Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
S. HOWARD, Editor
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
Vol. 2 March, 1914 ,No. 4
T'EH D T 0 JR. 1 PRECEPT Economy is near to the key. "BE IT EVER SO It has been said
J AND stone of character a)d svcce&' HuIBLE, THERE'S that of all the
PE,401NAL PAGE boy that is taught to save NO PLACE LUKEwords in the EngPRATICE. his potey will rarely be a bad Elish language, the
WHY WAIT FOR D a y after d a y na or a failire; the mnant who saves HOME." two most beauti-BETTEa TfIMES?,, we receive letters will rise in. his trade or profession, ful are "home" and "mother." Opinthat read about steadily; this i* inevitable.-Gladstone. ions differ on this, but surely there is as follows: "I am very much interested no dearer spot on earth than home--a
In the Bunnell-Dupont colony; I believe It is remarkable with what unanimity haven of refuge and a place of freedom. It is a great country, and when times men of prominence and success say that Though you may be men and women get better, I am going to buy a farm." they got their start by saving money. grown, can you not look back today Such letters are encouraging; they are And every one of these men has ad- upon the old "home" where you and always gladly received, but we keep vised young persons to go and do like- your brothers and sisters were born and wondering what is the use of waiting wise. Some of the foremost men in reared? It may have been a very simefor better times? every walk of life have gone on record ple, old-fashioned home, but it belonged
You say you are dissatisfied with as to the great benefits of systematic to your parents and to you, and you your present surroundings, that the cli- thrift-Washington, Lincoln, Gladstone, loved it better than any place on earth. mate is disagreeable, that business is Bismarck, Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Children reared in cities and moving uncertain, and that some day you are Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, from one apartment to the other will going to remedy these conditions; but, James J. Hill, and scores of others of never know what it means to lovingly why do you put off for next week, next equal prominence and successful attain- recall their childhood's home; even the month or next year what you could and ments have preached and practiced in- boys and girls moving from one rented should do today? dustry and thrift. The overwheliiing farm to the other will never have any
I am reminded of the story of the nature of this testimony is shown by the tender memories of a permanent home. Arkansas traveler-a familiar one to many quotations from the sayings of These boys and girls have a right to
most of you. This traveler was caught prominent men printed at the head of a real home. It may not be possible to in a heavy rainstorm and sought shelter each chapter and at the end of this give them one with any luxuries, but in a nearby cabin. The owner of this book. there is a great degree of satisfaction in
abode was tilted back in a rickety chair, living under one's own roof-tree and bebusily engaged in whittling a stick, iIJUiIumimmhmiNhIUmIII ing able to say, with the proud posseswhile the rain came through the roof BUN N EL L'S MOTTO, = sion of youth, "This is our fiell1, our
in a score of places. The traveler could tf fence, our horse or our cow."
scarcely find a spot in the room where fi "'ATCH US GROW" I have always had a great pity for the
the rain did not fall upon him, and Little lad, the son of an itinerant minisfinally he said to his contented host, ter, who confused the words "born" and
"Why don't you mend your roof?" The Read the experience tested words of a "'reared," and when asked where he was
astonishing reply was, "Well, when it's great merchant who began life as a poor born, replied, "Why, I was born all over raining ,I can't patch it, and when it's clerk: the state of Illinois."
not raining it don't need patching." "If you would succeed in business As I make this plea for the boys and
May it not be the case with some of never spend a cent more than you earn. girls, I am thinking of you, fathers and you who have thus written us? When _No matter how small your earnings, you mothers, who from month to month are times are good, and you are making should ma-ste-rtis art. I use the word paying out your money for the privigood wages, you are quite content, and 'art' advisedly, as so many young men lege of living in some one's else house, do not think it necessary to provide for appear to fritter away, without so much or on another's farm. It may mean the "rainy day"? But occasional hard as a thought, all their earnings." a considerable amount of personal sactimes are inevitable, and the man who John Wanamaker, the merchant rifice now to become the owner of a is working for wages is the first one to prince, who started with a very small little home of your own down at Bunfeel their sting. job in Philadelphia more than fifty nell, Florida, but your reward will pay
You may not have enough money to years ago, and now owns, mammoth you many fold for all present inconmove to Florida tomorrow, and begin stores in Philadelphia, New York and veniences. Your children will have the improvements on a little farm, but you Paris, knows what it means to have to satisfaction of helping to build up their can at least buy that farm today and save money, and this is his testimony: first real "home," and of growing to begin making your small monthly pay- "The difference between the clerk manhood and womanhood therein. ments thereon. Every payment you who spends all his salary and the clerk Not only from a matter of sentiment make you are that much nearer your who saves part of it is the difference- should these boys and girls be given a goal. in ten ybars-between the owner of a home, but it is your duty to them and
A good many people admit that they business and the man out of a job." to yourself from a financial standpoint. are never able to save anything unless The business career of John D. Rocke- No investment is more safe and sure to they go in debt, or assume some obliga- feller, generally believed to be the rich- bring large returns than good farm tion, and know that they must meet it est man in the world, had a very humble land, and nowhere can you find greater regularly. To such people the Bunnell beginning in a rural section of New opportunities than in Bunnell-Dupont. Development Company offers great bp- York state. This is what he says about Theodore Roosevelt once said, "I portunities, and the sooner you are able saving: should think ill of any man who did not
to realize this, the better off you will be. "How can one be ready for the glori- leave his children a little better off ma"It is never too late to be- ous opportunities ahead of him unless terially than himself." It may be that
gin saving money; nor too he has cultivated the habit of economy you will never be able to leave them
early. But there is no time and prudence? He must save all he can great wealth, but at least you can prolike the present." in season and out of season." vide a home.




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Uhe BUNNELL ROME BUILDER
11TIAU'~ Dr. Hoffman of Pennsylvania expectations. I am satisfied that one of these little farms
,, ~ is the best life Insurance policy a man can leave his family,
W AT Thinks of Bunnell in Summer. for not only does it provide a home, but also a haven
WI against adversity.
Editor of the Bunnell I had expected to find it rather hot, but on the contrary,
Home Builder: enjoyed a cool breeze every day of my visit to Florida.
For a long time I Yours very truly,
have been trying to E. G. HOFFMAN,
find an opportunity toPenyvia tell the readers of thePenyaia Home Builder of my
visit to Florida, and especially to the Bunnell An Iowa Farmer Advises
colony. Like m anuyRetr
others, I purchased a Rener to do.
Nitract of land in the
Bunnell DuPont colIony, trusting to the DerS:
honesty of the gentle- I have just returned from a visit to the Bunnell-DuPont
men of the Company, colony. As you know, I bought ten acres of land from you
-and my later experi- some time ago while I was living in Nebraska, and I wish
ence proved that my to state that I am well pleased with the property you sold
confidence w a s not me. There is one thing I cannot understand, and that is misplaced. why there are so many people who do not own, or do not
Having s elIe ct ed try to own their own homes. In this community there are Florida as my future a great number of renters, many of them living from hand
home, after consider- to mouth. With the rent they pay they could own their ing various Southern own homes in Bunnell, where they could live independently
D., E ____-- states, I resolved to and take life easy, after they had brought their land under
visit it and learn of the cultivation.
Dm E ofmnactual conditions. It I like Bunnell very much and although it is in its infancy
G.Ho~mnwas my purpose to I predict a great future for the colony and for the town.
study the real possibili- The people in Bunnell are the right class of people and as ties and opportunities, also to see if it were possible for a soon as you get more families to clear their land and locate little farm to give enough income to support Ia family in on their farms the price of land will advance rapidly. comfort, and this I found to be true.Ihoetgobcanbulmeaieltleoead
With these purposes in mind, I had timed my visit to li thope toe geof ac anlildmnc.itl om n
reach Florida in the summer season, so I could see it at lietreheesofmlf. its most undesirable time. Jacksonville I found a busy, I can recommend the colony to every one.
metropolitan city. 'As I traveled southward on every hand Yours respectfully,
I saw a growing, thriving country; dotting the railroadWM PAKR
Were prosperous looking villages, with new homes in allWM PAKR
directions. There were also large tracts of undeveloped Iowa.
lands that gave promise of a multitude of opportunities for energetic men. At Tampa I found another delightful and interesting city, whose progressiveness put to shame many larger Northern cities. Although I was sight-seeing, I was AAahntn a h a
on the alert to learn of the local conditions and possibili- W H A T seen much of the World Thinks
ties. I soon found that in the agricultural line Florida was especially prosperous. Having gleaned a general idea of of Bunnell-Dupont.
Florida, my next most vital interest was Bunnell and its Dear Mr. Verdenius: farm lands. Much as I had enjoyed my trip, my visit to I left Pullman, Washington, on December 16 and arrived
Bunnell was the best of all, for here I found a neat, attrac- a unl eebr2.Imytl o htt ysrrs
tive, substantially built little town, with cement walks, a unl eebr2.1mytl o htt ysrrs
electric lights and running water. But, although Bunnell I. found everything just as you had advertised it, and I was pleasing, my visit to the farm lands of the colony in give you great credit for this. the company of Mr. Turner, the Field Manager, created a -I am- a man 65-years of age. I have traveled a great most pleasing impression. The land lay ideally; the soil deal in my days. I have been through different parts of a rich loam, underlaid with a light clay subsoil left no Europe and South Africa. I lived in California for 33 doubt of its fertility, waiting only for man's hand to turn years, in Oregon 6 years, and I have been in Washington it into a bounteous garden. Had any doubt as to its fer- for 17 years, but I will say since I have been down to tility existed in my mind, the growing fields we visited Florida and looked over your colony, that in all my travels would have completely dispelled this, for I saw fields with I have never seen anything that looked better to me. I corn, tomatoes and other vegetables all giving the evi- have been a farmer and have raised stock for many years, dence of great fertility, although one crop (potatoes) had but I never saw any better opportunities for either than been harvested only a few weeks earlier. Again we saw in Florida.
sturdy young groves of orange trees, grapefruit, peaches, I want to say this to you people who read the Home figs and grape vines, planted on new land, yet strong and Builder. Don't be afraid to go to the Bunnell colony. I thrifty. The spirit of contentment and the substantial im- read the pamphlets before I left and I have studied them provements on the farms all told the story of success and since I came home, and I found everything to be true as prosperity. My later visits among these hospitable people advertised. If it was not, I should let you all know. It gave me further evidence of the richness of this land. all companies had been as straightforward and honest as
I also learned that the best water could be easily ob- the Bunnell Company we never would have heard so many, tained at a very nominal cost. The cultivation of this bad reports about Florida. soil does not entail the hard labor of the North, as the You can build up a home at Bunnell that in a few years soil is lighter and there are no stones to contend with, you can be proud of. Practically anything will grow there. and with proper preparation and care it will produce You have the land, the markets, and the finest of climates.
bumper crops. There you can have everything you ask for. What more
After much too short a visit, I left Bunnell for the do you want? North, firmly convinced that I had made the best invest- Floid for me. ment of my life when I bought my little Bunnell farm, which I almost forgot to mention proved to far exceed my (Washington.) E. B. LYBECKER.




Ufhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
HATAn Iowa Poultryman says of A Michigan Farmer who had "to
V H il his Success at Bunnell. beshown"found out in the colony.
Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, Dear Mr. Verdenius:
Chicago, Ill. Af ter my return from
Dear Sir: Bunnell in December I
I am going to tell planned to write you a I
you some of my ex- letter for the Home
periences in t h e Builder, but this seems p o u 1 try business, the first opportunity I and what I think of have had.
the Bunnell colony The morning I left
as a poultry dis- here for Florida a man
trict. wosaw me buying
I consider any of my ticket and learned the Leghorn breeds where I was going,
well adapted to the ejaculated, "Huh! Bunstate of Florida, but nell. Turpentine still. as I am a breeder of Rotten place. Watch 'Single Comb White out for it." So I reLeghorns I 1ike ceived a chill at the
them best. I started very start, and differ- in the poultry busi- ent people with whom ness in 1907, with a I became acquainted on few brown Leghorn the trip when they
hens and was well learned of my destinapleased with them, tion said in substance
but later sold them about the same thing. to a neighbor and Many of these people
bought some Barred were winter tourists, Mr. L. A. Rogers
Plymouth R o c k s and their cry was, "Go
and Buff Or ping- farther south, to Tampa, Miami, or some such place." The tons. They, how- first man I mentioned had been through Bunnell a number
ever, spelled failure of years ago, before the land was ever developed, and I for me on the dry believe he spoke sincerely.
arid land of western So you can imagine my state of mind by the time I
Dakota. In 1909 I arrived at Bunnell. I certainly was happily surprised, after
Mr. H4. C. Fadneas started with fifty- what I had been forced to swallow for several days. I
four white L e g- expected to see a dreary, forsaken place, but the neat buildhorns. They proved to be regular egg machines. When the ings, attractive streets and general prosperous conditions Rocks and Orpingtons were hunting the shaded ground, cheered me at once. Mr. Turner, who was at the train,
Miss Leghorn was busy chasing bugs and laying eggs. gave me the glad hand of welcome, and in the few days
Kid-winter 1913 I shipped ten Leghorn pullets to my that followed while riding by his side in the Company's
farm near Bunnell, Florida, and I never saw chickens do as auto, viewing the fine, level country, seeing the many well as these did at Bunnell. My coop was 8x12 and the improvements that have been made, I could not help but yard was only 24x56 feet, but they never stopped laying wonder at the progress that has been made in such a few while I was in Florida. short years.
The Leghorns were imported from Italy to America, so I seized every opportunity to go over the colony with Mr.
Florida ought to be the ideal American home for them, as Turner, which gave me an opportunity to see it from all Florida is really the Italy of America. All we need in the sides, and I'll bet he was glad to see me go, for if anyone line of shelter in Florida, for poultry, is three walls and a is an expert at asking questions it is Yours Truly, but he waterproof roof and a good large yard to keep the chickens seemed to take it all in good part. Still, I wasn't satisfied. out of the garden, and we have the egg machines in working The fact that Bunnell is a beautiful and rapidly growing order. town, populated with -as fine a people as could be found,
There was no time, during my stay-in Florida,that eggs' does not prove a single point. It is all up to the land went below twenty-five cents a dozen and when I returned to make good. If that fails, all will fail. That is what to my business in Iowa, July 30th, 1913, the price of eggs I wanted to make sure of, so had as many talks with the in Bunnell was thirty-five cents per dozen. farmers as my short stay would allow. I spent one night
I am a Scandinavian, and wish to say a few words to with Mr. Wehrman and had a very enjoyable and instructive
those Scandinavians who would like to move to a milder time. We spent nearly a day looking over the land and got climate. I don't think you could do better than to buy a caught.in quite a rain, which was rather wet, strange to say. farm in the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Ten acres will be all You have read many descriptions of the land in the Home
right for a small family, but twenty acres would do better. Builde ad an drttstraght I il ot
It wll ivemor roo fo buldigs nd alowpasurefor Builder, and it has been told pretty straight, so I will not It will give more room for buildings and allow pasture for say anything about that. I wanted to know what the land a. cow.wolprdc.Idknwtaswepoaos llgw
The Bunnell Development Company is square in all its Would produce. I do know that sweet potatoes will grow
dealings. They have the right kind of soil and, as a rule, some, for I swiped several and brought them to Michigan. good water and an ideal climate. What more do we want? They were fine and the yield is abundant.
Now you farmers who have good farms in the northern And sugar cane! I didn't think it possible for anything
states when you want to retire from your farm work, don't to grow so thick and handsome. These were the only crops sell your farm and move to town-only rent it and buy a I found in the fields while there, but they were enough.
small farm in our colony and make this your winter home. If everything else grows in proportion, and the farmers say I don't think, Mr. Farmer, that you will ever be sorry for they do, that is enough for me. I am a farmer, and that such a move and I believe that when once you come, you feature of the place appealed to me, but I must say that
are here to stay. If we don't want to work our land in the the prospects for fruits are equally as good. Bunnell colony we can always rent it. It was with regret that I left Bunnell, and I, for one,
Yours truly, predict 'a great future for our colony.
HENDRICK C. FADNESS, Yours very truly,
Iowa. Michigan. L. A. ROGERS.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Letters from Men who live in the Colony
Mr. W. A. Mack, formerly of California, Tells the Story of Bunnell-Dupont's Steady Growth.
(When Mr. Verdenuus becanie connected with the Bunnell
Development Company, the first man he located an a farm was And Mr. Szabelski has established an automobile garage Mr. W. A. Mack of California, and this was in the latter part -and machine shop, so you see we have everything now right of October, 1911. In April, 1912, Mr. Mack wrote a letter to our hand here in Bunnell, and the future for this colony telling just what he had accomplished in five months, and this looks very bright to me. letter was a great in-piratiom to -many who have sice bought The prospects for this time of the year for a big spring farms. To all these, as well as every other reader of the crop never looked so good to me since we have been in Home Builder, the following letter from Mr. Mack wil be most Florida as they do now, and the light of the comfortable interesting. These are the sincere 'words of a sincere zman?, home we had pictured out before we came here begins to and they briefly tell the story of our colony's growth.-Editor.) shine upon us. Dear Mr. Verdenius: Wishing all the settlers of the Bunnell colony a most sucI have been sitting back and watching results, and watch- cessful year, and with kind regards to yourself and family. ing our colony settle up, really beyond my expectations; I am, Respectfully yours,
and to tell you the truth, I feel a little ashamed of myself Florida. W.A. MACK.
that I have not contributed at least a few words to the Home Builder, which we are always glad to read.
In the first place, I want to say a few words about the letter I wrote you in 1912. I am still getting letters every few days from people who read that letter, and wonder if I really wrote it, or if the Company made it up. I wish to say to such people that we are here on the same 40 acres that we were on when I wrote to you, and we are glad we are here, and I think if the people who have written me I would only visit our place, I could soon convince them that every word in the 1912 letter was the truth. I know that .
I was very sincere in writing what I did. I was anxious ,
to have people come into the colony, for we were very much .
alone when we first came here. .- &"4,,.. ..... -..' '
You remember, Mr. Verdenius, where you took us, clear out to the extreme end of the Moody Road at that time, three miles south of Bunnell. W We had only one neighbor .
then, and that was Mr. Lambert, who lives one mile nearer Bunnell. But it ip different now. We have neighbors on every side of us, and close up, too, and the Moody Road has been extended on into Volusia County to accommodate the new settlers that are going in south of me.
It is true that we have met with some reverses since we have been here, but they were very small compared to what they night have been in other countries. It is true we have some heavy rains in Florida, but they do not destroy men's lives, nor do they destroy railroads and wagon Picture of a portion of Mr. Mack's farm taken a short time after he bridges, or float away houses and cattle as they do in other had purchased it.
states. I have just received a letter from my daughter today telling of the terrible floods in California. The Salinas Is it avy wonder tbat Florida is progressing at
valley is almost completely submerged and millions of dollars of damage has been done. We do not have such r rate which. arotses the astowishme.at of all wh o
floods as these in Florida. The rainstorms may drown out come from, far away sections?
a few crops that are not properly looked after, but that is As week by week goes by., winter or swmmler, about all the damage they do. more proof comes to He surface of the development
I have been here now over two years and I believe I
have learned enough about Florida to know what I-am ihiat is brin.qing -the best State in. the Union into
writing about, and I will say I prefer Florida to any country her own. Here. a county votes for good roads, I ever lived in. Our daughter started today from Salinas, there a. railroad is pushing a new artery of trade I California, for Bunnell, and you can imagine about how Io into fertile but undeveloped territory, ananxious we are for the train to pull into Bunnell that will bring her to us. other place a city votes for schools, still another
Well, Mr. Verdenius, I must say a few words about Bun- for bonds, great tracts of lands are being developed,
nell and then I will close. Bunnell is making the finest big manutfacturing plaits, immense hotels, 'new
kind of advancement. She is not booming like some homes by the thousand dotted over the fair State.
western towns I have seen, that grew at a tremendous rate for a few months and then died out, but Bunnell is growing permanently. Her business men are here to stay, and among the new enterprises is the Johnson Hardware & A Former Canadian says: "It's great to gather green peas
Supply Company. Mr. Johnson's store is up to date and he is certainly laying a foundation for a permanent and and celery from one's own garden" in Winter.
profitable business. We wish him the success that his efforts and courteous treatment deserves. I have just selected a 10-acre farm for my friend, Mr
The McArn Grocery Company is another most worthy James Duncan of British Columbia, Canada.
establishment, as Is also the Bunnell Cold Storage & Meat Everybody in the colony is busy with their potato cropMarket. Bunnell's greatest-felt need has been met by Mr. Strawberries are growing fine and the peach trees are in Bacher, recently from Waverly, Iowa, in the way of a full bloom. I want to tell you that it is great to gathe:
wagon and blacksmith shop. Mr. Bacher has put up a green peas and celery from one's own garden at this time
shop that is not only a great credit to Bunnell, but would of the year and to enjoy this lovely sunshine. The therbe a credit to any city. It is neat enough to be right up mometer registered today noon 70 degrees. What abour on Main street, pnd the beauty of it is we have the mechanic Chicago. S. J. HARRISONt
inside. Florida.




Ue BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
and who know what they are talking about.
354r. Gamier, of Canada, wishes he had come to the Mr. Brock, formerly of Arkansas, tells of the
Colony three years instead of three months ago. possibilities of our soil.
-ear Mr. Verdenius: IMr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
Well, dear sir, you are the cause of my coming to Florida, Chicago, Ill.
rd I thank you very much for it, for if I had remained in
Canada (that frozen country in winter, and roaster in sum- Dear Sir and Friend: =er) I believe I would be in my grave now; but instead of As I have been a resident of Bunnell, for two years, and
fiat, I feel ten years younger, am healthy and strong and receive the Bunnell Home Builder free of charge, which I
--gging away and planting things on my beautiful farm. appreciate very much, I. thought I would write you of my
1 enjoy it very much; so does my son who is with me. impressions of Bunnell and its possibilities, as I see them.
Z wish we had come here thlee years ago instead of three
months ago. This is a busy place now. There are two fine buildings
We have planted and sowed a good many things since south of the depot on Moody Boulevard in course of erec:,ur arrival here and I am going to put some sticks to my tion, which makes five besides the brick buildings that have :eas today. Talk about Florida land-it is great! What- been built lately. Mr. Bachus' shop is completed and it is
-v r we have sown and planted so far, has grown wonder- an ornament to the town, and is a busy place, for Mr.
-;-ey w have so a pated i Bachus has plenty of work on hand, which he knows how
-uly I sowed some parsley seed, which generally takes
:rom fifteen to twenty days to come up, but mine was up in to take care of. fve days and is way above the ground now. I'was talking to a stranger recently, and I shall repeat
I also planted a bed of three hundred strawberry plants. our conversation for the benefit of the readers of the Home :Jost of them are in bloom now and they were planted Builder. The newcomer said to me, "Does anything else
-::bout three weeks ago. I have carrots, turnips parsnips, grow here besides Irish potatoes? For everyone I see around :abbage, cauliflower, radishes, onions, celery, thyme, sum- here is hauling away Irish potatoes for seed, and all they er savory, in my garden and many other things, all of talk about is Irish potatoes." I replied, "'Yes, at this time
hich are growing nicely. It seems you can alinost see of the year many are interested in planting Irish potatoes,
-.hem grow. Of course, one has to work and have a system but I do not consider potatoes the main crop by any means. o go by. We can grow all kinds of citrus fruits here to perfection;
we can raise sugar cane and make $150.00 per acre, and
I am satisfied with Florida land, especially Bunnell land. seldom have a failure, and only replant it every three years; fdo not ant any better. We have cleared a large patch and we can also raise mighty fine sweet potatoes. I saw land where we are going to plant Irish potatoes. I am land this past summer after a crop of Irish potatoes was
leased with my land and with the climate, which is grand. taken off produce 300 bushels of- sweet potatoes without
is -wonderful to be working outside every day in one's any more fertilizer than was in the -round after the Irish z,;irt sleeves. When I compare this to frozen Canada it
Sm m potatoes were harvested. Yes, sir, and we can grow plenty
imost makes me shiver. Canada will never see me again. of forage for stock-owpea hay, oats, German millet, Kaffir
intend to live as long as I can in this beautiful country corn, field corn, clover and Spanish peanuts, the last named 3nd when my life is ended I shall be buried here, for it is good for man and beast. We grow all kinds of vegetables,
-ven too cold to be buried in Canada-so you can see I
:Jre this country, I love the climate, I love my farm and and ship what we do not need for home use. love the people here. I hope I shall succeed in my under- In our talk about oranges, I remarked that at presidential
-akings, and I have been successful so far. I am building election we can plant an orange grove, and at the next fine cottage on my farm-forty feet by twenty-two. I am election we can make a present of a box of oranges to the building it good and substantial; I am building it very new President. I know a man a few miles from here who
:asty, for, as I have told you before, I can say without has a small grove of two or three acres and he told a friend boasting, that I am a good carpenter, also a good painter of mine that he was all fixed now, and that his living was 2nd house decorator. secured. Can a wheat grower or a cotton grower in any
I expect later on, to raise some pigs and chickens, and state say the same with two or three acres of land, that h-ope to set out fruit trees as soon as I have time. You he is provided for in his old age? zee we have to work very hard at present, my faithful boy I am preparing myself to plant a few acres to oranges
and myself, clearing, sowing, planting and building. We and grapefruit, to take care of me in my old age. If we
.iave our work laid out, but in time we-shal--get-through [ prepare the -land- here -thoroughly* and-ditch-it when--neces- :. With patience and perseverance one can do many sary, it will grow anything I have mentioned, and many
-2ings. Bunnell for me forever! others that I have not mentioned.
Yours respectfully, Some people think that all they have to do is to plow
JOSHUA GARNIER, I up the land, put in Irish potatoes, and make a lot of money
Florida. in a few months. This is a great mistake. The land needs
a thorough course of preparation. It should have a crop
I of cowpeas planted and plowed under the first season, and at least 1,000 pounds of acid phosphate to the acre, also
plowed or disked in. Then if the other necessary things
ATTENTION PLEASE! are done, such as rotting the sod and picking roots, one
may reasonably expect a good crop of Irish potatoes. So
We want to remind the readers of the Home Builder that the resi- I advise all newcomers to have all the money they can Zents of Bunnell-DuPont who write letters for our paper each month, gather up to start with, for it takes money here as it does are very busy men and women, and they do not have time to write anywhere, to build up a new home and succeed. personall letters to you. Some of our farmers have received as many I showed my new acquaintance a three-year-old orange 7 3 ten letters a day, after having written a letter to the Home tree in Mr. Hardesty's garden with 28 large oranges on builder. You can understand that these people cannot take time to it now. answer your questions, and we world suggest that if you insist on Yes, Bunnell is good enough for me. If I don't make hearing from any of them, that you enclose $ 1.00 in your letter to pay good I am the one who is deficient. :hem for their time and trouble. EDITOR. Please excuse this long letter. I had not expected to
write so much. Yours truly,
_ _--_ _Bunnell, Florida. W. A. BROCK.




Mhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnmell and Dupont
As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
CITY DIREC TORY..Mr. Hardesty is building an addition District Deputy R. E. Neck, of PaChrhServices: to his house, to accommodate the over- latka, attended the meeting of Mohawk
Chuchflow of people who cannot be taken care Lodge No. 128, Knights of Pythias.
METHODIST CHURCH. of at the hotel. Monday night, and installed the officers
Preaching-Sunday, 11 a. m- for the ensuing term.
Preaching--Sunday, '7 p. M.
Sunday School-10 a. m. "MIellow Hill," the beautiful farm of
Secret Orders: Mr. W. H. Cochran, is being planted to Mr. T. J. Rose, of Toledo, Ohio, has
A. F. & A. M., NO. 200. potatoes by the Independent Potato built a nice little cottage on his tract
Company, Robert Moody, President. Iof land some distance south of Bunnell. Meets every second and fourth Tues- He and his wife moved into their new
day at 7 o'clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, home several days ago.
second floor Bank Building. Mlr. Mvosby reports a good stand of __KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. potatoes. Miss Lucia Hudson, supervisor of
Mohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every Girls' Canning Clubs in St. Johns
first and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at February 11th. Mr. Jepson's field of County, spent yesterday in Bunnell. Castle Hall, in Bank Building. spuds are certainly fine -and growing where she aroused intense interest in
rapidly. Mr. Mack's eighteen acres of canning club plans. She was cordially The next regular meeting of the potatoes are also showing up fine, received by the citizens and the public
Woman's Christian Temperance Union ____school and had the pleasure of addresswill be held at the Methodist Church at jing a mass meeting hastily assembled 2 o'clock on the afternoon of next Tues- Mr. J. O'Keepe, a prominent con- at her hotel. All eligible girls in Bunday, February 10th- A special program tractor of New Jersey, returned here nell were enrolled as members, with the will be rendered and not only the mem- after a trip farther South, and pur- hearty approval of their parents. Seed bers, but the Christians and all inter- chased a fine farm. planting was demonstrated and the iniested in the cause of temperance are ____Itial work of the Bunnell Division of the
most cordially invited to be present.- club was well begun.
Cora Miles, Press Superintendent. Another shipment of cabbage went Among the prominent citizens ol.
______out from the Bauman farm today. fBunnell who gave encouragement to
A Catholic priest of Minnesota has ..Miss Hudson was Mr. 1. I. Moody, presispent the past week in the colony mak- dent of the Bunnell State Bank, who
ing lansforthe stabishent f pledged a canning outfit for the Bunnell Catholic Church here. He has receivedClb Serabosworentlibl
authority from the Bishop of St. Augus- .for membership in the Canning Club gave
tntoetbiha church in our colony.- in their name., ;for the Boys, Corn Club,
______ ~~ ~.which is to be organized later.
Bunnll an ow oastof n u toSeveral of the Bunnell people went. date blacksmith and repair shop, Mr. P over to the beach near Ocean City SunBacher having completed his shop on 'day, there being three cars that made
Moody boulevard, which is up-to-date thtrp
in every way. He is also erecting a
cottage on the lot adjoining the shop. Anytrspe aIie nBu
nell on Friday evening, February 6th,
Every farmer in the colony is enjoy- by the Earnest Workers, the proceeds
ing outdoor life, for he is busy* in his ., going to help pay for the church piano.
field from morning to night engaged in __planting Irish potatoes. Many have IThe Oceola farm on the Deen road
their potatoes all planted and some of Field of Cabbage, about two miles south of near town, which is owned by Mr. Tolethem have beautiful green fields already. Bunnell, belonging to Mr. Lambert, man, of Washington, is beginning to farmer&i of Oklahoma. have the appearance of an up-to-date
Mr. C. W. Worthington, of Brooks- ____farm under the management of Messrs.
ville, Ky., is having his land on the Brock and Jenkins.
Espanola road just north of Bunnell It is .reported that 100 carloads of
cleared and will plant it to oranges and cabbage are ready for shipment from Mr. H. Culbreth, representing the H, grapefruit this year. DuPont, and are already sold at $1.75 IG. Miles & Co., commission merchants.
per hamper. These will probably net of New York, arrived at Bunnell last Mr. J. Bauman made a fine shipment $10,000.00 to the owners. -week to see what the prospects in his of lettuce and cabbage today (February ____line of business would be this coming
2d). The first of his crop will be Ispring and when told of the large acreshipped every week. The lettuce went Mr. I. 1. Moody has offered to buy all age of. potatoes that had been planted
t6 Ohio, the cabbage to Palm Beach. the potatoes he can get, f. o. b. Bun- and are being planted, his face brightnell, but few wish to sell, preferring to ened and he assured every one that we Febuar 4t. M. Jpso ha a inewait and take their chances on getting would see him in the colony when potafebruarypottoes Mr.xtepsn as) ajfin higher prices. The outlook for high toes are ready to be dug. breaking through the ground, prcsiIvr od Mr. Fred R. Allen, one of our larges,
Farmers, was in the city Wednesday, en
The following are among those who Mlr. E. D. Burke, of Vermont, has arrived Iroute to his famous Almero farm over
are erecting new buildings: Mr. Bacher, in Bunnell, where he will make his-future on the canal. double tenement; Mr. Williams, bunga- home. Mr. Burke will erect a dwelling on low; Mr. Chapman, fine residence; Mr. his property on Moody boulevard. Since = Mr. C. F. Turner, field manager of the Foster, another cottage. George Moody's arriving here he has bought several pieces Development Company, is kept very house is nearing completion and a ten- of property. He says Florida for the bal- busy since the first of the year showing ant is waiting for same. &nce of his days. ,the buyers their lands.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
It is the most prominent industry in the world today, By G. M. Nuss because it is the means by which the greater part of the
AGR ICULTU RE Bunnell, Fla. human race obtains its sustenance. What would the people
in the great cities do if it were not for agriculture? Why, consider, there would be no cities if it were not for agriculAgriculture-can any ture-no railroads, no stores, no mines, no schools, no
word be spoken or hotels--nothing practically.
written upon which
more depends than To have these things we must have thousands of men
that one word? We engaged in various industries and professions. Can these
find other words in the men perform their duties without some means of sustaining English language much life? No. Then they must have something to live upon,
more musical in sound and what is it? Wheat, rice, potatoes, beans, corn, meats,
and more dignified, as etc. All these are the products of agriculture. So, without it were-but, do we any reason of doubt, everything depends upon agriculture.
%W find words upon which There must undoubtedly be someone to produce these
any more actually de- products of the soil; every man cannot be a lawyer, doctor,
pends than the word merchant, mechanic or engineer. Some must be farmersagriculture? W o r d s the most independent men on earth, and not only that, but which hold the whole he who by honest and conscientious effort provides for himworld, so to speak, in self and family from the products of his land, and also sells the hollow of their for the benefit of the public and his bank account, has, in
hand; words which my estimation, more true nobility, nobility of heart and
provide, in practical purpose, than the kings and emperors of all Europe. Tennyand actual performance son said:
of what they represent, "Howe'er it be, it seems to me
the necessities of man, 'Tis only noble to be good,
of the great human Kind hearts are more than coronets,
race? No, most assur- And simple faith than Norman blood."
edly not. Then, why is In this case it is noble to be a tiller of the soil, to be
this little word "agri- one who produces something intended for man's upbuilding Mr. G. M. Nluss culture" so great, and and comfort. A simple, yet noble occupation is more than
why does so much de- Norman knighthood of old. He who sets himself to become
-nd upon it? And what does depend upon it? Now do a tiller of the soil is devoting himself to the most noble
-.t say it is not true, for if you consider you will see that and independent occupation today. He has a position of
is true--everything depends upon it. which to be proud, and above all, he is his own "boss,"
In prehistoric times men lived upon roots, berries, etc., and that means much to anyone. .st those things, and those only, which they could find on :-e land over which they roamed. They clothed themselves What could be more delightful than a beautiful home on
=th a few skins of animals and lived in caves. They did a farm with an abundance of vegetables, fruits, flowers and
-A live, in the sense we modern people do; they existed, pure air? A million dollar mansion on Fifth avenue, New merely existed, and were often at war among themselves. York, could not compare with it in comfort, beauty and
-hey used clubs as instruments of defense, and many stone healthfulness. If one should say to me, "What can I do .-nplements, first of a rough nature, and later smooth and to be independent and have a pleasant and profitable occu.jlished. pation?" I would without any hesitation give this reply,
"Pursue the most noble course, and become a tiller of the soil-an agriculturist."
--- Fifty thousand dollars will be paid Miami
fishermen for this week's catch, of Spanish mackerel, from present indications, the heaviest catches of the season being reported by nearly all the compavies. It is learned that 250,000 pounds of macko : r'tI have been shipped this week, while 100,000
pornds-are-o.r'the-way --1: now and will reach the low, houses before noon today. All crews report excel,_ . lent catches.- fiami Herald.
Home of Mr. G. Mf. Nuss
Ages passed, and at about the period of 6000 B. C. we
fnd that the Egyptians were practicing agriculture and
--any of the fine arts. The valley of the Nile was a fairly
Lood agricultural country, and they, desiring something
-.etter than prehistoric man, consequently began a great advancement in farming.
The Romans and Greeks also were interested in agriculThre, as is shown by their having a goddess of agriculture, ?eres; and a goddess of vegetation, Proserpine. The myth:logical tale is that Proserpine was captured by Pluto, god Df the Lower World, and lived with him six months, and
-ith her mother, Ceres, on earth for six months. In her absence everything withered and died-winter; in her presnce things became green-summer. So we see agriculture .olds a place.both in history and mythology. Newly Erected School Building in Dupont




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Important Announcement
PRICE OF LAND IN THE ORIGINAL BUNNELLDUPONT COLONY AGAIN TO BE ADVANCED. HE greater portion of land in the original Bunnell-Dupont Colony has been sold. There are
just a few choice farms still available, and some of these are very well located. The reason that these farms are still on the market is owing to the fact that some of our original
purchasers lapsed their accounts.
q When one considers the immense amount of development work that has already taken place in this original tract, and the fact that the Bunnell-Dupont Colony i's known all over the State as the most successful and attractive colonization proposition to be found anywhere, he will begin to
understand that every acre of this land is worth more today than the price we ask for it.
41 When this tract of land was first opened up, we sold some of our farms for $20.00 an acre; later the price was advanced to $25.00; then to $30.00, and last summer to $35.00 and $40.00 an acre.
q We now wish to announce that on May 1, 1914, the price of all the unsold land in the original colony will be advanced to $50.00 an acre. I have just received a letter from President L I. Moody,
requesting us to make this announcement in the March issue of the Home Builder.
q If you desire a farm in -this original tract, or if you wish to have a friend located near you there, we advise you to send in your order before May 1st. We give two months' notice of this advance in price, so that our present customers and all others with whom we have been corresponding will
have an opportunity to secure land at the present price.
q1 Please keep this announcement in mind, and make up your mind at once if you- desire one -of
these farms.
GENERAL SALES OFFICE:
BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
108 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL.
gn'
Florida's most beautiful March flower is the magnolia, and the photograph above shows a cluster of thesE blossoms.
The magnolia tree, devoid of its blossoms, is a thing of great beauty, as it lifts its waxen green leaves towards the clear blue of the Southern skies.
If you are a stranger in Florida, and should chance upon a magnolia tree at this season of the year, you would behold a most beautiful sight. Far above your head, nestling among the green leaves, you will see great cluster of white blossoms. It is indeed a sight worth seeing-another of Nature's rare gifts to Florida.







Full Text

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The Truth About Florida I The Bunnell Home Builder | | S. HOWARD, Editor H 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. §§ IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW^ Vo/. 2 March, 1914 JVo. 4 TIE EDITORS FERsSOHAL PAGE WHY WAIT FOR Day after day •‘BETTER TEMES?” we receive letters that read about as follows: “I am very much interested In the Bunnell-Dupont colony; I believe j it is a great country, and when times get better, I am going to buy a farm.” Such letters are encouraging; they are 1 always gladly received, but we keep i wondering what is the use of waiting for better times? You say you are dissatisfied with your present surroundings, that the cli mate is disagreeable, that business is uncertain, and that some day you are going to remedy these conditions; but, why do you put off for next week, next month or next year what you could and should do today? I am reminded of the story of the Arkansas traveler—a familiar one to most of you. This traveler was caught in a heavy rainstorm and sought shelter in a nearby cabin. The owner of this abode was tilted back in a rickety chair, busily engaged in whittling a stick, while the rain came through the roof in a score of places. The traveler could scarcely find, a spot in the room where the rain did not fall upon him, and finally he said to his contented host, “Why don’t you mend your roof?”’ The astonishing reply was, “Well, when it’s raining ,1 can’t patch it, and when it’s not raining it don’t need patching.” May it not be the case with some of you who have thus written us? When times are good, and you are making good wages, you are quite content, and do not think it necessary to provide for the “rainy day”? But occasional hard times are inevitable, and the man who is working for wages is the first one to feel their sting. You may not have enough money to move to Florida tomorrow, and begin improvements on a little farm, but you can at least buy that farm today and begin making your small monthly pay ments thereon. Every payment you make you are that much nearer your goal. A good many people admit that they are never able to save anything unless they go in debt, or assume some obliga tion, and know that they must meet it regularly. To such people the Bunnell Development Company offers great op portunities, and the sooner you are able to realize this, the better off you will be. “It is never too late to be gin saving money; nor too early. But there is no time like the present.” | PREGEPT Economy is near to the key; AND stone of character and success. PBifTirr boy that is taught to save ; rttAiaion,. mone ,j v: m rarely he a had | man or a failure; the man who saves will rise in his trade or profession steadily: this is inevitable. — Gladstone. It is remarkable with what unanimity men of prominence and success say that they got their start by saving money. And every one of these men has ad vised young persons to go and do like wise. Some of the foremost men in every walk of life have gone on record as to the great benefits of systematic thrift—Washington, Lincoln, Gladstone, Bismarck, Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, James J. Hill, and scores of others of equal prominence and successful attain ments have preached and practiced in dustry and thrift. The overwhelming nature of this testimony is shown by the many quotations from the sayings of prominent men printed at the head of each chapter and at the end of this book. giiiiiiuuiiuuiiiiiiiniiiiiQiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiinimiiiuiiiiuniiiuuiiiii^ | BUNNELL’S MOTTO* 1 | “WATCH US GROW” | ^NNinnininnniMiiiiiiiimimiimujiimimiiminjmuiimniimjE Read the experience tested words of a great merchant who began life as a poor clerk: “If you would succeed in business never spend a cent more than you earn. No matte r h ow small vour earnings, you should master this art. I use the word ‘art’ advisedly, as so many young men appear to fritter away, without so much as a thought, all their earnings.” John Wanamaker, the merchant prince, who started with a very small job in Philadelphia more than fifty years ago, and now owns' mammoth stores in Philadelphia, New York and Paris, knows what it means to have to save money, and this is his testimony: “The difference between the clerk who spends all his salary and the clerk who saves part of it is the difference— in ten years—between the owner of a business and the man out of a job.” The business career of John D. Rocke feller, generally believed to be the rich est man in the world, had a very humble beginning In a rural section of New York state. This is what he says about saving: “How can one be ready for the glori ous opportunities ahead of him unless lie has cultivated the habit of economy and prudence? He must save all he can in season and out of season.” It has been said that of all the words in the Eng lish language, the two most beauti“mother.” Opin“BE IT EVER SO HUMBLE, THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME." ful are “home" and ions differ on this, but surely there is no dearer spot on earth than home—a haven of refuge and a place of freedom. Though you may be men and women grown, can you not look back today upon the old “home” where you and your brothers and sisters were born and reared? It may have been a very sim ple, old-fashioned home, but it belonged to your parents and to you, and you loved it better than any place on earth. Children reared in cities and moving from one apartment to the other will never know what it means to lovingly recall their childhood’s home; even the boys and girls moving from one rented farm to the other will never have any tender memories of a permanent home. These boys and girls have a right to a real home. It may not be possible to give them one with any luxuries, but there is a great degree of satisfaction in living under one’s own roof-tree and be ing able to say, with the proud posses sion of youth, “This is onr fiel'd, our fence, our horse or our cow.” I have always had a great pity for the little lad, the son of an itinerant minis ter, who confused the words “born” and “reared,” and when asked where he was born, replied, “Why, I was born all over the state of Illinois.” As I make this plea for the bo}’s and girls, I am thinking of you, fathers and mothers, who from month to month are paying out your money for the privi lege of living in some one’s else house, or on another’s farm. It may mean a considerable amount of personal sac rifice now to become the owner of a little home of your own down at Bun nell, Florida, but your reward will pay you many fold for all present incon veniences. Your children will have the satisfaction of helping to build up their first real “home,” and of growing to manhood and womanhood therein. Not only from a matter of sentiment should these boys and girls be given a home, but it is your duty to them and to yourself from a financial standpoint. No investment is more safe and sure to bring large returns than good farm land, and nowhere can you find greater opportunities than in Bunnell-Dupont. Theodore Roosevelt once said, “I should think ill of any man who did not leave his children a little better off ma terially than himself.” It may be that you will never be able to leave them great wealth, but at least you can pro vide a home.

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Wfoe BUHNELL HOMEBUILDER IITT | A r T Dr. Hoffman of Pennsylvania W llA. 1 Thinks of Bunnell in Summer. Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: For a long time I have been trying to find an opportunity to tell the readers of the Home Builder of my visit to Florida, and es pecially to the Bunnell colony. Like many others, I purchased a tract of land in the Bunnell DuPont col ony, trusting to the honesty of the gentle men of the Company, and my later experi ence proved that my confidence was not misplaced. Having selected Florida as my future j home, after consideri ing various Southern states, I resolved to visit it and learn of the actual conditions. It was my purpose to study the real possibilij ties and opportunities, also to see if it were possible for a little farm to give enough income to support a family in comfort, and this I found to be true. With these purposes in mind, I had timed my visit to reach Florida in the summer season, so I could see it at its most undesirable time. Jacksonville I found a busy, metropolitan city. As I traveled southward on every hand I saw a growing, thriving country; dotting the railroad were prosperous looking villages, w r ith new homes in all directions. There were also large tracts of undeveloped lands that gave promise of a multitude of opportunities for energetic men. At Tampa I found another delightful and interesting city, whose progressiveness put to shame many larger Northern cities. Although I was sight-seeing, I was on the alert to learn of the local conditions and possibili ties. I soon found that in the agricultural line Florida was especially prosperous. Having gleaned a general idea of Florida, my next most vital interest was Bunnell and its farm lands. Much as I had enjoyed my trip, my visit to Bunnell was the best of all, for here I found a neat, attrac tive, substantially built little town, with cement walks, electric lights and running water. But, although Bunnell was pleasing, my visit to the farm lands of the colony in the company of Mr. Turner, the Field Manager, created a most pleasing impression. The land lay ideally; the soil a rich loam, underlaid with a light clay subsoil left no doubt of its fertility, waiting only for manÂ’s hand to turn it into a bounteous garden. Had any doubt as to its fer tility existed in my mind, the growing fields we visited would have completely dispelled this, for I saw fields with corn, tomatoes and other vegetables all giving the evi dence of great fertility, although one crop (potatoes) had been harvested only a few weeks earlier. Again we saw sturdy young groves of orange trees, grapefruit, peaches, figs and grape vines, planted on new land, yet strong and thrifty. The spirit of contentment and the substantial im provements on the farms all told the story of success and prosperity. My later visits among these hospitable people gave me further evidence of the richness of this land. I also learned that the best water could be easily ob tained at a very nominal cost. The cultivation of this soil does not entail the hard labor of the North, as the soil is lighter and there are no stones to contend with, and with proper preparation and care it will produce bumper crops. After much too short a visit, I left Bunnell for the North, firmly convinced that I had made the best invest ment of my life when I bought my little Bunnell farm, which I almost forgot to mention proved to far exceed my expectations. I am satisfied that one of these little farms is the best life insurance policy a man can leave his family, for not only does it provide a home, but also a haven against adversity. I had expected to find it rather hot, but on the contrary, enjoyed a cool breeze every day of my visit to Florida. Yours very truly, E. G. HOFFMAN, Pennsylvania. 1I7II A T" 1 An Iowa Farmer Advises W llA 1 Renters to do. Dear Sir: I have just returned from a visit to the Bunnell-DuPont colony. As you know, I bought ten acres of land from you some time ago while I was living in Nebraska, and I wish to state that I am well pleased with the property you sold me. There is one thing I cannot understand, and that is why there are so many people who do not own, or do not try to own their own homes. In this community there are a great number of renters, many of them living from hand to mouth. With the rent they pay they could own their own homes in Bunnell, where they could live independently and take life easy, after they had brought their land under cultivation. I like Bunnell very much and although it is in its infancy I predict a great future for the colony and for the town. The people in Bunnell are the right class of people and as soon as you get more families to clear their land and locate on their farms the price of land will advance rapidly. I hope to go back and build me a nice little home and live there the rest of my life. I can recommend the colony to every one. Yours respectfully, WM. PARKER, Iowa. 117If i T A Washington man who has ff llA 1 seen much of the World Thinks of Bunnell-Dupont. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I left Pullman, Washington, on December 16 and arrived at Bunnell December 22. I may tell you that to my surprise I found everything just as you had advertised it, and I give you great credit for this. I am a man 65. years of age. I have traveled a great deal in my days. I have been through different parts of Europe and South Africa. I lived in California for 33 years, in Oregon 6 years, and I have been in Washington for 17 years, but I will say since I have been down to Florida and looked over your colony, that in all my travels I have never seen anything that looked better to me. I have been a farmer and have raised stock for many years, but I never saw any better opportunities for either than in Florida. I want to say this to you people who read the Home Builder. DonÂ’t be afraid to go to the Bunnell colony. I read the pamphlets before I left and I have studied them since I came home, and I found everything to be true as advertised. If it was not, I should let you all know. If all companies had been as straightforward and honest as the Bunnell Company we never would have heard so many bad reports about Florida. You can build up a home at Bunnell that in a few years you can be proud of. Practically anything will grow there. You have the land, the markets, and the finest of climates. There you can have everything you ask for. What more do you want? Florida for me. (Washington.) E. B. LYBECKER.

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m@ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER I ITT | A 'T* An Iowa Poultryman says of W SHa\ I his Success at Bunnell. I ITT T IT A Michigan Farmer who had “to Yf flit 1 be shown” found out in the colony. Mr. Thos. A. Yerdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir: I am going to tell you some of my ex periences in the p o u 1 try business, and what I think of the Bunnell colony as a poultry dis trict. I consider any of the Leghorn breeds well adapted to the state of Florida, but as I am a breeder of Single Comb "White Leghorns I like them best. I started in the poultry busi ness in 1907, with a few brown Leghorn hens and was well pleased w'ith them, but later sold them to a neighbor and bought some Barred Plymouth Rocks and Buff Orping tons. They, how ever, spelled failure for me on the dry arid land of western Dakota. In 1909 I started with fiftyfour white Leghorns. They proved to be regular egg machines. When the Rocks and Orpingtons were hunting the shaded ground, .Miss Leghorn was busy chasing bugs and laying eggs. IMid-winter 1913 I shipped ten Leghorn pullets to my farm near Bunnell, Florida, and I never saw chickens do as well as these did at Bunnell. My coop was 8x12 and the yard was ODly 24x56 feet, but they never stopped laying while I was in Florida. The Leghorns were imported from Italy to America, so Florida ought to be the ideal American home for them, as Florida is really the Italy of America. All we need in the line of shelter in Florida, for poultry, is three walls and a waterproof roof and a good large yard to keep the chickens out of the garden, and we have the egg machines in working order. There was no time, during my stay^ in Florida, that eggs went below twenty-five cents a dozen and when I returned to my business in Iowa, July 30 th, 19.13, the price of eggs in Bunnell was thirty-five cents per dozen. I am a Scandinavian, and wish to say a few words to those Scandinavians who would like to move to a milder climate. I don’t think you could do better than to buy a farm in the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Ten acres will be all right for a small family, but twenty acres would do better. It will give more room for buildings and allow pasture for acow. The Bunnell Development Company is square in all its dealings. They have the right kind of soil and, as a rule, good water and an ideal climate. What more do we want? Now you farmers who have good farms in the northern states when you want to retire from your farm work, don’t sell your farm and move to town—only rent it and buy a small farm in our colony and make this your winter home. I don’t think, Mr. Farmer, that you will ever be sorry for such a move and I believe that when once you come, you are here to stay. If we don’t want to work our land in the Bunnell colony we can always rent it. Yours truly, HENDRICK C. FADNESS, Iowa. Dear Mr. Verdenius: After my return from Bunnell in December I planned to write you a letter for the Home Builder, but this seems the first opportunity I have had. The morning I here for Florida a who saw me my ticket and learned where I was ejaculated, “Huh! Bun nell. Turpentine still. Rotten place. Watch out for it.” So I ceived a chill at the very start, and differ ent people with whom I became acquainted on the trip when they learned of my destina tion said in substance about the same thing. Many of these people were winter tourists, and their cry was, “Go farther south, to Tampa, Miami, or some such place.” The first man I mentioned had been through Bunnell a number of years ago, before the land was ever developed, and I believe he spoke sincerely. Mr. L. A. Rogers So you can imagine my state of mind by the time I arrived at Bunnell. I certainly was happily surprised, after what I had been forced to swallow for several days. I expected to see a dreary, forsaken place, but the neat build ings, attractive streets and general prosperous conditions cheered me at once. Mr. Turner, who was at the train, gave me the glad hand of welcome, and in the few days that followed while riding by his side in the Company’s auto, viewing the fine, level country, seeing the many improvements that have been made, I could not help but wonder at the progress that has been made in such a few short years. I seized every opportunity to go over the colony with Mr. Turner, which gave me an opportunity to see it from all sides, and I’ll bet he was glad to see me go, for if anyone is an expert at asking questions it is Yours Truly, but he seemed to take it all in good part. Still, I wasn’t satisfied. The fact that Bunnell is a beautiful and rapidly growing town, populated with as fine a people as could be found, does not prove a single point. It is all up to the land to make good. If that fails, all will fail. That is what I wanted to make sure of, so had as many talks with the farmers as my short stay would allow. I spent one night with Mr. Wehrman and had a very enjoyable and instructive time. We spent nearly a day looking over the land and got caught in quite a rain, which was rather wet, strange to say. You have read many descriptions of the land in the Home Builder, and it has been told pretty straight, so I will not say anything about that. I wanted to know what the land would produce. I do know that sweet potatoes will grow some, for I swiped several and brought them to Michigan. They were fine and the yield is abundant. And sugar cane! I didn’t think it possible for anything to grow so thick and handsome. These were the only crops I found in the fields while there, but they were enough. If everything else grows in proportion, and the farmers say they do, that is enough for me. I am a farmer, and that feature of the place appealed to me, but I must say that the prospects for fruits are equally as good. It was with regret that I left Bunnell, and I, for one, predict a great future for our colony. Yours very truly. Michigan. L. A. ROGERS.

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m<2 BUMNIE1LIL HOME BUILDER Letters from Men who live in the Colony Mr. W. A. Mack, formerly of California, Tells the Story of Bunnell-Dupont’s Steady Growth. (When Mr. Verdenius became connected with the Bunnell j Development Company, the first man he located on a farm was Air. IF. A. Alack of California, and this was in the latter part of October, 1911. In April, 1912, Air. Alack wrote a letter telling just what he had accomplished in five months, and this letter was a great inspiration to many who have since bought farms. To all these, as well as every other reader of the I Home Builder, the following letter from Air. Alack will be most interesting. These are the sincere words of a sincere man, and they briefly tell the story of our colony’s growth. — Editor.) Dear Mr. Verdenius: I have been sitting back and watching results, and watch ing our colony settle up, really beyond my expectations; and to tell you the truth, I feel a little ashamed of myself that I have not contributed at least a few words to the Home Builder, which we are always glad to read. In the first place, I want to say a few words about the letter I wrote you in 1912. I am still getting letters every few days from people who read that letter, and wonder if I really wrote it, or if the Company made it up. I wish to say to such people that we are here on the same 40 acres that we were on when I wrote to you, and we are glad we are here, and I think if the people who have written me would only visit our place, I could soon convince them that every word in the 1912 letter was the truth. I know that I was very sincere in writing what I did. I was anxious to have people come into the colony, for we were very much alone when we first came here. You remember, Mr. Verdenius, where you took us, clear out to the extreme end of the Moody Road at that time, three miles south of Bunnell. We had only one neighbor then, and that was Mr. Lambert, who lives one mile nearer Bunnell. But it is different now. We have neighbors on every side of us, and close up, too, and the Moody Road has been extended on into Volusia County to accommodate the new settlers that are going in south of me. It is true that we have met with some reverses since we have been here, but they were very small compared to what they bright have been in other countries. It is true we have some heavy rains in Florida, but they do not destroy men’s lives, nor do they destroy railroads and wagon bridges, or float away houses and cattle as they do in other states. I have just received a letter from my daughter today telling of the terrible floods in California. The Salinas valley is almost completely submerged and millions of dollars of damage has been done. We do not have such floods as these in Florida. The rainstorms may drown out a few crops that are not properly looked after, but that is about all the damage they do. I have been here now over two years and I believe I have learned enough about Florida to know what I am writing about, and I will say I prefer Florida to any country I ever lived in. Our daughter started today from Salinas, California, for Bunnell, and you can imagine about how anxious we are for the train to pull into Bunnell that will bring her to us. Well, Mr. Verdenius, I must say a few words about Bun nell and then I will close. Bunnell is making the finest kind of advancement. She is not booming like some western towns I have seen, that grew at a tremendous rate for a few months and then died out, but Bunnell is growing permanently. Her business men are here to stay, and among the new enterprises is the Johnson Hardware & Supply Company. Mr. Johnson’s store is up to date and he is certainly laying a foundation for a permanent and profitable business. We wish him the success that his efforts and courteous treatment deserves. The McArn Grocery Company is another most worthy establishment, as is also the Bunnell Cold Storage & Meat Market. Bunnell’s greatest-felt need has been met by Mr. Bacher, recently from Waverly, Iowa, in the way of a wagon and blacksmith shop. Mr. Bacher has put up a shop that is not only a great credit to Bunnell, but would be a credit to any city. It is neat enough to be right up on Main street, and the beauty of it is we have the mechanic inside. And Mr. Szabelski has established an automobile garage and machine shop, so you see we have everything now right to our hand here in Bunnell, and the future for this colony looks very bright to me. The prospects for this time of the year for a big spring crop never looked so good to me since we have been in Florida as they do now, and the light of the comfortable home we had pictured out before we came here begins to shine upon us. Wishing all the settlers of the Bunnell colony a most suc cessful year, and with kind regards to yourself and family. I am. Respectfully yours, Florida. W. A. MACK. Picture of a portion of Mr. Mack’s farm taken a short time after he had purchased it. Is it any wonder thfit Florida is progressing at a rate which arouses the astonishment of all who come from far away sections? week by week goes by, winter or summer, j more proof comes to the surface of the development that is bringing the best State inthe Union into j her own. Here a county votes for good roads, there a railroadis pushing a new artery of trade i down into fertile but undeveloped, territory, an other place a city votes for schools, still another for bonds, great tracts of lands are being developed, big manufacturing plants, immense hotels, new homes by the thousand dotted over the fair State, j A Former Canadian says: “It’s great to gather green peas and celery from one’s own garden” in Winter. I have just selected a 10-acre farm for my friend, Mr James Duncan of British Columbia, Canada. Everybody in the colony is busy with their potato crop. Strawberries are growing fine and the peach trees are in full bloom. I want to tell you that it is great to gather green peas and celery from one’s own garden at this time of the year and to enjoy this lovely sunshine. The ther mometer registered today noon 70 degrees. What abou r Chicago. S. J. HARRISON, Florida.

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BOTHELL IOME BUILDER and who know what they are talking about. 31r. Garnier, of Canada, wishes he had come to the Colony three years instead of three months ago. Dear Mr. Verdenius: Well, dear sir, you are the cause of my coming to Florida, and I thank yon very much for it, for if I had remained in Canada (that frozen country in winter, and roaster in sum mer) I believe I would be in my grave now; but instead of 'hat, I feel ten years younger, am healthy and strong and digging away and planting things on my beautiful farm. I enjoy it very much; so does my son who is with me. Z wish we had come here three years ago instead of three months ago. We have planted and sowed a good many things since ;>ur arrival here and I am going to put some sticks to my teas today. Talk about Florida land:—it is great! What ever we have sown and planted so far, has grown wonder fully. I sowed some parsley seed, which generally takes from fifteen to twenty days to come up, but mine was up in five days and is way above' the ground now. I also planted a bed of three hundred strawberry plants. Host of them are in bloom now and they were planted about three weeks ago. I have carrots, turnips parsnips, abbage, cauliflower, radishes, onions, celery, thyme, sum mer savory, in my garden and many other things, all of v-hick are growing nicely. It seems you can almost see :hem grow. Of course, one has to work and have a system :o go by. I am satisfied with Florida land, especially Bunnell land. I do not want any better. We have cleared a large patch :i land where we are going to plant Irish potatoes. I am : leased with my land and with the climate, which is grand. It is wonderful to he working outside every day in one’s ihirt-sleeves. When I compare this to frozen Canada it almost makes me shiver. Canada will never see me again. I intend to live as long as I can in this beautiful' country and when my life is ended I shall be buried here, for it is even too cold to he buried in Canada—so you can see I love this country, I love the climate, I love my farm and I love the people here. I hope I shall succeed in my under takings, and I have been successful so far. I am building a fine cottage on my farm—forty feet by twenty-two. I am uilding it good and substantial; I am building it very :asty, for, as I have told you before, I can say without boasting, that I am a good carpenter, also a good painter and house decorator. I expect later on, to raise some pigs and chickens, and fiope to set out fruit trees as soon as I have time. You see we have to work very hard at present, my faithful boy and myself, clearing, sowing, planting and building. We have our work laid out, but in time we shall geirthrough ft. With patience and perseverance one can do many •kings. Bunnell for me forever! Yours respectfully, JOSHUA GARNIER, Florida. ATTENTION PLEASE! We want to remind the readers of the Home Builder that the resi dents of Bunnell-DuPont who write letters for our paper each month, -re very busy men and women, and they do not have time to write tersonal letters to you. Some of our farmers have received as many is ten letters a day, after having written a letter to the Home 3uilder. You can understand that these people cannot take time to answer your questions, and we would suggest that if you insist on hearing from any of them, that you enclose $1.00 in your letter to pay them for their time and trouble. EDITOR. Mr. Brock, formerly of Arkansas, tells of the possibilities of our soil. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir and Friend: As I have been a resident of Bunnell for two years, and receive the Bunnell Home Builder free of charge, which I appreciate very much, I thought I would write you of my impressions of Bunnell and its possibilities, as I see them. This is a busy place now. There are two fine buildings south of the depot on Moody Boulevard in course of erec tion, which makes five besides the brick buildings that have been built lately. Mr. Backus’ shop is completed and it is an ornament to the town, and is a busy place, for Mr. Baehus has plenty of work on hand, which he knows how to take care of. I : was talking to a stranger recently, and I shall repeat our conversation for the benefit of the readers of the Home Builder. The newcomer said to me, “Does anything else grow here besides Irish potatoes? For everyone I see around here is hauling away Irish potatoes for seed, and all they talk about is Irish potatoes.” I replied, “Yes, at this time of the year many are interested in planting Irish potatoes, but I do not consider potatoes the main crop by any means. We can grow all kinds of citrus fruits here to perfection; we can raise sugar cane and make §15 0.00 per acre, and seldom have a failure, and only replant it every three years; and we can also raise mighty fine sweet potatoes. I saw land this past summer after a crop of Irish potatoes was taken off produce 300 bushels of sweet potatoes without any more fertilizer than was in the ground after the Irish potatoes were harvested. Yes, sir, and we can grow plenty of forage for stock—cowpea hay, oats, German millet, Kaffir corn, field corn, clover and Spanish peanuts, the last named good for man and beast. We grow all kinds of vegetables, and ship what we do not need for home use.” In our talk about oranges, I remarked that at presidential election we can plant an orange grove, and at the next election we can make a present of a box of oranges to the new President. I know a man a few miles from here who has a small grove of two or three acres and he told a friend of mine that he was all fixed now, and that his living was secured. Can a wheat grower or a cotton grower in any state say the same with two or three acres of land, that he is provided for in his old age? I am preparing myself to plant a few acres to oranges and grapefruit, to take care of me in my old age. If we prepare the land here thoroughly, and ditch-it when neces sary, it will grow anything I have mentioned, and many others that I have not mentioned. Some people think that all they have to do is to plow i up the land, put in Irish potatoes, and make a lot of money in a few months. This is a great mistake. The land needs a thorough course of preparation. It should have a crop of cowpeas planted and plowed under the first season, and at least 1,000 oounds of acid phosphate to the acre, also plowed or disked in. Then if the other necessary things i are done, such as rotting the sod and picking roots, one may reasonably expect a good crop of Irish potatoes. So I advise all newcomers to have all the money they can gather up to start with, for it takes money here as it does anywhere, to build up a neAV home and succeed. I showed my new acquaintance a three-year-old orange tree in Mr. Hardesty’s garden with 28 large oranges on it now. Yes, Bunnell is good enough for me. If I don’t make good I am the one who is deficient. Please excuse this long letter. I had not expected to write so much. Yours truly, Bunnell, Florida. W. A. BROCK.

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me BUHHELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month CITY DIRECTORY. Church Services: METHODIST CHURCH. Preaching—Sunday, 11 a. m. Preaching—Sunday, 7 p. m. Sunday School—10 a. m. Secret Orders: A. F. & A. M., NO. 200. Meets every second and fourth Tues day at 7 o’clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. Mohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every first and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at Castle Hall, in Bank Building. The next regular meeting of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union will be held at the Methodist Church at 2 o’clock on the afternoon of next Tues day, February 10th. A special program will be rendered and not only the mem bers, but the Christians and all inter ested in the cause of temperance are most cordially invited to be present.— Cora Miles, Press Superintendent. A Catholic priest of Minnesota has spent the past week in the colony mak ing plans for the establishment of a Catholic Church here. He has received authority from the Bishop of St. Augus tine to establish a church in our colony. Bunnell can now boast of an up-todate blacksmith and repair shop, Mr. Bacher having completed his shop on Moody boulevard, which is up-to-date in every way. He is also erecting a cottage on the lot adjoining the shop. Every farmer in the colony is enjoy ing outdoor life, for he is busy in his field from morning to night engaged in planting Irish potatoes. Many have their potatoes all planted and some of them have beautiful green fields already. Mr. C. W. Worthington, of Brooksville, Ky., is having his land on the Espanola road just north of Bunnell cleared and will plant it to oranges and grapefruit this year. Mr. J. Bauman made a fine shipment of lettuce and cabbage today (February 2d). The first of his crop will be shipped every week. The lettuce went to Ohio, the cabbage to Palm Beach. February 4th. Mr. Jepson has a fine field of potatoes (sixteen acres) just breaking through the ground. The following are among those who are erecting new buildings: Mr. Bacher, double tenement; Mr. Williams, bunga low; Mr. Chapman, fine residence; Mr. Foster, another cottage. George Moody’s house is nearing completion and a ten ant is waiting for same. Mr. Hardesty is building an addition to his house, to accommodate the over flow of people who cannot be taken care of at the hotel. “Mellow Hill,” the beautiful farm of Mr. W. H. Cochran, is being planted to potatoes by the Independent Potato Company, Robert Moody, President. Mr. Mosby reports a good stand of potatoes. February 11th. Mr. Jepson’s field of spuds are certainly fine and growing rapidly. Mr. Mack’s eighteen acres of potatoes are also showing up fine. Mr. J. O’Keepe, a prominent con tractor of New Jersey, returned here after a trip farther South, and pur chased a fine farm. Another shipment of cabbage went out from the Bauman farm today. Field of Cabbage, about two miles south of Bunnell, belonging to Mr. Lambert, formerly of Oklahoma. It is reported that 100 carloads of cabbage are ready for shipment from DuPont, and are already sold at $1.75 per hamper. These will probably net $10,000.00 to the owners. Mr. I. I. Moody has offered to buy all the potatoes he can get, f. o. b. Bun nell, but few wish to sell, preferring to wait and take their chances on getting higher prices. The outlook for high prices is very good. Mr. E. D. Burke, of Vermont, has arrived his property on Moody boulevard. Since arriving here he has bought several pieces of property. He says Florida for the bal ance of his days. District Deputy R. E. Neck, of Palatka, attended the meeting of Mohawk Lodge No. 128, Knights of Pythias. Monday night, and installed the officers for the ensuing term. Mr. T. J. Rose, of Toledo, Ohio, has built a nice little cottage on his tract of land some distance south of Bunnell. He and his wife moved into their new home several days ago. Miss Lucia Hudson, supervisor of Girls’ Canning Clubs in St. Johns County, spent yesterday in Bunnell. w r here she aroused intense interest in canning club plans. She was cordially | received by the citizens and the public I school and had the pleasure of addressi ing a mass meeting hastily assembled | at her hotel. All eligible girls in Bun| nell were enrolled as members, with the hearty approval of their parents. Seed | planting was demonstrated and the ini tial work of the Bunnell Division of the club was well begun. Among the prominent citizens of Bunnell who gave encouragement to j Miss Hudson was Mr. I. I. Moody, presi dent of the Bunnell State Bank, who j pledged a canning outfit for the Bunnell j Club. Several boys who are not eligible for membership in the Canning Club gave in their names I for the Boys, Corn Club, which is to be organized later. Several of the Bunnell people went over to the beach near Ocean City Sun day, there being three cars that made the trip. An oyster supper was given in Bun nell on Friday evening, February 6th. by the Earnest Workers, the proceeds going to help pay' for the church piano. The Oceola farm on the Deen road near town, which is owned by Mr. Toleman, of Washington, is beginning to have the appearance of an up-to-date farm under the management of Messrs. Brock and Jenkins. Mr. H. Culbreth, representing the H G. Miles & Co., commission merchants, of New York, arrived at Bunnell last week to see what the prospects in his line of business would be this coming spring and when told of the large acre age of potatoes that had been planted and are being planted, his face bright ened and he assured every one that we would see him in the colony when pota toes are ready to be dug. Mr. Fred R. Allen, one of our larges farmers, was in the city Wednesday, en route to his famous Almero farm over on the canal. Air. C. F. Turner, field manager of the Development Company, is kept very busy since the first of the year showing the buyers their lands.

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Who UHH£LL HOME BUILDER AGRICULTURE Agriculture—cau any word be spoken or written upon wbicb more depends than that one word? We find otixer words in the English language much more musical in sound and more dignified, as it were—but, do we find words upon which any more actually de pends than the word agriculture? Words which hold the whole world, so to speak, in the hollow of their hand; words which provide, in practical and actual performance of what they represent, the necessities of man, of the great human race? No, most assur edly not. Then, why is this little word “agri culture” so great, and why does so much de fend upon it? And what does depend upon it? Now do -.Dt say it is not true, for if you consider you will see that %  is true—everything depends upon it. In prehistoric times men lived upon roots, berries, etc., ust those things, and those only, which they could find on :he land over which they roamed. They clothed themselves ith a few skins of animals ana lived in caves. They did rot live, in the sense we modern people do; they existed, ~erely existed, and were often at war among themselves. They used clubs as instruments of defense, and many stone .nplements, first of a rough nature, and later smooth and rolished. Mr. G. M. Nuss Home of Mr. G. M. Nuss Ages passed, and at about the period of 6000 B. C. we ind that the Egyptians were practicing agriculture and many of the fine arts. The valley of the Nile was a fairly good agricultural country, and they, desiring something Tetter than prehistoric man, consequently began a great advancement in farming. The Romans and Greeks also were interested in agricul ture, as is shown by their having a goddess of agriculture. Teres; and a goddess of vegetation, Proserpine. The myth ological tale is that Proserpine was captured by Pluto, god of the Lower World, and lived with him six months, and with her mother, Ceres, on earth for six months. In her absence everything withered and died—winter; in her pres ence things became green—summer. So we see agriculture bolds a place.both in history and mythology. It is the most prominent industry in the world today, because it is the means by which the greater part of the human race obtains its sustenance. What would the people in the great cities do if it were not for agriculture? Why, consider, there would be no cities if it were not for agricul ture—no railroads, no stores, no mines, no schools, no hotels—nothing practically. To have these things we must have thousands of men engaged in various industries and professions. Can these men perform their duties without some means of sustaining life? No. Then they must have something to live upon, and what is it? Wheat, rice, potatoes, beans, corn, meats, etc. All these are the products of agriculture. So, without any reason of doubt, everything depends upon agriculture. There must undoubtedly be someone to produce these products of the soil; every man cannot be a lawyer, doctor, merchant, mechanic or engineer. Some must be farmers— the most independent men on earth, and not only that, but he who by honest and conscientious effort provides for him self and family from the products of his land, and also sells for the benefit of the public and his bank account, has, in my estimation, more true nobility, nobility of heart and purpose, than the kings and emperors of all Europe. Tenny son said; “Howe’er it be, it seems to me ’Tis only noble to be good, Kind hearts are more than coronets. And simple faith than Norman blood.” In this case it is noble to be a tiller of the soil, to be one who produces something intended for man’s upbuilding and comfort. A simple, yet noble occupation is more than Norman knighthood of old. He who sets himself to become a tiller of the soil is devoting himself to the most noble and independent occupation today. He has a position of which to be proud, and above all, he is his own “boss,” and that means much to anyone. What could be more delightful than a beautiful home on a farm with an abundance of vegetables, fruits, flowers and pure air? A million dollar mansion on Fifth avenue. New York, could not compare with it in comfort, beauty and healthfulness. If one should say to me, “What can I do to be independent and have a pleasant and profitable occu pation?” I would without any hesitation give this reply, “Pursue the most noble course, and become a tiller of the soil—an agriculturist.” Fifty thousand dollars will he paid Miami fishermen for this week’s catch of Spanish mack erel. from present indications, the heaviest catches of the season being reported by nearly all the com panies. It is learned that 250,000 pounds of mack erel have been shipped this week, while 100,000 pounds are on the way in now and will reach the houses before noon today. All crews report excel lent catches.—Miami Herald. Newly Erected School Building in Dupont

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m& BUHH£LL HOME BUIILS>&K, Important Announcement PRICE OF LAND IN THE ORIGINAL BUNNELLDUPONT COLONY AGAIN TO BE ADVANCED. T HE greater portion of land in the original Bunnell-Dupont Colony has been sold. There are just a few choice farms still available, and some of these are very well located. The reason that these farms are still on the market is owing to the fact that some of our original purchasers lapsed their accounts. <1 When one considers the immense amount of development work that has already taken place in this original tract, and the fact that the Bunnell-Dupont Colony is known all over the State as the most successful and attractive colonization proposition to be found anywhere, he will begin to understand that every acre of this land is worth more today than the price we ask for it. Cf When this tract of land was first opened up, we sold some of our farms for §20.00 an acre; later the price was advanced to $25.00; then to $30.00, and last summer to $35.00 and $40.00 an acre. We now wish to announce that on May 1, 1914, the price of all the unsold land in the original colony will be advanced to $50.00 an acre. I have just received a letter from President 1.1. Moody, requesting us to make this announcement in the March issue of the Home Builder. €) If you desire a farm in this original tract, or if you wish to have a friend located near you there, we advise you to send in your order before May 1st. We give two months’ notice of this advance in price, so that our present customers and all others with whom we have been corresponding will have an opportunity to secure land at the present price. CJ Please keep this announcement in mind, and make up your mind at once if you desire one.of these farms. GENERAL SALES OFFICE: UNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 108 SOUTH LA SALLE STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. Florida’s most beautiful March flower is the magnolia, and the photograph above shows a cluster of these blossoms. The magnolia tree, devoid of its blossoms, is a thing of great beauty, as it lifts its waxen green leaves towards the clear blue of the Southern skies. If you are a stranger in Florida, and should chance upon a magnolia tree at this season of the year, you would behold a most beautiful sight. Far above your head, nestling among the green leaves, you will see great clusters of white blossoms. It is indeed a sight worth seeing—another of Nature’s rare gifts to Florida.