Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Sale Street, Chicao, 1U.
APRIL, 1916
An Ideal Southern Home just to the East of the Bunnell Colony
N~N'
This Charming Home Is the Residence of Mr. Knox, Who Is the Owner of One of the Most Beautiful
Orange Groves in the State of Florida. This Grove Covers More Than a Hundred Acres,
and Its Value Is Estimated at Over a Hundred Thousand Dollars.
Life is Indeed Worth Living Here




Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
https://archive.org/details/bunnellhomebuildl 916_2




S'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
An Invitation to the Readers of The Home Builder to Accompany Mr. Verdenius on His Trip to
Bunnell, Florida, April 18, 1916.
tween two opinions." I assume that you in the last twelve years from a little city have not become fully convinced of the of 10,000 inhabitants to a city with a merits of our colony or you would have population of almost 100,000 people. purchased a farm ere this. While in Jacksonville we shall pay a
Realizing that "seeing is believing," I visit to its famous "Ostrich Farm," overurge you who are interested in our col- looking the mighty St. Johns river, and ony, but who have not yet purchased here one could spend an entire day in a
land, to join me on this trip to Bunnell; pleasant and profitable manner. But we I: see for yourself what our land will pro- plan to see some of Jacksonville's parks.
-" duce, and hear with your own ears the her beautiful buildings, etc. The followstories of success from the lips of our ing morning, which will be Friday, Aprii farmers. The opinion given by the great 21st, we shall leave for St. Augustine. majority of those who have visited the the county seat of our county, St. Johns. Bunnell colony is that conditions there and the oldest city in the United States. far exceed their fondest expectations, Just the visit to St. Augustine alone and practically all who felt able to do so, would pay you for your trip to Florida. purchased more land after their visit," for this quaint old city possesses a charm I feel confident that those who accom- for every one, and one never tires of vispany me on this trip will feel amply re- iting its points of interest. We plan to paid for the time and cost of making the visit the ocean beach, old Fort Marion. trip: I am planning that this shall not the far-famed hotels that are located only be a business trip, but that it shall there, and many other interesting places. be a pleasure one as well. If any of you
who are making arrangements to visit The Bunnell Development Company
automobiles will meet us in St. AuBunnellgustine, and we shall leave that evening Mr. T. A. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small your wives accompany you, I want to say via the Dixie Highway for Bunnel.
Farm Man of Florida. that we shall be very glad indeed to have passing through Hastings. The new
them, and will do our best to make the pasi hrh Hatngs. Te next
"COME AND SEE." trip a pleasant one for them. I am al- day, which will be Saturday, we shad
ways anxious for the wives and the spend in and around Bunnell, visit and
Florida for many years has been far- daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so interview the farmers busy with their famed for her. delightful winter climate, that they will understand something of Irish potato crop, see the work of deveand the tourists particularly have flocked the pleasant surroundings and social life op ent going on in the colony, go over
to hat"Lad o Flwer" wen he old to be found there, and I have usually to Ocean City and the ocean beach, visit to that "Land of Flowers" when the cold tthe 106-acre orange grove nearby, and winds were raging over the northern found that if the wife is satisfied, the give you an opportunity to see-what the,
states. It will ever be a delight to spend husband is sure to be. Bunnell colony is like, what our people
the mid-winter days out of doors, under Let me tell you briefly of this trip, as have accomplished, and what wonderfu, azure skies, reveling in the bright sun- we have, mapped it out so far. We shall opportunities there are for those who shine and listening to the voice of the. take the "Dixie Flyer," which leaves the locate there in the near future. On Sunmocking-bird as he calls to his mate, and Dearborn Street Station, Chicago, April day we may possibly take a trip to Dayin Florida at this season of the year the 18th, at 10:25 p. m. The road over which tona. trees are laden with their wealth of or- the "Dixie Flyer" passes traverses eastanges, grapefruit and other citrus ern Illinois and western Indiana, crossing If you live in the East and would not fruits. the broad Ohio river at Evansville, and go to Florida via Chicago, I want you
However, the idea that Florida is only entering Kentucky. After sweeping then to meet me in Jacksonville Thursdesirable as a winter resort is a great through the rugged Kentucky foothills day morning, and join our party there fallacy. To realize the real worth of for a hundred miles, this famous train and then see Jacksonville, St. AugustinFlorida as a home state, and as a place leaves the "Blue Grass" state and enters lined above. Ifyou will writu ae oawhere one may make a good livelihood, Tennessee. Six miles north of Nashville once, I will give you the name of th you must see it when the crops are be- the great National Cemetery is passed, hotel at which you can meet us. ing harvested and when the farmers are where over seventeen thousand Federal receiving the returns from the combin- soldiers were laid to rest. In the center The Homeseekers' Excursions to Floration of soil and marvelous climate. This of a beautiful sect-ion, built within a cir- ida leave northern. cities the 1st and 3rfeature of Florida, I realize, is of pri- cle of hills, lies Nashville. the state cap- Tuesdays of each month. On these days mary interest to those who have bought ital. the rates to Florida are considerably reland in the Bunnell colony, or who con- Wednesday afternoon, Murfreesboro, duced, and the tickets are good for template purchasing farms there. I former capital of Tennessee, is reached, twenty-one days.
want you to visit Bunnell in the midst in the vicinity of which is another fa- For more complete particulars, I would of her busy season, and therefore I in- mous national cemeter-. The "Dixie suggest that you inquire of your local vite you and urge you to join me in a Flyer" then winds its way through the ticket agent. trip to Bunnell, taking advantage of the picturesque Tennessee Mountains. Soon homeseekers' excursion which leaves Lookout Mountain comes into view, with IF YOD WANT TO GO TO A
Chicago on Tuesday night, April 18th. the Tennessee River on the left, and WARMER, H E A L T H I E R, MORE
Many of our land owners have already about 4:00 o'clock p. m. Chattanooga is IDEAL CLIMATE-TO A COUNTRY
visited the colony, but if you have never reached. In the vicinity of Chattanooga WHERE YOU CAN RAISE THREE been there at the time of the potato har- are many points of interest. From Chatvest, it will be well worth your while to tanooga to Atlanta the train passes CROPS A YEAR ON THE SAME LANr take this trip. Those who own land at through battlefields almost the entire dis- -COME WITH ME, APRIL 18TH.
Bunnell but who have never visited the tance. NEXT, TO OUR BUNNELL COLONY.
colony, should, if possible, plan to go at Passing through Atlanta, the capital IT WILL BE THE "TRIP OF YOUR this time, because you cannot form a of Georgia, we will reach Jacksonville, clearer conception of the possibilities of the "Gateway to Florida," Thursday LIFE." WITH ALL MY HEART your own farm than by making a trip- of morning at 7:50 o'clock. We plan to URGE YOU TO COME AND SEE.
inspection at the time of the potato har- spend a day in Jacksonville, which you Thomas A. Verdenius,
vest. will find to be a most beautiful and
My invitation is particularly to all charming city, and the fastest-growing 108 South La Salle Street,
those who have so far been "halting be- one in the South. Jacksonville has grown Chicago, Illinois.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.




Uhe! BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
QUESTIONS OFTEN ASKED REGARDING THE BUNNELL COLONY
Answered by Mr. I. I. Moody, President Bunnell Development Company.
varies considerably. I believe that the av- 21. What is the annual mean tempererage acre of land- in our colony can be ature and rainfall in. Bunnell? Temperacleared at an approximate cost of $15.00 ture, about 68 degrees; rainfall, about 48 an acre. to 50 inches.
5. Is the timber on. the land of any 22. When is the heaviest rainfall? In
value? Yes, if saved for fence posts and August and September. fuel. 23. Do you ever have anry tornadoes in
6. Is irrigation necessary at Bunnell? that part of the country? No. No, not in the sense that irrigation is 24. Are sun-strokes of usual occurrence?
known in the western states. Not one There has never been a case of sunstroke
farm in a hundred is irrigated here. Our known of in the state of Florida. artesian wells, however, are of great val- 25. What kind of nights do you have?
Always cool
ue to the farmer in case there should be 26.A lw hat about ysild game and the a dry spell.
7. Is tie Bunneli colony in an ar- ga-me lawzes? There is a great variety of
tesian belt? Yes, one can strike artesian wild game, such as turkeys, squirrels, water almost any place in the colony, quail, .ducks and numerous other birds, inS. At what depthr can a-rtesian water eluding doves, snipes, etc. There are be obtained? From 150 to 300 feet. black bears, raccoons and opossums. The
9. Is the water pure anzd wholesome? hunting season lasts from three to four SYes absolutely. .. .. months,- according to the federal laws.
10. At what depth is good drinking The license fee is $15.00 for non-residents
in each county, and from $1.00 to ,$3.00
water obtained? At about a depth of 25 for residents. feet. -trrsdns
f ect.27. How about thre fishing? The finest
Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell 11. What is the cost of such a driven in the c out ty f salt-wate fish
State Bank. well? About $25.00. pump, pipe and labor and h coutr. Plenty of salt-water fish
'included. fresh water species. No license reWe are constantly receiving letters from 12. Does live-stock do well in Florida.? quired, -excepting for certain commercial our old buyers and also from men and This is a great country for live-stock. No fishing. women who contemplate a change of res- expensive barns have to be built for shel- 28: Is Bunnell a healthy place in which idence, containing a great many questions ter, but they may graze out of doors all ties in the United States. We are very regarding our Bunnell colony, and, because the year. (For further particulars on tiear salt water, and our lands are surI realize that many more people will be this subject, I would suggest you write our ne aor ns are srasking the same questions in future days, Mr. Verdenius, 108 South La Salle Street, rounded by pine forests-two important I have thought it a good plan to give Chicago.) essentials in creating health. Bunnell is
some of the most frequent queries in this 13. How mnany crops do you raise an- one of the most pleasant places in which issue of the HOME BUILDER, and to nually? Three-a fall crop, a spring crop 29. How about frosts? Light frosts
answer them for the benefit of all, as and a summer crop. .ully as space will permit me. 14. Where do you sell your products? occur between December and February,
I came to St. Johns County, Florida, They are shipped to practically all parts of This imes injuring the tender plants. from the State of Georgia when I was the United States and into Canada. of Florida- There is absolutely no frostquite a young man, and I have lived in 15. How many growing days' do you l.
the vicinity of where Bunnell is now lo- have at Bunnell? Practically every day in 30. How wich are the taxes on your cated for over fifteen years, and as I have the year is a growing day in our colony. 30d he taes are all pa te Bu ZD land? The taxes are all paid by the Buntraveled quite extensively through Florida, 16. What do you grow in the summer nell Development Company until our buyI feel that I am pretty thoroughly in- months? Hay, sugar cane, sweet potatoes ers receive deeds for their land; after thatformed regarding conditions generally here. and corn; the latter will vield equally as time the taxes will be about $1.50 to $2.00 large a crop per acre, if not larger, than On each ten acre tract. corn grown in the north, and we raise a
Question 1. What kind of people are dozen other field crops, also pears, peach- 31. How are the titles to your land?
living in the Bnnell colony at the pres- es, persimmons and other fruits too nu- Our titles are perfect. One has the privent time, and what is the class of people merous to mention. ilege of paying for his land in full at any
to whom you. have sold land? Bunnell is 17. Is it necessary to fertilize? It is not time, when we will ten give a Warranty
one of the most cosmopolitan places you necessary, but it pays to fertilize your D could imagine. We have citizens here land, just as it pays you to feed corn to 32. Are there any special rates offered from almost every State in the Union, 'hogs to fatten them. homeseekers to go to Florida? Yes, on
irom Canada, and countries across the 18. What is the cost of fertilizer? From the first and third Tuesdays of every
sea. You will find a splendid class of peo- $35.00 a ton upward, the cost having in- month tickets are sold at reduced rates, pie here, no doubt the same that you have greased considerably since the European good for 21 days. Your local ticket agent been accustomed to associate with, and war has been in progress. When the war can give you full information in regard
you will find the same churches, schools is over, we shall probably secure it at the to these excursion rates. and lodges. former prices.
2. How large and how snrall sized 19. W.Yhat is the value of improved land
:racts do you sell? From ten acres up- in your County? From $100.00 to $300.00 Why he Likes Florida Better
ward. We also have a few five acre tracts an acre, and the crops we grow and market near Bunnell, and a few near the town of in the winter will often equal the cost of hWhen I moved to Florida, I did not Dupont the land in one crop, while northern' and have the price of my railroad fare, con3. Are the lands timbered? Our land western farmers seldom earn over five per sequently I got another man to pay my is -what is known as "cut-over" land. cent on the value of their land. way here, but since moving here I have
Practically all the large trees have been 20. How do prices of building material accumulated enough to put myself and removed, but the stumps remain and there average with those in the north? With family on "easy street." I find that I are some young trees that have grown up lumber mills so near at hand, building ma- can make more money here in one year
_ince the other timber was removed. terial is naturally cheaper here. A four- than I could in five years at my old There is practically no underbrush on our room house can be built for about $300.00, home. :and. the average cost being $75.00 a room and Yous truly,
4. What is the cost of clearing the upward, according to the finish. Cement C. A. SMia.
"And? The price of clearing our land houses are practical. Bunnell, Florida
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.




Vf"e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell As
Mr. John Henide, of Oregon, is ag& on the job," having returned from Dakota, where he spent the summer. He will have his ten acres all under cultivation by another fall. He is not farming this year, having rented his place to W A. Mack, who has it planted to melons.
Mrs. C_ C. Jordan is making her home very attractive with fine flower beds trimmed with broken brick set out isuch shape as to make a pretty border She also has one of the best gardens iBunnell, and that is as it should be, for ,she is one of our hardest-working farmers and one of the biggest boosters e the colony. She not only tells people what can be done here, but will give them convincing proofs, if they visit hehome, two and a half miles south c-' Bunnell.
Mr. Robert T. Cochran, wholesale pctato dealer of New York, was in the cit Wednesday. In company with Messrs Lambert & Moody he drove over the Party of recent buyers in the Bunnell colony, coming from iinnesota, Ohio and Mich- farming section around Bunnell for the igan. Two of this iiumber were farmers from Minnesota, who purchased 16o purpose of inspecting the potato crop.
acres apiece. Altogether the party bought 470 acres of Bunnell land. He expressed himself as being agreeab7
Messrs. Turner and Sessions are mak- New Irish potatoes, received in St. surprised at the number of acres planteing good headway improving their farm Augustine from down the East Coast are to potatoes. He predicted big prices for near Bunnell. Last week they planted meeting with ready sale at $1.00 per t n e e h a .
a variety of fruit trees, including or- peck, which means $11.00 per barrel. The last brick in the Dixie Highwa7
anges, grapefruit, also grape-vines, etc. Indications continue very good for extra through St. Johns county was laid lay They also have a fine garden planted, high prices for our coming crop of po- Saturday morning, the event being celegrowing melons, corn, peas, beans, beets, tatoes. b e r a general goo:
lettuce, turnips, celery, etc. brated by a barbecue and genrlge
lettuce turnips, clr etc.son hav time for the construction crew, who have
one f or laest Messrs. Gilbertson and Johnson have been working on the job for so long. Mr. T. M. Beashor, one of our latest made splendid progress since they ar- b orrs a e ob buso long
buyers, has his farm all fenced, and will rived in the colony about two months Laborers are now busy grading o have his house completed soon. ago. They have their home nearly com- each side of the brick preparatory tc
pleted, their land fenced, and some good planting it to grass. Mr. T. H. Gudgel, formerly of Indiana, things to eat growing, such as waterhas just completed the clearing of five melons, musk-melons, cabbage, beets, etc. The orona section of the Bunnei acres of his land at Black Point. colony is one of the most progressive
Messrs. D. M. Deen, C. F. Turner and communities one could find. Everybody Mr. F. C. Worges has two flowing J. F. Lambert had extra good luck on is busy clearing land, building houses,
wells on his place in Section 3, and one their fishing trip the other day. They planting crops, getting ready to harvest: of the finest homes in the colony; also brought home seventy-five fine red fin the potato crop, planting orange groves some of the finest hogs. pike, and were fishing only four hours. etc.
One of the progressive citizens of the .... Korona district has just finished planting
ten acres to oranges and grapefruit. He expects to set ten acres to oranges and grapefruit each year for the next three years, which will give him a forty acre grove.
Mr. J. L. Council, one of Bunnell's most prosperous farmers, was married recently to Miss Annie Joy Groves, of Sebastian, Florida. As a wife was all that was lacking in John's life, we know that he is a happy and contented man now.
Mr. Council has thirty-five acres of potatoes that are most promising, and should yield him a "barrel" of money this year.
One of the best gardens in this section is that of Mrs. Franz, just west of town. She has almost everything in the vegetable line growing, such as young onions, green peas, lettuce, cabbage, A growing field near Bunnel; beets and rhubarb.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.




Uhe BUNNXLL HOME BUILDER
buted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Dr. F. L. Brown, one of St. Johns
County's enthusiastic citizens, takes great pride in his garden patch, and well he may. He recently displayed a product of his garden which was a head of lettuce, measuring sixty-one and a half inches in circumference. It was in splendid condition, crisp, and sweet.
Mr. John Jones, of St. Johns Park, has bought the interest of Mr. P. S. Lechleitner in the Bunnell Garage and Auto Supply Co., the deal being made Wednesday of this week.
Mr. James Carnell, of Ormond, one of the most prominent Masons in the state, delivered an address on Masonry to the members of Bunnell. Lodge No. 200 at their temple Tuesday evening.
Mr. A. Lambert was in town Wednesday with a load of fine strawberries, lettuce and cabbage, which met with ready sale.
Bunnell colony folks enjoying picnic East of Bunnell.
The reports from the potato growers Mr. John Buckles made a shipment of
of this section are that they are still peas to New York Thursday. Mr. Buckles looking for a bumper crop, with excep- plant tionally high prices. The farmers are hauling out their barrels and getting from which he has picked at the rate of everything in readiness to harvest their one hundred and fifty hampers to the crops when they mature. acre. He reports the peas selling in New
The barrel factory is working full ar.H eot h essligi e
Tie tuning out about twor hurd York at $4.50 per hamper, which after time, turning out about two hundred
barrels daily. They have the factory deducting freight and commission, nets storeroom and several other adjacent him $3.50 per hamper, or $525.00 per buildings full of barrels now. The acre.
farmers are requested to haul out at least half of the barrels they will need, Mr. A. Lambert has been busy this so there will be room to store the bar- winter supplying Bunnell with strawberrels in the factory, as it will take hard ries from his farm two and a half miles work to manufacture enough barrels to south of town. His first sales began in hold the crop between now and the last January, and he has several weeks yet of the shipping season. before his vines stop bearing.
A Boggs Potato Grader at work.
The above picture of the Boggs potato grader will be of great interest to all those who contemplate growing potatoes on their Bunnell colony farms. You will note that the potatoes can be accurately graded into No. Ones, Twos, Threes and the Culls, and means the saving of a great deal of time when the potatoes have to be sorted. Such a machine will soon pay for itself, as one can readily see. Northern buyers will much more readily
purchase potatoes that have gone ;hrough this grader, for they can be cer:ain that every barrel will be uniform ..
from top to bottom. A number of farmers near Bunnell have already ordered
-hese machines.
Buyers are coming into Bunnell and purchasing land at quite a rapid r ate :hese days. They are coming from V t
Canada, from the east, the north and ....
the west. They are delighted with con- -:,.'---...
-itions as they find them here, and are contracting for as much land as they feel Glimpse of our beautiful Gore Lake. Picture taken by Mrs. W. H. Milliken, of Chiable to carry. cago, one of land owners. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken have 45 acres
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
AND STILL THEY COME.
These Words of Praise from Satisfied Land Buyers.
NEW JERSEY MAN TELLS OF HIS I had a letter from Minnesota stating that DELIGHTFUL VISIT TO they have four feet of snow and that it
BUNNELL. is 40 to 60 degrees below zero nearly
every day, while here in- the BunnellI just returned from Bunnell, and Dupont colony the weather is delightful found it very cold and snowing here. I all the time. I do not believe the climate wish I was back in Bunnell. It is the at Bunnell could be beaten. only place for me, and I will be there My idea of things here is that a man to stay next fall if nothing happens. My can do well on a small tract of land. wife is very well pleased with the colony. H. GILBERTSON, Bunnell, Florida It would be impossible to tell all we
saw there, for we found things fine. I Has Lived in the Colony Three Years, and am very well pleased with my Bunnell Never Expects to Live Elsewhere.
farm, and I would not take double the I have now been a resident of Bunnell
price I paid for it. I have started to
get the land ready for planting next fall. since March, 1913. You do not have to My friend, Mr. Kinney, who went with ask me if I am favorably impressed -with me to Bunnell, bought 20 acres, and is the outlook here, and whether I expect very well pleased with his farm. He to make this my permanent home. Just will go down with me next fall and we go out on the Moody Road, east about will improve our two farms, arid plant one mile from town, and see if you think a crop. things there look durable. But for fear
that you do not see the things there as I
It seems to me that the people here in see them, I will make this assertion: the cold north are very foolish if they do I AM HERE TO STAY. not buy land in the Bunnell colony, for Yours very truly,
the soil there is easy to work and one ED. JOHNSON, Bunnell, Florida
can raise practically every kind of fruit
and truck. Another Bunnell Colony Man Who Has
Mr. ]. F..Alexander. We liked the people very much in the
colony. "Made Good," Tells What He Thinks of
A Central Illinois Buyer Tells the EDWARD TITSWORTH, New Jersey the Bunnell Colony.
Same Old Story, "I Found In regard to Bunnell as a farming
country, I think it is second to none, as
My Land Far Above everything I plant seems to grow and
yield abundantly-in fact, it is hard to
My Expectations." realize that there is such a country as
r l r is this, where everything grows. Your literature is no comparison to I am a Iissourian by birth and, as you
what I saw, during my recent trip to the know, all people from Missouri have "to
Bunnell colony. I found the land all that be shown." I have been here now almost
has been claimed for it in the way of four years, and I am convinced that this
production, but the climate was what ap- is the country for everyone who wants
pealed to me most strongly. I had not to farm-in fact, I have been "shown,"
been feeling the best in the world all and now I am here, settled for life. I
winter, had no appetite and did not feel o-n fifty acres of land and I value my
like working when I got to my office. How- farm at $8,000.00, and I am not willing
ever, I had not been at the "Halcyon" to sell at that. I believe you are doing
in Bunnell but a few days until I had a great deed when you Jet the people
such a ravenous appetite, I sometimes of the United States know about this
felt ashamed to eat so much. wonderful farming country, so that they
Again, the congeniality of the people may move here and make farm life worth
of Bunnell impressed me very favorably, Rcsidence of Mr. Whiiake,, Sttio,, Agen the living. Yours very truly, and if the fates should so arrange my of Bunncll. 0. C. MOSBY, Bunnell, Florida
destiny that I should never meet those
kind, whole-souled people again, they
will ever have a verdant place in my FORMER MINNESOTA MAN COMmemory. PARES CONDITIONS IN BUNNELL
COLON-Y WITH THOSE IN MINIn my conversation with one old settler NESOTA, AND IS HAPPY TO in the community regarding the health- E N IS H A .
fulness of the country, I was greatly amused when he told me that they "had I want to write you a few lines and
to kill a couple of desperadoes in order tell you how I like Florida and the counto start a graveyard, and didn't know try around Bunnell and Dupont. We now just where they were buried." certainly are well pleased here. We have
been in the colony a little over a month,
I certainly enjoyed my visit to the col- and have already made quite a good
ony, found my land far above my ex- many improvements on our little tract 2.
pectations, and if the good Lord is will- of land in Section four, southwest of ing (and I think He will be), I am going Bunnell. We have growing Irish and back nex fall to spend the winter. I sweet potatoes, co and different kin s shall be glad to recommend the colony to of garden truck. everyone who is interested in secoing a It is a wonderful change leaving behome there. hind the snow and ice of northern MinRespectfully yours, nesota, and after a few days' travel to Xewly-creccd home of .r. George Moody,
J. F. ALEXANDER, be able to enjoy the balmy breezes and brother of the President of the
Illinois. summer weather of sunny Florida. I Biinell Development Comnpany.
BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.




UBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
THE CALLER AT THE BACK DOOR. -By Thomas A. Verdenius.
One day last fall I was sitting at my dining table thoroughly Before the old fellow had left, I laid my hand on his satisfied and contented. My family were with me, and lunch shoulder, and I told him that he had done his work well inars just over. We were lingering at the table, happy in the deed, and I begged him to see that life held something good pleasant interchange of thought, and loth to break up the for him still, to save his pennies, and to get a little piece of
-harmed family circle, land, somehow, somewhere, where he might eventually have Just then there came a timid tapping at the back door, and freedom from the worries he is now encountering.when I went to- answer it I found an old man asking just for It was only a simple incident in life, my coming in contact
a bit of work to do-not charity, but WORK. His face was with this caller at my back door-just a few hours in my emtnned by the summer's sun, his hat was discolored by the rain, ploy, and he was gone, like "ships that pass in the night," but and his clothes were shiny and worn. He carried a little when he had left, I began to moralize, and these truths of
bundle under his arm, and his timid, shrinking manner plainly life loomed big in my mind. I realized more than ever what told the story of being turned from innumerable doors with these hard times are meaning to the men out of work, and to
-he same old story of no work to give him. the men who can find nothing to do, and I longed more than
Somehow or other I felt that this was not merely an ordi- ever to help men and women find the solution to their diffinary tranmp, and I asked him to sit down on my steps and I culties. zol e fIcudntfndsmtigfrhmt o Why need one be the man or woman at "the back door"?
aould see if I could not find something for him to do. I Is not one's heritage to the good things of life just as great
asked the old man- where he came from and why he was seek- a hs faohr h fotdo"t ii~ potnte
ing orkfro dor t dor. e tod m tht h orginllyas those of another? The "front door" to life's opportunities ing work from door to door. He told me that he origin yand possibilities may be yours, if you will but see the way came from Vermont, that he had generally been able to obtain and determine to enter in. work throughout -most of the year, in the lumber camps, on Item no be ie
the arm, ad esewere bu tha ths saso th "tmesareIt may not be possible for you to ever be what the world she farms, and elsewhere, but that this season the "times are deems a "rich" individual, but you may know the joy of insohard" he could find but little to do, no permanent work, dependence-of being rich, abundantly rich-in the things although he asked to mow lawns, cop wood and do any sort that really make life worth while; a comfortable home, in an
of menial chores.
ideal climate, a home that will provide all of the necessities
I set the man to work in my basement, sawing wood, and of life for you, and many of 'its luxuries; and you may be rich
it did one's heart good to see his shoulders straighten, and the in warm friendships, good health and the knowledge that you light of momentary happiness flit over his face, as he realized are bringing up your children in clean, healthful environments. that here would be work, food and shelter- for a few days at The possession of a bit of land can solve this problem of least. "hard times" for you, and the sooner you realize it, secure
When I asked this stranger his name his answer was simply your little farm-home and begin making payments on it, the "Tom," and as- I looked at his face and bent form, I thought sooner will independence be yours. that the world seeing him go by, with his little bundle under In the city of Chicago small plots of ground on vacant lots his arm, would think of him, if they thought of him at all, as are apportioned among many of the poor, and here you may just another ordinary tramp.. But the vision I had of this find them tending their tiny gardens, endeavoring to regain man was more than the tanned face, the old hat and the well- 1ost health, or to help provide for hungry mouths, and happy worn clothing. I seemed to see beyond all this-a sturdy, in the thought that now there is at least something they can
rugged youth, -reared among the hills of old Vermont, a typical do. As I have watched them at their work, I have thought Yankee lad, learning to swing his axe, saw the giant trees in that just in this manner, only on a larger scale, might be solved umber camps, or working on one of the little farms, the difficulties of thousands who are struggling against the
On further conversation with Tom I found him to be a odds of life.
man who had read a- great deal, a man who could talk intelli- With my utmost faith in the Bunnell colony, and because gently. He had done no particular good in life, and no espe- I KNOW what great opportunities are there for earnest men cial harm, excepting to himself, for he had failed to save his and women, I would say that here may be the spot where you money when he had work, and so today he must wander from may find a home for old age, and where you may be prodoor to door, or from farm to farm, asking for any kind of tected against the often-recurring, and- ever-to-be-dreaded employment and thankful for any, shelter he may find at night. HARD TIMES.
I tried to show-this man in my basement that there might It seems so needless, so sad, for anyone to have to look
still be better things in store for him, if he would but make a forward to a time when he will be but another "Caller at the real, earnest effort to obtain them. '-Oh, I realize my mistake," back door." And especially is this sad when the hoary white Tom replied, "I ought of years is mantling his
to have bought me brow. For it is a dreada little farm years ago ful. "thing, this growing
and settled down. I old. It is hard to know
was making money, it that the flowers and the
came easy and it-went fruits of your youth
easy, but I'didn't think have flown, and that the
of old age, hard times worm, the canker and
and what- it would'mean -the grief are yours
to have to depend- on alone. But it is a great
others for every mouth- deal harder to reach
ful one has to eat." your old age without
How I wish that ev- the ability to place your
ery reader of this story food in your mouth in
might have heard the an independent manner
old man as he told of t- and to protect yourself
the dollars thrown away, from the rain and storm
of the opportunities he without accepting the
had neglected, of' the shelter of another man's
playmates and work- roof.
mates who have gone Make up your mind,
-head of him in the race all you who read, that
of life. For it was cer- X this man who called at
tainly a sermon worth my back door is one of
:istening to, down there life's lessons sent to
.n my basement, and teach, and if you do not
one to set men and learn you will indeed be
women thinking, who lucky if you do not end
are now traveling theA
same road old Tom has prosperous farm-home near Binniell. If you will provide yoiirself a little home like your existence as he is same beid a cle at ending his.
taken. this, you nteed itever fear being a caller at anyone's "back door."




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Tiie Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiii APRIL 1916 An Ideal Southern Home just to the East of the Bunnell Colony This Charming Home Is the Residence of Mr. Knox, Who Is the Owner of One of the Most Beautiful Orange Groves in the State of Florida. This Grove Covers More Than a Hundred Acres, and Its Value Is Estimated at Over a Hundred Thousand Dollars. Life is Indeed W o r t h Living Her e

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/bunnellhomebuild1916_2

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me BUMM&LL, HOME BUILDER An Invitation to the Readers of The Home Builder to Accompany Mr. Verdenius on His Trip to Bunnell, Florida, April 18, 1916. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. “COME AND SEE.” Florida for many years has been farfamed for her. delightful winter climate, and the tourists particularly have flocked to that “Land of Flowers” when the cold winds were raging over the northern states. It will ever be a delight to spend the mid-winter days out of doors, under azure skies, reveling in the bright sun shine and listening to the voice of the mocking-bird as he calls to his mate, and in Florida at this season of the year the trees are laden with their wealth of or anges, grapefruit and other citrus fruits. However, the idea that Florida is only desirable as a winter resort is a great fallacy. To realize the real worth of Florida as a home state, and as a place where one may make a good livelihood, you must see it when the crops are be ing harvested and when the fanners are receiving the returns from the combin ation. cf soil and marvelous climate. This feature of Florida, I realize, is of pri mary interest to those who have bought land in the Bunnell colony, or who con template purchasing farms there. I want you to visit Bunnell in the midst of her busy season, and therefore I in vite you and urge you to join me in a trip to Bunnell, taking advantage of the homeseekers’ excursion which leaves Chicago on Tuesday night, April 18th. Many of our land owners have already visited the colony, but if you have never been there at the time of the potato har vest, it will be well worth your while to take this trip. Those who own land at Bunnell but who have never visited the colony, should, if possible, plan to go at this time, because you cannot form a clearer conception of the possibilities of your own farm than by making a tripof inspection at the time of the potato har vest. My invitation is particularly to all those who have so far been “halting be tween two opinions.” I assume that you have not become fully convinced of the merits of our colony or you would have purchased a farm ere this. Realizing that “seeing is believing,” I urge you who are interested in our col ony, but who have not yet purchased land, to join me on this trip to Bunnell; see for yourself what our land will pro duce, and hear with your own ears the stories of success from the lips of our fanners. The opinion given by the great majority of those who have visited the Bunnell colony is that conditions there far exceed their fondest expectations, and practically all who felt able to do so, purchased more land after their visit.' I feel confident that those who accom pany me on this trip will feel amply re paid for the time and cost of making the trip. I am planning that this shall not only be a business trip, but that it shall be a pleasure one as well. If any of you who are making arrangements to visit Bunnell at this time would like to have your wives accompany you, I want to say that we shall be very glad indeed to have them, and will do our best to make the trip a pleasant one for them. I am al ways anxious for the wives and the daughters to see our Bunnell colony, so that they will understand something of the pleasant surroundings and social life to be found there, and I have usually found that if the wife is satisfied, the husband is sure to be. Let me tell you briefly of this trip, as we have mapped it out so far. We shall take the “Dixie Flyer,” which leaves the Dearborn Street Station, Chicago, April 18th, at 10:25 p. m. The road over which the “Dixie Flyer” passes traverses east ern Illinois and western Indiana, crossing the broad Ohio river at Evansville, and entering Kentucky. After sweeping through the ragged Kentucky foothills for a hundred miles, this famous train leaves the “Blue Grass” state and enters Tennessee. Six miles north of Nashville the gx-eat National Cemetery is passed, i where over seventeen thousand Federal i soldiers were laid to rest. In the center { of a beautiful section, built within a cirI cle of hills, lies Nashville, the state capi ital. Wednesday afternoon, Mui-freesboro, } former capital of Tennessee, is reached, | in the vicinity of which is another fa mous national cemetery. The “Dixie Flyer” then winds its way through the pictui-esque Tennessee Mountains. Soon Lookout Mountain comes into view, with the Tennessee River on the left, and about 4:00 o’clock p. m. Chattanooga is reached. In the vicinity of Chattanooga ai-e many points of interest. From Chat tanooga to Atlanta the ti-ain passes through battlefields almost the entire dis tance. Passing through Atlanta, the capital of Geoi'gia, we will reach Jacksonville, the “Gateway to Floi-ida,” Thursday morning at 7:50 o’clock. We plan to spend a day in Jacksonville, which you will find to be a most beautiful and charming city, and the fastest-growing one in the South. Jacksonville has grown in the last twelve years from a little city of 10,000 inhabitants to a city with a population of almost 100,000 people. While in Jacksonville we shall pay a visit to its famous “Ostrich Faim,” over looking the mighty St. Johns river, anc here one could spend an entii-e day in a pleasant and pi-ofitable manner. But we plan to see some of Jacksonville’s parks, her beautiful buildings, etc. The follow ing morning, which will be Friday, April 21st, we shall leave for St. Augustine, the county seat of our county, St. Johns, and the oldest city in the United States. Just the visit to St. Augustine alone would pay you for your trip to Florida, for this quaint old city possesses a charm for evei-y one, and one never tires of vis iting its points of interest. We plan to visit the ocean beach, old Fox-t Marion. the far-famed hotels that are located there, and many other interesting places. The Bunnell Development Company automobiles will meet us in St. Au gustine, and we shall leave that evening via the Dixie Highway for Bunnell, passing through Hastings. The next day, which will be Saturday, we shall spend in and around Bunnell, visit and interview the fanners busy with their Irish potato crop, see the work of devel opment going on in the colony, go over to Ocean City and the ocean beach, visit the 106-acre orange grove nearby, and give you an oppoi-tuixity to see what the Bunnell colony is like, what our people have accomplished, and what wonderful oppoi-tunities there are for those who locate there in the near futui-e. On Sun day we may possibly take a trip to Day tona. If you live in the East and would not go to Floi-ida via Chicago, I want you then to meet me in Jacksonville Thurs day morning, and join our pai*ty there, and then see Jacksonville, St. Augustine and other places with us, as I have out lined above. If you will write me at once, I will give you the name of the hotel at which you can meet us. The Homeseekers’ Excursions to Flor ida leave northern cities the 1st and -3r: Tuesdays of each month. On these days the rates to Floi-ida ai-e considei*ably in duced, and the tickets ai-e good for twenty-one days. For more complete pai-ticulax-s, I would suggest that you inquire of your local ticket agent. IF YOU WANT TO GO TO A WARMER, HEALTHIER, MORE IDEAL CLIMATE—TO A COUNTRY WHERE YOU CAN RAISE THREE CROPS A YEAR ON THE SAME LANE —COME WITH ME, APRIL 18TH. NEXT, TO OUR BUNNELL COLONY IT WILL BE THE “TRIP OF YOUR LIFE.” WITH ALL MY HEART I URGE YOU TO COME AND SEE. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH. Thomas A. Verdenius, 108 South La Salle Sti-eet, Chicago, Illinois.

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BUNNELL F !OME BUILDER QUESTIONS OFTEN ASKED REGARDING THE BUNNELL COLONY Answered by Mr. I. I. Moody, President Bunnell Development Company. Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell State Bank. We are constantly receiving letters from our old buyers and also from men and women who contemplate a change of res idence, containing a great many questions regarding our Bunnell colon}-, and, because I realize that many more people will be asking the same questions in future days, I have thought it a good plan to give some of the most frequent queries in this issue of the HOME BUILDER, and to answer them for the benefit of all, as fully as space will permit me. I came to St. Johns County, Florida, from the State of Georgia when I was quite a young man, and I have lived in die vicinity of where Bunnell is now lo cated for over fifteen years, and as I have traveled quite extensively through Florida, I feel that I am pretty thoroughly in formed regarding conditions generally here. Question 1. What kind of people are living in the Bunnell colony at the pres ent time, and what is the class of people to whom you have sold land? Bunnell is one of the most cosmopolitan places you could imagine. We have citizens here from almost every' State in the Union, from Canada, and countries across the sea. You will find a splendid class of peo ple here, no doubt the same that you have been accustomed to associate with, and you will find the same churches, schools and lodges. 2. How large and how small sized tracts do you sell? From ten acres up ward. We also have a few five acre tracts near Bunnell, and a few near the town of Dupont 3. Are the lands timbered? Our land is what is known as “cut-over” land. Practically all the large trees have been removed, but the stumps remain and there are some young trees that have grown up since the other timber was removed. There is practically no underbrush on our land. 4. What is the cost of clearing the land? The price of clearing our land varies considerably. I believe that the av erage acre of land' in our colony can be cleared at an approximate cost of $15.00 an acre. 5. Is the timber on the land of any value? Yes, if saved for fence posts and fuel. 6. Is irrigation necessary at Bunnell? No, not in the sense that irrigation is known in the western states. Not one farm in a hundred is irrigated here. Our artesian wells, however, are of great val ue to the farmer in case there should be a dry spell. 7. Is the Bunnell colony inan ar tesian belt? Yes, one can strike artesian water almost any place in the colony. 8. At what depth can artesian water be obtained? From 150 to 300 feet. 9. Is the water pure and wholesome? Yes. absolutely. 10. At what depth is good drinking water obtained? At about a depth of 25 feet. 11. What is the cost of such a driven well? About $25.00. pump, pipe and labor 'included. 12. Does live-stock do well in Florida? This is a great country' for live-stock. No expensive barns have to be built for shel ter, but theymay graze out of doors all the year. (For further particulars on this subject, I would suggest you write our Mr. Yerdenius, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago.) 13. How many crops do you raise an nually? Three—a fall crop, a spring crop and a summer crop. 14. Where do you sell your producis? They are shipped to practically all parts of the United States and into Canada. 15. Hozu many growing days do you have at Bunnell? Practically every day in the year is a growing day in our colony. 16. JT hat do you grow in the summer months? Hay, sugar cane, sweet potatoes and corn; the latter will yield equally as large a crop per acre, if not larger, than corn grown in the north, and we raise a dozen other field crops, also pears, peach es, persimmons and other fruits too nu merous to mention. 17. Is it necessary to fertilise? It is not necessary, but it pays to fertilize your land, just as it pays you to feed corn to hogs to fatten them. 18. What is the cost of fertiliser? From $35.00 a ton upward, the cost having in creased considerably since the European war has been in progress. When the war is over, we shall probably secure it at the former prices. 19. What is the value of improved land in your County? From $100.00 to $300.00 an acre, and the crops w-e grow and market in the winter will often equal the cost of the land in one crop, while northern' and western farmers seldom earn over five per cent on the value of their land. 20. How do prices of building material average with those in the north? With lumber mills so near at hand, building ma terial is naturally cheaper here. A fourroom house can be built for about $300.00, the average cost being $75.00 a room and upward, according to the finish. Cement houses are practical. 21. What is the annual mean temper ature and rainfall in Bunnell? Tempera ture, about 68 degrees; rainfall, about 48 to 50 inches. 22. When is the heaviest rainfall? In August and September. 23. Do you ever have any tornadoes in that part of the country? No. 24. Are sunstrokes of usual occurrence? There has never been a case of sunstroke known of in the state of Florida. 25. What kind of nights do you have? Always cool. 26. What about wild game and the game lazes? There is a great variety of wild game, such as turkeys, squirrels, quail, ducks and numerous other birds, in cluding doves, snipes, etc. There are black bears, raccoons and opossums. The hunting season lasts from three to four months, according to the federal laws. The license fee is $15.00 for non-residents in each county, and from $1.00 to $3.00 for residents. 27. How about the fishing? The finest in the country. Plenty of salt-water fish and fresh water species. No license re quired, excepting for certain commercial fishing. 28. Is Bunnell a healthy place in which to live? One of the healthiest communi ties in the United States. We are verynear salt water, and our lands are sur rounded by pine forests—two important essentials in creating health. Bunnell is one of the most pleasant places in which to live—summer or winter. 29. How about frosts? Light frosts occur between December and February, sometimes injuring the tender plants. This may happen anywhere in the state of Florida. There is absolutely no frostline. 30. How much are the taxes on your land? The taxes are all paid by the Bun nell Development Company until our buy ers receive deeds for their land; after that time the taxes will be about $1.50 to $2.00 on each ten acre tract. 31. How are the titles to your land? Our titles are perfect. One has the priv ilege of paying for his land in full at any time, when we will then give a Warranty Deed and a perfect title to the land. 32. Are there any special rates offered homeseekers to go to Florida? Yes, on the first and third Tuesdays of every month tickets are sold at reduced rates, good for 21 days. Your local ticket agent can give you full information in regard to these excursion rates. Why he Likes Florida Better When I moved to Florida, I did not have the price of niv railroad fare, con sequently I got another man to pay my way here, but since moving here I have accumulated enough to put myself and family on “easy street.” I find that I can make more money here in one year than I could in five years at my old home. Yours truly, C. A. SMITH. Bunnell, Florida BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH

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She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell As BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH. Mr. John Henkle, of Oregon, is agaiz “on the job,” having returned from Da kota, where he spent the summer. Hr will have his ten acres all under cultiva tion by another fall. He is not farmirr this year, having rented his place to VT A. Mack, who has it planted to melons. Mrs. C. C. Jordan is making her home very attractive with fine flower beds trimmed with broken brick set out ir such shape as to make a pretty border She also has one of the best gardens ir Bunnell, and that is as it should be, for cShe is one of our hardest-working farm ers and one of the biggest boosters c: the colony. She not only tells people what can be done here, but will give them convincing proofs, if they visit her home, two and a half miles south cf Bunnell. Mr. Kobert T. Cochran, wholesale po tato dealer of New York, was in the city Wednesday. In company with Messrs Lambert & Moody he drove over the farming section around Bunnell for the purpose of inspecting the potato crop He expressed himself as being agreeably surprised at the number of acres planter to potatoes. He predicted big prices for the number ones this season. The last brick in the Dixie Highway through St. Johns county was laid las: Saturday morning, the event being cele brated by a barbecue and general goer time for the construction crew, who have been working on the job for so long. Laborers are now busy grading or each side of the brick preparatory tc planting it to grass. The Korona section of the Bunnell colony is one of the most progressive communities one could find. Everybody is busy clearing land, building houses planting crops, getting ready to harvest the potato crop, planting orange groves etc. One of the progressive citizens of the Korona district has just finished planting ten acres to oranges and grapefruit. He expects to set ten acres to oranges and grapefruit each year for the next three years, which will give him a forty acre grove. Mr. J. L. Councill, one of Bunnell’s most prosperous farmers, was married recently to Miss Annie Joy Groves, of Sebastian, Florida. As a wife was all that was lacking in John’s life, we know that he is a happy and contented man now. Mr. Councill has thirty-five acres of potatoes that are most promising, and should yield him a “barrel” of money this year. One of the best gardens in this sec tion is that of Mrs. Franz, just west of town. She has almost everything in the vegetable line growing, such as young onions, green peas, lettuce, cabbage, beets and rhubarb. Party of recent buyers in the Bunnell colony, coining from Minnesota, Ohio and Mich igan. Two of this number were farmers from Minnesota, zuho purchased 160 acres apiece. Altogether the party bought 470 acres of Bunnell land. Messrs. Turner and Sessions are mak ing good headway improving their farm near Bunnell. Last week they planted a variety of fruit trees, including or anges, grapefruit, also grape-vines, etc. They also have a fine garden planted, growing melons, com, peas, beans, beets, lettuce, turnips, celery, etc. Mr. T. M. Beashor, one of our latest buyers, has his farm all fenced, and will have his house completed soon. Mr. T. H. Gudgel, formerly of Indiana, has just completed the clearing of five acres of his land at Black Point. Mr. F. C. Worges has two flowing wells on his place in Section 3, and one of the finest homes in the colony; also some of the finest hogs. New Irish potatoes, received in St. Augustine from down the East Coast are meeting with ready sale at $1.00 per peck, which means $11.00 per barrel. Indications continue very good for extra high prices for our coming crop of po tatoes. Messrs. Gilbertson and Johnson have made splendid progress since they ar rived in the colony about two months ago. They have their home nearly com pleted, their land fenced, and some good things to eat growing, such as water melons, musk-melons, cabbage, beets, etc. Messrs. D. M. Deen, C. F. Turner and J. F. Lambert had extra good luck on their fishing trip the other day. They brought home seventy-five fine red fin pike, and were fishing only four hours. A grozving field near Bunnell

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER buted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Dr. F. L. Brown, one of St. Johns County's enthusiastic citizens, takes great pride in his garden patch, and well he may. He recently displayed a prod uct of his garden which was a head of lettuce, measuring sixty-one and a half inches in circumference. It was in splen did condition, crisp, and sweet. Mr. John Jones, of St. Johns Pai-k, has bought the interest of Mr. P. S. Lechleitner in the Bunnell Garage and Auto Supply Co., the deal being made Wednesday of this week. Mr. James Cain ell, of Ormond, one of the most prominent Masons in the state, delivered an address on Masonry to the members of Bunnell. Lodge No. 200 at their temple Tuesday evening. Mr. A. Lambert was in town Wednes day with a load of fine strawbei-ries, let tuce and cabbage, which met with x’eady sale. A Boggs Potato Grader at work. The above picture of the Boggs potato grader will be of great interest to all those who contemplate growing potatoes on their Bunnell colony farms. You will note that the potatoes can be accurately graded into No. Ones, Twos, Threes and the Culls, and means the saving of a great deal of time when the potatoes have to be soiled. Such a machine will soon pay for itself, as one can readily see. Northern buyers will much more readily purchase potatoes that have gone through this grader, for they can be cer tain that every barrel will be unifoim from top to bottom. A number of fann ers near Bunnell have already ordered these machines. Buyers are coming into Bunnell and purchasing land at quite a rapid rate these days. They are coming from Canada, from the east, the north and the west. They are delighted with con ditions as they find them here, and are contracting for as much land as they feel able to carry. Bunnell colony folks enjoy, The reports from the potato growers of this section are that they are still looking for a bumper crop, with excep tionally high prices. The farmers are hauling out their bands and getting evei’ything in readiness to haiwest their crops when they mature. The baiuel factory is working full time, turning out about two hundred bands daily. They have the factory storeroom and several other adjacent buildings full of bands now. The fanners are requested to haxxl out at least half of the ban-els they will need, so there will be room to store the bar rels in the factory, as it will take hard work to manufacture enough barrels to hold the crop between now and the last of the shipping season. ing picnic East of Bunnell. Mx\ John Buckles made a shipment of peas to New Yoi-k Thxirsday. Mr. Buckles planted two acres to peas this season, from which he has picked at the rate of one hundred and fifty hampei-s to the acre. He reports the peas selling in New Yoi-k at $4.50 per hampei-, which after deducting freight and commission, nets him §3.50 per hampei-, or §525.00 per acre. Mr. A. Lambert has been busy this winter supplying Bunnell with strawberi-ies from his farm two and a half miles south of town. His first sales began in January, and he has several weeks yet before his vines stop bearing. Glimpse of our beautiful Gore Lake. Picture taken by Mrs. W. H. Milliken, of Chi cago, one of land owners. Mr. and Mrs. Milliken have 45 acres BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18 TH.

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T5h BUHHELL HOME BUILDER AND STILL THEY COME. These Words of Praise from Satisfied Land Buyers. Mr. J. F. Alexander. A Central Illinois Buyer Tells the Same Old Story, “I Found My Land Far Above My Expectations.” Your literature is no comparison to what I saw, during my recent trip to the Bunnell colony. I found the land all that has been claimed for it in the way of production, but the climate was what ap pealed to me most strongly. I had not been feeling the best in the world all winter, had no appetite and did not feel like working when I got to my office. How ever, I had not been at the “Halcyon” in Bunnell but a few days until I had such a ravenous appetite, I sometimes felt ashamed to eat so much. Again, the congeniality of the people of Bunnell impressed me very favorably, and if the fates should so arrange my destiny that I should never meet those kind, whole-souled people again, they will ever have a verdant place in my memory. In my conversation with one old settler in the community regarding the health fulness of the country, I was greatly amused when he told me that they “had to kill a couple of desperadoes in order to stai*t a graveyard, and didn’t know now just where they were buried.” I certainly enjoyed my visit to the col ony, found my land far above my ex pectations, and if the good Lord is will ing (and I think He will be), I am going back next fall to spend the winter. I shall be glad to recommend the colony to everyone who is interested in securing a home there. Respectfully yours, J. F. ALEXANDER, Illinois. NEW JERSEY MAN TELLS OF HIS DELIGHTFUL VISIT TO BUNNELL. I just returned from Bunnell, and found it very cold and snowing here. I wish I was back in Bunnell. It is the only place for me, and I will be there to stay next fall if nothing happens. My wife is very well pleased with the colony. It would* be impossible to tell all we saw there, for we found things fine. I am very well pleased with my Bunnell farm, and I would not take double the price I paid for it. I have started to get the land ready for planting next fall. My friend, Mr. Kinney, who went with me to Bunnell, bought 20 acres, and is very well pleased with his farm. He will go down with me next fall and we will improve our two farms, and plant a crop. It seems to me that the people here in the cold north are very foolish if they do not buy land in the Bunnell colony, for the soil there is easy to work and one can raise practically every kind of fruit and truck. We liked the people very much in the colony. EDWARD TITSWORTH, New Jersey IRcsidcnre of Mr. IVhPaker, Station. Agent of Bunnell. FORMER MINNESOTA MAN COM PARES CONDITIONS IN BUNNELL COLONY WITH THOSE IN MIN NESOTA, AND IS HAPPY TO BE IN SUNNY FLORIDA. I want to write you a few lines and tell you how I like Florida and the coun try around Bunnell and Dupont. We certainly are well pleased here. We have been in the colony a little over a month, and have already made quite a good many improvements on our little tract of land in Section four, southwest of Bunnell. We have growing Irish and sweet tpotatoes, com and different kinds of garden truck. It is a wonderful change leaving be hind the snow and ice of northern Min nesota, and after a few days’ travel to be able to enjoy the balmy breezes and summer weather of sunny Florida. I had a letter from Minnesota stating that they have four feet of snow and that it is 40 to 60 degrees below zero nearly every day, while here in the BunnellDupont colony the weather is delightful all the time. I do not believe the climate at Bunnell could be beaten. My idea of things here is that a man can do well on a small tract of land. H. GILBERTSON, Bunnell, Florida Has Lived in the Colony Three Years, and Never Expects to Live Elsewhere. I have now been a resident of Bunnell since March, 1913. You do not have to ask me if I am favorably impressed with the outlook here, and whether I expect to make this my permanent home. Just go out on the Moody Road, east about one mile from town, and see if you think tilings there look durable. But for fear that you do not see the tilings there as I see them, I will make this assertion: I AM HERE TO STAY. Yours very truly, ED. JOHNSON, Bunnell, Florida Another Bunnell Colony Man Who Has “Made Good,” Tells What He Thinks of the Bunnell Colony. In regard to Bunnell as a farming country, I think it is second to none, as everything I plant seems to grow and yield abundantly—in fact, it is hard to realize that there is such a country as this, where everything grows. I am a Missourian by birth and, as you know, all people from Missouri have “to be shown.” I have been here now almost four years, and I am convinced that this is the countiy for everyone who wants to farm—in fact, I have been “shown,” and now I am here, settled for life. I own fifty acres of land and I value my farm at S8,000.00, and I am not willing to sell at that. I believe you are doing a great deed when you let the people of the United States know about this wonderful fanning country, so that they may move here and make farm life worth the living. Y'ours very truly, 0. C. MOSBY, Bunnell, Florida es N etvly-crected home of Mr. George Moody, brother of the President of the Bunnell Development Company. BE READY TO START FOR BUNNELL ON APRIL 18TH.

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gftc BUHHELL HOME BUILDER. THE CALLER AT THE BACK DOOR. —By Thomas A. Verdenius. One day last fall I was sitting at my dining table thoroughly satisfied and contented. My family were with me, and lunch was just over. We were lingering at the table, happy in the -ieasant interchange of thought, and loth to break up the charmed family circle. Just then there came a timid tapping at the hack door, and when I went to answer it I found an old man asking just for a bit of work to do—not charity, but WORK. His face was tanned by the summer’s sun, his hat was discolored by the rain, and his clothes were shiny and worn. He carried a little %¡ undle under his arm, and his timid, shrinking manner plainly :old the story of being turned from innumerable doors with ie same old story of no work to give him. Somehow or other I felt that this was not merely an ordi nary tramp, and 1 asked him to sit down on my steps and I would see if I could not find something for him to do. I asked the old man where he came from and why he was seek ing work from door to door. He told me that he originally came from Vermont, that he had generally been able to obtain work throughout most of the year, in the lumber camps, on the farms, and elsewhere, but that this season the “times are so hard” he could find but little to do, no permanent work, although he asked to mow lawns, chop wood and do any sort of menial chores. I set the man to work in my basement, sawing wood, and it did one’s heart good to see his shoulders straighten, and the light of momentary happiness flit over his face, as he realized chat here would be work, food and shelter for a few days at least. When I asked this stranger his name his answer was simply "Tom,” and as I looked at his face and bent form, I thought that the world seeing him go by, with his little bundle under his arm, would think of him, if they thought of him at all, as just another ordinary tramp. But the vision I had of this man was more than the tanned face, the old hat and the wellworn clothing. I seemed to see beyond all this—a sturdy, rugged youth, reared among the hills of old Vermont, a typical Yankee lad, learning to swing his axe, saw the giant trees in lumber camps, or working on one of the little farms. On further conversation with Tom I found him to be a man who had read a great deal, a man who could talk intelli gently. He had done no particular good in life, and no espe cial harm, excepting to himself, for he had failed to save his money when he had work, and so today he must wander from door to door, or from farm to farm, asking for any kind of employment and thankful for any shelter he may find at night. I tried to show this man in my basement that there might still be better things in store for him, if he would but make a real, earnest effort to obtain them. “Oh, I realize my mistake,” Tom replied, “I ought to have bought me a little farm years ago and settled down, was making money, it came easy and it went easy, but I didn’t think of old age, hard times and what it would mean to have to depend on others for every mouth ful one has to eat.” How I wish that ev ery reader of this story might have heard the old man as he told of the dollars thrown away, of the opportunities he had neglected, of the playmates and work mates who have gone ahead of him in the race of life. For it was cer tainly a sermon worth listening to, down there In my basement, and one to set men and women thinking, who are now traveling the same road old Tom has taken. Before the old fellow had left, I laid my hand on his shoulder, and I told him that he had done his work well in deed, and I begged him to see that life held something good for him still, to save his pennies, and to get a little piece of land, somehow, somewhere, where he might eventually have freedom from the worries he is now encountering. It was only a simple incident in life, my coming in contact with this caller at my back door—just a few hours in my em ploy, and he was gone, like “ships that pass in the night,” but when he had left, I began to moralize, and these truths of life loomed big in my mind. I realized more than ever what these hard times are meaning to the men out of work, and to the men who can find nothing to do, and I longed more than ever to help men and women find the solution to their diffi culties. Why need one be the man or woman at “the back door”? Is not one’s heritage to the good things of life just as great as those of another? The “front door” to life’s opportunities and possibilities may be yours, if you will but see the way and determine to enter in. It may not be possible for you to ever be what the world deems a “rich” individual, but you may know the joy of in dependence-of being rich, abundantly rich—in the things that really make life worth while; a comfortable home, in an ideal climate, a home that will provide all of the necessities of life for you, and many of its luxuries; and you may be rich in warm friendships, good health and the knowledge that you are bringing up your children in clean, healthful environments. The possession of a bit of land can solve this problem of “hard times” for you, and the sooner you realize it, secure your little farm-home and begin making payments on it, the sooner will independence be yours. In the city of Chicago small plots of ground on vacant lots are apportioned among many of the poor, and here you may find them tending their tiny gardens, endeavoring to regain lost health, or to help provide for hungry mouths, and happy in the thought that now there is at least something they can do. As I have watched them at their work, I have thought that just in this manner, only on a larger scale, might be solved the difficulties of thousands who are struggling against the odds of life. With my utmost faith in the Bunnell colony, and because I KNOW what great opportunities are there for earnest men and women, I would say that here may be the spot where you may find a home for old age, and where you may be pro tected against the often-recurring, and ever-to-be-dreaded HARD TIMES. It seems so needless, so sad, for anyone to have to look forward to a time when he will be but another “Caller at the back door.” And especially is this sad when the hoary white of years is mantling his brow. For it is a dread ful thing, this growing old. It is hard to know that the flowers and the fruits of your youth have flown, and that the worm, the canker and the grief are yours alone. But it is a great deal harder to reach your old age without the ability to place your food in your mouth in an independent manner and to protect yourself from the rain and storm without accepting the shelter of another man’s roof. Make up your mind, all you who read, that this man who called at my back door is one of life’s lessons sent to teach, and if you do not learn you will indeed be lucky if you do not end your existence as he is ending his. A prosperous farm-home near Bunnell. If you will provide yourself a little home like this, you need never fear being a caller at anyone’s “back door.”

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