Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
r E Edited by S. HOWARD
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicado, Ill.
Vol. 2 WATCH 2BVNELL GROW .No. 7
T h e E d4 i to r s Such advice from a man who understands VACATION TIME North, South, E ast
conditions throughout the entire country is anti Vest, people are
P e r s o n a l P a g e well worth considering, and the land own- now "taking vacations." It is the vacation
ers in the Bunnell-Dupont colony who have season, and all over the country and every FACTS AND in ten years, between already availed themselves of their oppor- where in the land conditions somewhat out
FIGURES 1900 and 1910, the popula- tunity in this respect are to be congratu- of the ordinary exist. Business men arc
F R9nd 1 the ppla- lated. away on a trip, and business men's families
tion of the United Satesmm .
increased fifteen million-about 21%; our TIMES HAVE A Fable-Years ago a
farm area increased a little over 4%; our CHANGED man had three grown
meat producing animals actually dropped sonsEDfo wh om lhre seow Many of out- readers have never seen Flormea prduinganial acualy ropedsons, for whom he se ida, or their farms in the Bunnell-lDupout
off over twenty million in number. letted vocations. The first one was very colony. Why not spend your vacation
smart, the next one was very good, the cln.Xh o pn orvcto
In 1900 for every one hundred people we lsat et one was very god, th there? Do not hesitate to go on account
had 90.3 cattle. Ten years later we had last one was very simple-minded. In his of the warm weather. It is not nearly so
only 68. For hogs the figures were re- hot there as you think, for it is always
spectively 84, going down to 61; for sheep o very sart, I will make a lawyer of the c ool in thw shade and you can sl eep every the drop per hundred population was from good one shall be a preacher; poor Jack night in c )nifo t. 'li(, fact of the matter
82 to 51. Think what this means! Cheap knows so little, I will make a farmer of is, it is cooler in Ibmunell now than in
meat can not be made on high-priced land our northern cities.
and sixty-cent corn, but the science of intensive farming will enable thie farmer to I 1t wx iill giv x ou a' w-iaix' ~r i glow around
raise three times as much on one acre as he your leart to stand on your own little
can under present conditions, which will Put Your Dollars Into fari, to get acquainted with it, as it
permit him to carry three times as much Were. As you gaze about you, you can
stock on his farm as he thinks he can now. The Ground picture in your mi find's eye just what this
This will build up the fertility of his fields faini will look like after a few years. Here
and reduce the cost of producing meat one- ,will stand the hoiie; there you will plant
half. some tr es; in that corner will be your
But, times have changed. There is no orange grove; here will be the vegetable
There are approximately 'ten acres of occupation in the world that calls for more garden; there at the back porch will be the
farm land per capita for the present popu- ability and judgment, brains, training, in- well, and beyond, the barn an( other buildlation. Only one-half 'of this is under plow; dustry and adaptability than farming. It migs. the other half is woodland, waste land, is a man's job. To plow and sow and real)
unbroken land, pasture, etc. It now takes without understanding is no more real We have no doubt but that you will
practically all we can raise to feed the farming than cutting a man's leg off with want to take olf your coat and get to people. We are beginning to import food- an ax is real surgery. work at once. You will feel so invigorated
stuffs. In fifty years our population will that it would seem a delight to clear a
be doubled. What shall we do about it? Agriculture is the basis of the nation's little patch of ground.
wealth. The soil is our greatest asset, and
Florida, and our own Bunnell-Dupont col- conserving and building this up helps every All good and well, but remember this ony stands on the threshold of a great pros- one. is your vacation, and you are not to
perity, if the people will realize their op- The simple-minded sons are no longer work tomo hard. You will want to run
portunity and make the land produce what chosen for the farm. It is the young mcu over to Ocean City,-so admirably situated it is able to produce. with 'brains and energy who are taking up on the banks of the canal, just a short disUnited States Congressman A. F. Lever, agricultural courses in colleges and other tance from the ocean. You will want to chairman of the committee on agriculture schools, and are preparing to become the gaze and gaze at the broad Atlantic of the House of Representatives, declares owners and successful managers of farms. stretching away to foreign shores. You productiityuEductionrhatdonesmuh toobrigiabout will want to visit the nearby orange groves,
thatEducation has done much to bring about and you will find great joy in lying under
lies in the South, and that before many this change. Boys are given farming some stately palms, and gazing up at the
years the Nation will be forced to turn to courses in many of our high schools. They clear blue of the southern skies, flecked the South for agricultural products. are taught dairying, fruit raising, etc., and here and there with fleecy clouds.
"If Horace Greeley were alive today he they are entering upon this grandest vocawould reverse his advice to young Americans tion of all, knowing the "Whys and Where. Don't object if you have to encounter to go west, and instead would say, 'Go fores" of farm life. a few hardships (it's all in a sunmer's
South, young man,'" the congressman de- The little flower and vegetable gardens vacation), and you know before you go
dared recently. "There are thousands of in the cities and small towns, planted and that Bunnelt-Dupont is a new country, and
acres of uncultivated land in the South cared for by the school children, are steps that you are going to have the great priviwhich in five years would surpass in produc- in the right direction. Everything should lege of helping in its developiment. Take tion any land in Illinois or Iowa. The be done to encourage this love for Nature, time to see what your future neighbors
American immigrant tide to Canada should this desire to plant and nourish-and then have accomplished, and I am sure that
be turned southward. The South needs our boys and girls will turn to the farm you will return to your present homes remore farmers. It has the best climate and and country life with glad and willing freshed in bodies anld mind, realizing that
soil for crops and live stock. The open hearts, realizing that there is the greatest if 1lorida can be so delightful in the sumdoor of opportunity is the South. Come opportunity for financial, physical and moral mier months, what may you not expect of South and be prosperous." development, her in the winter months?




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Put Your Dollars Into The Ground
By Thomas A. Verdenius
work for six months. He has traveled all enough for himself and his family, and is over looking for work and could not get almost always able to belp feed the multia job for love or money. We have walked tude. Then --- PPut Your Dollars Into the
fif ty miles from home and had to walk Ground." Where? I will not answer that
back again, without a job." question. If I were to tell you at Bunnell,
On top of these unsettled conditions came you probably would accuse me of talking the news, a few days ago, of the European from a selfish standpoint. It is true that war. Last week I wanted to pay off some I want to sell land, but I have never said
of my obligations and went to my bank to any one that Bunnell was the only place
ON -which is one of the safest institutions to buy. I believe in Bunnell-my heart is
in this city-to cash a check for $s00, in Bunnell-and I am convinced that Bunnell is all that I have ever claimed it to
but like hundreds and thousands of others
in this city are now doing, I was obliged be, but I am broad in my ideas, and I be' to cut my check to one-half that amount. lieve that any man who buys land, East In view of all these facts, I am sure no or West, North or South, at a conservative one will contradict me when I state that price and pays what the land is actually we are having abnormal times today. I worth, that he can not make a mistake.
do not consider myself in a position to Remember, I do not say to buy swamps,
give the reasons for these conditions, but rocks, mountains or rivers, but LANDone thing I do know is, that these condi- dirt that -will produce a crop. It is up to tions exist, and the one remedy for these you as to what part of the country you hard times may be summed up in these desire to locate in. If you want to raise
words "Put Your Dollars Into the wheat and live in a country where you Ground." Of course, I am not speaking lit- have large fuel bills to pay, and six or rally when I say this. I met a farmer a seven months of winter, I would not advise Mr. T. A. Verdenius few days ago who had placed over a thou- yo.u to go to Florida., But, if you want to
sand dollars in a glass fruit jar and buried raise oranges or grape-fruit, and enjoy the it in the ground for a year or more, but I balmy sea breezes throughout the entire In these days, the United States, the would not be so foolish as to advise our year, then I certainly would not advise
wealthiest country in the world, is under- readers to do that. However, I do believe you to go to Canada, but I would say, going a period of fear. A change of polite COME TO FLORIDA.
. 1cs that it is the duty of every man and
usually brings about financial depression, every woman to save a part of his or her Some people have misunderstood Florida,
although politics, in reality, have no effect earnings each month, and if they will not, and if you have the impression that all upon the fundamental principles of our they are doing themselves a great injustice you have to do is to buy a .10 or 20-acre
Government. During this period, and be- and the loved ones who are depending on tract of land in Florida, and that all your
fore, we find the great commercial inter- them. troubles thereafter will be over, you are
ests of the country hesitating, thinking, I know what it means to have to support sadly mistaken. Some settlers have come
conserving, holding back. a family on $60.00 a month in Chicago, and to our colony without practically any
This would not be the proper place to I have not forgotten the time when I money, and it has been hard f or them to
discuss politics, and it is the least of my did it myself. I also realize that it is hard succeed, but I* have never advised any one intentions to do so. I only wish to say, work to save, but I have never let a to come unprepared. Remember, that Bunthat I am in favor of making such laws month in my life go by since I came to this nell is a new country and that jobs are
as will benefit the great mass of people, country that I did not add a little to my not as plentiful as in an older and more for there are thousands of poor men and savings. I bought land on the installment settled community. Therefore, come prewomen to one wealthy individual. Abraham plan, just as I have asked you to do, and I pared, and, if possible, pay for your land Lincoln, in his own inimitable way, once have never regretted it. Besides my inter- first and get a deed for same, so that you said, "God must have loved the common ests in Bunnell, I have had farms in other will not need to worry about your monthly
people, otherwise He would not have made parts of Florida, also in Illinois, Idaho and payments, and have enough money to. pay so many." North Dakota. There has not been an for building your little home, fencing your
I have just returned from a western trip, acre of this land but that has doubled in land, buying farming implements, chickens, having covered a distance Of 7,000 miles. I value, and some of these farms are today a cow, a horse, etc. Besides that, you visited twelve western states and made a worth several times what I paid for them. should have enough money left to live on short trip to British Columbia, Canada. just I came to this country with a hundred dol- until your first crop has been harvested. before starting on this trip, I had visited lars in my pocket, and I had to learn to If you manage properly, you can live
the Bunnell-DuPont colony, and have there- speak the English language besides. 1 cheaper in Florida than in any other state
fore traveled from the extreme southeast- started to work for very small wages- in the Union.
ern State to the farthest northwestern saved my money-bought land, and held it On your arrival in the colony, fence at
State, within a few weeks time. On both for higher prices. Some of it I sold, some once one acre of land around your home.
these trips I stopped in a number of large I would not sell, but I can truthfully say A plot of ground 100x100 feet square will cities, and talked with a great many busi- that I have never lost a cent on my land be sufficient for a garden and will furnish ness men in the hotels and in the Pullman investments. I have seen several banks your table with the choicest vegetables all
cars, and practically every person I talked fail, although thus far I have been fortu- the year round. A small flock of chickens to had the same story of "hard times," nate in never having lost a cent in any will start you in the right way. A few
"hard times." bank. I' have bought stocks and bonds dollars will give you a start in the hog
While in Seattle, Wash., I saw several and have lost on my investments, but I business, on a small scale. Of course, it
thousand idle workingmen congregated in can not see how any man, with good judg- will not be anything great, but you can
the streets there each day. I was told ment, can ever lose any money by buying secure a couple of hogs when you first
that in Portland, Ore., there were over land. Some people have accused me of be- come, at a small cost, which will increase
6,000 houses empty, and just lately I re- ing a little fanatical on the subject of land, to a dozen or more before the end of the ceived a letter from one of my buyers in but again I repeat that the best solution first year. Canada, from which I quote the following: for hard times is "Back to the Land." Money in -Bunnell, well invested, backed
"I hope you can make things all right for Panics are man-made. Have you ever up by a little labor investment, and the
us, as we are anxious to hold our farms, stopped to think that the only man who is balance of what you have saved before you and then when the next 'hard times" strike safe at all times-in panicky or prosperous came to Bunnell, held in the bank, will see us, and we have our land deeded, we will days of the nation-is the farmer? The you through. After you have your little
not care. My friend and I have had no farmer can, with ease, produce more than farm started, you will be free from paying




Vhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Put Your Dollars into the Ground Sugar Cane as a Staple Industry in
(Continued)
rent-you will have no coal bills, and you Florida
will have cut out almost altogether your business with a grocer and butcher and
will be on your way towards independence. Especially Profitable for Making Syrup, the Demand for Which Greatly Exceeds
Now, the problem for you is not only to the Supply.
P make .a living, but to so employ your__time and judgment in the operation of
your 10 or 20 acres of land, that you will Dame Nature has favored all sections of cost for three years, and has been compiled be able to make money to lay away in our country, so that one or more staple from reports of those who are, today, conthe bank, and at the same time improve crops can be relied upon at all times; and sidered an authority on this question. Asyour farm from year to year until it be- while many of these industries have lain suming that the land has been cleared and comes a valuable asset to you. dormant for years before their true values ready for the cr0o), we have, figuring on the
Practically all of the readers of the have been determined, in no section has the basis of one acre:
Home Builder have bought land of me in industry of sugar cane growing been neg- Four tons of seed cane at $4 per ton.$16.00 the Bunnell colony. It is the least of lected as much as in Florida, when it Breaking ground and planting ...... 12.00
my intentions to discourage any one, but should be the leading staple industry, from Four plowings at $1.50 each...,.... 6.00 if you are not fully prepared to come the fact that a crop failure has never Fertilizer and applying same ........20.00
this year, wait another year, or even two been known, and no other crop offers as Stripping, topping and cutting 20 tons
or three years, for you can not afford to go eun o ao n oe netd fcnaeaeco e cea
make a failure, and you will meet with suc- godhetns forin labo deands moneyru ivse, ocan e, avrae0ro per acre at.......... 00
cess.iyofolwm adie sugar are greater than the American sup- Hauling cane to mill, 20 tons at 50c
If you have a contract with the Bunnell prtn............. 00
Development Company for a farm, youpeto...........100
certainly can congratulate yourself in hav- -oaFotpr cefrfrs er$4
ing made such a start, and every day bringsToacstprcefrfitya.$40
you one day nearer to the time when you On the second and third years there
will be your own boss and *can work on your is no seed cane to buy, nor the expense
own farm in Bunnell, but again I state, do of planting, which effects a saving of $28.00
not let your ambition run away with you per acre, so we have a net cost for the
by corning unprepared. ,econd and third years of $46.00 each year,
And to you reader of the Home Builder, making a total cost as follows:
who are not a buyer-what provision have First year................ $74.00
you made for old age? Are you spending Second year............... 46.00
all your money now? Then what will be Third year ..................46.00
the result when the infirmities of age overtake you? After you have toiled for Total cost three years. .$166.00
years in mills or factories, risking life and or an average cost of $55.53 per year; thus
limb, must you fall back on some friend delivering the crop of 20 tons per acre to
or relative to care for you in your old the mill at a cost of less than $3.00 per
age? Start right in now to secure a home ton.
of your own, for you will soon look back Now, as to the value of this cane, this
with pride and satisfaction upon these depends entirely on the amount of juice
days of saving, and regret that you did extracted. With animal and small power
not begin earlier. mills, the'extraction rarely ever exceeds 50
If Bunnell does not suit you, go where per cent, while with mills capable of exyou will be satisfied, but by all means- tracting an average of 75 per cent, we have
"Put Your Dollars Into the Ground." 40,000 p~oundls of cane, with 75 per cent extraction would yield 30,000 pounds of juice
GOOD SENSE. at an average of 9 degrees Beaume. To
reduce this to 36 degrees Beaume syrup
Keep it before the people of Florida that will require 80-91 per cent, or 24,273 pounds
therm is more money in pigs than in politics, of water to be ev aporated, leaving 5,727
and very much larger profit in steers than pounds of syrup, or 572 gallons, at a gross
in statesmen. This is not mere alliteration; delivered cost of 10c per gallon. In other*
it is good, hard sense, the solid truth, and Mr. Gettert in a Field of Sugar Cane near wodehaepdudintreyrsn
with the price of beef going up all over the unelone acre of land, 1,716 gallons of syrup
country, and Florida the best place in theatacsfotheyarof$6.0...
world to raise cattle in, we can add many ply, as evidenced by the enormous imports aTh a ed cost frtredyearse of $166.00. t
millions to the wealth of this State in the each year, thus proving that a good mar- Thredrcneaiysebtisw t
next few years by going in for cattle. There ket at good prices awaits those who will the average cost and results are from is no better money crop.-Lakeland News, give this industry their attention. ..sugar cane, and, as stated above, there is
_____________One of the noticeable facts is that there no other staple crop offering such attractive
are a number of different kinds of sugar profits as found in sugar cane which will, NEW DRIVEWAY TO BEACH cane grown and, strange to say, they all in the near future, be the leading industry
A new driveway is being constructed from do well, regardless of soil conditions, wheth- in this State.-F. W. Johnson, in "Florida Ocean City to the beach which will be a er planted on sandy clay, loam or muck Grower." great improvement over the 01(1 road. A ground. It is true the yield will be greater high and dry road bed will be thrown up in some soils than in others. This may (EDITOR'S NOTE: Sugar cane has
andl covered with shell for hard surfacing. he due to intense cultivation and heavy often been called the "lazy 'Man's crop." The contract for the dredging work was fertilization. Still, the fact remains that Of course this is 'not necessarily so by any I let to Mr. S. F. Smith, of Daytona, who sugar cane is a marked success in Florida. ineans, but it is an ideal crap for those who has already had a crew at work on the This is, to a great extent, due to the -cli- do not care to engage in intensive farming,
job over a week. The road, when completed, inatic conditions, as nowhere in the United and it is safe and sure. will be twenty feet wide with a canal States will be found a country so favorable Assuming 50 cents per gallon as the avof the same width alongside of it. The for sugar cane cultivation as Florida. We erage selling p rice for syrup, it will be noted dredging work will be finished in about have an ideal climate, with sufficient moist- fromt the above figures that the product three weeks. ure and a scarcity of insect life that is of one acre (1,716 gals.) should yield $858.00
A draw bridge will be constructed across marked, against a production cost of $166.00, plus
the canal at Ocean City which will con- For the benefit of those intending plant- a nominal manufacturing cost. There are,
nect this road with the one leading from Bun- ing sugar cane, the following table of costs however, many instances where the returns nell to Ocean City. can be relied upon as being the average have been much higher than these figuress)




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
-A
Beautiful Scenic Road East of Bunnell. The New $650, 000. 00 Highway Connects with this Road.
WORK TO BEGIN ON THE NEW BRICK Fair Association. The counties of St. PROVIDE YOURSELF WITH A PIECE OF
HIGHWAY SHORTLY. Johns and Putnam are the instigators of THIS EARTH.
this movement, we understand, but Duval, (By E. I. Sherman.)
It was expected that work would have Clay and Volusia counties have been asked
been begun before this time on the new to co-operate in the movement, and five
$650,000.00 highway through St. Johns coun- such counties should arrange a most sue- War in Europe is bound to seriously afcessful fair. feet business throughout the world. Today
ty, but there have been a great many At this writing we are not in possession business men are watching the European
preliminaries to be attended to after the of complete information regarding this or- situation very carefully. We do not know contract for the work was awarded. How- ganization, but the purpose is to hold a what effect it will have on our own country,
ever, we understand that the road commis- fair late in the winter that will attract vis- but we do know that only those who own sioners were to have signed the bonds on itors and tourists from all parts of the and till the land need not worry.
country. At the first meeting a charter was Like a thunderbolt, unexpected, the news August 4th, and that the contractor would read proposing a capitalization of $100,000 spread about one of the greatest of wars then be instructed to go ahead with the with shares of stock at $5.00 each. Several among the great nations of Europe. First
work. sites for fair grounds on the east side of reports were considered as newspaper sensathe St. Johns river were considered, each tions, which every one believed were withThe commissioners contracted with the offering unusual advantages of access by out foundation. It took but a few days
J. B. McCrary Company of Atlanta to do river, railroad and hard wagon roads. The to awaken the people everywhere to the
the engineering work. The frin were to sites bordering on the river are covered fact that the report of the coming big wear
begin laying the levels for the highway im- with splendid oak and magnolia trees, af- is in reality the Blackest and Gloomiest outlook fording shade and convenience of uncom- for the present generation.
immediately upon being notified that the mon excellence. No one can foretell the consequences-no
money was advanced and the county ready. A race track and ball ground will be pro- business man knows how long the strain
The Construction Company is preparing to I vided, and the river front with a wide will last, or when he will be forced to give
have brick rushed into the county, and expanse of water will give an opportunity up. No workingman knows how long he
as soon as they are given some of the for water sports of all kinds, will be able to provide for his family. Here
levels they will start three gangs of men again let us look at the man who owns -and
to work. Each gang is required to lay a Our own St. Johns County is entering into tills a piece of land. He does not worry
mile of the brick a month. this movement very enthusiastically and about high prices of eatables-he raises
- we believe that each county will be greatly everything he needs in his garden, he has It will no doubt be interesting to our read- benefited by such an annual assembly.
ers to learn tbyt tse entire bond issue of his own poultry, eggs, butter, milk, and in
$ le50,00.00 was sohl to J. J. Heard of A fair is of splendid benefit at all times, fact everything of the very best for himJacksonville at a premium of $2,100.00. This because: self and his family. War, or no war, he
very plainly demonstrates that the bankers It shows the homeseeker and investor need not worry how high the price of food
think favorably of St. Johns county, for it what Florida soil will produce. becomes, he need not worry about raising
is (ite often the -case that bond issues of It arouses interest in scientific farming rent money, fuel money, etc. MR. FARMtis kuie l ften tes thatond issaesr. taroues iitteiret inten ntificrm ER has considerable to spare besides what
this kilid sell for less thiaii par. methods with their attendant better crops. he eats, and when thousands of city people
It brings the people of the section repre- are practically starving, he gets high prices EAST FLORIDA FAIR ASSOCIATION seated together for several days, promoting for his surplus.
acquaintance and bringing about a profit- During ordinary quiet, prosperous times,
ORGANIZED, able exchange of ideas, when land colonizers are pointing out
A county fair is always aii interesting And there are other benefits equally to be (through literature and otherwise), the
feature. There we have the opportunity of desired. necessity of securing a piece of earth for
studying the iproducts of that coiiniunity,
of noting the class of live stock raised, aii(l If such a fair is held this winter it will such emergencies, only one in a thousand of observing conditions generally in the be a success, and it will not be more than takes such glorious advice. Usually, they county. (County fairs are held annually in a year or two before each of the counties say, "Oh, that's a Land Agent's talk, etc.," various sections of Florida, lit so far there can hol its own fair because interest will the one (1) who took the advice of that has been no such organization on the north- have been aroused. Land Agent is the only fortunate one out of
ern east coast of Florida. = ,, the 1000.
The progressive citizens of this section Y D aT It is too late for many to become indeof the state, realizing the great advantages Put Your Do Iars Io0 he pendent owners of Land and Home beto be derived from such a fair, met recently X cause they waited for prosperity in the
in Palatka for the purpose of organizing Ground cities until they have spent the last dolwhat will be known as tie East Florida lar, but there are yet thousands in every




Whe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
city who could better their condition TODAY. Many do not know where to go--- "One will have to o a ona
others who have read and heard about the way
wonderful opportunities are too skeptical. beat Bunnell"
They are looking for "knockers," who are
able to knock them out of the idea of own- Says Mr. Harrison, formerly of British Columbia
ing land-and these you find wherever you
may turn.
This war-these high prices of everything St. Augustine, Fla. I have also had the happy experience of
you need-this scarcity of money, whether raising and producing some excellent laying
he be a banker, merchant or workingman, Mr. T. A. Verdenius, birds from a little flock I gathered together.
should be sufficient reason for each and Chicago, Illinois. You have to "go some" to get pullets to
every man to be anxious to provide him- Dear. Sir:-I now take the privilege of beat mine. I have birds that have laid
self with a piece of this earth on which he from 18 to 24 eggs each, at the age of five
will be sure to make a living, no matter writing you in reference to the Bunnell months. This is not so bad after all. I
what happens-War, Panic or Fire. colony at the potato harvest time. I must have another strain I am working up for
say that I certainly had a great surprise, broilers. They weigh 2v to 3 lbs. at 12 As you know, I am staying some 40 miles weeks, besides being a heavy laying strain.
MR. WILLIAMS EXPECTS TO MARKET north of the colony, and the surprise was, As far as Indian Runner Ducks are con2,000 CHICKENS THIS WINTER. that I thought I had as good crops as any cerned, they are fine and very productive. I
one, but when I went out around my broth- am aiming to have 75 or 100 laying this Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, er's place, about three miles south of Bun- fall of this class. Who can kick at Florida
Chicago, Ill. nell, and saw his crops, also his neighbors, for poultry ?
Dear Sir:-I am right here plugging I had to tell them the truth about things I want to tell you, that after spending
away and intend to be here for many years up here at St. Augustine. I can assure you these many months in Florida, I realize to come, as I came here to make ii my they looked at me when I told them that that I have found here my "permanent
home and I will do as I intended to. I they had a hundred chances at Bunnell to home." I like it better all the time, and I have planted some sweet potatoes and am our one at St. Augustine at raising any- must say, without fear of contradiction,
raising lots of chickens. I am running thing. Up here at St. Augustine it has that we have the finest climate in the
two incubators at the present time and been dry and things seem to dry up soon, world.
contemplate buying another large machine, but there at Bunnell the fine green corn, Yours sincerely,
as I expect to market about two thou- luscious tomatoes, and other vegetables, SAM J. HARRISON.
sand broilers and frying chickens this win- make one feel like getting busy. Everyter-that is, if I can get eggs to set at body was engaged in the potato businessthe right time. This and my sweet potatoes digging, hauling, etc. It was certainly a MR. GILBERTSON SAYS THE CLIMATE ought to pay for the land. sight to see load after load hauled away OF BUNNELL IS THE BEST
Come to see me when in Bunnell and I for shipment. IN THE WORLD
will show you, in a few months, that I am I must say that any one will have to go not only talking, but am doing things. a long way to beat Bunndl in growing stuff. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
Yours truly, Of course, there are lots of things that can Chicago, Illinois.
M. M. WILLIAMS, be made a great success here, besides grow- Dear Sir:-As I am now home after a
Florida. ing Irish potatoes. There are good open- trip to Florida and the Bunnell-DuPont ings for the man who will get a move on colony, I am going to let you know how I him and tackle anything that comes. Such like it down there. I stayed there two a man will win out here. Of course, the months in the warmest time of the year,
THE BEST BANK same as elsewhere, we meet with some that and I like it fine. The climate is the
Is a Bank of EARTH. growl-they always did growl and always best in the world-a nice breeze every day,
will. After spending more than a year in with cool, restful nights. It never fails, Florida, I have seen and learned quite a lot I must say that I am well pleased with
Nobody can rob it. and I am quite willing to still learn. the colony and the people there, and any
It yields interest in health, I consider this to be a paradise for the one who is willing to do his share, can do
man who understands poultry raising. well on a little farm in the Bunnell-DuPont
Happiness and comfort. As I like to experiment a little, I have colony.
It is the best friend of old age. knocked around and found out quite a few Very truly yours,
fine poultry plants in this country, and H. GILBERTSON,
have seen some of the best birds they raise. Minnesota.
When the New Brick Highway in St. Johns County. extending through the Bunnell-DuPont Colony is completed, there wilt be 400 miles of hard
surfaced road& between Jacksonville and Miami. The above picture is a section of this road taken east of our new tract.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
CITY DIRECTORY Mr. H. B. Morehead, of New Castle, In- Five hundred freight cars ordered by the
Church Services: diana, recently purchased the farm of Mr. Florida East Coast R. R. are now being
A. S. Wylie. Mr. Morehead and his family received.
METHODIST CHURCH will take possession on September 1st. The The order has been placed for some time.
Preaching-Sunday. 11 a. m. farm will be operated by his son-in-law, The cars have been coming here, several at
Preaching-Sunday. 7 p. m.
Sunday School-10 a. in. while Mr. Morehead will take steps toward a time, but the entire five hundred will soon
Secret Orders; establishing some mail routes from Bun- be accounted for. This will greatly increase
A. F. & A. M.. No. 200 nell. the capacity of the system for the rapid
Meets every second and fourth Tuesday at 7 o'clock handling of freight.'
p. m. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. Mr. 0. C. Mosby, one of the most successKNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ful farmers of this section is growing some Mrs. G. C. McArn has contracted with
Mohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every first and
third Monday at 7:30 p. In. at Castle Hall, in Bank summer crops of field peas, soy beans and J. E. Kuhn for the clearing and putting Building. other forages on his farm at Black Point. into a state of cultivation ten acres of land
southwest of town on the Moody road. This
LOCALS Mr.J. W n have moved will be ready for planting in potatoes this
Mr. and Mrs. J. winter.
Rev. Smith Hardin, Presiding Elder of into the new cottage just completed on their
the Palatka district, delivered an interest- farm four miles east of town. ing discourse at the Methodist church A seven room cottage was completed relast Thursday. Quarterly conference was held. Mr. J. H. McKnight is doing a lot of im- cently by the Johnson Lumber & Supply proving on his farm southwest of town. Co. for Mr. H. D. Miller just beyond SemWork on the new Catholic church at He is having several acres cleared for culti- inole Heights on Moody boulevard.
Korona has begun. This church when com- vation and fenced.
pleted will cost about $3500.00. Rev. A. Mr. Worges and Mr. Faries, of Ethridge,
Baczyk now of Minnesota will arrive in The true value of land in this section Tennessee, visited Bunnell the first of the
the colony some time in September. is shown by the recent sale of a 35 acr week while on a prospective tour of Florida.
farm swhic sold the conent sderaion of They were favorably impressed with BunThe fall term of the Bunnell graded school farm which sold for the consideration of nell. Both purchased tracts east of town will open Monday, September 28th. The $10,500.00, that is, $300.00 an acre. which they will cultivate and reside on
-i. *The land is situated near whenng the
faculty in charge last year-viz., Prof. B. Hastings and they return with their families three
F. Buchanan, principal, and Mrs. B. F. Bu- was owned by M. A. Mintom August Craft, months hence.
been re-elected for of South Dakota, who came to St. Johns
chanan, assistant-has f county only a few weeks ago with his
another year. family, was the purchaser. I A co-operative store is soon to be erected
Bids for the contract for building the The crop now planted on this farm and an at Korona. It has been capitalized for sevto n equipment of farm tools were included in
Masonic temple, ranging from seven to nine the sale. of Chicago is the president of the Society.
thousand dollars, were received at the reg- The land in the Bunnell Colony is just ular meeting of the Masons Tuesday night. as valuable as the land that brought Korona is rapidly pushing to the front.
Notedes soepte or ation. $300.00 an acre. All it needs to bring such Application has been made for a postoffice,
mitteea price is development, and a depot and side track will be constructed immediately on the F. E. C. R. R.
Mr. Washuski has just completed one of at the town site three miles below Dupont.
the handsomest residences in this section at Mr. G. A. Cain, tie inspector for the Korona. The cost of the building was ap- Florida East Coast Railway, was in Bun- A warehouse and dock have recently been
proximately $5,000.00. nell several days of this week checking over erected at Ocean City.
the cross-ties gotten out in this vicinity.
Mr. Mazure has a force of twenty men The cutting of cross-ties has become quite Mr. Gilberson of Minnesota has recently
at work on his tract of land, getting the a money-making industry in this section. made considerable improvements on his farm
same into a state of cultivation. He will Mr. Cain reports that during the first half near Gore Lake. He has returned to the have twenty acres cleared and planted this of the present year approximately thirty north, but will locate here permanently in
year. On ten acres of this an orange grove thousand ties have been bought by the rail- a few months. His father, brother and two of 1,000 trees will be set out. road company at this point. At forty-five friends have farms in the colony.
cents each, the prevalent price paid for No.
A handsome cottage was completed on the I's, this number of ties brings into Bunnell Arrangements are being completed for the beach for Mr. I. I. Moody last week. the aggregate sum of $13,500.00. establishment of an ice plant in Bunnell,
The colonists will welcome this new industry
Mr. Rutherford White, of Bend, Oregon, F. D. Barmington dug some of his new as it will reduce the present price of ice
arrived Saturday to look over his ten acre from 25 to 50 per cent.
tract of land in the Bunnell colony. When crop of sweet potatoes Saturday which sold he left he said before another year passed $1.25 1er bushel. Another new brick building is completed
he would return bringing with him his in Bunnell. The ground floor will be taken up
mother and sister, and make Bunnell his Miss Lucia Hudson, the St. Johns county by a barber shop and a garage with a
home. supervisor of girls' canning clubs, of St. spacious floorage. The second story will be
Augustine visited Bunnell Monday and composed of office rooms.
Mr. Crowson is growing a great variety Tuesday and gave a demonstration in the
of crops. His diversified farming includes school building Tuesday afternoon. Mr. J. M. Disney is erecting a residence on
peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, cotton, his twenty-acre tract southwest of town.
sugar cane and corn, all of which are look- Mr. S. R. Bruner arrived here in August Mr. Disney came to Bunnell about three ing exceptionally fine. In addition he has 1913, from Kentucky, settling in Section 20 months ago and will soon have his tract a herd of 40 or more hogs. Mr. Crowson Range 30. He cleared and broke eight acres developed into a productive and improved
has found there is good money in raising of land; the following March he planted six farm.
hogs and has solved the problem of convert- acres of this land in watermelons, using ing Florida crops into cold cash. 1600 pounds of fertilizer on the six acres. He Mr. Robt. White has been plucking an
had on the six acres of land over 15000 melons, abundance of watermelons from six vines Mr. Gilbert Miller is building a nice res- The first load that Mr. Briiner brought growing in his garden. Besides what were idence on his property three miles south to Bunnell netted him $30.75. This load was eaten and given away to friends he has sold
of Bunnll which will be completed and oc- picked from three 50-foot rows. They were approximately ten dollars worth from these cupied in'a few weeks. the Tom Watson variety, six vines.




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
"Bunnell Takes the Cake -Just
"People are Pouring! into Florida like Water Over What You Claim for It"
Niagara Falls" Says Mr. Brown, who came Writes Mr. Wrillht
from Princeton, Indiana of Canada
Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, years ago I bought land at Bunnell, Florida, Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
Chicago, Illinois. in the great potato belt, at only $30.00 per Chicago, Illinois.
acre, on terms of 50c an acre per month.
Dear Sir:-I want to tell you what 1 Today the same kind of land is selling for Dear Mr. Verdenius:-At last I have
think of Florida, after spending two qum- $50.00 an acre. Land throughout the entire paid a visit to Bunnell, and inspected the mers and winters here. I will say, in the state of Florida has been steadily increas- 15 acres standing in my name, and, being language of Roosevelt, that I like it "bully" ing in value, and this has not been a land in a hurry, and my time limited, I could I have always found the summers fine, boom-the demand is what makes prices, not put in the time there I would like to,
with a good cool breeze from the ocean but f saw enough to satisfy me that it is
and Gulf of Mexico. 0. K. and just what you claim for it.
When I left Princeton, Indiana, Decem- I believe Bunnell has a great future, with
ber, two years ago, I left almost frozen, a little more energy spent in its developwith heavy winter clothing on and a heavy meant. I found the climate all that could
overcoat as well. That overcoat my wife be desired, and not so hot as I expectedburned up to get it out of the way, as 1 89 degrees-one reason why I went in
have never had any use for it since, and we June. The class of people are of the finest
never wear heavy clothing here, winter or quality and willing to give all information
summer. asked for.
Bunnell, in St. Johns county-not far from Ia
Hastings-is in the midst of the greatest I found the soil to be a black sandy loam,
Irish and Sweet Potato section of the and with exposure to the air, will be good
South. When I left Bunnell there were stuff. To release the small proportion of
thousands of acres of potatoes in that tannic acid, which I know it contains, ex
county, and I was told they produced from posture to the air will do that. I obtained
40 to 60 bbls. to the acre, selling from samples for testing purposes. I found the
$3.50 to $7.50 per bbl., the price varying land could be easily cleared-the stumps
according to the time of shipment. also-and I honestly believe that fertilizer
haccrding to arlyallovr the te of scan be dispensed with by the people taking I have been nearly all over the State of up mixed farming-put some of the land
Florida. From Miami to Tallahassee there in pasture, raise a few stock cattle, as
are acres and acres of Celery, Lettuce stock manure can not be beaten.
and Tomatoes. I know people who made
$250.00 an acre on lettuce and from $100 to The water I found can be obtained from
$150 an acre on tomatoes. You can't beat 8 to 20 feet-the deeper the better. Samit on an average in the world, and I know ples taken shows that it contains traces of
several who have made as high as $1,000 sulphur and iron, and what is better for the
per acre on celery. human blood than that? I got my share
I see in the Clarion News of Princeton, down all right.
that Indiana had a big crop of wheat and Mr. Morean of Oklahoma in a Bunnell I notice it would be a wise plan to get
made an average of 20 bushels to the acre Flower Garden the withood stock o spectivefarms
at 90c per bushel. According to that, the them with good stock upon respective farms,
at 9c pr bshe. Acordng o tattheand not let them roam at will-put some highest price was only $18.00 per acre, and Just received a letter from a Californian meat on them and turn them into money. the expenses to be deducted. Don't talk saying that hundreds of families are comyour high priced northern land to me- ing to Florida, as land out there is selling Poultry is needed-butter, cheese and eggs
Florida is good enough for this chicken, for from $500 per acre cash and up. Why -all could be produced around Bunnell. Let
and I am not a spring chicken at that, and should they not come here where we have the people get busy and walk fast like I know what I am talking about. I have had thdo-it won't hurt any. But, taking things enough of the northern winters and small the best climate in the world, and are over crops. Have been over the road too song 2,000 miles nearer the great markets of the in general, and the age of Bunnell-you have United States than California. a fine town and good- land and water, and
for my own good. A man is a fool to spend I believe will produce anything outside of
his life in the north if he has the means Here we have no killing frosts-no cy- wheat and apples, and even that in time. to get away. At Princeton this summer it clones, blizzards or freezeouts. It is never I visited other sections in the State, but registered up to 103 and that day it was too hot in summer or too cool in winter, Bunnell takes the cake. only 88 here and a good cool Gulf breeze. and there is plenty of rainfall. We have When I left the cold north, I was almost over 300 growing days and can grow from And pleastme le know, at once, about
dead with catarrh and my wife was very three to five crops on the same land. I have a town lot--the closer to the depot and
bad with the rheumatism. We are now cleared up my lot, and inside of four months Moody Road, the better. Locate me one
both well and enjoying the finest climate I have raised two crops and have the third there, if possible, and the money is yoursin the world, crop now started. You can raise anything corner lot, please.
that grows, except apples and wheat, but I might say in conclusion, my property
Here in Florida we have the largest hotel the other crops pay several times more. in Canada is now for sale. That means BunRemember, the Government census shows nell for me as soon as possible-wife and
Tampa we have the longest bridge span in that Florida averages $109.76 per acre. all.
the world-at Mulberry, near Tampa, the tht Flrida av ea $0. per acre.
largest phosphate mines in the world. At Where else can you beat it? Thanking you, I am,
St. Augustine-the oldest city in the Now these are facts, no real-estate boom. Yours respectfully,
United States-is located the finest tourist I have no axe to grind; all I have had in WILLIAM THOMAS WRIGHT,
hotel in the world. At Jacksonville we have mind is to secure a good place for myself, Canada.
the longest brick roads in the United States, my friends and neighbors-a place where and they are now building fine hard roads I am not ashamed to look my friends in III1IVIWIIIIVIIIIIIFF"IFIIIfiNIIIF
from Jacksonville to Miami on the East the face and say--"I told you about this I
Coast, passing through the Bunnell-DuPont Land of Promise-you would not believe colony. me until you came and saw for yourself," o
People are pouring into this State like for Seeing is Believing. T
water over the Niagara Falls, and the land H. E. BROWN, T Groun
is increasing in value right along. Two Florida. 111"""1111"111 ii




Wye BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A FAILURE WITH TWO LEGS AND A
SUCCESS WITH ONE.
good leg and a wooden one," said the realestate lawyer who tells the story. "'Get
D o o ua n tin and ride,' Imy id And he slowly clam-4
"sonlearned that my passenger had
wored ora railway, and had lost his leg
by an accident. He himself was largely to
blame for it, find so he had not been able
Dun nell Town Lo ngt say ahmes and ea the brad tatp
tokige any damag. He siewasn' gtamp
A Bunnell Tow nloking or work.a Hoe ad ahe wran'thgot
hswife earned by taking in washing. If
could do nothing more, he could at least
subtract the cost of his board. With him
away, there would be better fare for his
fed .00?wife and the three children.
fo r o o M"I was on my way to look at a small
__________farm that I thought of exchanging for an___________other piece of property that I held. The ~farm had eleven acres of land, and a house ~and barn in fair condition, but it was some distance from a railway station. I said to
my one-legged companion, 'I'll make you a
If so, you must send in your order for it before- proposition. If I take the piece of land I
Septmber'5, 914.am going to see, I'll put you on it with Septmber15, 914-your family for the rest of the year'-it was then in May-'-and it won't cost you a
We still have a few choice residence lots in, Bunnell cent. At the end of the year, if you make
which you can purchase for $50o0oo on the easy payment a go of it, and are satisfied, I will rent you
the farm or you can buy it of me.'
plan of $5.oo per month. "Well, I got the little farm, and theex
railway man and his family moved from
WQe have only a few of these lots and you. can not the city into 'the house. I helped him to a
secue tem t tis piceaftr Spte ber 15,foron hatcow and some hens, and also paid a chattel secue tem t tisprce fte Setemer "5, or n: hatmortgage on his cookstove, so that he could date the price of all lots will be advanced to $75.00 and take it into the country.
up. "The first year he set out strawberries
up. and raspberries, which were, of course, of
no immediate profit, but with the aid of his
Bunnell is in the midst of a growing agricultural cow, his hens, and his garden he was able to
district, and every lot in the town is bound to increase live. At the end of the year I sold him the
place on 'time,' for eight hundred dollars.
in value. Think this over, and if you want one of these "Little by little the man increased his
lots, send in your order for it at once, flock of hens until he had f our hundred.
He started an asparagus bed. He set out
more strawberries and raspberries, and he
We have also some beautiful town, lots for sale at bought another cow.
Ocean City, which are especially desirable for people "His house was on a state road that was
who wish to spend the winter months in Florida. much used by automobiles, and he sold
many of the products of his little farm to
the passers-by, who were glad to get per.
If you have not already bought a farm in our colony, fectly fresh eggs, butter, berries, and garwe wish to remind you that we still have a few good den stuff, and paid well for them. He would
set out whatever he had for sale on a table
farms for sale in the new tract, which can be purchased by the roadside, and one of the children
for $35.00 an acre, on the easy installment plan of $i.oo would 'tend store.' In this way he made
an are ech mnth.nine hundred dollars in one year.
an are ech mnth."In seven years the place 'was all paid Reme berthisprie hlds oodin he nw tactfor, and the improvements he had added Reme berthisprie hlds oodin he nw tactby putting up new buildings and enriching only. All land in the old tract is now $50.00 an acre, and the soil made the farm worth several hundred dollars more than it was when the
we have but very few farms left for sale at that price, purchase contract was signed.
Addesscom uniatinsandsen al orersto"If the man had kept both legs, and reAddrss ommnictios an sed al oder tomained in the employment of the railway
company, he would probably have had to
work at a wage for some one else all his
life-and very likely live in a tenement that T looked out on a back alley in the city. Now
Thos. A. ~h Ve de iu strnene nt evroswereoe, amnd he
o s m~~~h is independent prospt. icid erouseahe mando
ptropertn h chilrere healther and
is hopeful and happy.
i o8 South La Salle Street Chicago, Ill. "He had made a good deal of a failure of
life when he had two legs, but he succeeded
with only one leg when he became a farmer."




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Illllllll Vo/. 2 XVA.TCH B \7 JV JV E L L G 'R O W JWo 7 Tlhe E, dl I tt r 9 s Fersoiaal Page FACTS AND In ten years, between FIGURES 15)00 and 1910, the popula tion of the United States increased fifteen million — about 21%; our farm area increased a little over 4%; our meat producing animals actually dropped of! over twenty million in number. In 1900 for every one hundred people we had 90.3 cattle. Ten years later we had only 68. For hogs the figures were re spectively 84, going down to 61; for sheep the drop per hundred population was from 82 to 51. Think what this means! Cheap meat can not be made on high-priced land and sixty-cent corn, but the science of in tensive farming will enable the farmer to raise three times as much on one acre as he can under present conditions, which will permit him to carry three times as much stock on his farm as he thinks he can now. This will build up the fertility of his fields and reduce the cost of producing meat onehalf. There are approximately ten acres of farm land per capita for the present popu lation. Only one-half'of this is under plow; the other half is woodland, waste land, unbroken land, pasture, etc. It now takes practically all we can raise to feed the people. We are beginning to import food stuffs. In fifty years our population will be doubled. What shall we do about it? Florida, and our own Bunnell-Dupont col ony stands on the threshold of a great pros perity, if the people will realize their op portunity and make the land produce what it is able to produce. United States Congressman A. F. Lever, chairman of the committee on agriculture of the House of Representatives, declares that our country’s greatest soil productivity lies in the South, and that before many years the Nation will be forced to turn to the South for agricultural products. “If Horace Greeley were alive today he would reverse his advice to young Americans to go west, and instead would say, ‘Go South, young man,’ ” the congressman de clared recently. “There are thousands of acres of uncultivated land in the South which in five years would surpass in produc tion any land in Illinois or Iowa. The American immigrant tide to Canada should be turned southward. The South needs more farmers. It has the best climate and soil for crops and live stock. The open door of opportunity is the South. Come South and be prosperous.” Such advice from a man who understands conditions throughout the entire country is well worth considering, and the land own ers in the Bunnell-Dupont colony who have already availed themselves of their oppor tunity in this respect are to be congratu lated. TIMES HAVE A Fable—Years ago a CHANGED man had three grown sons, for whom he se lected vocations. The first one was very smart, the next one was very good, the last one was very simple-minded. In his wisdom the father said: “This one, who is so very smart, I will make a lawyer of; the good one shall be a preacher; poor Jack knows so little, I will make a farmer of him.” Put Your Dollars Into The Ground But, times have changed. There is no occupation in the world that calls for more ability and judgment, brains, training, in dustry and adaptability than farming. Tt is a man’s job. To plow and sow and reap without understanding is no more rpal farming than cutting a man’s leg off with an ax is real surgery. Agriculture is the basis of the nation’s wealth. The soil is our greatest asset, and conserving and building this up helps every one. The simple-minded sons are no longer chosen for the farm. It is the young men with brains and energy who are taking up agricultural courses in colleges and other schools, and are preparing to become the owners and successful managers of farms. Education has done much to bring about this change. Boys are given farming courses in many of our high schools. They are taught dairying, fruit raising, etc., and they are entering upon this grandest voca tion of all, knowing the “Whys and Where fores” of farm life. The little flower and vegetable gardens in the cities and small towns, planted and cared for by the school children, are steps in the right direction. Everything should be done to encourage this love for Nature, this desire to plant and nourish—and then our boys and girls will turn to the farm and country life with glad and willing hearts, realizing that there is the greatest opportunity for financial, physical and moral development. VACATION TIME North, South, East and West, people are now “taking vacations.” It is the vacation season, and all over the country and every where in the land conditions somewhat out of the ordinary exist. Business men are away on a trip, and business men’s families are away for the summer. Many of our readers have never seen Flor ida, or their farms in the Bunnell-Dupont eolony. Why not spend your vacation there ? Do not hesitate to go on account of the warm weather. It is not nearly so hot there as you think, for it is always cool in the shade and you can sleep every night in comfort. The fact of the matter is, it is cooler in Bunnell now than in our northern cities. Lt will give you a warm glow around your heart to stand on your own little farm, to get acquainted with it, as it were. As you gaze about you, you can picture in your mind’s eye just what this farm will look like after a few years. Here will stand the home; there you will plant some trees; in that corner will be your orange grove; here will be the vegetable garden; there at the back porch will be the well, and beyond, the barn and other build ings. We have no doubt but that you will want to take off your coat and get to work at once. You will feel so invigorated that it would seem a delight to clear a little patch of ground. All good and well, but remember this is your vacation, and you are not to work too hard. You will want to run over to Ocean City, %  so admirably situated on the banks of the canal, just a short dis tance from the ocean. You will want to gaze and gaze at the broad Atlantic stretching away to foreign shores. You will want to visit the nearby orange groves, and you will find great joy in lying under some stately palms, and gazing up at the clear blue of the southern skies, flecked here and there with fleecy clouds. Don't object if you have to encounter a few hardships (it’s all in a summer’s vacation), and you know before you go that Bunnell-Dupont is a new country, and that you are going to have the great privi lege of helping in its development. Take time to see what your future neighbors have accomplished, and I am sure that you will return to your present homes re freshed in bodies and mind, realizing that if Florida can be so delightful in the sum mer months, what may you not expect of her in the winter months?

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_ Sftc BUMNELL HOME BUILDER Put Your Dollars Into The Ground By Thomas A. Verdenius Mr. T. A. Verdenius In these days, the United States, the wealthiest country in the world, is under going a period of fear. A change of politics usually brings about financial depression, although politics, in reality, have no effect upon the fundamental principles of our Government. During this period, and be fore, we find the great commercial inter ests of the country hesitating, thinking, conserving, holding back. This would not he the proper place to discuss politics, and it is the least of my intentions to do so. I only wish to say, that I am in favor of making such laws as will benefit the great mass of people, for there are thousands of poor men and women to one wealthy individual. Abraham Lincoln, in his own inimitable way, once said, “God must have loved the common people, otherwise He would not have made so many.” I have just returned from a western trip, having covered a distance of 7,000 miles. I visited twelve western states and made a short trip to British Columbia, Canada. Just before starting on this trip, I had visited the Bunnell-DuPont colony, and have there fore traveled from the extreme southeast ern State to the farthest northwestern State, within a few weeks time. On both these trips I stopped in a number of large cities, and talked with a great many busi ness men in the hotels and in the Pullman cars, and practically every person I talked to had the same story of “hard times,” “hard times.” While in Seattle, Wash., I saw several thousand idle workingmen congregated in the streets there each day. I was told that in Portland, Ore., there were over 6,000 houses empty, and just lately I re ceived a letter from one of my buyers in Canada, from which I quote the following: “I hope you can make things all right for us, as we are anxious to hold our farms, and then when the next ‘hard times” strike us, and we have our land deeded, we will not care. My friend and I have had no work for six months. He has traveled all over looking for work and could not get a job for love or money. We have walked fifty miles from home and had to walk back again, without a job.” On top of these unsettled conditions came the news, a few days ago, of the European war. Last week I wanted to pay off some of my obligations and went to my bank —which is one of the safest institutions in this city—to cash a check for $ 500 but like hundreds and thousands of others in this city are now doing, I was obliged to cut my check to one-half that amount. In view of all these facts, I am sure no one will contradict me when I state that we are having abnormal times today. I do not consider myself in a position to give the reasons for these conditions, but one thing I do know is, that these condi tions exist, and the one remedy for these hard times may be summed up in these words “Put Your Dollars Into the Ground.” Of course, I am not speaking lit erally when I say this. I met a farmer a few days ago who had placed over a thou sand dollars in a glass fruit jar and buried it in the ground for a year or more, but I would not be so foolish as to advise our readers to do that. However, I do believe that it is the duty of every man and every woman to save a part of his or her earnings each month, and if they will not, they are doing themselves a great injustice and the loved ones who are depending on them. I know what it means to have to support a family on $60.00 a month in Chicago, and I have not forgotten the time when I did it myself. I also realize that it is hard work to save, hut I have never let a month in my life go by since I came to this country that I did not add a little to my savings. I bought land on the installment plan, just as I have asked you to do, and I have never regretted it. Besides my inter ests in Bunnell, I have had farms in other parts of Florida, also in Illinois, Idaho and North Dakota. There has not been an acre of this land but that has doubled in value, and some of these farms are today worth several times what I paid for them. I came to this country with a hundred dol lars in my pocket, and I had to learn to speak the English language besides. I started to work for very small wages— saved my money—bought land, and held it for higher prices. Some of it I sold, some I would not sell, but I can truthfully say that I have never lost a cent on my land investments. I have seen several banks fail, although thus far I have been fortu nate in never having lost a cent in any bank. I have bought stocks and bonds and have lost on my investments, but I can not see how any man, with good judg ment, can ever lose any money by buying land. Some people have accused me of be ing a little fanatical on the subject of land, but again I repeat that the best solution for hard times is “Back to the Land.” Panics are man-made. Have you ever stopped to think that the only man who is safe at all times—in panicy or prosperous days of the nation—is the farmer? The farmer can, with ease, produce more than enough for himself and his family, and is almost always able to help feed the multi tude. Then—“Put Your Dollars Into the Ground.” Where? I will not answer that question. If I were to tell you at Bunnell, you probably would accuse me of talking from a selfish standpoint. It is true that I want to sell land, but I have never said to any one that Bunnell was the only place to buy. I believe in Bunnell—my heart is in Bunnell—and I am convinced that Bun nell is all that I have ever claimed it to be, but I am broad in my ideas, and I be lieve that any man who buys land, East or West, North or South, at a conservative price and pays what the land is actually worth, that he can not make a mistake. Remember, I do not say to buy swamps, rocks, mountains or rivers, but LAND— dirt that will produce a crop. It is up to you as to what part of the country you desire to locate in. If you want to raise wheat and live in a country where you have large fuel bills to pay, and six or seven months of winter, I would not advise you to go to Florida. But, if you want to raise oranges or grape-fruit, and enjoy the balmy sea breezes throughout the entire year, then I certainly would not advise you to go to Canada, but I would say, COME TO FLORIDA. Some people have misunderstood Florida, and if you have the impression that all you have to do is to buy a 10 or 20-acre tract of land in Florida, and that all your troubles thereafter will be over, you are sadly mistaken. Some settlers have come to our colony without practically any money, and it has been hard for them to succeed, but I have never advised any one to come unprepared. Remember, that Bun nell is a new country and that jobs are not as plentiful as in an older and more settled community. Therefore, come pre pared, and, if possible, pay for your land first and get a deed for same, so that you will not need to worry about your monthly payments, and have enough money to pay for building your little home, fencing your land, buying farming implements, chickens, a cow, a horse, etc. Besides that, you should have enough money left to live on until your first crop has been harvested. If you manage properly, you can live cheaper in Florida than in any other state in the Union. On your arrival in the colony, fence at once one acre of land around your home. A plot of ground 100x100 feet square will be sufficient for a garden and will furnish your table with the choicest vegetables all the year round. A small flock of chickens will start you in the right way. A few dollars will give you a start in the hog business, on a small scale. Of course, it will not be anything great, but you can secure a couple of hogs when you first come, at a small cost, which will increase to a dozen or more before the end of the first year. Money in Bunnell, well invested, backed up by a little labor investment, and the balance of what you have saved before you came to Bunnell, held in the bank, will see you through. After you have your little farm started, you will be free from paying

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UhQ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Sugar Cane as a Staple Industry in Florida Especially Profitable for Making Syrup, the Demand for Which Greatly Exceeds the Supply. Put Your Dollars into the Ground (Continued) rent—you will have no coal bills, and you will have cut out almost altogether your business with a grocer and butcher and will be on your way towards independence. Now, the problem for you is not only to make a living, but to so employ your time and judgment in the operation of your 10 or 20 acres of land, that you will be able to make money to lay away in the bank, and at the same time improve your farm from year to year until it be comes a valuable asset to you. Practically all of the readers of the Home Builder have bought land of me in the Bunnell colony. It is the least of my intentions to discourage any one, but if you are not fully prepared to come this year, wait another year, or even two or three years, for you can not afford to make a failure, and you will meet with suc cess if you follow my advice. If you have a contract with the Bunnell Development Company for a farm, you certainly can congratulate yourself in hav ing made such a start, and every day brings you one day nearer to the time when you will be your own boss and can work on your own farm in Bunnell, but again I state, do not let your ambition run away with you by coming unprepared. And to you reader of the Home Builder, who are not a buyer—what provision have you made for old age? Are you spending all your money now? Then what will be the result when the infirmities of age over take you? After you have toiled for years in mills or factories, risking life and limb, must you fall back on some friend or relative to care for you in your old age? Start right in now to secure a home of your own, for you will soon look back with pride and satisfaction upon these days of saving, and regret that you did not begin earlier. If Bunnell does not suit you, go where you will be satisfied, but by all means— “Put Your Dollars Into the Ground.” GOOD SENSE. Keep it before the people of Florida that there is more money in pigs than in politics, and very much larger profit in steers than in statesmen. This is not mere alliteration; it is good, hard sense, the solid truth, and with the price of beef going up all over the country, and Florida the best place in the world to raise cattle in, we can add many millions to the wealth of this State in the next few years by going in for cattle. There is no better money crop. — Lakeland News. NEW DRIVEWAY TO BEACH A new driveway is being constructed from Ocean City to the beach which will be a great improvement over the old road. A high and dry road bed will be thrown up and covered with shell for hard surfacing. The contract for the dredging work was let to Mr. S. F. Smith, of Daytona, who has already had a crew at work on the job over a week. The road, when completed, will be twenty feet wide with a canal of the same width alongside of it. The dredging work will be finished in about three weeks. A draw bridge will be constructed across the canal at Ocean City which will con nect this road with the one leading from Bun nell to Ocean City. Dame Nature has favored all sections of our country, so that one or more staple crops can be relied upon at all times; and while many of these industries have lain dormant for years before their true values have been determined, in no section has the industry of sugar cane growing been neg lected as much as in Florida, when it should be the leading staple industry, from the fact that a crop failure has never been known, and no other crop offers as good returns for labor and money invested. Then, again, the demands for syrup and sugar are greater than the American supMr. Gettert in a Field of Sugar Cane near Bunnell ply, as evidenced by the enormous imports each year, thus proving that a good mar ket at good prices awaits those who will give this industry their attention. One of the noticeable facts is that there are a number of different kinds of sugar cane grown and, strange to say, they all do well, regardless of soil conditions, wheth er planted on sandy clay, loam or muck ground. It is true the yield will be greater in some soils than in others. This may be due to intense cultivation and heavy fertilization. Still, the fact remains that sugar cane is a marked success in Florida. This is, to a great extent, due to the 'cli matic conditions, as nowhere in the United States will be found a country so favorable for sugar cane cultivation as Florida. We have an ideal climate, with sufficient moist ure and a scarcity of insect life that is marked. For the benefit of those intending plant ing sugar cane, the following table of costs can be relied upon as being the average cost for three years, and has been compiled from reports of those who are, today, con sidered an authority on this question. As suming that the land has been cleared and ready for the crop, we have, figuring on the basis of one acre: Four tons of seed cane at $4 per ton.$16.00 Breaking ground and planting 12.00 Four plowings at $1.50 each 6.00 Fertilizer and applying same 20.00 Stripping, topping and cutting 20 tons of cane, average crop per acre at 50c per ton 10.00 Hauling cane to mill, 20 tons at 50c per ton 10.00 Total cost per acre for first year.$74.00 On the second and third years there is no seed cane to buy, nor the expense of planting, which effects a saving of $28.00 per acre, so we have a net cost for the second and third years of $46.00 each year, making a total cost as follows: First year $ 74.00 Second year 46.00 Third year 46.00 Total cost three years. .$166.00 or an average cost of $55.53 per year; thus delivering the crop of 20 tons per acre to the mill at a cost of less than $3.00 per ton. Now, as to the value of this cane, this depends entirely on the amount of juice extracted. With animal and small power mills, the extraction rarely ever exceeds 50 per cent, while with mills capable of ex tracting an average of 75 per cent, we have 40,000 pounds of cane, with 75 per cent ex traction would yield 30,000 pounds of juice at an average of 9 degrees Beaume. To reduce this to 36 degrees Beaume syrup will require 80-91 per cent, or 24,273 pounds of water to be evaporated, leaving 5,727 pounds of syrup, or 572 gallons, at a gross delivered cost of 10c per gallon. In other words, we have produced in three years on one acre of land, 1,716 gallons of syrup at a cost for three years of $166.00. The reader can readily see by this what the average cost and results are from sugar cane, and, as stated above, there is no other staple crop offering such attractive profits as found in sugar cane which will, in the near future, be the leading industry in this State. — F. W. Johnson, in “Florida Grower.” ( E DITOR’S NOTE: Sugar cane has often been called the "lazy man's crop.” Of course this is not necessarily so by any means, but it is an ideal crop for those who do not care to engage in intensive farming, and it is safe and sure. Assuming 50 cents per gallon as the av erage selling price for syrup, it will be noted from the above figures that the product of one acre (1,716 gals.) should yield $858.00 against a production cost of $166.00, plus a nominal manufacturing cost. There are, however, many instances where the returns have been much higher than these figures.)

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BUMHELL HOME BUILDER Beautiful Scenic Road East of Bunnell. The New $650,000. 00 Highway Connects with this Road. WORK TO BEGIN ON THE NEW BRICK HIGHWAY SHORTLY. It was expected that work would have been begun before this time on the new $650,000.00 highway through St. Johns coun ty, but there have been a great many preliminaries to be attended to after the contract for the work was awarded. How ever, we, understand that the road commis sioners were to have signed the bonds on August 4th, and that the contractor would then be instructed to go ahead with the work. The commissioners contracted with the J. B. McCrary Company of Atlanta to do the engineering work. The firm were to begin laying the levels for the highway im mediately upon being notified that the money was advanced and the county ready. The Construction Company is preparing to have brick rushed into the county, and as soon as they are given some of the levels they will start three gangs of men to work. Each gang is required to lay a mile of the brick a month. It will no doubt be interesting to our read ers to learn that the entire bond issue of $650,000.00 was sold to J. J. Heard of Jacksonville at a premium of $2,100.00. This very plainly demonstrates that the bankers think favorably of St. Johns county, for it is quite often the case that bond issues of this kind sell for less than par. EAST FLORIDA FAIR ASSOCIATION ORGANIZED. A county fair is always an interesting feature. There we have the opportunity of studying the products of that community, of noting the class of live stock raised, and of observing conditions generally in the county. County fairs are held annually in various sections of Florida, but so far there has been no such organization on the north ern east coast of Florida. The progressive citizens of this section of the state, realizing the great advantages to be derived from such a fair, met recently in Palatka for the purpose of organizing what will be known as the East Florida Fair Association. The counties of St. Johns and Putnam are the instigators of this movement, we understand, but Duval, Clay and Volusia counties have been asked to co-operate in the movement, and five such counties should arrange a most suc cessful fair. At this writing we are not in possession of complete information regarding this or ganization, but the purpose is to hold a fair late in the winter that will attract vis itors and tourists from all parts of the country. At the first meeting a charter was read proposing a capitalization of $100,000 with shares of stock at $5.00 each. Several sites for fair grounds on the east side of the St. Johns river were considered, each offering unusual advantages of access by river, railroad and hard wagon roads. The sites bordering on the river are covered with splendid oak and magnolia trees, af fording shade and convenience of uncom mon excellence. A race Hack and ball ground will be pro vided, and the river front with a wide expanse of water will give an opportunity for water sports of all kinds. Our own St. Johns County is entering into this movement very enthusiastically and •we believe that each county will be greatly benefited by such an annual assembly. A fair is of splendid benefit at all times, because: It shows the homeseeker and investor what Florida soil will produce. It arouses interest in scientific farming methods with their attendant better crops. It brings the people of the section repre sented together for several days, promoting acquaintance and bringing about a profit able exchange of ideas. And there are other benefits equally to be desired. If such a fair is held this winter it will be a success, and it will not be more than a year or two before each of the counties can hold its own fair because interest will have been aroused, piiiiiiiiiiiiiitt Put Your Dollars Into The ( Ground ..Illllllll.Illlllllllllllllll...Ill.II.Illlllllll.Illllllllll...mini PROVIDE YOURSELF WITH A PIECE OF THIS EARTH. (By E. I. Sherman.) War in Europe is bound to seriously af fect business throughout the world. Today business men are watching the European situation very carefully. We do not know what effect it will have on our own country, but we do know that only those who own and till the land need not worry. Like a thunderbolt, unexpected, the news spread about one of the greatest of wars among the great nations of Europe. First reports were considered as newspaper sensa tions, which every one believed were with out foundation. It took but a few days to awaken the people everywhere to the fact that the report of the coming big war is in reality the Blackest and Gloomiest outlook for the present generation. No one can foretell the consequences — no business man knows how long the strain will last, or when he will be forced to give up. No workingman knows how long he will be able to provide for his family. Here again let us look at the man who owns-and tills a piece of land. He does not worry about high prices of eatables—he raises everything he needs in his garden, he has his own poultry, eggs, butter, milk, and in fact everything of the very best for him self and his family. War, or no war, he need not worry how high the price of food becomes, he need not worry about raising rent money, fuel money, etc. MR. FARM ER has considerable to spare besides what he eats, and when thousands of city people are practically starving, he gets high prices for his surplus. During ordinary quiet, prosperous times, when land colonizers are pointing out (through literature and otherwise), the necessity of securing a piece of earth for such emergencies, only one in a thousand takes such glorious advice. Usually, they say, “Oh, that’s a Land Agent’s talk, etc.,” but now the !)!)!) out of the 1000 realize that the one (1) who took the advice of that Land Agent is the only fortunate one out of the 1000. It is too late for many to become inde pendent owners of Land and Home be cause they waited for prosperity in the cities until they have spent the last dol lar, but there are yet thousands in every

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER “One will have to go a long way to beat Bunnell’’ Says Mr. Harrison, formerly of British Columbia St. Augustine, Fla. city who could better their condition TO DAY. Many do not know where to go— others who have read and heard about the wonderful opportunities are too skeptical. They are looking for “knockers,” who are able to knock them out of the idea of own ing land—and these you find wherever you may turn. This war — these high prices of everything you need — this scarcity of money, whether he be a banker, merchant or workingman, should be sufficient reason for each and every man to be anxious to provide him self with a piece of this earth on which he will be sure to make a living, no mattei what happens — War, Panic or Fire. MR. WILLIAMS EXPECTS TO MARKET 2,000 CHICKENS THIS WINTER. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir: — I am right here plugging away and intend to be here for many years to come, as I came here to make it my home and I will do as I intended to. I have planted some sweet potatoes and am raising lots of chickens. I am running two incubators at the present time and contemplate buying another large machine, as I expect to market about two thou sand broilers and frying chickens this win ter — that is, if I can get eggs to set at the right time. This and my sweet potatoes ought to pay for the land. Come to see me when in Bunnell and I will show you, in a few months, that I am not only talking, but am doing things. Yours truly, M. M. WILLIAMS, Florida. THE BEST BANK Is a Bank of EARTH. It never fails, Nobody can rob it. It yields interest in health, Happiness and comfort. It is the best friend of old age. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Illinois. Dear. Sir: — I now take the privilege of writing you in reference to the Bunnell colony at the potato harvest time. I must say that I certainly had a great surprise. As you know, I am staying some 40 miles north of the colony, and the surprise was, that I thought I had as good crops as any one, but when I went out around my broth er’s place, about three miles south of Bun nell, and saw his crops, also his neighbors, I had to tell them the truth about things up here at St. Augustine. I can assure you they looked at me when I told them that they had a hundred chances at Bunnell to our one at St. Augustine at raising any thing. Up here at St. Augustine it has been dry and things seem to dry up soon, but there at Bunnell the fine green corn, luscious tomatoes, and other vegetables, make one feel like getting busy. Every body was engaged in the potato business— digging, hauling, etc. It was certainly a sight to see load after load hauled away for shipment. I must say that any one will have to go a long way to beat Bunnell in growing stuff. Of course, there are lots of things that can be made a great success here, besides grow ing Irish potatoes. There are good open ings for the man who will get a move on him and tackle anything that comes. Such a man will win out here. Of course, the same as elsewhere, we meet with some that growl — they always did growl and always will. After spending more than a year in Florida, I have seen and learned quite a lot and I am quite willing to still learn. I consider this to be a paradise for the man who understands poultry raising. As I like to experiment a little, I have knocked around and found out quite a few fine poultry plants in this country, and have seen some of the best birds they raise. I have also had the happy experience of raising and producing some excellent laying birds from a little flock I gathered together. You have to “go some” to get pullets to beat mine. I have birds that have laid from 18 to 24 eggs each, at the age of five months. This is not so bad after all. I have another strain I am working up for broilers. They weigh 2 y 2 to 3 lbs. at 12 weeks, besides being a heavy laying strain. As far as Indian Runner Ducks are con cerned, they are fine and very productive. I am aiming to have 75 or 100 laying this fall of this class. Who can kick at Florida for poultry ? I want to tell you, that after spending these many months in Florida, I realize that I have found here my “permanent home.” I like it better all the time, and 1 must say, without fear of contradiction, that we have the finest climate in the world. Yours sincerely, SAM J. HARRISON. MR. GILBERTSON SAYS THE CLIMATE OF BUNNELL IS THE BEST IN THE WORLD Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Sir: — As I am now home after a trip to Florida and the Bunnell-DuPont colony, I am going to let you know how 1 like it down there. I stayed there two months in the warmest time of the year, and I like it fine. The climate is the best in the world — a nice breeze every day, with cool, restful nights. I must say that I am well pleased with the colony and the people there, and any one who is willing to do his share, can do well on a little farm in the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Very truly yours, H. GILBERTSON, Minnesota. When the New Brick Highway in St. Johns County, extending through the Bunnell-DuPont Colony is completed. there will be 400 miles of hard surfaced roads between Jacksonville and Miami. The above picture is a section of this road taken east of our new tract.

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BUNHELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month CITY DIRECTORY Church Services: METHODIST CHURCH Preaching—Sunday. 11 a. m. Preaching—Sunday. 7 p. m. Sunday School—10 a. m. Secret Orders; A. P. & A. M., No. 200 Meets every second and fourth Tuesday at 7 o'clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS Mohawk Lodge. No. 128, meets every first and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at Castle Hall, in Bank Building. LOCALS Rev. Smith Hardin, Presiding Elder of the Palatka district, delivered an interest ing discourse at the Methodist church last Thursday. Quarterly conference was held. Work on the new Catholic church at Korona has begun. This church when com pleted will cost about $3500.00. Rev. A. Baczyk now of Minnesota will arrive in the colony some time in September. The fall term of the Bunnell graded school will open Monday, September 28th. The faculty in charge last year—viz., Prof. B. F. Buchanan, principal, and Mrs. B. F. Bu chanan, assistant—has been re-elected for another year. Bids for the contract for building the Masonic temple, ranging from seven to nine thousand dollars, were received at the reg ular meeting of the Masons Tuesday night. No bid was accepted, however, as the com mittee desired some time for consideration. Mr. Washuski has just completed one of the handsomest residences in this section at Korona. The cost of the building was ap proximately $5,000.00. Mr. Mazure has a force of twenty men at work on his tract of land, getting the same into a state of cultivation. He will have twenty acres cleared and planted this year. On ten acres of this an orange grove of 1,000 trees will be set out. A handsome cottage was completed on the beach for Mr. I. I. Moody last week. Mr. Rutherford White, of Bend, Oregon, arrived Saturday to look over his ten acre tract of land in the Bunnell colony. When he left he said before another year passed he would return bringing with him his mother and sister, and make Bunnell his home. Mr. Crowson is growing a great variety of crops. His diversified farming includes peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, cotton, sugar cane and corn, all of which are look ing exceptionally fine. In addition he has a herd of 40 or more hogs. Mr. Crowson has found there is good money in raising hogs and has solved the problem of convert ing Florida crops into cold cash. Mr. Gilbert Miller is building a nice res idence on his property three miles south of Bunnell which will be completed and oc cupied in a few weeks. Mr. Ii. B. Morehead, of New Castle, In diana, recently purchased the farm of Mr. A. S. Wylie. Mr. Morehead and his family will take possession on September 1st. The farm will be operated by his son-in-law, while Mr. Morehead will take steps toward establishing some mail routes from Bun nell. Mr. O. C. Mosby, one of the most success ful farmers of this section is growing some summer crops of field peas, soy beans and other forages on his farm at Black Point. Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wagoner have moved into the new cottage just completed on their farm four miles east of town. Mr. J. H. McKnight is doing a lot of im proving on his farm southwest of town. He is having several acres cleared for culti vation and fenced. The true value of land in this section is shown by the recent sale of a 35 acre farm which sold for the consideration of $10,500.00, that is, $300.00 an acre. The land is situated near Hastings and was owned by M. A. Minton. August Craft, of South Dakota, who came to St. Johns county only a few weeks ago with his family, was the purchaser. The crop now planted on this farm and an equipment of farm tools were included in the sale. The land in the Bunnell Colony is just as valuable as the land that brought $300.00 an acre. All it needs to bring such a price is development. Mr. G. A. Cain, tie inspector for the Florida East Coast Railway, was in Bunnell several days of this week checking over the cross-ties gotten out iu this vicinity. The cutting of cross-ties has become quite a money-making industry in this section. Mr. Cain reports that during the first half of the present year approximately thirty thousand ties have been bought by the rail road company at this point. At forty-five cents each, the prevalent price paid for No. l’s, this number of ties brings into Bunnell the aggregate sum of $13,500.00. F. D. Barmington dug some of his new crop of sweet potatoes Saturday which sold at $1.25 per bushel. Miss Lucia Hudson, the St. Johns county supervisor of girls’ canning clubs, of St. Augustine visited Bunnell Monday and Tuesday and gave a demonstration in the school building Tuesday afternoon. Mr. S. R. Bruner arrived here in August 1013, from Kentucky, settling in Section 20 Range 30. He cleared and broke eight acres of land; the following March he planted six acres of this land in watermelons, using 1000 pounds of fertilizer on the six acres. He had on the six acres of land over 15000 melons. The first load that Mr. Bruner brought to Bunnell netted him $30.75. This load was picked from three 50-foot rows. They were the Tom Watson variety. Five hundred freight ears ordered by the Florida East Coast R. R. are now being received. The order has been placed for some time. The cars have been coming here, several at a time, but the entire five hundred will soon be accounted for. This will greatly increase the capacity of the system for the rapid handling of freight. Mrs. G. C. McArn has contracted with J. E. Kuhn for the clearing and putting into a state of cultivation ten acres of land southwest of town on the Moody road. This will be ready for planting in potatoes this winter. A seven room cottage was completed re cently by the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. for Mr. H. D. Miller just beyond Sem inole Heights on Moody boulevard. Mr. Worges and Mr. Faries, of Ethridge, Tennessee, visited Bunnell the first of the week while on a prospective tour of Florida. They were favorably impressed with Bun nell. Both purchased tracts east of town which they will cultivate and reside on when they return with their families three months hence. A co-operative store is soon to be erected at Korona. It has been capitalized for sev eral thousand dollars. Mr. Frank Rezmer of Chicago is the president of the Society. Korona is rapidly pushing to the front. Application has been made for a postoffice, and a depot and side track will be con structed immediately on the F. E. C. R. R. at the town site three miles below Dupont. A warehouse and dock have recently been erected at Ocean City. Mr. Gilberson of Minnesota has recently made considerable improvements on his farm near Gore Lake. He has returned to the north, but will locate here permanently in a few months. His father, brother and two friends have farms in the colony. Arrangements are being completed for the establishment of an ice plant in Bunnell. The colonists will welcome this new industry as it will reduce the present price of ice from 25 to 50 per cent. Another new brick building is completed in Bunnell. The ground floor will be taken up by a barber shop and a garage with a spacious floorage. The second story will be composed of office rooms. Mr. J. M. Disney is erecting a residence on his twenty-acre tract southwest of town. Mr. Disney came to Bunnell about three months ago and will soon have his tract developed into a productive and improved farm. Mr. Robt. White has been plucking an abundance of watermelons from six vines growing in his garden. Besides what were eaten and given away to friends he has sold approximately ten dollars worth from these six vines.

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me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER a People are Niagara Pouring into Florida like Water Over Falls” Says Mr. Brown, who came from Princeton, Indiana Bunnell Takes the Cake—Just What You Claim for It” Writes Mr. Wright of Canada Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Sir:— I want to tell you what 1 think of Florida, after spending two sum mers and winters here. I will say, in the language of Roosevelt, that I like it “bully.’' I have always found the summers fine, with a good cool breeze from the ocean and Gulf of Mexico. When I left Princeton, Indiana, Decem ber, two years ago, I left almost frozen, with heavy winter clothing on and a heavy overcoat as well. That overcoat my wife burned up to get it out of the way, as 1 have never had any Use for it since, and we never wear heavy clothing here, winter or summer. Bunnell, in St. Johns county — not far from Hastings — is in the midst of the greatest Irish and Sweet Potato section of the South. When I left Bunnell there were thousands of acres of potatoes in that county, and I was told they produced from 40 to 60 bbls. to the acre, selling from $3.50 to $7.50 per bbl., the price varying according to the time of shipment. I have been nearly all over the State of Florida. From Miami to Tallahassee there are acres and acres of Celery, Lettuce and Tomatoes. I know people who made $250.00 an acre on lettuce and from $100 to $150 an acre on tomatoes. You can’t beat it on an average in the world, and I know several who have made as high as $1,000 per acre on celery. I see in the Clarion News of Princeton, that Indiana had a big crop of wheat and made an average of 20 bushels to the acre at 90c per bushel. According to that, the highest price was only $18.00 per acre, and the expenses to be deducted. Don’t talk your high priced northern land to me— Florida is good enough for this chicken, and I am not a spring chicken at that, and know what I am talking about. I have had enough of the northern winters and small crops. Have been over the road too long for my own good. A man is a fool to spend his life in the north if he has the means to get away. At Princeton this summer it registered up to 103 and that day it was only 88 here and a good cool Gulf breeze. When I left the cold north, I was almost dead with catarrh and my wife was very bad with the rheumatism. We are now both well and enjoying the finest climate in the world. Here in Florida we have the largest hotel in the world, located at Palm Beach. At Tampa we have the longest bridge span in the world — at Mulberry, near Tampa, the largest phosphate mines in the world. At St. Augustine — the oldest city in the United States — is located the finest tourist hotel in the world. At Jacksonville we have the longest brick roads in the United States, and they are now building fine hard roads from Jacksonville to Miami on the East Coast, passing through the Bunnell-DuPont colony. People are pouring into this State like water over the Niagara Falls, and the land is increasing in value right along. Two years ago I bought land at Bunnell, Florida, in the great potato belt, at only $30.00 per acre, on terms of 50c an acre per month. Today the same kind of land is selling for $50.00 an acre. Land throughout the entire state of Florida has been steadily increas ing in value, and this has not been a land boom-the demand is what makes prices. Mr. Morgan of Oklahoma in a Bunnell Flower Garden Just received a letter from a Californian saying that hundreds of families are com ing to Florida, as land out there is selling for from $500 per acre cash and up. Why should they not come here where we have the best climate in the world, and are over 2,000 miles nearer the great markets of the United States than California. Here we have no killing frosts—no cy clones, blizzards or freezeouts. It is never too hot in summer or too cool in winter, and there is plenty of rainfall. We have over 300 growing days and can grow from three to five crops on the same land. I have cleared up my lot, and inside of four months I have raised two crops and have the third crop now started. You can raise anything that grows, except apples and wheat, but the other crops pay several times more. Remember, the Government census shows that Florida averages $109.76 per acre. Where else can you beat it? Now these are facts, no real-estate boom. I have no axe to grind; all I have had in mind is to secure a good place for myself, my friends and neighbors—-a place where I am not ashamed to look my friends in the face and say—“I told you about this Land of Promise—you would not believe me until you came and saw for yourself,” for Seeing is Believing. H. E. BROWN, Florida. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Illinois. Dear Mr. Verdenius: — At last I have paid a visit to Bunnell, and inspected the 15 acres standing in my name, and, being in a hurry, and my time limited, I could not put in the time there I would like to, but I saw enough to satisfy me that it is O. K. and just what you claim for it. I believe Bunnell has a great future, with a little more energy spent in its develop ment. I found the climate all that could be desired, and not so hot as I expected— 89 degrees—-one reason why I went in June. The class of people are of the finest quality and willing to give all information asked for. I found the soil to be a black sandy loam, and with exposure to the air, will be good stuff. To release the small proportion of tannic acid, which I know it contains, ex posure to the air will do that. I obtained samples for testing purposes. I found the land could be easily cleared—the stumps also — and I honestly believe that fertilizer can be dispensed with by the people taking up mixed farming — put some of the land in pasture, raise a few stock cattle, as stock manure can not be beaten. The water I found can be obtained from 8 to 20 feet—the deeper the better. Sam ples taken shows that it contains traces of sulphur and iron, and what is better for the human blood than that? I got my share down all right. I notice it would be a wise plan to get rid of those razor-back hogs and replace them with good stock upon respective farms, and not let them roam at will—put some meat on them and turn them into money. Poultry is needed—butter, cheese and eggs —all could be produced around Bunnell. Let the people get busy and walk fast like 1 do—it won’t hurt any. But, taking things in general, and the age of Bunnell—you have a fine town and good land and water, and I believe will produce anything outside of wheat and apples, and even that in time. I visited other sections in the State, but Bunnell takes the cake. And please let me know, at once, about a town lot—the closer to the depot and Moody Road, the better. Locate me one there, if possible, and the money is yours— corner lot, please. I might say in conclusion, my property in Canada is now for sale. That means Bun nell for me as soon as possible—wife and all. Thanking you, I am, Yours respectfully, WILLIAM THOMAS WRIGHT, Canada. !II!UI!I!!I!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!I!!II!I!IIIIIII!!M Put Your Dollars Into i The 6round i IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUlllllllllllM

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Do You Want A Bunnell Town Lot for $£Q M ? If so, you must send in your order for it before September 15, 1914. We still have a few choice residence lots in Bunnell which you can purchase for $50.00, on the easy payment plan of $5.00 per month. We have only a few of these lots and you can not secure them at this price after September 1 5 for on that date the price of all lots will be advanced to $75.00 and up. Bunnell is in the midst of a growing agricultural district, and every lot in the town is bound to increase in value. Think this over, and if you want one of these lots, send in your order for it at once. We have also some beautiful town lots for sale at Ocean City, which are especially desirable for people who wish to spend the winter months in Florida. If you have not already bought a farm in our colony, we wish to remind you that we still have a few good farms for sale in the new tract, which can be purchased for $35.00 an acre, on the easy installment plan of $1.00 an acre each month. Remember this price holds good in the new tract only. All land in the old tract is now $50.00 an acre, and we have but very few farms left for sale at that price. Address communications and send all orders to Thos. A. Verdenius 108 South La Salle Street Chicago, Ill. A FAILURE WITH TWO LEGS AND A SUCCESS WITH ONE. “He was pegging along the road with one good leg and a wooden one,” said the realestate lawyer who tells the story. “ ‘Get in and ride,’ I said. And he slowly clam bered into my carriage. “I soon learned that my passenger had worked for a railway, and had lost his leg by an accident. He himself was largely to blame for it, and so he had not been able to get any damages. He was on a tramp, looking for work. He said he wasn’t go ing to stay at home and eat the bread that his wife earned by taking in washing. If he could do nothing more, he could at least subtract the cost of his board. With him away, there would be better fare for his wife and the three children. “I was on my way to look at a small farm that I thought of exchanging for an other piece of property that I held. The farm had eleven acres of land, and a house and barn in fair condition, but it was some distance from a railway station. I said to my one-legged companion, ‘I’ll make you a proposition. If I take the piece of land I am going to see, I’ll put you on it with your family for the rest of the year’—it was then in May—‘and it won’t cost you a cent. At the end of the year, if you make a go of it, and are satisfied, I will rent you the farm or you can buy it of me.’ “Well, I got the little farm, and the ex railway man and his family moved from the city into the house. I helped him to a cow and some hens, and also paid a chattel mortgage on his cookstove, so that he could take it into the country. “The first year he set out strawberries and raspberries, which were, of course, of no immediate profit, but with the aid of his cow, his hens, and his garden he was able to live. At the end of the year I sold him the place on ‘time,’ for eight hundred dollars. “Little by little the man increased his flock of hens until he had four hundred. He started an asparagus bed. He set out more strawberries and raspberries, and he bought another cow. “His house was on a state road that was much used by automobiles, and he sold many of the products of his little farm to the passers-by, who were glad to get per fectly fresh eggs, butter, berries, and gar den stuff, and paid well for them. He would set out whatever he had for sale on a table by the roadside, and one of the children would ‘tend store.’ In this way he made nine hundred dollars in one year. “In seven years the place was all paid for, and the improvements he had added by putting up new buildings and enriching the soil made the farm worth several hun dred dollars more than it was when the purchase contract was signed. “If the man had kept both legs, and re mained in the employment of the railway company, he would probably have had to work at a wage for some one else all his life—and very likely live in a tenement that looked out on a back alley in the city. Now he is independent, prosperous, a man of property. His children are healthier and stronger than they ever were before, and he is hopeful and happy. “He had made a good deal of a failure of life when he had two legs, hut he succeeded with only one leg when he became a far mer.”