Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
S. HOWARD, Editor
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicalgo, Ill.
Vol. 2 April, 1914 /NO. 5
T H E D I T 0 RS I MR. L I. MOODY, PRESIDENT OF THE HOME BUILDER This issue of the
PERSONAL PAG BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO., TO BE PUB- Home Builder will
LEADER IN THE AFFAIRS OF LISHED IRREG- reach our readers a
ULARILY HERE- little later in the
ST. JOHNS GRreat interest is be- I ST. JOHNS COUNTY. I month than usual,
and hereafter this
COUNTY HOPES ing t a k e n in the One of the foremost young men of St. magazine will not be published regularTO HAVE INEW coming election in Johns County, if not the entire State of Iy each month, but will be issued at
RCW St. Johns County, Florida, is iMr. I. I. Moody, President irregular intervals, and will contain the
ByRICKMoAD. Florida. The Coun- of the Bunnell Development Company.
ty Commissioners have called for this news of the colony from the time the
election for the purpose of voting on -.previous issue was published.
the question of a bond issue for a brick I This announcement may cause disaproad sixty-four miles long, extending pointmenL to some of our readers, and
from the northern to the southern the Editor makes it with regret. We
boundary line of St. Johns County; con- have come to know each other through
necting at the north with the brick the pages of our little magazine, and
road to Jacksonville, the metropolis of the appreciation and co-operation of the
the State, and at the south with the land owners and others interested in
hard-surfaced road which is being built the Bunnell-Dupont Colony has been
by the several counties on the Florida very helpful to the Editor.
East Coast between the cities of Jacksonville and Miami, a distance of nearly However, after careful consideration,
four hundred miles. this change has seemed quite necessary
to the officials of the Bunnell DevelopThis will be one of the best roads in ment Company.
the United States, and the Bunnell-Du- You will understand that the publishpont Colony has the good fortune of ing of thousands of copies of this magbeing so favorably located as to have azine each month, with the cost of cuts,
this great thoroughfare pass right etc., has been expensive, and the Cointhrough the central part of it. pany has spared no pains to make this
an attractive and helpful paper.
The readers of the Home Builder can
readily appreciate the great advantages Most of the land o the Bunnell Deto our colony by having such a splen- _ead te oals hat w nd
did road as this. It will increase the and the officials feel that the wiser and
value of the land, and will put the Col- better plan would be to use the money
ony in close* touch with all the large that is now being spent monthly on the
cities along the East Coast. Home Builder, for future development
Mr. 1. I. Moody work in the Colony.
The men who compose the Bunnell Mr. Moody is also President of the We know that it is a pleasure for
Development Company are strongly in Bunnell State Bank. He is one of the you to read the Home Builder each favor of this road. They are already most popular men in St. Johns County, month, but we believe when you are heavy taxpayers in the county, but will and a prominent figure in county poli- located on your farm in the Bunnell-Dube glad to bear their part in the ex- tics. About two years ago he was pont Colony, that you will be thankful pense of building this road. elected President of the Board of Coun- for all general improvements that have
As our contract holders are not tax- ty Commissioners, and his name has been made.
payers they certainly will all be anxious frequently been mentioned as a future We do not want to give up the Home to learn that this bond issue has been State Senator. Builder entirely and will, therefore,
favorably voted upon. Being one of the most progressive publish it at irregular intervals, as
citizens cf the county, he is a tireless stated above, and if in the interims you It does not seem possible that any- worker in the "Good Roads Movement," want any particular information reone living in St. Johns County could be and during the past month has devoted garding the Colony, write to Mr. Verdeopposed to such a public improvement, much of his time to making short ad- nius, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, and that will be of such lasting benefit to dresses to the citizens of the county, ad- he will be glad to give you the inthem, as this vitrified brick road. vocating the bond issue for .the new formation desired.
We hope that the voters of the Bun- road. The Editor again wishes to express
nell-Dupont Colony will be unanimously Future colonists as well as the pres- his appreciation of your hearty co-operin favor of this new road, because it ent settlers of the Bunnell-Dupont Col- ation, and asks all those who visit the will add so much to the value of all ony, will find and have found Mr. Colony, or locate there during the conproperty, and will be a great conven- Moody to be a good friend and neighbor. ing month, to kindly write him of your ience in traveling. His great ambition is to see the Bun- impressions of Bunnell-Dupont, and any
nell-Dupont tract settled with earnest, other information that might be of It is a necessary improvement and a sincere men and women, and, for all interest to our readers. sound business proposition, and if this such he ever has a welcoming hand and We shall endeavor to make the Home bond issue is passed, it will afford us a kind word. Builder as interesting as it has been in
great pleasure to so announce it to the This man has indeed earned the right past months, and the only change will readers of the Home Builder. to be called "The Father of Bunnell." be that it will not be published so often.




Room For The Children-By Mrs. Marie Walshe of Canada
Ah! WHAT would the world be to us and just as the secret process of crystallization which
If the children were no more? constitutes the difference between the charcoal and tti
We should dread the desert behind us diamond, operates, so does environment-by some
Worse than the dark before. (Longfellow.) strange alchemy of secret skill-fashion the priceless
gem of human virtue; or develop the dross of human
"Suffer little children to come unto me, for of such passions into creatures, godless and vicious.
is the K o Here and there, as Ruskin again reminds us-is to be
eKingdom of God. found a rock crystal of the purest race and finest teFor a moment let us lift the veil of past centuries, per, born in a bad neighborhood-so bad that it has and look back upon this scene: Through the group of had to fight with vile calcareous mud, by which protecting disciples, venture those Judean mothers, was nearly buried. A weaker crystal would have died each one eager to place her child where the benign in despair, but gathering itself together, like HerculeE
smile of the wonderful Prophet might beam-upon it; against the serpents, it threw a layer of crystal ove
and his gentle voice raised in prayer on their behalf the clay, and conquered it, and LIVED ON. Thus also would seem to banish any shadows of destiny hovering MAY some human natures conquer their evil destinyover them. Gaze upon their eager young faces, their their dark environment, and live above it--but HOW tiny hands clinging in confidence to the robe of the FEW! Gentle Teacher, while others, more timid, shrink before No wonder then that parents shrink from rearing the stern gazes of the men around him, until those their precious little ones in evil surroundings--ye.
sweet words, "Forbid them not," drew the little ones where can they go? Is there no escape to healthier to his side. Maybe some were attired in the "fine lin- purer conditions of life? en" that bespoke wealth-others merely clad in the Thank God, there IS! Far distant from the city's
coarse garments of the peasant child; yet unto the strife and sin and turmoil! Far from the rush and
Savior, rich, or poor, mattered not-each childish form struggle for existence--in the purer atmosphere of represented to Him a casket containing a precious gem country life we find verily a "City of Refuge."
-a HUMAN SOUL-a part of the Kingdom of God- "God made the country, but man made the town,"
and so His blessing fell upon that throng of childish said one. Then, for THEIR sake, bring the children worshippers, consecrating each little one unto the into THEIR OWN. "Of such is the Kingdom of God,"
FATHER OF ALL. so, surely they belong to God's country, where flower:
Enough! We KNOW our Lord's value of a little blossom, and birds sing, and fruit trees droop their
child His verdict has travelled down the ages to the weight of golden burdens-where children play out of Twentieth Century. Let the veil fall over the PAST. doors, developing amid Nature's purest elementsLet us gaze resolutely into the PRESENT. At what where rosy cheeks and bright eyes contrast with the
value do we estimate a child today? Go down into the pallor and listlessness of city-bred little ones. bowels of the earth, search the dark corridors running Take a mental glimpse of Florida, once known a through the mines, and there inquire the value of child- "The rich man's playground "-now recognized as the life. Pass hence-into the glass-house-the mill-the poor man's Paradise. Bring the children HERE, where
canning factories-the fisheries, and again raise the all settlers are continually; finding homes. In this land important query-WHAT IS THE VALUE OF A of fruit and flowers there is room for the CHILDREN
CHILD? and you shall learn how Christian nations -room for the perfect development of their physical
interpret the teaching of their Lord. strength and their higher nature.
Search our large cities for homes in localities suit- Find a home in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, whereable for the uprearing of young humans, and you will on a few acres-you may raise sufficient produce tfind that there is room for all but the CHILDREN. provide a comfortable Ling in return for honest labor
Can we wonder that the State mourns the increase of What others can do, with energy, and on small capchildless homes? Although parents may offer payment tal-YOU can do also, fathers and mothers of little for room for their children in coin bearing the motto, children, whose souls and bodies are continually cry"In God We Trust," still there is no room for those ing out for a purer, healthier atmosphere--a brighter little ones, of whom the Master said, "Of such is the environment. The Bunnell Development Co. certainly Kingdom of Heaven." offers exceptional advantages to home-seekers-adWhere, anxious parents, will you locate your babies? vantages such as render it possible for city toilers tc There is no room for them, save in the tenement sec- purchase a "small farm that will provide a BIG living* tion, or in those crowded parts of our cities where on most reasonable terms. health and morality are alike menaced; where poverty A farm of your OWN is worth trying for-where the
and vice claim the right to elbow virtue aside; where produce raised finds easy shipment to the large cities wild young creatures grow up untrained and reckless- of America and Canada. Bring the children untc and, as Ruskin remarks, "Heaven only knows where THEIR OWN. Rear them where Mother Nature ha.they, and we who have cast them there, shall stand a chance to touch them with her gentle hand, and deat last." velop that which is noblest and best in their being. For
THEIR sake, if for no other reason.
"Yet, THERE lies the charcoal dim and low- Come where the child with mirth half wild
HERE gleams the diamond high in fame, Clasps flowers to his breast,
While WELL the Sons of Science know And shouts aloud in joyous glee,
THEIR ATOM GRAINS ARE BOTH THE SAME." "I like this place the best."




M',e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER.
Letters of Interest from Colony Buyers
-"r. Thos. A. Verdenius, Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Mr- Thos. A. Verdenius,
Chicago, Ill. Chicago, Ill. Chicago, Ill.
_fy Dear Sir: Dear Mr. Verdenius: Dear Sir:
On my return from" the "Land of I have just returned from a trip to Well, I have been to Florida and can
Flowers" to this land of snow and be- Bunnell and am very glad to tell you say that I am well pleased with my ow-zero-weather, permit me to address that I was agreeably surprised at the holdings and would not take double :ou, and through you the readers of the richness and fertility of the land. I the amount I have paid for it. I have Bunnell Home Builder, and tell you bought twenty acres a year ago, with- ten acres of the finest land that lays That I think of the Sunny South Land. out seeing it, and I am thoroughly sat- out-of-doors, located two miles south of
It was my good fortune to be per- isfied with same and with the climate Bunnell, on the Florida East Coast emitted to visit Bunnell early in Septem- and people. I was sorry that I had to R. R. ber, 1913, and for the first time see go back to Wisconsin again. I was more than pleased with the
:he farm of ten acres I had purchased Mr. Turner took me all around in treatment I received at Bunnell. Mr. some months before, and which is lo- the automobile and I was certainly Turner, the Field Manager, is sure a
-ated near the constantly growing little pleased to see that not only my land fine gentleman. I saw everything growz:lty of Bunnell, and with which I was was good but that all the land around ing that one could think of. I also z reatly pleased as to location, soil and Bunnel-DuPont is fine, and I intend to visited the East Coast Canal, which I future prospects. I was indeed sorry get as many of my friends as possible think is the most beautiful place I saw 7hat I could not, at that time, begin to interested, in Florida.
hg up the ground and prepare for the I hough it was in January the My brother and I are going to buy
,inter's planting of potatoes, which is weather was nice and pleasant and a lot in Ocean City. We think the
-egun in December. people were busy planting potatoes. lots are cheap at the price the company
On my return to the station and be- Mrs. Hardesty, with whom I was stay- asks for them. One thing I found out,
-ore leaving Bunnell (which I did re- ing, picked the first ripe strawberries and that was that Bunnell needs very =retfully), I met Mr. Moody, our Presi- January 23rd, and I tell you they cer- badly a large hotel, as I had a hard time :ent, also Mr. Heath. Both of these tainly did taste fine. to get a room while there.
gentlemen are permanently located at Every one seems to be happy and
Eunnell and are deeply interested in prosperous.
.he welfare of the city, and I was sat- I saw some parties that were fishing
_Aied that they were gentlemen of the for oysters on the canal. They had a
: ghest type. As further evidence that washtub full, which looked good to me.
was not mistaken in my estimate of I was surprised at what I saw there
hem, I asked a gentleman of promi- and inside of a few years it will be a
:-ence, being on the staff of several thickly settled country.
overnors of the State of Florida, what W"Tishing you success, I remain,
_e knew of Bunnell and thought of its Y Voury very truly,
:uture, and this is virtually what he G. C. GATES,
4aid: "Ndt much over three years ago Colorado.
-Qere was nothing there but a saw mill
:od a few little huts. Now they have Editor Bunnell Home Builder:
beautiful little city. Even thus early So many good things are being given
-ey have elected their Mayor, and I us in the Home Builder, from month to
believee that there is before it a bright month, that I think a word of apprecia":ture. As to the gentlemen who have tion from one of the many on the re:-_en instrumental in bringing about Mr. Hagenofforaboatrideon GoreLake ceiving end of the line would not be :uch a change in so short a time, Mr. I. amiss.
-Moody and his associates, I consider I did not go down to Bunnell for We-my family and I-look for the
hem honest and honorable in all their pleasure but I heard so many say that monthly visit of the Home Builder as
-ealings, and with the quality of the the land was not good and so hard to though it were a letter from home, and
_:nd to help them, why should not Bun- clear that I thought I would go down indeed it is, not only one but several eil, in a few years, be a much larger and look for myself. Most of the land letters from home-our prospective :zy than now'-and this testimony is easy to clear and can be cleared home at least. And when it comes,
':om a disinterested party. with very little expense. I am only every line is read with much interest
Yours truly, looking forward to the day I will be and pleasure. While we have a perGEO. W. DELONG, able to take my family down, and I hope sonal acquaintance with only a few of
New York. it will not be long before I can do so, the residents in our colony, we feel
and I will never think of going back acquainted with many through the letr. T. A. Verdenius, to city life and cold climate. ters they have written to the Home
Chicago, Ill. Yours truly, Builder. It would give me pleasure to
Iear Mr. Verdenius. NILS M; HAGEN, shake the hands of the writers and
I have now been in the colony a little N Visconin. thank them not only for these letters,
W-er three months and have two and but for the pioneer work they are do-_e-half acres of Irish potatoes up and Dear Sir: ing in the Bunnell-DuPont colony.
. oking fine. I am now getting ready to I am well satisfied with my invest- Sincerely,
,:ant a small garden. ment and with this glorious climate. I M. A. LEONARD, Nevada.
I have lived in a tent all winter, and came here a helpless invalid and am
--ere were only a few nights that we now healthy and hearty and would not
-_pt a fire in our little cook stove, us- go back North to live under any cir.: it only to cook our meals. I have cumstances. My land has increased 100
few chickens and they do well here. per cent in value.
"7e have one hen off with thirteen little I am putting in some crops on my ::icks. if I was up North I think I land this time and have some trees V'ould have to make stockings for them planted, even to three apple trees, also
take them in the house by the fire. bananas, figs, grapes and strawberries,
prefer to be in Florida and see pine and will plant citrus fruit and Japanese tees than to be huddled around a stove persimmons next December. .ad see nothing but snow and ice. J. D. CURRAN.
Yours very truly, Florida.
WALTER BAILEY, Florida. (A former Canadian.) Boating Scene near Ocean City




'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDERA HINT TO THE SOUTH. Last year over 4,000 barrels of pota- KEEPING BEES IN FLORIDA
toes were shipped from Bunnell over
Prof. Moses E. Wood, of the Central the Florida East Coast Railroad. IS VERY PROFITABLE.
State Normal School, Edmond, Okla.,
writing to the Manufacturers' Record, In a recent issue of the St. Augustine says: Record, Mr. Frank E. Bugbee, the well- Bees Are a Great Help to Citrus Grow"After a year in*Washington, where known farmer and potato grower of ers and Many Other
I saw land selling for $200 to $800 per Hastings, stated that he has secured Fits.
acre for agricultural purposes and from accurate information as to the acreage $600 to $1,200 for apple land without that has been planted to potatoes in Tallahassee.-If the office bees took irrigation and without planting, and this county. in increasing yield from plants were
from $1,200 to $3,000 per acre for
orchards in full bearing, I am more fully understood, there would be many
than convinced that the South is the more apiaries in Florida than there are
country." at present. It is said that encourage"The advertising, the railroad com- meant of bee-keeping in a certain dispanies, the steamship companies and met t of Ne-k a, in a c h alaf
eleven other agencies, including mis- trict of Nebraska, where much alfalfa
representation, are working for them is grown resulted in the addition of
against the South." more than 200 per cent, to the yield of
When the railroads and the people of good seed of high germinative powers
the South, comments the Record, put I.in the fields of that valuable legume forth the same broad energy and the 4 and hay llant. We have heard of a
same liberal expenditure of money to T citrus grove in Florida which bore well
make known the resources of the South for some years. Year before last some
as have been expended in making known one discovered a bee tree near this
the resources of the Northwest, the grove, cut it down and thus dispersed
South will far more than duplicate the its inhabitants. The following year
development of-the Pacific Coast. there was almost no crop from that
But this doesn't count the cities with Sample ofPotatoes raised in the Bunnell grove. their population engaged in manufac- Dupont Colony.
ture, trade and transportation, and the Not only fruit growers, but observextra amount of products that these The Southern part of St. Johns ant truckers, are aware that they are
would consume. County has specialized on Irish potatoes much indebted to the bees. The little
By the last census Florida had three- for many years, and has produced the honey gatherer dives into the depths quarters of a million people, and now great bulk of the spuds in Florida. of a blossom in search of a nectar, has nearly a million. If six million Other sections are giving attention and and, emerging, carries off much pollen people lived in the State, the oppor- space to the potato, but St. Johns on its fuzzy coat. Within the next tunities of each would not be less than County will always lead in this particu- blossom of the same species it visits now. In fact, Florida could easily sup- lar branch of farming, owing to its it rubs much of this pollen on the port fifteen million people, and if she peculiar advantages for potato culture. pistils, securing the fertilization of the had twice that number would not be DuPont has planted 650 acres, Bun- ovules and the consequent formation
more thickly settled than England. nell about 1,000 acres, Orange Mills, of fruit. Cross fertilization, so essen1 1,500, Hastings and Spuds about 5,500 tial to the stamina of plants and aniacres. mals, is made more certain by the visits
POTATO CROP IN ST. JOHNS of the bees. So well is the useful
The following are some figures taken agency of the bees understood in many COUNTY. from actual returns in the St. Johns parts of the North that fruit growers
"Our many visitors are being greatly County potato district. They are from maintain bee colonies in their orchards impressed by viewing the thousands of a twenty-acre farm, growing three crops not so much for the honey, which is acres, green with young potato plants a year, being receipts and expenditures regarded rather as a by-producer, but in the Southern part of St. Johns for Irish potatoes, corn and hay. for the sake of increasing the yield of
County. It is enough to gladden the the trees.
eyes of any crop-loving people"-says Receipts.
the Hastings Journal. First crop: Irish potatoes planted
in January, dug in April and HEAVY. REDUCTION IN EXM May. Yield 50 barrels at $3.50 PRESS RATES FROM FLORIDA
. . per barrel .................. $3,500
- Second crop:- Corn, planted in Sweeping Changes in the Tariffs from
April. Yield 50 bu. at 70c.... 700
Third crop: Cowpeas, sown when Southern to Northern Florida
corn is cultivated last time. Have Just Been Made.
Yield 11 tons at S20 .........600 Express rate reductions of more than
id n 2.. 50 per cent in some cases-an instance
Total receipts .............. $4,800 of which is the rate to Chicago on
grapefruit-went into effect on FebruExpenditures. ary 1st, as a result of the recent sweepView of a Potato Field in the Bunnell DuPont First crop: Irish potatoes, seed, ing changes made in the tariffs caused
Colony.on by the investigation and report of the
fertilizer, labor, barrels, etc., Interstate Commerce Commission. All that our farmers have to do this I $ 75 per acre ............... $1,500
year is to produce the spuds, and the Second crop: Corn, seed, cultivat- Under the new tariff schedule which
market will do the rest. A majority of ing and harvesting, $5 per acre 100 has been adopted, there will be two the fields this season are in better con- Third crop: Hay, seed, cultivating general classes of express. The first dition than they have been for years. class will be all merchandise shipments:
The early planters will be digging in a a the second all articles of food and drink.
April. A potato the size of a hen egg excepting certain kinds of liquor. The
was brought in last week from the field Total expenditures .......... $1,700 second class rate is uniformly 75 per of Newton Thigpen, who planted on the Receipts .................... $4,800 cent of the first class rate on shipments
16th of December. Much satisfaction Expenditures ................ 1,700 of more than five pounds. On shipis evidenced over the outlook, and a ments of five pounds or under, the rate
good average yield predicted. Net proceeds 20-acre farm... $3,100 is the same for both classes.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Florida's Welcome to the Homeseeker A GOOD LIVING FROM ONE
ACRE OF LAND.
Greater -Opportunities Here for the Man of Moderate Means Than Any Other State in the Union
Florida today has more uncultivated Come to Florida, and we will show productive land than any other State you the most hospitable, intelligent and 'n the Union. Of the more than 27,- progressive people in the world. We J00,000 acres, less than 10 per cent is will show you communities in which actually in cultivation. It is not be- You can live and be happy to a ripe oldYcause the land is poor, nor because the age. We cannot show you that fabled
climate is bad, nor because we are not Fountain of Youth, for which Ponce de near the markets. It is because Flor- Leon sought so long and believed he 'da has been overlooked. It is because had discovered in "The Land of Flow:he State has not had the attention ers," but we will show you people who from her own people, nor of the world have lived such happy, comfortable, outside, that she has not been devel- sweetened lives in our matchless land hoped. of roses, romance and riches that, al-
though they have passed the proverbial
Come to Florida, and we will show threescore and ten, they are as happy,
you the finest soil under the sun. We. as sweet and smiling, and as much in We used to think that a thousand will show you land producing 120 bush- love with life and all that life holds acres was almost necessary on which els of corn to the acre; we will show dear as they were at. twenty-one. to make a living, but time has shown land producing five, six and seven crops that a single good acre, properly taken
of alfalfa and other hay a year; we Come to Florida, and we will show care of, is sometimes too much for one
will show you land producing the finest you the finest beaches in the world, man to handle. potatoes, and more of them, than any where bathing is good every hour of Down in Philadelphia there is one
country in the world; we will show you every day of every year that rolls by. man who clears $1,400 a year from iand producing the finest tomatoes, We will show you the limpid lakes and one-third of an acre. beans, celery, cabbage, lettuce, turnips, streams of the interior, abounding in Out in Southern California there is :arrots and all other vegetables prac- fish, and over the shimmering sheen of a man who has discovered an ideal way :ically every month in the year in whose pellucid water you may float or in which to handle a full acre of ground. largely profitable quantities. We will sail all day long. On one-quarter of his acre he has
Zhow you the finest sugar cane grown
n the world in large quantities, and Come to Florida, where every citizen his house, garage, and flower gardens. st big profits; we will show you the holds open the door of opportunity and On the second quarter of the acre, =nest groves of oranges, grapefruit, welcomes you within; where every hand he has his truck garden, and he raises avocados, guavas, bananas, pineapples, is a helping hand, and every way is a ofly those vegetables for which the and all tropical and citrus fruits. We welcome. Come here to make your public will pay the most. He never will show you strawberry patches in fortune, and stay to spend the happiest takes one head of celery out of the midwinter, that produce berries at 50 and most comfortable days of your life. ground without he puts another in its
-ents, 75 cents and a dollar a quart Come to Florida, where every word place. 'n Northern markets. We will show is a welcome; every day is a door of On the other half of his acre he has
you everything that grows in the ground opportunity; every year a record of re- all kinds of fruit trees. And on the or above the ground, in quantity and pose and comfort. Come to Florida and same half of the acre, around each .uality equal to the most productive help us build here the empire State tree, he has his chicken yards and his :ountries in the world. of America, where you wouldn't change squab farm.
the weather if you could, and where Last year that man is reported to
Come to Florida, and we will' Show there are more days of sunshine and have made nearly $7,000 off one acre of you some of the finest improved roads more sweet-scenteT showers over the ground. He is not a farmer, either. n America......meadows and the orange groves than in He was formerly a Professor in an
Come to Florida, and we will show any country under the broad canopy of Eastern college. you the most healthful country in the heaven. Could you find any greater independworld. We will show you a lower per- Florida has room for ten millions of ence than a little land will bring? ientage of mortality than that shown you. Now is the time to come.-Flor- Could you imagine any greater happiby any other country. ida Metropolis. ness than being able to supply every
-. want you can think of, without a single
worry in the world?
GOVERNOR TRAX.LMfELL'S INVITATION. The Bunnell-DuPont colony is being
rapidly cut up into small holdings, and
With a progressive, industrious, intelligent, hospitable and high type thousands of people who have practicof citizenry; with a rapidly increasing population, increased activities in ally been "slaves" all of their lives.
the fartm and fruit industries, a conspicuous enlargement of manufacturing are finding full and complete independenterprises, and a very marked expansion of mining operations, Florida ence and happy leisure on our little
is rapidly forging to the front as one of the greatest of the American farms.
States. For those who wish to find greater happiness and prosperity,
we bid you come to our State. No State offers greater opportunities to F :,,,, *
those who desire to engage in fruit growing, truck farming, general _10
fearing, cattle raising, or in manufacturing enterprises.
We offer you gratis the finest climate on the globe, and our lands 2.M
and real estate generally can be purchased at prices that are reasonable.
To you of the frozen North we say: a
Come to the land of the palm and the land of the fruit and the vine;
the land where the sun shines the brightest; the land where the skies are
the clearest; the land of all lands the dearest.
PARK TRA NMEMLL,
Governor of Florida.
SGlimpse of Road from the Colony to Daytona




Ce BUNNELL NOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
AS Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
CITY DIRECTORY. The Bunnell Development Compaily is Mr. H. Graham of Minnesota was very
doing a regular land-office business, and much pleased with his land. Before he Church Services: the field manager, Mr. Turner, is kept returned he made reservations for sevbusy every day. Quite often two or three eral of his friends, who have since purMETHODIST CHURCH. extra automobiles are in the field to show chased in the Bunnell colony.
Preaching-Sunday, 11 a. m. the land to parties who have already
Preaching-Sunday, 7 p. M. bought and are here to inspect their land,
Sunday School-10 a. m. and to prospective buyers. Among the Mr. and Mrs. Bortree have purchased
more recent arrivals are Mr. C. E. Swen- a 20-acre farm in the Bunnell colony and Secret Orders: den of Iowa, Dr. LeBontiller of Illinois, also four beautiful lots near the school
G. C. Gates and Frank Frazier of Mis- house at Bunnell. A. F. & A. M., NO. 200. souri, Mr. Biddle and Mr. Lindsey of
Pennsylvania, J. E. Cunningham of CanMeets every second and fourth Tues- adI .Gtso Idaa .M ae
day at 7 o'clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, aia, 3f. E. Gates of Indiana, -,\. M. Hagen sday atf7locak p.mdingMa, of Wisconsin. H. E. Blair of Iowa, Mr. Messrs. Cochran & Moody are delivering
second floor Bank Building. and Mrs. Garrett of Kentucky, Messrs. W. lumber, as fast as possible, to Ocean City.
H. and S. S. Fletcher of Ohio, Mr. S_ D. which will be used in the construction of KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. Day of Kansas, Mr. S. L. Seymour of Illi- several summer homes there.
nois. -Mr. Win. Thomas of Washington,
Mohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every and many others. The hotel and boardfirst and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at ing houses are filled to their capacity all Several prospective bidders on the new Castle Hall, in Bank Building. the time. and Field Manager Mr. Trner brick road to be built through the county
has difficulty sometimes in finding ac- drove through Bunnell accompanied by the commodations for the many buyers and county commissioners. Let us hope that LOCALS. visitors in the colony. Let us hope that the bond issue will be carried April 1.
the new hotel will be erected at an early and if it is, watch the price of land in Strawberries are plentiful in the colony date. the St. Johns conhn go up.
these days. Practically every settler has i
his strawberry patch. W. M. Hardesty, Mr. and Mrs. Wickline of Indiana are Mr. I. I. Moody, president of the Bunand others are supplying the city with improving their property at Ocean City. nell Development Company, has one of They are also going to build a rooming- the finest fields of potatoes to be found this delicious fruit. house and will open a restaurant at Ocean in the colony. Although the present
City at an early date. outlook in regard to the potato crop
generally is very promising, indications
The potato fields around Bunnell are Mr. J. Baughman. one of our progres- are that Mr. Moody will have a bumper looking fine, and the prospects are that sire farmers of Black Point. has a beau- crop. He states that he expects to sell tiful field of: cabbage and lettuce, from $4,000 worth of potatoes from his 14 we will have a full crop this season. which he is shipping daily, acres.
Mr. J. E. I.ngraham. vice-president of Mr. W. A. Mack, formerly of CallMr. A. Lambert. one of our best farm- the Florida East Coast Railroad Co., was fornia, and one of our oldest settlers, ers, who came from Oklahoma. continues in Bunnell Saturday. Mr. Ingraham ac- who owns 40 acres of land on the Moody trips to Bunnell companied Mr. Moody over the farming Road, three miles south of Bunnell, has to make his tri-weekly section around Bunnell and was very I seventeen acres of exceptionally fine powith a wagon load of fine vegetables. much pleased with the improvements that states. All those visiting the colony have been made here since he visited Bun- at this time, should be sure to see Mr. nell last. Mr. Ingralam predicts a great Mack's potato field. Mr. Council, who
Colonel S. F. McElherne of Chicago has future for Bhimnel!. came to the colony a few months ago,
started clearing a ten-acre tract of land is a neighbor of Mr. Mack, and he too
stad John O'Keefe of New Jersey has has a splefidid field of potatoes. for -Mr. Rogers, which is located near the purchased a farm on the Moody road colonel's farm. This is the third tract near Ocean City and made quite a number The fact that all of the land in the the colonel has cleared since he arrived of friends while in Bunnell. original colony is to be advanced to
$50.00 an acre on May 1st, is causing
in Bunnell. Mr. Cochran is contemplating the erect- an unusual demand for'our farms at this
ing of a garage 25x100 feet just west of time. A great number of people have the Tribune building. -visited the colony recently, and when
.Mr. Huffman and Mr. Jepson expect to they saw the splendid development beendi u their potatoes about Aipril The concrete dwelling of Mr. Geo. ing made here, and realized that the Moody at Ocean City is nearly com- same land they can buy now for $35.00 10. These two gentlemen have a line pleted. and $40.00 an acre will cost them
field of potatoes and will undoubtedly $50.00 an acre after May cst, they are
receive the high prices which always pre- Messrs. Allen & Duggan of Wilmington. eager y snapping up the choicest revail the first of the season. Delaware. spent several days in Bunnell. maining tracts.
They looked over the entire colony and
made reservations for themselves and ser- Notwithstanding the fact that the eral of their friends, colonists are very busy just now with
The hunting season has ended. Last I their spring crops, they are willing to
Friday. the last day. the woods were full A great number of houses are under take a "day off" when matters of pubtf hunters taking their last try at the construction in the city of Bunnell. Mr. lic interest are to be discussed, and last quail. turkey and deer. The season open- Ed..Tohnson will begin the erection of a Saturday there was a large attendance concrete building 75x70. Mr. J. B. Boaz at the barbecue dinner, given in the inhas also contracted to build him a con- terest of the Good Roads Movement. them hard to find. Deer have been plenti- crete. building. 25x70, and when corn- Among the speakers were Mr. I. I. ful all through the season and are still pleted this building will be occupied by Moody, president of the Bunnell Deto be found on any of the ranges, the Tribune. velopment Company.




6he BUNNEXLL HOMX BUILDER
Neglected Opportunities -By Mr. Geo. Reading of Connecticut
One afternoon my wife was admiring the'display in the cheap there?
show-windows of the costliest and largest store in Los Since the war, the ill-feeling toward the North, and the
Angeles, California, "Hamberger's, Completed in 1908," North's undesire to compete and mingle with the negro, when she overheard the following conversation: "Hello, has left Florida somewhat remote. JTohn, what are you looking so blue about.?" John, who When the West opened up the land was cheap on the had been standing gazing at the curbstone, replied, "It Pacific coast and in Northwest states; but as the settlers makes me sick when I think of what a fool I was not to have came the more the land sold for, until it has reached, and bought this site when I first came here; why I could have in a good many cases, over reached its maximum-thus got it for a song then: now look at it." The abusive lan- depriving the average man of opportunities. guage about himself was more than my wife wished to hear, But at last the awakening has come. Florida is opening so she went on her way. up. Thousands of settlers from all over the United States
are locating there and spreading the good news to their L.friends.
[ TBut what type are these settlers? IMen and women of past experience, who have seen the fallacies of other states, w ho have experienced the hardships and reverses in other States men and women with but one sentiment, and that is to make good and do good, and they are certainly proving 4- the truth of their contentions. Do you mean to tell me
that a state with such God-given opportunities, and such men and women as these, to fulfill its mission, can do else ~ ~; ~~I~21than overtake her sister states?
Before long Florida will be known in her true colors, and a then the army of dissatisfied farmers who have gone over
the border line into Canada, only to meet worse reverses, the army of dissatisfied tenant farmers from all other states will be clamoring for Florida lands, and I have my doubts if one will be able in a few years from now to buy an acre of land within five miles of Bunnell for less than $500.00.
In closing I wish to urge those who have not grasped An Unimproved Farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. this opportunity to take it before it is too late. Bunnell is offering to you the greatest opportunity you will ever have; In my estimation this man was not a fool. He had only if not for your own sake, do it for your family's sake. 'After done what a good many more of us have done-neglected you have made your first payment you will begin to read
an opportunity. My father, for instance, twenty years ago, their literature and you will become interested in farming let several such opportunities go by, and my chum's father and teach your children likewise. You will be delighted to was offered a large stretch of marshland for almost nothing, think that you have a little farm to go to when shop which today is worth over a million dollars. drudgery becomes unbearable, and to know that your boy
Did it ever strike you, as you strolled around a district in will not have to drudge the way you have done.
your own town where lately had been erected large business .I worked from the borderline of Mlexico up to San Franblocks and tenement houses that you might have bought cisco for three years, looking for an opportunity, and by the land on which these buildings now stand for a very accident I came in contact with some Florida literature. I small sum of money; or in the suburbs, where you could went to the Public Library and read the books about have bought a whole acre for the same price that is now Florida; I looked up the Government statistics about Florbeing asked for a single building lot? ida, and it did not take me long to realize that my opporAnother incident of this kind that comes to my memory tunitv had come. was a helper of mine in Los Angeles. His father was one of-. the early settlers and bought a few acres of land close to the city for almost nothing; but six years ago this land was worth $1,000.00 a building lot. My helper's father had willed him three such lots, but the young man did not realize how fortunate he was in having a father who had not neglected his opportunities.
Years ago all over America such opportunities were to be found, but as time passed these opportunities became less, *' and in my estimation there is but one state left that still possesses a "Golden Opportunity," and that state is Florida.
I do not mean to say that all opportunities are gone, for
in almost every city there are good business chances, if e one has money enough, intelligence enough, and I may add is "lucky" enough to be in the division of success which Bradstreet rates at about 6 per cent. If the workingman could have shorter hours and better pay there would be
splendid opportunities in most every town for all of them, by farming and fruit raising on a small scale, and thus giving them a good start. .4
But it is the Golden Opportunities we want. And why
do I regard Florida as the only state left for such oppor- Sunday Afternoon Party of Neizhbors at the Home of one of our Settlers. tunities? I do not want to be misunderstood, and so add that the southeastern states in general offer better induce- I can plainly picture Bunnell in the future; not a town ments to the tiller of the soil than the northeastern or of mushroom growth, not an industial town, but a homewestern states ever did, or ever will offer. like town inhabited by home-like people, w ith a steady but
Soil is the greatest producer of wealth there is, and its substantial growth, its surrounding acres regarded as invalproductive qualities are proportional to the climatic condi- uable by those fortunate enough to own them. tions, water supply, shipping facilities, location and markets. Do not let 17 cents a day stand between you and probably Florida possesses these important factors to a greater degree the greatest opportunity you may ever have. Remember than ever her nearest competitor, California. that opportunity is not very persistent, so do not let it
But if Florida has such opportunities, why is land so pass you by.




This is Positively the Last Time I shall ask I
most men never ]mow what it Isfi
to be independent, but remain foryou to Buy a Farm from me in the
ever slaves to the drudgery of la-
bo from morning till night, youth
---Bu --nne-- ont Colony to old age, with never a hope of
release.
'lli llmilf l l H~Ifllllm illll luulflmmlIDgIHih"
Unless you write me for information, or 1FLORMIDAS POSBJILITIES.
state that you wish to purchase a farm O
....- in or colony, I shall never ask you again. In the opinion of the editor of the
Even now I do not intend to urge you in Florida Times-Union, Florida is grow*.this matter, ing so rapidly that those who do not
I know the possibilities of the State may
I have sent you my Book, my Banner suspect that the growth is too rapid.
I and other literature, and some of you No State in the Union has ever grown
hae.ben.rec I more rapidly than Florida could grow
have been receiving the Home Blder andgow soundly.
for nearly a year and a half. If you have What other States can produce, Florread the letters from satisfied buyers that ida can produce, but she does grow have appeared in the Home Builder from such products only to a limited extent,
because she can grow products that no
month to month you must realize that other State on this side of the continent
our farms are increasing in value. can grow, and these are much more
profitable than the products that are
I fully believe that the price of all or shared by other States. Florida has land wfil double, and treble in value: all kinds of tropical fruits in addition within the next few years. I to the farm products of other States.
Our monopoly of tropical fruits is not
few of or land owners secured their much, tighter than that of vegetables farms for $20.00 an acre, but more of them and berries that can be grown in other for $25.00 and $30.00. States. Of course vegetables such as
we grow can be grown elsewhere, but
Mr. T. A. Verdenfus Until May 1st, 1914, you can purchase not at a time that would place them in
7he Pioneer sa Farm Man of Florida. farms in our colony for $35.00 and $40.00 competition with ours. Our garden an acre, but after that date the price of all land in the old Colony will be products get to the markets when the $50.00 per acre. demand is great and there is no supply
except that which we furnish.
We will discontinue our advertising after May 1st. The few unsold A million and a half people in this
farms will sell themselves. as our present colonists are adding to their State can make a liberal living supplyholdings, and bring' n 'their old friends and neighbors. ing the Eastern part of the United
ing in States with tropical fruits and winter
Remember, I shall not ask you again to buy. If I do not hear from vegetables. But this supposes that they
you before May 1st, I shall not annoy you further. make nothing for themselves but buy
their food from other States. If our
It Is Now Up To You. If you want a farm at the present price, you producers grew their own foodstuffs
can obtain it by filling out the attached order blank. and produced for the markets only as
Improved farms all around us are selling for $200.00 and $300.00 an surplus crops, there would be ample room and opportunity for three million
acre. Some of the raw land adjoining ours has sold for $100.00 an acre. people.
If you ever expect to own a farm in our colony, now is your time to I ''''''''' M
buy. Take advantage of the present low prices, and you will make money Fia
year after year as land values increase. l Fortunate is the man who, by
Shis labor, is able to provide for
Fill out the order blank and send it before MI&ay 1st, to. himself and family the necessities
of life, but thrice fortunate is he =
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, who can say "Sick or well, come I
what may, I have home, food, 1
108 S. La Salle Street, clothing and friends, and I am_=
free until I die."
Chicago, Ill. .....,......,..m...m.lm.
IMPORTANT TELEGRAM JUST RECEIVED
AS WE GO TO PRESS THE 'FOLLOWING TELEGRAM IS RECEIVED IN THE CHICAGO OFFICE, AND IT AFFORDS US GREAT PLEASURE TO PUBLISH IT.
THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, BUNNELL, FLORIDA, APRIL 1, 1914.
108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois.
St. Johns County voted favorably today on the Six Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollar Bond Issue. This means much for St. Johns County generally and especially for our colony. The benefits of- this road
to our buyers cannot be estimated. The construction of same will be started in the very near future.
Be sure to announce in the April Home Builder the advance in the price of our land on May first.
I. I. MOODY,. President




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida | The Bunnell Home Builder \ | S. HOWARD, Editor | !1 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. |§ Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Vol. 2 April, 1914JWo. 5 TIE EDITORS PERSONAL, PAGE ST. JOHNS COUNTY HOPES TO HAVE NEW BRICK ROAD. Great interest is be ing taken in the coming election in St. Johns County, Florida. The Coun ty Commissioners have called for this election for the purpose of voting on the question of a bond issue for a brick road sixty-four miles long, extending from the northern to the southern boundary line of St. Johns County, con necting at the north with the brick road to Jacksonville, the metropolis of the State, and at the south with the hard-surfaced road which is being built by the several counties on the Florida East Coast between the cities of Jack sonville and Miami, a distance of nearly four hundred miles. This will be one of the best roads in the United States, and the Bunnell-Dupont Colony has the good fortune of being so favorably located as to have this great thoroughfare pass right through the central part of it. The readers of the Home Builder can readily appreciate the great advantages to our colony by having such a splen did road as this. It will increase the value of the land, and will put the Col ony in close touch with all the large cities along the East Coast. The men who compose the Bunnell Development Company are strongly in favor of this road. They are already heavy taxpayers in the county, but will be glad to bear their part in the ex pense of building this road. As our contract holders are not tax payers they certainly will all be anxious to learn that this bond issue has been favorably voted upon. It does not seem possible that any one living in St. Johns County could be opposed to such a public improvement, that will be of such lasting benefit to them, as this vitrified brick road. We hope that the voters of the Bunnell-Dupont Colony will be unanimously in favor of this new road, because it will add so much to the value of all property, and will be a great conven ience in traveling. It is a necessary improvement and a sound business proposition, and if this bond issue is passed, it will afford us great pleasure to so announce it to the readers of the Home Builder. MR. I. I. MOODY. PRESIDENT OF THE BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO.. LEADER IN THE AFFAIRS OF ST. JOHNS COUNTY. One of the foremost young men of St. Johns County, if not the entire State of Florida, is Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development Company. Mr. /. /. Moody Mr. Moody is also President of the Bunnell State Bank. He is one of the most popular men in St. Johns County, and a prominent figure in county poli tics. About two years ago he was elected President of the Board of Coun ty Commissioners, and his name has frequently been mentioned as a future State Senator. Being one of the most progressive citizens of the county, he is a tireless worker in the “Good Roads Movement,” and during the past month has devoted much of his time to making short ad dresses to the citizens of the county, ad vocating the bond issue for the new road. Future colonists as well as the pres ent settlers of the Bunnell-Dupont Col ony, will find and have found Mr. Moody to be a good friend and neighbor. His great ambition is to see the Bun nell-Dupont tract settled with earnest, sincere men and women, and for all such he ever has a welcoming hand and a kind word. This man has indeed earned the right to be called “The Father of Bunnell.” HOME BUILDER This issue of the TO BE PUBHome Builder will LISHED IRREGreach our readers a ULARLY HERElittle later in the 1FTER month than usual, and hereafter this magazine will not be published regular ly each month, but will be issued at irregular intervals, and will contain the news of the colony from the time the previous issue was published. This announcement may cause disap pointment to some of our readers, and the Editor makes it with regret. We have come to know each other through the pages of our little magazine, and the appreciation and co-operation of the land owners and others interested in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony has been very helpful to the Editor. However, after careful consideration, this change has seemed quite necessary to the officials of the Bunnell Develop ment Company. You will understand that the publish ing of thousands of copies of this mag azine each month, with the cost of cuts, etc., has been expensive, and the Com pany has spared no pains to make this an attractive and helpful paper. Most of the land of the Bunnell De velopment Company has now been sold, and the officials feel that the wiser and better plan would be to use the money that is now being spent monthly on the Home Builder, for future development work in the Colony. We know that it is a pleasure for you to read the Home Builder each month, but we believe when you are located on your farm in the Bunnell-Du pont Colony, that you will be thankful for all general improvements that have been made. We do not want to give up the Home Builder entirely and will, therefore, publish it at irregular intervals, as stated above, and if in the interims you want any particular information re garding the Colony, write to Mr. Verdenius, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, and he will be glad to give you the in formation desired. The Editor again wishes to express his appreciation of your hearty co-oper ation, and asks all those who visit the Colony, or locate there during the com ing month, to kindly write him of your impressions of Bunnell-Dupont, and any other information that might be of interest to our readers. We shall endeavor to make the Home Builder as interesting as it has been in past months, and the only change will be that it will not be published so often.

PAGE 2

Room For The Children—By Mrs. Marie Walshe of Canada Ah! WHAT would the world be to us If the children were no more? We should dread the desert behind us Worse than the dark before. (Longfellow.) “Suffer little children to come unto me, for of such is the Kingdom of God.” For a moment let us lift the veil of past centuries, and look back upon this scene: Through the group of protecting disciples, venture those Judean mothers, each one eager to place her child where the benign smile of the wonderful Prophet might beam upon it; and his gentle voice raised in prayer on their behalf would seem to banish any shadows of destiny hovering over them. Gaze upon their eager young faces, their tiny hands clinging in confidence to the robe of the Gentle Teacher, while others, more timid, shrink before the stern gazes of the men around him, until those sweet words, “Forbid them not,” drew the little ones to his side. Maybe some were attired in the “fine lin en” that bespoke wealth—others merely clad in the coarse garments of the peasant child; yet unto the Savior, rich, or poor, mattered not—each childish form represented to Him a casket containing a precious gem —a HUMAN SOUL—a part of the Kingdom of God— and so His blessing fell upon that throng of childish worshippers, consecrating each little one unto the FATHER OF ALL. Enough! We KNOW our Lord's value of a little child His verdict has travelled down the ages to the Twentieth Century. Let the veil fall over the PAST. Let us gaze resolutely into the PRESENT. At what value do we estimate a child today? Go down into the bowels of the earth, search the dark corridors runningthrough the mines, and there inquire the value of childlife. Pass hence—into the glass-house—the mill —the canning factories—the fisheries, and again raise the all important query—WHAT IS THE VALUE OF A CHILD? and you shall learn how Christian nations interpret the teaching of their Lord. Search our large cities for homes in localities suit able for the uprearing of young humans, and you will find that there is room for all but the CHILDREN. Can we wonder that the State mourns the increase of childless homes? Although parents may offer payment for room for their children in coin bearing the motto, “In God We Trust,” still there is no room for those little ones, of whom the Master said, “Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven.” Where, anxious parents, will you locate your babies? There is no room for them, save in the tenement sec tion, or in those crowded parts of our cities where health and morality are alike menaced; where poverty and vice claim the right to elbow virtue aside; where wild young creatures grow up untrained and reckless— and, as Ruskin remarks, “Heaven only knows where they, and we who have cast them there, shall stand at last.” “Yet, THERE lies the charcoal dim and low— HERE gleams the diamond high in fame, While WELL the Sons of Science know THEIR ATOM GRAINS ARE BOTH THE SAME.” and just as the secret process of crystallization which constitutes the difference between the charcoal and the diamond, operates, so does environment—by some strange alchemy of secret skill—fashion the priceless gem of human virtue; or develop the dross of humar I passions into creatures, godless and vicious. Here and there, as Ruskin again reminds us—is to be found a rock crystal of the purest race and finest ten per, born in a bad neighborhood—so bad that it has had to fight with vile calcareous mud, by which r. was nearly buried. A weaker crystal would have died in despair, but gathering itself together, like Hercules against the serpents, it threw a layer of crystal ove: the clay, and conquered it, and LIVED ON. Thus alsc MAY some human natures conquer their evil destiny— their dark environment, and live above it—but HOV FEW! No wonder then that parents shrink from rearing their precious little ones in evil surroundings—ye: where can they go? Is there no escape to healthier purer conditions of life? Thank God, there IS! Far distant from the city's strife and sin and turmoil! Far from the rush anc struggle for existence—in the purer atmosphere o: country life we find verily a ‘ ‘ City of Refuge. ’ ’ “God made the country, but man made the town,' said one. Then, for THEIR sake, bring the childrer into THEIR OWN. ‘ Of such is the Kingdom of God, so, surely they belong to God’s country, where flowers : blossom, and birds sing, and fruit trees droop their weight of golden burdens—where children play out o: doors, developing amid Nature’s purest elements— where rosy cheeks and bright eyes contrast with the pallor and listlessness of city-bred little ones. Take a mental glimpse of Florida, once known as “The rich man’s playground”—now recognized as the poor man’s Paradise. Bring the children HERE, where settlers are continually finding homes. In this lane of fruit and flowers there is room for the CHILDREN —room for the perfect development of their physical strength and their higher nature. Find a home in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, where on a few acres—you may raise sufficient produce t: provide a comfortable living in return for honest labor What others can do, with energy, and on small capi tal—YOU can do also, fathers and mothers of little children, whose souls and bodies are continually err ing out for a purer, healthier atmosphere—a brighter environment. The Bunnell Development Co. certain!^ offers exceptional advantages to home-seekers—ad vantages such as render it possible for city toilers t: purchase a ‘ ‘ small farm that will provide a BIG living' on most reasonable terms. A farm of your OWN is worth trying for—where the produce raised finds easy shipment to the large cities of America and Canada. Bring the children untc THEIR OWN. Rear them where Mother Nature has a chance to touch them with her gentle hand, and de velop that which is noblest and best in their being. For THEIR sake, if for no other reason. Come where the child with mirth half wild Clasps flowers to his breast, And shouts aloud in joyous glee, “I like this place the best.”

PAGE 3

m>e BUHHELL HOMEBUILDER Letters of Interest from Colony Buyers Hr. Thos. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. My Dear Sir: On my return from" the “Land of Flowers” to this land of snow and beiow-zero-weather, permit me to address ou, and through you the readers of the Bunnell Home Builder, and tell you ~hat I think of the Sunny South Land. It was my good fortune to be per mitted to visit Bunnell early in Septem ber, 1913, and for the first time see 'he farm of ten acres I had purchased some months before, and which is loated near the constantly growing little :ity of Bunnell, and with which I was greatly pleased as to location, soil and future prospects. I was indeed sorry -hat I could not, at that time, begin to ilg up the ground and prepare for the winter’s planting of potatoes, which is egun in December. On my return to the station and benre leaving Bunnell (which I did re gretfully), I met Mr. Moody, our Presiient, also Mr. Heath. Both of these gentlemen are permanently located at Bunnell and are deeply interested in :he welfare of the city, and I was satified that they were gentlemen of the highest type. As further evidence that was not mistaken in my estimate of -hem, I asked a gentleman of promi nence, being on the staff of several Governors of the State of Florida, what he knew of Bunnell and thought of its riture, and this is virtually what he mid: “Not much over three years ago here was nothing there hut a saw mill :nd a few little huts. Now they have beautiful little city. Even thus early hey have elected their Mayor, and I elieve that there is before it a bright mture. As to the gentlemen who have men instrumental in bringing about -uch a change in so short a time, Mr. I. f Moody and his associates, I consider nem honest and honorable in all their tealings, and with the quality of the mnd to help them, why should not Bunuell, in a few years, be a much larger hty than now”—and this testimony worn a disinterested party. Yours trulv, GEO. W. DELONG, New York. Hr. T. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. ear Mr. Verdenius. I have now been in the colony a little rer three months and have two and ue-half acres of Irish potatoes up and ,:oking fine. I am now getting ready to riant a small garden. I have lived in a tent all winter, and ..ere were only a few nights that we mpt a fire in our little cook stove, us.ug it only to cook our meals. I have few chickens and they do well here. Ye have one hen off with thirteen little hicks. If I was up North I think I ould have to make stockings for them r take them in the house by the fire. I prefer to be in Florida and see pine rees than to be huddled around a stove nd see nothing but snow and ice. Yours very truly, WALTER BAILEY, Florida. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I have just returned from a trip to Bunnell and am very glad to tell you that I was agreeably surprised at the richness and fertility of the land. I bought twenty acres a year ago, with out seeing it, and I am thoroughly sat isfied with same and with the climate I and people. I was sorry that I had to go back to Wisconsin again. Mr. Turner took me all around in the automobile and I was certainly pleased to see that not only my land was good but that all the land around Bunnel-DuPont is fine, and I intend to get as many of my friends as possible interested. Although it was in January the weather was nice and pleasant and people were busy planting potatoes. Mrs. Hardesty, with whom I was stay ing, picked the first ripe strawberries January 23rd, and I tell you they cer tainly did taste fine. Mr. Hagen off for a boat ride on Core Lake I did not go down to Bunnell for pleasure but I heard so many say that j the land was not good and so hard to j clear that I thought I would go down j and look for myself. Most of the land is easy to clear and can be cleared with very little expense. I am only I looking forward to the day I will be j able to take my family down, and I hope it will not be long before I can do so, and I will never think of going back : to city life and cold climate. Yours truly, NILS M: HAGEN, Wisconsin. Dear Sir: I am well satisfied with my invest ment and with this glorious climate. I came here a helpless invalid and am now healthy and hearty and would not go back North to live under any cir cumstances. My land has increased 100 per cent in value. I am putting in some crops on my land this time and have some trees planted, even to three apple trees, also bananas, figs, grapes and strawberries, and will plant citrus fruit and Japanese persimmons next December. J. D. CURRAN, Florida. (A former Canadian.) Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir: Well, I have been to Florida and can say that I am well pleased with my holdings and would not take double the amount I have paid for it. I have ten acres of the finest land that lays out-of-doors, located two miles south of Bunnell, on the Florida East Coast R. R. I was more than pleased with the treatment I received at Bunnell. Mr. Turner, the Field Manager, is sure a fine gentleman. I saw everything grow ing that one could think of. I also visited the East Coast Canal, which I think is the most beautiful place I saw in Florida. My brother and I are going to buy a lot in Ocean City. We think the lots are cheap at the price the company asks for them. One thing I found out, and that was that Bunnell needs very badly a large hotel, as I bad a hard time to get a room while there. Every one seems to be happy and prosperous. I saw some parties that were fishing for oysters on the canal. They had a washtub full, which looked good to me. I was surprised at what I saw there and inside of a few years it will be a thickly settled country. Wishing you success, I remain, Yourv very truly, G. C. GATES, Colorado. Editor Bunnell Home Builder: So many good things are being given us in the Home Builder, from month to month, that I think a word of apprecia tion from one of the many on the re ceiving end of the line would not be amiss. We—my family and I—look for the monthly visit of the Home Builder as though it were a letter from home, and indeed it is, not only one but several letters from home—our prospective home at least. And when it comes, every line is read with much interest and pleasure. While we have a per sonal acquaintance with only a few of the residents in our colony, we feel acquainted with many through the let ters they have written to the Home Builder. It would give me pleasure to shake the hands of the writers and thank them not only for these letters, but for the pioneer work they are do ing in the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Sincerely, M. A. LEONARD, Nevada. Boating Scene near Ocean City

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BUNHELL HOME BUILDER A HINT TO THE SOUTH. Prof. Moses E. Wood, of the Central State Normal School, Edmond, Okla., %  writing to the Manufacturers’ Record, says: “After a year in'Washington, where I saw land selling for $200 to $800 per acre for agricultural purposes and from $600 to $1,200 for apple land without irrigation and without planting, and from $1,200 to $3,000 per acre for orchards in full bearing, I am more than convinced that the South is the country.” “The advertising, the railroad com panies, the steamship companies and eleven other agencies, including mis representation, are working for them against the South.” When the railroads and the people of the South, comments the Record, put forth the same broad energy and the same liberal expenditure of money to make known the resources of the South as have been expended in making known the resources of the Northwest, the South will far more than duplicate the development of* the Pacific Coast. But this doesn’t count the cities with their population engaged in manufac ture, trade and transportation, and the extra amount of products that these would consume. By the last census Florida had threequarters of a million people, and now has nearly a million. If six million people lived in the State, the oppor tunities of each would not be less than now. In fact, Florida could easily sup port fifteen million people, and if she had twice that number would not be more thickly settled than England. POTATO CROP IN ST. JOHNS COUNTY. “Our many visitors are being greatly impressed by viewing the thousands of acres, green with young potato plants in the Southern part of St. Johns County. It is enough to gladden the eyes of any crop-loving people”—says the Hastings Journal. View of a Potato Field in the Bunnell Dupont Colony. All that our farmers have to do this year is to produce the spuds, and the j market will do the rest. A majority of | the fields this season are in better con; dition than they have been for years, j The early planters will be digging in j April. A potato the size of a hen egg i was brought in last week from the field j of Newton Thigpen, who planted on the I 16th of December. Much satisfaction is evidenced over the outlook, and a j good average yield predicted. Last year over 4,000 barrels of pota toes were shipped from Bunnell over the Florida East Coast Railroad. In a recent issue of the St. Augustine Record, Mr. Frank E. Bugbee, the wellknown farmer and potato grower of Hastings, stated that he has secured accurate information as to the acreage : that has been planted to potatoes in this county. Sample of Potatoes raised in the Bunnell Dupont Colony. The Southern part of St. Johns County has specialized on Irish potatoes for many years, and has produced the great bulk of the spuds in Florida. Other sections are giving attention and space to the potato, but St. Johns County will always lead in this particu lar branch of farming, owing to its peculiar advantages for potato culture. DuPont has planted 650 acres, Bun nell about 1,000 acres, Orange Mills, 1,500, Hastings and Spuds about 5,500 ’ acres. The following are some figures taken from actual returns in the St. Johns j County potato district. They are from a twenty-acre farm, growing three crops a year, being receipts and expenditures for Irish potatoes, corn and hay. Receipts. First crop: Irish potatoes planted in January, dug in April and May. Yield 50 barrels at $3.50 per barrel.$3,500 Second crop: Corn, planted in April. Yield 50 bu. at 70c. 700 Third crop: Cowpeas, sown when corn is cultivated last time. Yield tons at $20. 600 Total receipts.$4,S00 Expenditures. First crop: Irish potatoes, seed, fertilizer, labor, barrels, etc., $75 per acre.$1,500 Second crop: Corn, seed, cultivat ing and harvesting, $5 per acre 100 Third crop: Hay, seed, cultivating and harvesting, $5 per acre. 100 Total expenditures.$1,700 Receipts .$4,800 Expenditures 1,700 Net proceeds 20-acre farm... $3,100 KEEPING BEES IN FLORIDA IS VERY PROFITABLE. Bees Are a Great Help to Citrus Grow ers and Many Other Fruits. Tallahassee.—If the office bees took in increasing yield from plants were fully understood, there would be many more apiaries in Florida than there are at present. It is said that encourage ment of bee-keeping in a certain dis trict of Nebraska, where much alfalfa is grown, resulted in the addition of more than 200 per cent, to the yield of good seed of high germinative powers in the fields of that valuable legume and hay plant. We have heard of a citrus grove in Florida which bore well for some j^ears. Year before last some one discovered a bee tree near this grove, cut it down and thus dispersed its inhabitants. The following year there was almost no crop from that grove. Not only fruit growers, but observ ant truckers, are aware that they are much indebted to the bees. The little honey gatherer dives into the depths of a blossom in search of a nectar, and, emerging, carries off much pollen on its fuzzy coat. Within the next blossom of the same species it visits it rubs much of this pollen on the pistils, securing the fertilization of the ovules and the consequent formation of fruit. Cross fertilization, so essen tial to the stamina of plants and ani mals, is made more certain by the visits of the bees. So well is the useful agency of the bees understood in many parts of the North that fruit growers maintain bee colonies in their orchards not so much for the honey, which is regarded rather as a by-producer, but for the sake of increasing the yield of the trees. HEAVY REDUCTION IN EX PRESS RATES FROM FLORIDA. Sweeping Changes in the Tariffs from Southern to Northern Florida Have Jnst Been Made. Express rate reductions of more than 50 per cent in some cases—an instance of which is the rate to Chicago on grapefruit—went into effect on Febru ary 1st, as a result of the recent sweep ing changes made in the tariffs caused by the investigation and report of the Interstate Commerce Commission. Under the new tariff schedule which has been adopted, there will be two general classes of express. The first class will be all merchandise shipments: the second all articles of food and drink, excepting certain kinds of liquor. The second class rate is uniformly 75 per cent of the first class rate on shipments of more than five pounds. On ship ments of five pounds or under, the rate is the same for both classes.

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BUHHELL HOME BUILDER Florida’s Welcome to the Homeseeker Greater Opportunities Here for the Man of Moderate Means Than Any Other State in the Union Florida today has more uncultivated productive land than any other State in the Union. Of the more than 27,000,000 acres, less than 10 per cent is actually in cultivation. It is not be cause the land is poor, nor because the climate is bad, nor because we are not j near the markets. It is because Flor ida has been overlooked. It is because :he State has not had the attention from her own people, nor of the world outside, that she has not been devel oped. Come to Florida, and we will show you the finest soil under the sun. We will show you land producing 120 bush els of corn to the acre; we will show land producing five, six and spven crops of alfalfa and other hay a year; we will show you land producing the finest potatoes, and more of them, than any country in the world; we will show you Land producing the finest tomatoes, beans, celery, cabbage, lettuce, turnips, carrots and all other vegetables prac tically every month in the year in Largely profitable quantities. We will show you the finest sugar cane grown in the world in large quantities, and at big profits; we will show you the finest groves of oranges, grapefruit, avocados, guavas, bananas, pineapples, and all tropical and citrus fruits. We will show you strawberry patches in midwinterthat produce berries at 50 cents, 75 cents and a dollar a quart :n Northern markets. We will show you everything that grows in the ground or above the ground, in quantity and quality equal to the most productive countries in the world. j Come to Florida, and we will'show you some of the finest improved roads in America. Come to Florida, and we will show you the most healthful country in the j world. We will show you a lower per! entage of mortality than that shown i by any other country. Come to Florida, and we will show you the most hospitable, intelligent and progressive people in the world. We will show you communities in which you can live and be happy to a ripe old age. We cannot show you that fabled Fountain of Youth, for which Ponce de Leon sought so long and believed he had discovered in “The Land of Flow ers,” but we will show you people who have lived such happy, comfortable, sweetened lives in our matchless land of roses, romance and riches that, al though they have passed the proverbial threescore and ten, they are as happy, as sweet and smiling, and as much in love with life and all that life holds dear as they were at. twenty-one. Come to Florida, and we will show you the finest beaches in the world, where bathing is good every hour of every day of every year that rolls by. We will show you the limpid lakes and streams of the interior, abounding in fish, and over the shimmering sheen of whose pellucid water you may float or sail all day long. Come to Florida, where every citizen holds open the door of opportunity and welcomes you within; where every hand is a helping hand, and every way is a welcome. Come here to make your fortune, and stay to spend the happiest and most comfortable days of your life. Come to Florida, where every word is a w'elcome; every day is a door of opportunity; every year a record of re pose and comfort. Come to Florida and help us build here the empire State of America, where you wouldn’t change the weather if you could, and where there are more days of sunshine and more sweet-scented' showers over the meadows and the orange groves than in any country under the broad canopy of heaven. Florida has room for ten millions of you. Now is the time to come.—Flor ida Metropolis. A GOOD LIVING FROM ONE ACRE OF LAND. We used to think that a thousand acres was almost necessary on which to make a living, but time has shown that a single good acre, properly taken care of, is sometimes too much for one man to handle. Down in Philadelphia there is one man who clears $1,400 a year from one-third of an acre. Out in Southern California there is a man who has discovered an ideal way in which to handle a full acre of ground. On one-quarter of his acre he has his house, garage, and flower gardens. On the second quarter of the acre, he has his truck garden, and he raises only those vegetables for which the public will pay the most. He never takes one head of celery out of the ground without he puts another in its place. On the other half of his acre he has all kinds of fruit trees. And on the same half of the acre, around each tree, he has his chicken yards and his squab farm. Last year that man is reported to have made nearly $7,000 off one acre of ground. He is not a farmer, either. He was formerly a Professor in an Eastern college. Could you find any greater independ ence than a little land will bring? Could you imagine any greater happi ness than being able to supply every want you can think of, without a single worry in the world? The Bunnell-DuPont colony is being rapidly cut up into small holdings, and thousands of people who have practic ally been “slaves” all of their lives, are finding full and complete independ ence and happy leisure on our little farms. GOVERNOR TRAMMELL’S INVITATION. With a progressive, industrious, intelligent, hospitable and high type of citizenry; with a rapidly increasing population, increased activities in the farm and fruit industries, a conspicuous enlargement of manufacturing enterprises, and a very marked expansion of mining operations, Florida is rapidly forging to the front as one of the greatest of the American States. For those who wish to find greater happiness and prosperity, we bid you come to our State. No State offers greater opportunities to those who desire to engage in fruit growing, truck farming, general farming, cattle raising, or in manufacturing enterprises. We offer you gratis the finest climate on the globe, and our lands and real estate generally can be purchased at prices that are reasonable. To you of the frozen North we say: Come to the land of the palm and the land of the fruit and the vine; the land where the sun shines the brightest; the land where the skies are the cleaz-est; the land of all lands the dearest. PARK TRAMMELL, Governor of Florida. Glimpse of Road from the Colony to Daytona

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mh BUNNELL fiOMC SUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month CITY DIRECTORY. Church Services: METHODIST CHURCH. Preaching—Sunday, 11 a. m. Preaching—Sunday, 7 p. m. Sunday School—10 a. m. Secret Orders: A. F. & A. M., NO. 200. Meets every second and fourth TuesJ day at 7 o’clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. Mohawk Lodge, No. 12S, meets every i first and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at Castle Hall, in Bank Building. LOCALS. Strawberries are plentiful in the colony these days. Practically every settler has his strawberry patch. TV. M. Hardesty and others are supplying the city with this delicious fruit. The Bunnell Development Company is doing a regular land-office business, and the field manager, Mr. Turner, is kept busy every day. Quite often two or three extra automobiles are in the field to show the laud to parties who have already bought and are here to inspect their land, and to prospective buyers. Among the more recent arrivals are Mr. C. E. Swenden of Iowa, Dr. LeBontiller of Illinois, G. 0. Gates and Frank Frazier of Mis souri, Mr. Biddle and Mr. Lindsey of Pennsylvania, J. E. Cunningham of Can ada, M. E. Gates of Indiana. N. M. Hagen of Wisconsin. H. E. Blair of Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Garrett of Kentucky. Messrs. TV. H. and S. S. Fletcher of Ohio, Mr. S. D. Day of Kansas, Mr. S. L. Seymour of Illi nois. Mr. TYm. Thomas of Washington, and many others. The hotel and board ing houses are filled to their capacity all the time, and Field Manager Mr. Turner has difficulty sometimes in finding ac commodations for rhe many buyers and visitors in the colony. Let us hope that the new hotel will be erected at an early date. Mr. and Mrs. Wickline of Indiana are improving their property at Ocean City. They are also going to build a roominghouse and will open a restaurant at Ocean City at an early date. The potato fields around Bunnell are looking fine, and the prospects are that we will have a full crop this season. Mr. A. Lambert, one of our best farm ers, who came from Oklahoma, continues to make his tri-weekly trips ro Bunnell with a wagon load of fine vegetables. Colonel S. F. Mc-Elherne of Chicago has started clearing a ten-acre tract of land for Mr. Rogers, which is located near the colonel’s farm. This is the third tract the colonel has cleared since he arrived Mr. J. Baughman, one of our progres sive farmers of Black Point, has a beau tiful field of cabbage and lettuce, from i which he is shipping daily. i .Mr. J. E. Ingraham, vice-president of the Florida East Coast Railroad Co., was in Bunnell Saturday. Mr. Ingraham ac companied Mr. Moody over the farming section around Bunnell and was very much pleased with the improvements that j have been made here since he visited Bun' nell last. Mr. Ingraham predicts a great future for Bunnell. Mr. John O’Keefe of New Jersey has purchased a farm on the Moody road near Ocean City and made quite a number of friends while in Bunnell. in Bunnell. Mr. Huffman and Mr. Jepson expect to begin digging their potatoes about April 10. These two gentlemen have a fine field of potatoes and will undoubtedly receive the high prices which always pre vail the first of the season. The hunting season has ended. Last Friday, the last day. the woods were full of hunters taking their last try at the quail, turkey and deer. The season open ed with plenty of birds, but closed with them hard to find. Deer have been plenti ful all through the season and are still to be found on any of the ranges. Mr. Cochran is contemplating the erect ing of a garage 25x100 feet .iust west of the Tribune building. The concrete dwelling of Mr. Geo. Moody at Ocean City is nearly com pleted. Messrs. Allen & Duggan of Wilmington. Delaware, spent several days in Bunnell. They looked over the entire colony and I made reservations for themselves and sev eral of their friends. A great number of houses are under construction in rlie city of Bunnell. Mr. Ed. Johnson will begin the erection of a concrete building 75x70. Mr. J. B. Boaz i has also contracted to build him a eoni Crete, building, 25x70, and when comj pleted this building will be occupied by 1 the Tribune. Mr. H. Graham of Minnesota was very much pleased with his land. Before he returned he made reservations for sev eral of his friends, who have since pur chased in the Bunnell colony. Mr. and Mrs. Bortree have purchased a 20-acre farm in the Bunnell colony and also four beautiful lots near the school house at Bunnell. Messrs. Cochran & Moody are delivering lumber, as fast as possible, to Ocean City, which will be used in the construction of several summer homes there. Several prospective bidders on the new brick road to be built through the county drove through Bunnell accompanied by the county commissioners. Let us hope that the bond issue will be carried April 1. and if it is. watch the price of land in the St. Johns county go up. Mr. I. I. Moody, president of the Bun nell Development Company, has one of ; the finest fields of potatoes to be found I in the colony. Although the present | outlook in regard to the potato crop generally is very promising, indications are that Mr. Moody will have a bumper crop. He states that he expects to sell §4,000 worth of potatoes from his 14 acres. Mr. W. A. Mack, formerly of Cali fornia, and one of our oldest settlers, who owns 4 0 acres of land on the Moody Road, three miles south of Bunnell, has seventeen acres of exceptionally fine po tatoes. All those visiting the colony at this time, should be sure to see Mr. Mack’s potato field. Mr. Council, who came to the colony a few months ago, is a neighbor of Mr. Mack, and he too has a splefidid field of potatoes. The fact that all of the land in the original colony is to be advanced to §50.00 an acre on May 1st, is causing an unusual demand for our farms at this time. A great number of people have visited the colony recently, and when they saw the splendid development be ing made here, and realized that the same land they can buy now for §35.00 and §40.00 an acre will cost them §50.00 an acre after May 1st, they are eagerly snapping up the choicest re maining tracts. Notwithstanding the fact that the colonists are very busy just now with their spring crops, they are willing to | take a “day off” when matters of pub; lie interest are to be discussed, and last Saturday there was a large attendance at the barbecue dinner, given in the in terest of the Good Roads Movement. Among the speakers were Mr. I. I. Moody, president of the Bunnell De1 velopment Company.

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S&e BUNNELL HOMEBUIILBEB, Neglected Opportunities — By Mr. Geo. Reading of Connecticut One afternoon my wife was admiring the display in the show-windows of the costliest and largest store in Los Angeles, California, “Hamberger’s, Completed in 1908,” when she overheard the following conversation: “Hello, John, what are you looking so blue about?” John, who had been standing gazing at the curbstone, replied, “It makes me sick when I think of what a fool I was not to have bought this site when I first came here; why I could have got it for a song then; now look at it.” The abusive lan guage about himself was more than my wife wished to hear, so she went on her way. An Unimproved Farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. In my estimation this man was not a fool. He had ouly done what a good many more of us have done—neglected an opportunity. My father, for instance, twenty years ago, let several such opportunities go by, and my chum’s father was offered a large stretch of marshland for almost nothing, which today is worth over a million dollars. Did it ever strike you, as you strolled around a district in your own town where lately had been erected large business blocks and tenement houses that you might have bought i the land on which these buildings now stand for a very small sum of money; or in the suburbs, where you could have bought a whole acre for the same price that is now being asked for a single building lot? Another incident of this kind that comes to my memory was a helper of mine in Los Angeles. His father was one ofthe early settlers and bought a few acres of land close to the city for almost nothing, but six years ago this land was worth $1,000.00 a building lot. My helper’s father had willed him three such lots, but the young man did not realize how fortunate he was in having a father who had not neglected his opportunities. Years ago all over America such opportunities were to be found, but as time passed these opportunities became less, and in my estimation there is but one state left that still possesses a “Golden Opportunity,” and that state is Florida. I do not mean to say that all opportunities are gone, for in almost every city there are good business chances, if one has money enough, intelligence enough, and I may add is “lucky” enough to be in the division of success which Bradstreet rates at about 6 per cent. If the workingman could have shorter hours and better pay {here would be splendid opportunities in most every town for all of them, by farming and fruit raising on a small scale, and thus giving them a good start. But it is the Golden Opportunities we want. And why do I regard Florida as the only state left for such oppor tunities? I do not want to be misunderstood, and so add that the southeastern states in general offer better induce ments to the tiller of the soil than the northeastern or western states ever did, or ever will offer. Soil is the greatest producer of wealth there is, and its productive qualities are proportional to the climatic condi tions, water supply, shipping facilities, location and markets. Florida possesses these important factors to a greater degree than ever her nearest competitor, California. But if Florida has such opportunities, why is land so cheap there? Since the war, the ill-feeling toward the North, and the North’s undesire to compete and mingle with the negro, has left Florida somewhat remote. When the West opened up the land was cheap on the Pacific coast and in Northwest states; but as the settlers came the more the land sold for, until it has reached, and in a good many cases, over reached its maximum—thus depriving the average man of opportunities. But at last the awakening has come. Florida is opening up. Thousands of settlers from all over the United States are locating there and spreading the good news to their friends. But what type are these settlers? Men and women of past experience, who have seen the fallacies of other states, who have experienced the hardships and reverses in other states, men and women with but one sentiment, and that is to make good and do good, and they are certainly proving the truth of their contentions. Do you mean to tell me that a state with such God-given opportunities, and such men and women as these, to fulfill its mission, can do else than overtake her sister states? Before long Florida will be known in her true colors, and then the army of dissatisfied farmers who have gone over the border line into Canada, only to meet worse reverses, the army of dissatisfied tenant farmers from all other states will be clamoring for Florida lands, and 1 have my doubts if one will be able in a few years from now to buy an acre of land within five miles of Bunnell for less than $500.00. In closing I wish to urge those who have not grasped this opportunity to take it before it is too late. Bunnell is offering to you the greatest opportunity you will ever have; if not for your own sake, do it for your family’s sake. After you have made your first paj’ment 5 r ou will begin to read their literature and you will become interested in farming and teach your children likewise. You will be delighted to think that you have a little farm to go to when shop drudgery becomes unbearable, and to know that your boy will not have to drudge the way you have done. I worked from the borderline of Mexico up to San Fran cisco for three years, looking for an opportunity, and by accident I came in contact with some Florida literature. I went to the Public Library and read the books about Florida; I looked up the Government statistics about Flor ida, and it did not take me long to realize that my oppor tunity had come. Sunday Afternoon Party of Neighbors at the Home of one of our Settlers. I can plainly picture Bunnell in the future; not a town of mushroom growth, not an industrial town, but a home like town inhabited by home-like people, -with a steady but substantial growth, its surrounding acres regarded as inval uable by those fortunate enough to own them. Do not let 17 cents a day stand between you and probably the greatest opportunity you may ever have. Remember that opportunity is not very persistent, so do not let it pass you by.

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This is Positively the Last Time I shall ask you to Buy a Farm from me in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony Unless you write me for information; or state thatyou wish to purchase a farm in our colony. I shall never ask you again. Even now I do not intend to urg’e you in this matter. I have sent you my Book, my Banner and other literature, and some of you have been receiving the Home Builder for nearly a year and a half. If you have read the letters from satisfied buyers that have appeared in the Home Builder from month to month, you must realize that our farms are increasing in value. I fully believe that the price of all our land will double, and treble in value, within the next few years. A few of our land owners secured their farms for -$20.00 an acre, but more of them for $25.00 and $30.00. Until May 1st, 1914, you can purchase farms in our colony for $35.00 and $40.00 .an acre, but after that date the price of all land in the old Colony will he $50.00 per acre. We will discontinue our advertisingafter May 1st. The few unsold farms will sell themselves, as our present colonists are adding to their holdings, and bringing in their old friends and neighbors. Remember, I shall not ask you again to buy. If I do not hear from you before May 1st, I shall not annoy you further. It Is Now Up To You. If you want a farm at the present price, you can obtain it by filling out the attached order blank. Improved farms all around us are selling for $200.00 and $300.00 an acre. Some of the raw land adjoining ours has sold for $100.00 an acre. If you ever expect to own a farm in our colony, now is your time to buy. Take advantage of the present low prices, and you will make money year after year as land values increase. Fill out the order blank and send it before May 1st, to. THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 S. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Mr. T. A. Verdenius The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. £iiimuiiiiiuiiiiuiiuiiiiiiuiuiiiiiiiiiiHiuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinn! £ = It is profoundly pitiful that — = 1 most men never know what it is EE I to be independent, hut remain for1 ever slaves to the drudgery of laE = bor from morning till night, youth E | to old age, with never a hope of — 5 release. jfiininnmniiimnMniiiiuimiimmiiiimiimiii[iiiimnimnnniii= FLORIDA’S POSSIBILITIES. In the opinion of the editor of the Florida Times-Union, Florida is grow ing so rapidly that those who do not know the possibilities of the State may suspect that the growth is too rapid. No State in the Union has ever grown more rapidly than Florida could grow and grow soundly. What other States can produce, Flor ida can produce, but she does grow such products only to a limited extent, because she can grow products that no other State on this side of the continent can grow, and these are much more profitable than the products that are shared by other States. Florida has all kinds of tropical fruits in addition to the farm products of other States. Our monopoly of tropical fruits is not much tighter than that of vegetables and berries that can be grown in other States. Of course vegetables such as we grow can be grown elsewhere, but not at a time that would place them in competition with ours. Our garden products get to the markets when the demand is great and there is no supply except that which we furnish. A million and a half people in this State can make a liberal living supply ing the Eastern part of the United States with tropical fruits and winter vegetables. But this supposes that they make nothing for themselves but buy their food from other States. If our producers grew their own foodstuffs and produced for the markets only as surplus crops, there would be ample room and opportunity for three million people. = E = Fortunate is the man who, by 5 | his labor, is able to provide for = § himself and family the necessities 5 | of life, but thrice fortunate is he § = who can say “Sick or -well, come § = what may, I have home, food, | = clothing and friends, and I am | = free until I die.” 3 ftiimmmiiiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin IMPORTANT TELEGRAM JUST REGEIVED AS WE GO TO PRESS THE 'FOLLOWING TELEGRAM IS RECEIVED IN THE CHICAGO OFFICE, AND IT AFFORDS US GREAT PLEASURE TO PUBLISH IT. “THOMAS A. VERDENIUS, 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois. BUNNELL, FLORIDA, APRIL 1, 1914. St. Johns County voted favorably today on the Six Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollar Bond Issue. This means much for St. Johns County generally and especially for our colony. The benefits ofthis road to our buyers cannot be estimated. The construction of same will be started in the very near future. Be sure to announce in the April Home Builder the advance in the price of our land on May first. I. I. MOODY, President