hundred people it a spieckled perch which tipped the beami at
r 1,11ll I IlA CO ,' 7 AST 0.1I i I Utlti~ l iiixiit'h e hu forty plolnds.
li-;liiS leave Jaef-kil,: Arrive in ltllin,ll- sand.
vI-lc' lia1113: The great influx of buyers of the Bun- Mr. A. Lainbert, one of our good farm9:30 A. M.2 W45 1'. m
1 :30 P. I. 4:23 V.0. iell Development Company has done ers flown on the Moody road, was in town
8 :00 P. 11. it:40 P, M, much towards causing this phenomenal this week with a load of fine strawbertI'ilve lutanll X\rrv,: Inli'. ih increase lin population, and when we con- ries which he grew in his garden. They
-illfy:
G :29 A. IN1. 9 :00 A. NJ, 6ider the hundreds of others who are met with ready sale at fancy prices.
10l:26 A. At. 1:30 1'. 31.___ ________________1 :318 11. NJ. 7:6 II M.\---____ _________________Tremendous Movement
Launched f or the Creation of
a New County With Bunnl l' n3 h A County Seat. 7
Things are happpningr so rapidly at
Bunnell: matters of 4uch great importane are being considered that it fairly
taktas one's breath away. The owners of
the Bunnell colony lands, who are living
imi the north, the east and the west, are ,
ever anxious for the latest news coo- '~'
cerning developments at Bunnell. How- 1j ,,..
ever, we believe that the headlines of
'*hit; articlv I11 thrill you ab nothing ehclse*~
V~u wilnonhtthyae di. ~F
thiriRs" at 8unoll, and the creationl of r
a npkw county, %iith Bunnell as, its county I ~
11'cnt, w.ill put our commt-unity in the front 1A!'
manktu, and give our land owners advan- 5S' '
tugoil they have not dreamed of before. .
The creation of a new county in this ___________ ________territory hag bpo undpr 'advisement for
the pat four years, although nothing A riew 01 (raen lieadm near Ocearn 'it&
When you buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, you pay no taxes whatever until you have Completed all the payments on your land. The Bunnell Development Company bears every expense of this nature for you during the, time you are making your payments. We pay all recording fees, taxes, etc., and all you need ptovide for are Juat your armall monthly payments. Can't you afford these?




"___ h BUNNEILL HOME BUILDERby our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Efforts Being Put Forth for The work of clearing and fencing the Quite a large crowd of Bunnell young
White cemetery is progressing rapidly, people will enjoy an oyster roast at $20,000 High School Build- and within a few days the work will be Ocean City tonight,
ing in Bunnelilopee._Thein Bunnellspor report The People's Garage has installed an
The Bunnell sportsmen report that up-to-date vulcanizing machine, together
The people of southern St. Johns hunting and fishing continues very good. with several other new equipments neeCounty, particularly in the vicinity id' Several large strings of thirds and fikh 3unnell, are not so busy making money have been brought in this week by the a to an up-o-date garage.
that they neglect the educational side of different sportsmen.
life. The strenuous efforts that are ba- Tax Assessor Edminster, after spending made by our citizens to have a sp- Mr. George Salyerds, who lives out ing several weeks in the southern end cial school district created are proof of on Haw Creek, brought in some fine cab- of St. Johns County, assessing the propthis statement. We want an up-to-d:itc bages this week which brought six and erty, returned to St. Augustine Thursday high school building here in Bunnell. one-half cents a pound. afternoon.
We need one badly, and we believe that
with the creation of a special school dis- Several auto loads of young people trict, we may make this possible, and from St. Augustine came over for the J. B. Boaz, editor of the St. Johns
give others the advantages of such dance in Woodman Hall in Bunnell on Tribune, reports that he and family have school as well. Wednesday evening, been enjoying some fine strawberries and
A special meeting of about fifty prom- celery, grown in their own garden.
inent citizens of this district was held in Growers in the vicinity of DuPont the Bunnell school house on Wednesdmiy shipped three cars of cabbage to the Among the squirrel hunters out Monafternoon. Short talks were made by northern markets this week, which met day morning were Rev. Ramsey, C. F.
Supt. of Public Instruction. D. D. Cor- with ready sale at $5.50 and $6.00 per Turner, D. Y. Conatser and J. B. Boaz.
bett, Hon. I. I. Moody and Rev. R. L. hundred. Their farms are located on the Ramsey. It was decided to appoint a Dupont Florida Central Railroad, southcommittee to call on the patrons of the west of Bunnell. They will ship another The work being done by the students various schools in the vicinity of Bun- car of cubhage Monday. of the High School is satisfactory innell and talk the matter over with them. deed. The pupils in the tenth grade are
At the present time there are six One of the largest crowds ever packed finishing their first course in zoology
schools, besides the Bunnell school being into the Woodman Hall listened to Evan- by doing their experiments and drawmaintained in this end of the county, gelist Evers, of the Seventh Day Adven- ings. Latin is the hobby of the ninth each with a small attendance. Should tist Church, while he gave his stereopti- erade. The eighth grade students are the people of this section favor a special con lecture on Temperance last night. ronging for the experiment station in school district, it will mean the erection connection with their agricultural work.'
in Bunnell of a nice brick school building, Bids have been asked for on the conto cost from fifteen to twenty thousand struction of a good bridge across Haw Mr. W. J. Sezudlo of Detroit, Michigan, dollars. This building would be fully Creek, near the home of Mr. Hamilton. arrived in Bunnell Thursday evening acequipped for the conducting of an up-to- The county commissioners are to be com- companied by seven Polish people from date high school, where the children of mended for having ordered the construc- that city, who are here for tha. tao the surrounding country would receive a tion of this bridge, as it is very inmuch of inspecting the farms of the Korona high school education. needed by the farmers of that section, section of the colony with a view of buyShould the district be created, it is the which is the heart of the farming sec- ing. The Polish colony at Korona is intention of the officials to make arrange- tion of this end of the county, besides rapidly growing, and at the rate they ments whereby automobiles will bring it is where rural route No. 1 crosses the are now buying this land it will not be the children to school from the different creek. long until it is all taken up. Mr. Sczudlo
arts of the district, and carry them makes a trip down from Detroit every
ome again, free of cost to the parents. The Bunnell Telephone Company is in- month, and al ways has with him a party
This is one of the greatest movements stalling new telephones in several of the of buyers. for Bunnell and adjacent community that Bunnel homes this week, which is an inhas been launched sincee the beginning of tication that Bunnell continues to grow. Mr. Fred Moberg, of El Cerrita, Cal the town. It means progress, and our arrived this week, and after inspecting
people are working hard to bring it With onions selling at 15 cents a his land, which is near the home of Mr,
about, Better mehool facilities will mean pound, cabbage one hundred and forty Seyers, he decided that it wan what he better children, and better men and wo- dollars a ton, Irish potatoes one dollar was looking for and he will immediately men, and we sincerely trust that the a peck, the Florida farmers should get have it cleared and put under cultivation. majority of men and women will see it busy. He expressed himself, as being well
in this light and decide for the special Mr. J. H. Peardon, who recently came pleased with this Section. school district, here from Maine, has purchased the
Ward place, consisting of ten acres, situated on the Dixie Highway two miles Mr. and Mrs. Josef Spinier arrived in
Mr. A. J. Vefed, of Hurley, S. D., east of Bunnell. He is building a tern- Bunnell this week, and have purchased hae purchased one section (640 acres) of porary home on the place and is going the H. D. Miller home on Moody Bouleland west of Bunnell. Mr. Vefed in- to have five acres plowed and planted yard. They will take possession at ones,
forms uc that he will immediately bring to peas preparatory to planting a crop of and will make Bunnell their future home. itown his farming equipment, among early vegetables next winter.
which io a thirty-horse tractor which The F. M. Leanard Co., of Boston, who
Furnichoe the motive power for five turn- In driving over the colony this week have leased the l1O-acre orange grove min plows, a ditching machine and overY- we find that the potatoes are all coming ofv nox & Bead east of Bunnell, have thing that is ncided on ,nn up-to-date up in fine shape, nearly everyhodv hay- begun the shipment of their crop of farm. He albo stated that lie had sev- ing a good stand. Mr. Mick's crop scems oran l e se er uo tk
eml riedq wo wll prchse lrgeorange.,. They have aeveru[ auto trucks eral P rienda who will purchase large to be the furthest advanced of any in the hauling the fruit to Bunncll, and hope to tracts of this land ant will immediately colony and he will no doubt be the first be able to ship a car a day until the on. bugin farming and stock raiing here. to ship this season. tire crop i. moved,
Do you think it would be hard to give up the stool at the lunch counter, the big coal bills, the burst of water pipes, the snow, the ice, the grime and thesoot, foraplace where you would have delightful sunshine, all manner of beautiful flowers and foliage, fine hunting and fishing, bathing and boating. and an income that would take you beyond the worries of the High Cost of Living? Here is food for thought, and you would do well to digest it.




"he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Polish Priest of the Korona District of the Bunnell Colony, Writes of the Value of
Our Lands
Dear Mr. Verdenius: As you know, this is now my third year here, and I am very certain about the value of the land in Korona. With the improvements which the Bunnell Development Company propose to make throughout this section in the near future, I am certain that the land will rise in value.
In my travels over Florida I have seen land inferior to the land in our Polish colony, Korona, selling: for from $75.00 to $100.00 an acre.
I can only foresee that-there will before long be a rush of Polish settlers here, who will have some means, energy and good will, and to such I will say that after a few years a prosperous future may be yours here.
A Prosperous farm-home near IBunnell. If you wzoill provide yourself a little home like Lhis, yau need Very truly yours,
never worri about the hiah court of lrinno. (Rev.) A. BACZYK,
.Korona, Florida (DuPont P. O.) The Pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Bunnell writes of his Korona, Florida (uPnt P. .)
Impressions of the Colony S Bunnell, Florida. there have been as many as sixteen presDear Mr. Verdenius: ent at one time. And, there is no orYou have asked mine to write you as to ganization connected with the church that what I think of this country, and I am I has done quite so much as the Helping glad to comply. I, having been reared Hand Society, an organization composed not a great many miles north of here, of the young ladies of the town, whose just across the Florida-Georgia line, am object is to be a moral, financial and in a position to say more, possibly, about spiritual aid to the church and the comnthe true conditions and the outlook for munity. this country than one who has come from I am glad that I have come to Bunnell, an altogether different section, with a or I should say, I'm glad that I have different class of soil and different cli- been sent to Bunnell. The work among mate. the people here is a delight and pleasure,
From an agricultural standpoint there and I'm glad to be able to call this my. is no doubt a great future for this vec- home for a time at least. tion. It has proven that many and I find myself delighted with the coLnvarious crops can be produced here, and templation of things just as they are those who are in a position to know, with me tonight. Here in a town of tell inme that the soil here is capable of about eight hundred people, comfortably being built up to a very high state of sitting in my study without a fire on the production. 8th of January, an electric light hanging
The climate here cannot be exe lied over my study table, city water at my anywhere in the world. I have en back door, a nice parsonage, a nice here now for several months, which per- church and nice people among whom and :.
lod of time has extended from mid-sum- with whom to work. mer to mid-winter, and at no time h:.ve With the very best wishes for you in 'Rv. 1. Baczyl
I suffered from over-hat or cold. This- every way, I am, Very sincerely yours, of tne Caholic ChurcA. Aorm,. nuna Colony iQ indeed a hmot delightful and healthful R. L. RAMSEY.
eiimate, far enough inland to avoid the dampness of the sea coast itself, yet near enough the ocean to get the benefit of the aca-breese, which are known to be a mocet admirable minoderator of atmospheric temperature,
From a social standpoint, I do not know of a place anywhere that is more fortunate than Bunnell. The personality of the aitisonship of the town is decidedly above the average, due to the fact that in so many of the homes here the inmates. are found to be cultured and educated to a degree of fineness not usual to a town of this size.
Our church work in steadily on the upgrade. During the past. seven months ovor forty members have been added to the church roll, and the entire membership hua taken on now tife and is working for the uplift and the upbuilding of the entire community. The Men's Bible Class, organized sonim eight or nine week. ago, is proving to he a decided success. There are now sonime twentyfour of five iniell)ei :i Of this clasa, and( A ;roina Field ner tunnetil




_ _he BUNNIELL HOME B UILDERCOULDN'T FOOL "UNCLE JOE" -_., "
Former Sveakrr Wouldn't Be Lured Into
First Telephone Venture.
Shortly after Alexanler Graham ie -l
invented the telephone, "Uncle Joe" Cannon, then a young member of Congress,
was approached with a proposition to invest $1,000 in the new project to talk
over an ordinary wire strung on top of
wooden poles, Fred C. Kelly writes in
McClure's. For $1,000, he was assured.
he could be in on the ground floor of a
great business enterprise that was destined to revolutionize methods of communication the world over.
Just a short time before that Cannon
had lost a few hundred dollars in a
scheme to convert brass into gold by a
new chemical process. So he laughed
heartily and slapped his thigh when the
telephone proposition was laid beforehim.
"I would much rather," declared he,
"put my money in something more conservative. I think I'll go out in the country and buy up a few bee lines." Far,,, near I)a ,onf. howinu htAl re,,dVor t'iop.
A few days later Cannon had occasion
to call at the office of a young chap are presenting themselves all the time, urns. and should be read by every pernamed Vail, who was at the head of the if we have but eyes to see them and un- son at all interested in "America's Winrailway mail service in the postoffice de- derstanding to appreciate their worth. ter Garden": partment. These are unlimited opportunities for "Men are now finding gold in Florida
"Mr. Vail is not in. He has resigned success in our ow-n Bunnell Colony. Not -not in mines, but in her forests, farms, his place," Cannon was informed, only does odr three crops annually make gardens and fisheries. All the gold mined
"Resigned his place!" exclaimed Can- our sbil of great value, not only does our in Nevada and Arizona-last year was not. non, in amazement, for resignations from location and our transportation facilities equal to the wealth that went to* Florfda government jobs were almost unheard of. offer unusual advantages for the home- in exchange for her fruits and vegeta"Yes, he's gone with this thing invent- seeker, the man or the woman who is bless. There were enough golden oranges ed by a man named Bell. You know- looking for success; but there is money and grapefruit raised in'Florida last winthey claim they can talk between differ- being made and to be made in a straight ter to pay back the price"--5,000,000-. ent towns over a wire. Vail invested real estate way. Lots in Bunnell have that this country paid Spain for the tersome money in it and is going to make already doubled and trebled in value, ritory of Florida in 1821. Thousands of that his business." some of them have bought their owners farmers, fruit growers, truck gardeners.
"Well, it's just too bad," said Cannon; from twenty to thirty times the amount "I always liked Vail. They tried to get they originally paid the Bunnell Devel- those who have recently bough land in me for iheIr sucker. I'm sorry-it should opment Company for them. have been a nice chap like Vail." These are but a fewv suggestions to -down to detail woik in hot-'stuffy' 6li3a
He never saw Vail again until last win- "set you thinking." Don't be one who in the great cities of the North-young ter, when he attended a big dinner at the says in a few brief years when you learn men-middle-aged men-elderly men-National Geographic Society in Washing- of the wonderful successes in our colony, all have found in Florida a haven of rest ton. The guests all around the table "Blamed if it ain't a funny little old where they can enjoy the best of health, placed receivers to their ears and heard world!" But rather be among those who the balmiest of weather, and more than the roar of the Pacific ocean at San have seen the opportunities awaiting abundant compensation for their work. F.At4eiaeo. Right near Cannon sat Theo- them at Bunnell and are busily engaged "In Florida you will find nature your doe Vail, the multi-millionaire head of in reaping a bountiful harvest. friend and ally. She does not havd to
the American Telegraph and Telephone be fought as in northern countries, but
Company. FINDING GOLD IN FLORIDA. works for you-with you, every day,
"Blamed, ift1- ain't a funny little old While the following extract from a St. with rich soil, sunshine and an unfailing world!" remarked Cannon. Louis newspaper concerning Florida has water supply. Farming is a eontinuouq
It is, at that. been used repeatedly in advertisements performance in this enchanted land,
We are all quite ready to admit that of land companies, it is so full of facts which yields from three to five crops this was a lost opportunity for "Uncle that should appeal to the homeseeker each year in return for a minimum of Joe," and yet opportunities for success that it will bear repeating in these col- labor."
f l (td of ,h:t';-t-,, wi" u/ ,l' 1 Sut qt "o L' Ihtrtnd ;egout .\VdSe I/, ~~-n ,, -e,!. I' uI'a tl (,rras 5,t 0hf /mt i" ,O '~ "i'#t i,'-re, O.! o'anu(Tg Ot .zr~l .fV~ .-Il
-4, O ttiItp td !lia t h".tl y.tl ltlg




DID YOU EVER WISH
that you could get away from worry, rush anxiety and the.
HIGH COST OF LIVING incidental to life in a great city?
WOULD YOU LIKE
sone (Jay to b~e -,a producer olf somte (0' the high priced foods youi Ilse daily, rather than he ai ooiier- to sort of even things 1111 before you Iiave to lay down the burden of life? WOULD YOU CONSIDER
a plan to establish your family niea r to Natu re, in a- locality with, good schools, chunrces andu Society, nan from the almost constant worry of ineeting tke' never ending and ever increasing ex
to live ini an Ideal i'liiiite, wherei- three hundred and sixty-five days. of the year are growing days, and where you ewn raise three crops
WOULD YOU LIKE
to live in at country where tlwere are no severe winters and where you can, pick orange-s in ha trees, while the moreu unfortunate jwcople of the North arc buiv' shoveling snow?
WOULD YOU CONSIDER MOVING TO FLORIDA if we can prove to your satisfaction that' it v'o.d&Ina U 4Xtb pro)sperity, I~iliUI lenii. mid happines for you and four loved ones
till,,WOULD YOU LIKE TO BUY A FARM IN OUR BUNNELL COLONY
at I price and on ternis thiat are within the- reach of practically
THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE ARE PLANNING TO OWN A 11lTLF
AR.E YOUH ONE,~ 0+' THEIiM?~ A home with a grove, track fart aind poultry y ard in thle B unnell colony means independence. 1,4
Fill out thec order blank and isail at to nie at once, nlso write ine fully what you desire your farm for, whether for general farinintrnck fai niTig, fruit rhising, or whether you wvish to have -a luell~en farn, a. pean or orange grove. Our field nnnsl'ger and engineer at Bunnell will then be able to- maket a selection for you )'II iiz i telIi gont. ima ner, Ouat will ni t your pa rtinl ar neted1s.
Tband in our new tract- is selling for only $35.01 11n a4ere, on the monthly ilnstailirfelit plan of -50 conts an aec pur month, or $5-00 it month for eaelh ten acres yoll purchase.
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.




Full Text

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|pillilll!!!!ll[!!!l!lllll!!llll!il^ nillllilHii ,| lllll|||| l lliliiililllil|lilllllllll!ll!lll!M s File I rutk About Florida g J Tbe Bunnell Home Builder | Edited by S. HOWARD = 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. lllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllli willllll lllllllllll ltlllllllll llllllll'llllllll lllllllllll llllllllllllliw ^ MARCH, 19 17 A Field of “Money-Makers’’ in the Bunnell Colony The above is a picture taken in April, 1915, of an Irish potato field in the Bunnell Colony. Should vve have but an average crop this season and the present high prices prevail, we will ship out of St. Johns County more than five million dollars worth of early potatoes. There are, approximately, 20,000 acres of Irish potatoes planted in this part of the country. Our Bunnell farmers market their Irish potato crop, which i3 the first of their three annual crops, before the farmers of the North have begun plowing for their first and only crop.

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t5ftv BUNNELL HOME BUILDER FLORIDA IS ADVANCING RAPIDLY The most interesting State in the Union, ay fat' as the real estate worth is concerned, is the State of Florida. And it must be said that when the real estate people are interested in any particular locality it is because the locality is grow ing'; also, when the dealers in the homes and farms of a section are interested, it means that the people in general uiv in terested. This is a result that must nec essarily follow, and can be plainly seen by any one who stops to think. Most everyone whom you meet knows the fact that Florida is a booming State, and for that reason there must be a cause why so much money is being spent in this section, and why so many settlers are coming to it. The reason can he stated in a very few words—we have the land and the desirable location. Vet this still leaves a very important question open, to-wit: “Why was this tand not taken up years ago? Why did the Amer ican people go to the far West and over into Canada instead of coming to this land of sunshine, if conditions are so good here ? ’’ WHY NOT SETTLED BEFORE? The reason is this: In the first place years ago slavery existed in this State, and that held back the tide of immigra tion. After that, the Civil War took place, and of course there was not much moving around during that stormy pe riod; and then there was a third reason, the terrible mistakes of the reconstruc tion period. These are the reasons why Florida was not fully settled in the years that are gone." But that does not interest the Floridian of today. In fact, it is now working to his benefit. The money that would have been made two or three gen erations ago is now being made and the present generation is getting the benefit of it. Some of the reasons why Florida is such a great State today are the follow ing; The location is ideal; the climate ia the best in the United States; the laws are aa good aa any in the Union, and the farmer and grower can raise almost any thing on hia Florida land that his brother can raise in all of the other States of the Union put together. These reasons make a home in Florida a most desirable acquisition. INCREASE IN POPULATION. At the present time it is a safe guess that there are about one hundred million people in the United States. This enor mous population must be fed and clothed, and for that reason the high price of liv ing is becoming a serious economic ques tion all over the country. The consump tion of products is getting ahead of the production. This is the greatest reason why every one should make an effort to secure a home and some land while the chance ia yet here. If a man owns a few acres :n this Stute he is sure of a living, because lie can raise ail that he needs and have some left to sell. The climate ie ao mild Lhut he does not have to make provision for a winter's supply of fuel, and. on the other hand, the sea breezes which sweep the whole State make this country a desirable place in which to live? during the summer. CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. The temperature does not get any higher here than it docs in New York and Chicago, and a sunstroke is never known. These climatic conditions are to he I aken into consideration, and it will be found that they cannot lie equaled in the United States. Thousands of people are taking advan tage of the chance to get homes and lands in this State, and the next few years will show them the value of their foresight. This is in reality a young State when its development is taken into consideration. The whole South is in an undeveloped state. Only about two-fifths of the tillable land is now under cultiva tion, but why go to Georgia or Alabama when the sumc grade of land can be se cured here, and in most cases the land is better, plus the most ideal climatic conditions that prevail in the whole coun try ? During the past year over a million acres of land have been sold in Florida, and the real estate dealers predict as big a business next year. In time the State of Florida will be completely settled. The West has passed into history, but the South is just now in the making. All moving Americans should heed the call of the South, instead of following the idle dream of “Westward, ho!”—Jacksonville Metropolis. Mr. (i A .Imlf-rAntr .Ctt*hUr of the ISu until State Hunk Cashier of the Bunnell State Bank Writes of That Institu tion’s Splendid Condition Dear Sir: It has been my intention for some time to write you a letter relative to the con dition of the Bunnell State Bank, but owing to the increase of business, it has been almost impossible for me to write any one. The volume of business during the past fail and present winter surpasses anything in the history of the bank. We now have near eight hundred active checking accounts, and our deposits have been growing ail the while. Our collec tions last fall were almost marvelous, and with the steady increase otherwise, we have the assurance here that there is prosperity in the country. We have grown until we are forced to hunt larger quarters, but we feel that our new hank is going to meet our needs in every re spect. You know. Mr. Verdeniua, that when hanks have plenty of money there can be no better evidence that the people have money, and banks grow only as the country grows. It is the prosperity of (he people that has made the Bunnell State Bank about twice the size it was four years ago. Lot me say again that when the development and growth of a country stops, then the growth of every institution must stop. I regret that I do not have time to write you more at this time, but you must excuse me on the plea that I am a very busy man, and will write again when I have more time. With kindest regards, I am, Yours very truly, G. A. ANDERSON. Bunnell, Floridu. Statement of tin* Condition uf cite III'NN ELI. STALE BANK \t flit? 1'lonr of UuhIii^h, December 30, Illld; 1 I. Moody, President G. A. Anderson, Cashier lienourrea 4 *ijdi on Iniud ........ 14.K03.O2 Kxprlisu iici OUllt 3J3W.4N Furniture .. 2,roo.oo Roil Ksdiilfr Comity wiimiiits. .... TOT A l...911 I.llQIt.7tt Liabilities On pit nl stork ...9 IJUMO.fM Surplna mid undivided profits. • 4,047.11DopnsiU SI.OHLin (Vsl.lei.s* rheekft .KM.KO IHLVfcl I merest and discount. <1.130.00 lte-d!s*r>jnt Ti.riOO.OO TOT A L .91 l4.OOR.73 INTERESTING FACTS WORTH KNOWING ABOUT THE ORANGE TREE. “No fruit tree eomparea wifh it aa to hardiness and length of life. In Home is an orange tree that has reaehod the remarkable age of 716 years. In France is an orange tree with a record of 403 years, and it is still sturdy and healthy, with promise of reaching a ripe old age. In Spain are orange groves -100 years old, one tree of which has been growing for (132 years. In the Azores is a tree that produced 20,000 oranges in one season. In Europe fiOOO oranges were picked from one tree. In Florida, to come nearer home, a grower gathered 6000 oranges from one of the six hundred trees that comprise his grove, and he realized 397.00 from the one tree in one season. The banner yield in Florida from one tree was 10,000 oranges. There arc few like It. It is a tree sixty feet high and four feet in diameter.

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_ Sftg BUNNELL HOME BUILDER __ THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF SOIL Mr. T. A. Verdeniu Tbe Pioneer Small Parm Man of Florida. The amount of land in the United States, as well as in other countries, is limited, what the land will produce is unlimited. In our own Bunnell colony the soil will easily produce three crops a year, sometimes more,—but, THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF SOIL. After the soil has been inhabited, man nor na ture, nor any other force can add to this crop. The United States is increasing its population at a tremendous rate. The cities are now over-crowded, and as soon as the great war in Europe is over, the peasantry from Europe will flock to our shores as never before, for they are go ing to endeavor to get away from future calamities and from the countries so deeply in debt, where it will be an almost unbearable burden for the tax-payers, who will have to pay the cost of this tremendous war. Judging from correspondence I have received from relatives and friends in Europe, 1 feel that it 19 safe to say that within a couple of years there is going to be the greatest immigration from Europe to America that this country has ever knoivn, A majority of these people will come with the avowed determination of settling upon farm lands in America. In Europe, notably in such countries an Germany, Denmark, France nnd Hol land, the farms owned and worked by farmers are as a general rule, smaller than ton acres. In little Denmark, with its poor soil and northern climate, there are 16U,000 farms each from seven lo ten acres in urea France is said to have two million farms of less than twelve acres in sue, nnd another million farms each comprising less than twenty-five acres. 1 am able to speak personally of the great number of small farms in Holland, where I, the son of a farmer, was bom. Upon these farms families of five and siv live nnd sell a portion of what they produce. It Is here that the correct idea of farming is learned. These farmers utilize every square inch of ground, and though they are compelled by the climate of their countries lo remain idle many months of the year, yet they manage to live comfortably and at the same time to lay by a little money. However, many of these expert farmers from northern Europe have made their plans that as soon as this war is over, they will come to THE LAND OF THE FREE—TO AMERICAwhere greater opportunities may be found. During the last ten yeurs farm values all over the United States, and especially in Florida, have arisen at tremendous rates. In some instances Florida lands that could have been purchased a few years ago for $25.00 per acre, are today being held at $250.00 to $500.00 an acre, and even higher prices than these are being paid. Twelve miles to the north of the Bun nell colony, at Hastings, Florida, t know of one particular farm that was sold for $350.00 an acre, while I have no doubt that this land ten years ago might have been bought for $35.00 an acre. Further more, I have not the slightest doubt that farms in the Bunnell colony ten years hence will sell for as much per acre as the one I have mentioned at Hastings. Our soil at Bunnell is equally as good as that at Hastings; our transportation is the same, and our location is as good, if not better. The only difference is that the Hastings section is older and hence more developed. There is one farmer in the Bunnell colony who has grown over $4,000.00 worth of produce on twenty acres last year, besides having supplied the needs of his large family with plenty of eggs, meat, chickens, butter, milk, etc. There are still other farmers in our colony who have sold more than $1,500.00 worth of produce from their ten-acre farms; an other I shall mention who cleared $204.67 per acre on his one crop of Irish pota toes, followed by two more crops on the same land that year. These people and many others who have been very successful, are living now in the Bunnell colony, and 1 make the proposition that I will pay anyone the price of his return trip ticket from his home to Bunnell, if I cannot bring you to these people, who will tell you what they have done. Far-seeing men with visions of the fu ture, such as Harriman and Hill, during their lives, as well as many other noted citizens, have been engaged in the mighty movement of placing citizens of this country out upon the virgin lands where they could hecome independent. Surely there could be no more worthy undertaking. THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF LAND, and at last the people of our country have realized this fact, and they are Hocking to Florida by the trainloads. This winter the demand for Florida land seems to be greater than ever; even many of our rich men, seeing the value of lands in Florida advancing so rapidly, are buy ing large acreages and holding them for investment purposes, to be sold at large increases a few years hence. Let me remind you that there ia but one crop of Bunnell colony land, and at the rate these lunds are being sold it will be but a mutter of time until this crop I is ail disposed of. The men und women | who have selected this colony as the place j for their future homes muy indeed con gratulate themselves on their good judg ment and their splendid investments, and within a few years l am sure they will he able to more fully appreciate the truth of my words. Good wages will not always last. When the frightful European cataclysm is ended, there will come a world-wide re adjustment. Natural law will prevail; action and reaction are equal. High wages and the height of prosperity will be followed by low wages, little work and the slough of despond. Fortunate will be the men and women who are then pre pared to cope with the situation. What arrangements ure you making ? Are you preparing yourself for those days ? If you have not already done so, then let me tell you once again that in my opinion there is no place in the United States where a man may start farming under less difficulties, in a com paratively new country, than in the Bun nell colony. It will not be long, however, until you will not be able to buy any more land, of such excellent quality, at the price and terms offered you by the Bunnell Development Company today. No truer saying was ever uttered than this: “THERE IS BUT ONE CROP OF LAND.” Tvnical picture of theaveraocland found in the JJun nell t'olonv Thit ptinlo wnt inken (/flour ttiree niilee aoutk of Munneil. The persistent advertiser is pretty cer tain to be a man who ia not afraid to have the things he advertises investi gated. And that is why persistent ad vertising and success go hand In hand.

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Uhe BUNMFXL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed CITY nm-XTOKY vui.utcn sicj;vicks: FlItST .M. K CUHUi.‘II Sunday Si ltool trVi.T v Sunday— I 0 :00 A .M. F. livrtl. Supt. I-TiS'ichlng—11:00 A. M mul 7 :.*i0 I*. M. Ladies’ Air! Sen-Iffy Firs I .Mmulny **si*li month. •li inn Servl *'.* *vrry Sutidnv iiHerimori (tr t 0 ••till < Ity I ’ mIiio ii t .'t :00 F. M. 1*1-11.Vi r Meet 1 ui: WnltU'S.lii y in 7 ::>0 i\ \t Li • dies' Fritycr Ali .•cl inn Frl .lay nl ::l>fj F M Rev. It. 1 L. Knni&ey Castor. CIUIIK II iF Cl 1 HIST. Stuitli ii y School %  i-Vi'L-.V Still day—I 0 :A0 V M C. 1>. Ilitgndnnt, Supt. SEVENTH JA ^ Ah • VI*: NT 1ST. Sstldij ttli School f S;itui*ln, v) 10: On A. \| L. i \ .* oliUSOli, St ipt. Fruit riling Servl* •e. 1 1 .00 \ .M. V. F M. V. S. Mim-i hi;* c Sal unlay ). 1 Alt F. M — -Klrlntnl Mhh 1)> I'l l Dsidfitl. I'rnyt *r Mevil itK. WflllltLStll LV. 7 :00 F. M. .Spool; nl Lecture, Sunday, 7:00 I*, ftl. r ATHOL IF ruinccii —KtiltoNA. Miihu—0 :Ill) A. M. Hew A. Htirjiyk, I'naror. WOMAN’S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANLE UNION. Meets second .'tin! four lit Tuesdays In itiotU h. Mrs. I'\ A. Kli-h, I’rcHldeul. SBCKKT OHDKKS: A. F. A* A. M. No. 2>0 Meets fvory sftrnml and l*oiirt.li Tuesday m 7:00 l*. M. In Mitsnitii lliill. sci-mid floor Hank Hullilln^. All vlaitinir brotliora invited to ultrnd. D. M. I Jeon, W. M. ORDER EAHTRHN ST AH Meets every flrst nnd rtilnl Tnesilny nl 7 :0fl P. M. In the Masonic flail. Mrs. HiiKinloru (.Matron). CUt;NTV OFKfCIAI.K: S. C. Middleton, Tax Collector W. R. Edmlnster, Tax Assessor. O. 1’. Goode, Clerk of Court. 0. .1. Perry, Sheriff. I>. [). Corbett, Sirpt. Public liistnieriou. All of SI. Augustine. I'Tn. KhOltllU EAST' COAST HA 11.WAY Cu. Trains leave JaekMouvtlle: 9 :3 0 A. M. 1 :30 P. M. 8 :00 P. M. f.eiive lluonell r> :29 A. M. Ill .26 A. M. 1 :38 P. 11. Arrive in Rnnnell — IJally : 12 :45 P. II. i :23 I'. M 11 :4 0 P. M. Arrive tu .lnrk.sonvillc —Dally : 9 .00 A. 11. 1 :30 P. M 7 :B0 P 11. Tremendous Movement Launched for the Creation of a New County — With Bun| nell eta ita County Seat. Things are happening so rapidly at Bunnell’ matters of such great impor tance are being considered that it fairly takes one's breath away. The owners of the Runnell colony lands, who are living in the north, the east and the west, are ever_ anxious for the latest news con cerning developments at Bunnell. How ever. we believe that the headlines of ihie article will thrill you as nothing else has done. You will see that they are “doing things" at Bunnell, and the creation of a now county, with liunncll ue its county j seat, will put our community in the front j ranks, ana give our land owners advan tages they nave not dreamed of before. The creation of a new county in this territory has been under advisement for the past four years, although nothing public has been said concerning it. How ever, it has seemed to those most inter ested that this was the year for the movement to he launched. This new county, if created by the leg islature as desired, will comprise the southern end of St. Johns County and the northern end of Volusia County. It will lie folly miles north and south, and twenty-live miles oakl and west. It will embrace six hundred and forty thousand acres of land, a majority of which is the best farming land in the State. Its pop ulation to begin with will he approxi mately (('a thousand, with the “Biggest Little Town in Florida” for its county seat. When created it will be the best county in the state. A new county, with a new county scat, is much to be desired by the citizens of this section. Many of them are forced to travel great distances to reach their county seat—St. Augustine. With the new county created, and Bunnell the county seat, any one living in the county could reach the county seat within three hours at the outside, as the farthest dis tance to the county seat would he only twenty-three miles. When the present counties of St. Johns and Volusia were laid out, and their county seats chosen, no one ever dreamed of the manner in which this district would he settled. It seems almost un believable when we face the statement that within the past eight years the southern end of St. Johns County, to gether with the northern end of Volusia County, has increased in its population from less Ilian one hundred people to a population of approximately ten thou sand. 'Che great influx of buyers of the Bun nell Development Company has done much towards causing this phenomenal increase in population, and when we con sider the hundreds of others who are planning to soon come and settle on their Bunnell colony farms, we can judge of the further increase. A number of names were suggested for this proposed county, but as a compli ment to the man at the head of the Run nell Development Company, President 1. 1. Moody, who has done so much for this section of the country, many of the citizens decided that it should be MOODY COUNTY. Mr. Moody, of course, appre ciated this honor, hut in an open letter, published in the St. Johns Tribune, he requested that the name might not he Moody, hut FLAGLER, in honor of Henry M. Flagler, the master-builder of Florida, and termed by Mr. Moody, “the greatest man that ever lived in our be loved state." We are sure that our readers will he eager to know of developments along this line as they take place. Mr. J. H. Martin, of Island Grove, Florida, has accepted the position of head bookkeeper of the Bunnell Development Company, taking the place of Judge W. C. Heath, who has been forced to resign on account of his failing eyesight. M. Stone has entered the horse and mule business in Bunnell. When you have one to sell or swap, or when you want to buy one, see Mike. A party of five from Bunnell spent Wednesday afternoon fishing. They re turned to town with forty-three fine speckled perch which tipped the beam nt forty pounds. Mr. A. Lambert, one of our good farm ers down on the Moody road, was in town this week with a load of fine strawber ries which he grew in his garden. They met with ready sale at fancy prices. A ruw oj Ocean Beach near Ocean Citu When you buy a farm in the Bunnell colony, you pay no taxes whatever until you have completed all the payments on your land. The Bunnell Development Company bears every expense of this nature for you during the 1 time you are malting your payments. We pay all recording fees, taxes, etc., and all you need provide for arc just your small monthly payments. Can’t you afford these?

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__Sft g BUNNELL HOME B U I L D E R ___ by our Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Efforts Being Put Forth for $20,000 High School Build ing in Bunnell The people of southern St. Johns County, particularly in the vicinity of Bunnell, are not so busy making money that they neglect the educational side of life. The strenuous efforts that are be ing made by our citizens to have a spe cial school district created are proof of this statement. We want an up-to-date high school building here in Bunnell. We need one badly, and we believe that with the creation of a special school dis trict, we may make this possible, and give others the advantages of such a school as well. A special meeting of about fifty prom inent citizens of this district was held in the Bunnell school house on Wednesday afternoon. Short talks were made by Supt. of Public Instruction, D. D. Cor bett, Hon. I. I. Moody and Rev. R, L. Ramsey. It was decided to appoint a committee to call on the patrons of the various schools in the vicinity of Bun nell and talk the matter over with them. At the presept time there are six schools, besides the Bunnell school being maintained in this end of the county, each with a small attendance. Should the people of this section favor a special school district, it will mean the erection in Bunnell of a nice brick school building, to cost from fifteen to twenty thousand dollars. This building would be fully equipped for the conducting of an up-todate high school, where the children of the surrounding country would receive a high school education. Should the district be created, it is the intention of the officials to make arrange ments whereby automobiles will bring the children to school from the different parts of the district, and carry them home again, free of coat to the parents. This is one of the greatest movements' for Bunnell and adjacent community that has been launched since the beginning of the town. It means progress, and our people are working hard to bring it about. Better school facilities will mean better children, and better men and wo men, and we sincerely trust that the majority of men and women will see it in this light and decide for the special school district, Mr. A, J. Vefed, of Hurley, S. D., has purchased ope section (640 acres) of land west of Bunnell. Mr. Vefed in forms us that he will imniediatelv bring down his farming equipment, among which is a thirty-horse tractor which furnishes the motive power for five turn ing plows, a ditching machine and every thing that is needed on an up-to-date farm. He also stated that lie had sev eral friends who will purchase large t.racte of thio land and will immediately begin farming and stock raising here. The work of clearing and fencing the White cemetery is progressing rapidly, and within a few days the work will be completed. The Bunnell sportsmen report that hunting and fishing continues very good. Several large strings of birds and fish have been brought in this week by the different sportsmen. > Mr. George Salyerds, who lives out on Haw Greek, brought in some fine cab bages this week which brought six and one-half cents a pound. Several auto loads of young people from St. Augustine came over for the dance in Woodman Hall in Bunnell on Wednesday evening. Growers in the vicinity of DuPont shipped three cars of cabbage to the northern markets this week, which met with ready sale at $5.50 and $6.00 per hundred. Their farms are located on the Dupont Florida Central Railroad, south west of Bunnell. They will ship another car of cabhage Monday. One of the largest crowds ever packed into the Woodman Hail listened to Evan gelist Evers, of the Seventh Day Adven tist Church, while he gave his stereopticon lecture on Temperance last night. Bids have been asked for on the con struction of a good bridge across Haw Creek, near the home of Mr. Hamilton. The county commissioners are to be com mended for having ordered the construc tion of this bridge, as it is very much needed by the farmers of that section, which is the heart of the farming sec tion of this end of the county, besides it is where rural route No. 1 crosses the creek. The Bunnell Telephone Company is in stalling new telephones in several of the Bunnell homes this week, which is an in dication that Bunnell continues to grow. With onions selling at 15 cents a pound, cabbage one hundred and forty dollars a ton, Irish potatoes one dollar a peck, the Florida farmers should get busy. Mr. J. H. Peardon, who recently came here from Maine, has purchased the Ward place, consisting of ten acres, sit uated on tbe Dixie Highway two miles east of Bunnell. He is building a tem porary home on the place and is going to have five acres plowed and planted to peas preparatory to planting a crop of early vegetables next winter. In driving over the colony this week we find that the potatoes are all coming up in fine shape, nearly everyhody hav ing a good stand. Mr. Mack’s crop seems to be the farthest advanced of any in the colony and he will no doubt be the first to ship this season. Quite a large crowd of Bunnell young people will enjoy an oyster roast at Ocean City tonight. The People’s Garage has installed an up-to-date vulcanizing machine, together with scverul other new equipments nec essary to an up-to-date garage. Tax Assessor F.dminster, after spend ing several weeks in the southern end of St. Johns County, assessing the prop erty, returned to St. Augustine Thursday afternoon. J. B. Boaz, editor of the St. Johns Tribune, reports that he and family have been enjoying some fine stvawberries and celery, grown in their own garden. Among the squirrel hunters out Mon day morning were Rev. Ramsey, C. F. Turner, D. Y. Conatser and J. B. Boaz. The work being done by the students of the High School is satisfactory in deed. The pupils in the tenth grade are finishing their first course in zoology by doing their experiments and draw ings. Latin is the hobby of the ninth grade. The eighth grade students are longing for the experiment station in connection with their agricultural work. Mr. W. J. Sczudlo of Detroit, Michigan, arrived in Bunnell Thursday evening ac companied by seven Polish people from that city, who are here for the pewq}as£ of inspecting the farms of the Korona section of the colony with a view of buy ing. The Polish colony at Korona is rapidly growing, and at the rate they are now buying this land it will not be long until it is all taken up. Mr. Sczudlo makes a trip down from Detroit every month, and always has with him a party of buyers. Mr. Fred Moberg, of El Cerrita, Cal., arrived this week, and after inspecting his land, which is near the home of Mr. Seyers, he decided that it was what he was looking for and he will immediately have it cleared and put under cultivation. He expressed himself as being well pleased with this Section. Mr. and Mrs. Josef Spinier arrived in Bunnell this week, and have purchased the H. D. Miller home on Moody Boule vard. They will take possession at once, und will make Bunnell their future home. The F. M. Leanard Co., of Boston, who have leased the 110-acre orange grove of Knox & Bead east of Bunnell, have begun the shipment of their crop of oranges. They have several auto trucks hauling the fruit to Bunnell, and hope to be able to ship a car a day until the en tire crop is moved. Do you think it Would be hard to give up the stool at the lunch counter, the big coal bills, the burst of water pip*, the snow, the ice, the grime and the soot, foraplace where you would have delightful sunshine, all manner of beautiful flowers and foliage, fine hunting and fishing, bathing and boating, and an income that would take you beyond the worries of the High Cost of Living? Here is food for thought, and you would do well to dige*t it.

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5)Sc BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A prosperous farm-home nenr Bunnell. If you will provide yourself a little home like this, you need never worry about the hiyh cost of lir-ino The Pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Bunnell writes of his Impressions of the Colony Polish Priest of the Korona Dis trict of the Bunnell Colony, Writes of the Value of Our Lands Dear Mr. Verdenius: As you know, this i9 now my third year here, and I am very certain about the value of the land in Korona. With the improvements which the Bunnell De velopment Company propose to make throughout this section in the near fu ture, I am certain that the land will rise in value. In my travels over Florida I have seen land inferior to the land in our Polish colony, Korona, selling for from $75.00 to $100.00 an acre. I can only foresee that there will be^ fore long be a rush of Polish settlers here, who will have some means, energy and good will, and to such I will say that after a few years a prosperous future may be yours here. Very truly yours, (Rev.) A. BACZVK, Korona, Florida (DuPont P. 0.) ^ Bunnell, Florida. Dear Mr. Verdenius: You have asked me to write you as to what T think of this country, and I am glad to comply. I, having been reared not a great many miles north of here, just across the Florida-Georgia line, am in a position to say more, possibly, about the true conditions and the outlook for this country than one who has come from an altogether different section, with a different class of soil and different cli mate. From an agricultural standpoint there is no doubt a great future for this lec tion. It has proven that many and various crops can be produced here, and those who are in a position to know, tell me that the soil here is capable of being built up to a very high state of production. Tho climate here cannot be excelled cel le Bee anywhere in the world. I have here now for several months, which per iod of time has extended from mid-sum mer to mid-winter, and at no time have 1 suffered from over-heat or cold, 'this is indeed a most delightful and healthful eiimate, far enough inland t.o avoid the dampness of the sea coast itself, yet near enough the ocean to get the benefit of the eea-breezes, which are known to be n rnoet admirable moderator of at mospheric temperature. From a social standpoint, I do not know of a place anywhere that is more fortunate than Bunnell. The personality of the citizenship of the town is decidcdiv above the average, due to the fact that in an many of the homes here the inmates are found to be cultured and educated to a degree of fineness not usual to a town of this size. Our church work ia steadily on the up grade. During the past seven months over forty members have been added to the church roll, and the entire member ship hu=j taken on new tife and is working for the uplift and the upbuilding of the entire community. The Men's Bible Claes, organized some eight or nine weeks ago. is proving to he a decided success. There are now some twentyfour or five members of this class, and I there have been as many as sixteen pres ent at one time. And, there is no or1 ganization connected with the church that | has done quite so much as the Helping Hand Society, an organization composed of the young ladies of the town, whose object is to be a moral, financial and spiritual aid to the church and the com munity. 1 am glad that I have come to Bunnell, j or I should say, IÂ’m glad that I have been sent to Bunnell. The work among the people here is a delight and pleasure, and IÂ’m glad to be able to call this my home for a time at least. I find myself delighted with the con templation of things just as they are with me tonight. Here in a town of about eight hundred people, comfortably sitting in my study without a fire on the 8th of January, an electric light hanging over my study table, city water at my back door, a nice parsonage, a nice church and nice people among whom and with whom to work. With the very best wishes for you in every way, I am, Very sincerely yours, R. L. RAMSEY. A. Baczyk of Che Catholic Church. Aoruna. fiunntll Colony A (iroud.no yield near Bunnell

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BUNNE1L1L HOME BUILDER COULDN’T FOOL “UNCLE JOE” Former Speaker Wouldn't Be Lured Into First Telephone Venture. Shortly after Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone, "Uncle Joe” Can non, then u young member of Congress, was approached with a. proposition to in vest $1,000 in the new project to talk over an ordinary wire strung on top of wooden poles, Fred C. Kelly writes in McClure's. For $1,000, he was assured, he could be in on the ground floor of a great business enterprise that was des tined to revolutionize methods of com munication the world over. Just a short time before that Cannon had lost a few hundred dollars in a scheme to convert brass into gold by a new chemical process. So he laughed heartily and slapped his thigh when the telephone proposition was laid beforehim. "I would much rather,” declared he, “put my money in something more con servative. I think I’ll go out in the coun try and buy up a few bee lines.” A few days later Cannon had occasion to call at the office of a young chap named Vail, who was at the head of the railway mail service in the postoffice departm ent. ‘‘Mr. Vail is not in. He has resigned his place,” Cannon was informed. “Resigned his place!” exclaimed Can non, in amazement, for resignations from government jobs were almost unheard of. “Yes, he’s gone with this thing invent ed by a man named Bell. You know— they claim they can talk between dilTerent towns over a wire. Vail invested some money in it and is going to make that his business." “Well, it’s just too bad," said Cannon; "I always liked Vail. They tried to get me for their sucker. I’m sorryit should have been a nice chap like Vail.’’ He never saw Vail again until last win ter, when he attended a big dinner at the National Geographic Society in Washing ton. The guests all around the table placed receivers to their ears and heard the roar of the Pacific ocean at San Ev&heieco. Right near Cannon sat Theo dore Vail, the multi-millionaire head of the American Telegraph and Telephone Company. "Blamed' if ‘It ain’t a funny little old world!” remarked Cannon. It is, at that. We are all quite ready to admit that this was a lost opportunity for “Uncle Joe,” and yet opportunities for success are presenting themselves all the time, if we have but eyes to see them and un| derstanding to appreciate their worth. These are unlimited opportunities for i success in our own Bunnell Colony. Not I only does our three crops annually make ( our soil of great value, not only does our j location and our transportation facilities | offer unusual advantages for the homeseeker, the man or the woman who is looking for success; but there is money being made and to be made in a straight real estate way. Lots in Bunnell have already doubled and trebled in value, some of them have brought their owners from twenty to thirty times the amount they originally paid the Bunnell Devel opment Company for them. These are but a few suggestions to “set you thinking.” Don’t be one who says in a few brief years when you learn of the wonderful successes in our colony. “Blamed if it ain’t a funny little old world!” But rather be among those who have seen the opportunities awaiting them at Bunnell and are busily engaged in reaping a bountiful harvest. FINDINcTgOLeTIN FLORIDA. While the following extract from a St. Louis newspaper concerning Florida has been used repeatedly in advertisements of land companies, it is so full of facts that should appeal to the homeseeker that it will bear repeating in these col umns, and should be read by every per son at all interested in “America’s Win ter Garden”: “Men are now finding gold in Florida —not in mines, but in her forests, farms, gardens and fisheries. All the gold mined in Nevada and Arizona'last year was not equal to the wealth that went to Florida' in exchange for her fruits and vegeta bles. There were enough golden oranges and grapefruit raised in Florida last win ter to pay back the price—$6,000,000—. that this country paid Spain for the ter ritory of Florida in 1821. Thousands of farmers, fruit growers, truck gardeners, those who have recently bought land in Florida, and who were formerly tied •down to detail work in hot'Stnffy offices in the great cities of the North—young men—middle-aged men—elderly men— all have found in Florida a haven of rest where they can enjoy the best of health, the balmiest of weather, and more than abundant compensation for their work. “In Florida you will find nature your friend and ally. She does not have to be fought as in northern countries, but works for you—with you, every day, with rich soil, sunshine and an unfailing water supply. Farming is a continuous performance in this enchanted land, which yields from three to five crops each vear in return for a minimum of labor." felimosr of Hr: I'l f ( r c or an re jrove jut! e tsl of lit e HunnAll colony .Vote the. nur/niiirctU Pulm tress in. UtrharX or omul Tin dr res of Ontnocs 01 urope/mll nil! jive irou an imtfpendent li> iuu in the Sunny XonUtliUKl.

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DID YOU EVER WISH WSSS&ESB&SSSSSSS^SSSl wsasrtzssss. that you could get away from worry, rush anxiety and the HIGH COST OF LIVING incidental to life in a great city? WOULD YOU LIKE some day to be a producer of souk 1 of the high priced foods yon use daily, rather Mom he a consumer—-to sort of even things op before you have' to lay down the burden of life? WOULD YOU CONSIDER a plan to establish your family near to Nature, in a locality with good schools, churches and society, away from the almost constant worry of meeting the never ending and ever increasing ex penses of living? WOULD YOU LIKE to live in an ideal climate, whore three hundred and sixty-five days, of the year are growing days, and where you can raise three crops annuallv ? WOULD YOU LIKE to live in a country where there are no severe winters and where you can pick oranges ffbm the trees, while the moreunfortunate people of the North arc busy shoveling snow? WOULD YOU CONSIDER MOVING TO FLORIDA if we can prove to your satisfaction that it would' mean hoalth, >rosperity, independence and happiness for you and your loved ones? WOULD YOU LIKE TO BUY A FARM IN OUR BUNNELL COL ONY at a price and on terms that are within the reach of practically every man and woman? THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE ARE PLANNING TO OWN A LITTLE FARM SOME DAY ARE YOU ONE' OE THEM? A homo with a grove, truck fan and poultry yard in the Bunnell colony means independence. Bui cess is easier than failure. Fill out the order blank and mail it to me at once, also write me fully what you desire your farm for, whether for general fann ing, truck farming, fruit rliising, or whether you wish to have a chicken farm, a pecan or orange grove. Our field mnnaI'ger and engineer at. Bunnell will then he able to make a selection for you, in an intelligent manner, that wiil moot your particular needs. ; Land in our new tract is selling for only $35.00 an acre, on the monthly installment plan of uO cents an acre per month, or If!5.00 a month for each ten acres you purchase. THOMAS A. VERDEN1US, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, III.