Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
S. HOWARD, Editor
1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicailo, Ill.
Vol. 2 January,.19,14 J~o. 2
THEE~]OR' PERSO AL FLORIDA FRUITS COMEE The next best thing to spending
THEEDTO 'SPE SO AL AS A DELIGHTFUL Chita nFlorida, is to have
CHR-ISTMALS R E M E.NL- a bit of Florida come to us in
PAGE BRANCE. the North at Christmas time.
7 True, we can always go to the
YOUR NEW YEAR From time immemorial the advent stores and buy fruit, a wreath of holly, or a sprig of
RESOLUTION. of the New Year has been the occa- mistletoe, and we are told they came from Florida, but
sion .for""turning over a new leaf," one does not find such a delight in these things, as if they for making one or more resolutions as to our future con- traveled all the way from Florida "on purpose" for him. duct or plans. Mr. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development CoinThe New Year is indeed a fitting time for the com- pany, therefore made the Editor's heart glad by sending us
mencement of new undertakings. The old year with its for Christmas two large boxes filled with a beautiful assorthopes and its disappointments, its successes and its fail- ment of oranges, tangerines and grapefruit-perfect in forures, is gone. We cannot bring it back or change what mation and delightful in flavor. Never have oranges tasted
has occurred during its twelve months. But the New Year so sweet since the days when we gathered them from the
of promise is opening to us and it is for us to make of it trees in Florida, as these sent us by Mr. -Moody. something better than the previous years have been. It seems rather selfish to tell our readers about such a
What is your New Year resolution? What goal are you treat, and not have shared it with them, but since many of
striving to reach? What success are you endeavoring to you were so far away, this was impossible, and we can only
attain? It is well to sit down quiety and think these things wish that the time will soon come when "You all" will be over-make your resolution, and then set to work with a permanently located on your own little Florida farms, where
full determination to carry it through, no matter what ob- you may be able to gather such 'delicious fruit from your stacles you may encounter. groves.
If you were provident enough during the past year
or previous years to purchase for yourself a farm-home
in the Bunnell-DuPont Colony, that some day will give
you independence and the comforts of life, be thankful DO YOU WANT TO KNOW The Editor had in mind an
for this, and resolve that no matter what may happen, hard "A REMIEDY FOR HARD editorial for this issue of the times or ill health, you will pay for your land and be able TIES?" THEN READ MR. Home Builder on the present to rest in the assurance of a real home of your own in old VTERDENLUS' ARTICLE IN so-called "hard times," but
age. THIS ISSUE. when Mr. Verdenius' article
And you, who have been hesitant and doubtful, let was received, he felt that but
me urge you earnestly and sincerely to make one resolu- little more could be said along this line, and so it is given
tion at least, in this, the beginning of the New Year, that to you for your careful thought and consideration with this you will purchase a farm at Bunnell, and that you will buy brief comment, "Them's my sentiments, too." your farm at once, while you can-secure a very choice loca- Mr. Verdenius has in a clear, concise manner given us tion in the new tract. much food for thought in this article, "A Remedy for Hard
The Editor wishes for every reader of the Home Builder Times." It is indeed a sad thing when misfortunes, hardin the New Year much happiness and prosperity, and can ships Or calamities befall and there is no remedy for them, candidly say that he knows of no better way towards at- but we should feel that it is a matter for rejoicing when taining both, than by becoming the -owner -of a Home of- one can find a solution for these difficulties, and you will be Your Own, for delighted to read that Mr. Verdenius' remedy for hard times
"He who owns a home of his own, -is nothing more or less than "back to the land." Read careIf only a cottage with vines overgrown, fully what he says, act accordingly, and help your friends
Of the pleasure of life gets a larger per cent, eliminate their troubles by having them read "A Remedy
Than his haughtiest neighbor who has to pay rent." for Hard Times."
-~z --- -77-Pitr fOrnegoe erBnel, AWne Scn in Michian-HC OYU R.l? Pckn rne.na unl
taken inDcme WNE NW"or"UN KE"i aur




Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
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https:/!archive.org/details/bunnellhomebuildv2no_0




Mhe BUNNELLL HOMX BUILDER
Montana Lawyer states that hie "found no better soil in the
South than that in the Bunnell Dupont Colony."
Chester, Montana, Dec. 12, 1913. 1 looked for the disadvantages and objectionable features Mr. hos.A. erdeius everywhere. I used my eyes and ears much and my mouth Mr. hos.A. erdeius less. I peered into the thickets for snakes and alligators, Chicago, Ill. btIswnihr re ocnentesibti c
My Dea Sir:quitted itself upon its own evidence. I attacked the drinkYou asked me to ing water, but it came out clear. I mentally objected to
write you of my im- the dry surface, but found an abundance of moisture just
pressions of Florida. underneath. I reasoned that such sandy land could not Very well, I am glad to produce bountiful crops; but the beautiful orange and do so. I will send you grapefruit groves and vegetable gardens, undid my arguthe following:met
Left Montana No- met
vember 4, and have iFlorida offers the new colonist good soil, plenty of moisjust returned after an ture and a perfect climate. These three great assets are absence of some thirty- Nature's gifts. The colonist, the home-maker, must supply seven days. ithe other requisites, viz.: seed, labor and judgment. Nature
Traveled over Du- Imeets us half way. For healthfulness of the climate and val, St., Johns, Volusia, Ithe net income for_ her cultivated acres, a glance at the Putnam, Alachua and United States government's statistics shows Florida well in
Marion counties, in thled
- -, Florida, by a u to0,
j buggy, steamboat and I made a special trip to attend a county fair, and what 1
S on foot. there saw, before my eyes, put all my inborn doubts to
I bought ten acres of flight, and Florida won her case with me by a mere pre- ~~ Bunnell land last June ponderance of evidence. .I have, therefore, come back to
and, after carefully in- Montana to arrange to make the sunny peninsula my future
-specting same on this home.
C. Louis Brazee trip, together w i t h
many other tracts, in The truth about Florida is an all sufficiency. If the genthe counties above named, I came back home the owner, eral public were in possession of that truth, there would be not only of ten acres, but another ten also. This tells you jno more primitive Florida lands for sale at $35.00 an acre, whether or not I was satisfied. within three months thereafter. The American people genFrom the view point of an attorney, I examined the tftle erally know a good thing when they see it, but, in this case, to your holdings and am satisfied. only a few have seen it.
I had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Again; let me not be misunderstood: I believe that the
Messrs. Moody, Lambert, Heath and Turner. One is for- Northerner's first impression, in many cases, of the Florida tunate to be able to add such men to the list of his acquaint- country, will not measure up with his pre-conceived mental ances, and their friendship is an asset to one's fortune. I standard. This was so in my own case; but he who puts consider these men straight and white through and through. the whole matter to the careful and impartial test, as 1
Florida is not a place where one may find bank bills hang- have tried to do, will surrender his objections as I have ing from the trees, nor gold and silver coins under his feet been compelled to do, and become a home owner in the land
-excepting by, with and through honest toil, guided by Iof sunshine and flowers, health and happiness, peace and energy and common sense, a will, a real man's eff ort, a plenty. cool, level-headed, pre-conceived and well sustained deter- I will state just here, that I found no better soil in all my mination to win; and then, the bank bills and coins will be travels in the South, than I found in the Bunnell-DuPont his in abundance. There will he find climate and soil, colonies. I will say, further, that I cannot conscientiously ready, open, inviting, beckoning to a million people to come advise any person or persons without means or experience and find health, peace and plenty. to go to Florida, if he or they expect to find a fortune alFlorida's greatest need today is, and ever will be, tillers ready- wrapped and stamped. for such will not be the case; of her wonderful soil; farmers, intensive husbandmen. Give but, for him or them who can go prepared to make a proper her these, and she will give them all they ask. beginning, there need be no doubt of an abundant and happy
"What man has done, man may do," and what Florida future.
has done, Florida may do, and with increased abundance. I took occasion, while there, to talk with pioneer colonist,
I saw and personally examined her products, embracing and, in the main, I found them happy and prosperous. I oranges, grapefruit, vegetables, poultry and other staples, ate of their vegetables and fruits and found them to be exand found them to be excellent. I must predict a great cellent. The longer the term of residence in Florida, the increase in Florida's enormous output in the future, and I better satisfied I found the resident. This certainly speaks must, likewise, predict a like increase in the price of Florida well for the state. lands. Had people known of California, Alaska, Nevada and Colorado's mineral wealth a hundred years before they In my judgment, Florida, today, offers such inducements did, their mines would be a hundred years older than they to the home-seeker as no other state, in my knowledge, carare today. As soon as they learned the truth, they grasped offer. I believe that her future, a few years hence, will be the opportunities. Likewise, when people learn of the hid- a genuine surprise to the American continent; for, certain den wealth of Florida-through the proper handling of her it is, that no other land this side of the Atlantic is so rich resources-they, too, will grasp- her opportunities. in its natural conditions and surroundings, reaching, as ir.
My first impressions of Florida, I am frank to say, were does, a half a thousand miles into the sub-tropical climate, not up to my expectations. Let no man be deceived by read- Ibetween two great bodies of deep, blue, terpered seas. ing this letter. Others might experience similar thoughts I have written quite enough, Mr. Verdenius, and will and feelings. I went to Florida to learn the truth. I tray- close, wishing you good cheer in your humane missionaryeled much, examined soil, native grasses, class and charac- labors of placing a worthy people in worthy homes. ter of trees and other growths, topographical conditions, Most respectfully yours,
looking to drainage, citrus and vegetable products, etc., etc. C. LOUIS BRAZEE.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Facts About Florida, and a Few Reasons Why the BunnellDupont Colony is the Best Place in the
United States in Which to Live
1. FLORIDA has the widest range of agricultural production of any state in the Union.
2. FLORIDA is 1,500 miles nearer the Northern markets and 2,500 miles nearer the Eastern markets than California.
3. FLORIDA products reach the markets first and get the best prices.
4. FLORIDA has the best climate in the United States to live in and the possibilities for both pleasiue and profit are unexcelled.
a. Florida is the land where sunstrokes, blizzards and cyclones are unknown.
6. FLORIDA climate has less variation in temperature than any other state in the Union.
7. FLORIDA farmers work out-of-doors every day in the year.
8. FLORIDA land can be bought with the money spent for fuel in Northern states.
9. FLORIDA enjoys ample and well distributed rainfall.
10. FLORIDA offers a soil and climate which are well adapted to fruits and vegetables that can-not be grown in the Northern states.
11. FLORIDA land values are constantly increasing.
12. FLORIDA potatoes and tomatoes produce large profits.
13. FLORIDA strawberries and celery are world famous, and $1,000 per acre crops have been grown on lands which cost only a few dollars an acre a few years ago.
14. FLORIDA produces the finest grapefruit and oranges in the world.
15. The soil is prolific and easy to till.
16. You can raise three vegetable crops or four mixed crops from the same land in one year.
17. You can have a charming home surrounded by the trees and flowers of a semi-tropical climate in Florida.
18. You can plant and harvest something every month in the year, and work out-of-doors every day.
19. Water is abundant, pure and soft.
20. Few, if any, states have ever progressed as Florida is progressing today.
The Bunnell-DuPont colony is the banner colony of Florida and offers today to the man seelkng a home or an investment, advantages unsurpassed anywhere in the United States.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Pennsylvrania Teacher says one cannot realize the many
advantages of Bunnell Dupont unless hie has seen it.
Dear Sir: in bathing as much as he pleased. As to the pretended
Upon my return gold, he had taken the word in its proper sense and was from Florida, where I wrong, just as many of our people are who judge of the
was engaged in clear- things with their eyes shut.
ing and plowing my .Everybody knows that there are some rivers in all the
land to make it ready continents in the sands of which real pure gold may be
-for sowing and plant- found, and we occasionally read that real small gold grains
ing, I am anxious to have been found in the stomachs of poultry, which they
say a few words about picked up from the sands; but as for Florida's sandy soil,
this beautiful land and I am not bold enough to assert that any pure gold or gold its wonders. Permit ore is to be found there, and yet gold exists and is lying
me, please, to go back hidden and sleeping in this soil. Let us look for it; let us J*, a little in my descrip- wake it-by clearing, plowing and harrowing the soil cheer-tion and begin at the fully; by sowing, planting and cultivating it with assiduity
beginning, and intelligence, and one morning when we shall awake and
After Columbus had rise to visit our sandy farm, we shall- scarcely be able to
discovered the Baha- believe and trust our eyes, when small golden grains peep* ,. ~ mas near the Atlantic ing out of pikes and ears will nod smiling and greeting us,
coas of meria in when large lumps of golden melons, cantaloupes and pineh4a d conueed Cubnard apples will form a precious carpet spread out around our had onqured uba feet, when pomelos, oranges, lemons, peaches, limes, guavas, early in the sixteenth primons and plums will richly cover the trees of our $~ Lcnr, Goveo of
entry, onc d e groves and when large, splendid golden berries or sweet Le o ,Gvro f grapes will be hanging on all sides from the vines of our
4,otoRcoJastl shady bowers and summer-houses. We shall not have to
J. T. Voby w nerfulan not fa fear any hoar-frost pernicious to our crops and vineyards.
J. T VOL4 wndeful andnot ar, It will be needless to be afraid of deadly explosions in facaway, where he would tories and mines which unfortunately threaten every minute
-:nd plenty of gold and a fountain which would make thlieofarwrknmnadteanhltonfter
:he old young again, and he was anxious to bathe in theilives, ofrhardoworimnadthynih.toohi
:he water of the miraculous fountain so that he might faieswotyfoupt.
regain his youth. He therefore undertook an exploration On the contrary, how happy shall we feel then, seeing
voyage, and cruising about for several weeks he struck the that we have more than enough to be provided, and can be mainland of North America (1513) and landed at a point with our beloved families for the rest of our lives. In this
not far from where St. Augustine, the county seat of our regard a farm affords greater satisfaction and content than e ounty, now stands and where our colony Bunnell-DuPont real gold and is therefore preferable to that glistening and is situated, ticklish metal, for "content is happiness."'
As the winter is unknown in that climate, and the dense The man who has not made a trip to Florida cangreen foliage and profusion of bright flowers were and are not believe all this to be true; nor is it sufficient to go only Still prevailing everywhere, he named the country "Florida," to one place where the land is not yet planted and bearing or "Land of Flowers." fruit. He who will convince himself of this soil's fertility
This name has been fully justified, for as far as one can ought to go further north, to Hastings and Palatka, or fursee, -nothing but shining green leaves of trees and bushes, ther south to New Smyrna, Indian River and the next vicinmixed with the light-green leaves of wild grapevines, with ity, where he will find the same soil as at Bunnell-DuPont, all kinds of verdure, and flowers bright with red, blue, Pink, but more developed. There he will stare with his eyes wide yellow and white blossoms and flowering bushes and roses open and in astonishment he will lay his finger upon the of every kind, wound of his incredulous heart, saying, "Lord, I believe!"
And just the same splendor and gorgeousness which we adMy four friends and I often walked on the railroad about mire now in the vicinity of the above mentioned places will twelve o'clock at noon, from DuPont to Bunnell (3y, miles) amaze us within a few years at Bunnell-DuPont. and back again, and on whatever side we cast our eyes, the Hastings, a place of recent development, produced and picture of this wonderful scene changed but little. It was shipped two years ago about 250,000 barrels of potatoes. never too hot, because the sea-breeze is constantly blowing, Our colony will follow and do the same before long. and the nights are always cool and restful.
As to mosquitoes, I was not molested by them in the Now I beg the permission of addressing a few sincere and
least, and in point of reptile I saw, but one dead snake candid words about our honorable company. All of us know lying killed on the railroad-a small gray grass-snake, very well that the company is laudably active and spending much money in building fine-houses and necessary streets Some people are audacious enough to pretend that Florida and digging indispensable ditches. We have at Bunnellis a "sand desert." Yes, the land is sandy and in its figura- DuPont a modern railroad traversing both places (the East tive sense it may also be called a "desert," but because it Coast Railroad). We have attractive newly built houses, was being devastated and deserted for many years, as it we have broad milk-white streets-but do not think that was the bone of contention and the seat of nearly continuous every acre of the company's land is under cultivation. If wars between the Indians and Spain, Spain and France, so, you will be disappointed. WH9EAT WVE NEED IS MORE
England and Spain, etc., until at last the country was pur- PEOPLE TO CLEAR AND~ PLANT THE LAND. chased by the United States (1819). M~~y farm is just at the corner of the town of DuPont. I
This sandy soil, producing gigantic trees, cannot be bad shall do and help as much as I can by planting over three at all. I have a fir-stump on my farm measuring three hundred different fruit trees and grapevines next spring. If
feet in diameter and it will cost much labor to remove it, all would improve their holdings what a wonderful country together with its colossal roots, and my father, who was Bunnell would be. an experienced farmer, always used to assert that only a Florida's climate is mild, healthful and agreeable.
good soil will produce such immense and prodigious trees.1,frmpatamulycniedothsneiyad
But, even an inferior soil may be improved many times Iut fo mvy partemfllovnced of haewite siwncherty and byadicosmnwtssudsne.pn ysadatv every reader can rely upon it and follow me, for "in union
hands.there is strength."
We know that Ponce de Leon did not find the gold which Yours very truly,
the cunning Indian showed him in a dazzling light, but he found most'grateful and comfortable springs with luke- J. T. VOLK,
warm water, bright as silver-f where he could take delight Pennsylvania.




-6/e BUNNELL HOMEL BUILDER
Bunnell-Dupont -well adapted to the Raising of'
Poultry and Fruit.
There are indeed but few places in Florida, or in the entire United States, where a man who wishes to give all ofhis time to poultry and fruit raising can find a better location than in the Bunnell-DuPond colony; therefore, I believe it a good plan to devote one page of the Home Builder this month to the discussion of the great possibilities that I B~unnell offers for these industries.
There are no two businesses that can be more success- 7
fully combined than the raising of fruit and poultry. While the poultry man is gathering eggs and selling broilers, he can, at the same time, be preparing to harvest an additional crop, in the way of increased profits from his fruit trees, etc. The orange and grapefruit groves may be used as poultry yards, and the trees will yield a larger crop from having the hens among them; and while the fruit trees are young, many kinds of vegetables and green poultry foods may be growni among the trees, and thus the poultry receives the benefit of this food the owner reduces his grain bills from fifty to seventy-five per cent. Poultry yard in Bunnell.
It must not be supposed for one moment that all or any of these fine results can be obtained by sitting down and waite777-1 ing for them. Hard work, good judgment and careful atten- ~ ..tion to details are just as necessary here as elsewhere, but
* 4. .the returns from this necessary attention are so far in excess of what is usually attained elsewhere that it seems to ~- -~ ,~be well worth the effort. The greater comfort with which one can perform these duties is also a very important factor in the work at Bunnell. In the first place, there is hardly
- a day in the year during which the sun does not shine at
least part of the time. Then, too, the climate is so de- lightful, so equable, so satisfying, that it is a joy at nearly
- all times to be out in the fresh, wine-like air, working
among the birds and the fruit trees and watching the ob- jects of one's attention growing to full maturity and a
- goodly supply of profits.
Eggs, at this writing, are selling for from fifty to sixty cents a dozen. Friers and broilers about forty-five cents
- ,~ ... -per pound alive, and the demand is good. These figures
V may give some slight idea of prevailing prices.
* -The fancier has large advantages over his Northern
brother on account of the hatching season coming so much earlier than in the North, and thus enabling him to get out early breeding stock for sale, and hatching eggs of far
- greater fertility than is usual with Northern raised eggs
pice tock aind tieggs hed has thegasasmacilities that thosepi stk winte tie.gs And has reads markeiting this thgh. . . .of the IN-orth have, through the medium of advertising and building up a reputation for delivering the goods as per, sample.
I cannot urge any one ~who expects to go in the poultry business too strongly to settle in Bunnell. There is room
-~ for a number of people to engage in the poultry business.
-~ -The -fact that there are several large hotels on the Florida . East Coast, which during several months of the year are
over-crowded with the -wealthiest people from all parts of 18 months old grape-fruit tree in grove near. Dupont. the United States, gives the man who would like to go in
The raising of grape-fruit is very profitable. the poultry business greater chances in Bunnell than any place else that I know of.
If you have planted your acreage to fruit trees, and the fowls are allowed to range among them, or when the coops,
-with a small yard around each tree, are placed in a lot, the benefits are soon noticed. Whether citrus or other fruits are planted, the poultry will benefit them to a surprising degree, and the birds at the same time will receive the benefit of the shade from the trees. Two hundred birds per acre may. be kept in this manner. with very profitable results.
By planting velvet beans near the fences, which will soon cover these fences, the fowls will be supplied with an abun dance of the best of green and bulky food and the necessary exercise required in hunting for the buried grains and seeds. Of course, by using coops and confining the birds, larger result may be obtained and a far larger number of birds can be kept to the acre, but with this system the labor will be -increased considerably. 'We would advise that the birds be given plenty of free range. Flock of "Rhode Island Reds" raised near Dupont.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
The church people and the entire sec- farm and is now personally superintending on his land for the beginning of improve-:on of country appreciate the action of the its clearing, breaking and general develop- minents, and hopes to be able to have some Annual Conference of Methodist Ministers ment. The Colonel-will spend this winter land prepared for a spring crop. f the state in assigning Rev. L. D. Haynes here and return to Chicago next spring. :) this charge for the ensuing conference The following season he will return here, Mr. Jacob Bauman of New Jersey, is pre-ear. accompanied by his family, and with them paring to plant cucumbers, Irish potatoes,
will be some friends whose lands he is also lettuce and corn for the early spring crop, Mrs. Abbott. former state lecturer of having cleared now. after which he will grow sweet potatoes.
issouri and who is the owner of one of
ur farms, made an eloquent address, after Mr. J. Jepson and Dr. Huffman have re- Mr. Edward Pederson of Milwaukee, is
whichh she organized the W. C. T. U. in cently purchased additional stock for their here for some time. Mr. Pederson was one
,unnell. farm and expect to have their lands ready of the Bmunnell Company's first purchasers
for planting at the earliest possible mo- and has visited here with his family One of the most important meetings held ment. previously. He enjoys an outing and will
:n this section by any of the secret orders strike his tent on his lots here and remain
as that by the Knights of Pythias on last One of the most enthusiastic farmers in for a time. monday evening. It was the district meet- the Bunnell-DuPont colony is Mr. W. H. ig and presided over by Deputy Grand Gray, of Spokane, Washington Mr. and Mr. H. B. Koch, formerly of Missouri, has
hancellor. Mrs. Gray have a nice farm near Gore Lake made splendid headway since his arrival
and in addition have purchased some very here and has several acres of land ready Mr. and Mrs. John H. Burke of Port fine hammock lands farther east, which for planting. which will first be planted to
efferson, New York, who came to the will be devoted to the culture of oranges cabbages and Irish potatoes, which he will alony recently, have entered enthusias- and grapefruit. probably follow with corn or sweet pota:ieally into the building of a home here. toes. He will complete the clearing of his
heir land is located near the lake and Mr. and Mrs. Gray have placed their -farm next spring on the new lands of
.hey will make every effort to have an daughter, Louise. in the St. Joseph's Acad- which hlie will plant cowpeas, preparatory
legant place in what appears destined to emy at St. Augustine, for the splendid to a large er area of vegetables for the fole one of the most popular sections of the literary training that is given at that insti- lowing fall or spring season.
-ntire area of lands of the Bunnell Develop- tution.
.ient Company. Ex-Mayor W. S. Jordan of Jacksonville,
One of the most enthusiastic of the is now a frequent visitor to Bunnell and is
Mr. H. C. McClintock of Iron Hill, Mld., recent purchasers of Bunnell property is Mr. delighted with -the progress that is being ..rrived here accompanied by Mr. C. W. George Kampher of New- Mexico. Mr. made both in the town of Bunnell and suririffith of Chester, 'Virginia. who is pros- Kampher is delighted with the climatic con- rounding country. In a recent interview the acting. Our citizens welcome these young ditions that allow him to remain outdoors Mayor advised that he had visited several id enterprising men and congratulate them the entire year, of which privilege he was sections of the state and was pleased with a their good judgment to locate here. denied in his former state during the winter the general development that was being
months, made in the various localities and regards
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Jordan of Union City, any good land in the state as being worth
.ennessee, who have recently purchased One of the most progressive and scientific $100.00 an acre.
and of the Bunnell Developmeit Company, farmers who have bought at Bunnell is Mr.
Are guests at Hotel Bunnell. They have a 0. C. Mlosby of Idaho. Mr. Mosby will Mr. C. W. Weatherington of Kentucky,
-ery fertile tract of land near the experi- plant thirty acres of land this year. twenty- who is the owner of a fine farm in the mentall farm and have already begun its live of which he will plant to Irish pota- Bunnell colony and who spent some time .:eneral development. MIrs. Jordan is a lady toes, which will be followed by sweet pota- here last year. is going to return within a if considerable experience in farming opera- toes exclusively. Mr. Mosby bought in few weeks and will take up the further im:ions and being herself an expert gardener Black Point, one of the most fertile see- provement of his land. Mr. Weatherington .ill be of considerable aid to Mr. Jordan tions of the colony, writes that he is very anxious to get to
a the planning and beautifying of their -Bunnell because he considers it the best
:arm. Mr. J. D. Cuirran, who has settled on the country he has ever seen and he hopes to
Moody boullevard to the beach, will begin bring several of his friends with him. Dr. and Mrs. Jennings of Nevada. arrived a small house soon and expects later to build Monday and will settle on their farm near a more commodious building. Messrs. Sezudlo and Strach, formerly of
;ore Lake. They are friends of Mr. and .. Chicago, are now located on their land near
Mrs. Gray. whose former home was Spo-, Mr. N. Scholen of Washington, who has Korona. They have been here but a few
-ane, Wash. lands on the eastern side of Bunnell and weeks and have already erected a little
DuPont. will diversify his crops and plant house. They have cleared some land and Mr. J. H. Coster and family of New York Irish potatoes and velvet beans. Mr. expect to plant a crop soon. These gentle-tate, arrived here recently and having ac- Scholen will also plant some land to the men arc very satisfied with their farms and .epted their allotment of land. moved on famous early sweet potato of N-orth Caro- with the country in general. to it as quickly as possible and began de- lina. which is possibly the most valuable v6lopments. Mr. Coster has erected his crop placed on the markets of the eastern The Farmer's Society of Equity met in
house, barn and fences and has made rapid cities in the early summer, a call communication on Saturday evening
advancement on the preparation of his land last. The meeting was called for the purfor planting. He will first plant the entire MIr. John H. Barney of Olivet. South Da- pose of discussing the purchase of seed and area cultivated to Irish potatoes, which will kota. came this week Mr. Barney has fertilizer for the coming crop. Mr. Bobbitt
)e followed by some later summer crops. bought, and being delighted with the of .T. H. Schneider and Company. of New
climate and general conditions, will arrange York. met with them and discussed his Among the new arrivals are Mr. and Mrs. for a permanent home here. terms of handling their products in the
L. A. Jett and children of ClarksvillUe: Tenn. -spring. The members represent totally
Mr. Jett had purchased land on the shell Ir. Thomas Sayers of New York City, about 500 acres and it is their endeavor to
road to the beach and has come to de- will plant his farm this season to cabbage, buy their supplies as nearly as possible as
relop his property and make this their lettuce and Irish potatoes, which will be a unit.
future home. followed by sweet potatoes.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Benjamin Council of
Near the beautiful sheet of water. Gore Mr. J. Warizenluff of Iola. Kans., a Limestone. Tenn.. arrived Thuirsday evening
Lake, Colonel -J. A. McElberne, a prominent former purchaser of land here, arrived on and are temporarily the guests of Mrs. lawyer of Chicago. has purchased a pretty Thursday last and will move immediately Council's father.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER:
Former Nevada Doctor Chooses California Cannot Hold People After
Bunnell in Preference to any They Have Learned of
Place in California Bunnell
Thos. A. Verdenius, Esq., Among the hundreds of purchasers who
Chicago, Ill. have bought of the Bunnell Development
Dear Sir: is none is more enterI wish to tell you why I came to the Bunnell-DuPont Company, there is one who ore entercolony, Florida. Mrs. Jennings (my wife) and myself de- prising than Mr. A. W. Jenkins. cided a few years ago that when we quit mining in Nevada Mr. Jenkins, whose former home was in
we would seek a climate more congenial, free from the ex- Tennessee, arrived at Bunnell some weeks treme of cold and heat, a few miles from the seaside in a citrus belt, on a small farm, where we could have a good ago, accompanied by his family. Jersey cow or two, hence have pure milk and butter, raise He began preparations to clear his farm
a few chickens and, possibly, other poultry, fruit and vege- immediately and so well pleased was he with tables; in a healthy section with good, pure water, free from immediately and so well pleased was he with malaria, the general conditions here that he advised a
We at first expected that our destination would be on the son, Oscar Jenkins, in California, to sell out coast of Southern California. We investigated very care- and come to Bunnell at once. fully- and thoroughly from Santa Barbara to San Diego, California. I also investigated every portion of Florida. His son complied with his request and
FIRST--I found that the land in California could not be came promptly, bringing his family, to make bought (the unimproved) for less than five hundred dollars this their future home. per acre. I found equally as good land, if not better, in this As California is practically the only corncolony, in the same kind of a belt, the same distance from the ocean, at from thirty-five to forty dollars Der acre. petitor that Florida has, our people feel conSECOND-I found that vegetables and fruits could be gratulated to have inhabitants of that state
placed in the markets about thirty days earlier than from become citizens of this, and Mr. Jenkins is Southern California, hence would command better prices.
THIRD--I found that the shining to the great centers only one of a number of former Californians and markets of trade would only average about one-half who are now living in our colony.
of the distance and one-half of the cost from this colony, that it would be from Southern California.
In reard to its productiveness I find that Pvervthin- that His Own New Potatoes for Christis nroduced in every other state does well here. orcent annlos and wheat. I am told they are not profitable to mas Dinner Delightful Experience
-row bhere. but I find growing in this colony or belt. oranges, tangerines. g-ranefruits. lemons, bananas. fies. dates. nine- o anadia
annles. and several other fruits that I am not vet familiar with their names: also rice s-enr cne. cotton. n cans. Dec. 24, 1913.
nanuts. E nzlish walnuts, which are not produced in the Northern states. Mr. Howard,
This colonv is two or three hundred miles north of the Chicago, Ill.
wvereloAdes and is considered healthy. There iq an ahun- Dear Sirdsnea of -ood nure water in theb, ground r. but evrvonue ha- not sot it to the srnefa,.. hit thev en. ve it. I know Say, it's fine to be able to dig new this to be tre, as I sm n scientific evnort in lontin- vins potatoes for Christmas out of one'of water. -old. silver and other nreions metals. O nt own garden. That is what I have
twenty eroas that I hobirbf in the onlnnv T found p living% vin. I hld a wol driven there whicl took onlv two hours. been doing today-much better
I hbve pln-y or gonc. mire. soff waler, than freezing up North. It's just
Mwr. and Mrs, W. T. (Tra -v lnsit lnd in this colony last like midsiuniner instead of Christsnrine at .20O0 an are rand were reently offered and refused several hundred dollars profit for fourteen acres mas. of it. It is yet unimproved. I do not envy you up there in the
There is some good Ind for sale rAt in this colonv at cold. I cannot make out why peothirty-five and forty dollars nor acre. b ut it is goine fast. y there jst to make a mer
Anyone desiring a good farm should not delay in purchas- ple stay there just f 0 in e bering. The terms of payment are very liberal. existence and freeze in the barWe visited an orange grove a few davs.seo of 100 acres. gain, when they could enjoy this
where the owner of it has refused a oaiarter of a million dollars for it. The orange and grapefruit trees were loaded suer weather all the year
with the luscious fruit. It is located only a mile outside around. I suppose, like myself.
of this colony. before I saw Florida, they scarcely
In conclusion permit me to say that I am a native ofeve but what I is that
Kentucky and my wife is a native of Missouri; that we have believe it, but what I say is that
resided in several states of the Union and have been in many 'they had better come South and
more, and that we have decided to make Florida our future, live where life is well worth livpermanent home, hence we have cast our lot among these people and we are now one of them. I reside one and one- ilg. half miles east of DuPont, St. Johns County. Sincerely yours,
Very cordially yours, S. J. HARRISON,
J. JENNINGS,
Florida. Florida.




Vhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A Remedy for Hard Times. A sincere appeal to all thinking I believe in the "brotherhood of man," but I
also believe that it is the duty of every man, espemenThosA an d en cially husbands and providers, to improve their
By Tkoo. A. Vordenjus conditions as quickly as possible, and not wait for
Everyone seems political conditions to change. If you share my
to be t asking opinion that the farmer is really the only inde"hadtobe thes ing pendent man, then let us see where such indehard times" these pendence can be secured. Personally, I would days, and the pe- not care to leave the United States. No doubt rusal of my morn- there are many other good countries besides our ing p aper con- own country, but I would not consider them; so
vinces me t h a t my chief object is to show the readers of the these conditions do Home Builder where they can secure reasonable not only exist in land in our own country. Chicago alone, but Land values in the West are well known, and
practically all over throughout the Middle West the land owner is the country. Los considered a big man. In the Northern Atlantic
Angeles, Califor- Coast states farm lands have become impoverma, reports a vast ished by continued usage, but as an offset we number of idle also find that these lands have become more valum e n; Portland, able on account of their location and the large Mr. A. Ved,,is poulation, especially in the cities, so that the
The Pioneer Small Farm Man of Florida. Oregon, tells about POP ier "down and outs." One big concern in Gary, majority of farms in the Eastern states are pracIndiana, has laid off half of its help; other firms tically suburbs of thriving towns, or estates of are cutting down their working hours, while still millionaires. others have discharged all their unmarried men, It is in the South that the present homeseeker and several factories are reported as being closed will find his Paradise, and if the railroads of the lown entirely. At the same time I read how South had done as much to apprise the people
philanthropic institutions are busy helping the of or country of what is waiting there for them poor and those out of work. One of the large as the railroads of the West have done, no doubt chunrches of Chicago is giving every man who by this time every acre of land in the South would asks for it, coffee and bread each morning for have been taken up. breakfast.
The two principal political parties are accusing each other as being the cause of these hard times. The Republicans blame the Democrats and the Democrats say the Republicans are at fault, while the general public-the middle class
-does not know what and who to blame. Three main causes are mentioned as being responsiblethe change of administration, the tariff, and the new currency law, and although I do not feel able to state what causes the unsettled condition in our country, I do believe that I can give a remedy or hes har ties.You need not fear "hard times" if you have a edy for these hard times. o Florida home like this.
You readers of the Home Builder will admit
the truth of the following statement-that the CHIEF OF ALL THE SOUTHERN
only man who can really and truly be called in- STATES, FOR THE FARMER OR
dependent, is the man who has a tract of land' HOMESEEKER, IS FLORIDA. It is the paid for and in a producing condition. Such a ""Land of Promise" and is rapidly coming into man need not fear hard times, nor the day when its own. It is THE STATE in the Union that he will likely be discharged on account of the is growing more rapidly in population and wealth scarcity of orders, a dull season, or a score of than any other, and the world is commencing to other reasons known.to you. realize what Florida really is.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A Remedy for Hard Times.
Here are a few things about Florida to be remembered. One of the first necessities in th,
-"establishment of a home is the building of tht
-- house-a place of shelter-and this can be bul:
for a third or half the cost of building it. in ; Northern climate. Fuel bills can be reduced t almost nothing, as there are few days when a F : fire is needed, and plenty of wood is to be foune
in our colony. The necessity for warm clothing is also eliminated; besides, and best of all, Bunnell is in a codintry where tlnee crops a-year are A) raised. This means a great deal for the newcomer, who does not have to wait a full year tc realize something from his land, and if he shoulkencounter one crop failure, he would still hay-: two more chances to make good.
Florida soil, in my opinion, is the most productive soil in the United States, and there art several reasons for this statement; but the pimary one is the fact that it is located where i: has more sunshine throughout the year than any other state in the Union, and it has an aibundanct of rainfall as well.
Florida's varied resources of forest and faruland, her magnificent fisheries, her great phosphate deposits, her fertile soil and her mavelou: climate, have attracted the attention of the whole A field of corn near Bunnell. world; consequently capital and immigration arr
Take, for instance, our colony at Bmumell, turning Floridaward so rapidly that statistician:where we have today land owners from almost find difficulty in keeping record of the state'.every state of the Union, and although only a constantly increasing progress.
small percentage of the buyers are settled on Florida has increased in population, as credtheir farms, we can state that our buyers are to ited by the government in 1910, for a ten-yea! be found in almost every large city of the U, period, forh-two- per cent, but. it can be safely also in Canada, Yukon, Alaska, Hawaiian Is- figured that almost all of this increase can be
lands, iexiCo, E kngland and Switzerland. Of traced to the progress being made by the state
land, T~excoEngand nd -"izerand Of in those last three years. the thousands of new settlers who are coming to Florida, only a small percentage are farmers; many of them are clerks, merchants, laborers; men and women who are tired of the old hand-to-mouth existence and who have nerve and energy enough to break away from drudgery and start anew to carve out for themselves a life of hidependence, in a real land of plenty. I believe I can say without fear of contradiction, that the man who expects to make Florida his home will find fewer obstacles and hardships than any other place I know of, and he can start with less money in Florida than any other state. A beautiful bungalow in Bunnell.




he BUNNIELL HOME BUILDER
A Remedy for Hard Times.
Less than forty years ago, Florida's produc- .
:in was very small indeed. Last year, however, ne of the railroads penetrating the state handled riore than 25,000 carloads of fruits and vege"ables. The cities of the North, consuming the heater portion of Florida's products, are dis:ant from Florida's shipping point from a day Ind a half to two days and a half, so that Flor'da's fruits and vegetables are landed in New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis and other INorthern cities fresh from the tree and vine.
One does not have to go back many years to
recall the fact that Florida was at one time very
much misrepresented, particularly as to the health Tribune Building, one of Bunnell's business block&.
and natural conditions of the state, but the fact The public-school service is excellent. Churches s Florida's death rate is less than that of any of various denominations are to be found in every otherr state in the Union. town and settlement. The social spirit is broad,
Florida's soil will produce every known fruit and the hospitality of the people, both Southern in the world, most of them in abundance. Her and of the thousands who had come from the
Atrus-fruit industries are second in size to those North and are now living here, is of the kind that
-f California, while in quality the fruit has no makes the stranger welcome and at home. 'ztperior in the world. Florida's trucking indus- Out-of-door life is one of Florida's chief attry is in a class by itself and includes almost every tractions. The annual average temperature is known variety, about 70 degrees. It rarely goes above 90 in the
Vegetables are practically grown during every summer or below 80 in the winter.
month of the year, and the bulk of the crops is It is never too hot or too cold for the full en,ent to the markets during the winter season, joymlent, of out-of-door life, and such recreations
when the highest prices prevail, as hunting, fishing, bathing, etc., can be indulged
Florida's climate, while wonderfully beneficial in every month in the year.
to the tourist and seeker for health, is equally Florida's real estate values have doubled and
valuable and important in the growing of fruits trebled in the last few years and will do so again and vegetables and all field crops. Florida's pop- in the next few years. This is especially true at ulation, both urban and rural, is composed of the Bunnell. The Bunnell Development Company best of American citizenship. first sold land for $20.00 an acre, then the price
was advanced to $25.00, and $30.00, and today no land is sold for less than $35.00 and $40.00, while recently one ten-acre tract near Bunnell was resold for $100.00 an acre.
Not only is Florida's soil unequaled for trucking or the production of citrus fruits, but it is proving to be superior for staple crops-corn, rye, forage crops of all kinds, sugar cane, cotton, etc. Florida is destined to be one of the most
-- remarkable farming states in the Union before
-many years. People from the North are coming here rapidly and every day new Wonders of Florida's soil are being discovered. ....______________ I wish I could ring a bell in the ears of every
Street scene in Bunnell. workingman, every clerk, every person, for that




he BUNNIELL HOME BUILDEa
A Remedy for Hard Times.
matter, throughout the length and breadth of from cover to cover. Get them interested in Bunthis great country of ours, and awaken them to nell; you can do them no greater favor; nor can the fact that they are wasting the best years of you prove your friendship for them in any better their lives, working for others, and I wish I could way than by doing this. Urge them to start at help them to understand that with a little effort once to secure a home-and you may depend on their part, they can easily become the owner of upon it that the Bunnell Development Company at least ten acres of good, tillable land in the will allot them good land. splendid Bunnell-DuPont colony, where they If you are not already a buyer in this banner
will be beyond the reach of the so-called "hard colony of Florida-B UNNELL-D U PONTtimes." qt least GIVE ME AN OPPORTUNITY TO
PROVE TO YOU WHY YOU SHOULD BECOME -ONE, AND WHY YOU SHOULD BUY A FARM AT ONCE.
I It is impossible for me to give further details regarding our colony in this article. All I have endeavored to do, is to give you what, in my opinion, is a REMEDY FOR HARD TIMES.
If you want to know more about our colony, 9" '00 : write for my booklet, "A LITTLE FARMA BIG LIVING." I have just gotten out a
-- .' new edition of this book. It is printed in three
Florida East Coast Railroad Company's Depot at Bunnell colors, with many up-to-date photographs, which I had taken while in Bunnell recently. It is writSAVE YOUR MONEY, if only a few dol- ten in a conservative manner and I can back up
lars per month and become the owner of a every statement therein and can, very easily,
Bunnell-DuPont farm-home. It will mean that prove to you that Bunnell-DtuPont is the place you are, step by step, reaching the goal-"Inde- where you should invest and where you should pendence." Bear in mind that the best insurance make yor future home. you can have for your family is a good piece If you, will fill out the coupon below and retum
of land in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, that the it to me, I will send you my booklet, "A LITsurest protection you can have in your evening TLE FARM-A BIG LIVING," my 1914 of life is the ownership of this self-same land. Calendar, and also the Bunnell Home Builder And just this is my remedy for hard times. for six months, free of cost.
I want to ask the thousands who receive this issue of the Home Builder if you will not see that one or more of your friends reads it through
M Cut out this Coupon and mail to our Sales Office at Chicago today
THOS. A. VERDENIUS,
108 South La Salle Street, Chicado, Illinois
I am interested in the Bunnell-DuPont colony and would like to receive a copy of your book,
"A Little Farm-A Big Living"
and would also like to receive for six months, free of cost, your madazine, The Home Builder, and your 1914 Calendar.
NAME STREET and NUMBER
CITY STATE
If you have any acquaintances who are interested, kindly give us their names and addresses in the space below.




M~e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER&
Back to the Land
By Mrs. Marie Walehe, of Canada
How many discouraged city toilers, hopeless and that Canada, which once exported eggs, has now to
weary of fighting against a series of invidious circtun- import them, and in greater quantities each year. stances, finally surrender to the phantom called "des- Hitherto, when there was an egg shortage in Canada, tiny"t and cry in their distress, "It is useless to struggle eggs have been available in the Chicago and western in the meshes in. which I am entangled; all things have markets, but by reason of the same cause (under proconspired against me; I can never extricate myself." duction) Americans also are short of eggs and since
Unto those thus terribly perplexed, existence is in- the revision of the tariff have actually imported them. deed a failure, if there comes not unto their souls the What is the conclusion of it all? In Mr. Brown's sweet assurance of a Supreme Providence, tender and opinion it is the "Golden Opportunity" for farmers pitiful, awaiting the moment when the toiler's hand and others to increase their poultry plants and take shall be outstretched for guidance. advantage of the high prices prevailing for poultry
Emerson, in his essay on the "Over-Soul" says: and poultry products.
"From within, or from behind, a light shines through I "BACK TO THE LAND" should be the cry of men us upon things and makes us aware that we are noth- 'and women now laboring to make others rich. BACK ing, but the light is ALL" and if to one looking out- TO THE LAND, where they may build their own homes ward from a maze of difficulties, that light reveals an and produce a supply of food to satisfy the demands outlet, an escape, and rising in newly found strength of crowded cities, and at the same time enrich them"He breaks his birth's invidious bar, selves.
And breasts the blows of circumstance, What induces men to delve and search for gold and
And grapples with his evil Star. jewels? The value of the precious metal! The demand
Then surely will the difficulties vanish and the path- for the glittering gems! If. the insufficient supply of way to success be found. Unto laborers in mills and food products has become a subject of such importance factories, yielding up their all of strength and sill to 1 as to engage the attention of America's and Canada's build colossal fortunes for a few; unto the discouraged most earnest men and women, then surely here is the
workrs n vaiou sphresof abor evr ferin as golden opportunity. offered to city toilers, anxious to the years glide by, that presently they will be requested escape to better and healthier environments. to stand aside for younger, more ambitious men; to all IPurchase a farm! Become your own master! Avail such there comes today a light that reveals an exit from yourself of the easy terms offered by the Bunnell Detheheat-rndng onfictwih pvery ad ardtims; velopment Company. Engage in the food producing an escape from uncongenial conditions of city life and idsr nFoiatems aoe tt nAeia
toff"BAK TOTHELAND"-ad Whrefre9 where, owing to its fertile soil and favorable climatic
Why -should that time-worn remedy be offered as a codemins ariin fma casrode ctesuandla the samer solution to the enigma of hard times? Because, after demnd enrihn romcrowsedtte a at abo i thme an exhaustive insearch and inquiry into the cause of couenrcpo yourevs own te ladtaremoabin twae the high cost of living, the verdict is that the main, the conrunyurwnldtareina" gREAL cause is to be found in the simple old-fashioned slave" toiling for a mere living in office, mill or store. law of Better, after the day's labor to sit under the shelter
of your own home, gazing with the pleasure of posSUPPLY AND DEMAND. session upon the citrus groves and the vegetables grow'That the high cost of living is driving men "back to ing upon your farm, which- in due time will yield a the land," is the statement of Major Dyer, Secretary rich harvest. Better as the passing years leave their to World Immigration Commissioner Lamib of -the Sal- silver trace upon your locks, to know you will be reapvation. Army-and THIS after a world's tour, investi- ing the results of a wise investment and earnest ingating labor conditions. "We intend to advise im- dustry, than to be wandering homeless, seeking shelter
migrants to steer clear of big cities which are already from the charity of others. too congested," declared the Major. One writer declares that, "instead of saying that
Dealing with the high cost of living, an experienced man is the creature of circumstances, it would be nearer Canadian farmer gives us, as his opinion that "more the mark to say that man is the architect of circumfarmers is the remedy. " The great evil, he declares, stance. However true that may be, it is a blessed is the increase in the consumption of food in the privilege to own a home of one's own-a place of rest cities, and the falling off in supplies from country in the days where our human frames, yielding to the districts." Iweariness of age, may have no fear of care or poverty.
Following this is a statement from Mr. Brown, Chief Where we may watch the sun go down,
of the Poultry Division of the Canadian Department
of Agriculture. After an exhaustive investigation of In radiant hues of lingering light
the egg trade, he finds that Canadians are eating more, Without a city's walls to frown
and the supply is so insufficient to meet the demand jAnd choke fair eve with sullen night.
FLORIDA strawberries and celery are world famous, and $1,000 per acre crops have been grown on lands which cost only a few dollars an acre .a few years ago.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Bunnell's Youngest Land Owner $500.00 cash has been offered this
B Ia eman, who paid only $125.00
Baby Irma Tice of f[or his five acres
Newark, New Jer- Dear Sir:
sey, eigh t e en I want to say a few words about Bunnell and the splendid treatment I have received from the Bunnell DevelopI "months of ade, and meant Company; and I want to tell you something of what
youngest land I have done here. I have cleared my land, have been beautifying my two town lots and have been aiding others. My owner in the Bun- lots are the first to be seen on entering the beautiful town
nell-DuPont colony of Bunnell. The homes here are small but attractive and
I am now erecting a new one.
I came to Florida five years ago; landed in St. Cloud Irma's farm was pur- with $6.00 in cash. Had a few carpenter's tools with me.
-chased for her by Mrs. Helped build a new home at St. Cloud, then came to BunPurkis and Mrs. Groff nell and went to work for Mr. B. B. Batchelder, Bunnell's
of Newark, N. J., and old, reliable contractor. I worked for him for quite
by the time she has awhile, and my first winter in Florida just cost me $110.00.
I went back to Ohio the next summer with $24.00 to reached womanhood it the good, after having spent a delightful winter. I purwill be worth a small chased a five-acre farm near Bunnell for $25.00 an acre, f o r tun e to her, and have it about paid for now. I have been offered
whether any improve- $500.00 cash for this farm, so I consider this mighty good
ments are ever made for such a small investment.
on it or not. I am usually so busy here that I have not had time to
visit the many beautiful spots nearby, but hope to do so Surely, no one could later.
: give a child a better I wish that all of my friends could realize the bright
gift. Parents and rela- prospects I have here, and could understand that the optives would do well to portunities for them are just as great if they would only follow the example of buy a farm in this colony. I would be only too glad to
these two ladies, and make selections for any of them, free of charge. No one
we are glad to say that can make a mistake by investing here for there is no land in this section but what is worth more than the price asked a number of parents for it, and it is growing more valuable day by day. How
are now paying for 1. would like to pass around the luscious oranges right now,
Bunnell f a r m s for of which I have a good supply.
their little sons and Yours very truly,
daughters. E. A. FOSTER,
Florida.
Have you treated yourself to a winter in Florida, Do you knbw of any other place where land sells
where you can spend your tme and energy out- for so little and produces so much? Where a single
doors among flowers and gardens instead -of shovel- good crop has returned more than the cost of the
ing snow, thawing out water pipes and paying large land and all the improvements?
bills for fuel?
.. . -- -A .. -I_ i.- .... =. .. I
. . . . 4 4-- .,4
4 4
Florida is the winter home of the wild duck. The above picture was taken only a few miles from our new tract. The Bunnell-DuPont colony is a paradise for the sportsman. Our lands are located in a region where one may enjoy the finest hunting and fishing, and all manner of outdoor sports.
FLORIDA has the best climate in the United States to live in and
the possibilities for both pleasure and profit 9re unexcelled.




Two Short Stories of Success
NEW YORK MAN WELL PLEASED WITH FROM PLOUGHING THE SEA TO PLOUGHBUNNELL-DUPONT ING THE LAND
Mr. Kuhn and family arrived at Bunnell eleven months ailo. lie Mr. Yarnell left the Navy August 8th, 1913. Arrived at Bunnell
has built a five room house at a coat of $400.00; small barn September 4th. Began clearing his land Sept. 15th; built a five
and outbuildings for $60.00. He has cleared, fenced room house, barn and hen house at a cost of $575. His fenand plowed ten acres of land. lie duo a well, ily arrived Dec. 20th. Has 15 acres fenced, four and
costing $11.00. obtaining good water at one-half acres cleared and plowed. Obtained fine
a depth of twenty-two feet water atea depth of 33 ft.; coat of well $13.00
Dear Mr. Verdenius: Mr. Thos. A.Verdenius,
I received your calendar and thank you very much. Chicago, Ill.
Now I will write you a few lines to let you know what I Dear Mr. Verdenius:
think of B unnell. Today is the anniversary of two events I have now found
which should make me feel happy. This is my thirty-sixth tm nuht rt
birthday, and eleven months since I came to Bunnell. When tyme aeg toes wI
-I look back and see what I have accomplished during these. Shveafwlns I
last eleven months, I do feel happy. I have built me a nice be eejs
house and cleared ten acres of -land which I planted to .-.three months; have
I hae a erynicefarmandther ismy fifteen acre tract potatoes last week. Ihv eync amadteei
lots of good land left, and if I have any luck I will get .fenced, five-room
more, for I think it is the best investment I can make. h.hueban ndot
The limae hee isjustfin; th sunshins alostshes built, four acres The limte hre s jst fne;the un hins alosttheof land plowed, oneyear around. My family and myself are feeling splendid. Half acre of Bermuda
We have a nice flock of chickens which have been laying onions in the ground
most every day, and we have sold some eggs, too, for and up, have a nice
-which we received forty cents per dozen. gadno oteey
Iam certainly pleased with my investment here. I have thing growing, includwokdhr hssme n aemade me a home which 2flg strawberries. I am
I can feel proud of, and it only took eleven months to getting. two a cre s
do it. Now my hardest work is done-I can take it easier. ready to plant to toMy land is fenced as well as cleared. We have no coal to Kmatoes and sweet pepbuy, but a nice garden coming on to supply us with fresh pers and I may set out
vegetables. Now, what more does a man want, and where sm reete e
can one do better? ildendo hw
much time I have to
* spare for that work
between now and
-S. K. Yarnell March 31st, 'but if I
~ don't this year I will next, sure.
I had my soil tested by the State Agricultural College of Gainesville, Florida, to see if it was suitable for fruit. They
* ..-. ~gave me a good report on it for either fruit or truck farminall the haye t dole to be ninedofil groutn qutesi and ife hany toe isinoe to be skepticalfit gonuitesi
* is to write to the Agricultural College.
__ Bunnell-DuPont is coming to the front fast. They are
__ building right along now. The Company is using three .~automobiles to show people the land;- the hotel is full of
- folks all the time and the Florida East Coast Railroad is
running three extra trains each day, bringing people into S Florida. Everyone is busy now getting their fertilizer in the soil for potatoes and we expect a banner year. The merchants are all doing a good business and everything looks prosperous. We are having fine weather- .. Wishing you and the colony every success, I am
- *Yours very truly, S. K. YARNELL.
Mr. Kuhn and sons preparing their land for potato crop
The town of Bunnell is a regular little city. We have ..>.
some good stores where one can purchase anything he wants.
I intend to plant an orange grove next year, for oranges do well here. I have seen some grown close to my place and they were the sweetest I have ever eaten. One thing about this colony, you can plant something every day in the year and it will grow. You can raise everything in your garden that is good to eat and for pleasure you can go to the Atlantic Ocean, which is only seven miles from
Bunnell, and catch lots of fish, camp there at any time of the year, and get an abundance of oysters, too, in season. We have been there several times. We have very nice shelled roads which makes it a pleasure to drive, and one can see all kinds of crops growing along the way. No -'.. .
wonder that they call this the Flower State. Roses will 1
bloom all the year around. I am well pleased and so is my family. Give me Bunnell-DuPont; no city life for me. ,
Yours truly, ~- --~
JOSEPH E. KUHN. Home of Mr. S. K. Yarnell




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Glimpse of 106-acre orange grove just east of the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Note the magnificent palm trees in the background. Last season about 10, 000 boxes of delicious Fruit were shipped From this grove.
Ten acres of oranges or erape-fruit will give one an independent living in this Sunny Southland
What Others Have Done in Florida OUR 1914 CALENDARS RECEIVE HEARTY WELCONEE.
Practically every mail brings one or more letters acknowlChase & Co., who handled a celery crop of 120 acres, edging receipt of our calendar, and containing favorable
-er deducting their commission, -returned $106,028.16 to comment on same. One of these letters reads as follows:
-.e growers; an average of about $884 an acre.
My dear Mr. TFerden its :Henry P. Chappell, nine years ago a railroad agent at Allow me to thank yot for the nice and rather .niique
.5 a month, was one of the pioneers who planted celery. calendar you sent me. I was under the impressions, that ten .:)day his income is $25,000 a year-half as much as the acres of Florida. land wras a. big slice, but the tall, smooth.Iary of the President of the United States. faced fellow on the calendar seems to be able to carry it in
A. T. Rosseter has made $50,000 in the last five years his hand.
-:sing celery and lettuce on Florida land that a few years I expect to go down. to Bannell this fall, and perhaps I will
-o was considered, worthless. hace the pleasitre of shakihg you by the hand.
Last year George C. Chamberlain realized $24,000 from Yours tr iy,
-n ares f lnd. is eler yilded$1,50 a ace, fl- E. KA_,NTTER.
-. acres of land. His celery yielded $1,650 an acre, fol- We trust that each one who received a calendar has hung
.::-ed with egg plant, which sold for $650 an acre more. it in a prominent place so that it may constantly remind
L. C. Pace made $40,000 net on forty acres of celery you and your friends of the Sunny Southland, and especially
: :owed by lettuce. He then had one sure crop left, either of its most successful colony-BUNNELL-DUPONT. rn or sweet potatoes, before it was again time to plant If you have not received one of our calendars you may
-_Iery. secure same by writing to the
C. P. Williams, formerly a locomotive engineer, has made General Sales Office,
30,000 in the last three years raising celery on five acres BUNNTELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY,
land. 108 So. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill.
Rudolph Warner, west of Bunnell, obtained a net profit :st Spring of $980 from a fraction over five acres of Irish :-tatoes. California "booster" admits that the Florida
These merely show what can be done. It takes brains, East Coast is the finest country he ever saw
-zergy and a little capital, but the possibilities are here.- Mr Verdenius:
-h:change. I am going to relate a little instance that. happened a
few days ago. A friend of mine, a prominent railway official, had always praised California when we met, while I the Bunnell-DuPont Land Owners who are now had championed Florida. As I was leaving for New York
living in the Colony:- the other day, I met this friend, who had just returned
from a'visit to the Florida East Coast, and I asked him If you take an interest in reading the Bunnell Home if he found I had exaggerated about Florida. His answer
Builder, won't you send any items of interest you was: "Homer, the East Coast of Florida is the finest courmay have to this office for publication? Tell us what I w a e H er t East oa o oi es te ne onimpr-ovements you have made; what you contemplatetry I have ever put foot on and you never told me onecia on plase tenth. Florida is destined to be the greatest State in the
making, and how you are getting along. Also sendUnion."
us items of social affairs and of church interest, or
write us a letter for publication. Such co-operationto say good-bye.
writeous pat lette fory ublicationuch pecoe tin When people go and see for themselves, then they will
on your part will be very Hapecidby t be like my friend, unless they are too narrow-minded.
Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder, Wishing you a prosperous New Year, I remain,
108 So. LaSalle Street, Yours sincerely,
Chicago, ll. HOMER E. HASKELL,
West Virginia.
FLORIDA produces the finest grapefruit and oranges in the world.




6he BUNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
CITY DIRECTORY. 50 ROOM HOTEL WILL BE BUILT IN
Church Services: BUYNELL.
METHODIST CHURCH.
P 1 To Be Erected on Railroad Street Just
Preaching-Sunday, 11 a.mi. ...
Preaching-Sunday, 7 p. in. South of the Bank Block.
Sunday School-10 a.m. in.
Secret Orders: X-- 'V, The owners of the property just south
of the bank block have informed us tha:
F. &A.M., NO.200. J jwe can expect to see a fine up-to-date
Meets every second and fourth Tues- fifty-room hotel on the property within
day at 7 o'clock p. mn. in Masonic Hall, the near future.
second floor Bank Building. The hotel is to be modern in everKNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. ,respect. It will be built of either conMohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every crete blocks or brick. It will be threE
fs stories. The first floor will be occupied first and third Monday at 7:30 p. in. at wih westr rom,=helbb, inn
Castle Hall, in Bank Building. : with twe store rooms, the lobby, dining
room and kitchen. Each bed room wiLf
Partially completed blacksmith shop have flowing water, electric lights and At the last meeting of the road con- at Banneli the furniture will be of the best quality.
missioners an order was given to at This hotel will fill a long felt wan:
once open up and grade the road from for Bunnell, as our present hotel buildBunnell to DuPont parallel with the A recent visitor to Bunnell was Mr. ing is inadequate to accommodate the
railroad. NiIs Hagen of Wisconsin, who has a people who come to Bunnell, they haybeautiful twenty-acre tract of land ing to turn people away nearly every
about two miles east of Bunnell. Mr.
The local W. C. T. U. observed the Hagen is well pleased and made a selec- day on account of not having room fo: day of prayer for national prohibition. tion for. one of his northern neighbors, them. dayefreonadeoinl evc The building of this hotel will be ii
In the forenoon a devotional service Mr. Hoffman. keigwt h rwho u it
was conducted. The feature of the keeping with the growth of our litt.
evening's program was an address given Rmtyt wihout i an lon sand t c
by Mrs. Alice Scott Abbott, which was Rev.Wlr. i llin H.T. try to do without it any longer is out
enjoyed by all present. Hotchkins, both of Chicago, Illinois, are the question.
in Bunnell and expect to make this their
future home. -We wish to extend to Mr. J. C. Miller, of Ormond, has
Messrs. George Moody, W. H. Coch- them a most hearty welcome. rented the Smithers farm west of Bunran, and Robert Moody have begun the nell and will plant twenty acres of it t:
erection of their summer homes at potatoes this season. Mr. Miller is a:.
Ocean City. Watch Ocean City grow. Mr. Rezmer, a Chicago hustler, spent old potato grower and we predict grea:
several days in the colony and made success for him this season. selections for a great number of his Mr. Willis Williams is erecting a nice
Our farmers these days are preparing friends, in the new tract. It is reported cottage on his lot across the railroad and planting their land to Irish pota- that Mr. Rezmer has reserved, for a few from the hotel. toes. A few of them planted their weeks, almost one solid section of land. potatoes the latter part of December Mr.
but the larger acreage will be planted Boujohn has opened up thz
between the 20th of January and the Among the many new arrivals at Bun- cooper shop of the Farmers Manufac15th of February. nell are Mr. Brigham and family who turing Co., and is busy making barrels
All indications point to good prices have come from London, England, to for the coming potato crop at Bunnell again in April and May, when our crop make their future home in the colony. Mr. Boujohn estimates the number of will be marketed. We will have a great Mr. Brigham, however, is not the only barrels to be used here this season amany new growers this season, as con- man from across the waters who has from fifteen to twenty thousand.
siderable new land has been brought become interested in our colony. The under the plow since the last crop, Company has received inquiries from Mr. Parker has bought the meat marwhich, added to the acreage we had last China, Japan, the Philippines and vari- ket of the Hastings Cold Storage Co., a: paa,, gives us the largest area under ous countries of Europe. Bunnell, to which he will add a corncultivation of any year so far. This plete line of groceries. Mr. Parke:
large acreage and the splendid prospects moved here from Baxley, Georgia.
for high prices make the future of Bun-
nell-DuPont look very bright, while the i Mr Ed. Johnson has completed his
farmers are wearing smiles that won't E
come off. ,magnificent concrete bungalow or
Among those who are planting pota- Moody Boulevard and has moved into iL
toes are: W. A. Mack, W. A. Brock, Ms WlamHe..pkdt
9 Scholen, 0. C. Mosby, J. L. Council, : Mrs. William Hardesty picked the
G. Miller, J. E. Kuhn, 0. Dahlgreen, Jos. first ripe strawberries of the season
G.oMille, 3. E. Kharrin, D Josaofrom her vines Friday, January 23rd. Conway, H. C. Harrison, C. D. Haga-____dorn, Hufman and Jeppson, Win. Wehr- ra
man, A. Lambert, G. M. Nuss, I I r. 1. 1. Moody has contracted for E
Moody, J. F. Lambert, J. B. Johnson nice two-story residence to be built o.,
J. W. Malphurs, C. B. Miller, L. Gray: his lots on the corner of Lambert AveW_ L. Bartlett, Nich Lasch, H. B. Koch, n nue and Turner Street. When coinJ. H. Coster, G. L. Tolman, E. Deen, pleted it will be occupied by Mr. W
E. H. Headen, M. 0. Tippen, G. W. Dur- One of the many new homes now being con. Sapp, cashier of the Bunnell St,. rence, E. E. Loughridge. structed in the Bunnell-DuPont coloiiy Bank.
FLORIDA products reach the markets first and get the best prices.




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
Quite a large crowd attended the A number of Bunnell business men
-ance in the Tribun, building Wednes- are making plans for the organization
day night. All report an enjoyable of a new company to take over the presevening. ent water-works, electric light plant and
telephone system. This company will
The stockholders of the Bunnell State install up-to-date machinery for the
Bank held their annual meeting in the I light plant and water-work system and
o e kewill lay pipes through portions of the executive office of the bank on Wednes- i town not at present supplied with city
day, January 7. 'water.
The showing for the past year's busi- The telephone system will also receive
aess was an excellent one and the stock- a general overhauling.
olders were well pleased. The usual All of these improvements will be of
10 per cent dividend was declared and great benefit to the people of Bunnell
neat sum set aside. gra beei otepol f unl
nand we wish the company much success.
The Bunnell Lodge, Free and Ac- r Mrs. N. M. G. Prange lectured at the
cepted Masons, No. 200, met in their school house in Bunnell on Saturday
-egular convention, at which meeting afternoon, February 7th, to the farmers
officers were elected for the ensuing in the southern portion of St. Johns
:erm. Quite a large number were in on.Mrs. Prange is an authority
.1-ftendance. on all phases of agriculture and horticulture and gave much splendid advice
attendante hasmes of agilur e andmortiMr. J. C. Johnson is erecting a dwell- to thefarmersofourcommunity.
:ng house on his lots in Seminole
Heights. Mr. Johnson will move into Messrs. Cochran and Moody have
2is new home just as soon as it is com- completed the shelling of the John AnDleted. derson Highway from the Volusia coun- ty line to McClouds' Corner, a distance
of five miles.
Messrs. W. A. Mack and 0. C. Mosby, Mr. Verdenius visiting the orange grove of Mr.
:wo of our best farmers, inform us they Helm, east of Bunnell Mr. W. H. Bacher is improving his
are disposing of their fall crop of Irish Rev. L. D. Haynes is improving his lots on Moody Boulevard preparatory to potatoes at $1.25 per bushel f. o. b. two lots which he purchased next to the erecting a nice home. If we can get Bunnell. parsonage. He has planted palm trees a few more men like Mr. Bacher to
across the front and is putting up a move to Bunnell we will soon have a fence. cit..
Mr. J. L. Nuss and son, who own a fence. __
farm on the Moody road near Bunnell, BUNNELL STATE BANK FIRST TO APPLY FOR RESERVE STOCK
have erected a nice bungalow and now First in Florida to act under the new currency law, the Bunnell State Bank yesterday made apperfect condition, which they are plant- plication by telegraph for stock in the reserve bank system provided under the new currency law. ing to potatoes. This action was authorized at a meeting held in the afternoon at Bunnell. No other State Bank
in Florida has yet made application for stock in the system and this gives the Bunnell bank the distinction of being the first.
1 7
Ilk
Florida is a land of flowers. Every month of the year produces a new variety. Nature's floral gift for
Le month of February is a profusion of orange blossoms. If you have never visited a grove at this season of the year you cannot imagine the exquisite perfume exhaled by these millions of wax-like flowers. Just now one may see in a Florida orange grove, the ripened fruit and the blossoms for the next crop hanging from the
same branches-a most attractive sight.
FLORIDA land can be bought with the money spent for fuel in Northern
states.




'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Happenings All Over the State of Florida
An instance of the values of Florida orange and grape- The "Better Roads Movement" is growing stronger everfruit properties, properly matured and cared for, was never day in Florida and especially in St. Johns County. The better evidenced than when Mr. J. J. Heard, a Jackson- citizens of St. Johns County are going to vote on a bond
ville banker, recently received $100,000 for a 100-acre issue, which was favored by practically all the- large tax
grove. This was at the rate of $1,000 per acre. The prop- payers, including- the President of the Bunnell Developerty sold by Mr. Heard for this large sum is unquestionably ment Company, Mr. I. I. Moody, who is a strong, earnes: very desirable from any standpoint, but is not-an unusual and constant worker for good roads in our county. If the grove nor more desirable than many a grove found in bond issue is favorably voted upon there will be built.
Florida. If you would be a Mr. Heard, the opportunity sixty-four miles of hard road in St. Johns County, running
is yours. from the north to the south, this road to be built of brick
Welcome to Alfred Burbank.-The citizens of St. Johns concrete or rock. This road will extend through Espanola.
Coyhae toiged theiram e tleter of wt.lcom, Bunnell and DuPont to the Volusia County line, and will County have signed their names to a letter of welcome, take about seven months to build it, at the rate of nine
addressed to the famous horticulturist, Mr. Alfred Bur- miles a month. This will indeed be another step toward
bank of Santa Barbara, California, who is opening up a progress in our county.
large experimental farm in St. Johns County. Mr. Burbank
owns one thousand acres of land not far from the holdings Friday was a red-letter day at the ocean pier and up the
of the Bunnell Development Company. He and his brother Tomoka. Fishermen who came up from the pier at noon
have been very successful in plant breeding and fruit raising reported that forty-five big sea bass were caught up to 11 and in originating new and prolific varieties of Irish pota- o'clock when they left to come home for dinner. These toes. The removal of Mr. Burbank from California to fish by actual test weighed from eight to thirty-five pounds.
Florida is surely-our gain, while it is California's loss. an average probably of about fifteen pounds.-Halifax Journal.
We are one of the few land companies in the The hay crop for the past year has been unusually heavy
state located on. the grounds, working with and and the weather conditions have been very favorable. The
helping our settlers. first cutting yielded from one and one-half to two tons
oenot thsfarshw oper acre. The barns are packed with fine hay and many Does ntot this fact show our fa~th in the coun try? stacks are in the fields, being sold for $15.00 per ton unbaled and $20.00 per ton baled.-St. Johns Tribune.
All Florida vegetables are in good demand.-Beans as
high as four dollars per basket; lettuce two dollars per Now that you are the owzer of a farm in the
basket; peppers three dollars and twenty-five cents per I
large basket; -peas seven dollars per basket; egg plants c
three dollars and fifty cents per box. your friends in joining you there? Have you told
The first hamper shipments of Irish potatoes have moved them- of the many advantages awaiting them at
out from South Florida and bringing around 8c per pound Buinnell-DuPont, and that they too can secure a
and, in demand at that price. choice farm undr the most reasonable term. We
Cabbages continue to hold their own. As high as thirtytwo dollars per ton is being paid. The first car of cabbages believe if you will tell your friends just the plain left Florida on the 7th of January. Some shipments have facts regarding our colony, they will be anxious
netted growers a dollar and fifty cents per crate. i to purchase farms for themselves, and -we should
. The orange growers of Florida are preparing to utilize 1 like to help you interest them; therefore if you the advantages offered by the new parcel post regulations. will fill out the blank below and will send to us at
The new regulations, which went into effect January 1, once. we will be pleased to comply with your remake it possible for packages weighing up to fifty pounds que ae -il ou leate to our friend.
to be sent in the first and second zones, and packages quest and -ail our literature to your frieIds.
weighing up to twenty pounds in all zones of the parcel
post system. ATTENTION PLEASE I
H. A. Lanier furnishes us the following figures of what We want to remind the readers of the Rome Builder that the resihe produced this year from a single acre of ground. These dents ot Buanell-DuPont who write letters for our paper each month, figures demonstrate that not only do citrus fruits and vege- are very busy men and women, and they do not have time to write tables pay here, but that the more staple crops are also personal letters to you. Some of our farmers have received as many profitable. From this acre of ground Mr. Lanier produced as ten letters a day, atter having written a letter to the Home thirty-five barrels of corn, worth $35; two crops of hay, Builder. You can understand that these people cannot take time to making four tons, valued at $20 a ton; $4-0 worth of Irish answer your questions, and we wo .ld suggest that if you insist on potatoes and 100 crates of squash, which netted $60.- hearing from any of them, that you enclose $i.00 in your letter to pay
Zolfo Springs Truth. them for their time and trouble. EDITOR.
VW Cut Out this Coupon and mail to our Sales Office at Chicago today 0
THOS. A. VERDENIUS,
108 South La Salle Street, Chicado, Illinois
Below are the names and addresses of some of my acquaintances who are interested in securing
homes in the Bunnell-DuPont Colony. Please send them a copy of your book,
"'A Little Farm-A BgLiving"
also the Bunnell Home Builder for six months.
Name Street and No. City State
Name_ Street and No. City State__C rite your own name here)







Full Text

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The Truth About Florida The Bunnell Home Builder Vol. 2 S. HOWARD, Editor 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. llllllllIM January, 1914 JVo. 2 YOUR NEW Y'EAR From time immemorial the advent RESOLUTION. of the New Year has been the occa sion /or “turning over a new leaf,” for making one or more resolutions as to our future con duct or plans. The New Year is indeed a fitting time for the com mencement of new undertakings. The old year with its hopes and its disappointments, its successes and its fail ures, is gone. We cannot bring it back or change what has occurred during its twelve months. But the New Year of promise is opening to us and it is for us to make of it something better than the previous years have been. What is your New Year resolution? What goal are you striving to reach? What success are you endeavoring to attain? It is well to sit down quiety and think these things over—make your resolution, and then set to work with a full determination to carry it through, no matter what ob stacles you may encounter. If you were provident enough during the past year or previous years to purchase for yourself a farm-home in the Bunnell-DuPont Colony, that some day will give you independence and the comforts of life, be thankful for this, and resolve that no matter what may happen, hard times or ill health, you will pay for your land and be able to rest in the assurance of a real home of your own in old age. And you, who have been hesitant and doubtful, let me urge you earnestly and sincerely to make one resolu tion at least, in this, the beginning of the New Year, that you will purchase a farm at Bunnell, and that you will buy your farm at once, while you can secure a very choice loca tion in the new tract. The Editor wishes for every reader of the Home Builder in the New Year much happiness and prosperity, and can candidly say that he knows of no better way towards at taining both, than by becoming the owner of a Home of Your Own, for “He who owns a home of his own, If only a cottage with vines overgrown. Of the pleasure of life gets a larger per cent. Than his haughtiest neighbor who has to pay rent.” FLORIDA FRUITS COME The next best thing to spending AS A DELIGHTFUL Christmas in Florida, is to have CHRISTMAS R E M E Ma bit of Florida come to us in BRANCE. the North at Christmas time. True, we can always go to the stores and buy fruit, a wreath of holly, or a sprig of mistletoe, and we are told they came from Florida, but one does not find such a delight in these things, as if they traveled all the way from Florida “on purpose” for him. Mr. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development Com pany, therefore made the Editor’s heart glad by sending us for Christmas two large boxes filled with a beautiful assort ment of oranges, tangerines and grapefruit—perfect in for mation and delightful in flavor. Never have oranges tasted so sweet since the days when we gathered them from the trees in Florida, as these sent us by Mr. Moody. It seems rather selfish to tell our readers about such a treat, and not have shared it with them, but since many of you were so far away, this was impossible, and we can only wish that the time will soon come when “you all” will be permanently located on your own little Florida farms, where you may be able to gather such delicious fruit from your groves. DO Y'OU WANT TO KNOW The Editor had in mind an “A REMEDY FOR HARD editorial for this issue of the TIMES?” THEN READ MR. Home Builder on the present VERDENIUS’ ARTICLE IN so-called “hard times,” but THIS ISSUE. when Mr. Verdenius’ article was received, he felt that but little more could be said along this line, and so it is given to you for your careful thought and consideration with this brief comment, “Them’s my sentiments, too.” Mr. Verdenius has in a clear, concise manner given us much food for thought in this article, “A Remedy for Hard Times.” It is indeed a sad thing when misfortunes, hard ships or calamities befall and there is no remedy for them, but we should feel that it is a matter for rejoicing when one can find a solution for these difficulties, and you will he delighted to read that Mr. Verdenius’ remedy for hard times is nothing more or less than “back to the land.” Read care fully what he says, act accordingly, and help your friends eliminate their troubles by having them read “A Remedy for Hard Times.” A Winter Scene in Michigan—WHICH DO YOU PREFEFt? “WINTER SNOWS” or “SUNNY SKIES” Picture of Orange grove near Bunnell taken in December Picking Oranges near Bunnell in January

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/bunnellhomebuildv2no_0

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m<§ BUHHELL SfOMK busilder Montana Lawyer states that he “found no better soil in the South than that in the Bunnell Dupont Colony.” Chester, Montana, Dec. 12, 1913. Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius Chicago, Ill. My Dear Sir: You asked me to write you of my im pressions of Florida. Very well, I am glad to do so. I will send you the following: Left Montana No vember 4, and have just returned after an absence of some thirtyseven days. Traveled over Du val, St. Johns, Volusia, Putnam, Alachua and Marion counties, in Florida, by auto, buggy, steamboat and on foot. I bought ten acres of Bunnell land last June and, after carefully in specting same on this C. Louis Brazee tri P together W i t h many other tracts, m the counties above named, I came back home the owner, not only of ten acres, but another ten also. This tells you whether or not I was satisfied. From the view point of an attorney, I examined the title to your holdings and am satisfied. I had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Messrs. Moody, Lambert, Heath and Turner. One is for tunate to be able to add such men to the list of his acquaint ances, and their friendship is an asset to one’s fortune. I consider these men straight and white through and through. Florida is not a place where one may find bank bills hang ing from the trees, nor gold and silver coins under his feet —excepting by, with and through honest toil, guided by energy and common sense, a will, a real man’s effort, a cool, level-headed, pre-conceived and well sustained deter mination to win; and then, the bank bills and coins will be his in abundance. There will he find climate and soil, ready, open, inviting, beckoning to a million people to come and find health, peace and plenty. Florida’s greatest need today is, and ever will be, tillers of her wonderful soil; farmers, intensive husbandmen. Give her these, and she will give them all they ask. “What man has done, man may do,” and what Florida has done, Florida may do, and with increased abundance. I saw and personally examined her products, embracing oranges, grapefruit, vegetables, poultry and other staples, and found them to be excellent. I must predict a great increase in Florida’s enormous output in the future, and I must, likewise, predict a like increase in the price of Florida lands. Had people known of California, Alaska, Nevada and Colorado’s mineral wealth a hundred years before they did, their mines would be a hundred years older than they are today. As soon as they learned the truth, they grasped the opportunities. Likewise, when people learn of the hid den wealth of Florida—through the proper handling of her resources—they, too, will grasp her opportunities. My first impressions of Florida, I am frank to say, were not up to my expectations. Let no man be deceived by read ing this letter. Others might experience similar thoughts and feelings. I went to Florida to learn the truth. I trav eled much, examined soil, native grasses, class and charac ter of trees and other growths, topographical conditions, looking to drainage, citrus and vegetable products, etc., etc. I looked for the disadvantages and objectionable features everywhere. I used my eyes and ears much and my mouth less. I peered into the thickets for snakes and alligators, but I saw neither. I tried to condemn the soil, but it ac quitted itself upon its own evidence. I attacked the drink ing water, but it came out clear. I mentally objected to the dry surface, but found an abundance of moisture just underneath. I reasoned that such sandy land could not produce bountiful crops; but the beautiful orange and grapefruit groves and vegetable gardens, undid my argu ment. Florida offers the new colonist good soil, plenty of mois ture and a perfect climate. These three great assets are Nature’s gifts. -The colonist, the home-maker, must supply the other requisites, viz.: seed, labor and judgment. Nature meets us half way. For healthfulness of the climate and the net income for her cultivated acres, a glance at the United States government’s statistics shows Florida well in the lead. I made a special trip to attend a county fair, and what I there saw, before my eyes, put all my inborn doubts to flight, and Florida won her case with me by a mere pre ponderance of evidence. I have, therefore, come back to Montana to arrange to make the sunny peninsula my future home. The truth about Florida is an all suificiency. If the gen eral public were in possession of that truth, there would be no more primitive Florida lands for sale at $35.00 an acre, within three months thereafter. The American people gen erally know a good thing when they see it, but,in this case, only a few have seen it. Again, let me not be misunderstood: I believe that the Northerner’s first impression, in many cases, of the Florida country, will not measure up with his pre-conceived mental standard. This was so in my own case; but he who puts the whole matter to the careful and impartial test, as I have tried to do, will surrender his objections as I have been compelled to do, and become a home owner in the land of sunshine and flowers, health and happiness, peace and plenty. I will state just here, that I found no better soil in all my travels in the South, than I found in the Bunnell-DuPom colonies. I will say, further, that I cannot conscientiously advise any person or persons without means or experience to go to Florida, if he or they expect to find a fortune al readywrapped and stamped, for such will not be the case; but, for him or them who can go prepared to make a proper beginning, there need be no doubt of an abundant and happy future. I took occasion, while there, to talk with pioneer colonists and, in the main, I found them happy and prosperous. I ate of their vegetables and fruits and found them to be ex cellent. The longer the term of residence in Florida, the better satisfied I found the resident. This certainly speaks well for the state. In my judgment, Florida, today, offers such inducements to the home-seeker as no other state, in my knowledge, car. offer. I believe that her future, a few years hence, will be a genuine surprise to the American continent; for, certain it is, that no other land this side of the Atlantic is so rich in its natural conditions and surroundings, reaching, as i: does, a half a thousand miles into the sub-tropical climate, between two great bodies of deep, blue, terpered seas. I have written quite enough, Mr. Verdenius, and wil. close, wishing you good cheer in your humane missionary labors of placing a worthy people in worthy homes. Most respectfully yours, C. LOUIS BRAZEE.

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__EUMHELL HOME BUILDER,__ Facts About Florida, and a Few Reasons Why the BunnellDupont Colony is the Best Place in the United States in Which to Live 1. FLORIDA lias tlie widest range of agTicultnral production of any state in tlie Union. 2. FLORIDA is 1,500 miles nearer tlie Northern markets and 2,500 miles nearer the Eastern markets than California. 3. FLORIDA products reach the markets first and get the best prices. 4. FLORIDA has the best climate in the United States to live in and the possibilities for both pleasure and profit are unexcelled. 5. Florida is the land where sunstrokes, blizzards and cyclones are unknown. 6. FLORIDA climate has less variation in temperature than any other state in the Union. 7. FLORIDA farmers work out-of-doors every day in the year. 8. FLORIDA land can be bought with the money spent for fuel in Northern states. 9. FLORIDA enjoys ample and well distributed rainfall. 10. FLORIDA offers a soil and climate which are well adapted to fruits and vegetables that can not be grown in the Northern states. 11. FLORIDA land values are constantly increasing. 12. FLORIDA potatoes and tomatoes produce large profits. 13. FLORIDA strawberries and celery are world famous, and $1,000 per acre crops have been grown on lands which cost only a few dol lars an acre a few years ago. 14. FLORIDA produces the finest grapefruit and oranges in the world. 15. The soil is prolific and easy to till. 16. You can raise three vegetable crops or four mixed crops from the same land in one year. 17. You can have a charming home surrounded by the trees and flowers of a semi-tropical climate in Florida. 18. You can plant and harvest something every month in the year, and work out-of-doors every day. 19. Water is abundant, pure and soft. 20. Few, if any, states have ever progressed as Florida is progressing today. The Bunnell-DuPont colony is the banner colony of Florida and offers today to the man seeking a home or an investment, advantages unsurpassed anywhere in the United States.

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m>e BUHME1LL, HOME TOIEBER Pennsylvania Teacher says one cannot realize the many advantages of Bunnell Dupont unless he has seen it. Dear Sir: Upon my return from Florida, where I was engaged in clear ing and plowing my land to make it ready for sowing and plant ing, I am anxious to say a few words about this beautiful land and its wonders. Permit me, please, to go back a little in my descrip tion and begin at the beginning. After Columbus had discovered the Baha mas near the Atlantic coast of America in 1492 and the Spaniards had conquered Cuba early in the sixteenth century, Ponce d e Leon, Governor of Porto Rico, was told by an Indian of a wonderful land not far away, where he would find plenty of gold and a fountain which would make the old young again, and he was anxious to bathe in the water of the miraculous fountain so that he might regain his youth. He therefore undertook an exploration voyage, and cruising about for several weeks he struck the mainland of North America (1513) and landed at a point not far from where St. Augustine, the county seat of our county, now stands and where our colony Bunnell-DuPont is situated. As the winter is unknown in that climate, and the dense green foliage and profusion of bright flowers were and are still prevailing everywhere, he named the country “Florida,” or “Land of Flowers.” This name has been fully justified, for as far as one can see, nothing but shining green leaves of trees and bushes, mixed with the light-green leaves of wild grapevines, with all kinds of verdure, and flowers bright with red, blue, pink, yellow and white blossoms and flowering bushes and roses of every kind. My four friends and I often walked on the railroad about twelve o’clock at noon, from DuPont to Bunnell (3 y 2 miles) and back again, and on whatever side we cast our eyes, the picture of this wonderful scene changed but little. It was never too hot, because the sea-breeze is constantly blowing, and the nights are always cool and restful. As to mosquitoes, I was not molested by them in the least, and in point of reptile I saw but one dead snake lying killed on the railroad—a small gray grass-snake. Some people are audacious enough to pretend that Florida is a “sand desert.” Yes, the land is sandy and in its figura tive sense it may also be called a “desert,” but because it was being devastated and deserted for many years, as it was the bone of contention and the seat of nearly continuous wars between the Indians and Spain, Spain and France, England and Spain, etc., until at last the country was pur chased by the United States (1819). This sandy soil, producing gigantic trees, cannot be bad at all. I have a fir-stump on my farm measuring three feet in diameter and it will cost much labor to remove it, together with its colossal roots, and my father, who was an experienced farmer, always used to assert that only a good soil will produce such immense and prodigious trees. But, even an inferior soil may be improved many times by a judicious man with sound sense, open eyes and active hands. We know that Ponce de Leon did not find the gold which the cunning Indian showed him in a dazzling light, but he found most grateful and comfortable springs with luke warm water, bright as silver-i where he could take delight in bathing as much as he pleased. As to the pretended gold, he had taken the word in its proper sense and was wrong, just as many of our people are who judge of the things with their eyes shut. Everybody knows that there are some rivers in all the continents in the sands of which real pure gold may be found, and we occasionally read that real small gold grains have been found in the stomachs of poultry, which they picked up from the sands; but as for Florida’s sandy soil, I am not bold enough to assert that any pure gold or gold ore is to be found there, and yet gold exists and is lying hidden and sleeping in this soil. Let us look for it; let us wake it—by clearing, plowing and harrowing the soil cheer fully; by sowing, planting and cultivating it with assiduity and intelligence, and one morning when we shall awake and rise to visit our sandy farm, we shallscarcely be able to believe and trust our eyes, when small golden grains peep ing out of pikes and ears will nod smiling and greeting us, when large lumps of golden melons, cantaloupes and pine apples will form a precious carpet spread out around our feet, when pomelos, oranges, lemons, peaches, limes, guavas, persimmons and plums will richly cover the trees of our groves and when large, splendid golden berries or sweet grapes will be hanging on all sides from the vines of our shady bowers and summer-houses. We shall not have to fear any hoar-frost pernicious to our crops and vineyards. It will be needless to be afraid of deadly explosions in fac tories and mines which unfortunately threaten every minute the lives of hard working men and the annihilation of their families, worthy of our pity. On the contrary, how happy shall we feel then, seeing that we have more than enough to be provided, and can be with our beloved families for the rest of our lives. In this regard a farm affords greater satisfaction and content than real gold and is therefore preferable to that glistening and ticklish metal, for “content is happiness.” The man who has not made a trip to Florida can not believe all this to be true; nor is it sufficient to go only to one place where the land is not yet planted and bearing fruit. He who will convince himself of this soil’s fertility ought to go further north, to Hastings and Palatka, or fur ther south to New Smyrna, Indian River and the next vicin ity, where he will find the same soil as at Bunnell-DuPont, but more developed. There he will stare with his eyes wide open and in astonishment he will lay his finger upon the wound of his incredulous heart, saying, “Lord, I believe!” And just the same splendor and gorgeousness which we ad mire now in the vicinity of the above mentioned places will amaze us within a few years at Bunnell-DuPont. Hastings, a place of recent development, produced and shipped two years ago about 250,000 barrels of potatoes. Our colony will follow and do the same before long. Now I beg the permission of addressing a few sincere and candid words about our honorable company. All of us know very well that the company is laudably active and spend ing much money in building fine'houses and necessary streets and digging indispensable ditches. We have at BunnellDuPont a modern railroad traversing both places (the East Coast Railroad). We have attractive newly built houses, we have broad milk-white streets—but do not think that every acre of the company’s land is under cultivation. r If so, you will be disappointed. WHAT WE NEED IS MORE PEOPLE TO CLEAR AND PLANT THE LAND. My farm is just at the corner of the town of DuPont. I shall do and help as much as I can by planting over three hundred different fruit trees and grapevines next spring. If all would improve their holdings what a wonderful country Bunnell would be. Florida’s climate is mild, healthful and agreeable. I, for my part, am fully convinced of the sincerity and truth of every sentence I have written down here, and every reader can rely upon it and follow me, for “in union there is strength.” Yours very truly, J. T. YOLK, Pennsylvania.

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_ m @ BUMHELL HOME BUILDER __ Bunnell—Dupont well adapted to the Raising of Poultry and Fruit. There are indeed but few places in Florida, or in the en tire United States, where a man who wishes to give all of his time to poultry and fruit raising can find a better loca tion than in the Bunnell-DuPond colony; therefore, I be lieve it a good plan to devote one page of the Home Builder this month to the discussion of the great possibilities that Bunnell offers for these industries. There are no two businesses that can be more success fully combined than the raising of fruit and poultry. While the poultry man is gathering eggs and selling broilers, he can, at the same time, be preparing to harvest an additional crop, in the way of increased profits from his fruit trees, etc. The orange and grapefruit groves may be used as poultry yards, and the trees will yield a larger crop from having the hens among them; and while the fruit trees are young, many kinds of vegetables and green poultry foods may be grown among the trees, and thus the poultry receives the benefit of this food the owner reduces his grain bills from fifty to seventy-five per cent. 18 months old grape-fruit tree in grove near.Dupont. The raising of grape-fruit is very profitable. If you have planted your acreage to fruit trees, and the fowls are allowed to range among them, or when the coops, with a small yard around each tree, are placed in a lot, the benefits are soon noticed. Whether citrus or other fruits are planted, the poultry will benefit them to a surprising degree, and the birds at the same time will receive the benefit of the shade from the trees. Two hundred birds per acre may be kept in this manner, with very profitable results. By planting velvet beans near the fences, which -will soon cover these fences, the fowls will be supplied with an abun dance of the best of green and bulky food and the neces sary exercise required in hunting for the buried grains and seeds. Of course, by using coops and confining the birds, larger result may be obtained and a far larger number of birds can be kept to the acre, but with this system the labor will be -increased considerably. We would advise that the birds be given plenty of free range. Poultry yard in Bunnell. It must not be supposed for one moment that all or any of these fine results can be obtained by sitting down and wait ing for them. Hard work, good judgment and careful atten tion to details are just as necessary here as elsewhere, but the returns from this necessary attention are so far in ex cess of what is usually attained elsewhere that it seems to be well worth the effort. The greater comfort with which one can perform these duties is also a very important factor in the work at Bunnell. In the first place, there is hardly a day in the year during which the sun does not shine at least part of the time. Then, too, the climate is so de lightful, so equable, so satisfying, that it is a joy at nearly all times to be out in the fresh, wine-like air, working among the birds and the fruit trees and watching the ob jects of one’s attention growing to full maturity and a goodly supply of profits. Eggs, at this writing, are selling for from fifty to sixty cents a dozen. Friers and broilers about forty-five cents per pound alive, and the demand is good. These figures may give some slight idea of prevailing prices. The fancier has large advantages over his Northern brother on account of the hatching season coming so much earlier than in the North, and thus enabling him to get out early breeding stock for sale, and hatching eggs of far greater fertility than is usual with Northern raised eggs in the winter time. And as regards marketing his highpriced stock and eggs, he has the same facilities that those of the North have, through the medium of advertising and building up a reputation for delivering the goods as per sample. I cannot urge any one .who expects to go in the poultry business too strongly to settle in Bunnell. There is room for a number of people to engage in the poultry business. The fact that there are several large hotels on the Florida East Coast, which during several months of. the year are over-crowded with the wealthiest people from all parts of the United States, gives the man who would like to go in the poultry business greater chances in Bunnell than any place else that I know of. Flock of "Rhode Island Reds" raised near Dupont.

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m<§ BUNNELL HOME, BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During tbe Month The church people and the entire see:on of country appreciate the action of the .nnual Conference of Methodist Ministers the state in assigning Rev. L. D. Haynes this charge for the ensuing conference ear. Mrs. Abbott, former state lecturer of lissouri and who is the owner of one of ur farms, made an eloquent address, after riiicli she organized the AY. G. T. U. in Bunnell. One of the most important meetings held n this section by any of the secret orders as that by the Knights of Pythias on last Monday evening. It was the district meetug and presided over by Deputy Grand hancellor. Mr. and Mrs. -John H. Burke of Port "efferson, New York, who came to the :>lony recently, have entered enthusias tically into the building of a home here. Their land is located near the lake and they will make every effort to have an legant place in what appears destined to e one of the most popular sections of the -ntire area of lands of the Bunnell Develop ment Company. Air. H. C. MeClintoek of Iron Hill. Md., rrived here accompanied by Air. C. W. Griffith of Chester, Virginia, who is prosecting. Our citizens welcome these young nd enterprising men and congratulate them n their good judgment to locate here. Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Jordan of Union City, Tennessee, who have recently purchased .and of the Bunnell Development Company, %  .re guests at Hotel Bunnell. They have a err fertile tract of land near the experi mental farm and have already begun its general development. Mrs. Jordan is a lady >f considerable experience in farming operadons and being herself an expert gardener will be of considerable aid to Mr. Jordan h the planning and beautifying of their farm. Dr. and Mrs. Jennings of Nevada, arrived Monday and will settle on their farm near Jore Lake. They are friends of Mr. and Airs. Gray, whose former home was Spo-_ kane, Wash. Air. J. H. Coster and family of New York Mate, arrived here recently and having ac cepted their allotment of land, moved on ro it as quickly as possible and began de velopments. Mr. Coster has erected his house, bam and fences and has made rapid advancement on the preparation of his land for planting. He will first plant the entire area cultivated to Irish potatoes, which will he followed by some later summer crops. Among the new arrivals are Air. and Airs. L. A. Jett and children of Clarksville. Tenn. Mr. Jett had purchased land on the shell road to the beach and has come to de velop his property and make this their future home. Near the beautiful sheet of water. Gore Lake, Colonel -J. A. AIcElherne. a prominent lawyer of Chicago, has purchased a pretty farm and is now personally superintending its clearing, breaking and general develop ment. The Colonel’will spend this winter here and return to Giicago next spring. The following season he will return here, accompanied by his family, and with them will be some friends whose lands he is also haring cleared now. Air. J. Jepson and Dr. Huffman have re cently purchased additional stock for their farm and expect to have their lands ready for planting at the earliest possible mo ment. One of the most enthusiastic farmers in the Bunnell-DuPont colon}is Air. AA 7 H. Gray, of Spokane, AA’ashington Air. and Airs. Gray have a nice farm near Gore Lake and in addition have purchased some very fine hammock lands farther east, which will be devoted to the culture of oranges and grapefruit. Air. and Airs. Gray have placed their daughter, Louise, in the St. Joseph’s Acad emy at St. Augustine, for the splendid literary training that is given at that insti tution. One of the most enthusiastic of the recent purchasers of Bunnell property is Air. George Kampher of New Alexieo. Air. Kampher is delighted with the climatic con ditions that allow him to remain outdoors the entire year, of which privilege he was denied in his former state during the winter months. One of the most progressive and scientific farmers who have bought at Bunnell is Air. 0. C. Alosby of Idaho. Air. Alosby will plant thirty acres of land this year, twentyfive of which he will plant to Irish pota toes, which will be followed by sweet pota toes exclusively. Air. Alosby bought in Black Point, one of the most fertile sec tions of the colony. Air. J. D. Curran, who has settled on the Aloody boulevard to the beach, will begin a small house soon and expects later to build a more commodious building. Air. N. Seholen of Washington, who has lands on the eastern side of Bunnell and DuPont, will diversify his crops and plant Irish potatoes and velvet beans. Air. Seholen will also plant some land to the famous early sweet potato of North Caro lina. which is possibly the most valuable crop placed on the markets of the eastern cities in the early summer. Air. John H. Barney of Olivet. South Da kota. came this week Air. Barney has bought, and being delighted with the climate and general conditions, will arrange for a permanent home here. Air. Thomas Sayers of New Y'ork City, will plant his farm this season to cabbage, lettuce and Irish potatoes, which will be followed by sweet potatoes. Air. -J. Wartzenluff of Iola. Kans., a former purchaser of land here, arrived on Thursday last and will move immediately on his land for the beginning of improve ments, and hopes to be able to have some land prepared for a spring crop. Air. Jacob Bauman of New Jersey, is pre paring to plant cucumbers, Irish potatoes, lettuce and corn for the early spring crop, after which he will grow sweet potatoes. Air. Edward Pederson of Alilwaukee, is here for some time. Air. Pederson was one of the Bunnell Company’s first purchasers and has visited here with his family previously. He enjoys an outing and will strike his tent on his lots here and Temain for a time. Air. H. B. Koch, formerly of Alissouri. has made splendid headway since his arrival here and has several acres of land ready for planting, which will first be planted to cabbages and Irish potatoes, which he will probably follow with corn or sweet pota toes. He will complete the clearing of his farm next spi'ing on the new lands of which he will plant cowpeas, preparatory to a larger area of vegetables for the fol lowing fall or spring season. Ex-AIayor AA*. S. Jordan of Jacksonville, is now a frequent visitor to Bunnell and is delighted with the progress that is being made both in the town of Bunnell and sur rounding country. In a recent interview the Alayor advised that he had visited several sections of the state and was pleased with the general development that was being made in the various localities and regards any good land in the state as being woi'th $100.00 an acre. Air. C. AY. AYeatherington of Kentucky, who is the owner of a fine farm in the Bunnell colony and who spent some time here last year, is going to return within a few weeks’ and will take up the further im provement of his land. Air. AYeatherington writes that he is very anxious to get to Bunnell because he considers it the best country he has ever seen and he hopes to bring several of his friends with him. Alessi'S. Sezudlo and Strach, formerly of Chicago, are now located on their land near Korona. They have been here but a few weeks and have already erected a little house. They have cleared some land and expect to plant a crop soon. These gentle men are very satisfied with their farms and with the country in general. The Farmer’s Society of Equity met in a call communication on Saturday evening last. The meeting was called for the pur pose of discussing the purchase of seed and fertilizer for the coniine crop. Air. Bobbitt of J. H. Schneider and Company, of New York, met with them and discussed his terms of handling their products in the spring. The members represent totally about n00 acres and it is their endeavor to buy their supplies as nearly as possible as a unit. Air. and Airs. R. Benjamin Council of Limestone. Tenn.. arrived Thursday evening and are temporarily the guests of ATrs. Council’s father.

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BUMMELIL HOME BUILDER' Former Nevada Doctor Chooses Bunnell in Preference to any Place in California Thos. A. Verdenius, Esq., Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir: I •wish to tell you why I came to the Bunnell-DuPont colony, Florida. Mrs. Jennings (my wife) and myself de cided a few years ago that when we quit mining in Nevada we would seek a climate more congenial, free from the ex treme of cold and heat, a few miles from the seaside in a citrus belt, on a small farm, where we could have a good Jersey cow or two, hence have pure milk and butter, raise a few chickens and, possibly, other poultry, fruit and vege tables; in a healthy section with good, pure water, free from malaria. We at first expected that our destination would be on the coast of Southern California. We investigated very care fully and thoroughly from Santa Barbara to San Diego, California. I also investigated every portion of Florida. FIRST—I found that the land in California could not be bought (the unimproved) for less than five hundred dollars per acre. I found equally as good land, if not better, in this colony, in the same kind of a belt, the same distance from the ocean, at from thirty-five to forty dollars ner acre. SECOND—I found that vegetables and fruits could be nlaced in the markets about thirty days earlier than from Southern California, hence would command better Drices. THIRD—I found that the shiDDing to the great centers and markets of trade would onlv average about one-half of the distance and one-half of the cost from this colony, that it would be from Southern California. In regard to its nroductiveness I find that, everything that is oroduced in ekerv other state does well here, eveent annles and wheat. T am told they are not profitable to grow here, but I find growing in this colonv or belt, oranees. tangerines, grapefruits, lemons, bananas, figs, dates, nineannles. and several other fruits that I am not vet familiar with their names: also rice, sugar cane, cotton, pecans, peanuts. English walnuts, which are not produced in the Northern states. This colonv is two or three hundred miles north of thp Plverglades and is considered healthy. There is an ahunrlnnoe of good nure water In the ground here, hut evervone has not got it to the surface, hut they cap have it. I know tt>is to he true, as T am a scientific evoert in locating veins of water, gold silver and other precious metals. On the twentv acres that T bought in the colonv T found a living vein. T had a well driven there which took onlv two hours. I have nlentv of good. nure. soft wafer. Mr. and Mrs W. IT. Cray bought land in this colonv last snring at $30.(10 an acre and were recently offered and refused several hundred dollars profit for fourteen acres of it. It is yet unimproved. There is some good land for sale vet in this colonv at thirty-five and forty dollars ner acre, hut i f is going fast. Anyone desiring a good farm should not delay in purchas ing. The terms of payment are very liberal. We visited an orange grove a few davs.ago of 100 acres, where the owner of it has refused a Quarter of a million dollars for it. The orange and grapefruit trees were loaded with the luscious fruit. It is located only a mile outside of this colony. In conclusion permit me to say that I am a native of Kentucky and my wife is a native of Missouri; that we have resided in several states of the Union and have been in many more, and that we have decided to make Florida our future, permanent home, hence we have cast our lot among these people and we are now one of them. I reside one and onehalf miles east of DuPont, St. Johns County. Very cordially yours, J. JENNINGS, Florida. California Cannot Hold People After They Have Learned of Bunnell Among the hundreds of purchasers who have bought of the Bunnell Development Company, there is none who is more enter prising than Mr. A. W. Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins, whose former home was in Tennessee, arrived at Bunnell some weeks ago, accompanied by his family. He began preparations to clear his farm immediately and so well pleased was he witk the general conditions here that he advised a son, Oscar Jenkins, in California, to sell out and come to Bunnell at once. His son complied with his request anc came promptly, bringing his family, to make this their future home. As California is practically the only com petitor that Florida has, our people feel con gratulated to have inhabitants of that state become citizens of this, and Mr. Jenkins is only one of a number of former Californians who are now living in our colony. His Own New Potatoes for Christ mas Dinner Delightful Experience of a Former Canadian Dec. 24, 1913. Mr. Howard, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir— Say, it’s fine to he able to dig lien potatoes for Christmas out of one> own garden. That is what I have been doing today—much better than freezing up North. It’s just like midsummer instead of Christ mas. I do not envy you up there in the cold. I cannot make out why peo ple stay there just to make a mere existence and freeze in the bar gain, when they could enjoy this summer weather all the year around. I suppose, like myself before I saw Florida, they scarcely believe it, but what I say is that they had better come South and line where life is well worth liring. Sincerely yours, S. J. HARRISON, Florida.

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gfte BUHHEdLL HOME BUILDER A Remedy for Hard Times. A sincere appeal to all thinking men and women. By Thos. A. Verdenius Mr. T. A. Verdenius The Pioneer Small Farm \Ian o£ Florida. Everyone seems to be talking “hard times” these days, and the pe rusal of my morn ing p a p e r con vinces me that these conditions do %  > not only exist in Chicago alone, but practically all over the country. Los Angeles, Califor nia, reports a vast n umbe r of idle men; Portland, Oregon, tells about her “down and outs.” One big concern in Gary, Indiana, has laid off half of its help; other firms are cutting doAvn their working horns, while still others have discharged all their unmarried men, and several factories are reported as being closed down entirely. At the same time I read how philanthropic institutions are busy helping the poor and those out of work. One of the large churches of Chicago is giving every man who asks for it, coffee and bread each morning for breakfast. The two principal political parties are accus ing each other as being the cause of these hard times. The Republicans blame the Democrats and the Democrats say the Republicans are at fault, while the general public—the middle class —does not know what and who to blame. Three main causes are mentioned as being responsible— the change of administration, the tariff, and the new currency law, and although I do not feel able to state what causes the unsettled condition in our country, I do believe that I can give a rem edy for these hard times. You readers of the Home Builder will admit the truth of the following statement—that the only man who can really and truly be called in dependent, is the man who has a tract of land' paid for and in a producing condition. Such a man need not fear hard times, nor the day when he will likely be discharged on account of the scarcity of orders, a dull season, or a score of other reasons known to wou. I believe in the “brotherhood of man,” but I also believe that it is the duty of every man, espe cially husbands and providers, to improve their conditions as quickly as possible, and not wait for political conditions to change. If you share my opinion that the farmer is really the only inde pendent man, then let us see where such inde pendence can be secured. Personally, I would not care to leave the United States. No doubt there are many other good countries besides our own country, but I would not consider them; so my chief object is to show the readers of the Home Builder where they can secure reasonable land in our own country. Land values in the West are well known, and throughout the Middle West the land owner is considered a big man. In the Northern Atlantic Coast states farm lands have become impover ished by continued usage, but as an offset we also find that these lands have become more valu able on account of their location and the large population, especially in the cities, so that the majority of farms in the Eastern states are practically suburbs of thriving towns, or estates of millionaires. It is in the South that the present homeseeker will find Iris Paradise, and if the railroads of the South had done as much to apprise the people of our country of what is waiting there for them as the railroads of the West have done, no doubt by this time every acre of land in the South w r ould have been taken up. You need not fear 4 *hard times** if you have a Florida home like this. CHIEF OF ALL THE SOUTHERN STATES, FOR THE FARMER OR HOMESEEKER, IS FLORIDA. It is the "Land of Promise and is rapidly coming into its own. It is THE STATE in the Union that is growing more rapidly in population and wealth than any other, and the world is commencing to realize what Florida really is.

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BUHHELL HOME BUILDER A Remedy for Hard Times. A field of corn near Bunnell. Take, for instance, our colony at Bunnell, where we have today land owners from almost every state of the Union, and although only a small percentage of the buyers are settled on their farms, we can state that our buyers are to be found in almost every large city of the Union, also in Canada, Yukon, Alaska, Hawaiian Is lands, Mexico, England and Switzerland. Of the thousands of new settlers who are coming to Florida, only a small percentage are farm ers; many of them are clerks, merchants, labor ers; men and women who are tired of the old hand-to-mouth existence and who have nerve and energy enough to break away from drudgery and start anew to carve out for themselves a life of independence, in a real land of plenty. I believe I can say without fear of contradiction, that the man who expects to make Florida his home will find fewer obstacles and hardships than any other place I know of, and he can start with less money in Florida than anv other state. Here are a few things about Florida to be re membered. One of the first necessities in tin establishment of a home is the building of the house—a place of shelter—and this can be buir for a third or half the cost of building it in a Northern climate. Fuel bills can be reduced t. almost nothing, as there are few days when a fire is needed, and plenty of wood is to be founc in our colony. The necessity for warm clothim. is also eliminated; besides, and best of all, Bun nell is in a country where three crops a year art raised. This means a great deal for the new comer, who does not have to wait a full year t>. realize something from his land, and if he shouL encounter one crop failure, he would still havtwo more chances to make good. Florida soil in my opinion is the most pro ductive soil in the United States and there are several reasons for this statement; but the primary one is the fact that it is located where i: has more sunshine throughout the year than any other state in the Union, and it has an abimdanct of rainfall as well. Florida’s varied resources of forest and farm land, her magnificent fisheries, her great phos phate deposits, her fertile soil and her marvelouclimate, have attracted the attention of the whok world; consequently capital and immigration art turning Floridaward so rapidly that statisticianfind difficulty in keeping record of the stateconstantly increasing progress. Florida has increased in population, as cred ited by the government in 1910, for a ten-yea: period, forty-two per cent, but it can be safely figured that almost all of this increase can be traced to the progress being made by the state in those last three years. A beautiful bungalow in Bunnell.

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m@ BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A Remedy for Hard Times. Less than forty years ago. Florida's produc~:on was very small indeed. Last year, however, ne of the railroads penetrating the state handled more than 25,000 carloads of fruits and vege tables. The cities of the North, consuming the greater portion of Florida’s products, are dis*ant from Florida’s shipping point from a day :nd a half to two days and a half, so that Florla’s fruits and vegetables are landed in New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis and other Northern cities fresh from the tree and vine. One does not have to go back many years to recall the fact that Florida was at one time very much misrepresented, particularly as to the health and natural conditions of the state, but the fact is Florida’s death rate is less than that of any :ther state in the Union. Florida’s soil will produce every known fruit n the world, most of them in abundance. Her citrus-fruit industries are second in size to those jf California, while in quality the fruit has no superior in the world. Florida’s trucking indus try is in a class by itself and includes almost every anown variety. Vegetables are practically grown during every month of the year, and the bulk of the crops is ^ent to the markets during the winter season, when the highest prices prevail. Florida’s climate, while wonderfully beneficial :o the tourist and seeker for health, is equally valuable and important in the growing of fruits and vegetables and all field crops. Florida’s pop ulation, both urban and rural, is composed of the best of American citizenship. Street scene in Bunnell. Tribune Building, one of Bunnell’s business blocks. The public-school service is excellent. Churches of various denominations are to be found in every town and settlement. The social spirit is broad, and the hospitality of the people, both Southern and of the thousands who had come from the North and are now living here, is of the kind that makes the stranger welcome and at home. Out-of-door fife is one of Florida’s chief at tractions. The annual average temperature is about jo degrees. It rarely goes above 90 in the summer or below 30 in the winter. It is never too hot or too cold for the full en joyment of out-of-door life, and such recreations as hunting, fishing, bathing, etc., can be indulged in every month in the year. Florida’s real estate values have doubled and trebled in the last few years and 'will do so again in the next few years. This is especially true at Bunnell. The Bunnell Development Company first sold land for $20.00 an acre, then the price was advanced to $25.00, and $80.00, and today no land is sold for less than $35.00 and $40.00, while recently one ten-acre tract near Bunnell was resold for $100.00 an acre. Not only is Florida’s soil unequaled for truck ing or the production of citrus fruits, but it is proving to be superior for staple crops—corn, rye, forage crops of all kinds, sugar cane, cotj ton, etc. Florida is destined to be one of the most j remarkable farming states in the Union before i many years. People from the North are coming here rapidly and every day new wonders of Flor ida’s soil are being discovered. I wish I could ring a bell in the ears of every workingman, every clerk, every person, for that

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gfee TOHHELL HOME BUILDER A Remedy for Hard Times, matter, throughout the length and breadth of tills great country of ours, and awaken them to the fact that they are wasting the best years of their lives, working for others, and I wish I could help them to understand that with a little effort on their part, they can easily become the owner of at least ten acres of good, tillable land in the splendid Bunnell-DuPont colony, where they will be beyond the reach of the so-called “hard times.” Florida East Coast Railroad Company’s Depot at Bunnell SAVE YOUR MONEY, if only a few dol lars per month and become the owner of a Bunnell-DuPont farm-home. It will mean that you are, step by step, reaching the goal—“Inde pendence.” Bear in mind that the best insurance you can have for your family is a good piece of land in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, that the surest protection you can have in your evening of life is the ownership of this self-same land. And just tliis is my remedy for hard times. I want to ask the thousands who receive tills issue of the Home Builder if you will not see that one or more of your friends reads it through from cover to cover. Get them interested in Bun nell ; you can do them no greater favor; nor can you prove your friendship for them in any better way than by doing this. Urge them to start at once to secure a home—and you may depend upon it that the Bunnell Development Company will allot them good land. If you are not already a buyer in this banner colony of Florida—.BUNNELL-DU PONT— St least GIVE ME AN OPPORTUNITY TO PROVE TO YOU WHY YOU SHOULD i BECOME ONE, AND WHY YOU SHOULD BUY A FARM AT ONCE. It is impossible for me to give further details regarding our colony in this article. All I have endeavored to do, is to give vou what, in my opin ion, is a REMEDY FOR HARD TIMES. If you want to know more about our colony, write for my booklet, "A LITTLE FARM — A BIG LIVING .” I have just gotten out a new edition of this book. It is printed in three colors, with many up-to-date photographs, which I had taken while in Bunnell recently. It is writ ten in a conservative manner and I can back up every statement therein and can, very easily, prove to you that Bunnell-DuPont is the place where you should invest and where you should make your future home. If you. will fill out the coupon below and return it to me, I will send vou my booklet, “A LIT TLE FARM—A BIG LIVING,” my 1914 Calendar, and also the Bunnell Home Builder for six months, free of cost. 1W* Cut out this Coupon and mail to our Sales Office at Chicago today THOS. A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois I am interested in the Bunnell-DuPont colony and would like to receive a copy of your book. “A Little Farm—A Big Living ” and would also like to receive for six months, free of cost, your magazine, The Home Builder, and your 1914 Calendar. NAME_:__ STREET and NUMBER___ CITY_STATE_ If you have any acquaintance* who are interested, kindly give us their names and addresses in the space below.

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Wh@ BUHHSuILlL HOME BUILDER Back to the Land By Mrs. Marie Walske, of Canada How many discouraged city toilers, hopeless and weary of fighting against a series of invidious circum stances, finally surrender to the phantom called “des tiny” and cry in their distress, “It is useless to struggle in the meshes in which I am entangled; all things have conspired against me; I can never extricate myself.” Unto those thus terribly perplexed, existence is in deed a failure, if there comes not unto their souls the sweet assurance of a Supreme Providence, tender and pitiful, awaiting the moment when the toiler’s hand shall be outstretched for guidance. Emerson, in his essay on the “Over-Soul” says: “From within, or from behind, a light shines through us upon things and makes us aware that we are noth ing, but the light is ALL” and if to one looking out ward from a maze of difficulties, that light reveals an outlet, an escape, and rising in newly found strength “He breaks his birth’s invidious bar, And breasts the blows of circumstance, And grapples with his evil Star. ’ ’ Then surely will the difficulties vanish and the path way to success be found. Unto laborers in mills and factories, yielding up their all of strength and skill to build colossal fortunes for a few; unto the discouraged workers in various spheres of labor, ever fearing as the years glide by, that presently they will be requested to stand aside for younger, more ambitious men; to all such there comes today a light that reveals an exit from the heart-rending conflict with poverty and hard-times; an escape from uncongenial conditions of city life and tofi—“BACK TO THE LAND!”—and Wherefore? Why should that time-worn remedy be offered as a solution to the enigma of hard times? Because, after an exhaustive insearch and inquiry into the cause of the high cost of living, the verdict is that the main, the REAL cause is to be found in the simple old-fashioned law of SUPPLY AND DEMAND. That the high cost of living is driving men “back to the land,” is the statement of Major Dyer, Secretary to World Immigration Commissioner Lamb of the Sal vation Army—and THIS after a world’s tour, investi gating labor conditions. “We intend to advise im migrants to steer clear of big cities which are already too congested,” declared the Major. Dealing with the high cost of living, an experienced Canadian farmer gives us, as his opinion that “more farmers is the remedy. ” “ The great evil, ’ ’ he declares, “is the increase in the consumption of food in the cities, and the falling off in supplies from country districts.” Following this is a statement from Mr. Brown, Chief of the Poultry Division of the Canadian Department of Agriculture. After an exhaustive investigation of the egg trade, he finds that Canadians are eating more, and the supply is so insufficient to meet the demand that Canada, which once exported eggs, has now to import them, and in greater quantities each year. Hitherto, when there was an egg shortage in Canada, eggs have been available in the Chicago and western markets, but by reason of the same cause (under pro duction) Americans also are short of eggs and since the revision of the tariff have actually imported them. What is the conclusion of it all? In Mr. Brown’s opinion it is the “Golden Opportunity” for farmers and others to increase their poultry plants and take advantage of the high prices prevailing for poultry and poultry products. “BACK TO THE LAND” should be the cry of men and women now laboring to make others rich. BACK TO THE LAND, where they may build their own homes and produce a supply of food to satisfy the demands of crowded cities, and at the same time enrich them selves. What induces men to delve and search for gold and jewels? The value of the precious metal! The demand for the glittering gems! If the insufficient supply of food products has become a subject of such importance as to engage the attention of America’s and Canada’s most earnest men and women, then surely here is the golden opportunity offered to city toilers, anxious to escape to better and healthier environments. Purchase a farm! Become your own master! Avail yourself of the easy terms offered by the Bunnell De velopment Company. Engage in the food producing industry in Florida—the most favored state in America, where, owing to its fertile soil and favorable climatic conditions you may raise produce to supply the eager demands arising from crowded cities, and at the same time enrich yourselves. Better far to labor in the country, upon your own land, than remain a “wageslave” toiling for a mere living in office, mill or store. Better, after the day’s labor to sit under the shelter of your own home, gazing with the pleasure of pos session upon the citrus groves and the vegetables grow ing upon your farm, which*in due time will yield a rich harvest. Better as the passing years leave their silver traces upon your locks, to know you will be reap ing the results of a wise investment and earnest in dustry, than to be wandering homeless, seeking shelter from the charity of others. One writer declares that, “instead of saying that man is the creature of circumstances, it would be nearer the mark to say that man is the architect of circum stance.” However true that may be, it is a blessed | privilege to own a home of one’s own—a place of res: in the days where our human frames, yielding to the weariness of age, may have no fear of care or poverty Where we may watch the sun go down, In radiant hues of lingering light Without a city’s walls to frown And choke fair eve with sullen night. FLORIDA strawberries and celery are world famous, and $1,000 per acre crops liave been grown on lands wMcli cost only a few dol lars an acre a few years ago.

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ms BUMMELL HOMS BUILDER Bunnell’s Youngest Land Owner Baby Irma Tice of Newark, New Jersey, eighteen months of age, and youngest land owner in the Bunnell-DuPont colony Irma’s farm was pur chased for her by Mrs. Purkis and Mrs. Groff of Newark, N. J., and by the time she has reached womanhood it will be worth a small fortune to her, whether any improve ments are ever made on it or not. Surely, no one could give a child a better gift. Parents and rela tives would do well to follow the example of these two ladies, and we are glad to say that a number of parents are now paying for Bunnell farms for their little sons and daughters. Have you treated yourself to a winter in Florida, where you can spend your time and energy out doors among flowers and gardens instead -of shovel ing snow, thawing out water pipes and paying large tills for fuel? $500.00 cask kas keen offered tkis man, wko paid only $125.00 for kis five acres Dear Sir: I want to say a few words about Bunnell and the splen did treatment I have received from the Bunnell Develop ment Company; and I want to tell you something of what i I have done here. I have cleared my land, have been beau tifying my two town lots and have been aiding others. My lots are the first to be seen on entering the beautiful town of Bunnell. The homes here are small but attractive and I am now erecting a new one. I came to Florida five years ago; landed in St. Cloud with §6.00 in cash. Had a few carpenter’s tools with me. Helped build a new home at St. Cloud, then came to Bun nell and went to work for Mr. B. B. Batchelder, Bunnell’s old, reliable contractor. I worked for him for quite awhile, and my first winter in Florida just cost me $110.00. I went back to Ohio the next summer with $24.00 to the good, after having spent a delightful winter. I pur chased a five-acre farm near Bunnell for $25.00 an acre, and have it about paid for now. I have been offered $500.00 cash for this farm, so I consider this mighty good for such a small investment. I am usually so busy here that I have not had time to visit the many beautiful spots nearby, but hope to do so later. I wish that all of my friends could realize the bright prospects I have here, and could understand that the op portunities for them are just as great if they would only buy a farm in this colony. I would be only too glad to make selections for any of them, free of charge. No one can make a mistake by investing here for there is no land in this section but what is worth more than the price asked for it, and it is growing more valuable day by day. How I would like to pass around the luscious oranges right now, of which I have a good supply. Yours very truly, E. A. FOSTER, Florida. Do you knoiv of any other place where land sells for so little and produces so much? Where a single good crop has returned more than the cost of the land and all the improvements? Florida is the winter home of the wild duck. The above picture was taken only a few miles from our new tract. The Bunnell-DuPont colony is a paradise for the sportsman. Oar lands are located in a region where one may enjoy the finest hunting and fishing, and all manner of out-door sports. FLORIDA lias tlie best climate in tlie United States to live in and tlie possibilities for botb pleasure and profit are unexcelled.

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Two Short Stories of Success* NEW YORK MAN WELL PLEASED WITH BUNNELL-DUPONT FROM PLOUGHING THE SEA TO PLOUGHING THE LAND Mr. Kuhn and family arrived at Bunnell eleven months ago. He has built a five room house at a cost of $400.00; small barn and outbuildings for $60.00. He has cleared, fenced and plo-wed ten acres of land. He dug a well, costing $11.00, obtaining good water at a depth of twenty-two feet Mr. Yarnell left the Navy August 8th, 1913. Arrived at Bunnell September 4th. Began clearing his land Sept. 15th; built a five room house, barn and hen house at a cost of $575. His fam ily arrived Dec. 20th. Has 15 acres fenced, four and one-half acres cleared and plowed. Obtained fine water at’a depth of 33 ft.; cost of well $13.00 Mr. Kuhn and tons preparing their land for potato crop Dear Mr. Verdenius: I received your calendar and thank you very much. Now I will write you a few lines to let you know what I think of Bunnell. Today is the anniversary of two events which should make me feel happy. This is my thirty-sixth birthday, and eleven months since I came to Bunnell. When I look back and see what I have accomplished during these last eleven months, I do feel happy. I have built me a nice house and cleared ten acres of land which I planted to potatoes last week. I have a very nice farm and there is lots of good land left, and if I have any luck I will get more, for I think it is the best investment I can make. The climate here is just fine; the sun shines almost the year around. My family and myself are feeling splendid. We have a nice flock of chickens which have been laying most every day, and we have sold some eggs, too, for which we received forty cents per dozen. I am certainly pleased with my investment here. I have worked hard this summer and have made me a home which I can feel proud of, and it only took eleven months to do it. Now my hardest work is done—I can take it easier. My land is fenced as well as cleared. We have no coal to buy, but a nice garden coming on to supply us until fresh vegetables. Now, what more does a man want, and where can one do better? The town of Bunnell is a regular little city. We have some good stores where one can purchase anything he wants. I intend to plant an orange grove next year, for oranges do .well here. I have seen some grown close to my place and they were the sweetest I have ever eaten. One thing about this colony, you can plant something every day in the year and it will grow. You can raise everything in your garden that is good to eat and for pleasure you can go to the Atlantic Ocean, which is only seven miles from Bunnell, and catch lots of fish, camp there at any time of the year, and get an abundance of oysters, too, in season. We have been there several times. We have very nice shelled roads which makes it a pleasure to drive, and one can see all kinds of crops growing along the way. No wonder that they call this the Flower State. Roses will bloom all the year around. I am well pleased and so is my family. Give me Biumell-DuPont; no city life for me. Yours truly, JOSEPH E. KUHN. Mr. Tkos. A.Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Mr. Verdenius: I have now found time enough to write you a few lines. I have been here just three months; have my fifteen acre tract fenced, five-room house, barn and out houses built, four acres of land plowed, onehalf acre of Bermuda onions in the ground and up, have a nice garden of most every thing growing, includ ing strawberries. I am getting, two acres ready to plant to to matoes and sweet pep pers and I may set out some trees, either pe can or fruit trees. It will depend on how much time I have to spare for that work betw r een now and S.K. Yarnell March 31st, but if I don’t this year I will next, sure. I had my soil tested by the State Agricultural College of Gainesville, Florida, to see if it was suitable for fruit. They gave me a good report on it for either fruit or truck farm ing, and if any one is inclined to be skeptical about the soil all they have to do to be convinced of its growing qualities is to write to the Agricultural College. Bunnell-DuPont is coming to the front fast. They are building right along now. The Company is using three automobiles to show people the land; the hotel is full of folks all the time and the Florida East Coast Railroad is running three extra trains each day, bringing people into Florida. Everyone is busy now getting their fertilizer in the soil for potatoes and we expect a banner year. The merchants are all doing a good business and everything looks prosperous. We are having fine weather. Wishing you and the colony every success, I am Yours very truly, S. K. YARNELL, Home of Mr. S. K. Yarnell

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me BUHMELL HOME BUILDER Glimpse of 106 acre orange grove just east of the Bunnell-DuPont colony. Note the magnificent palm trees in the background. Last season about 10,000 boxes of delicious fruit were shipped from this grove. Ten acres of oranges or grape-fruit will give one an independent living in this Sunny Southland What Others Have Done in Florida Cliase & Co., who handled a celery crop ol 120 acres, i;ter deducting their commission, returned §106,028.16 to -he growers; an average of about §884 an acre. Henry P. Chappell, nine years ago a railroad agent at 55 a month, was one of the pioneers who planted celery. Today his income is §25,000 a year—half as much as the salary of the President of the United States. A. T. ftosseter has made §50,000 in the last five years rising celery and lettuce on Florida land that a few years -go was considered, worthless. Last year George C. Chamberlain realized §24,000 from on acres of land. His celery yielded §1,650 an acre, fol:wed with egg plant, which sold for §650 an acre more. L. C. Pace made §40,000 net on forty acres of celery ::llowed by lettuce. He then had one sure crop left, either :rn or sweet potatoes, before it was again time to plant olery. C. P. Williams, formerly a locomotive engineer, has made 130,000 in the last three years raising celery on five acres :: land. Rudolph Warner, west of Bunnell, obtained a net profit list Spring of §980 from a fraction over five acres of Irish potatoes. These merely show what can be done. It takes brains, -xergy and a little capital, but the possibilities are here.— Exchange. To the Bunnell-DuPont Land Owners who are now living in the Colony:— If you take an interest in reading the Bunnell Home Builder, won’t you send any items of interest you may have to this office for i>ublication? Tell us what improvements you have made; what you contemplate making, and how you are getting along. Also send us items of social affairs and of church interest, or write us a letter for publication. Such co-operation on your part will be very much appreciated by the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder, 108 So. LaSalle Street, Chicago, HI. OUR 1814 CALENDARS RECEIVE HEARTY WELCOME. Practically every mail brings one or more letters acknowl edging receipt of our calendar, and containing favorable comment on same. One of these letters reads as follows: My dear Mr. Yerdenius : — Allow me to thank you for the nice and rather unique calendar you sent me. I was under the impression that ten acres of Florida %  land v:as a big slice, but the tall, smooth faced fellow on the calendar seems to be able to carry it in his hand. I expect to go down to Bunnell this fall, and perhaps I will hare the pleasure of shaking you by the hand. Yours truly, M. E. KANTNER. We trust that each one who received a calendar has hung it in a prominent place so that it may constantly remind you and your friends of the Sunny Southland, and especially of its most successful colony—BUNNELL-DUPONT. If you have not received one of our calendars you may secure same by writing to the General Sales Office, BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 108 So. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. California “booster” admits that the Florida East Coast is the finest country he ever saw Mr. Yerdenius: I am going to relate a little instance thathappened a few days ago. A friend of mine, a prominent railway offi cial, had always praised California when we met, while I had championed Florida. As I was leaving for New York the other day, I met this friend, who had just returned from a visit to the Florida East Coast, and I asked him if he found I had exaggerated about Florida. His answer was: “Homer, the East Coast of Florida is the finest coun try I have ever put foot on and you never told me onetenth. Florida is destined to be the greatest State in the L’nion.” My train was moving and I had to say good-bye. When people go and see for themselves, then they will be like my friend, unless they are too narrow-minded. Wishing you a prosperous New Year, I remain, Yours sincerely, HOMER E. HASKELL, West Virginia. FLORIDA produces tlie finest grapefruit and oranges in tlie world

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BUNNEXL IOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont CITY DIRECTORY. Church Services: METHODIST CHURCH. Preaching—Sunday, 11 a. m. Preaching—Sunday, 7 p. m. Sunday School—10 a. m. Secret Orders: F. & A. M., NO. 2 00. Meets every second and fourth Tues day at 7 o’clock p. m. in Masonic Hall, second floor Bank Building. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. Mohawk Lodge, No. 128, meets every first and third Monday at 7:30 p. m. at Castle Hall, in Bank Building. At the last meeting of the road com missioners an order was given to at once open up and grade the road from Bunnell to DuPont parallel with the railroad. The local W. C. T. TJ. observed the day of prayer for national prohibition. In the forenoon a devotional service was conducted. The feature of the evening’s program was an address given by Mrs. Alice Scott Abbott, which was enjoyed by all present. Messrs. George Moody, TV. H. Coch ran, and Robert Moody have begun the erection of their summer homes at Ocean City. Watch Ocean City grow. Our farmers these days are preparing and planting their land to Irish pota toes. A few of them planted their potatoes the latter part of December but the larger acreage will be planted between the 20th of January and the loth of February. All indications point to good prices again in April and May, when our crop will be marketed. We will have a great many new growers this season, as con siderable new land has been brought under the plow since the last crop, which, added to the acreage we had last jCu., gives us the largest area under cultivation of any year so far. This large acreage and the splendid prospects for high prices make the future of Bunnell-DuPont look very bright, while the farmers are wearing smiles that won't come off. Among those who are planting pota toes are: W. A. Mack, W. A. Brock, N. Scholen, O. C. Mosby, J. L. Council, G. Miller, J. E. Kuhn, O. Dahlgreen, Jos. Conway, H. C. Harrison, C. D. Hagadorn, Hufman and Jeppson, Wm. Wehrman, A. Lambert, G. M. Nuss, I. I. Moody, J. F. Lambert, J. B. Johnson, J. W. Malphurs, C. B. Miller, L. Gray, W. L. Bartlett, Nich Lasch, H. B. Koch, J. II. Coster, G. L. Tolman, E. Deen, E. H. Headen, M. O. Tippen, G. W. Durrence, E. E. Loughridge. Partially completed blacksmith shop at Banneli A recent visitor to Bunnell was Mr. Nils Hagen of Wisconsin, who has a | beautiful rwenty-acre tract of land i about two miles east of Bunnell. Mr. I Hagen is well pleased and made a selec' tion for one of his northern neighbors, ; Mr. Hoffman. Rev. F. M. Williams and Mr. H. T. j Hotc-hkins, both of Chicago, Illinois, are | in Bunnell and expect to make this their j future home. We wish to extend to them a most hearty welcome. Mr. Rezmer, a Chicago hustler, spent several days in the colony and made selections for a great number of his friends, in the new tract. It is reported that Mr. Rezmer has reserved, for a few | weeks, almost one solid section of land. Among the many new arrivals at Bun nell are Mr. Brigham and family who have come from London, England, to make their future home in the colony. Mr. Brigham, however, is not the only man from across the waters who has become interested in our colony. The Company has received inquiries from China, Japan, the Philippines and vari ous countries of Europe. i i One of the many new homes now being constructed in the Bunnell-DuPont colony 50 ROOM HOTEL WILL BE BUILT IS BUNNELL. To Be Erected on Railroad Street Just South of the Bank Block. The owners of the property just south of the bank block have informed us tha: we can expect to see a fine up-to-date fifty-room hotel on the property withir. the near future. The hotel is to be modern in every respect. It will be built of either con crete blocks or brick. It will be three stories. The first floor -will be occupied with twe store rooms, the lobby, dining room and kitchen. Each bed room will have flowing water, electric lights and the furniture will be of the best quality. This hotel will fill a long felt wan: for Bunnell, as our present hotel build ing is inadequate to accommodate the people who come to Bunnell, they hav ing to turn people away nearly every day on account of not having room for them. The building of this hotel will be in keeping with the growth of our little city, which is growing in bounds, and t: try to do without it any longer is out c: the question. Mr. J. C. Miller, of Ormond, has rented the Smithers farm west of Bun nell and will plant twenty acres of it t: potatoes this season. Mr. Miller is an old potato grower and we predict grea: success for him this season. Mr. Willis Williams is erecting a nice cottage on his lot across the railroad from the hotel. Mr. Boujohn has opened up the cooper shop of the Farmers Manufac turing Co., and is busy making barrel: for the coming potato crop at Bunnell. Mr. Boujohn estimates the number of barrels to be used here this season a* from fifteen to twenty thousand. Mr. Parker has bought the meat mar ket of the Hastings Cold Storage Co., a: Bunnell, to which he will add a com plete line of groceries. Mr. Parker moved here from Baxley, Georgia. Mr. Ed. Johnson has completed his magnificent concrete bungalow on Moody Boulevard and has moved into it. Mrs. William Hardesty picked the first ripe strawberries of the season from her vines Friday, January 23rd. Mr. I. I. Moody has contracted for z nice two-story residence to be built or. his lots on the corner of Lambert Ave nue and Turner Street. When com pleted it will be occupied by Mr. w_ s Sapp, cashier of the Bunnell Sth, Bank. FLORIDA products reach tlie markets first and get the best prices

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BUNM&IL1L HOME BUILDER Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Quite a large crowd attended tlie lance in the Tribune, building Wednes day night. All report an enjoyable evening. The stockholders of the Bunnell State Bank held their annual meeting in the executive office of the hank on Wednes day, January 7. The showing for the past year’s busi ness was an excellent one and the stock holders were well pleased. The usual 10 per cent dividend was declared and a neat sum set aside. The Bunnell Lodge, Free and Ac cepted Masons, No. 200, met in their regular convention, at which meeting rfficers were elected for the ensuing term. Quite a large number were in attendance. Mr. J. C. Johnson is erecting a dwell ing house on his lots in Seminole Heights. Mr. Johnson will move into his new home just as soon as it is com pleted. Messrs. W. A. Mack and O. C. Mosby, two of our best farmers, inform us they are disposing of their fall crop of Irish potatoes at §1.25 per bushel f. o. b. Bunnell. Mr. J. L. Nuss and son, who own a farm on the Moody road near Bunnell, have erected a nice bungalow and now have a beautiful farm, with their land in perfect condition, which they are plant ing to potatoes. Mr. Verdenius visiting the orange grove of Mr. Helm east of Bunnell Rev. L. D. Haynes is improving his two lots which he purchased next to the parsonage. He has planted palm trees across the front and is putting up a fence. A number of Bunnell business men are making plans for the organization of a new company to take over the pres ent water-works, electric light plant and telephone system. This company -will install up-to-date machinery for the light plant and water-work system and will lay pipes through portions of the town not at present supplied with city water. The telephone system will also receive a general overhauling. All of these improvements will be of great benefit to the people of Bunnell and we wish the company much success. Mrs. N. M. G. Prange lectured at the school house in Bunnell on Saturday afternoon, February 7th, to the farmers in the southern portion of St. Johns County. Mrs. Prange is an authority on all phases of agriculture and horti culture and gave much splendid advice to the farmers of our community. Messrs. Cochran and Moody have completed the shelling of the John An derson Highway from the Volusia coun ty line to McClouds’ Corner, a distance of five miles. Mr. W. H. Bacher is improving his lots on Moody Boulevard preparatory to erecting a nice home. If we can get a few more men like Mr. Bacher to move to Bunnell we will soon have a city. BUNNELL STATE BANK FIRST TO APPLY FOR RESERVE STOCK First in Florida to act under the new currency law, the Bunnell State Bank yesterday made ap plication by telegraph for stock in the reserve bank system provided under the new currency law. This action was authorized at a meeting held in the afternoon at Bunnell. No other State Bank in Florida has yet made application for stock in the system and this gives the Bunnell bank the distinction of being the first. Florida is a land of flowers. Every month of the year produces a new variety. Nature’s floral gift for The month of February is a profusion of orange blossoms. If you have never visited a grove at this season of the year you cannot imagine the exquisite perfume exhaled by these millions of wax-like flowers. Just now one may see in a Florida orange grove, the ripened fruit and the blossoms for the next crop hanging from the same branches—a most attractive sight. FLORIDA land can be bought with the money spent for fuel in Northern states.

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BUHNE1ULiOME BUILDER Happenings All Over the State of Florida An instance of the values of Florida orange and grape fruit properties, properly matured and cared for, was never better evidenced than when Mr. J. J. Heard, a Jackson ville banker, recently received $100,000 for a 100-acre grove. This was at the rate of $1,000 per acre. The prop erty sold by Mr. Heard for this large sum is unauestionably very desirable from any standpoint, but is not-an unusual grove nor more desirable than many a grove found in Florida. If you would be a Mr. Heard, the opportunity is yours. Welcome to Alfred Burbank.—The citizens of St. Johns County have signed their names to a letter of welcome, addressed to the famous horticulturist, Mr. Alfred Bur bank of Santa Barbara, California, who is opening up a large experimental farm in St. Johns County. Mr. Burbank owns one thousand acres of land not far from the holdings of the Bunnell Development Company. He and his brother have been very successful in plant breeding and fruit raising and in originating new and prolific varieties of Irish pota toes. The removal of Mr. Burbank from California to Florida is surely our gain, while it is California’s loss. We are one of the few land companies in the state located on the grounds, working with and helping our settlers. Does not this fact show our faith in the country? All Florida vegetables are in good demand.—Beans as high as four dollars per basket; lettuce two dollars per basket; peppers three dollars and twenty-five cents per large basket; peas seven dollars per basket; egg plants three dollars and fifty cents per box. The first hamper shipments of Irish potatoes have moved out from South Florida and bringing around 8c per pound and in demand at that price. Cabbages continue to hold their own. As high as thirtytwo dollars per ton is being paid. The first car of cabbages left Florida on the 7th of January. Some shipments have netted growers a dollar and fifty cents per crate. The orange growers of Florida are preparing to utilize the advantages offered by the new parcel post regulations. The new regulations, which went into effect January 1, make it possible for packages weighing up to fifty pounds to be sent in the first and second zones, and packages weighing up to twenty pounds in all zones of the parcel post system. H. A. Lanier furnishes us the following figures of what he produced this year from a single acre of ground. These figures demonstrate that not only do citrus fruits and vege tables pay here, but that the more staple crops are also profitable. From this acre of ground Mr. Lanier produced thirty-five barrels of corn, worth $35; two crops of hay, making four tons, valued at 820 a ton; 840 worth of Trish potatoes and 100 crates of squash, which netted $60.— Zolfo Springs Truth. The “Better Roads Movement” is growing stronger ever? day in Florida and especially in St. Johns County. The | citizens of St. Johns County are going to vote on a bond issue, which was favored by practically all the large tax payers, including the President of the Bunnell Develop ment Company, Mr. I. I. Moody, who is a strong, earnest | and constant worker for good roads in our county. If the bond issue is favorably voted upon there will be built sixty-four miles of hard road in St. Johns County, running from the north to the south, this road to be built of brick concrete or rock. This road will extend through Espanola. Bunnell and DuPont to the Volusia County line, and will take about seven months to build it, at the rate of nine miles a month. This will indeed be another step toward progress in our county. Friday was a red-letter day at the ocean pier and up the Tomoka. Fishermen who came up from the pier at noon reported that forty-five big sea bass were caught up to 11 o’clock when they left to come home for dinner. These fish by actual test weighed from eight to thirty-five pounds, an average probably of about fifteen pounds.—Halifax j Journal. The hay crop for the past year has been unusually heavy and the weather conditions have been very favorable. The first cutting yielded from one and one-half to two tons per acre. The barns are packed with fine hay and many stacks are in the fields, being sold for $15.00 per ton un baled and $20.00 per ton baled.—St. Johns Tribune. Now that you are the owner of a farm in the Bunnell colony, what have you done to interest your friends in joining you there? Rave you told them of the many advantages awaiting them at BunnelBDuPont, and that they too can secure a choice farm under the most reasonable terms. We believe if you will tell your friends just the plain facts regarding our colony, they will be anxious to purchase farms for themselves, and toe should like to help you interest them; therefore if you will fill out the blank below and will send to us at once, toe will be pleased to comply with your rei quest and mail our literature to your friends. ATTENTION PLEASE I We want to remind the readers of the Home Builder that the resi dents ot Bunnell-DuPont who write letters for our paper each month, are very busy men and women, and they do not have time to write personal letters to you. Some of our farmers have received as many as ten letters a day, after having written a letter to the Home Builder. You can understand that these people cannot take time to answer your questions, and we wo la suggest that if you insist on hearing from any of them, that you enclose § i.oo in your letter to pay them for their time and trouble. EDITOR. Cut out this Coupon and mail to our Sales Office at Chicago today THOS. A. VERDENIUS, 108 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois Below are the names and addresses of some of my acquaintances who are interested in securing homes in the Bunnell-DuPont Colony, Please send them a copy of your hook, “A Little Farm—A Big Living” also the Bunnell Home Builder for six months. Name Street and No. City State Name Street and No. Citv State (Write your own name here).