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The Bunnell home builder

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Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

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Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
- The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicatio, Ill.
SEPTEMBER, 1916
Busy Haying Scene in Field West of Bunnell.
The Average Florida Farmer Grows Three Crops Each Year.
The Plan Followed by the Majority of our Bunnell Farmers is to Raise First, a Crop of Potatoes; Second, Corn; and Third, Haywhich many are Harvesting at the present time.
"Three Crops a Year" is the Slogan of the Bunnell Colony Farmers.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Florida GrowingFaster Than the Nation
Florida already outstripping the na- In the ten years 1900 to 1910 the in- Although Florida is not primarily a tion as a whole in the ratio of its growth crease in the value of farm lands in the manufacturing state its manufacturers' as compared with past years, is recog- United States was 118 -per cent and in have shown a steady growth. nized today by all students of progress Florida 203 per cent. The value of farm In 1909 there was 2,159 establishments as being upon the eve of a great move- buildings in the United States in that giving employment to an average of ment of population to its vacant lands time increased seventy-seven per cent, 57,473 wage earners, or 7.6 per cent of and a development and industry that will and in Florida 144 per cent. the total population. During this period
place it among the leaders. Especially The value of farm implements and ma- the gross value of products per capita is this true of stock raising, dairying and chinery in the country increased 68 per of the entire population of the state ingeneral farming. cent between 1900 and 1910, and in Flor- creased from $8 to $97.
It has been made famous by 'its ida 126 per cent. The value of the factory products of
citrus groves and truck farms and it will Florida rose from $36,800,000 in 1900
be still more famous for diversified *agri- to $90,000,000 in 1912; the value of farm
culture. products from $18,300,000 to $43,600,000;
Barton W. Curtis, sent by the Coun- the value of f6rest products from
try Gentleman to investigate conditions ~~$18,000,000 to $34,000,000; the value of
in the south, writing in the issue of mineral output from $2,300,000 to
February 14, said: $11,000,000.-Tampa Tribune.
"A good many millions of us who do
not know the South, and who have
calmly blundered ahead in our mistaken HEAVY SHIPMENTS
view of the South and its resources and
progress, are waking to a realization
of our folly.
"During the past decade the South has Since September of last year-less
outstripped other sections of the United than eleven months-Florida has shipped
Stats i th inreae ofeduatinalfa-42,119 solid carloads of fruits and vegeciStites nd duingrete nfextdcadena the tables, not counting the immense quanadvance in this direction will be intiishpedbexrsanlsshn greater proportion. car load shipments by steamer. This
"Thelowcostof and nd he lwermade 1,404 train loads of thirty cars coThof lvin cnsth out will snhewigter each, or about six solid train loads for
tide of native immigration into the each working day. Among the produce
Southern States." which was shipped were:
Florda' poulaton s gvenby te TuckFar Eas ofRunell5,597 carloads grapefruit. UnidSats 190lacensus ie 75,69 ane In uc 1900 th Esce ofBthe ntina 17,824 carloads oranges.
increase since the census of 1900 of banks in the state amounted to $9,642,- 2,811 cars miedtuvegeals 224,077, or 42.4 per cent, as against only 703; these resources now amount to 2,20 carloads lietuce. 21 per cent for the United States as a about $60,000,000. The individual de- 2,9 carloads pineaples.
whoe.posits of the national banks rose from 3,599 carloads celery.
Of Florida's entire population 219,080 $6,435,000 in 1900 to $32,035,000 in the 402 carloads strawberries. live in cities and incorporated towns of latter part of 1912 and have been stead- 1,434 carloads potatoes. 2,500 inhabitants or more, while 533,539, ily increasing since, while the deposits 1,524 carloads melons. or 70.9 per cent live in the rural terrn- in t he other banking institutions rose 41 carloads cantaloupes. tory. For confirmation of these and from $3,714,000 in 1900 to $28,683,000 in Great is Florida. All this produce is
other facts aboui Florida's rapid growth 1912. the result of about twenty years work.
see the U. S. census. In 1890 there was about 2,400 miles Prior to 1896 practically no shipments
From this it must be concluded that of railroad in this' state. In the next were made except citrus fruits. Within the principal industry and the most prof- teni years the increase was to 3,256 twenty more years, mark the prediction, itable for the people generally is farm- Ini les, or a gain of only 760 miles. But shipments of cattle and meats will exing, cattle raising and dairying. in the last twelve,'years there has been ceed all other shipments which Will
The general character of Florida ag- a gain of over 2,000. miles, and this gain still be twice or thrice as heavy as at riculture is indicated by the fact that isindicative of the general prosperity present. nearly one-fourth of the total value of of the state.
crops in 1909 was contributed by potatoes and other vegetables, about onefifth by fruits and nuts, about one-sixth
by cereals, and about one-seventh by
cotton. The remainder twenty-four per "Let us learn to be content with what we have. Let us get
cent of the total, consisted mostly of
grains and seeds (other than cereal), rid of our false estimates, set up all the higher ideals-a quiet
forest crops and sugar crops. h m ,v n s o u w l ni g e o k ul o h n p r t o
The total wealth of the state in the hmvnso u w lnig e ok ulo h nprto
form of farm property in 1910 was of a genius, a few friends worthy of being loved, and able to love
$143,183,000. Of this more than four- u nrtrahnrdincn laue htbign ano
fifths is in the form of land and build- u nrtrahnrdincn laue htbign ano
ings valued at $118,146,000 as against remorse, a devotion to the right that will never swerve; a simple reli$40,799,833 in 1900, an increase of 169.6
per cent in ten years. gion empty of all bigotry, full of trust and hope and love-and to
The value of Florida's twelve leading such a philosophy this world will give up all the empty joy it has."
diversified crops common to most of the
country, not including citrus fruits, in- -David Swing.
creased from $6,677,000 in 1899, to
$15,104,000 in 1910, a gain of 126 per
cent, against only eighty-one per cent for
the whole country. ______________________________________




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
THE CLIMATE AND THE FLORIDA ORANGES FAR SUPERIOR
TO PACIFIC COAST'S.
FARMER. "I must confess that there is something about California that I like, but I
will be equally frank to say that I am alNo man should be so much interested ways glad to get back to Jacksonville and
Florida, because Jacksonville andi Florida
in the weather as the farmer. It is one have advantages which cannot be cornof his assets, not quite as valuable as pared with by the west coast," stated C.
the soil he cultivates, but of great con- I. Capps, Western sales manager of the
sequence to his growing crops. In the Campbell Automatic Irrigation Sprinkcolder states the great menace to his lers, upon his return after an extended
crops, never withdrawn for a single sea- trip to the Pacific coast. Mr. Capps
son, is the weather. He cannot foresee spent three months at the exposition conwhat it will be except at short intervals, ducting a demonstration of the sprinkand he cannot fence against it in any lers which are made in Jacksonville and
adequate way. It is an old saying that, "no man can farm against climate," and before leaving he established a branch
it is true. No man knows how true it is Mr.fce in CaAiso well as the farmer, whose "bucking"7 Mr. Capps declared that while in Caliagainst the elements of the air origin- fornia he had a good chance, naturally,
aainst the eens oto give a fair and square test to the Calated this proverb. ionafutand especially the oranges,
Now, if there is a country where this ifornia fruits, of coping the ora
mysterious and uncontrollable force, with a view of comparing the Florida
which most farmers fear, is known to fruit. "You may say," he said, "that all
this talk of California's superiority, acbe friendly, helpful and not hurtful, an cording to the Westerner's point of view,
ally of the producer and not an enemy, is all bosh. Florida's oranges are far
there will be a center of attraction; andam in due time the densest agricultural pop- not mistaken in this belief, for I have
ulation. So long as there is on the con- not in in this bei for I have
tinent a land of refuge from the un- been in position to give them both a fair
kindness of Nature, and a country where trial, and I am naturally interested in
the forcing and developing agencies of agriculture."
both climate and soil tend to and do modify the struggle of existence, so long
will men who till the soil press into it. ARE YOU INTERESTED IN
It is only a question of growing "wise"
to the situation-of knowing the facts A OF THESE?
about it and giving the right kind of
climate its true place among the helpful Bunnell needs and will support the folagencies which make for successful ag- Tomoka River, just east of our new tract. This lowing enterprises: riculture. riaer abounds in the gamest fish--Trout, Black CANNING FACTORY, FOR CANThe wise farmer today knows what Bass and many other species. NING ALL KINDS OF VEGETABLES;
he wants-more climate and less land SYRUP MILL, FOR PUTTING UP
than his father had. It was natural that CANNED SYRUP;
the early settlers on the Atlantic Coast UP-TO-DATE HABERDASHERY;
should think more of land than of cli- POEM. JEWELER;
mate. The very climatic conditions OPTICIAN;
made necessary a considerable acreage, BY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER. DENTIST;
since crops were dependent on the PLUMBER AND TIN SHOP;
weather. But today we are in a new CRATE FACTORY;
age. The farmer's work, the soil, seed "This day two hundred years ago, PHOTOGRAPHER;
selection, methods of culture, value of The wild grapes by the river's side ATTORNEY.
temperature and moisture at the right And tasteless groundnuts trailing low, If either of these is your line of busitime, receive much attention from ex- The table of the woods supplied. ness and you want to locate in the best
perts, and we have as the result of study country in the world, get in communicaand experiment a new agriculture. tion with Mr. J. B. Boaz, Editor St.
Fewer acres and better tillage is the Unknown the apple's red and gold, ton TibuM., B. Foa, E tocSt
watchword. The Secretary of Agricul- The blushing tints of peach and pear; Johns Tribune, Bunnell, Florida, at once,
ture at Washington says: "Production The mirror of the river told and not acreage is the measure of profit, No tale of orchards ripe and rare... ..... ... ..........
and moisture at the right time and the iwj
right temperature all the time is the Wild as the fruits he scorned to till, measure of production." That is to say, These vales, the idle Indian trod; I
climate is more important than acreage. Nor knew the glad creative skill All that the wisest market gardeners of The joy of him who toils with God. Europe have secured by building walls
to keep out cold winds, by training fruit 0 painter of the fruits and flowers! trees against "dead walls" to secure the We thank thee for thy wise design, benefit of reflected sunshine, and by run- Whereby these human hands of ours ning steam pipes underground to warm In Nature's garden work with thine.
the soil-artificial methods of making
climate at great expense-we have in
the Bunnell colony-under stormless Give fools their gold and knaves their skies without cost, power;
Let fortune's bubbles rise and fall;
Who sows a seed or trains a flower,
Florida is a summer as well as Or plants a tree, is more than all.
a winter resort. Each night For he who blesses most is blest;
you sleep, each day you smile. And God and man shall own his worth
Who toils to leave as his bequest
An added beauty to the earth." An Unimproved Farm in the Bunnell Colony




A Woman's Side of the Question
Interesting letter from Mrs. C. C. Jordan, formerly of Tennessee, who has spent more than two years in the colony
4< [f< /<-A.
AV 2
,Mrs. C. C. Jordan,
who resides'
about two
' / miles south
4~~A(JAAof Bunnell
Mrs. Jordan
has found -Bunnell soil
poultry raising :, e A t is adapted to
in the colony A r Jtq the growing of
ver profitable. /Z strawberriesvey pite $Mrs. Jordan's
she got on an LA strawberry
avergt of patch b e i n g
sixty eggs daily, Mr. Jordan is one of our exceptionally
which she sold for best farmers-most all of his fine. From one
forty cents a dozen. land is under cultivation. Practically everything that can be raised single plant they
in the Bunnell colony is to be found growing on the Jordan farm. picked over a quart
A patch of ground 60 ft. by 8 ft. planted to cabbage, yielded Mr. Jordan $50.00 last spring, of fine berries.




heBUNNEVLL HOME BUILDER
Why Florida is a Land of Promise FOIAFRESSV
ING MORE FEED
Florida farmers are becoming more
COUNTY COMMISSIONER W. B. EDMINSTER TELLS OF and more independent of imported feed.
RECENT TRIP This fact is shown by the amount of
corn on farms this spring. C. C. Hare,
County Commissioner W. B. Edmin- ter here than in any state I have visited,' field agent for the Bureau of Crop Esster, of St. Johns county, Florida, has especially the Japanese cane, which will timates, calls attention to the estimates just returned from an extensive trip produce upwards of 20 tons to the acre. made by the Bureau of Crop Estimates through the middle North, and in writ- These crops are all stock feeds and en- during the last three years. In the
igtafrediBunldeciig silage. spring of 1914 the amount was 4,000,000
soeo h mrsin fthe journey "Tesl ssvn h amr nte bushels; in 1915 3,472,000 and this
some ofl the impresion of ari i h spring it is 4,800,000.
he says: middle West and it will prove the mak- The amount of oats of farms three
"In answer to your request for a ing of us here is my belief. St. Johns years. In 1914 it was 130,000 bushels;
statement from me as to the compara- county land will produce double the in 1915, 135,000; and in 1916, 183,000. tive values and 'possibilities of Florida amount of ensilage of any county in the farming land, as to the lands of Illinois, middle West, and all that is necessary Iowa, South Dakota and states from to bring the successful farmers from the Interesting News Items Regarding
which I have just returned after a more high-priced lands of the middle West to or less careful study of conditions, I our cheap lands of Florida is to be able Stock Raising in Our Section of submit the following: to show them that the cow and hog can Florida.
be produced along with our staple crops. ___"The lands in the middle West are in When this is done we can't keep them One of the largest stock deals that
a very high state of cultivation and have away. Great damage has been done the hsbe aei t on onyi
reached their limit. These lands sell state by unscrupulous land sharks sell- hsm bee madte ine st.on county ihn from $150 to $300 per acre and produce ing worthless lands to the man who, if Mr. R. D. Pellicer sold his herd of an average of 50 bushels of corn per properly placed, would have succeeded cate oth adikCm ny f
acre, which sells for 50 cents per bushel, and have been a booster for the state Jcttesov te Chadic Co,000. hmaeo each year, or say from 20 to 35 bushels instead of a knocker, and I found these Jacksonvle ofaoriatl $30000000Ths.mke of wheat per acre which sells for from in every place I visited. But I know, worth of range stock that Mr. Pellicer 90 cents to $1.25 a bushel. I only men- as a Florida farmer, that we have the has sold within the past twelve months. tion these two crops to save space as best possibilities of any state in the He has built a loading pen at Bunnell they are typical. This being the case, Union, because of our climate. In the where he is loading and shipping his as a Florida farmer, I marvelled at the Illinois valley I just had to give up. The stock to Jacksonville. prosperity. But I found that all of the thermometer ranged daily from 95 to ___farm owners were people who had ac- 112 and the humidity was so heavy it Mr. J. R. Hayden, of Virginia and
quired these lands, either by homestead was almost impossible to breathe. How Nebraska, has recently purchased 8,500 or they or their ancestors had bought my mind would turn to the good old acres of land in Volusia county south
them at cheap prices, fifteen, twenty, ocean breezes, and I registered a vow of the Bunnell Development Company's thirty or forty years ago. Now, I that nothing but business would evernetrc.Hhaaladtknposcontend that the value of the land should take me into the hot summer or the sine trct hpers alred tae posebe based upon what they can be made to cold. winter of the middle Western states pionvofehis proertyland strend im-ee produce plus the increase on account of again. Notwithstanding the delight I provemen.0 Hed plans00to0spend teenm location and environment. This being got from that beautiful rolling country $75,000.00, and $10,00.0 win hee im-th the case, how do our Florida agricul- of Iowa and South Dakota in all its parovemrnens an thistwilte one ofathen tural lands compare in value with Illi- perfection of cultivation and. improve- past as nyboddsokadh nois, Iowa, South Dakota or any other ment Florida is good enough for me." has purchased two blooded bulls which of the great agricultural states? St. W. B. EDMINSTER. cost $1,100.00 apiece.
Johns county flatwoods land, which can
be bought in large bodies for $20 per ________________________________________acre, produces a crop of 40 barrels of
Irish potatoes from January to June
which this past season sold for $5 and
$4, according to grade, on track, and j J J~ DO YOU THINK -FLORIDA
six weeks later you could not see a ~( I* ~ I~SUMMERS ARE HOTTER
mule working corn on the same ground, RELADJ THIS HNELEHEE
as the corn was so high. In September TH N E S W R ?
and October from a ton to a ton and a
half of hay will be cut as a third crop.
"It is very evident to any observer To correct the erroneous belief that extremes of heat are greater in
that Florida has the natural advantage
over any and all states agriculturally. Florida than in various points in the North and West, we submit the records What we lack is experience in husband- of the United States Weather Bureau for Florida stations and a few stations ing our resources. The Illinois farmer.
utilizes every bit of his product, while in other states, for a summer season, giving the number of days the maxiI think I am safe in saying that 40 per mum temperature was above ninety degrees. cent of the Florida farm product is lost.
Stock raising and feeding will save this
waste, and it is ver" rapidly being FLORIDA STATIONS: Jupiter, 19; Titusville, 24; Key West, 5.
proven that this is to be a great stockraising state. It is demonstrated that WESTERN STATES: Denver, 24; Dodge City, Kan., 60; St. Louis,
we can raise beef and pork cheaper in 30 Sacramento, Cal., 35; Red Bluff, Cal., 69; Pueblo, Colo., 35; Keeler, Florida than any other state in the
Union, as our pasturing season is longer Colo., 66; Kearney, Neb., 23; Keokuk, Iowa, 28; Fresno, Cal., 88; Fort and we can raise legumes, such as cow- Smith, Ark., 51; Concordia, Kan., 50; Cincinnati, 24; and Bismark, 24. peas, soy beans and velvet beans, which
are very high in feeding value, at the It is superfluous to comment on the record submitted. same time enriching the soil, while corn,
sugar cane, sorghum, millet, etc., do FoiaFre n o eekr
well. At this date these crops are bet- FoiaFre n o eekr




Vhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
The Floridian's Creed and Covenant
By William Fremont Blackman, Ph. D., LL. D., Former President
IA 41'of Rollins College, Winter Park.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of the open and fathomless sky, lambent stars, of mountainous opalescent clouds, of soft benignant airs, of incessant summer, of unstinted and vivifying sunshine, of responsive and fecund soil.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, laved on every hand--cooled and warmed and cleansed and fed and decorated-by the azure V and teeming waters of tropic seas, and by countless and sparkling
lakes and streams.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of wide-stretching and open woods, of limitless green prairies and glades, of dense and vinehung hammocks, of mysterious bays and swamps, all in their various forms lovely and fruitful; the land of fragrant pine and mourning cypress, cf moss-draped oak, of waxen magnolia, of comely palm, of regal poinciana, of flaming vine, and of shy and brilliant orchid.
Corn Field-Bunnell Colony-Second Crop. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of the orange and pomelo and spicy kumquat, of peach and pear and persimmon and
______________________loquat, of pineapple and guava and mango and avocado; of corn and cotton and cane and cattle, and of whatever else is anywhere borne of trees or grown by the soil of the earth.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, the home of creatures strange, curious and beautiful-the saurian monster, the gliding reptile, the darting dainty lizzard, the aquatic manatee, the egret in snowy nuptial array, the roseate spoonbill, the exuberant mocking bird, the flame-like, flute-like cardinal, the woodpecker with ivory bill and the humming-bird with ruby throat, the painted butterfly sipping nectar in winter days.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of romantic legend and ad-' venturous history, of towns the most ancient and the newest, of swiftly-growing cities, of farms and orchards, and of wide and inviting solitudes still awaiting man's coming.
I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, magnet and meeting-place for men and women of the North and the South, the East and the West, and countries over-sea. Americans all, one blended and Florida is the Fisherman's Paradise-A Couple of Hours Catch indissoluble and free people. I believe in her eager boys and winsome girls, in her schools and colleges, in her churches of divers faiths, in her institutions of philanthropy and mercy, and in her press, the voice and the instructor of her common mind and Will.
IN FINE, I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, the commonwealth old yet young,- unformed as yet, but palpitant with energy and faring forth into the future with high hope and swift step; and believing thus,
I COVENANT with all her people of like faith to give myself to her service, mind and heart and hand and purse, to explore and develop her hidden resources, to celebrate her praises 7, truthfully, to win worthy citizens for her void spaces, to till her
fields, to keep pure her politics, to make more efficient her i_ WAschools, to strengthen and unify her churches, to cleanse and
The ocean beach so near at hand is a great boon to Bunnell sweeten her social life, and thus to make her in full fact what. Colony land owners. she is by human right and Divine dower,
Mrs. Milliken of Chicago and Mr. Foster of Indiana, two of ourTH QUE OFCM NWA HS
land owners on the beach at Ocean City.THQUEOFCM NWA HS




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell
Mrs. R. M. Deen was exhibiting an Mr. J. B. Parker, of Alberta, Canada, Mr. and Mrs. Gi. E. Drew, who have
unusually large stalk of corn this week. who has visited Bunnell twice before, and been spending the summer months in The stalk, which measured fourteen feet who is the fortunate owner of sixty acres New York state, will return to Bunnell in length, was raised by Mrs. Deen in her of land here, arrived in Bunnell this week soon. garden in Bunnell. The corn fields in with his wife and four children. He this community are a sight to *behold plans to erect his home at once and begin Fish are now beginning to bite in the these days, and a look at same will con- the development of his farm. We wel- canal at Ocean City, and the B~unnell vince the most skeptical that the Bun- come the Parker family to our colony, anglers will be kept busy for thle next nell colony can produce as good corn as few months landing the finny tribe. Mrs.
any other state in the Union. We have Messrs. Jackson and Deen -brought in Smith and Mrs. Bloaz landed thirtynever seen as prolific in any other lo- to Bunnell several crates of fine toma- seven fish last Thursday, the total cality as it is in this locality. As high toes recently which met with ready sale. weight being twenty-three and one-half as nine ears have been counted on one A number of the tomatoes were weighed pounds. stalk and from four to six are quite com- and found to tip the beam at one pound mon in the fields. Land that will pro- each. The quality was very fine. They There was a good attendance at the
duce in this manner is certainly valuable also brought in some fine watermelons, dance last Saturday evening in Woodland. man Hall. The music was furnished by
Mr. M. Stone has purchased the water- Warner's orchestra.
Mr. W. J. Sczudlo, of Detroit, accom- melon crops of Mr. W. A. Mack and ___panied by several land buyers, arrived in Messrs. Turner and Sessions. He Ocean City proves a great attraction
Bunnell last Saturday, and went imme- brought into Bunnell several fine melons these days. Every afternoon and evendiately to Korona, where they purchased which met with ready sale at from 35 ing large crowds of lBunnellites may be land. to 75 cents each. He expects to ship a seen leaving for Ocean City to enjoy the
car to St. Augustine next week, bathing in the "mighty deep." C. V.
The work on the McArn store build- Brown and family, of Bunnell, with the
ing, corner Moody Boulevard and Turner -Misses Casey of St. Augustine, recently
Street, is progressing rapidly. The spent a week at Ocean City in a most
McArn Company expects to move into delightful manner. Mr. W. H. Deen and
their new building by October 1st. Read Again Whnat the family expect to be in Ocean City for
Mr. J. E. Jones and son have pur- Florida Farmer and several weeks.
chased the interest of Mr. C. A. Smith The Convention of the Second District,
in the Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply H o m esee k er s a ys W. C. T. U., of Florida, met last week
Co., and will continue the business under in Bunnell. There was a large attendthe same name. Mr. W. L. Jones will ab u FL R D 'Sance, and much interest was manifested
continue as manager. The garage is a o tF O I ASin the work.
doing a fine business and with indications of a large tourist travel this year S U M MER CLIMATE Mr. T. E. Holden, who has been emthere is no doubt but what the business ployed by Mr. C. A. Smith, as pharmawill increase from month to month. on Page 5. cist for the past year, has purchased
the Smith Drug Store, and will conduct
Rural mail route No. 1 from Bunnell I_________________ the business in the same building under
is now in operation. J. C. Geiger is the the name of Holden's Pharmacy. Mr.
mail carrier, and reports that the pa- Smith will devote his time to his lumber
trons are very enthusiastic over the The work of removing the old sawmill business and other interests he has in
route. South of the Tribune building is com- and around Bunnell.
pleted. The removal of this eye-sore____Presiding Elder Sibert, of Miami, was adds much to the attractiveness of that Mr. G. A. Anderson, cashier of the in Bunnell Thursday evening and deliv- part of our city. Bunnell State Bank, was a visitor to
ered a very interesting sermon in the Msr.W .CcrnadF icn aak hrdyeeig
Methodist church. Msr.W .CcrnadF icn aak hrdyeeig
________have entered the cypress shingle busiThe Bunnell farmers met in Bunnell ness and report that their machinery is A great deal of interest has been
on Sturay ithCouty emostrtor being installed very rapidly and that it manifested in the meetings of the SevLon advea ofith e salty emnaof will be only a few days until they be- enth Day Adventists in the Gospel Tent
the different limie fertilizer companies of operations. They have secured a in Bunnell during the past weeks. An the state for the purpose of going into large amount of timber southwest of interesting Sunday School has been orthe qualities of these fertilizers. Bunnell and their mill is located on ganized with Mr. W. A. Mack as SuperSweetwater branch near the timber. intendent. Four churches are now orgranized in the colony-the Methodist
Mrs. E. J. Ford and son Robert, ac- Messrs. Lambert and Moody recently Episcopal, Christian, Seventh-Day Adcompanied by Mrs. Ford'.s mother, Mrs.
L. M. Brown, have arrived here from purchased from the Harwood Naval ventists and Catholic.
New York city and will make this thei Stores Company seven thousand acres of___erfine farming lands, the amount involved There has been quite a lot of hay cut fufine land. jus acr thes Dixi High- beng approximately one hundred thou- and baled in the vicinity of Dupont.
offnelndjs arssteDii Hg-sand dollars. This land is situated in ___way from the farm of Mr. G. W.* Dur- Volusia county, just south of the St. Mr. H. D. Miller brought in to some
rance, which she will put under cultiva- Johns county line, and is considered one of his Bunnell friends some very luscious tion as soon as possible. of the best tracts of farming land in grapes recently. He stated that the
this section of the state. vines were set out in February, 1915,
Mr. Bache of Chattahoochee, Florida, and such grapes as these he offered as
has paid a visit to the Bunnell colony. The pavillion and bath houses at roof that vineyards could be made to He expressed himself as being very Ocean City are now completed, and bear successfully in this section.
pleased with his land here. crowds of people are enjoying both bathing and dancing. Quite a large crowd Mr. Adams, of Marietta, Georgia, was
Quite a large number of Bunnell attended the dance there Thursday even- a recent visitor to Bunnell. He came to
Masons attended the meeting of the ing. Several cars of dancers from St. inspect his nice tract of land just south Masonic lodge in St. Augustine Thurs- Augustine and Hastings were in attend- of town, and expressed himself as being day evening. ance. well pleased with same.




IAre You Interested in Buying
a Farm in the Bunnell Colony?
We have some very desirable farms still for sale. A few of them are in our Old Tract, while many more may be had in the new tract.
The Price of Land in the Old Tract Today miss-$40.00 an Acre and Upwards.
But these are Cheap at $40.00 an Acre. We fully believe that within a very few years time you cannot buy one of these for less than $100.00 an Acre. There is No More Land for $35.00 an Acre in
Mr. T. .. Verdenius, the Pioneer Smnal the Old Tract.
Farmt Man of Florida,
If you would like to secure a farm-home at Bunnell, will you kindly answer the following questions? By doing this you will give us information that will assist us very materially in giving you the right location, should you decide to purchase one of our Bunnell colony farms.
If you desire, we shall be pleased to mail you a map of our colony lands and to mark on same one or two locations suitable to your individual requirements.
THIS IS NOT AN ORDER-IT IS JUST AN INQUIRY BLANK.
Cut Out This Blank and Return to
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Company, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago
HOW MANY ACRES WOULD YOU CONSIDER BUYING?_.........................................................
WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING KINDS OF SOIL DO YOU WANT? Suitable for citrus fruits? (Oranges and grape-fruit) ...............................................................
Suitable for general farming?......................................................................................
Suitable for trucking?.............................................................................................
Suitable for poultry raising? .....................................................................................
ARE YOU PROTESTANT OR CATHOLIC? ........................................................ .................
(We have Protestant churches in the northern part of the colony and a Catholic church in the southern part.)
ARE YOU MARRIED OR SINGLE? ............................................... ................. ..............
WHAT IS YOUR AGE? ............................................................................................
HAVE YOU ANY CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE? .................................................................
HAVE YOU EVER FARMED BEFORE? ...........................................................................
ARE YOU FOND OF FISHING AND HUNTING? ..................................................................
WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE LOCATED NEAR THE OCEAN?........................................................
HAVE YOU ANY FRIENDS WHO HAVE BOUGHT LAND FROM US? ..............................................
IF SO, WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE LOCATED NEAR THEM? ....................................................
YOUR NAME....................................................................................................
FULIL ADDRESS.................................................................................................
Kindly give us any additional information which you think we should have to assist us in making an intelligent selection for you. If you will carefully answer the above questions, we shall know whether it is necessary to locate you near one of our schools, near which church, etc. We have six
schools in our colony and four churches.
REMEMBER: THIS IS NOT AN ORDER BLANK-IT IS SIMPLY AN INQUIRY.




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Illlllllllllllll! SEPTEMBER, 1916 Busy Haying Scene in Field West of Bunnell. The Average Florida Farmer Grows Three Crops Each Year The Plan Followed by the Majority of our Bunnell Farmers is to Raise First, a Crop of Potatoes; Second, Corn; and Third, Hay— which many are Harvesting at the present time.
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0^0 BUNNELL HOME BUIEDEIR Florida Growing Faster Than the Nation Florida already outstripping the na> tion as a whole in the ratio of its growth as compared with past years, is recog nized today by all students of progress as being upon the eve of a great move ment of population to its vacant lands and a development and industry that will place it among the leaders. Especially is this true of stock raising, dairying and general farming. It has been made famous by its citrus groves and truck farms and it will be still more famous for diversified agri culture. Barton W. Curtis, sent by the Coun try Gentleman to investigate conditions in the south, writing in the issue of February 14, said: “A good many millions of us who do not know the South, and who have calmly blundered ahead in our mistaken view of the South and its resources and progress, are waking to a realization of our folly. “During the past decade the South has outstripped other sections of the United States in the increase of educational fa cilities and during the next decade the advance in this direction will be in greater proportion. “The low cost of land and the lower cost of living in the South will swing the tide of native immigration into the Southern States.” Florida’s population as given by the United States 1910 census is 752,6i9, an increase since the census of 1900 of 224,077, or 42.4 per cent, as against only 21 per cent for the United States as a whole. Of Florida’s entire population 219,080 live in cities and incorporated towns of 2,500 inhabitants or more, while 533,539, or 70.9 per cent live in the rural terri tory. For confirmation of these and other facts about Florida’s rapid growth see the U. S. census. From this it must be concluded that the principal industry and the most prof itable for the people generally is farm ing, cattle raising and dairying. The general character of Florida ag riculture is indicated by the fact that nearly one-fourth of the total value of crops in 1909 was contributed by pota toes and other vegetables, about onefifth by fruits and nuts, about one-sixth by cereals, and about one-seventh by cotton. The remainder twenty-four per cent of the total, consisted mostly of grains and seeds (other than cereal), forest crops and sugar crops. The total wealth of the state in the form of farm property in 1910 was $143,183,000. Of this more than fourfifths is in the form of land and build ings valued at .$118,146,000 as against $40,799,833 in 1900, an increase of 169.( per cent in ten years. The value of Florida’s twelve leading diversified crops common to most of th< country, not including citrus fruits, in creased from $6,677,000 in 1899, t( $15,104,000 in 1910, a gain of 126 pe; cent, against only eighty-one per cent foi the whole country. In the ten years 1900 to 1910 the in crease in the value of farm lands in the United States was 118 per cent and in Florida 203 per cent. The value of farm buildings in the United States in that time increased seventy-seven per cent, and in Florida 144 per cent. The value of farm implements and ma chinery in the country increased 68 per cent between 1900 and 1910, and in Flor ida 126 per cent. Truck Farm East of Bunnell In 1900 the resources of the national banks in the state amounted to $9,642,703; these resources now amount to about $60,000,000. The individual de posits of the national banks rose from $6,435,000 in 1900 to $32,035,000 in the latter part of 1912 and have been stead ily increasing since, while the deposits in the other banking institutions rose from $3,714,000 in 1900 to $28,683,000 in 1912. In 1890 there was about 2,400 miles of railroad in this state. In the next ten years the increase was to 3,256 miles, or a gain of only 760 miles. But in the last twelve years there has been a gain of over 2,000 miles, and this gain is indicative of the general prosperity of the state. Although Florida is not primarily a manufacturing state its manufacturers have shown a steady growth. In 1909 there was 2,159 establishments giving employment to an average of 57,473 wage earners, or 7.6 per cent of the total population. During this period the gross value of products per capita of the entire population of the state in creased from $8 to $97. The value of the factory products of Florida rose from $36,800,000 in 1900 to $90,000,000 in 1912; the value of farm products from $18,300,000 to $43,600,000; the value of forest products from $18,000,000 to $34,000,000; the value of mineral output from $2,300,000 to $11,000,000.—Tampa Tribune. HEAVY SHIPMENTS Since September of last year—less than eleven months—Florida has shipped 42,119 solid carloads of fruits and vege tables, not counting the immense quan tities shipped by express and less than car load shipments by steamer. This made 1,404 train loads of thirty cars each, or about six solid train loads for each working day. Among the produce which was shipped were: 5,597 carloads grapefruit. 17,824 carloads oranges. 2,811 cars mixed vegetables. 2,205 carloads lettuce. 292 carloads pineapples. 6,390 carloads tomatoes. 3,599 carloads celery. 402 carloads strawberries. 1,434 carloads potatoes. 1,524 carloads melons. 41 carloads cantaloupes. Great is Florida. All this produce is the result of about twenty years work. Prior to 1896 practically no shipments were made except citrus fruits. Within twenty more years, mark the prediction, shipments of cattle and meats will ex ceed all other shipments — which will still be twice or thrice as heavy as at present. “Let us learn to be content with what we have. Let us get rid of our false estimates, set up all the higher ideals—a quiet home, vines of our own planting; a few books full of the inspiration of a genius, a few friends worthy of being loved, and able to love us in return, a hundred innocent pleasures that bring no pain or remorse, a devotion to the right that will never swerve; a simple reli gion empty of all bigotry, full of trust and hope and love—and to such a philosophy this world will give up all the empty joy it has.” —David Swing.

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER THE CLIMATE AND THE FARMER. No man should be so much interested in the weather as the farmer. It is one of his assets, not quite as valuable as the soil he cultivates, but of great con sequence to his growing crops. In the colder states the great menace to his crops, never withdrawn for a single sea son, is the weather. He cannot foresee what it will be except at short intervals, and he cannot fence against it in any adequate way. It is an old saying that, “no man can farm against climate,” and it is true. No man knows how true it is so well as the farmer, whose “bucking” against the elements of the air origin ated this proverb. Now, if there is a country where this mysterious and uncontrollable force, which most farmers fear, is known to be friendly, helpful and not hurtful, an ally of the producer and not an enemy, there will be a center of attraction; and in due time the densest agricultural pop ulation. So long as there is on the con tinent a land of refuge from the un kindness of Nature, and a country where the forcing and developing agencies of both climate and soil tend to and do modify the struggle of existence, so long will men who till the soil press into it. It is only a question of growing “wise” to the situation — of knowing the facts about it and giving the right kind of climate its true place among the helpful agencies which make for successful ag riculture. The wise farmer today knows what he wants—more climate and less land than his father had. It was natural that the early settlers on the Atlantic Coast should think more of land than of cli mate. The very climatic conditions made necessary a considerable acreage, since crops were dependent on the weather. But today we are in a new age. The farmer’s work, the soil, seed selection, methods of culture, value of temperature and moisture at the right time, receive much attention from ex perts, and we have as the result of study and experiment a new agriculture. Fewer acres and better tillage is the watchword. The Secretary of Agricul ture at Washington says: “Production and not acreage is the measure of profit, and moisture at the right time and the right temperature all the time is the measure of production.” That is to say, climate is more important than acreage. All that the wisest market gardeners of Europe have secured by building walls to keep out cold winds, by training fruit trees against “dead walls” to secure the benefit of reflected sunshine, and by run ning steam pipes underground to warm the soil—artificial methods of making climate at great expense—we have in the Bunnell colony — under stormless skies without cost. Florida is a summer as well as a winter resort. Each night you sleep, each day you smile. Tomoka River, just east of our new tract. This riuer abounds in the gamest fish — T rout, Black Bass and many other species. POEM. BY JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER. "This day two hundred years ago, The wild grapes by the river’s side And tasteless groundnuts trailing low, The table of the woods supplied. Unknown the apple s red and gold, The blushing tints of peach and pear; The mirror of the river told No tale of orchards ripe and rare. Wild as the fruits he scorned to till. These vales, the idle Indian trod; Nor knew the glad creative skill The joy of him who toils with God. O painter of the fruits and flowers! We thank thee for thy wise design. Whereby these human hands of ours In Nature’s garden work with thine. Give fools their gold and knaves their power; Let fortune’s bubbles rise and fall; Who sows a seed or trains a flower, Or plants a tree, is more than all. For he who blesses most is blest; And God and man shall own his worth Who toils to leave as his bequest An added beauty to the earth.” FLORIDA ORANGES FAR SUPERIOR TO PACIFIC COAST’S. “I must confess that there is some thing about California that I like, but I will be equally frank to say that I am al ways glad to get back to Jacksonville and Florida, because Jacksonville and Florida have advantages which cannot be com pared with by the west coast,” stated C. I. Capps, Western sales manager of the Campbell Automatic Irrigation Sprink lers, upon his return after an extended trip to the Pacific coast. Mr. Capps spent three months at the exposition con ducting a demonstration of the sprink lers which are made in Jacksonville and before leaving he established a branch office in Los Angeles. Mr. Capps declared that while in Cali fornia he had a good chance, naturally, to give a fair and square test to the Cal ifornia fruits, and especially the oranges, with a view of comparing the Florida fruit. “You may say,” he said, “that all this talk of California’s superiority, ac cording to the Westerner’s point of view, is all bosh. Florida’s oranges are far superior to the California product. I am not mistaken in this belief, for I have been in position to give them both a fair trial, and I am naturally interested in agriculture.” ARE YOU INTERESTED IN ANY OF THESE? Bunnell needs and will support the fol lowing enterprises: CANNING FACTORY, FOR CAN NING ALL KINDS OF VEGETABLES; SYRUP MILL, FOR PUTTING UP CANNED SYRUP; UP-TO-DATE HABERDASHERY; JEWELER; OPTICIAN; DENTIST; PLUMBER AND TIN SHOP; CRATE FACTORY; PHOTOGRAPHER; ATTORNEY. If either of these is your line of busi ness and you want to locate in the best country in the world, get in communica tion with Mr. J. B. Boaz, Editor St. Johns Tribune, Bunnell, Florida, at once, and he will give you complete details. An Unimproved Farm in the Bunnell Colony

PAGE 5

Efce BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Why Florida is a Land of Promise COUNTY COMMISSIONER W. B. EDMINSTER TELLS OF RECENT TRIP County Commissioner W. B. Edminster, of St. Johns county, Florida, has just returned from an ,extensive trip through the middle North, and in writ ing to a friend in Bunnell describing some of the impressions of the journey he says: “In answer to your request for a statement from me as to the compara tive values and possibilities of Florida farming land, as to the lands of Illinois, Iowa, South Dakota and states from which I have just returned after a more or less careful study of conditions, I submit the following: “The lands in the middle West are in a very high state of cultivation and have reached their limit. These lands sell from $150 to $300 per acre and produce an average of 50 bushels of corn per acre, which sells for 50 cents per bushel, each year, or say from 20 to 35 bushels of wheat per acre which sells for from 90 cents to $1.25 a bushel. I only men tion these two crops to save space as they are typical. This being the case, as a Florida farmer, I marvelled at the prosperity. But I found that all of the farm owners were people who had ac quired these lands, either by homestead or they or their ancestors had bought them at cheap prices, fifteen, twenty, thirty or forty years ago. Now, I contend that the value of the land should be based upon what they can be made to produce plus the increase on account of location and environment. This being the case, how do our Florida agricul tural lands compare in value with Illi nois, Iowa, South Dakota or any other of the great agricultural states ? St. Johns county flatwoods land, which can be bought in large bodies for $20 per acre, produces a crop of 40 barrels of Irish potatoes from January to June which this past season sold for $5 and $4, according to grade, on track, and six weeks later you could not see a mule working corn on the same ground, as the corn was so high. In September and October from a ton to a ton and a half of hay will be cut as a third crop. “It is very evident to any observer that Florida has the natural advantage over any and all states agriculturally. What we lack is experience in husband ing our resources. The Illinois farmer utilizes every bit of his product, while I think I am safe in saying that 40 per cent of the Florida farm product is lost. Stock raising and feeding will save this waste, and it is verr rapidly being proven that this is to be a great stockraising state. It is demonstrated that we can raise beef and pork cheaper in Florida than any other state in the Union, as our pasturing season is longer and we can raise legumes, such as cowpeas, soy beans and velvet beans, which are very high in feeding value, at the same time enriching the soil, while corn, sugar cane, sorghum, millet, etc., do well. At this date these crops are bet ter here than in any state I have visited, especially the Japanese cane, which will produce upwards of 20 tons to the acre. These crops are all stock feeds and en silage. “The silo is saving the farmers in the middle West and it will prove the mak ing of us here is my belief. St. Johns county land will produce double the amount of ensilage of any county in the middle West, and all that is necessary to bring the successful farmers from the high-priced lands of the middle West to our cheap lands of Florida is to be able to show them that the cow and hog can be produced along with our staple crops. When this is done we can’t keep them away. Great damage has been done the state by unscrupulous land sharks sell ing worthless lands to the man who, if properly placed, would have succeeded and have been a booster for the state instead of a knocker, and I found these in every place I visited. But I know, as a Florida farmer, that we have the best possibilities of any state in the Union, because of our climate. In the Illinois valley I just had to give up. The thermometer ranged daily from 95 to 112 and the humidity was so heavy it was almost impossible to breathe. How my mind would turn to the good old ocean breezes, and I registered a vow that nothing but business would ever take me into the hot summer or the cold winter of the middle Western states again. Notwithstanding the delight I got from that beautiful rolling country of Iowa and South Dakota in all its perfection of cultivation and improve ment, Florida is good enough for me.” W. B. EDMINSTER. FLORIDA FARMERS SAV ING MORE FEED Florida farmers are becoming more and more independent of imported feed. This fact is shown by the amount of corn on farms this spring. C. C. Hare, field agent for the Bureau of Crop Es timates, calls attention to the estimates made by the Bureau of Crop Estimates during the last three years. In the spring of 1914 the amount was 4,000,000 bushels; in 1915 3,472,000 and this spring it is 4,800,000. The amount of oats of farms three years. In 1914 it was 130,000 bushels; in 1915, 135,000; and in 1916, 183,000. Interesting News Items Regarding Stock Raising in Our Section of Florida. One of the largest stock deals that has been made in St. Johns county in some time is the one just closed, when Mr. R. D. Pellicer sold his herd of cattle to the Chaddick Company of Jacksonville for $30,000.00. This makes a total of approximately $50,000.00 worth of range stock that Mr. Pellicer has sold within the past twelve months. He has built a loading pen at Bunnell where he is loading and shipping his stock to Jacksonville. Mr. .1. R. Hayden, of Virginia and Nebraska, has recently purchased 8,500 acres of land in Volusia county south of the Bunnell Development Company’s new tract. He has already taken posses sion of his property and started im provements. He plans to spend between $75,000.00 and $100,000.00 in these im provements, and this will be one of the large ranches in the state. Mr. Hayden plans to raise only blooded stock and he has purchased two blooded bulls which cost $1,100.00 apiece. Florida Farmer and Homeseeker. rn1 4 r\ rpi ||n DO YOU THINK FLORIDA p || 8 IH I ^ SUMMERS ARE HOTTER 1 A A M.AKJ THAN ELSEWHERE? To correct the erroneous belief that extremes of heat are greater in Florida than in various points in the North and West, we submit the records of the United States Weather Bureau for Florida stations and a few stations in other states, for a summer season, giving the number of days the maxi mum temperature was above ninety degrees. FLORIDA STATIONS: Jupiter, 19; Titusville, 24; Key West, 5. WESTERN STATES: Denver, 24; Dodge City, Kan., 60; St. Louis, 30; Sacramento, Cal., 35; Red Bluff, Cal., 69; Pueblo, Colo., 35; Keeler, Colo., 66; Kearney, Neb., 23; Keokuk, Iowa, 28 ; Fresno, Cal., 88; Fort Smith, Ark., 51; Concordia, Kan., 50; Cincinnati, 24; and Bismark, 24. It is superfluous to comment on the record submitted.

PAGE 6

me BUNNELL, HOME BUILDER Corn Field—Bunnell Colony—Second Crop. Florida it the Fisherman' a Paradise—A Couple of Hours Catch The ocean beach so near at hand is a great boon to Bunnell Colony land owners. Mrs. Milliken of Chicago and Mr. Foster of Indiana, two of our land owners on the beach at Ocean City. The Floridian’s Creed and Covenant By William Fremont Blackman, Ph. D., LL. D., Former President of Rollins College, Winter Park. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of the open and fathomless sky, lambent stars, of mountainous opalescent clouds, of soft benignant airs, of incessant summer, of unstinted and vivifying sunshine, of responsive and fecund soil. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, laved on every hand—cooled and warmed and cleansed and fed and decorated—by the azure and teeming waters of tropic seas, and by countless and sparkling lakes and streams. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of wide-stretching and open woods, of limitless green prairies and glades, of dense and vinehung hammocks, of mysterious bays and swamps, all in their various forms lovely and fruitful; the land of fragrant pine and mourning cypress, cf moss-draped oak, of waxen magnolia, of comely palm, cf regal pcinciana, cf flaming vine, and of shy and brilliant orchid. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of the orange and pomelo and spicy kumquat, of peach and pear and persimmon and lcquat, cf pineapple and guava and mango and avocado; of com and cotton and cane and cattle, and cf whatever else is anywhere borne cf trees or grown by the soil cf the earth. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, the home of creatures strange, curious and beautiful—the saurian monster, the gliding reptile, the darting dainty lizzard, the aquatic manatee, the egret in snowy nuptial array, the roseate spoonbill, the exuberant mock ing bird, the flame-like, flute-like cardinal, the woodpecker with ivory bill and the humming-bird with ruby throat, the painted butterfly sipping nectar in winter days. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, land of romantic legend and ad venturous history, of towns the most ancient and the newest, of swiftly-growing cities, of farms and orchards, and of wide and inviting solitudes still awaiting man’s coming. I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, magnet and meeting-place for men and women of the North and the South, the East and the West, and countries over-sea. Americans all, one blended and indissoluble and free people. I believe in her eager boys and winsome girls, in her schools and colleges, in her churches of divers faiths, in her institutions of philanthropy and mercy, and in her press, the voice and the instructor of her common mind and will. IN FINE, I BELIEVE IN FLORIDA, the commonwealth old yet young, unformed as yet, but palpitant with energy and faring forth into the future with high hope and swift step; and believ ing thus, I COVENANT with all her people cf like faith to give my self to her service, mind and heart and hand and purse, to ex plore and develop her hidden resources, to celebrate her praises truthfully, to win worthy citizens for her void spaces, to till her fields, to keep pure her politics, to make more efficient her schools, to strengthen and unify her churches, to cleanse and sweeten her social life, and thus to make her in full fact what she is by human right and Divine dower, THE QUEEN OF COMMONWEALTHS.

PAGE 7

&f>@ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell Mrs. R. M. Deen was exhibiting an unusually large stalk of corn this week. The stalk, which measured fourteen feet in length, was raised by Mrs. Deen in her garden in Bunnell. The corn fields in this community are a sight to behold these days, and a look at same will con vince the most skeptical that the Bun nell colony can produce as good com as any other state in the Union. We have never seen as prolific in any other lo cality as it is in this locality. As high as nine ears have been counted on one stalk and from four to six are quite com mon in the fields. Land that will pro duce in this manner is certainly valuable land. Mr. W. J. Sczudlo, of Detroit, accom panied by several land buyers, arrived in Bunnell last Saturday, and went imme diately to Korona, where they purchased land. The work on the McArn store build ing, comer Moody Boulevard and Turner Street, is progressing rapidly. The McArn Company expects to move into their new building by October 1st. Mr. J. E. Jones and son have pur chased the interest of Mr. C. A. Smith in the Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply Co., and will continue the business under the same name. Mr. W. L. Jones will continue as manager. The garage is doing a fine business and with indica tions of a large tourist travel this year there is no doubt but what the business will increase from month to month. Rural mail route No. 1 from Bunnell is now in operation. J. C. Geiger is the mail carrier, and reports that the pa trons are very enthusiastic over the route. Presiding Elder Sibert, of Miami, was in Bunnell Thursday evening and deliv ered a very interesting sermon in the Methodist church. The Bunnell farmers met in Bunnell on Saturday with County Demonstrator Lawton and several of the salesmen of the different lime fertilizer companies of the state for the purpose of going into the qualities of these fertilizers. Mrs. E. J. Ford and son Robert, ac companied by Mrs. Ford’s mother, Mrs. L. M. Brown, have arrived here from New York city and will make this their future home. Mrs. Ford owns 20 acres of fine land just across the Dixie High way from the farm of Mr. G. W. Durrance, which she will put under cultiva tion as soon as possible. Mr. Bache of Chattahoochee, Florida, has paid a visit to the Bunnell colony. He expressed himself as being very pleased with his land here. Quite a large number of Bunnell Masons attended the meeting of the Masonic lodge in St. Augustine Thurs day evening. Mr. J. B. Parker, of Alberta, Canada, who has visited Bunnell twice before, and who is the fortunate owner of sixty acres of land here, arrived in Bunnell this week with his wife and four children. He plans to erect his home at once and begin the development of his farm. We wel come the Parker family to our colony. Messrs. Jackson and Deen brought in to Bunnell several crates of fine toma toes recently which met with ready sale. A number of the tomatoes were weighed and found to tip the beam at one pound each. The quality was very fine. They also brought in some fine watermelons. Mr. M. Stone has purchased the water melon crops of Mr. W. A. Mack and Messrs. Turner and Sessions. He brought into Bunnell several fine melons which met with ready sale at from 35 to 75 cents each. He expects to ship a car to St. Augustine next week. Read Again What the Florida Farmer and Homeseeker says about FLORIDA’S SUMMER CLIMATE on Page 5. The work of removing the old sawmill south of the Tribune building is com pleted. The removal of this eye-sore adds much to the attractiveness of that part of our city. Messrs. W. H. Cochran and F. Vincent have entered the cypress shingle busi ness and report that their machinery is being installed very rapidly and that it will be only a few days until they be gin operations. They have secured a large amount of timber southwest of Bunnell and their mill is located on Sweetwater branch near the timber. Messrs. Lambert and Moody recently purchased from the Harwood Naval Stores Company seven thousand acres of fine farming lands, the amount involved being approximately one hundred thou sand dollars. This land is situated in Volusia county, just south of the St. Johns county line, and is considered one of the best tracts of farming land in this section of the state. The pavillion and bath houses at Ocean City are now completed, and crowds of people are enjoying both bath ing and dancing. Quite a large crowd attended the dance there Thursday even ing. Several cars of dancers from St. Augustine and Hastings were in attend ance. Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Drew, who have been spending the summer months in New York state, will return to Bunnell soon. Fish are now beginning to bite in the canal at Ocean City, and the Bunnell anglers will be kept busy for the next few months landing the finny tribe. Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Boaz landed thirtyseven fish last Thursday, the total weight being twenty-three and one-half pounds. There was a good attendance at the dance last Saturday evening in Wood man Hall. The music was furnished by Warner’s orchestra. Ocean City proves a great attraction these days. Every afternoon and even ing large crowds of Bunnellites may be seen leaving for Ocean City to enjoy the bathing in the “mighty deep.” C. V. Brown and family, of Bunnell, with the Misses Casey of St. Augustine, recently spent a week at Ocean City in a most delightful manner. Mr. W. H. Deen and family expect to be in Ocean City for several weeks. The Convention of the Second District, W. C. T. U., of Florida, met last week in Bunnell. There was a large attend ance, and much interest was manifested in the work. Mr. T. E. Holden, who has been em ployed by Mr. C. A. Smith, as pharma cist for the past year, has purchased the Smith Drug Store, and will conduct the business in the same building under the name of Holden’s Pharmacy. Mr. Smith will devote his time to his lumber business and other interests he has in and around Bunnell. Mr. G. A. Anderson, cashier of the Bunnell State Bank, was a visitor to Talatka Thursday evening. A great deal of interest has been manifested in the meetings of the Sev enth Day Adventists in the Gospel Tent in Bunnell during the past weeks. An interesting Sunday School has been or ganized with Mr. W. A. Mack as Super intendent. Four churches are now or ganized in the colony—the Methodist Episcopal, Christian, Seventh-Day Ad ventists and Catholic. There has been quite a lot of hay cut and baled in the vicinity of Dupont. Mr. H. D. Miller brought in to some of his Bunnell friends some very luscious grapes recently. He stated that the vines were set out in February, 1915, and such grapes as these he offered as proof that vineyards could be made to bear successfully in this section. Mr. Adams, of Marietta, Georgia, was a recent visitor to Bunnell. He came to inspect his nice tract of land just south of town, and expressed himself as being well pleased with same.

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Mr. T. A. Verdenius, the Pioneer Smalt Farm Man of Florida. Are You Interested in Buying a Farm in the Bunnell Colony? We have some very desirable farms still for sale. A few of them are in our Old Tract, .while many more may be had in the new tract. The Price of Land in the Old Tract Today is $40.00 an Acre and Upwards. But these are Cheap at $40.00 an Acre. We fully believe that within a very few years time you cannot buy one of these for less than $100.00 an Acre. There is No More Land for $35.00 an Acre in the Old Tract. If you would like to secure a farm-home at Bunnell, will you kindly answer the following ques tions? By doing this you will give us information that will assist us very materially in giving you the right location, should you decide to purchase one of our Bunnell colony farms. If you desire, we shall be pleased to mail you a map of our colony lands and to mark on same one or two locations suitable to your individual requirements. THIS IS NOT AN ORDER—IT IS JUST AN INQUIRY BLANK. Cut Out This Blank and Return to THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, Bunnell Development Company, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago HOW MANY ACRES WOULD YOU CONSIDER BUYING?. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING KINDS OF SOIL DO YOU WANT? Suitable for citrus fruits? (Oranges and grape-fruit).. Suitable for general farming? .... Suitable for trucking? ... Suitable for poultry raising? ARE YOU PROTESTANT OR CATHOLIC?. (We have Protestant churches in the northern part of the colony and a Catholic church in the southern part.) ARE YOU MARRIED OR SINGLE?.. WHAT IS YOUR AGE?. HAVE YOU ANY CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE?. HAVE YOU EVER FARMED BEFORE?. ARE YOU FOND OF FISHING AND HUNTING?. WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE LOCATED NEAR THE OCEAN?. HAVE YOU ANY FRIENDS WHO HAVE BOUGHT LAND FROM US? IF SO, WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE LOCATED NEAR THEM? .. YOUR NAME .. FULL ADDRESS Kindly give us any additional information which you think we should have to assist us in mak ing an intelligent selection for you. If you will carefully answer the above questions, we shall know whether it is necessary to locate you near one of our schools, near which church, etc. We have six schools in our colony and four churches. REMEMBER: THIS IS NOT AN ORDER BLANK—IT IS SIMPLY AN INQUIRY.