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The Bunnell home builder

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Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

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Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, III.
MARCH, 1916
Plowing Land in Mid-Winter in Shirt Sleeves
Here is a Bunnell farmer plowing in the month of January. He is preparing his land for the Irish potato crop, which is the first of the three annual crops raised in our colony. This is quite a contrast to the northern farmer, who cannot raise anything during the winter months, but must spend his savings of the summer for feed for his livestock, and for fuel and heavy clothing for himself and family.
WHAT IS YOUR CHOIjCE?




Uhe BUNNELL HOME~ BUILDER
WHAT YOU CAN DO TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BUNNELL COLONY.
(This Article by Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius is Particularly for the Men and Women Who Have
Bought Land at Bunnell, But Who as Yet Are Non-Residents.
their farms, built their little homes, you cannot have it all cleared at once, cleared and fenced their lands, who start with five acres, two acres, or even
raised the first crops and in every way one acre. Read what Dr. Hoffman says helped bring the community to its pres- in his letter on page seven. Read it ent stage of prosperity have done a great again. It was written by a man who work, and we might say have done more does not live on his land, but who bethan their share in the great plan of de- lieves in doing things, and not putting velopment? Do you realize that those off for tomorrow what he can do today. pioneers have paved the way for the He is not only rendering valuable assistthousands who are to -follow? For it ance to the colony, but to himself as grows easier every day to make a suc- well.
cess in the Bunnell colony. Get your land under cultivation. Let
Some four years ago you might have it earn something for you. -Plant a crop found at Bunnell one little school house, of potatoes next spring. Start an with one teacher and about a dozen pu- orange grove-there is money in Florida pils, a few houses-and little more. To- oranges.
day it is an incorporated town, having Do you feel that you are not able to public school with two years of high spend any money for this purpose at the school, and a hundred and ten pupils en- present time? Well, if you haven't any rolled. There are schools to be found in money to spend, you surely can spend various directions over the colony, and some of your time in the cause of the there is telephone service, hard roads, Bunnell colony. Do a little missionary and this up-to-date town has stores, elec- work in the interest of Bunnell. Boost tric light plant, two good hotels, state it for all you are worth, for it will be bank, barrel and crate factory, ice plant, your future home. Tell your fellowMr. T. A. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small city water, blacksmith shop, garage, workmen in the shop, the store or the
Farm Mlan of Florida. drug store, doctor, lodges of various factory about the great Bunnell colony.
kinds, church, etc., etc. Talk to the people you know on your
It is only natural that those who have If you consider conditions 'then and street about it, or tell the good news of bought land in the Bunnell colony are now, you may have some idea of what Bunnell to the farmers about you. Let anxious to see the country grow, to see the early settlers have done for you. them know about the farm you have it go forward and reach the highest pos- When you go to Bunnell to locate on your purchased at Bunnell, about the great sible stagi of development. The faster farm-home things will be much easier advantages of that community; tell them a new country grows along the lines of for you because of them, and your land about Bunnell's wonderful climate, the permanent development, the more valu- is already much more valuable because three crops we raise there each year, and able property becomes in that communi- of the development work they have done. the many other good things you can tell. ty, for where population is the thickest, Farms have been re-sold for twice the If every present land owner would unthere real estate is the most valuable, amount originally paid the Bunnell De- dertake to induce just one more person I do not know of any exception to this velopment Company for the land, for to buy a farm at Bunnell, our numbers rule, and I know that it holds good in the some of this land was first put on the would shortly be doubled, and we Bunnell colony, market for $20.00 an acre. wouldn't have land enough to supply the
Therefore, if only from a selfish point It is not difficult to realize that our demand. Surely each land owner can of view, we all should be "boosters" for colony farms today, after so many im- do this much, for you know, "where Bunnell-Bunnell colony for all of us, Iprovements have been made, are cheaper thert's a will, there's a way." When you first, last and all the time. at $50.00 an acre, than they were four are the means of selling a farm to a
The degree of prosperity that comes years ago for $25.00, and I confidently friend of yours you are helping yourto the Bunnell colony will not only in- believe that the same land will increase self, you are helping the colony, and you crease the value of our farms, our lots, as rapidly, if not more so, within the are rendering an inestimable service to or our real estate of any nature there, next four or five years than it has in the friend whom you interest. He will but it will mean something more than the past. feel indebted to you for the rest of his
mere dollars and cents to the actual resi- But, to tell you all this is not the pur- life, for calling to his attention the great dents of the colony. It will increase the pose of this article. What I want is to advantages of the Bunnell colony, and happiness and welfare of our people, for ask this question of all who own land in for showing him the way whereby he it will buy the modern conveniences and the colony, but who do not reside there could secure a home in the Southland, comforts of life, yet-What are you doing toward the at such a reasonable price, and on such
It will give us larger and better building up of the community? desirable terms.
schools for our children, better churches I have not the slightest doubt but that As a special inducement and compenfor worship, bigger stores from which to every buyer is interested in the rapid sation for your trouble, I will pay you select the things we buy, and better growth of and development of our splen- the regular agents' commission for all prices for the things we sell. It will did colony, with, its superior advantages sales made by you, said commissions to give us free mail delivery, better and as to climate, soil and transportation, be credited on your own account with us. cheaper telephone service and transpor- but I want to urge each one so interested See your friend at once. Tell him tation facilities, better roads and more to render some definite assistance to- that you bought land of the Bunnell Deof them, and a great many more things wards pushing along the wheel of prog- velopment Company, and that you would that we find in every old settled com- ress in the Bunnell colony, like to have him secure a home at Blunmunity. Almost two thousand people have nell, too. We will give him a good tract
As I recall the Bunnell colony of four bought land in our colony whlo are as yet of land, and as near yours as possible, years ago, my admiration is great for non-residents. That is quite a large so that you may be neighbors when you those settlers who had faith enough in number, and T am sure that the men go to live on your farm-home.. themselves, in the Bunnell Development and women who comprise this number The things in life that require an efCompany and in the future of our colony, do not want to leave all the burden of fort on our part, are the things we most to sell their homes in the north and the development to "the other fellow." enjoy. You will feel happier and more west and come and settle at Bunnell. Do you ask what you can do? Well, contented when you reach Bunnell if you
Do you realize that these men and let us see-what about clearing all, or have had some part in the building up women who came to Bunnell, settled on part of your land and fencing it? If of the community.
PREPAREDNESS IS THE WATCHWORD OF THE DAY.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A REPORT ON BUNNELL'S "BANNER" POTATO CROP.
As Given by Mr. 1. 1. Moody, After a Trip of Inspection Over the Colony.
high record mark. The acreage planted end, the main items of expense being in the Bunnell colony is approximately seedI potatoes, fertilizer, labor and bar100 per cent larger than last year. There rels. Fifty barrels per acre is considhas been considerable clearing of land ered a good crop, though sixty to sevendone in the colony, and much of this new ty-five barrels are frequently made. I land has been seeded to potatoes. recall that last year one of the farmers
It is safe to assume that close on to in the Bunnell colony harvested from two million dollars' worth of spuds will eighty to ninety barrels per acre of Irish be dug out of the bowels of the earth in potatoes, another netted over $200.00 per about two months' time, or possibly a lit- acre on his crop. tle less. This estimate may be a few Four dollars a barrel f. o. b. depot is
hundred thousand dollars too high or too a good average price for potatoes, allow. This will depend on the weather, though as stated above, the indications yield and market. are that our farmers will receive more
Never in my memory have Irish pota- this season. toes been higher in price at this time of
the year than they are now. The report
of the United States Department of Agriculture shows a great shortage. There
are at the present time fewer old potatoes in the market to compete with our
coming crop than perhaps at any time
before. If we add to this the fact that
there will be practically no potatoes imMr. 1. L. Moody, President of the Bivnnell ported from other countries, we can realState Bank. ize something of the prices our farmers
are anticipating.
Never before in the history of Bunnell Several of our potato growers have alhas the potato crop been planted as ready been offered $4.00 per barrel, f. o.
early as this year, and seldom has it been b. depot, the buyer agreeing to take the planted under such favorable conditions. three different grades of potatoes, Nos.?
I have just returned from a long ride ones, twos and threes, delivery to be~ Pota to Field in the Bioinell Colony. in my auto over the colony, and it cer- made any time from the beginning of tainly is a pretty sight to see the fields the season up to May 20th. One com- I consider the potato industry a most and fields of dark green potato plants, mission house has offered $5.00 a barrel profitable one for our colony, and this is in long, straight, even rows, almost coy- for number ones and twos. one of the main reasons why it is growering the ground. The barrel factory in Bu~nnell is work- ing and expanding from year to year.
With the scarcity of old potatoes in ing with full capacity, as this shop will From an experiment originally of less the northern markets at this early date, have to turn out over twenty-five thou- than ten acres in this county, to perhaps and the high prices of same, there is sand barrels, which after being filled ten thousand acres or more today, bringevery indication that the returns will be with Bunnell spuds, will be dispatched ing into the county each year approxivery large for our crop of new potatoes to New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh mately two million dollars to our farmthis season. iand the uttermost parts of the continent. ers for the first of the three annual
The farmers of Bunnell as an average, In the vicinity of Bunnell there are crops, is a growth that is most encourall have very good stands of potatoes. perhaps a hundred farmers who have aging indeed, and demonstrates the wonOn y wnfarm a mile south of Bun- planted potatoes this year as a winter derful productivity of our soil and the nell I have twenty acres planted to po- crop, for the northern markets. Some vleo u avlu itrciae
tatoes. The potatoes were planted De- of these farmers are making this their The potato industry here is still in its cember 28th and 29th, and I have at principal business, others are taking it infancy, but the time is coming when inleast 98 per cent of a stand; in fact, it up as merely a side line, stead of shipping two million dollars'
is as near a perfect stand as I ever saw. Potatoes is an expensive crop to raise worth of potatoes from St. Johns county, There are only a few hills missing, and here. It costs at least $55.00 an acre to we shall be shipping that amount from after examining several of them, I found see a crop through from beginning to our Bunnell colony. that in cutting the seed they had failed
to leave an eye on the piece of potato
that was planted, thus accounting for
most of the missing hills.Not only is the outlook at Bunnell, Du 7
Pont and Korona for a record crop very good, but all through the southern part
of our county the same favorable conditions exist. I had to go to St. Augustine (our county seat) last week to attend a meeting of the County Commissioners and I passed through Hastings.
I have also had occasion lately to visit
other leading potato sections of St. Johns
county, but I must say that I have not
seen any better potato fields anywhere
than right here in the Bunnell colony.
It is not easy to say with positive accuracy how many acres there are planted
to potatoes, but it is very reasonable to
assert that it will largely exceed anything ever before attempted in the history of potato raising in this county.
The average for the county will be fully
twenty per cent larger than any previous One of Mr. Moody's Potato F~armns.
ARE YOU PREPARING FOR OLD AGE AND THE ADVERSITIES OF LIFE?




7'/ie BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Con
CITY DIRECTORY J. Sczudlo of Detroit, who is already the The tent meeting conducted by Rev. R.
CHURCH SERVICES: owner of a fine farm at Korona. All C. White, under the auspices of the
FIRST M. E. CHURCH. the members of this party expressed Church of Christ, has closed with good
Sunday School every Sunday-10:00 A. M. themselves as highly pleased with Flor- results. There will be a permanent orPreaching-l1:00 A. M. and 7:30 P. M.
Ladies' Aid Society- first Monday each ida, and the Bunnell colony. ganization which will meet every Sunday
month. for the regular church services.
Rev. L. D. Haynes, Pastor. The Eureka Literary Society of the
CATHOLIC CHURCH-KORONA. Bunnell school is doing splendid work. A good friend has offered two corner
Mass-9:30 A. M. On Friday they rendered a most inter- lots for a church building and there will
Rev. A. Baczyk, Pastor. esting program. The piano fund for the be another edifice going up in town, if
WOMAN'S IN school is growing, and some good enter- nothing prevents, by the middle of the
Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays In month. tainments are being planned when the summer or early fall.
Alice Scott-Abbott, President. instrument is secured.
SECRET ORDERS: Messrs. C. V. Brown, Floyd Brown and
A. F. & A. M., No. 200. Hon. W. A. McWilliams of St. Augus- P. Blewitt spent Tuesday evening at
Meets every second and Fourth Tuesday at tine, who is a director of the Bunnell 7:00 P. M. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank tie h sadrco fteBnelOcean City fishing. They landed a firBuilding. State Bank and one of St. Johns County's teen-pound bass.
All visiting brothers invited to attend, most prominent attorneys, is being urged
D. M. Deen. W. M. by his many friends to make the race for
ORDER EASTERN STAR. State Senator. Should he decide to en- Mr. J. N. Shepperd, of Omaha, Neb.,
Meets every first and third Tuesday at 7:00 ter the race there is no doubt but that he arrived in Bunnell this week. He is P. M. in the Masonic Hall.
Mrs. Hagadorn (Matron). will poll a large vote throughout the well pleased with his property here
FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY CO. county. which he bought some time ago.
Trains leave Jackson- Arrive in Bunnellville: Daily: An important statement was issued
9:30 A. M. 12:45 P.M. from Washington, .D. C., by the census
1:30 P.M. 4:23 P. M.
8:00 P. M. 11:46 P. M. bureau which shows the remarkable
Leave Bunnell: Arrive in Jacksonville growth of the state of Florida in recent
-Daily: years. On July 1, 1915, the population
5:29 A.M. 9:00 A. M.
10:26 A. M. 1:30 P. M. of the state was 870,802; in January,
4 :S P. M. 7:50 P. M. 1916, it was 882,148, and estimated to
July 1, 1916, is 893,493.
The Bunnell W. C. T. U. will meet in The increase in Florida from July 1,
the church next Tuesday at 2:30 P. M. 1915, to July 1, 1916, is an excellent inThe meeting will be in the nature of a crease to the state's commercial develFrances E. Willard Memorial service. opment.
Mrs. Abbot was invited by the people of Haw Creek neighborhood to spend Febru- Mr. Ed. Johnson is planting all kinds
ary 6th with them. She lectured twice of citrus trees, grapevines, date palms, on Sunday, organizing the Haw Creek bamboo, rubber trees, plums, peaches,
Union for the W. C. T. U. crabapples and several different kinds of
ornamental trees on his home place on Farms in the Korona section of the the Moody Boulevard just east of BunBunnell colony are being sold at a rapid nell. rate. Eight Polish people from Detroit and Hamtramck have just paid a visit to Mr. Z. G. Holland made a shipment of the colony, and purchased 150 acres of peas Tuesday to the firm of Smith & land. They were accompanied by Mr. W. Holden, New York.
Up-to-date Drug Store
Mr. J. J. Buckles made a shipment of
peas to H. G. Miles, New York, Tuesday of this week. Mr. Buckles has quite an acreage planted to peas which are doing nicely.
The Bunnell Development Co. has purchased from the Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply Co. a new Ford touring car which will be used by Field Manager Turner in showing the land to their many different purchasers.
Bunnell Chapter U. D. Order Eastern
Star held a very interesting meeting in the Masonic Temple Saturday evening. Mrs. Lula M. Scott, Grand Matron of the State of Florida, was present; also Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Carter and Mrs. Harris, prominent members of the order at Daytona, were in attendance. A large Mr. Cychner's farm near Dupont. Picture made about two months ago, showing land number of the membership Were in atready for potato crop. Note Mr. Cychner's barn in center rear of picture, tendance and an extra good meeting was and portion of house to the right, the result.
IF YOU DO NOT PREPARE YOURSELF NOW,




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
'ibuted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Mr. F. A. Rich has purchased the Du- A party composed of Mr. J. F. Alex- A Newsy Little Letter From One
pont Bakery from Mr. S. C. Yarnell and ander, of Pana, Ill., his daughter, Mrs.
will move it to his home in North Bun- May Eberlein, of Bloomington, Ill., and of Our Bunnell Farmers.
nell. Mr. A. Henderson, also of Bloomington,
arrived in Bunnell this week and are Dear Sir and Friend:
Mr. F. G. Osburn is putting up a nice stopping at the Halcyon. Mr. Alexander I received the HOME BUILDER. Many
little residence in Bunnell. He will have owns some valuable land here and he ex- thanks. I thought I would send in a few one room reserved for a meat market. presses himself as being well pleased. items for your next issue. The most We welcome him here, and especially are Mr. Alexander also purchased land for absorbing subject now among the farmwe interested in the meat proposition. his brother while in the colony, and made ers is the Irish potato crop. The strawseveral reservations for friends. berries are much in evidence these days
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Havens and two around Bunnell, and bring big prices.
sons, of Cleveland, Ohio, are now in Bun- The town council of Bunnell has had Just think, here in Bunnell the ground is nell, and will make this their future trash cans placed along the streets of covered with strawberries, where the home. Mr. Havens owns some valuable the village, and all are requested to place farmers have berry patches; while I
farm lands here, which he will immedi- papers, etc., in same. Bunnell has the just had a letter from Mr. Morhead in ately put under cultivation, reputation of being one of the nicest and Indiana, and he tells me that the ground
cleanest little towns on the east coast, there is covered with snow and ice. He Mr. W. H. Stutsman of Canada paid a and it is hoped that each citizen will says it makes a fellow wish he was in
visit to the colony recently. He was so assist in keeping the village clean and Florida.
well pleased with his land here that he trim. I notice many strangers on our streets.
contemplates purchasing ten acres addi- I find they are land owners, who have
tional. Among the many carloads of produce come to look over their land-some to
that pass through Bunnell daily for stay, others to make arrangements for
northern markets, are Florida's fine win- improving their land before they come ter tomatoes. We understand that from here. the city of Miami alone there is shipped I am having improvements made upon out tomatoes at the rate of a carload an the 20-acre farm of Mr. Paul Soguel, hour. Our Bunnell soil is splendidly south of Bunnell. He lives in Canada, adapted to the growing of tomatoes, and but will come to Bunnell next winter .to no doubt our farmers in the future will make his home here. I am preparing grow same more extensively, land for chufas, sugar cane, sorghum,
millet and rice for hog forage.
t- Mr. Tolman and myself are going into Florida orange growers are now get- hog raising. We have a fine bunch of ting from $1.25 to $1.50 per box on the hogsng. W eih a fie ncof
tree for their fruit, and the demand for hogs now, which many of the newcomers both the orange and the grapefruit is come around to look at, and they go away very active. The total crop is estimated convinced that this is a good place in at 18,000 to 20,000 cars, a third of which which to raise hogs-raise the feed and is yet in the groves, the hogs will raise themselves. I can
say the same of chickens.
I have met Mr. Sages going to market
Mr. Sim Speer reports a fine crop of several times with a water-bucket full celery on their land near Dupont. They of eggs. The price of eggs is always cut ten hundred and fifty crates of num- good here, and all kinds of chicken feed ber one celery from one and a quarter will grow well here. acres of land which sold for twenty-one Yours very truly,
hundred dollars, which amounts to six- W.A. BROCK,
teen hundred eighty dollars an acre. Bunnell, Florida.
fr. Smith at Bunnell.
Mr. E. Hampel, of Michigan, is in the
city today. He contemplates buying a
farm here. ,
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Morrison, of Can- .ada, arrived in Bunnell this week and SUL-,
are stopping at the Halcyon. Mr. Morrison owns a nice tract of land in Section 29.
Mr. F. G. Pribbernow and wife, of
Canada, arrived in Bunnell Wednesday evening and are stopping at the Halcyon.
They own a nice twenty acre tract of land in Section 8, which they are well
pleased with.
Mr. U. C. Swiger, of Dola, W. Va.,
who owns ten acres of land on the Moody road near Bunnell, spent several days with us last week. Mr. Swiger is well pleased with the country and says he expects to buy twenty acres more.
He will return in the fall with his family
and will probably locate them here per- Mr. John Wilkowski's farm near Korona, Bunnell colony. Land recently cleared. This
manently then. gentleman moved this winter from Chicago to his 3o-acre farm.
LI WILL BE A LOSER IN THE BATTLE OF LIFE.




6eBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
POULTRY AND BEES, FOR This is merely one instance wherein a
Floridian, by nativity or adoption, has
BUNNELL FARMERS. engaged in bee culture with considerable
profit to himself. Indeed, the press of
Here are two side lines of active that the state is continually printing items can be operated with but trifling capital, like the above, noting successes with and are highly remunerative. All poul- bees to a greater or less degree. try thrives and even the local demand In the Bunnell colony there is always
for birds and eggs at fancy prices far ex- bloom for the bee to work on. The man ceeds the supply. with bees in this section is not up
Eggs are sometimes as high as 60 against a long barren season as is the cents per dozen in the winter season, case in the North, but may figure on a and because it is warm the hens will lay steady production the year around. well. Properly conducted, a poultry All land buyers or visitors to Bunnell farm of 1,000 well-bred chickens will pro- should visit the bee colony near Ocean duce an excellent income for a family. City. There is a good market all the time for
broilers at stiff prices. For profit and I Sigh For the Land of the general adaptability to the climate the
White Leghorn leads, with the Rhode Cypress and Pine.
Island Red and White Orpington a close SAMUEL HENRY DICKSON.
second. I sigh for the land of the cypress and pine,
Where the jessamnine blooms, and the gay
woodbine;
Where the moss droops low from the
green oak-tree,Oh, that sun-bright land is the land for41
The snowy flower of the orange there
Sheds its sweet fragrance through the air;
And the Indian rose delights to twine
Its branches with the laughing vine.
There the deer leaps light through the Yoing Grape fruit Tree-in Orange Grove of open glade, Mr. Helmn, East of Bunnell.
Or hides him far in the forest shade,____When the woods resound in the dewy D IYN NFO IA
mornDARIGIFLRD.
With the clang of the merry hunter's This Report comes from the Florida horn.
There the humming-bird, of rainbow Agrieultural Experimental Station, Fine Flock? of Poultry in the Bitnnell plume, at Gainesville, Florida.
Colony. Hangs'over the scarlet creeper's bloom; "The dairy industry of the state has
While 'midst the leaves his varying dyes not yet more than started. According A start can be made with a few chick- Sparkle like half-seen fairy eyes. to our best data, there are about 45,000 ens and a big flock built up in one sea- There the echoes ring through the live- cows here that are kept for milk only. son at small expense. In securing stock long day This means that Florida has one milk
one should be particular to get well-bred With the mock-bird's changeful rounde- cow for each seven or eight of the whole birds and, if possible, to know that they lay; population. It is also estimated that
come from a good laying strain. Save And at night, when the scene is calm and these same cows produce on the average eggs from best layers for hatching and still, about 157 gallons of milk per year each.
thereby improve your flock. Eliminate With the moan of the primitive whip-poor- The reason for this low yield is the poor the boarders-hens thatt don't lay-and will, quality of the animals.
dispose of your surplus cockerels. An ef- Oh! I sigh for the land of the cypress and There is a good demand for all dairy ficiently conducted poultry farm in this pine, products. At the present prices the
section will yield big returns. Of the laurel, the rose, and the gay wood- selling of whole milk (30 cents per galThe busy little bee is a great money bine; lon) will give better returns than will
maker in Florida. After commenting Where the long, gray moss decks the rug- the sale of 20%7 cream ($1.00 per gallon) on the labor and care incident to their ged oak-tree,- or butter. The sale of cream will return
long winter hibernation in the North, That sun-bright land is the land for me. a larger profit than can be had by sellthe Outing Magazine says: ing butter.
"In Florida there is no such work to Milk retails at from eight to twelve
do. The bees work all winter, and they cents per quart. Cream retails at from
have as good feed in February and twenty-five to thirty cents per pint.
March as they do in July. The orange The wholesale price of these products
groves are alive with honey gatherers, is of course, somewhat less. The price
and their buzzing blends into almost a kof butter varies greatly with the quality. roar in March, for that is when the or- There is a demand for good dairy
ange flowers are open. Florida is the cows. The man who raises good dairy
natural home of the bee, and honey will stock will find a ready sale for them at
yet become as familiar a product as a fair price.
sugarcane." Any of the dairy breeds do well in
Mr. 0. 0. Poppleton, the Florida bee the state when given proper care. At
king, has 265 colonies of bees which have the present time there are perhaps more
an average of fifty thousand or a total Jerseys in the state than any other
of over thirteen million bees. Up to July, single dairy breed. There are a few
1915, he had shipped over thirty thousand Holsteins and Guernseys.
pounds of honey and he expected to ship A large variety of good forage crops
two or three more tons last year. Mr. Ican be cheaply grown. Among legumes Poppleton is a northern man, but has the velvet-bean has few equals. as a
spent the last twenty-five years on the grain feed for milk production."-(FlorEast Coast of Florida, which he regards Beauitiful Road Bordered by Date Palmns, ida Agricultural Exp. Station Gainesas an earthly paradise. Between Bunnell and Daytona. ville, Fla.)
MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A LETTER OF VITAL IMPORTANCE RAISE HOGS IN FLORIDA. With his general farming well established, the farmer can safely attempt
ItsoudbeRadb Eey-we St. Johns County Adapted to truck growing. He will have become acbe Runead booy vryOn er This Business, quainted with his land, with himself, and
It souldwith the markets. He will be in position The secret of profitable farming is to to win out heavily, or, if in any way he keep the farm plant busy. A brood sow fails, he can smile at his mishap and try had just as well be producing pigs while again with a strong hand. she is eating everything in sight. The These are some of my ideas gathered Tennessee Station figures that it takes during nearly two years in Florida. $11.82 to keep a brood sow a year. If .MHA ,Mchg.
she produces seven pigs a year in a one
litter system, the birth charge against
the pigs is $1.68 a head. If she produces
two litters of seven pigs each, the birth
charge to the pigs is 84 cents a head.
Sows which average more than seven
pigs to the litter will cut the birth charge
lower.
Florida is especially adapted to the TF
two litter system of raising pigs. The 'P
winters are mild and there is an abundance of pasture and forage for the sow I
and pigs during the suckling period. U
Furthermore green pasture crops can j
be had as supplements to the concen-trates which are fed to the maturing
animals. Thus two objections to the system which are met in the North are
eliminated.
- The advantages of the two litter sys- -__________Dr. E. G. H-offmnan of Pennsylvania. tem are as follows: 1. The cheapest rti aiiHieNa uot
gains are to be had in young growing f'ttIar-oeAerIupr
I hope you will impress on the animals. The pigs are pushed rapidly until they reach 200 or 250 pounds at 6
minds of the owners of land in to 8 months old. 2. Maximum returns THE ITALY OF AMERICA.
the Colony, the advantage of can be had from the herd. 3. The money Evidently local pride is tempered with
vested in the herd can be turned twice modesty. Italy might boast of being the clearing up at least a portion of a year. 4. Twice as many hogs can be Florida of Europe, but Florida's climate
their land. I speak from expe- fattened and one litter can be sold out is so far superior to that of Italy that
riece or lthug I uststil f the way of others. 5. This method the state should take no pride in the
riene, or lthugh mut sillgives minimum risk from disease. The comparison.
continue to live up north, I have animals stay on the farm only a short The winter playground of North Amerfro tie t tie, n are timae and so the danger from cholera or ica and the haven and refuge of the "Sick had, frmtm otma ce other diseases is lessened. Yankee" who is in search of blue skies
or so of my Bunnell farm cleared and balmy breezes is more like Paradise
and plowed. Michigan Man, After Residence than like Italy to Americans who have
I sartd atrile vera yar of Nearly Two Years in Florida, dreamed of Paradise and been disilluI strte a tifl ove a earsioned in Italy. ago, having a little done now Makes Helpful Suggestions Search in the corners of the world,
to Forid Farers.and the "show places" as well, and you and then as I could spare the t Flrd Fam s.will not find a happier combination of
money. As a result, today I Dear Friend Verdenius: sunshine and sea air, of arching blue
Please let me say through your inter- overhead and rolling blue off shore than have five acres cleared a nd esting paper that, were I the adviser of you find upon the coast of Florida. Italy
fenced in the best of shape-so prospective settlers in Florida, I should was sunny, and Italian skies were soft
I av canedmy advise them to, by all means, buy land to the barbarian of northern Europe
by degrees I aecagdof a regular land company-a big, strong when Florida was discovered by EuroVision of Florida into a Reality, company. I have seen a few independent peans. Now and then, when a northbuyers who met with misfortunes, and wester comes blistering down the FlorSo, come what will, I have a when cornered and disappointed, were ida coast, there's a chilly suggestion of
place prepared that will support not only in a strange land, but were an Italian winter, but there the compariwithout an intimate friend within a thou- son ends.-Henry Watterson in the me. There will be no waiting sand miles. On the other hand, the buy- Louisville Courier-Journal.
for the grubbing and clearing. ers from a strong land company always
fidin that company a strong helping
It nlywaits the seed to make hand, whenever "a fellow needs a
the harvest, friend." Big land companies can only
succeed as their colonists succeed.
What I have done others can Also, while one cannot compliment
do also, and if but ninety-nine Florida too highly, as being a wonderful
state for truck growing, yet, I think,
other men would do the same, that the average new settler can do even
the value of the land would in- better at general farming, especially if
creae rpidy. her ar enugh he has a cow or, two, some hogs, anda
creae raidly Thre ae enugh good flock of poultry.
new settlers down there who The thrifty general farmer in Florida has a fine backing for any special unwill do the work at very reason- dertaking, especially so as all surplus
able figures. products find a ready market, and because a little money goes far when one Shiell Road Extendim fromi St. Augustie (Dr.) E. G. HOFFMAN, has so little need to run to the store. Toward Bun nell.
TODAY YOU SHOULD PREPARE FOR THE INEVITABLE TOMORROW.




DID YOU EVER WISH
that you could get away from worry, rush, anxiety and
the high cost of living incidental to life in a great city ?
WOULD YOU LIKE
some day to be a producer of some of the high priced foods you use daily, rather than be a consumer-to sort of even things up before you have to lay down the burden of life?
WOULD YOU CONSIDER
a plan to establish your family near to Nature, in a locality with good schools, churches and society, away from the almost constant worry of meeting the never ending and ever increasing exto live in an ideal climate, where three hundred and sixty-five days of the year are growing days, and where you can raise three crops
WOULD YOU LIKE
to live in a country where there are no severe winters and where 7_7,___ you can pick oranges from the
T"77trees, while the more unfortunate people of the North, are busy shoveling snow?
WOULD YOU CONSIDER MOVING TO FLORIDA
if we can prove to your satisfaction that it would mean health, prosperity, independence and happiness for you and your loved
WOULD YOU LIKE TO BUY A FARM IN OUR BUNNELL COLONY
at a price and on terms that are within the reach of practically every man and woman? If so, then write me at once and tell me fully what you wish to engage in, whether general farming, truck farming, fruit raising, or whether you desire a chicken farm, a pecan or orange grove.
If you will tell me of the ambitions you have for yourself and family, we shall be able to make a selection of a farm for your particular needs in a much more intelligent manner. Our land is now selling for only $35.00 an acre, on the monthly installment plan of 50 cents an acre per month,, or $5.00 for each ten acres you purchase.
1 I A Day Will Pay For
C.w A 10-Acre Farm at Bunnell
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.
WHave you read our Book "A Little Farm-A Big Living" ?
It will be'mailed to you free of cost, if you ask for it




Full Text

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|jlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllll!!!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM | The Truth About Florida | [ The Bunnell Home Builder | | Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. IllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllM MARCH, 1916 Plowing Land in Mid"Winter in Shirt Sleeves Here is a Bunnell farmer plowing in the month of January. He is preparing his land for the Irish potato crop, which is the first of the three annual crops raised in our colony. This is quite a contrast to the northern farmer, who cannot raise anything during the winter months, but must spend his savings of the summer for feed for his livestock, and for fuel and heavy clothing for himself and family. W.HAT IS YOUR C H O u I C"E ?

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UAe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER WHAT YOU CAN DO TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BUNNELL COLONY. (This Article by Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius is Particularly for the Men and Women Who Have Bought Land at Bunnell, But Who as Yet Are Non-Residents. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, the Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. It is only natural that those who have bought land in the Bunnell colony are anxious to see the country grow, to see it go forward and reach the highest pos sible stage of development. The faster a new country grows along the lines of permanent development, the more valu able property becomes in that communi ty, for where population is the thickest, there real estate is the most valuable. I do not know of any exception to this rule, and I know that it holds good in the Bunnell colony. Therefore, if only from a selfish point of view, we all should be “boosters” for Bunnell—Bunnell colony for all of us, first, last and all the time. The degree of prosperity that comes to the Bunnell colony will not only in crease the value of our farms, our lots, or our real estate of any nature there, but it will mean something more than mere dollars and cents to the actual resi dents of the colony. It will increase the happiness and welfare of our people, for it will buy the modern conveniences and comforts of life. It will give us larger and better schools for our children, better churches for worship, bigger stores from which to select the things we buy, and better prices for the things we sell. It will give us free mail delivery, better and cheaper telephone service and transpor tation facilities, better roads and more of them, and a great many more things that we find in every old settled com munity. As I recall the Bunnell colony of four years ago, my admiration is great for those settlers who had faith enough in themselves, in the Bunnell Development Company and in the future of our colony, to sell their homes in the north and the west and come and settle at Bunnell. Do you realize that these men and women who came to Bunnell, settled on their farms, built their little homes, cleared and fenced their lands, who raised the first crops and in every way helped bring the community to its pres ent stage of prosperity have done a great work, and we might say have done more than their share in the great plan of de velopment? Do you realize that those pioneers have paved the way for the thousands who are to follow? For it grows easier every day to make a suc cess in the Bunnell colony. Some four years ago you might have found at Bunnell one little school house, with one teacher and about a dozen pu pils, a few houses—and little more. To day it is an incorporated town, having public school, with two years of high school, and a hundred and ten pupils en rolled. There are schools to be found in various directions over the colony, and there is telephone service, hard roads, and this up-to-date town has stores, elec tric light plant, two good hotels, state bank, barrel and crate factory, ice plant, city water, blacksmith shop, garage, drug store, doctor, lodges of various kinds, church, etc., etc. If you consider conditions then and now, you may have some idea of what the early settlers have done for you. When you go to Bunnell to locate on your farm-home things will be much easier for you because of them, and your land is already much more valuable because of the development work they have done. Farms have been re-sold for twice the amount originally paid the Bunnell De velopment Company for the land, for some of this land was first put on the market for $20.00 an acre. It is not difficult to realize that our colony farms today, after so many im provements have been made, are cheaper at $50.00 an acre, than thev were four years ago for $25.00, and I confidently believe that the same land will increase as rapidly, if not more so, within the next four or five years than it has in the past. But, to tell you all this is not the pur pose of this article. What I want is to ask this question of all who own land in the colony, but who do not reside there vet—What are you doing toward the building up of the community? I have not the slightest doubt but that every buyer is interested in the rapid growth of and development of our splen did colony, with its superior advantages as to climate, soil and transportation, but I want to urge each one so interested to render some definite assistance to wards pushing along the wheel of prog ress in the Bunnell colonv. Almost two thousand people have bought land in our colony who are as yet non-residents. That is quite a large number, and I am sure that the men and women who comprise this number do not want to leave all the burden of development to “the other fellow.” Do you ask what you can do ? Well, let us see—what about clearing all, or part of your land and fencing it? If you cannot have it all cleared at once, start with five acres, two acres, or even one acre. Read what Dr. Hoffman says in his letter on page seven. Read it again. It was written by a man who does not live on his land, but who be lieves in doing things, and not putting off for tomorrow what he can do today. He is not only rendering valuable assist ance to the colony, but to himself as well. Get your land under cultivation. Let it earn something for you. Plant a crop of potatoes next spring. Start an orange grove—there is money in Florida oranges. Do you feel that you are not able to spend any money for this purpose at the present time? Well, if you haven’t any money to spend, you surely can spend some of your time in the cause of the Bunnell colony. Do a little missionary work in the interest of Bunnell. Boost it for all you are worth, for it will be your future home. Tell your fellowworkmen in the shop, the store or the factory about the great Bunnell colony. Talk to the people you know on your street about it, or tell the good news of Bunnell to the farmers about you. Let them know about the farm you have purchased at Bunnell, about the great advantages of that community; tell them about Bunnell’s wonderful climate, the three crops we raise there each year, and the many other good things you can tell. If every present land owner would un dertake to induce just one more person to buy a farm at Bunnell, our numbers would shortly be doubled, and we wouldn’t have land enough to supply the demand. Surely each land owner can do this much, for you know, “where there’s a will, there’s a way.” When you are the means of selling a farm to a friend of yours you are helping your self, you are helping the colony, and you are rendering an inestimable service to the friend whom you interest. He will feel indebted to you for the rest of his life, for calling to his attention the great advantages of the Bunnell colony, and for showing him the way whereby he could secure a home in the Southland, at such a reasonable price, and on such desirable terms. As a special inducement and compen sation for your trouble, I will pay you the regular agents’ commission for all sales made by you, said commissions to be credited on your own account with us. See your friend at once. Tell him that you bought land of the Bunnell De velopment Company, and that you would like to have him secure a home at Bun nell, too. We will give him a good tract of land, and as near yours as possible, so that you may be neighbors when you go to live on your farm-home. The things in life that require an ef fort on our part, are the things we most enjoy. You will feel happier and more contented when you reach Bunnell if you have had some part in the building up of the community. PREPAREDNESS IS THE WATCHWORD OF THE DAY

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Uh& BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, A REPORT ON BUNNELL’S “BANNER” POTATO CROP. As Given by Mr. I. I. Moody, After a Trip of Inspection Over the Colony. Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell State Bank. Never before in the history of Bunnell has the potato crop been planted as early as this year, and seldom has it been planted under such favorable conditions. I have just returned from a long ride in my auto over the colony, and it cer tainly is a pretty sight to see the fields and fields of dark green potato plants, in long, straight, even rows, almost cov ering the ground. With the scarcity of old potatoes in the northern markets at this early date, and the high prices of same, there is every indication that the returns will be very large for our crop of new potatoes this season. t The farmers of Bunnell as an average, all have very good stands of potatoes. On my own farm a mile south of Bun nell I have twenty acres planted to po tatoes. The potatoes were planted De cember 28th and 29th, and I have at least 98 per cent of a stand; in fact, it is as near a perfect stand as I ever saw. There are only a few hills missing, and after examining several of them, I found that in cutting the seed they had failed to leave an eye on the piece of potato that was planted, thus accounting for most of the missing hills. Not only is the outlook at Bunnell, Du Pont and Korona for a record crop very good, but all through the southern part of our county the same favorable condi tions exist. I had to go to St. Augus tine (our county seat) last week to at tend a meeting of the County Commis sioners and I passed through Hastings. I have also had occasion lately to visit other leading potato sections of St. Johns county, but I must say that I have not seen any better potato fields anywhere than right here in the Bunnell colony. It is not easy to say with positive ac curacy how many acres there are planted to potatoes, but it is very reasonable to assert that it will largely exceed any thing ever before attempted in the his tory of potato raising in this county. The average for the county will be fully twenty per cent larger than any previous high record mark. The acreage planted in the Bunnell colony is approximately 100 per cent larger than last year. There has been considerable clearing of land done in the colony, and much of this new land has been seeded to potatoes. It is safe to assume that close on to two million dollars’ worth of spuds will be dug out of the bowels of the earth in about two months’ time, or possibly a lit tle less. This estimate may be a few hundred thousand dollars too high or too low. This will depend on the weather, yield and market. Never in my memory have Irish pota toes been higher in price at this time of the year than they are now. The report of the United States Department of Ag riculture shows a great shortage. There are at the present time fewer old pota toes in the market to compete with our coming crop than perhaps at any time before. If we add to this the fact that there will be practically no potatoes im ported from other countries, we can real ize something of the prices our farmers are anticipating. Several of our potato growers have al ready been offered $4.00 per barrel, f. o. b. depot, the buyer agi’eeing to take the three different grades of potatoes, Nos. ones, twos and threes, delivery to be made any time from the beginning of the season up to May 20th. One com mission house has offered $5.00 a barrel for number ones and twos. The barrel factory in Bunnell is work ing with full capacity, as this shop will have to turn out over twenty-five thou sand barrels, which after being filled with Bunnell spuds, will be dispatched to New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and the uttermost parts of the continent. In the vicinity of Bunnell there are perhaps a hundred farmers who have planted potatoes this year as a winter crop, for the northern markets. Some of these farmers are making this their principal business, others are taking it up as merely a side line. Potatoes is an expensive crop to raise hei’e. It costs at least $55.00 an acre to see a crop through from beginning to end, the main items of expense being seed potatoes, fertilizer, labor and bar rels. Fifty barrels per acre is consid ered a good crop, though sixty to seven ty-five barrels are frequently made. I recall that last year one of the farmers in the Bunnell colony harvested from eighty to ninety barrels per acre of Irish potatoes, another netted over $200.00 per acre on his crop. Four dollars a barrel f. o. b. depot is a good average price for potatoes, al though as stated above, the indications are that our farmers will receive more this season. Potato Field in the Bunnell Colony. I consider the potato industry a most profitable one for our colony, and this is one of the main reasons why it is grow ing and expanding from year to year. From an experiment originally of less than ten acres in this county, to perhaps ten thousand acres or more today, bring ing into the county each year approxi mately two million dollars to our farm ers for the first of the three annual crops, is a growth that is most encour aging indeed, and demonstrates the won derful productivity of our soil and the value of our marvelous winter climate. The potato industry here is still in its infancy, but the time is coming when in stead of shipping two million dollars’ worth of potatoes from St. Johns county, we shall be shipping that amount from our Bunnell colony. One of Mr. Moody’s Potato Farms. ARE YOU PREPARING FOR OLD AGE AND THE ADVERSITIES OF LIFE?

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings in and Around Bunnell as Con CITY DIRECTORY CHURCH SERVICES: FIRST M. E. CHURCH. Sunday School every Sunday—10 :00 A. M. Preaching-—11:00 A. M. and 7 :30 P. M. Ladies’ Aid Society — first Monday each month. Rev. L. D. Haynes, Pastor. CATHOLIC CHURCH—KORONA. Mass—9 :30 A. M. Rev. A. Baczyk, Pastor. WOMAN’S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. Meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays in month. Alice Scott-Abbott, President. SECRET ORDERS: A. F. & A. M., No. 200. Meets every second and Fourth Tuesday at 7 :00 P. M. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. All visiting brothers invited to attend. D. M. Deen, W. M. ORDER EASTERN STAR. Meets every first and third Tuesday at 7 :00 P. M. in the Masonic Hall. Mrs. Hagadorn (Matron). FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY CO. J. Sczudlo of Detroit, who is already the owner of a fine farm at Korona. All the members of this party expressed themselves as highly pleased with Flor ida, and the Bunnell colony. The Eureka Literary Society of the Bunnell school is doing splendid work. On Friday they rendered a most inter esting program. The piano fund for the school is growing, and some good enter tainments are being planned when the instrument is secured. Hon. W. A. McWilliams of St. Augus tine, who is a director of the Bunnell State Bank and one of St. Johns County’s most prominent attorneys, is being urged by his many friends to make the race for State Senator. Should he decide to en ter the race there is no doubt but that he will poll a large vote throughout the county. The tent meeting conducted by Rev. R. C. White, under the auspices of the Church of Christ, has closed with good results. There will be a permanent or ganization which will meet every Sunday for the regular church services. A good friend has offered two corner lots for a church building and there will be another edifice going up in town, if nothing prevents, by the middle of the summer or early fall. Messrs. C. V. Brown, Floyd Brown and P. Blewitt spent Tuesday evening at Ocean City fishing. They landed a fif teen-pound bass. Mr. J. N. Shepperd, of Omaha, Neb., arrived in Bunnell this week. He is well pleased with his property here which he bought some time ago. \ Trains leave Jackson ville : 9:30 A. M. 1:30 P. M. 8 :00 P. M. Leave Bunnell: 5:29 A. M. 10 :26 A. M. 4 :3R P. M. Arrive in Bunnell— Daily: 12 :45 P. M. 4 :23 P. M. 11:46 P. M. Arrive in Jacksonville —Daily: 9 :00 A. M. 1:30 P. M. 7:50 P. M. The Bunnell W. C. T. U. will meet in the church next Tuesday at 2:30 P. M. The meeting will be in the nature of a Frances E. Willard Memorial service. Mrs. Abbot was invited by the people of Haw Creek neighborhood to spend Febru ary 6th with them. She lectured twice on Sunday, organizing the Haw Creek Union for the W. C. T. U. Farms in the Korona section of the Bunnell colony are being sold at a rapid rate. Eight Polish people from Detroit and Hamtramck have just paid a visit to the colony, and purchased 150 acres of land. They were accompanied by Mr. W. An important statement was issued from Washington, D. C., by the census bureau which shows the remarkable growth of the state of Florida in recent years. On July 1, 1915, the population of the state was 870,802; in January, 1916, it was 882,148, and estimated to July 1, 1916, is 893,493. The increase in Florida from July 1, 1915, to July 1, 1916, is an excellent in crease to the state’s commercial devel opment. Mr. Ed. Johnson is planting all kinds of citrus trees, grapevines, date palms, bamboo, rubber trees, plums, peaches, crabapples and several different kinds of ornamental trees on his home place on the Moody Boulevard just east of Bun nell. Mr. Z. G. Holland made a shipment of peas Tuesday to the firm of Smith & Holden, New York. Mr. Cychner’s farm near Dupont. Picture made about two months ago, showing land ready for potato crop. Note Mr. Cychner’s barn in center rear of picture, and portion of house to the right. Up-to-date Drug Store I Hi Mr. J. J. Buckles made a shipment of peas to H. G. Miles, New York, Tuesday of this week. Mr. Buckles has quite an acreage planted to peas which are doing nicely. The Bunnell Development Co. has pur chased from the Bunnell Garage & Auto Supply Co. a new Ford touring car which will be used by Field Manager Turner in showing the land to their many different purchasers. Bunnell Chapter U. D. Order Eastern Star held a very interesting meeting in the Masonic Temple Saturday evening. Mrs. Lula M. Scott, Grand Matron of the State of Florida, was present; also Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Carter and Mrs. Har ris, prominent members of the order at Daytona, were in attendance. A large number of the membership were in at tendance and an extra good meeting was the result. IF YOU DO NOT PREPARE YOURSELF NOW,

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me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER ibuted by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month A Newsy Little Letter From One of Our Bunnell Farmers. Mr. F. A. Rich has purchased the Du pont Bakery from Mr. S. C. Yamell and will move it to his home in North Bun nell. Mr. F. G. Osbum is putting up a nice little residence in Bunnell. He will have one room reserved for a meat market. We welcome him here, and especially are we interested in the meat proposition. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Havens and two sons, of Cleveland, Ohio, are now in Bun nell, and will make this their future home. Mr. Havens owns some valuable farm lands here, which he will immedi ately put under cultivation. Mr. W. H. Stutsman of Canada paid a visit to the colony recently. He was so well pleased with his land here that he contemplates purchasing ten acres addi tional. tr. Smith at Bunnell. Mr. E. Hampel, of Michigan, is in the city today. He contemplates buying a farm here. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Morrison, of Can ada, arrived in Bunnell this week and are stopping at the Halcyon. Mr. Mor rison owns a nice tract of land in Sec tion 29. Mr. F. G. Pribbernow and wife, of Canada, arrived in Bunnell Wednesday evening and are stopping at the Halcyon. They own a nice twenty acre tract of land in Section 8, which they are well pleased with. Mr. U. C. Swiger, of Dola, W. Va., who owns ten acres of land on the Moody road near Bunnell, spent several days with us last week. Mr. Swiger is well pleased with the country and says he expects to buy twenty acres more. He will return in the fall with his family and will probably locate them here per manently then. A party composed of Mr. J. F. Alex ander, of Pana, Ill., his daughter, Mrs. May Eberlein, of Bloomington, Ill., and Mr. A. Henderson, also of Bloomington, arrived in Bunnell this week and are stopping at the Halcyon. Mr. Alexander owns some valuable land here and he ex presses himself as being well pleased. Mr. Alexander also purchased land for his brother while in the colony, and made several reservations for friends. The town council of Bunnell has had trash cans placed along the streets of the village, and all are requested to place papers, etc., in same. Bunnell has the reputation of being one of the nicest and cleanest little towns on the east coast, and it is hoped that each citizen will assist in keeping the village clean and trim. Among the many carloads of produce that pass through Bunnell daily for northern markets, are Florida’s fine win ter tomatoes. We understand that from the city of Miami alone there is shipped out tomatoes at the rate of a carload an hour. Our Bunnell soil is splendidly adapted to the growing of tomatoes, and no doubt our farmers in the future will grow same more extensively. Florida orange growers are now get ting from $1.25 to $1.50 per box on the tree for their fruit, and the demand for both the orange and the grapefruit is very active. The total crop is estimated at 18,000 to 20,000 cars, a third of which is yet in the groves. Mr. Sim Speer reports a fine crop of celery on their land near Dupont. They cut ten hundred and fifty crates of num ber one celery from one and a quarter acres of land which sold for twenty-one hundred dollars, which amounts to six teen hundred eighty dollars an acre. Dear Sir and Friend: I received the HOME BUILDER. Many thanks. I thought I would send in a few items for your next issue. The most absorbing subject now among the farm ers is the Irish potato crop. The straw berries are much in evidence these days around Bunnell, and bring big prices. Just think, here in Bunnell the ground is covered with strawberries, where the farmers have berry patches; while I just had a letter from Mr. Morhead in Indiana, and he tells me that the ground there is covered with snow and ice. He says it makes a fellow wish he was in Florida. I notice many strangers on our streets. I find they are land owners, who have come to look over their land—some to stay, others to make arrangements for improving their land before they come here. I am having improvements made upon the 20-acre farm of Mr. Paul Soguel, south of Bunnell. He lives in Canada, but will come to Bunnell next winter .to make his home here. I am preparing land for chufas, sugar cane, sorghum, millet and rice for hog forage. Mr. Tolman and myself are going into hog raising. We have a fine bunch of hogs now, which many of the newcomers come around to look at, and they go away convinced that this is a good place in which to raise hogs—raise the feed and the hogs will raise themselves. I can say the same of chickens. I have met Mr. Sages going to market several times with a water-bucket full of eggs. The price of eggs is always good here, and all kinds of chicken feed will grow well here. Yours very truly, • W. A. BROCK, Bunnell, Florida. Mr. John Wilkowski’s farm near Korona, Bunnell colony. Land recently cleared. This gentleman moved this winter from Chicago to his 30-acre farm. U WILL BE A LOSER IN THE BATTLE OF LIFE

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15h BUNMELL HOME BUILDER POULTRY AND BEES, FOR BUNNELL FARMERS. Here are two side lines of activity that can be operated with but trifling capital, and are highly remunerative. All poul try thrives and even the local demand for birds and eggs at fancy prices far ex ceeds the supply. Eggs are sometimes as high as 60 cents per dozen in the winter season, and because it is warm the hens will lay well. Properly conducted, a poultry farm of 1,000 well-bred chickens will pro duce an excellent income for a family. There is a good market all the time for broilers at stiff prices. For profit and general adaptability to the climate the White Leghorn leads, with the Rhode Island Red and White Orpington a close second. Fine Flock of Poultry in the Bunnell Colony. A start can be made with a few chick ens and a big flock built up in one sea son at small expense. In securing stock one should be particular to get well-bred birds and, if possible, to know that they come from a good laying strain. Save eggs from best layers for hatching and thereby improve your flock. Eliminate the boarders—hens that don’t lay—and dispose of your surplus cockerels. An ef ficiently conducted poultry farm in this section will yield big returns. The busy little bee is a great money maker in Florida. After commenting on the labor and care incident to their long winter hibernation in the North, the Outing Magazine says: “In Florida there is no such work to do. The bees work all winter, and they have as good feed in February and March as they do in July. The orange groves are alive with honey gatherers, and their buzzing blends into almost a roar in March, for that is when the or ange flowers are open. Florida is the natural home of the bee, and honey will yet become as familiar a product as sugarcane.” Mr. O. 0. Poppleton, the Florida bee king, has 265 colonies of bees which have an average of fifty thousand or a total of over thirteen million bees. Up to July, 1915, he had shipped over thirty thousand pounds of honey and he expected to ship two or three more tons last year. Mr. Poppleton is a northern man, but has spent the last twenty-five years on the East Coast of Florida, which he regards as an earthly paradise. This is merely one instance wherein a Floridian, by nativity or adoption, has engaged in bee culture with considerable profit to himself. Indeed, the press of the state is continually printing items like the above, noting successes with bees to a greater or less degree. In the Bunnell colony there is always bloom for the bee to work on. The man with bees in this section is not up against a long barren season as is the case in the North, but may figure on a steady production the year around. All land buyers or visitors to Bunnell should visit the bee colony near Ocean City. I Sigh For the Land of the Cypress and Pine. SAMUEL HENRY DICKSON. I sigh for the land of the cypress and pine, Where the jessamine blooms, and the gay woodbine; Where the moss droops low from the green oak-tree,— Oh, that sun-bright land is the land for me! The snowy flower of the orange there Sheds its sweet fragrance through the air; And the Indian rose delights to twine Its branches with the laughing vine. There the deer leaps light through the open glade, Or hides him far in the forest shade, When the woods resound in the dewy morn With the clang of the merry hunter’s horn. There the humming-bird, of rainbow plume. Hangs over the scarlet creeper’s bloom; While ’midst the leaves his varying dyes Sparkle like half-seen fairy eyes. There the echoes ring through the live long day With the mock-bird’s changeful rounde lay; And at night, when the scene is calm and still. With the moan of the primitive whip-poorwill. Oh! I sigh for the land of the cypress and pine, Of the laurel, the rose, and the gay wood bine; Where the long, gray moss decks the rug ged oak-tree,— That sun-bright land is the land for me. Beautiful Road Bordered by Date Palms, Between Bunnell and Daytona. Young Grapefruit Tree in Orange Grove of Mr. Helm, East of Bunnell. DAIRYING IN FLORIDA. This Report comes from the Florida Agricultural Experimental Station, at Gainesville, Florida. “The dairy industry of the state has not yet more than started. According to our best data, there are about 45,000 cows here that are kept for milk only. This means that Florida has one milk cow for each seven or eight of the whole population. It is also estimated that these same cows produce on the average about 157 gallons of milk per year each. The reason for this low yield is the poor quality of the animals. There is a good demand for all dairy products. At the present prices the selling of whole milk (30 cents per gal lon) will give better returns than will the sale of 20% cream ($1.00 per gallon) or butter. The sale of cream will return a larger profit than can be had by sell ing butter. Milk retails at from eight to twelve cents per quart. Cream retails at from twenty-five to thirty cents per pint. The wholesale price of these products is of course, somewhat less. The price of butter varies greatly with the quality. There is a demand for good dairy cows. The man who raises good dairy stock will find a ready sale for them at a fair price. Any of the dairy breeds do well in the state when given proper care. At the present time there are perhaps more Jerseys in the state than any other single dairy breed. There are a few Holsteins and Guernseys. A large variety of good forage crops can be cheaply grown. Among legumes the velvet-bean has few equals as a grain feed for milk production.”—(Flor ida Agricultural Exp. Station, Gaines ville, Fla.) MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES

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6fro BUMHELL HOME BUILDER A LETTER OF VITAL IMPORTANCE It should be Read by Every Owner of Bunnell Colony Land Dr. E. G. Hoffman of Pennsylvania. I hope you will impress on the minds of the owners of land in the colony, the advantage of clearing up at least a portion of their land. I speak from expe rience, for although I must still continue to live up north, I have had, from time to time, an acre or so of my Bunnell farm cleared and plowed. I started a trifle over a year ago, having a little done now and then as I could spare the money. As a result, today I have five acres cleared and fenced in the best of shape—so by degrees I have changed my Vision of Florida into a Reality. So, come what will, I have a place prepared that will support me. There will be no waiting for the grubbing and clearing. It only waits the seed to make the harvest. What I have done others can do also, and if but ninety-nine other men would do the same, the value of the land would in crease rapidly. There are enough new settlers down there who will do the work at very reason able figures. (Dr.) E. G. HOFFMAN, RAISE HOGS IN FLORIDA. St. Johns County Adapted to This Business. The secret of profitable farming is to keep the farm plant busy. A brood sow had just as well be producing pigs while she is eating everything in sight. The Tennessee Station figures that it takes $11.82 to keep a brood sow a year. If she produces seven pigs a year in a one litter system, the birth charge against the pigs is $1.68 a head. If she produces two litters of seven pigs each, the biiTh charge to the pigs is 84 cents a head. Sows which average more than seven pigs to the litter will cut the birth charge lower. Florida is especially adapted to the two litter system of raising pigs. The winters are mild and there is an abund ance of pasture and forage for the sow and pigs during the suckling period. Furthermore green pasture crops can be had as supplements to the concen trates which are fed to the maturing animals. Thus two objections to the sys tem which are met in the North are eliminated. The advantages of the two litter sys tem are as follows: 1. The cheapest gains are to be had in young growing animals. The pigs are pushed rapidly until they reach 200 or 250 pounds at 6 to 8 months old. 2. Maximum returns can be had from the herd. 3. The money invested in the herd can be turned twice a year. 4. Twice as many hogs can be fattened and one litter can be sold out of the way of others. 5. This method gives minimum risk from disease. The animals stay on the farm only a short time and so the danger from cholera or other diseases is lessened. Michigan Man, After Residence of Nearly Two Years in Florida, Makes Helpful Suggestions to Florida Farmers. Dear Friend Verdenius: Please let me say through your inter esting paper that, were I the adviser of prospective settlers in Florida, I should advise them to, by all means, buy land of a regular land company—a big, strong company. I have seen a few independent buyers who met with misfortunes, and when cornered and disappointed, were not only in a strange land, but were without an intimate friend within a thou sand miles. On the other hand, the buy ers from a strong land company always find in that company a strong helping hand, whenever “a fellow needs a friend.” Big land companies can only succeed as their colonists succeed. Also, while one cannot compliment Florida too highly, as being a wonderful state for truck growing, yet, I think, that the average new settler can do even better at general farming, especially if he has a cow or two, some hogs, and a good flock of poultry. The thrifty general farmer in Florida has a fine backing for any special un dertaking, especially so as all surplus products find a ready market, and be cause a little money goes far when one has so little need to run to the store. With his general farming well estab lished, the farmer can safely attempt truck growing. He will have become ac quainted with his land, with himself, and with the markets. He will be in position to win out heavily, or, if in any way he fails, he can smile at his mishap and try again with a strong hand. These are some of my ideas gathered during nearly two years in Florida. H. M. HAFF, Michigan. A Pretty Farm-Home Near Dupont. THE ITALY OF AMERICA. Evidently local pride is tempered with modesty. Italy might boast of being the Florida of Europe, but Florida’s climate is so far superior to that of Italy that the state should take no pride in the comparison. The winter playground of North Amer ica and the haven and refuge of the “sick Yankee” who is in search of blue skies and balmy breezes is more like Paradise than like Italy to Americans who have dreamed of Paradise and been disillu sioned in Italy. Search in the comers of the world, and the “show places” as well, and you will not find a happier combination of sunshine and sea air, of arching blue overhead and rolling blue off shore than you find upon the coast of Florida. Italy was sunny, and Italian skies were soft to the barbarian of northern Europe when Florida was discovered by Euro peans. Now and then, when a north wester comes blistering down the Flor ida coast, there’s a chilly suggestion of an Italian winter, but there the compari son ends.—Henry Watterson in the Louisville Courier-Journal. Shell Road Extending from St. Augustine Toward Bunnell. TODAY YOU SHOULD PREPARE FOR THE INEVITABLE TOMORROW.

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DID YOU EVER WISH that you could get away from worry, rush, anxiety and the high cost of living incidental to life in a great city ? WOULD YOU LIKE some day to be a producer of some of the high priced foods you use daily, rather than be a consumer—to sort of even things up before you have to lay down the burden of life? WOULD YOU CONSIDER a plan to establish your family near to Nature, in a locality with good schools, churches and society, away from the almost con stant worry of meeting the never ending and ever increasing ex penses of living? WOULD YOU LIKE to live in an ideal climate, where three hundred and sixty-five days of the year are growing days, and where you can raise three crops annually? WOULD YOU LIKE to live in a country where there are no severe winters and where you can pick oranges from the trees, while the more unfortunate people of the North are busy shoveling snow? WOULD YOU CONSIDER MOVING TO FLORIDA if we can prove to your satisfaction that it would mean health, prosperity, independence and happiness for you and your loved ones? WOULD YOU LIKE TO BUY A FARM IN OUR BUNNELL COLONY at a price and on terms that are within the reach of practically every man and woman? If so, then write me at once and tell me fully what you wish to engage in, whether general farming, truck farming, fruit raising, or whether you desire a chicken farm, a pecan or orange grove. If you will tell me of the ambitions you have for yourself and family, we shall be able to make a selection of a farm for your particular needs in a much more intelligent manner. Our land is now selling for only $35.00 an acre, on the monthly installment plan of 50 cents an acre per month, or $5.00 for each ten acres you purchase. A Day Will Pay For A 10-Acre Farm at Bunnell THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. ^j0§T“Have you read our Book “A Little Farm—A Big Living** ? It will be' t mailed to you free of cost, if you ask for it