Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
NOVEMBER, 1916
Portion of Mr. G. A. Dupont's Herd of Durock Jerseys
The above is a picture of Mr. G. A. Dupont feeding a part of his herd of Durock Jersey Hogs. Mr. Dupont now resides about twelve miles north of I-Bunnell, but at one time he owned a small saw -mill some four miles south of Bunnell, and our town of Dupont was named for him.




M'e BUNNIELL HOME BUILDER
Bunnell's Rapid Growth by Mr. 1. 1. Moody
I therefore never seem to be able to cafe, where meals are furnished at all think of Blunnell as being more than five hours. The owner of the tonsorial parlor years old, and I now want to tell your is doing a flourishing business, while the readers, in as brief a manner as possible, pool rooms and bowling alleys afford the just what we have accomplished in that citizens an opportunity of passing away length of time. You may then judge for their leisure time.
yourselves whether or not every Bunnell- We have two physicians in Bunnell ite has reasons to be proud of our colony, who are always ready to answer the call Taking into consideration that only a of those in need of a doctor. The Pine very small percentage of our approxi- Grove Inn and the Halcyon, our two upmately 3,000 buyers have As yet to-date hotels, furnish ample accommodasettled on their lands-what shall we tions for the traveling public, although not expect to do during the coming, five they are usually over-crowded during the years, when perhaps more than half of winter months.
our buyers will have located on their We have a weekly newspaper, the St.
farms during that time? Johns Tribune, with a real, live Editor.
The town of BUNNELL is incorpo- This paper goes into the homes of nearly
rated and has a population of approxi- two thousand people, and everyone who mately eight to nine hundred people; our is interested in the Bunnell colony should Mayor being Mr. W. H. Heath. Bunnell be a subscriber to it. Bunnell has also a has a good public school in which all of bre n rt atrwihsple
the common branches are taught, as well bre n rt atrwihsple
as two years of high school work. School our potato and vegetable growers with closd lst ermwithonehunredand necessary barrels and crates, and that is cled plast tmw onlhaeehure andoo a large number, too, at the time of our
Mr. L. L Moody, Pres. of the Bunnell at Bunnell, but others at Ocean City, shpigseon
State Bank. Black Point, Dupont, Codyville and The surrounding country as Well as the
Korona. We have three churches in Bun- other towns in the colony are endeavor-" I am writing this article primarily for nell-Methodisf, Christian and Seventh ing to keep pace with the growth of Bunthe benefit of those who have not kept Day Adventists, likewise a Catholic- nell, and are developing very rapidly. closely in touch with the rapid develop- church in Korona, which is in the south- One can scarcely look in any direction ment taking place in our colony, and par- ern part of the colony, without seeing some new settler clearing
ticularly in our town of Bunnell, which The following lodges are in operation his land, or building his home, barn or is justly called "The Biggest Little City at Bunnell: The Bunnell Lodge No. 200, fences. One of the most important imin Florida." I shall likewise give the fol- Free and Accepted Masons; Order of the provements in the country was the comlowing information for the benefit of the Eastern Star; Modern Woodmen of pletion of the brick highway across the men and women who have only recently America, and the Knights of Pythias. county. This road is known as the Dixie heard about Bunnell. It may be that what The women of the colony have organized Highway, extends across the Bunnell colI shall say will sound like "ancient his- the Ladies' Improvement Society; the ony for a distance of eight miles,' and tory" to many of the readers of the Stitch and Chatter Club, and the Ladies' makes the hauling of produce a very easy HOME BUILDER; still, after all, it is Aid Society. matter for the farmers who are living
not a bad thing for all of us to look Among the business houses in Bunnell near by. Another important improvement backward occasionally and mark the road may be found the following firms: M. for our community was the establishing over which we have come. Kanner & Company, McArn & Company of Rural Free Delivery Route No. 1 from
The story of Bunnell's growth and de- and People's Mercantile Company. These Bunnell. This route covers a distance of velopment may read like a fairy tale to three stores carry a full and complete about twenty-seven miles, going- west those who have never seen our 'colony, line of general merchandise and all. are from Bunnell; and on October 16th a secbut the things I shall tell you about it doing a good business in our community. ond route was established extending from are simple, unvarnished truths. Great Holden's Drug Store is as nice a store as Bunnell to Bulow, via Ocean City. things have been accomplished in south- one can find in many towns twice the A new railroad is now under construcern St. Johns County during the past five size of Bunnell. This store supplies the tion, crossing the Bunnell colony from years. No one particular individual trade within a radius of twenty miles of Dupont to Orange Hammock, viaCody-, should have all the credit for this, nor Bunnell. The Bunnell Hardware Coin- ville. Side tracks are to be laid at a disthe Bunnell Development Company (al- pany carries a large line of hardware, tance of every two miles, so that the though it has undoubtedly done its farmizig implements, furniture, etc., and farmers will be able to load or unload share); but as I see it, the greatest work are ready to supply our newcomers as their produce within a mile or two of has been done by the men and women well as our old residents with anything their farms.
who have bought farms in our colony, in their line. The Bunnell State Bank is I have not had the time t o write anywho have had faith in us and in our prop- one of the strongest banking institutions thing about Ocean City, Dupont or osition, and who have had faith enough in the State. Korona, and my space is now taken up.
in themselves to come here and develop The Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply However, I do want to say that all of
the community and demonstrate the pos- Company is enjoying a large business, these towns are growing and improvesibilities of our soil. especially since the brick highway has ments are being made right along. With
It is a little over five years since I first been completed. L. A. Jett & Company only this brief review before us, we must met Mr. Verdenius, and I believe it will and the Johnson Lumber & Supply Coin- surely all admit that we have been "GObe five years next December that he be- pany manufacture and handle all kinds ING SOME," and yet the colony is only came our sales manager and sent out his of rough and dressed lumber and handle in its infancy. When this country is once first piece of literature regarding the large stocks of building material. The settled up, and by that I mean when all Bunnell colony. Of course the town of Bunnell Ice, Light & Water Company of the men and women who have bought
Bunnell had been laid out some time pre- supplies our town with electric lights and land of the Bunnell Development Coinvious to that, and we had begun adver- ice, having an up-to-date plant. Mr. pany come here, clear their farms and tising the colony on a small scale; but Bacher has one of the best blacksmith put them under cultivation, we shall have the public generally really only heard shops in the state. The Bunnell Tele- the GARDEN SPOT OF THE UNITED about Bunnell at that time, and prac- phone Company is growing rapidly, there STATES. Let each of us do our share tically all of her growth has been since now being over one hundred subscribers towards hastening the day when our then. Ifor this Exchange. Bunnell also has a dreams shall all have become realities.
DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 2 1ST.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
THE COST OF BUILDING A WHAT ONE SUCCESSFUL BUNHOME IN THE BUNNELL NELL FARMER HAS DONE
COLONY "Mr. J. C. Miller, of Black Point, was
The cost of building a home in Florida Lin with him five ears of fine corn, which
must vary according to the taste and means A__he grew on his farm this year. The five
of the individual, just as the cost of build- -ears when laid out end to end measured ing a home must vary in our northern -five feet and eleven inches and weighed states;, and to give exact figures regard- five and one-half pounds.
ing such a cost is next to impossible. Al- Mr. Millet has about sixteen acres of
most daily do we receive one or more let- this corn, which he grew on the same
ters asking the cost of building a home at ____ land that he harvested a spring crop of
Bunnell, and here again we are confronted UIrish potatoes from, and he estimates
with the same question -WHAT KIND ~ h. L~that he is gathering at the rate of sixtyOF A HOME DO YOU NEED OR ,.six bushels to the acre. He has already
WANT? If filled two large cribs to their capacity,
We have always told inquirers that a so full in fact that the floor of one of
comfortable home could be built in the &A them broke down, and he has more corn
colony for about seventy-five dollars a __ __ /togthr
room. Of course no one can expect any- W t aherse. f ewudhaeeog
thing elaborate at this price. The follow- corn o ke run him unt ld havestedouh
ing letter from Mr. Reynolds, of Detroit, conext crp, hsid: "Inwillh harvesenouh
Micheiasest geuteswl.wt to feed my four mules, all my hogs,
ou stmts chickens, etc., and then have plenty to
Mr. Reynolds is a practical man-a mia- sell." On this same ground he has a fine
chinist, and has lived in the South. He co fca rspaieadvle
was kind enough to allow us to reproduce bean hay, which he will cut before prein the HOME BUILDER the plans for the
home he expects to erect in the Bunnell If any of the readers of the HOME paring his land for his spring crop of
colony this fall. We believe our readers BUILDER desire further information re- potatoes. will study these plans with interest. garding this little house, I shall be glad Mr. Miller will enter the Heard Na_____________to answer any questions to the best of tional Bank corn contest and expects to
my ablity.win the $100 prize they are offering for Deoar A Sir: eanmiligyo wovew Today it is cold and cloudy here, and the best three bushels of corn grown in
ofa inxnive hmmilouse andw i s tr It tell you we are thinking longingly Florida.
ofa nxesv osadwl r o about Bunnell. When asked what this crop of corn
give you a description of same, without Yours very truly, had cost him, Mr. Miller said: "It has
BUkiLDER up o tuhispbcae i the O M. C. REYNOLDS, not cost me one cent in cash, and only a
BeIDR of asitac toi soecaone elsoe who Detroit, Mich. few days of work."
be o asistnce o sme ne ese hoIn regard to his sweet potato crop, like myself, is planning to move to the MORE THAN TWELVE MILLION which is now ready to begin harvesting,
Bunnell colony and erect a home.* DOLLARS SPENT FOR GOOD he said: "I have about three acres
After a careful study of conditions at patdt we oaosfo hc
Bunnell, I decided to build an inexpen- ROADS IN FLORIDA epant to dsee potatoe from whihtI
sive yet substantial house, and in work- The total amount of money spent and bushels of good potatoes."
ing out my plans I have had quotations being spent in Florida for good roads Sweet potatoes are now selling at a
onsplesfo hevros ubr during the past five years comes up to dollar a bushel."-Si. Johns Tribune.
dealers in Bunnell. I have also had in $12,271,424.37. Residents of St. Johns________mind a house that will be neat, attractive County are proud that our county has a and roomy, and have plenty of light and place on the honor roll as among the BUNNELL HOTELS ARE PREair-the latter two being essential in a progressive counties in this great state. PARING FOR A BUSY
southern climate. Thousands of people came to the state WINTER
This house will have five rooms and last winter simply because of the progtwo porches, also two large closets, one ress in road work by many of the lead- The hotels and boarding houses of
opening off of each bed room. The liv- ing counties, and there will be many Bunnell are making preparations for a
ing nd inig romsaremuc lagermore thousands next winter for the same large number of winter visitors, and no ihn ad diningy ros are muchilare reason. It is an important fact to be doubt they will all be filled to their cathanes ae usully feonetd in oin noted from federal statistics that Florida pacity. Bunnell can boast of two good
arch. A bed room will open off of each is now expending more money per capita hotels and three good boarding houses.
of hes tw roms;a frepacein he for good roads than any' state in the Besides our hotel facilities, Bunnell is
Unon locate abou half-wa bewe Daytona i th
living room adding to the comfort and Union.____ load S.auutinefwoy ofetheen mostofa
artistic arrangement of the room. The mous wter regstinto the nite Stas
kitchen being to one side of the main JACKSONVILLE'S NEW PACK- with weeoall goo thUighwast
part of the house, giving it three out- ING PLANT both these cities. So with these advanside walls, allows not only for plenty of The packing plant of Armour & Coin- tages, not to say'anything of our splenlight and air, but keeps all of the kitchen pany at Jacksonville is now almost com- did fishing and hunting, Bunnell should work well away from the rest of the pleted. The slaughtering capacity of the be an ideal place in which to spend the
house. The large back porch provides plant will be 200 head of cattle, 500) hogs winter.
ample space for washing or other work. and 500 sheep daily, and it is expected _________________The cost of this house will of course that there will be no shortage in the "I I ne ouad ,o kni-'za ie,
depend on the grade, of lumber used and stock for killing, as already assurances If bot of -u coidcerys the interior finish desired, but by using have been given by Florida, Georgia and Anf both of uscoldneorht seell a good grade of material and the owner other stock raisers that shipments will And, ithan in neor heart ad iine,
doing the work himself, this house can be large and continuous. With the open- I' sue at are~ of id diffe'h~'r ldiiess
be erected at Bunnell for less than $500. ing up of this plant the stock-raising And clasp our hands in friendlliness;
Or, if the owner is not capable of doing business in Florida has gained one of the Our thoughts would pleasantly agree, all of the work himself, he can hire a best points for the business, and it is I nwyuadio nwm.
carpenter for a while, and still keep the predicted that the business will increase IfIke-o n o nwatmena.
price under $500. ten-fold within a few years.I
DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.




A GROUP OF INTERESTING LETTERS FROM d
kv 2
Mr. Phillips in His Field of Sweet
Potatoes.~a446
NEW HAMPSHIRE MAN VISITS /
HIS BUNNELL COLONY FARM c',z- v o
I want to tell you in a few words about our visit to Bunnell, Florida. We arrived /9 -4 '&
in Bunnell on the 13th of November, 1915, and came home on the 20th of March, 1916. We liked the place very much and found the people as fine as one would care to meet. We think the Com- 4A
pany has done a good deal to build up ''"
the town in so short a time. Everything V. />..seemed to be well planned and the town 4n _o4 Mr. W. C.
in a prosperous condition. We have ten acres of fine land at Black Point fenced .
and two and one-half acres cleared. Mr. A'
Miller will carry it on for us until September, 1917. This is a nice piece of 0$p a.iv -- "r -,. M v .
land and- in a fine neighborhood. Our / _- j i-. z4c' .
health was the finest ever while in Flor- a4
ida. We were much pleased with the Colony and the way the Company has Z d
dealt with the people, as everything seemed to be done on the square.
Yours very truly,
(Signed) FRANK J. WINN, Jr.,
New Hampshire.
Note-Mr. Winn has recently purchased an additional 10 acres of land in our colony, making his holdings now 20 acres.
LETTER FROM A GEORGIA
WOMAN rd fr L
I look forward to receiving the HOME(/ ,
BUILDER, and read everything in it with interest. I talk Bunnell to every- Glimpse of Five Acre Orange Grove South West of Dupont, one who will let me, and I will be glad to Belonging to Mr. Robertson.
say at any time that the Bunnell Devel What Bunnell Colony Has Meant to Mr. Phillips "'_ -"
opment Company has treated me right all the way through. We'have our hold- Five years ago Mr. Phillips was employed by a large
ings nearly paid for, and are anxious to manufacturing concern, but gave up his good position after get a deed for our land. I am hoping to four of the best physicians had told him that his days were go to Florida to live, but want to be fixed numbered. comfortably first. Mr. Phillips' attention was drawn to Bunnell, he came to
(Signed) FANNIE E. FOSTER, the colony and investigated Florida's climate, our lands and
Georgia. our company thoroughly, and on April 21, 1913, purchased 4
twenty-five acres of Bunnell colony land, located about one and a half miles south of Bunnell on the Moody Road. t ,
Mr. Phillips never lived in the country until he came to Do not fail to read the last page Bunnell, always having resided in large cities or suburbs of this issue, which will tell you allI of same.
about the next excursion to Bunnell Since locating on his farm, Mr. Phillips has grown a FOLLOW THIS MAN'S E
variety of crops, including Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, COLONY EXTENDS WELCqMX" on November 21st. beans, tomatoes, cabbage, onions, melons, etc. At one time GOOD, HONORABLE AND INf




OWNERSS OF FARMS IN THE BUNNELL COLONY
Howe of Air. I1'* C' Phillips, About On1e
Sanid a Half '11,1 i ole /h of 13111n1ll,
't't oil the 11o)od\ k Rad.
( ..FORMER CANADIAN SATISFIED
~ ~/ ~ WITH BUNNELL
I had a letter from a frin I in Alberta, Canada, the other day, and he told me that everything was killed by frost on
_4e ~4 OAugust 10th. I was thinking-what a contrast to Florida. I am here to stay S and make a home, and if I keep my
health I will make good. I like the country, and I truly believe that it has a
- good future. I have no desire to return
a.. -g-- a.. P-North.
C. Phillips. With best wishes, I remain
Yours truly,
(Signed) L. C. JOHNSON,
Bunnell, Florida.
___--_/__-______ RECENT LETTER FROM MR.
W. A. MACK, OF BUNNELL ~ .~,i,.j 1. hope you will pardon me for not
writing you sooner, but I have been so busy since I saw you. We have had so much work on the land that we cleared up this year. I am thankful to say that J our whole forty acres is cleared in good
..... shape, and we are planting our fall crop
of Irish potatoes this week. After that will come our corn-husking, and then Ss haying.
A We have had a fine summer-not too
hot and not too much rain. The corn crops are good generally, and altogether we feel that the Lord has blessed us abundantly in 1916.
With best wishes to yourself and family, I am
Entrance to One Hundred and Six Acre Orange Grove, (Signed)rely. A. MACK
South East.of Bunnell. Bunnell, Florida.
What Bunnell Colony Has Meant to Mr. Phillips-Con't he harvested a crop of sweet potatoes averaging 175 bushels W reyut ot unl
to the acre, which he sold for eighty-five cents a bushel. We urge you to go to Bunnell He has not only made a comfortable living for himself and with Mr. Verdenius on the next ext, /. / family during the time that he has been clearing his land cursion, but if this is impossible,
and getting it into good shape, but he has enhanced the per- then do. the next best thing. SEND manent value of his property as well.
Mr. Phillips considers the Bunnell colony splendidly YOUR ORDER TO HIM for a Bunadapted to the raising of poultry, as well as the raising of nell Colony farm before he leaves any kind of stock, and he ought to be able to judge of these on the 21st, and he will be happy matters correctly, after a residence of more than three years to personally select your land for in the colony. you. WRITE HIM TODAY and
EAMPLE-THE BUNNELL But, best of all, Mr. Phillips has entirely regained his tell him just the kind offarm you
!O G ARMS TO SCORES OF health, which he says is worth far more to him than money desire.
STRIOUS FAMILIES. or his Bunnell farm with all its improvements.




Vhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed
(The following items have been 'con- An up-to-date undertaking establish- Mr. 0. C. Mosby informs us that he is
tribu ted from time to time by our Colony ment has been opened up in Bunnell by harvesting corn that averages fifty bushcorrespondent. Therefore, if some of the Mr. B. A. Bolton. Much as we deplore els to the acre, and that his neighbor, news is not entirely up to date, our read- the necessity of such a business in our Mr. J. C. Miller, will realize still more ers will understand 'that it has not all midst, it is but the natural result of per acre than he. This is as good as albeen received at one tinie.-Editor.) every growing community. most any corn raised in the corn dis______________tricts, and when one realizes that this is The McArn Company bought from Mr. All rural free delivery- patrons who but one of the three bumper crops that
W. A. Mack this week a coop of chick- have not yet put up the regulation mail has been grown on this land since Janens, thirty-one in number, for which they box, can secure same at the actual cost uary 1st, he can form some idea of the paid him $19.80, an average of over 63 of 90 cents from the Bunnell Mercantile possibilities of 'our soil. In addition to cents each, This coop of chickens were Company, who have purchased a quan- the corn, Mr. Mosby also raised a fine
Barred Rocks and certainly were beau- tity of boxes. crop of potatoes, and is now harvesting
ties. It pays to grow the large stock of __________a large hay crop. This is the usual crop
poultry. AprycmoeofZG.HladJ.rotation in this section, though a great
AprtycomosdoZ.G.HolandJ variety of crops can be grown successJ' Buckles and others passed through fully.
Mr. S. L. Speer of Dupont reports that Bunnell today en route to Ocean City,
he will set six acres of celery this week. where they went to fish. The Miller Brothers are selling some
Look out for the man that made Dupont fine corn this week, the Bunnell Hardcelery__famous. Mrs. A. S. Abbott has purchased the ware Company buying their first lot of
Welta Moore residence just to the rear one hundred bushels. They also have fine The recent revival services at the M. of her home. She will remodel it and sweet potatoes and hay for salle.
E. church have closed. Thirty-six mem- rent it to winter tourists.________bers were received into the church, and TeKle rtesrpr eyfvr
the pastor and people are looking for TeKle rtesrpr eyfvr
greater work in the future. Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Drew have returned ably on their sweet potato outlook, and
_____________to Bunnell after a very pleasant visit to while in town the other day, contracted
The Bunnell Mercantile Company has their old home in New York State. foZ the sale of same.
installed its grist mill. All those who Mrs. Reinheimer has purchased the Messrs. Chas. Jordan, W. C. Phillips,
desire to have their corn ground into Foster property on Main Street, and she H. W. Sessions and several others are
havher smeal dones oy brinickn toeted Bun- and Miss Smith are now residing there, preparing their land for a cabbage crop nae smeane Compann D. F.e Mcuflufedofban r this winter and anticipate a ready sale,
nelMratl opn.Mr. DF.M ufi'felofbasrc as the market is strong and the cabbage
looking fine. He will harvest same in crop in the North this year was very Rural Free Delivery Route No. 1 November. The strawberry plants set short.
closed its second month with an increase out by a number of our farmers some________in business of a fraction over fifty per weeks ago are expected to 'be bearing Messrs. Deen and Jackson are planning
cent over the preceding month. This during the Christmas holidays, to raise a considerable amount of truck
route, which is an every-other-day route, ti itr uha enpacb
is now serving eighty-one families, but Mr. 0. N. Jackson informs us that he ti itr uha enpacb
it should serve at least one hundred fain- will have all kinds of vegetables for sale bage, etc. ilies, if those who have not put up their within the next thirty to forty days. Jack boxes will do so. If a hundred families is a good farmer and knows how to grow The indications are that the Irish poare served there is a chance of having it truck. He will be seen on the streets this tato crop in this section will be much a daily route, and this will be much more winter almost every week with a wagon larger this coming spring than last year, convenient for all patrons. load of nice fresh vegetables, and the prospects for high prices are ex____________________________cellent, as one can readily ascertain by investigating crop reports all over the
This is the year for our Bunnell farm- Quite a few acres in the colony have conty
ers to plant cabbage. A communication been planted to fall Irish potatoes, which country.____from northern markets states that cab- give evidence of a good stand.Mes.DaisndNrsaepeacbagesvrsre and therk at the prle ofa ing their land for an onion crop. They
cabageandsaur kautis oube wat Messrs. C. A. Smith, E. ,W. Johnston will, if nothing happens, have around ten it usually is. There is big money in and J. I. Choate have organized the Peo- tons of Bermudas for sale when they harFlorida cabbage when the northern crop ple's Mercantile Company, having pur- vest their crop. This estimate is based is short like it is this year. Let every chased the general merchandise of S. on former results in this section. farmer plant at least one acre to cab- Ross, and will conduct their business bage and get the high prices that will next door to the Bunnell State Bank. M.Wzwk' on rnegoea
previl hiswiner.They will carry a general line of mer- Korona has grown wonderfully during
Mr. and Mrs. Milliken of Chicago have chandise and will cater to both t w,7n and the past year, and is in a flourishing conrented the Doty house on Church street cutytae iin
andwil moe hre n te nar utue. Electric lights have been installed in' Mr. W. A. Mack reports that they have
Mr. 0. C. Mosby has been selling quite the pavillion at Ocean City, also a large gathered over five hundred bushels of a quantity of corn to the Bunnell Hard- electric piano player. Church services fine corn from eleven acres of land, that ware Company, for which he received are held at Ocean City every other Sun- was planted to potatoes last spring.
$1.00 per bushel. day. Three thousand dollars' worth of spring
potatoes, five hundred dollars' worth of
Ex-Governor Jennings of Jacksonville Mr. Ed. Johnson has his shingle mill corn, eleven tons of hay, a nice crop of
delivered an address on the political nearly completed, and will soon be ship- both Irish and sweet potatoes, besides issues of the day in the Woodmen hall ping shingles. He states that he will cut lots of chickens and eggs, is not so bad Tuesday evening, about five million at his present location, from a small farm in-one year.
DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUN NELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.




6he BUNNE9LL HOME BUILDER
by our Special Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Mr. J. L. Jones and family, formerly The farmers of St. Johns county are Automobile owners here will be pleased
of California, are now living in the Miller becoming interested in the growing of to know that the Bunnell Garage & Auto home on Moody Road, and expect to strawberries, and we expect to see this Supply Company will have installed,
spend the winter there while they are county one of the foremost strawberry within the next few weeks, at their getting their land cleared and put under growing counties in the State within a garage, a free-air outfit and a large vulcultivation, short while. People are becoming edu- canizing plant. Both these outfits are the
cated to the value of the strawberry, and best that could be bought and called for Mr. John W. Davis and Mr. Floyd of meetings are being held for that purpose. the expenditure of several hundreds of
St. Augustine were recent visitors in On conservative figures it has been dollars. Tourists will find the Bunnell southern St. Johns county for the pur- proven that our farmers may realize garage the most up-to-date and best
pose of gathering agricultural statistics $700 or more per acre net profit from equipped garage on their route, and Bunof the county. These will be properly strawberries. nell people can justly be proud of the
tabulated at Tallahassee and used by the enterprise shown by this concern.
State and U. S. Government for distri- Mr. Crisp, of the Wilson & Toomer
bution over the country. Fertilizer Company, and Mr. Trueman of The pupils of the Bunnell school have
the ndeendet FrtiizerComany settled down for the term's work. Four the linpndet Fertuileie Compaicny teachers are at the present time in The J. B. Parker family, formerly of were ouokn at buessinteki.n charge, and they all express themselves
Canada, are busily engaged clearing their it fDpn atwe.as being well pleased with prospects for lands, located south of Bunnell on the an exceptionally good school this year.
Sweetwater highway. Mr. Parker has The postoffice department at Washinggiven the contract for the erection of a ton, D. C., has asked for bids for carry- Pastor Ramsey of the M. E. church new home, and the way he is taking hold ing rural mail between Bunnell and Bu- has organized a men's Bible class, with of the work indicates that he is destined low, via Ocean City, for the term from a membership of twelve to begin with. to become one of our successful farmers. October 16, 1916, to June 30, 1920. This In future the class will meet in the school
_____________is another significant fact regarding the building, and it is the -wish of Pastor
The recent Sunday School Institute, development of our country, since one Ramsey that all men in Bunnell will join which was held at the Raw Creek church rural route is already in operation. this class.
was most interesting, and a large number of people were in attendance. It being an all-day session, a bountiful dinner
was spread at noon, to which everyone
did full justice.
Work on the new railroad is progressing, rapidly. About one mile of rail has 1
been laid from the dock at this end of
the line, and it is expected that connections will be made and the road ready for
operation in four or five weeks. The railroad bridge across Haw Creek at the
Hamilton farm is rapidly nearing completion.
There is great activity throughout the
colony among the Irish potato growers
as well as all those raising garden truck.
There have been large numbers attend- Hoame of 11,r. Frank Vincent-Just North of thc Town of Funelcl.
ing the revival services at the Methodist
church in Punnell. M. L. Lifsey of M.Jh .Cucl stenwya- M.adMs vlPottgte
Barnsville, Georgia, has charge of the F.Jh .Cucl stenwya- M.adMs vlPottgte
music, and Rev. F. P. McCall of Jasper, pointed postmaster at Bunnell, he hay- with Mr. L. C. Prouty, father of Mr. Florida, is the. Evangelist. ing received the highest grade from the Prouty, arrived in Bunnell Thursday
civil service examination taken at Palat- afternoon. Mr. Prouty owns a fine tract ka last July. Mr. Deen, the retiring of land on Sweetwater highway, just
The Times-Union of Jacksonville in- postmaster, having other interests which south of Bunnell, which he will immediforms us that prospects are very good demanded his personal attention, felt it ately put under cultivation. He will that Duval County will in the near future his duty to retire from the service, move into the Fireball house, near the complete the shelling of the unpaved farmn of Mr. John L. Councill, where he
three-quarters of a mile of Dixie high- Mr. F. G. Osborn, proprietor of the will reside until he can erect his house way, just north of the St. Johns County Bunnell Meat Market, has made some im- on his farm. roadway arch. (Two views of this arch provements to the interior of his market appeared in a recent issue of the HOME which add greatly to its appearance. Our The store building of the MeArn CoinBUILDER.) town is to be congratulated on having pany is now practically completed. This
such a good market, with a stock Of building adds much to the appearance of
The colored people of the A. M. E. meats always up to the standard, the business section of Bunnell, being a
church of the Palatka District plan to -concrete building 25x65, the front of
hold their camp meeting at Bunnell this Leaston Pellicer is busy erecting a solid plate glass. The McArn Company year. These meetings are attended by bungalow on his twenty-acre farm in expect to move their large stock of genalmost every colored person from Jack- Section 3. Le'aston must mean business. eral merchandise into this building just sonville to Miami, there being as high as as soon as it is completed, where they
ten thousand in attendance during the Miss Alice Cochran of Bunnell will will continue to cater to the trading pubten days. teach the Dupont school this year. lic of Bunnell and surrounding country.
DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.




Excursion Trip to BUNNELL on -November 2 1,1916
Will You be One Iof the Party?
Even though you may have already bought land in the Bunnell colony; even
though you may have visited Bunnell before; even though you may have no in'tention of purchasing land at the present time, I urge you to join me on this trip.
T h e hardships, glimpse of Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga and many problems and dis- other points of interest. From Chattanooga to Atlanta, comforts of winter Georgia, the train passes through battlefields almost
will soon be upon the entire distance.
US. It will mean ill
health for some, add- I shall not attempt to tell you of the interesting
ed expenses for all. 'features of Jacksonville, St. Augustine and other porWhy ait ntilthe tions of Florida, to say nothing of our wonderful BunWinte wi nti dthae -nell. It will afford us great pleasure to take you to wintr wi nd sare Ocean City and the ocean beach, show you the 1 06blowng? ake our acre orange grove nearby, take you over, our colony plans now to get and let you learn from their own lips just what our
away permanently in farmers have done and are doing. You will then be
-a few years more, able to form some idea of the possibilities of this secand come with me tion- of Florida.
on this trip and let I believe if you really want to do it, you can easily
me show you just afford to take this trip, which is not an expensive one
what our colony has by any means, an d you are certain to be amply reto offer. If you have paid for your time and eff orts. already visited your
Mr. T. 41. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small land, you will be Remember the date -TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
Farm Man oj Florida.
eager to go again, 21, 1916.' The round-trip fare from Chicago to Bunand see the many improvements that have taken place -nell on this homeseekers' excursion is $41.89. Your in your absence. ticket will be good for twenty-one dayt. I believe I
I am planning that this shall not only be a business can safely say that if you join me on this trip I shall trip, but that it shall be a pleasure one as well. If any be able to make it more pleasant for you than if you of you who are making arrangements to visit Bun- should go at a later date by yourself. nell at this time would like to have your wives accompany you, I want to say that we shall be very glad 'If YOU live in the East and would not go to Florida indeed to have them. I am always anxious for the via Chicago, then I want you to leave your city on wives and daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so that the 2 1 st and meet us in Jacksonville on the following they may understand something of the pleasant sur- Thursday morning, and continue, your journey with roundings and social life to be found there, for I have us from there. If you will write me at once I will usually found that if the wife is satisfied, the husband give you the name of the hotel at which to meet us. is sure to be.
I shall be glad to supply you with any further inIf you enjoy traveling, the railroad trip alone is a formation regarding the trip which you may desire, if delightful one. We shall pass through the rugged you will write me at once. I say to you now, as I have Kentucky foothills, through historical Tennessee, with a said many times before, that "Seeing Is Believing,"i so
If you want to go to a warmer, healthier, more ideal climate- to a country
where three crops are raised each year on the same land-come with me on
November 21st to our BUNNELL COLONY. It will be the "trip of your life."
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St., CHICAGO




IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO BUYERS OF LAND IN THE BUNNELL COLONY
You will note that I am going to Bunnell shortly and while there we shall carefully go over all the accounts on our books.
If your account is not paid up to date please send your remittance at once to the Home Office at Bunnell, so that it may reach that office not later than December 2nd. If you will do this we shall be sure to find your account in first-class condition when we come to check it over.
We will accept Liberty Bonds as payments on the land and will give you full credit on your account for same one hundred cents on the dollar.
If your account is already up to date, simply ignore this notice.
Yours very truly,
OW NOTE :-Please note if the address on your envelope is your latest address. If not, kindly forward your correct address at once to the Chicago Office, 108 South La Salle Street.




Full Text

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| The Truth About Florida | | The Bunnell Home Builder | | Edited by S. HOWARD M 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. M Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllljllllllllllllll^ NOVEMBER, 1916 Portion of Mr. G. A. Dupont’s Herd of Durock Jerseys The above is a picture of Mr. G. A. Dupont feeding a part of his herd of Durock Jersey Hogs. Mr. Dupont now resides about twelve miles north of Bunnell, but at one time he owned a small saw-mill some four miles south of Bunnell, and our town of Dupont was named for him.

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*e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Bunnell’s Rapid Growth by Mr. I. I. Moody Mr. 1. I. Mood J), Pres, of the Bunnell State BankI am writing this article primarily for the benefit of those who have not kept closely in touch with the rapid develop ment taking place in our colony, and par ticularly in our town of Bunnell, which is justly called “The Biggest Little City in Florida.” I shall likewise give the fol lowing information for the benefit of the men and women who have only recently heard about Bunnell. It may be that what I shall say will sound like “ancient his tory” to many of the readers of the HOME BUILDER; still, after all, it is not a bad thing for all of us to look backward occasionally and mark the road over which we have come. The story of Bunnell’s growth and de velopment may read like a fairy tale to those who have never seen our tolony, but the things I shall tell you about it are simple, unvarnished truths. Great things have been accomplished in south ern St. Johns County during the past five years. No one particular individual should have all the credit for this, nor the Bunnell Development Company (al though it has undoubtedly done its share); but as I see it, the greatest work has been done by the men and women who have bought farms in our colony, who have had faith in us and in our prop osition, and who have had faith enough in themselves to come here and develop the community and demonstrate the pos sibilities of our soil. It is a little over five years since I first met Mr. Verdenius, and I believe it will be five years next December that he be came our sales manager and sent out his first piece of literature regarding the Bunnell colony. Of course the town of Bunnell had been laid out some time pre vious to that, and we had begun adver tising the colony on a small scale; but the public generally really only heard about Bunnell at that time, and prac tically all of her growth has been since then. I therefore never seem to be able to think of Bunnell as being more than five years old, and I now want to tell your readers, in as brief a manner as possible, just what we have accomplished in that length of time. You may then judge for yourselves whether or not every Bunnellite has reasons to be proud of our colony. Taking into consideration that only a very small percentage of our approxi mately 3,000 buyers have as yet settled on their lands—what shall we not expect to do during the coming five years, when perhaps more than half of our buyers will have located on their farms during that time ? The town of BUNNELL is incorpo rated and has a population of approxi mately eight to nine hundred people; our Mayor being Mr. W. H. Heath. Bunnell has a good public school in which all of the common branches are taught, as well as two years of high school work. School closed last term with one hundred and ten pupils. Not only have we our school at Bunnell, but others at Ocean City, Black Point, Dupont, Codyville and Korona. We have three churches in Bun nell—Methodist, Christian and Seventh Day Adventists, likewise a Catholic church in Korona, which is in the south ern part of the colony. The following lodges are in operation at Bunnell: The Bunnell Lodge No. 200, Free and Accepted Masons; Order of the Eastern Star; Modern Woodmen of America, and the Knights of Pythias. The women of the colony have organized the Ladies’ Improvement Society; the Stitch and Chatter Club, and the Ladies’ Aid Society. Among the business houses in Bunnell may be found the following firms: M. Kanner & Company, McAm & Company and People’s Mercantile Company. These three stores carry a full and complete line of general merchandise and all are doing a good business in our community. Holden’s Drug Store is as nice a store as one can find in many towns twice the size of Bunnell. This store supplies the trade within a radius of twenty miles of Bunnell. The Bunnell Hardware Com pany carries a large line of hardware, farmipg implements, furniture, etc., and are ready to supply our newcomers as well as our old residents with anything in their line. The Bunnell State Bank is one of the strongest banking institutions in the State. The Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply Company is enjoying a large business, especially since the brick highway has been completed. L. A. Jett & Company and the Johnson Lumber & Supply Com pany manufacture and handle all kinds of rough and dressed lumber and handle large stocks of building material. The Bunnell Ice, Light & Water Company supplies our town with electric lights and ice, having an up-to-date plant. Mr. Bacher has one of the best blacksmith shops in the state. The Bunnell Tele phone Company is growing rapidly, there now being over one hundred subscribers for this Exchange. Bunnell also has a cafe, where meals are furnished at all hours. The owner of the tonsorial parlor is doing a flourishing business, while the pool rooms and bowling alleys afford the citizens an opportunity of passing away their leisure time. We have two physicians in Bunnell who are always ready to answer the call of those in need of a doctor. The Pine Grove Inn and the Halcyon, our two upto-date hotels, furnish ample accommoda tions for the traveling public, although they are usually over-crowded during the winter months. We have a weekly newspaper, the St. Johns Tribune, with a real, live Editor. This paper goes into the homes of nearly two thousand people, and everyone who is interested in the Bunnell colony should be a subscriber to it. Bunnell has also a barrel and crate factory, which supplies our potato and vegetable growers with necessary barrels and crates, and that is a large number, too, at the time of our shipping season. The surrounding country as jvell as the other towns in the colony are endeavor ing to keep pace with the growth of Bun nell, and are developing very rapidly. One can scarcely look in any direction without seeing some new settler clearing his land, or building his home, barn or fences. One of the most important im provements in the country was the com pletion of the brick highway across the county. This road is known as the Dixie Highway, extends across the Bunnell col ony for a distance of eight miles, and makes the hauling of produce a very easy matter for the farmers who are living near by. Another important improvement for our community was the establishing of Rural Free Delivery Route No. 1 from Bunnell. This route covers a distance of about twenty-seven miles, going west from Bunnell; and on October 16th a sec ond route was established extending from Bunnell to Bulow, via Ocean City. A new railroad is now under construc tion, crossing the Bunnell colony from Dupont to Orange Hammock, via Cody ville. Side tracks are to be laid at a dis tance of every two miles, so that the farmers will be able to load or unload their produce within a mile or two of their farms. I have not had the time to write any thing about Ocean City, Dupont or Korona, and my space is now taken up. However, I do want to say that all of these towns are growing and improve ments are being made right along. With only this brief review before us, we must surely all admit that we have been “GO ING SOME,” and yet the colony is only in its infancy. When this country is once settled up, and by that I mean when all of the men and women who have bought land of the Bunnell Development Com pany come here, clear their farms and put them under cultivation, we shall have the GARDEN SPOT OF THE UNITED STATES. Let each of us do our share towards hastening the day when our dreams shall all have become realities. DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.

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m@ BUMNELL HOME BUIILDEIR THE COST OF BUILDING A HOME IN THE BUNNELL COLONY The cost of building a home in Florida must vary according to the taste and means of the individual, just as the cost of build ing a home must vary in our northern states; and to give exact figures regard ing such a cost is next to impossible. Al most daily do we receive one or more let ters asking the cost of building a home at Bunnell, and here again we arc confronted with the same question — W HAT KIND OF A HOME DO YOU NEED OR WANT? We have always told inquirers that a comfortable home could be built in the colony for about seventy-five dollars a room. Of course no one can expect any thing elaborate at this price. The follow ing letter from Mr. Reynolds, of Detroit, Michigan, seems to agree quite well with our estimates. Mr. Reynolds is a practical man — a ma chinist, and has lived in the South. He was kind enough to allow us to reproduce in the HOME BUILDER the plans for the home he expects to erect in the Bunnell colony this fall. We believe our readers will study these plans with interest. Thomas A. Verdenius. Dear Sir: I am mailing you two views of an inexpensive house, and will try to give you a description of same, without taking up too much space in the HOME BUILDER. I do this because I hope to be of assistance to some one else who, like myself, is planning to move to the Bunnell colony and erect a home. After a careful study of conditions at Bunnell, I decided to build an inexpen sive yet substantial house, and in work ing out my plans I have had quotations on supplies from the various lumber dealers in Bunnell. I have also had in mind a house that will be neat, attractive and roomy, and have plenty of light and air—the latter two being essential in a southern climate. This house will have five rooms and two porches, also two large closets, one opening off of each bed room. The liv ing and dining rooms are much larger than are usually found in ordinary homes, and will be connected by an open arch. A bed room will open off of each of these two rooms; a fireplace in the living room adding to the comfort and artistic arrangement of the room. The kitchen being to one side of the main part of the house, giving it three out side walls, allows not only for plenty of light and air, but keeps all of the kitchen work well away from the rest of the house. The large back porch provides ample space for washing or other work. The cost of this house will of course depend on the grade of lumber used and the interior finish desired, but by using a good grade of material and the owner doing the work himself, this house can be erected at Bunnell for less than $500. Or, if the owner is not capable of doing all of the work himself, he can hire a carpenter for a while, and still keep the price under $500. Pof'cA /H-Ajs: If any of the readers of the HOME BUILDER desire further information re garding this little house, I shall be glad to answer any questions to the best of my ability. Today it is cold and cloudy here, and I tell you we are thinking longingly about Bunnell. Yours very truly, M. C. REYNOLDS, Detroit, Mich. MORE THAN TWELVE MILLION DOLLARS SPENT FOR GOOD ROADS IN FLORIDA The total amount of money spent and being spent in Florida for good roads during the past five years comes up to $12,271,424.37. Residents of St. Johns County are proud that our county has a place on the honor roll as among the progressive counties in this great state. Thousands of people came to the state last winter simply because of the prog ress in road work by many of the lead ing counties, and there will be many more thousands next winter for the same reason. It is an important fact to be noted from federal statistics that Florida is now expending more money per capita for good roads than any state in the Union. JACKSONVILLE’S NEW PACK ING PLANT The packing plant of Armour & Com pany at Jacksonville is now almost com pleted. The slaughtering capacity of the plant will be 200 head of cattle, 500 hogs and 500 sheep daily, and it is expected that there will be no shortage in the stock for killing, as already assurances have been given by Florida, Georgia and other stock raisers that shipments will be large and continuous. With the open ing up of this plant the stock-raising business in Florida has gained one of the best points for the business, and it is predicted that the business will increase ten-fold within a few years. WHAT ONE SUCCESSFUL BUN NELL FARMER HAS DONE “Mr. J. C. Miller, of Black Point, was in to see the editor Thursday, bringing in with him five ears of fine corn, which he grew on his farm this year. The five ears when laid out end to end measured five feet and eleven inches and weighed five and one-half pounds. Mr. Miller has about sixteen acres of this com, which he grew on the same land that he harvested a spring crop of Irish potatoes from, and he estimates that he is gathering at the rate of sixtysix bushels to the acre. He has already filled two large cribs to their capacity, so full in fact that the floor of one of them broke down, and he has more com to gather. When asked if he would have enough com to run him until he harvested his next crop, he said: “I will have enough to feed my four mules, all my hogs, chickens, etc., and then have plenty to sell.” On this same ground he has a fine crop of crab grass, peavine and velvet bean hay, which he will cut before pre paring his land for his spring crop of potatoes. Mr. Miller will enter the Heard Na tional Bank com contest and expects to win the $100 prize they are offering for the best three bushels of corn grown in Florida. When asked what this crop of com had cost him, Mr. Miller said: “It has not cost me one cent in cash, and only a few days of work.” In regard to his sweet potato crop, which is now ready to begin harvesting, he said: “I have about three acres planted to sweet potatoes from which I expect to dig seven hundred and fifty bushels of good potatoes.” Sweet potatoes are now selling at a dollar a bushel.”— St. Johns Tribune. BUNNELL HOTELS ARE PRE PARING FOR A BUSY WINTER The hotels and boarding houses of Bunnell are making preparations for a large number of winter visitors, and no doubt they will all be filled to their ca pacity. Bunnell can boast of two good hotels and three good boarding houses. Besides our hotel facilities, Bunnell is located about half-way between Daytona and St. Augustine, two of the most fa mous winter resorts in the United States, with exceptionally good highways to both these cities. So with these advan tages, not to say anything of our splen did fishing and hunting, Bunnell should be an ideal place in which to spend the winter. “If I knew you and you knew me, If both of us could clearly see, And, with an inner sight, disuine The meaning of your heart and mine, I’m sure that we would differ less And clasp our hands in friendliness; Our thoughts would pleasantly agree, If I knew you and you knew me.” — Waterman. DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.

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A GROUP OF INTERESTING LETTERS FROM 0 Mr. Phillips in His Field of Sweet Potatoes. NEW HAMPSHIRE MAN VISITS HIS BUNNELL COLONY FARM I want to tell you in a few words about our visit to Bunnell, Florida. We arrived in Bunnell on the 13th of November, 1915, and came home on the 20th of March, 1916. We liked the place very much and found the people as fine as one would care to meet. We think the Com pany has done a good deal to build up the town in so short a time. Everything seemed to be well planned and the town in a prosperous condition. We have ten acres of fine land at Black Point fenced and two and one-half acres cleared. Mr. Miller will carry it on for us until Sep tember, 1917. This is a nice piece of land and, in a fine neighborhood. Our health was the finest ever while in Flor ida. We were much pleased with the Colony and the way the Company has dealt with the people, as everything seemed to be done on the square. Yours very truly, (Signed) FRANK J. WINN, Jr., New Hampshire. Note—Mr. Winn has recently pur chased an additional 10 acres of land in our colony, making his holdings now 20 acres. LETTER FROM A GEORGIA WOMAN I look forward to receiving the HOME BUILDER, and read everything in it with interest. I talk Bunnell to every one who will let me, and I will be glad to say at any time that the Bunnell Devel opment Company has treated me right all the way through. We have our hold ings nearly paid for, and are anxious to get a deed for our land. I am hoping to go to Florida to live, but want to be fixed comfortably first. (Signed) FANNIE E. FOSTER, Georgia. Do not fail to read the last page of this issue, which will tell you all about the next excursion to Bunnell on November 21st. / 9 / £' z 5~ Cr^^ c^r^si4~& ^ ** S/Sj Mr. W. C.j 'jjj u % ~~ /T CL^cL isA&sts*. % .. J* / e 0 _'___ / _'fasom 'H-tuL tyii w asw^ iv-ix&l, zU-a. dej'strf, ^ L -^rr^ Glimpse of Five Acre Orange Grove South West of Dupont, Belonging to Mr. Robertson. What Bunnell Colony Has Meant to Mr. Phillips Five years ago Mr. Phillips was employed by a large manufacturing concern, but gave up his good position after four of the best physicians had told him that his days were numbered. Mr. Phillips’ attention was drawn to Bunnell, he came to the colony and investigated Florida’s climate, our lands and our company thoroughly, and on April 21, 1913, purchased twenty-five acres of Bunnell colony land, located about one and a half miles south of Bunnell on the Moody Road. Mr. Phillips never lived in the country until he came to Bunnell, always having resided in large cities or suburbs of same. Since locating on his farm, Mr. Phillips has grown a variety of crops, including Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes, beans, tomatoes, cabbage, onions, melons, etc. At one time ^uunr\L surUL ^ '-ytsiy'h ^ '^rWve-eL. Uk'U crv\~ FOLLOW THIS MAN’S EY COLONY EXTENDS WELCOMI; GOOD, HONORABLE AND INI

PAGE 5

)WNERS OF FARMS IN THE BUNNELL COLONY i r ~~* c v v, • %  Jr -~ij **VC£^~ siA. s>nsv %  Oo^ce. A^^e.U -t** % CVri^ctr£v~J/C ss^JJL rh £ I *~'^ Co ^ JL /urr'v^^' ^ im> Jvv*. Jasun, Z -sjUo^Jck^zL OsascL S*u ^tU^JL thj^ < C. Phillips. 'yj~ ftpUf y < ^ e/ ^~ £ ^ rVZ i ^'~4sC^j_ 1$ iji4> ^rzJ^^JteA y^x^, fb ^J^rUrv^edL rv-cp ’IjvJtkc^-4 ^ r CLC4. t %  yy l/ vn^JtLj' cry*— i&U^-. ^ tLwsy* &^^*^ vvn "Tr^d^-ey/ ,_ -T^->. 42^'fc'>'V'i/l^^£3>' ^GsO~d!Clnr^cL. firm. *rdsUsV£_ ’tdut. *^v-JLc cr^v-trui crV T ^cx/t*%ru' -^erUl -i Xstruu ip sgryL&siJpSc-r\~Entrance to One Hundred and Six Acre Orange Grove, South East of Bunnell. What Bunnell Colony Has Meant to Mr. Phillips— Con’t J\ tjut. r^JVOAs '*'**• bU
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&h@ BUHMELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Contributed (The following items have been con tributed from time to time by our Colony correspondent. Therefore, if some of the news is not entirely up to date, our read ers will understand that it has not all been received at one time. — Editor.) The McArn Company bought from Mr. W. A. Mack this week a coop of chick ens, thirty-one in number, for which they paid him $19.80, an average of over 63 cents each. This coop of chickens were Barred Rocks and certainly were beau ties. It pays to grow the large stock of poultry. Mr. S. L. Speer of Dupont reports that he will set six acres of celery this week. Look out for the man that made Dupont celery famous. The recent revival services at the M. E. church have closed. Thirty-six mem bers were received into the church, and the pastor and people are looking for greater work in the future. The Bunnell Mercantile Company has installed its grist mill. All those who desire to have their com ground into either meal, grits or chicken feed may have same done by bringing to the Bun nell Mercantile Company. Rural Free Delivery Route No. 1 closed its second month with an increase in business of a fraction over fifty per cent over the preceding month. This route, which is an every-other-day route, is now serving eighty-one families, but it should serve at least one hundred fam ilies, if those who have not put up their boxes will do so. If a hundred families are served there is a chance of having it a daily route, and this will be much more convenient for all patrons. This is the year for our Bunnell farm ers to plant cabbage. A communication from northern markets states that cab bage is very scarce, and that the price of cabbage and sauer kraut is double what it usually is. There is big money in Florida cabbage when the northern crop is short like it is this year. Let every farmer plant at least one acre to cab bage and get the high prices that will prevail this winter. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken of Chicago have rented the Doty house on Church street and will move here in the near future. Mr. O. C. Mosby has been selling quite a quantity of corn to the Bunnell Hard ware Company, for which he received $1.00 per bushel. Ex-Governor Jennings of Jacksonville delivered an address on the political issues of the day in the Woodmen hall Tuesday evening. An up-to-date undertaking establish ment has been opened up in Bunnell by Mr. B. A. Bolton. Much as we deplore the necessity of such a business in our midst, it is but the natural result of every growing community. All rural free delivery patrons who have not yet put up the regulation mail box, can secure same at the actual cost of 90 cents from the Bunnell Mercantile Company, who have purchased a quan tity of boxes. A party composed of Z. G. Holland, J. J 4 Buckles and others passed through Bunnell today en route to Ocean City, where they went to fish. Mrs. A. S. Abbott has purchased the Welta Moore residence just to the rear of her home. She will remodel it and rent it to winter tourists. Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Drew have returned to Bunnell after a very pleasant visit to their old home in New York State. Mrs. Reinheimer has purchased the Foster property on Main Street, and she and Miss Smith are now residing there. Mr. D. F. McDuffie’s field of beans are looking fine. He will harvest same in November. The strawberry plants set out by a number of our farmers some weeks ago are expected to be bearing during the Christmas holidays. Mr. 0. N. Jackson informs us that he will have all kinds of vegetables for sale within the next thirty to forty days. Jack is a good farmer and knows how to grow truck. He will be seen on the streets this winter almost every week with a wagon load of nice fresh vegetables. Quite a few acres in the colony have been planted to fall Irish potatoes, which give evidence of a good stand. Messrs. C. A. Smith, E. W. Johnston and J. I. Choate have organized the Peo ple’s Mercantile Company, having pur chased the general merchandise of S. Ross, and will conduct their business next door to the Bunnell State Bank. They will carry a general line of mer chandise and will cater to both trwn and country trade. Electric lights have been installed in the pavillion at Ocean City, also a large electric piano player. Church services are held at Ocean City every other Sun day. Mr. Ed. Johnson has his shingle mill nearly completed, and will soon be ship ping shingles. He states that he will cut about five million at his present location. Mr. O. C. Mosby informs us that he is harvesting corn that averages fifty bush els to the acre, and that his neighbor, Mr. J. C. Miller, will realize still more per acre than he. This is as good as al most any corn raised in the com dis tricts, and when one realizes that this is but one of the three bumper crops that has been grown on this land since Jan uary 1st, he can form some idea of the possibilities of our soil. In addition to the com, Mr. Mosby also raised a fine crop of potatoes, and is now harvesting a large hay crop. This is the usual crop rotation in this section, though a great variety of crops can be grown success fully. The Miller Brothers are selling some fine corn this week, the Bunnell Hard ware Company buying their first lot of one hundred bushels. They also have fine sweet potatoes and hay for sale. The Kilper Brothers report very favor ably on their sweet potato outlook, and while in town the other day, contracted fo^ the sale of same. Messrs. Chas. Jordan, W. C. Phillips, H. W. Sessions and several others are preparing their land for a cabbage crop this winter and anticipate a ready sale, as the market is sti'ong and the cabbage crop in the North this year was very short. Messrs. Deen and Jackson are planning to raise a considerable amount of truck this winter, such as beans, peas, cab bage, etc. The indications are that the Irish po tato crop in this section will be much larger this coming spring than last year, and the prospects for high prices are ex cellent, as one can readily ascertain by investigating crop reports all over the country. Messrs. Davids and Norris are prepar ing their land for an onion crop. They will, if nothing happens, have around ten tons of Bermudas for sale when they har vest their crop. This estimate is based on former results in this section. Mr. Wazewski’s young orange grove at Korona has grown wonderfully during the past year, and is in a flourishing con dition. Mr. W. A. Mack reports that they have gathered over five hundred bushels of fine corn from eleven acres of land, that was planted to potatoes last spring. Three thousand dollars’ worth of spring potatoes, five hundred dollars’ worth of com, eleven tons of hay, a nice crop of both Irish and sweet potatoes, besides lots of chickens and eggs, is not so bad from a small farm in one year. DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.

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1UMHELL HOME BUILDER by our Special Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Mr. J. L. Jones and family, formerly of California, are now living in the Miller home on Moody Road, and expect to spend the winter there while they are getting their land cleared and put under cultivation. Mr. John W. Davis and Mr. Floyd of St. Augustine were recent visitors in southern St. Johns county for the pur pose of gathering agricultural statistics of the county. These will be properly tabulated at Tallahassee and used by the State and U. S. Government for distri bution over the country. The J. B. Parker family, formerly of Canada, are busily engaged clearing their lands, located south of Bunnell on the Sweetwater highway. Mr. Parker has given the contract for the erection of a new home, and the way he is taking hold of the work indicates that he is destined to become one of our successful farmers. The recent Sunday School Institute, which was held at the Haw Creek church was most interesting, and a large num ber of people were in attendance. It be ing an all-day session, a bountiful dinner was spread at noon, to which everyone did full justice. Work on the new railroad is progress ing rapidly. About one mile of rail has been laid from the dock at this end of the line, and it is expected that connec tions will be made and the road ready for operation in four or five weeks. The rail road bridge across Haw Creek at the Hamilton farm is rapidly nearing com pletion. There is great activity throughout the colony among the Irish potato growers as well as all those raising garden truck. There have been large numbers attend ing the revival services at the Methodist church in Bunnell. M. L. Lifsey of Bamsville, Georgia, has charge of the music, and Rev. F. P. McCall of Jasper, Florida, is the. Evangelist. The Times-Union of Jacksonville in forms us that prospects are very good that Duval County will in the near future complete the shelling of the unpaved three-quarters of a mile of Dixie high way, just north of the St. Johns County roadway arch. (Two views of this arch appeared in a recent issue of the HOME BUILDER.) The colored people of the A. M. E. church of the Palatka District plan to hold their camp meeting at Bunnell this year. These meetings are attended by almost every colored person from Jack sonville to Miami, there being as high as ten thousand in attendance during the ten days. The farmers of St. Johns county are becoming interested in the growing of strawberries, and we expect to see this county one of the foremost strawberry growing counties in the State within a short while. People are becoming edu cated to the value of the strawberry, and meetings are being held for that purpose. On conservative figures it has been proven that our farmers may realize $700 or more per acre net profit from strawberries. Mr. Crisp, of the Wilson & Toomer Fertilizer Company, and Mr. Trueman of the Independent Fertilizer Company were looking after business in the vicin ity of Dupont last week. The postoffice department at Washing ton, D. C., has asked for bids for carry ing rural mail between Bunnell and Bulow, via Ocean City, for the term from October 16, 1916, to June 30, 1920. This is another significant fact regarding the development of our country, since one rural route is already in operation. Mr. John L. Councill is the newly ap pointed postmaster at Bunnell, he hav ing received the highest grade from the civil service examination taken at Palat ka last July. Mr. Deen, the retiring postmaster, having other interests which demanded his personal attention, felt it his duty to retire from the service. Mr. F. G. Osborn, proprietor of the Bunnell Meat Market, has made some im provements to the interior of his market which add greatly to its appearance. Our town is to be congratulated on having such a good market, with a stock of meats always up to the standard. Leaston Pellicer is busy erecting a bungalow on his twenty-acre farm in Section 3. Leaston must mean business. Miss Alice Cochran of Bunnell will teach the Dupont school this year. Automobile owners here will be pleased to know that the Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply Company will have installed, within the next few weeks, at their garage, a free-air outfit and a large vul canizing plant. Both these outfits are the best that could be bought and called for the expenditure of several hundreds of dollars. Tourists will find the Bunnell garage the most up-to-date and best equipped garage on their route, and Bun nell people can justly be proud of the enterprise shown by this concern. The pupils of the Bunnell school have settled down for the term’s work. Four teachers are at the present time in charge, and they all express themselves as being well pleased with prospects for an exceptionally good school this year. Pastor Ramsey of the M. E. church has organized a men’s Bible class, with a membership of twelve to begin with. In future the class will meet in the school building, and it is the wish of Pastor Ramsey that all men in Bunnell will join this class. Mr. and Mrs. Ovil Prouty, together with Mr. L. C. Prouty, father of Mr. Prouty, arrived in Bunnell Thursday afternoon. Mr. Prouty owns a fine tract of land on Sweetwater highway, just south of Bunnell, which he will immedi ately put under cultivation. He will move into the Fireball house, near the farm of Mr. John L. Councill, where he will reside until he can erect his house on his farm. The store building of the McAm Com pany is now practically completed. This building adds much to the appearance of the business section of Bunnell, being a concrete building 25x65, the front of solid plate glass. The McArn Company expect to move their large stock of gen eral merchandise into this building just as soon as it is completed, where they will continue to cater to the trading pub lic of Bunnell and surrounding country. I. Home of Mr. Frank Vincent—Just North of the Town of Bunnell. DO NOT FAIL TO READ THE LAST PAGE OF THIS ISSUE, WHICH WILL TELL YOU ALL ABOUT THE NEXT EXCURSION TO BUNNELL, ON NOVEMBER 21ST.

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Excursion Trip to BUNNELL on November 21, 1916 Will You be One of the Party? Even though you may have already bought land in the Bunnell colony; even though you may have visited Bunnell before; even though you may have no in tention of purchasing land at the present time, I urge you to join me on this trip. The hardships, problems and dis comforts of winter will soon be upon us. It will mean ill health for some, add ed expenses for all. Why wait until the winter winds are blowing? Make your plans now to get away permanently in a few years more, and come with me on this trip and let me show you just what our colony has to offer. If you have already visited your land, you will be eager to go again, and see the many improvements that have taken place in your absence. Mr. T. jJ. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. I am planning that this shall not only be a business trip, but that it shall be a pleasure one as well. If any of you who are making arrangements to visit Bun nell at this time would like to have your wives accom pany you, I want to say that we shall be very glad indeed to have them. 1 am always anxious for the wives and daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so that they may understand something of the pleasant sur roundings and social life to be found there, for I have usually found that if the wife is satisfied, the husband is sure to be. If you enjoy traveling, the railroad trip alone is a delightful one. We shall pass through the rugged Kentucky foothills, through historical Tennessee, with a glimpse of Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga and many other points of interest. From Chattanooga to Atlanta, Georgia, the train passes through battlefields almost the entire distance. I shall not attempt to tell you of the interesting features of Jacksonville, St. Augustine and other por tions of Florida, to say nothing of our wonderful Bun nell. It will afford us great pleasure to take you to Ocean City and the ocean beach, show you the 1 06acre orange grove nearby, take you over our colony and let you learn from their own lips just what our farmers have done and are doing. You will then be able to form some idea of the possibilities of this sec tion of Florida. I believe if you really want to do it, you can easily afford to take this trip, which is not an expensive one by any means, and you are certain to be amply re paid for your time and efforts. Remember the date — TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1916. The round-trip fare from Chicago to Bun nell on this homeseekers’ excursion is $41.89. Your ticket will be good for twenty-one days. I believe I can safely say that if you join me on this trip I shall be able to make it more pleasant for you than if you should go at a later date by yourself. If you live in the East and would not go to Florida via Chicago, then I want you to leave your city on the 21st and meet us in Jacksonville on the following Thursday morning, and continue your journey with us from there. If you will write me at once I will give you the name of the hotel at which to meet us. I shall be glad to supply you with any further in formation regarding the trip which you may desire, if you will write me at once. I say to you now, as I have said many times before, that “Seeing Is Believing,” so If you want to go to a warmer, healthier, more ideal climate — to a country where three crops are raised each year on the same land—come with me on November 21st to our BUNNELL COLONY. It will be the “trip of your life.” THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St., CHICAGO

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IMPORTANT NOTICE TO BUYERS OF LAND IN THE BUNNELL COLONY You will note that I am going to Bunnell shortly and while there we shall carefully go over all the accounts on our books. If your account is not paid up to date please send your remittance at once to the Home Office at Bunnell, so that it may reach that office not later than December 2nd. If you will do this we shall be sure to find your account in first-class condition when we come to check it over. We will accept Liberty Bonds as payments on the land and will give you full credit on your account for same — one hundred cents on the dollar. If your account is already up to date, simply ignore this notice. Yours very truly, NOTE: — Please note if the address on your envelope is your latest address. If not, kindly forward your correct address at once to the Chicago Office, 108 South La Salle Street.