Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
=_ The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder I
Edited by S. HOWARD
= 1115-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicado, Ill.
Vol. 1 November, 1913 No. 12
MottoHAVE YOU WRITTEN Kindly bear in
THE EDITOR'S Boallk'ot
YOUR LETTER FOR mind that the
"'latdiih (i Grow." THE ANNIVERSARY next issue of the
PERSONAL NUMBER? 11 o m e Builder
will be our Anniversary Number. It will be the largest
PA G E and best Home Builder ever pub lshed;
printed in colors, and will contain a splen
did collection of photographs, which Mr.
JAPANESE PER- The parcel post sys- Verdenius had taken in the colony this
SIMMONS BY tem has become a month.
You will be glad to receive it, we know,
PARoEL POST very popular means and to read every word contained therein,
of transportation, and for it is your magazine the same as ours.
one is able to experience all of the delight- frt is you gaine th sm y our .
ful sensations of opening the Christmas Btward making the Anniversary Number a
box, when the postman leaves at his door w ird nt e uchvunlessywNumb vr
bOXk pakg etb aclps.- success?. It will not be such unless we have
a bulky package sent by parcel post. co-operation.
Mr. Verdenius, on his recent trip to Flor- oratione
ida, cheered the hearts of several of his For almost one year we have done our
friends in the North, with the aid of Uncle best to give y e of cost, an up-to-date,
Sam's new mode of delivery. One of these interesting little paper, and now we ask of
was he Eito, wh wa therecpien ofvti in return to write us a letter at once was the Editor, .who was the recipient of f' the Aniniversary Number.
a dozen Japanese persimmons. oteAlu r;,rNmb.
If you have been to the colony, tell us
Have you ever eaten Japanese persim- of your trip, what you saw, and what you
mons? The kind raised in Florida, each think of Bunnell-I)uPont. If you have not
one the size of a large apple? If not, you yet had the privilege of going, tell us why
have missed one of the most delicious fruits you were attracted to the colony, what you
in existence. The flavor is exquisite, scarce- think about it, and what you intend to do
ly to be associated with the wild puckering with your farm, etc.
persimmons known to us in the North. + It makes no difference if you have writThis fruit is very popular, and has a ten a letter for the Home Builder before.
ready market, retailing for four and five Send us another for the Anniversary Numcents apiece on the streets of Jacksonville ber. Write it si nuily in your own wy .
If you have any friends whom you would
and other southern cities. like to have receive a copy of the next
We are indeed grateful for such delight. ire
fulissue, send their names and addresses to the fulh remeraeosible fo Fori e eand oEditor, and same will be attended to
wish it were possible to share these treats Mr. Gettert picking Japanese Persimmons promptly.
with the many readers of the Home Builder. at DuItont
However, you may raise them for your- It is possible that the December issue
selve, some day, for no one should-fail to will be a few days late in reaching you, but
have some Japanese persimmon trees on his it, is coming, nevertheless, and will be all
Bunnell farm. DEMAND FOR FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT the more welcomed, we are sure.
GREAT Remember that for the best three letters
the following prizes will be awarded:
THE SAME STORY The charm of Bun- Heavy Inquiry Is Made for Early Oranges- First prize ................. $3.00
BUT TOLD WITH nell-DuPont t a k e s Second prize ................ 2.00
NEW INTEREST possession of every Consignments Light Third prize ................. 1.00
one who visits the The demand for Florida grapefruit is Address letters to
colony. The possibilities of its soil, and the the demang tor o d aers in
delights of its climate are ever felt, and active, according to reports of dealers in S. HOWARD,
have been expressed through the pages of citrus fruits. Orders are being received Editor Bunnell Home Builder,
the Home Builder from time to time by a from all parts of the country, and con- 1115 Woman's Temple.
great many people. signers report they are very much pleased Chicago, Ill.
to see such a wide demand, as it means
You will enjoy the splendid letters in this more healthy conditions.
issue coming from various sections of the Shipments are reported as moderate. D N Fail
-u~n ry. These impressions of our colony Many packing houses, which prior to last Not a to Read
Wn th'e Sunny South Land are "old, yet ever week have been operating on grapefruit,
new." They were not written under the have temporarily discontinued operations, Pages four and five of this
stimulus of a present enthusiasm, but have or are preparing to switch to oranges.
been given after a careful inspection and The market opened this year at extreme- issue, which give full inforthoughtful deliberation. ly high prices. nation regarding 25,000
We never tire of hearing about the things Unless excessive shipments leave the additional acreage that has
we love, hence the Editor takes pleasure state the market should continue strong. been placed on the market
in publishing these various communications, A very heavy inquiry for early oranges
being confident that they will be read with is being made and there is no difficulty in by the Bunnell Developpleasure by the future home builders in securing orders at prices which will prove ment Company.the Bunuell-DuPont Colony. very satisfactory to growers.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A Western Man'
Mr. Wade Sler of Madras, Oregon, and Who has Liv
The pictures of the colony accompanying this artic
as to your plans, etc., which were fair Kansas City or Denver. I will admit that
enough, so that a deal was closed whereby should one stand in the sun, sheltered from I would have until October 1st to inspect the breeze, which constantly blew while the land, and consequently passed up the I was there, that he would, in all probaPortland deal for the tim". bilities, take on a good coat of tan, but let
I left here the 25th of August for Bun- him step out where the breeze is blowing, nell, via Chicago, and certainly did run into or in the shade, and lie will find that the some hot weather before I arrived in Flor- heat is not so close as it is in the Central ida. In Denver, Colo., Kansas City, Mo., States. You will better understand what and southern Iowa, I almost suffocated, I mean by the breeze when I say that 16
the heat was so intense; in fact, I suffered was blowing just strong enough that your more from its effects than I did in Florida, employees in the Company's office used where I arrived a week later, paper weights to keep their documents from
If you will bear With me for a few min- being misplaced when the windows were utes I will try to give you an idea as to raised. how the country which you are advertising I was very much surprised when your
for sale appeals to me, appreciating the fact Mr. Turner and Mr. Johnston took me all as I write that my visit was spent in the over the colony in an automobile, as I was most critical season of the year and at a expecting to have to climb over fallen timtime when everything was comparatively ber, tree tops, and underbrush, as are all
dull. our logged-over lands here in the West, but
Your climate in summer I consider to be instead of encountering this I found pracfar above the average so far as cool nights tically what I would call a prairie country are concerned. I spent five nights in Bun- with about enough straight timber, from nell and there was not an evening but what six to nine inches in diameter and from I would retire with a good comforter drawn fifty to seventy-five feet high with scarcely Mr. Wade Siler over me-something I did not do in Iowa, no limbs, on each tract to build a comMr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
Chicago, Ill.
Dear Mr. Verdenius:
For some time I had made preparations to buy a small tract of land near Portland, Oregon, with the idea of going into the poultry business, as well as trucking on a small scale. By chance, I received what proved to be some descriptive matter on the Bunnell Development Company's holdings (and believe me, Mr. Verdenius, your descriptive matter had a very narrow escape from the fire, as, like the majority of advertising matter, it found its way to the waste basket without being opened, but I must thank a friend who dug it out along with some other matter that lie was looking for, and who, after glancing through the first page of your "Banner" said: "Siler, here is what you are looking for instead of Portland real estate"). After perusing its Typical picture of the average land found in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony
pages I was interested enough to write you fortable log house, barn, and other build-ings, besides furnishing posts with which to fence.
Of course your soil is new to me, as all soil that I am familiar with is of a different nature. So near as I could describe the soil in your locality, would say that should one dig up a shovel full it would seem as though they had taken a lot of black soil and sprinkled sand all through it. That is neither here nor there, however for any soil, or dirt, that can produce ai T' grow the different fruits, vegetables anEF grasses that I saw in your colony is absolutely Al without a doubt. While there I was taken to the Ocean for a couple of trips, which were enjoyed immensely. On one of these trips, just as we came to the East Coast Canal, which runs along the east side of your colony, a couplee of fishermen had just landed a catch, and they were as nice a string of fish as A View of Ocean Beach, near Ocean City one could possibly wish for. The men were




She BUNNELL HOMI BUILDER
ideas of Florida
*Years in the West, Tells Why He Prefers Bunnell-Dupont
re made by Mr. Slier on his recent trip to Florida
Now in conclusion I wish to say that I lave practically been in every State west W tile Misssisippi River, all through Northwestern Canada, and have seen lands jump from $i15.0 to $125.00 per acre here in the Northwest, but I consider Florida the best place I know of today for an investment, and mark what I tell you, inside of fifteen years you will see Florida land selling at the top of t he market, for th iigh the s ate is old so far a discovirv is uncrcrn d, it is just in its infa1n-v in devvlon.n1mt. I expect to make Florida my future home.
Yours very truly, WAIDE SILFR, Madras, Oregon.
LETTER FROM A LAND MAN. Mr. Verdenius.
)ear Sir-I read in the "Tropical Sun" that you had purchased 25,000 acres Cluster of Grape Fruit grown near Bunnell of land south of Bunnell. I am glad to
hear that you are spreading out. If the kind enough to let me take a picture, which them in good condition and makes traveling land is as good as the Bunnell tract, which I will send you, along with some other a pleasure. I helped you to sell, it is good land. Will
views thlat I had the pleasure of taking. I cannot speak too highly of the treat- say I have been an immigration agent for
We also got some fine oysters, some of meant which I received at the hands of the twenty years, in Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkanthose great, big Eastern ones that we pay men in charge, assuring you that they did sas, Texas and the Gulf Coast country.
a good price for out here in the West, and everything within their power to make my j located a colony at Kingsville, Texas, I took my first bath in the Ocean, which visit a pleasant one. and have a son there now. It is too dry
was certainly great. I was agreeably surprised to note the there. He is coming to Florida-the land
I had the pleasure of visiting the large healthy conditions that exist throughout of Sunshine and Flowers.
orange grove just east of your colony and your colony, which would seem to verify 1 have visited different parts of Texas,
can truthfully say that the finest oranges, the statement of your local physician that Alabama, Florida and other states, but will grape-fruit and lemons I ever saw were his practice is very limited. I neither saw say that taking everything into considerathere. Also visited a number of small nor heard of malaria, for which Florida has say tha takng eveyhnent Cons
groves scattered throughout the colony such a reputation outside, among those who the best proposition I have found in all my
which certainly looked good and shows that have been misinformed, twenty years' experience, and you know
should one be inclined to raise fruit of I was taken from Bunnell to St. Augus- I sold about $10,000 worth of your Bunnell
any description that they can not beat the tine through the Hastings district by auto, dirt to well satisfied customers at PrineBunnell-DuPont lands, and let me add right here that while the ton, Ind., and Mt. Carmel, Ill. My nephew
I was especially impressed with the lot Hastings district from a viewer's stand- at Mt. Carmel bought forty acres at Bunof Dr. St. Peter in Bunnell, where I saw point has your colony outclassed, it is only nell and will build a two-story residence more different varieties of fruits, and vege- owing to the fact that she is an older coun- thereon. He is well satisfied and is coming tables than I have ever seen in all my life try and more fully developed. I saw just with a carload of furniture and horses and
growing on one little spot of .ground. as good soil in the Bunnell-DuPont colony- will clear up his land.
Your transportation facilities cannot be just as good fruit and vegetables growing, William Jennings Bryan has been all over
excelled, as the main line of the Florida and in fact, consider Bunnell a much nicer the world but chose Florida for his home.
East Coast passes directly through your little city, even though in her infancy, than Edison, the American Wizard, has his home
land. any I saw on my entire trip, considering here. Swift, the Packer King, has his home
I found that they are improving roads the size. St. Augustine is in a class by her- here. Henry M. Flagler, the empire builder,
by shelling same all along the main tray- self and is a city that none should fail to spent many millions on the East Coast of eled thoroughfares, which certainly puts visit while in that part of the country. Florida and his tine palaces are here, also the largest hotels in the world. Many of the great and rich men own beautiful homes here, and I, too, have a home of my own in the beautiful country, where every (lay is a growing (lay and where no one need use a fan, as the breezes from the deep blue sea and the grand old (,ulf fan you to sleep, and the hottest (lay we have bad this summer was 90 degrees and a good cool breeze. Can you people of the north say this? People here now are beginning to make gar(dens and are getting ready to put in their winter crops, while the snow diggers up north are laying in their coal. Away with your coal bills and doctor bills! We don't have them down here. We are too busy enjoying life to bother with such things, and don't need them. Wake up ye north, erners-come where you will have no mA slush, snow or freeze-out, no asthma, catarrh, rheumatism or consumption. I know A few hours catch in the Colony whereof I speak.
11. E. BROWN, (Florida).




.he BUNNELL UOME BUILDER
25,000 Acres of Additional Land Placed on th
On Account of the Great Demand foir Land in Our Colony, the B
Tract of Land Adjoini
Everything have been nade in regard to this wonder- of the land was .sold, a few settlers came
grows, be it an ful state from time to time in the Bunnell in, and here and there a home was built.
animal, a plant, Home Builder, or elsewhere in our liter- But what is it today? One of Florida's
a tree or a ature, I wish he or she would let me know foremost and most successful colonies. This
habit either when they expect to go to Florida. I would is not foolish or idle talk, but these are real
like to meet them at Bunnell and show facts. Buwnell-DuPont is known all over
oodem something of the state, and I could the state, from Jacksonville to Key West,
We can think make them admit at least that Florida, in- and she is known as a successful comof nothing in deed, offers wonderful opportunities. munity.
this beautiful However, skeptics have always existed If you doubt this statement, kindly tell
world of ours, and always will exist. When Fulton in- ine where you can find in Florida a young
if' it be alive, vented the first steamboat it became known community the equal of Bunnell, which did
which does not that he would try out his little vessel on not have a single house when we first
grow. the Hudson River, on a certain day. People started development work and which now
The sm all were very anxious t see the results. Great is a thriving town with a good school,
acorn w h i ch crowds gathered on 'the banks of the river church, bank, stores, electric light plant,
and among the number were, as usual, sev- city water works, cement sidewalks, and falls from the eral pessimists who did not believe that it everything that almost any up-to-date comtree, and is Thos. A. Verdentus would ever be possible to move a boat by munity possesses. I shall not further
carried away steam. Among the curious ones was an enumerate its many advantages. I would
by the little lad to be planted in a corfier old lady, who walked up and down, repeat- prefer to have you read the letters from of the garden, will, before many years, edly exclaiming, "He can never make it our buyers, published in this issue, and
become a shady oak- There are no excep- go; he can never make it go," but the hour hear the story from an investor's point of
Stcame, and Mr. Fulton put the machinery in view. I am sure that no one can doubt that
tons to these laws, laMI doyn by Nature, motion; the wheels turned slowly, and the Bunnell's growth has been really remarkand the same truths apply to the growth first steamship was under way. As this able.
of a country. Statistics show that the pop- skeptical old lady watched the brave little If you have read the Home Builder each ulation of the United States doubles itself steamer, she became greatly excited, and month you have noticed by the announcebegan to cry, "He can never stop it; he can ments that practically all of the land in about every twenty-five years. We have, never stop it." the original Bunnell-DuPont tract has been
at the present time, some ninety millions I have related this story a great many sold. It is true that there are some very
of people, and if the above statement is times and, in my judgment, it is a splendid fine farms in the original colony that are correct, and if the immigration to this coun- illustration of Florida's growth. Many still open, but the large acreage has all try keeps up, we will have one hundred and people who once thought that the steamship been disposed of. We have been successful (the great state of Florida) would never in selling these farms, not only because we eighty million folks in the United States be developed, are now exclaiming at the have never misrepresentd conditions, not twenty-five years hence. This will mean top of their voices, "You can never stop only because we have been true to our custhat two mouths must be fed where one its growth." tomers, but because we have had the cois today; two people must be clothed where But, instead of talking about Florida in operation of a large number of buyers who, one is today; two human beings must be general, let me confine myself to that part after visiting their own holdings, have recof Florida in which most of our readers ommended our land to their friends.
shelte-ed where one is today. are so deeply interested-the tract of land After careful consideration, we have
Haie you ever stopped to think that prac- known as the Bunnell-DuPont colony. This added about 25,000 acres of land to our tically everything we eat or wear comes colony is no exception to the rule. It is original holdings. This beautiful new tract from Mother Earth in a direct or indirect alive, and naturally growing steadily and is located just south of the original 35,000 surely, acres, and is, in every respect, as good as
'ay. This being true, one can readily see A very few years ago the Bunnell De- the tract we have so successfully sold. We
that our country will have to produce twice velopment Company was organized. Some are placing this on the market for $35.00
as much twenty-five years from now as it
does today, and of necessity the soil that is
laying idle today will be under cultivation
then, and without doubt every foot of land
will, by that time, produce something. We
have only to study present conditions carefully to see that we are fast speeding toward that time.
There are but few large tracts of land
left for sale. Most of them have been subdivided into farms of larger or smaller
acreage, and in the middle west--in Illinois,
Iowa and other states-it is rather diflicult to find a farm of 640 acres, as most
all of the land has been cut up in 160,
SO and even 40 acre farms. As this section
of the country has grown, so also will Florida grow and be developed. The stream of
imimigration is Southward today, and espeeially to Florida. Statistics show that while
the country in general had an increase in
population of 21% from 1900 to 1910, Florida increased 42.4%, twice this amount, in
the same length of time.
I believe I can cure the greatest Florida
knocker if lie will only give me a chance,
and if any one doubts the statements which Partly completed home ofMr. Szabelski, at Korona




Ube BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
N/arket by the Bunnell Development Company
& pment Company has been Obliged to Place on the Market Their
r Colony on the South
an acre, on the easy terms of $1.00 an acre Likewise, on account of the rapidly inper month. creasing traffic, the railroad company has
As almost all the DuPont lots have been just purchased and received twelve new
given away, we shall not have any free lots 110-ton locomotives, and still more are orto give with the purchases made in the dered. This action is in line with the
new tract. steady march of progress all over the state
The Florida East Coast Railroad also cuts and, although I am not a prophet, or the
this new body of land in two, as it does son of a prophet, I predict that before our present colony, so that the location and long St. Johns County will be split in two.
transportation facilities are equally as good We will also take a slice from Volusia -and we will have at least one or two County and we will have a new county in
towns in this new tract. the state, with Bunnell as its county seat.
These are all the facts I can give to the People who have bought town lots in
readers of the Home Builder at the present Bunnell certainly can congratulate themtime. In a few weeks we will have a new selves, and to any one who wishes to buy
edition of our booklet, "A LITTLE FARM- town lots now, I shall be glad to submit
A BIG LIVING," with new, up-to-date plats, etc.
photographs and we shall be glad to send Let our motto always be, "WATCH US
any of our buyers or readers a copy of our GROW."
new booklet, containing map, full partic- For any further particulars regarding our
ulars, etc., upon request. new tract of land, write to the
I spent several days on the new tract
while in Florida this month, and was ac- GENERAL SALES OFFICE,
companied by a soil expert and photog- Bunnell Development Company,
rapher. As always, we wish to give our 108 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill. Mr. J. B. Sumner
old buyers the first chance and if any one of you want to increase your holdings we
shall be glad to give you a choice location M r Sumner, Satisfied Owner,
in the new tract, or if you have any friends Another Land
or neighbors who desire farms, let us know, or even should you like to be transferred, we will be glad to give you the opportunity.
It will therefore be a good idea for you to Bunnell Development Co. land of Sunshine. If you let this opportalk to your friends and neighbors before I just returned from my first visit to the tunity go by, some day you will say, when
the announcement of the opening of the new it is too late, "Oh, if I had only bought
tract has been made public. The demand State of Florida and the Bunnell-DuPont land in Bunnell-DuPont while land was
seems to be great, and already 900 acres colony, and I want to say something that cheap."
have been sold in the new addition. Re- will induce some one else to buy land in These farms are going fast and there is
member, while speaking to your friends in this colony. I bought land of the Bunnell only one crop of Florida land, but the best
regard to this new tract that we are not
selling this land on the fifty cents an acre Development Company over two and one- of it is you can raise three crops a year
plan, but on the easy terms of $1.00 an half years ago, just on the recommenda- on this soil. Think of it-three crops in
one year. One cannot realize what this
acre per month. tions of this company, without seeing it, means until you go there and see for yourWhile in Florida I visited several of the but on my visit to Bunnell I want to say self. If you don't want to buy before seeindustrial agents of the various large rail- that I did not find things as I thought I ing, make your inspection at once. You road companies of the South and all are would, but it was a happy disappointment won't come away without leaving $5.00 or
expecting a great influx to the state this r $10.00 as first payment on a ten or twenty
winter. The Bunnell colony will get its for I found the little town of Bunnell away acre tract. The people will give you a fair
share, and we will be fully prepared, with above my expectations-a beautiful little deal if you buy before seeing the land and this new body of land, to please every one city with nice streets, walks, houses, and when you go to see what you have, if you who means business. above all things lots of big-hearted and are not satisfied and cannot be suited, if
you go within the allotted time, your
We expect to raise the price of all the whole-souled people, ready to give you a money is ready for you.
unsold land, also land that we are going glad hand and a good word, and the people As I returned home I had the pleasure
to resell on account of non-payment, to connected with the company stand ready to of Mrerd comp a ar asuac
$40.00 an acre in the near future. of Mr. Verdenius' company as far as Jackshow their customers every courtesy pos- sonville. He is a whole-souled, big-hearted Everything grows. So has our colony, sible. gentleman in every sense of the word and
not only in acreage, but men and women running over with good things to tell you
are coming in very rapidly to take posses- I consider the land first-class; the climate about Florida.
sion of their farms and to make Bunnell ideal. Conditions are different from what
their permanent home, and before many they are in the North. Here in Illinois we Buy yourself a little home at Bunnell
--'-fars the Bunnell-DuPont tract is going are laying in coal and wood for a six NOW. Don't put it off another day, for
1 o be a thickly settled community. Every- months' freeze and, like the ground hogs, tomorrow you may not get what you want.
where in the colony new homes are going take to our holes, but in Florida and the There are bright prospects in store for Bunup, as well as in town. A new school has Bunnell-DuPont colony all is sunshine. nell that very few know of, but they are
just been completed at DuPont; hard roads People are plowing and getting ready to coming sure and soon.
are being built throughout our lands, and plant their winter crops. This is the place You can raise oranges, grapefruit, corn, the Florida East Coast Railroad Company for a poor man who is willing to work, but potatoes, cane, hogs-anything. I speak
is going to lay double tracks from Key I want to say that money don't grow on from observation, not hearsay, and I am
West to Jacksonville, on account of the the trees nor is it obtained without some looking forward and preparing to some day
great increase in traffic, and a new railroad effort, but a man who will get a hustle on soon make this my home.
will soon be built from Ormond to St. himself can sure make good at Bunnell.
Augustine, thus giving us two railroads The soil is there, also the climate, and J. B. SUMNER,
instead of one. now is the time to get a little home in the (Illinois).




'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Mr. Gettert, Who Has Made a Study of Soil Conditions Throughout the
United States, Admits that Florida Beats Them All
. This land had produced as much as sixty
barrels of potatoes per acre, for which the
farmers received from $3.00 to $3.50 a barrel. After the potatoes were shipped to
the north they had raised a crop of good
corn. I was told that it brought about fifty
bushels to the acre, and the corn that the
farmer showed me compared very favorably
with corn grown in Iowa and Illinois. After
the corn was harvested the field had been
sown in cowpeas, which they were cutting
while I was in Bunnell. Cowpeas was a
new crop to me, but it is used for the feeding of horses or any kind of stock, the same
as hay, only that it is more nutritious. It
took me a little time to be convinced that
this is 'as splendid a feed as it is claimed
to be. hut I obse' ved that stock aiet so 101 d
of this particular hay that they would
rather eat it than the very best timothy or
grain.
I saw one field not very far from DuPont,
where they were cutting cowpeas which
would average about two tons to the acre,
and cowpeas' hay is selling for about $20.00
a ton. I was still more surprised when I
Mr. H. C. Gettert discovered that while eating my dinner that
the cowpeas served in the hotel are as good
a bean as any snap-bean I ever tasted in
To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder. the north. The above three mentioned
I have just refurnihYfroin a trip to Flor- crops are grown on the same land in one ida, and as per your request, I will tell you year, and I must confess that I never was a little about this trip. As you know, my in any other place where this could be done. interest heretofore has been mostly in the In the middle west, where I am living to- Mr. Gettert in a Field of Sugar Cane, near Bunnell
far West and I really never gave Florida day, the value of farm land is based on a very much thought. One hears very many 10% basis. By this I mean that if an acre an acre. I saw the finest Sea Island cotton
favorable, as well as unfavorable, reports of land in Illinois, Wisconsin or Iowa, will growing in that territory and, as you know, about the state and I made up my mind that produce $10.00 net an acre a year, such land the Sea Island cotton is the very best cotI would make a thorough investigation and is worth $100.00 an acre. If it produces ton that can be raised and can be only cover the entire state, and if there was twice or three times the amount the value grown successfully in Florida and in the any good to be found in it that I would is increased accordingly. If those figures southern part of Georgia.
try to find it. hold good in the state of Florida, the land While I was at Bunnell I visited several
I consider myself fortunate in having is certainly worth ten times more than the large and small orange groves. I underhad a good guide with me, a man who had Bunnell Development Company is asking stand that there is a very heavy inquiry
made Florida his home for two years and for same, for there is not a question of and a great market for early oranges, espewho has visited almost every county in doubt but the land I saw will easily pro- cially on account of the great damaging
the state several times; a man who is well duce from $100.00 to $200.00 net to the acre frost which killed so many orange trees known in the state and who has a host of a year. in California last year. I had the pleasure
friends there, who were there to meet him The farmers were just starting to plow of eating some of the most delicious grapeat almost every station where we stopped. their land for the fall crop. They have fruit I ever tasted and I wish to say that
I take this opportunity to express myself an early spring crop, a summer crop and a this fruit alone will bring the owner a and state that it certainly was a pleasure fall crop and, although I did not go to handsome profit. Last year grapefruit was
to me to travel with a man who has so Florida at the very best time of the year, sold for $3.62 a box, f. o. b. the packing
many friends and who can make friends I saw all kinds of vegetables growing in house, to the Florida Citrus Fruit Exchange.
as easily. It made my trip one of the most this colony. I visited a very interesting I talked to various people who told me (heliglitful ones I have ever taken. It was garden in the town of Bunnell, owned by that their grapefruit grove brought them a pleasure to travel with a man who has a doctor, who came from Iowa. I saw about $500.00 an acre per year-and this
the utmost confidence in the state of Flor- there almost any kind of vegetable that fruit can be produced for about fifty cents ida and has chosen, as his life's work, the can be raised in any part of the country, a box. development of a part of it. This man's besides all kinds of fruits, pineapples, I could go on and tell you a great deal
name is Thomas A. Verdenius. I hesitate oranges, grapefruit, bananas, etc., etc. more about my trip but I fear that I would
to state that it took Mr. Verdenius a couple I had several pictures taken and took take up too much valuable space in your
of v ars to pisumade mio to accomi-any hi some of them myself. I enclose herewith paper, but as actions speak louder than
on one of his trips, a few which, if you see fit, you may pub- words, I wish to say that I have made up
I was born and raised on a farm in the lish with this article. my mind to form a syndicate among my
state of Iowa and have more or less visited I consider the climate of Florida one of friends to purchase several hundred acres twenty-six states in the Union, and also am the greatest climates I know of. I have of land in the new tract of the Bunnell well acquainted in Canada. I have made been in the state of California several times Development Company. I was on this new
a study of the soil and climatic conditions and I have seen the thermometer register tract with Mr. Verdenius. I inspected itJ K\ of this country and consider myself some- there as high as 115, while I was told over thoroughly and I consider it as good land what of a judge on that subject; but I and over again by the farmers at Bunnell as I have seen in the state of Florida. it
must confess fiat in all my travels I never that last summer, while it was so unbear- is a fine sandy loam and has a good clay was so halilly surprised and I never found ably hot in the middle West, the ther- subsoil at a depth of about eighteen inches.
anything that could compare with what mometer never registered higher than 96. I predict a great future for Bunnell.
I saw in the state of Florida and in the I saw in the colony a great number of Wishing you and the Bunnell DevelopIhmnnell-lDulPont colony in particular. small patches of sugar cane, which is indeed ment Company, and all connected with the
I was on land fromn which they were bar- a very profitable and easy growing crop. company, a great success, I am vesting the third crop this year. The first The sugar cane need not be replanted for Sincerely yours,
crop had been potatoes, which were planted three or four years and will bring the H. C. GETTERT,
in Januaryy and harv-ested about April. owner a net profit of from $150.00 to $250.00 (Illinois).




Ihe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
NNELL SCHOOL OPENED MONDAY F. E. C. RAILWAY TO BE DOUBLE W. H. COCHRAN GETS CONTRACT TO
e Bunnell graded school opened Mon- TRACKED SHELL ROAD TO VOLUSIA
y with the largest enrollment of previous COUNTY
years. Line Will Be Built Along Coast From
All pupils were assembled in the main
room, and strange to say, many states Ormond to St. Augustine At the meeting of the county coinuiwere represented by the enrolling of pupils, sioners held in St. Augustine Tuesday the
reprsened b tu enrllig ofpupiscontract for shelling that po(rt ion of the whose parents have recently moved into The question of doubling the Florida Jontr Andersonheighway commcing at the
this section. East Coast track has been often discussed. Joine of Mr. MiLoud east unnelng a ndl
When the enrollment was made the prin- A substantial report is now out to the wine of r. t1,ere cast of Iin ell, and
cipal gave a short talk, why pupils should effect that this double tracking will be running fro there Volusia cea(un ty lin, wvas procure an education and why parents under way within the next three months. outhawarde to teW. Viol. ikchran, of Bunnty h, al. should educate their children. A direct line will be built from St. Augus- Mr. Cochran Ihas. finished selling rolad
Superintendent D. D. Corbett, of St. Au- tine to Ormond and will follow the old ro hn s nd hn rk
gustine, after being introduced by the prin- Kings Road, which crosses the Bunnell from Bunnell to Espanola and is now workcipal, gave an encouraging and interesting Development Company's land five miles east ing on the miile stretch north of Espanola. talk to the school, which was much appre- of Bunnell and one mile this side of Ocean He hopes to finish this mile within a few ciated. Several parents accompanied their City. When this is completed the people terest in the school, railroad transportation within easy reach and it will not take him long to finish it, as
The pupils were given instructions re- of them. he will not be bothered by having to wait
garding their grade work for the year Preparatory to taking care of the rapidly on shell, since he will g4t his ml shell out
1913-14 and the books to be used in the increasing traffic, the railroad company has from the mine oil the canal about fifteen various grades as the course of study. just purchased and received twelve izo-ton miles north of oceann (it y and will float
It is predicted that this will be a very locomotives of the Pacific type, and more them to the different landings.
interesting school year for Bunnell. The are ordered. This stretch of the rad will b in perprincipal, Prof. Buchanan, was formerly the feethis strhape byo thie road willturists begin per0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ fe 1settaeppe >stsby~ i e ,ashign irp r 0 t Itle tunei the tourists begin
principal of the Sopchoppy High School, Mr. 0. C. Mosby is bringing in some very to come through.
which used to be the best school in that fine string beans, radishes and turnip greens, county, and we trust that the parents of for which he is receiving nice prices from NEW PUBLIC ROAD TO BE OPENED the children will give Prof. Buchanan their the h is receiving nice prices rom NEW PUBLIC ROAD TO BE OPENEDmerchants. hearty co-operation. -m h
The county commissioners are advertisSCHOOL AT DUPONT OPENED MONDAY The Johnson Lumber & Supply (Co. is ing the opening of a public highway from
County Superintendent of Public Instruc- building two houses at Korona this week. Bunnell to DuPont along the east righttion D. Corbett opened the iew school One for Charley Zibert and the other for of-way of the Florida East Coast railway. aton DuPon t Monday. The opened the new schoolattend- Frank Lovze. As soon as this stretch of road is deat D uPont M onday. The opening attend- l r d p b i N o k w l be i a d it il
ance was most creditable and is still lared public, work will begin and it will
growing. Mr. WV. A. Sapp, cashier Bunnell State he opened. It will be graded and ditched
The right public spirit was shown by Bank, has rented the Lambert & Moody after which it will be hard-surfaced. This
providing a good sized school house and Cottage on Railroad street, where he will is another step forward for liunnell and site. This spirit is bound to win favor keep house. Mrs. Sapp is expected to ar- DuPont. It will connect these two towns with the county school officials. rive Sunday. with a good automobile road and will make
--it possible to travel the entire distance
Rev. Allen left Tuesday night for his The farmers are enjoying garden truck within fifteen minutes.
home in Titusville after conducting a very grown by them on their gardens, which _successful revival meeting at the Meth- they have made for the coming winter. Mr. Robt. Hamilton, who has a contract
odist church. They are already eating radishes. green to shell the 1)een road, is kept busy, for
peppers and cucumbers, and lots of other the work has started and everything is Mr. W. H. Cochran reports that hlie has good things are rapidly on their way, which going along nicely. The work is being done his farm "Meadow Hill" in fine shape for will supply them all winter, systematically.
a spring crop.
Mr. Hagadorn has just finished harvest- DEVELOPMENT COMPANY HAS CREW COL. F. S. McELHERNE ARRIVES IN ing a fine crop of cowpea hay and will not AT WORK ON ROAD TO THE BEACH
be forced to buy any more northern grown AT WORK ON ROAD TO THE BEACH
BUNNELL hay, as he says that our own is superior to
Col. F. S. McElherne, of Chicago, who that grown in the north and also can be Monday morning the l)Development Conis owner of twenty acres of Bunnell land, grown at a much cheaper price. pany started a crew of mien to building a
has arrived in the city and has begun the driveway from the east side of the canal
clearing of his land preparatory to plant- Mr. G. W. Durrance brought a fine load at Ocean City to the b)ea(ch, which, as soon ing a crop this winter. He has employed of watermelons to town today. as completed and the ferry boat is put in,
a crew of men who are busy getting his will make it possible to drive to the waland in shape for the plow. He will also Sweet potatoes are plentiful now. Every- ter's edge of the Atlantic.
clear and put in cultivation a tract of land one has some to sell. As soon as this work is completed there
owned by Mr. J. A. Banker. will be several houses built on the beach,
Col. McElherne is well pleased with this which will be occupied by summer tourists
country and advises all who own land here Mr. Doughty has sold his hay at a net and local families, as this is a most deto get busy and have it cleared and put profit of $40.00 per acre. lightful place to spend the sumnier.
der cultivation so they can reap the
profits which are sure to come if it is prop- Mr. W. A. Mack has six acres of fine fall Thie road to Ocean Beach is progressing erly farmed. Irish potatoes. Mr. Scholen also has some rapidly and will be completed in a short
We welcome Col. McElherne to our midst fine potatoes. time.
and predict success for him, as he is going
at it in the right way. Let others follow Mr. Gray vill plat about five acres of In addition to his original pinrcase, Mr. the course taken by the Colonel. ad Gra pri t athis ea. o J. L. Nuss bought the (eorgi, Moody 'arm
oranges and grapefruit this season and will build a nice house shortly.
Mr. S. K. Yarnell has contracted with the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. to build Mr. Cookman caught several fine bass Mr. H. B. Koch reports that hle has a fine
him a cottage on his farm just south of this week. They weighed about twenty-one field of young peppers and expects to make Bunnell. pounds each. a bunch of money.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
"Whither Thou Goest I Will Go" ADDITIONAL LOCAL ITEMS.
Mr. G. Miller, of Dunedin, Fla., has
moved into the building in North Bunnell
A Remarkable Letter of Couraile arnd Cheer owned by the Bunnell State Bank. We
welcome Mr. Miller to our midst.
Those words of upon the weekly or monthly pay-day, to a F. A. Rich, who started into the liver
Ruth, as she left her condition of independence and affluence, is business the first of October in Bunnie
homeland to share the assuredly an alluring outlook to the man is doing a nice business.
who knows all too well that his period of
fortunes of one whom usefulness in the labor market is limited; Mr. W. H. Bacher has been remodeling
she had learned to and yet, there are wives who apparently the Bunnell telephone lines for the past
love, reminds me of forget that strong and natural as are the week.
claims of kindred, yet a woman's husband__an incident of pecu- and children have a prior claim upon her
liar interest. affections, even though it should cost a G. C. MeArn & Co. are opening an upseverance of all other ties. Men give up to-date grocery store in the store room A young minister, their best in strength and labor (often for adjoining the Bunnell Meat & Ice Co. in the
who had been selected Mrs. Marie Walahe a bare living wage), only to be cast aside Tribune building. to enter the mission when those precious gifts have been used MrF.LBydhdace ofmnt
field in a hitherto neglected part of Africa, nurye stoninal prdilotsing agan work this week making extensive improvewasur giin aotnal farewelln mesagetofrind
whom heiigh naevel metsagain. fBefore the heavy burdens it is compelled to bear, ments in Bunnell water works system.
who hemigt nvermee agin."Beore while many a constitution taxed to its
Inded myrrineded f thrate sadMetho- limit, pleads mutely for a chance to re- Rev. S. Traver, of Climax, Ga., was in midist minteInewintf ee thsaetco- cuperate and recover lost forces in a pure town a few days recently inspecting his
ference would send me to labor for the anhel-gvgcimtporyhr.
Lord-possibly to some far distant post. One such instance came under my notice The farmers around Bunnell are busy
Her reply was that of the true woman, 'I recently. A lady told me that her brother, hay making. will go to the end of the world with youI' whose health had broken down in Mon-__-And as I looked at that young wife sit- treal, was ordered by his physician to win- The Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. is ting beside me, with an infant in her arms, ter in Florida, and his simple testimony is building a cottage for Mrs. Porter on her I read in her eyes the trust and confidence worth recording in his own words. lot near the home of F. A. Rich. Mrs.
that knew not fear; and in the after years, "Directly I reach Florida, I feel that it Porter and daughter will move in as soon when the story of those pioneer missionaries is possible to breathe without distress; and as it is completed. became known, the courage and devotion before 1 am there a week my cough leaves
of that young wife and mother, amidst me. I have passed two winters there and Mr. J. B. Sumner, of Effingham, Ill., was
difficulties and trials, proved that she was it certainly is an ideal climate for regain- in Bunnell for the past few days. Mr. indeed an ideal helpmate for a good man. ing one's health." Sumner is very well pleased with the cliIt seems so sad to meet a woman who, As I read each month the various tes- mate here and says we have a mighty fine
from motives of fear or selfishness, will timonies of settlers in the Bunnell-DuPont country. allow herself to become an obstacle in the colony, I long for the time when I shall path of her husband's progress, and espe- bid adieu to cold winters and snow-clad Through the kindness of Agent Bell the
cially so when the way lies open for him regions. The pictures and prospects are so Bunnell fans are getting the accounts of to rise from the ranks of wage-earner to alluring that one envies those already set- the world's series of baseball as each play a position where hie may become a land tled in Florida. It is also delightful to is made. Mr. Bell announces the play in
proprietor and his own master. Indeed, one read of men whom ill health has disabled, less than one minute after it is made. marvels that so many women are content and who have found strength and regained
to see their husbands toiling daily, with lost powers in its vitalizing climate. In- Bunnell is full of land buyers and homeonly this outlook, that presently, as the deed, both my husband and I are contin- seekers this -week. Everybody is on the years pass, they will be thrust aside to ually looking forward to the time when jump getting ready for the winter crops
make way for younger men. Yet, I have we also shall be numbered among the busy and things are beginning to look like we
known wives to absolutely refuse their Home Builders of the Bunnell-DuPont are going to have a big winter's business. consent to a change for better, freer con- colony.
ditions, because it would involve separation The dance at the Tribune Hall Thursday
from friends and relatives. From wage MARIE WALSHE, night was well attended.
slavery to freedom; from a dependency (Canada).
___ __ ___ ___ ____________________ _________ Mayor Heath will leave Sunday for
points in Georgia where he will spend a
SPLENDID YIELD OF CORN FOR ST. REPORTED SHORTAGE MAKES CAB- f ew days.
JOHNS_ BAGERIS Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, of Wilson, Ind.,
were down this week looking over their
Now Being Harvested; Is Selling Readily Conditions Get Better for Florida Growers; purchases here. Mr. Wilson expects to
for $r.8o Per Bag the Prices Go Higher build on his place.
Corn harvesting here is now fully under The cabbage situation gets better and SILOS AND CORN
way an(1 much satisfaction is being had better for the grower. The reported shortover teslniyid.age has stimulated the demand with active St. Johns farmers are fast learning to
The hsplendiudl beield.n ea results. stop the leaks in farming methods. The
Thisve hs unoutadlreen acond year The northern market is steadily rising, farmers of Florida are more or less wastecounty particularly has its full share. Florida has the biggest cabbage crop ful because crops are so easily raised. To
Som ofthefieds ereareyiedin 50 now on its fields than has been known save the waste is to save the soil.
bsmel o the ae.eeae ilig5 before and will yield a big money return. With six silos constructed, each holdit,
buselsto he W.St. Johns county farmers are preparing 100 tons, our farmers are getting te mos
This is this section's secondary crop after to put in a reasonable acreage and fully out of their corn. Left in the field with the potatoes ha~ve lwenl harvested( expect it to be a paying crop. Our planters the fodder, corn stalks are worth about
This is a crop of vast importance to the will do well to immediately plant their $2 per acre, cut and put into silos while state and too little attention is being paid seed beds and by the time the plants are green these same stalks with the fodder to it. Tihe West has a shortage this year matured enough to set out they will know are worth nearly $15.00 per acre. of over five hundred millions of bushels, in a definite manner if the crop is really If the West could utilize its corn stalks The South has come to the front with fully going to pay. If not, they can leave the the present shortage of corn would be offset seven hundred and fifty millions of bushels, seed beds alone and be at no loss. Plant by millions 'of .tons of high grade feed in with Florida's quota of 11,000,000, better by your beds and watch the market. We do silos. Disaster teaches us to husband the 2,000,000 bushels than last year. not think you will, destroy your beds. surplus we waste every (lay of our lives.-




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida I The Bunnell Home Builder | Edited by S. HOWARD 1115—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. Vo/. 1 November, 1913 JVo. 12 JAPANESE PERThe parcel post sysSIMMONS BY tem has become a PARCEL POST very popular means of transportation, and one is able to experience all of the delight ful sensations of opening the Christmas box, when the postman leaves at his door a bulky package sent by parcel post. Mr. Verdenius, on his recent trip to Flor ida, cheered the hearts of several of his friends in the North, with the aid of Uncle Sam’s new mode of delivery. One of these was the Editor, who was the recipient of a dozen Japanese persimmons. Have you ever eaten Japanese persim mons? The kind raised in Florida, each one the size of a large apple? If not, you have missed one of the most delicious fruits in existence. The flavor is exquisite, scarce ly to be associated witli the wild puckering persimmons known to us in the North. This fruit is very popular, and lias a ready market, retailing for four and five cents apiece on the streets of Jacksonville and other southern cities. We are indeed grateful for such delight ful remembrances from Florida and only wish it were possible to share these treats with the many readers of the Home Builder. However, you may raise them for your selves some day, for no one should fail to have some Japanese persimmon trees on his Bunnell farm. THE SAME STORY The charm of BunBUT TOLD WITH nell-DuPont takes NEW INTEREST possession of every one who visits the colony. The possibilities of its soil, and the delights of its climate are ever felt, and have been expressed through the pages of the Home Builder from time to time by a great many people. You will enjoy the splendid letters in this ( issue, coming from various sections of the k,untry. These impressions of our colony in the Sunny South Land are “old, yet ever new.” They were not written under the stimulus of a present enthusiasm, but have been given after a careful inspection and thoughtful deliberation. We never tire of hearing about the things we love, hence the Editor takes pleasure in publishing these various communications, being confident that they will be read with pleasure by the future home builders in the Bunnell-DuPont Colony. Bu n no il’s Motto “Watcli Us Grow.” Mr. Gettert picking Japanese Persimmons at Dupont DEMAND FOR FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT GREAT Heavy Inquiry Is Made for Early Oranges— Consignments Light The demand for Florida grapefruit is active, according to reports of dealers in citrus fruits. Orders are being received from all parts of the country, and con signers report they are very much pleased to see such a wide demand, as it means more healthy conditions. Shipments are reported as moderate. Many packing houses, which prior to last week have been operating on grapefruit, have temporarily discontinued operations, or are preparing to switch to oranges. The market opened this year at extreme ly high prices. LTnless excessive shipments leave the state the market should continue strong. A very heavy inquiry for early oranges is being made and there is no difficulty in securing orders at prices which will prove very satisfactory to growers. HAVE YOU WRITTEN Kindly bear in YOUR LETTER FOR mind that the THE ANNIVERSARY next issue of the NUMBER? Home Builder will be our Anni versary Number. It will be the largest and best Home Builder ever published; printed in colors, and will contain a splen did collection of photographs, which Mr. Verdenius had taken in the colony this month. You will be glad to receive it, we know, and to read every word contained therein, for it is your magazine the same ^.s ours. But, are you going to do your part to ward making the Anniversary Number a success? It will not be such unless we have your co-operation. For almost one year we have done our best to give you, free of cost, an up-to-date, interesting little paper, and now we ask of you in return to write us a letter at once for the Anniversary Number. If you have been to the colony, tell us of your trip, what you saw, and what you think of Bunnell-DuPont. If you have not yet had the privilege of going, tell us why you were attracted to the colony, what you think about it, and what you intend to do with your farm, etc. It makes no difference if you have writ ten a letter for the Home Builder before. Send us another for the Anniversary Num ber. Write it simply in your own way. If you have any friends whom you would like to have receive a copy of the next issue, send their names and addresses to the Editor, and same will be attended to promptly. It is possible that the December issue will be a few days late in reaching you, but it is. coming, nevertheless, and will be all the more welcomed, we are sure. Remember that for the best three letters the following prizes will be awarded: First prize .$3.00 Second prize 2.00 Third prize 1.00 Address letters to S. HOWARD, Editor Bunnell Home Builder, 1115 Woman’s Temple, Chicago, Ill. Do Not Fail to Read Pages four and five of this issue, which give full infor mation regarding 25,000 additional acreage that has been placed on the market by the Bunnell Develop ment Company.

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BUNMELL IOME BUILDER A Western Man’s Mr. Wade Siler of Madras, Oregon, and W^ho has Live^j^si ^ The pictures of the colony accompanying this articl w Mr. Wade Siler as to your plans, etc., which were fair enough, so that a deal was closed whereby I would have until October 1st to inspect the land, and consequently passed up the Portland deal for the time. I left here the 25th of August for Bun nell, via Chicago, and certainly did run into some hot weather before I arrived in Flor ida. In Denver, Colo., Kansas City, Mo., and southern Iowa, I almost suffocated, the heat was so intense; in fact, I suffered more from its effects than I did in Florida, where I arrived a week later. If you will bear with me for a few min utes I will try to give you an idea as to how the country which you are advertising for sale appeals to me, appreciating the fact as I write that my visit was spent in the most critical season of the year and at a time when everything was comparatively dull. Your climate in summer I consider to be far above the average so far as cool nights are concerned. I spent five nights in Bun nell and there was not an evening but what I would retire with a good comforter drawn over me—something 1 did not do in Iowa, Kansas City or Denver. I will admit that should one stand in the sun, sheltered from the breeze, which constantly blew while I was there, that he would, in all proba bilities, take on a good coat of tan, but let him step out where the breeze is blowing, or in the shade, and he will find that the heat is not so close as it is in the Central States. You will better understand what I mean by the breeze when I say that it, was blowing just strong enough that your employees in the Company’s office used paper weights to keep their documents from being misplaced when the windows were raised. I was very much surprised when your Mr. Turner and Mr. Johnston took me all over the colony in an automobile, as I was expecting to have to climb over fallen tim ber, tree tops, and underbrush, as are all our logged-over lands here in the West, but instead of encountering this I found prac tically what I would call a prairie country with about enough straight timber, from six to nine inches in diameter and from fifty to seventy-five feet high with scarcely no limbs, on each tract to build a comMr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Mr. Verdenius: For some time I had made preparations to buy a small tract of land near Portland, Oregon, with the idea of going into the poultry business, as well as trucking on a small scale. By chance, I received what proved to be some descriptive matter on the Bunnell Development Company’s hold ings (and believe me, Mr. Verdenius, your descriptive matter had a very narrow escape from the fire, as, like the majority of advertising matter, it found its way to the waste basket without being opened, but I must thank a friend who dug it out along with some other matter that he was looking for, and who, after glancing through the first page of your “Banner” said: “Siler, here is what you are looking for instead of Portland real estate”). After perusing its pages I was interested enough to write you Typical picture of the average land found in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony A View of Ocean Beach, near Ocean City fortable log house, barn, and other build ings, besides furnishing posts with which to fence. Of course your soil is new to me, as all soil that I am familiar with is of a differ ent nature. So near as I could describe the soil in your locality, would say that should one dig up a shovel full it would seem as though they had taken a lot of black soil and sprinkled sand all through it. That is neither here nor there, howeveM for any soil, or dirt, that can produce aifl grow the different fruits, vegetables anir grasses that I saw in your colony is abso lutely A1 without a doubt. While there I was taken to the Ocean for a couple of trips, which were enjoyed immensely. On one of these trips, just as we came to the East Coast Canal, which runs along the east side of your colony, a couple of fishermen had just landed a catch, and they were as nice a string of fish as one could possibly wish for. The men were

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m& BUNNELL HOMEBUILDER deas of FI orida m Years in the West, Tells Why He Prefers Bunnell-Dupont re made by Mr. Siler on his recent trip to Florida Cluster of Grape Fruit grown near Bunnell kind enough to let me take a picture, which 1 will send you, along with some other views that 1 had the pleasure of taking. We also got some fine oysters, some of those great, big Eastern ones that we pay a good price for out here in the West, and I took my first bath in the Ocean, which was certainly great. I had the pleasure of visiting the large orange grove just east of your colony and can truthfully say that the finest oranges, grape-fruit and lemons I ever saw were there. Also visited a number of small groves scattered throughout the colony which certainly looked good and shows that should one be inclined to raise fruit of any description that they can not beat the Bunnell-DuPont lands. I was especially impressed with the lot of Dr. St. Peter in Bunnell, where I saw more different varieties of fruits, and vege tables than I have ever seen in all my life growing on one little spot of ground. Your transportation facilities cannot be excelled, as the main line of the Florida East Coast passes directly through your land. I found that they are improving roads by shelling same all along the main trav eled thoroughfares, which certainly puts them in good condition and makes traveling a pleasure. I cannot speak too highly of the treat ment which I received at the hands of the men in charge, assuring you that they did everything within their power to make my visit a pleasant one. I was agreeably surprised to note the healthy conditions that exist throughout your colony, which would seem to verify the statement of your local physician that his practice is very limited. I neither saw nor heard of malaria, for which Florida has such a reputation outside, among those who have been misinformed. I was taken from Bunnell to St. Augus tine through the Hastings district by auto, and let me add right here that while the Hastings district from a viewer's stand point has your colony outclassed, it is only owing to the fact that she is an older coun try and more fully developed. I saw just as good soil in the Bunnell-DuPont colony — just as good fruit and vegetables growing, and in fact, consider Bunnell a much nicer little city, even though in her infancy, than any I saw on my entire trip, considering the size. St. Augustine is in a class by her self and is a city that none should fail to visit while in that part of the country. Now iii conclusion I wish to say that I have practically been in every State west of the Mississippi River, all through North western Canada, and have seen lands jump from $15.00 to $125.00 per acre here in the Northwest, but 1 consider Florida the best place I know of today for an invest ment, and mark what I tell you, inside of fifteen years you will see Florida land sell ing at the top of the market, for th .ugh the state is old so far as discovery is concerned, it is just in its infancy in development. I expect to make Florida my future home. Yours very truly, WADE fSILER, Madras, Oregon. LETTER FROM A LAND MAN. Mr. Verdenius. Dear Sir — I read in the “Tropical Sun” that you had purchased 25,000 acres of land south of Bunnell. I am glad to hear that you are spreading out. If the land is as good as the Bunnell tract, which I helped you to sell, it is good land. Will say I have been an immigration agent for twenty years, in Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkan sas, Texas and the Gulf Coast country. I located a colony at Kingsville, Texas, and have a son there now. It is too dry there. He is coming to Florida—the land of Sunshine and Flowers. 1 have visited different parts of Texas, Alabama, Florida and other states, but will say that taking everything into considera tion, the Bunnell Development Company has the best proposition I have found in all my twenty years’ experience, and you know I sold about $10,000 worth of your Bunnell dirt to well satisfied customers at Prince ton, Ind., and Mt. Carmel, Ill. My nephew at Mt. Carmel bought forty acres at Bun nell and will build a two-story residence thereon. He is well satisfied and is coming with a carload of furniture and horses and will clear up his land. William Jennings Bryan has been all over the world but chose Florida for his home. Edison, the American Wizard, has his home here. Swift, the Packer King, has his home here. Henry M. Flagler, the empire builder, spent many millions on the East Coast of Florida and his fine palaces are here, also the largest hotels in the world. Many of the great and rich men own beautiful homes here, and I, too, have a home of my own in the beautiful country, where every day is a growing day and where no one need use a fan, as the breezes from the deep blue sea and the grand old Gulf fan you to sleep, and the hottest day we have had this sum mer was !)(> degrees and a good cool breeze. Can you people of the north say this ? Peo ple here now are beginning to make gar dens and are getting ready to put in their winter crops, while the snow diggers up north are laying in their coal. Away with your coal bills and doctor bills! We don't have them down here. We are too busy enjoying life to bother with such things, and don’t need them. Wake up ye north erners—come where you will have no mud, slush, snow or freeze-out, no asthma, ca tarrh, rheumatism or consumption. I know whereof I speak. H. E. BROWN, (Florida). A few hours catch in the Colony

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Uhe BUNNELL EfOME BUILDER 25,000 Acres of Additional Land Placed on the On Account of the Great Demand for Land in Our Colony, the B i^bell |D< Tract of Land Adjoinin^the } Thos. A. Verdenius Everything grows, he it an animal, a plant, a tree or a habit — either good or bad. We can think of nothing in this beautiful world of ours, if it be alive, which does not grow. The small acorn which falls from the tree, and is carried away by the little lad to be planted in a corner of the garden, will, before many years, become a shady oak. There are no excep tions to these laws, laid down by Nature, and the same truths apply to the growth of a country. Statistics show that the pop ulation of the United States doubles itself about every twenty-five years. We have, at the present time, some ninety millions of people, and if the above statement is correct, and if the immigration to this coun try keeps up, we will have one hundred and eighty million folks in the United States twenty-five years hence. This will mean that two mouths must be fed where one is todjiy; two people must be clothed where one is today; two human beings must be slieltefed where one is today. Have you ever stopped to think that prac tically everything we eat or wear comes from Mother Earth in a direct or indirect way? This being true, one can readily see that our country will have to produce twice as much twenty-five years from now as it does today, and of necessity the soil that is laying idle today will be under cultivation then, and without doubt every foot of land will, by that time, produce something. We have only to study present conditions care fully to see that we are fast speeding to ward that time. There are but few large tracts of land left for sale. Most of them have been sub divided into farms of larger or smaller acreage, and in the middle west — in Illinois, Iowa and other states—it is rather diffi cult to find a farm of 640 acres, as most all of the land has been cut up in ICO, 80 and even 40 acre farms. As this section of the country has grown, so also will Flor ida grow and be developed. The stream of immigration is Southward today, and espe cially to Florida. Statistics show that while the country in general had an increase in population of 21% from 1900 to 1910, Flor ida increased 42.4%, twice this amount, in the same length of time. I believe I can cure the greatest Florida knocker if he will only give me a chance, and if any one doubts the statements which have been made in regard to this wonder ful state, from time to time in the Bunnell Home Builder, or elsewhere in our liter ature, I wish he or she would let me know when they expect to go to Florida. I would like to meet them at Bunnell and show them something of the state, and I could make them admit at least that Florida, in deed, offers wonderful opportunities. However, skeptics have always existed and always will exist. When Fulton in vented the first steamboat it became known that he would try out his little vessel on the Hudson River, on a certain day. People were very anxious to see the results. Great crowds gathered on the banks of the river and among the number were, as usual, sev eral pessimists who did not believe that it would ever be possible to move a boat by steam. Among the curious ones was an old lady, who walked up and down, repeat edly exclaiming, "He can never make it go; he can never make it go,” but the hour came, and Mr. Fulton put the machinery in motion; the wheels turned slowly, and the first steamship was under way. As this skeptical old lady watched the brave little steamer, she became greatly excited, and began to cry, “He can never stop it; he can never stop it.” I have related this story a great many times and, in my judgment, it is a splendid illustration of Florida’s growth. Many people who once thought that the steamship (the great state of Florida) would never be developed, are now exclaiming at the top of their voices, “You can never stop its growth.” But, instead of talking about Florida in general, let me confine myself to that part of Florida in which most of our readers are so deeply interested—the tract of land known as the Bunnell-DuPont colony. This colony is no exception to the rule. It is alive, and naturally growing steadily and surely. A very few years ago the Bunnell De velopment Company was organized. Some of the land was sold, a few settlers came in, and here and there a home was built. But what is it today ? One of Florida’s foremost and most successful colonies. This is not foolish or idle talk, but these are real facts. Bunnell-DuPont is known all over the state, from Jacksonville to Key West, and she is known as a successful com munity. If you doubt this statement, kindly tell me where you can find in Florida a young community the equal of Bunnell, which did not have a single house when we first started development work and which now is a thriving town with a good school, church, bank, stores, electric light plant, city water works, cement sidewalks, and everything that almost any up-to-date com munity possesses. I shall not further enumerate its many advantages. I would prefer to have you read the letters from our buyers, published in this issue, and hear the story from an investor’s point of view. I am sure that no one can doubt that Bunnell’s growth has been really remark able. If you have read the Home Builder each month you have noticed by the announce ments that practically all of the land in the original Bunnell-DuPont tract has been sold. It is true that there are some very fine farms in the original colony that are still open, but the large acreage has all been disposed of. We have been successful in selling these farms, not only because we have never misrepresentd conditions, not only because we have been true to our cus tomers, but because we have had the co operation of a large number of buyers who, after visiting their own holdings, have rec ommended our land to their friends. After careful consideration, we have added about 25,000 acres of land to our original holdings. This beautiful new tract is located just south of the original 35,000 acres, and is, in every respect, as good as the tract we have so successfully sold. We are placing this on the market for $35.00 Partly completed home of Mr. Szabelski, at Korona

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BUNNELL HOME. BUILDER Market by the Bunnell Development Company ^^ipment Company has been Obliged to Place on the Market Their nginal Colony on the South an acre, on the easy terms of $1.00 an acre per month. As almost all the DuPont lots have been given away, we shall not have any free lots to give with the purchases made in the new tract. The Florida East Coast Railroad also cuts this new body of land in two, as it does our present colony, so that the location and transportation facilities are equally as good — and we will have at least one or two towns in this new tract. These are all the facts I can give to the readers of the Home Builder at the present time. In a few weeks we will have a new edition of our booklet, “A LITTLE FARM— A BIG LIVING,” with new, up-to-date photographs and we shall be glad to send any of our buyers or readers a copy of our new booklet, containing map, full partic ulars, etc., upon request. I spent several days on the new tract while in Florida this month, and was ac companied by a soil expert and photog rapher. As always, we wish to give our old buyers the first chance and if any one of you want to increase your holdings we shall be glad to give you a choice location in the new tract, or if you have any friends or neighbors who desire farms, let us know, or even should you like to be transferred, we will be glad to give you the opportunity. It will therefore be a good idea for you to talk to your friends and neighbors before the announcement of the opening of the new tract has been made public. The demand seems to be great, and already 900 acres have been sold in the new addition. Re member, while speaking to your friends in regard to this new tract that we are not selling this land on the fifty cents an acre plan, but on the easy terms of $1.00 an acre per month. While in Florida 1 visited several of the industrial agents of the various large rail road companies of the South and all are expecting a great influx to the state this winter. The Bunnell colony will get its share, and we will be fully prepared, with this new body of land, to please every one who means business. We expect to raise the price of all the unsold land, also land that we are going to resell on account of non-payment, to $40.00 an acre in the near future. Everything grows. So has our colony, not only in acreage, but men and women are coming in very rapidly to take posses sion of their farms and to make Bunnell their permanent home, and before many |j r ears the Bunnell-DuPont tract is going "o be a thickly settled community. Every where in the colony new homes are going up, as well as in town. A new school has just been completed at DuPont; hard roads are being built throughout our lands, and the Florida East Coast Railroad Company is going to lay double tracks from Key West to Jacksonville, on account of the great increase in traffic, and a new railroad will soon be built from Ormond to St. Augustine, thus giving us two railroads instead of one. Likewise, on account of the rapidly in creasing traffic, the railroad company has just purchased and received twelve new 110-ton locomotives, and still more are or dered. This action is in line with the steady march of progress all over the state and, although I am not a prophet, or the son of a prophet, I predict that before long St. Johns County will be split in two. We will also take a slice from Volusia County and we will have a new county in the state, with Bunnell as its county seat. People who have bought town lots in Bunnell certainly can congratulate them selves, and to any one who wishes to buy town lots now, I shall be glad to submit plats, etc. Let our motto always be, “WATCH US GROW.” For any further particulars regarding our new tract of land, write to the GENERAL SALES OFFICE, Bunnell Development Company, 108 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. Mr. J. B. Sumner Mr. Sumner, Another Satisfied Land Owner, Writes of Bunnell-Dupont Bunnell Development Co. I just returned from my first visit to the State of Florida and the Bunnell-DuPont colony, and I want to say something that will induce some one else to buy land in this colony. I bought land of the Bunnell Development Company over two and onehalf years ago, just on the recommenda tions of this company, without seeing it, but on my visit to Bunnell I want to say that I did not find things as I thought I would, but it was a happy disappointment for I found the little town of Bunnell away above my expectations—a beautiful little city with nice streets, walks, houses, and above all things lots of big-hearted and whole-souled people, ready to give you a glad hand and a good word, and the people connected with the company stand ready to show their customers every courtesy pos sible. I consider the land first-class; the climate ideal. Conditions are different from what they are in the North. Here in Illinois we are laying in coal and wood for a six months’ freeze and, like the ground hogs, take to our holes, but in Florida and the Bunnell-DuPont colony all is sunshine. People are plowing and getting ready to plant their winter crops. This is the place for a poor man who is willing to work, but I want to say that money don't grow on the trees nor is it obtained without some effort, but a man who will get a hustle on himself can sure make good at Bunnell. The soil is there, also the climate, and now is the time to get a little home in the land of Sunshine. If you let this oppor tunity go by, some day you will say, when it is too late, “Oh, if I had only bought land in Bunnell-DuPont while land was cheap.” These farms are going fast and there is only one crop of Florida land, but the best of it is you can raise three crops a year on this soil. Think of it—three crops in one year. One cannot realize what this means until you go there and see for your self. If you don't want to buy before see ing, make your inspection at once. You won’t come away without leaving $5.00 or $10.00 as first payment on a ten or twenty acre tract. The people will give you a fair deal if you buy before seeing the land and when you go to see what you have, if you are not satisfied and cannot be suited, if you go within the allotted time, your money is ready for you. As I returned home I had the pleasure of Mr. Verdenius’ company as far as Jack sonville. He is a whole-souled, big-hearted gentleman in every sense of the word and running over with good things to tell you about Florida. Buy yourself a little home at Bunnell NOW. Don't put it off another day, for tomorrow you may not get what you want. There are bright prospects in store for Bun nell that very few know of, but they are coming sure and soon. You can raise oranges, grapefruit, corn, potatoes, cane, hogs — anything. I speak from observation, not hearsay, and I am looking forward and preparing to some day soon make this my home. J. B. SUMNER, (Illinois).

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gfce BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Mr, Gettert, Who Has Made a Study of Soil Conditions Throughout the United States, Admits that Florida Beats Them All Mr H. C. Gettert To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder. I have just returned from a trip to Flor ida, and as per your request, I will tell you a little about this trip. As you know, my interest heretofore has been mostly in the far West and 1 really never gave Florida very much thought. One hears very many favorable, as well as unfavorable, reports about the state and I made up my mind that I would make a thorough investigation and cover the entire state, and if there was any good to be found in it that I would try to find it. I consider myself fortunate in having had a good guide with me, a man who had made Florida his home for two years and who has visited almost every county in the state several times; a man who is well known in the state and who has a host of friends there, who were there to meet him at almost every station where we stopped. I take this opportunity to express myself and state that it certainly was a pleasure to me to travel with a man who has so many friends and who can make friends as easily. It made my trip one of the most delightful ones I have ever taken. It was a pleasure to travel with a man who has the utmost confidence in the state of Flor ida and has chosen, as his life’s work, the development of a part of it. This man’s name is Thomas A. Verdenius. I hesitate to state that it took Mr. Verdenius a couple of years to persuade me to accompany h.m on one of his trips. I was born and raised on a farm in the state of Iowa and have more or less visited twenty-six states in the Union, and also am well acquainted in Canada. 1 have made a study of the soil and climatic conditions of this country and consider myself some what of a judge on that subject; hut I must confess that in all my travels I never was so happily surprised and I never found anything that could compare with what I saw in the state of Florida and in the Bunnell-DuPont colony in particular. I was on land from which they were har vesting the third crop this year. The first crop had been potatoes, which were planted in January and harvested about April. This land had produced as much as sixty barrels of potatoes per acre, for which the farmers received from $3.00 to $3.50 a bar rel. After the potatoes were shipped to the north they had raised a crop of good corn. I was told that it brought about fifty bushels to the acre, and the corn that the farmer showed me compared very favorably with corn grown in Iowa and Illinois. After the corn was harvested the field had been sown in cowpeas, which they were cutting while I was in Bunnell. Cowpeas was a new crop to me, but it is used for the feed ing of horses or any kind of stock, the same as hay, only that it is more nutritious. It took me a little time to be convinced that this is as splendid a feed as it is claimed to be. but 1 observed that stock an; so toi d of this particular hay that they would rather eat it than the very best timothy or grain. I saw one field not very far from DuPont, where they were cutting cowpeas which would average about two tons to the acre, and cowpeas’ hay is selling for about $20.00 a ton. I was still more surprised when I discovered that while eating my dinner that the cowpeas served in the hotel are as good a bean as any snap-bean I ever tasted in the north. The above three mentioned crops are grown on the same land in one year, and I must confess that 1 never was in any other place where this could be done. In the middle west, where I am living to day, the value of farm land is based on a 10% basis. By this I mean that if an acre of land in Illinois, Wisconsin or Iowa, will produce $10.00 net an acre a year, such land is worth $100.00 an acre. If it produces twice or three times the amount the value is increased accordingly. If those figures hold good in the state of Florida, the land is certainly worth ten times more than the Bunnell Development Company is asking for same, for there is not a question of doubt but the land I saw will easily pro duce from $100.00 to $200.00 net to the acre a year. The farmers were just starting to plow their land for the fall crop. They have an early spring crop, a summer crop and a fall crop and, although I did not go to Florida at the very best time of the year, I saw all kinds of vegetables growing in this colony. I visited a very interesting garden in the town of Bunnell, owned by a doctor, who came from Iowa. I saw there almost any kind of vegetable that can be raised in any part of the country, besides all kinds of fruits, pineapples, oranges, grapefruit, bananas, etc., etc. I had several pictures taken and took some of them myself. I enclose herewith a few which, if you see fit, you may pub lish with this article. I consider the climate of Florida one of the greatest climates I know of. I have been in the state of California several times and I have seen the thermometer register there as high as 115, while I was told over and over again by the farmers at Bunnell that last summer, while it was so unbear ably hot in the middle West, the ther mometer never registered higher than 96. I saw in the colony a great number of small patches of sugar cane, which is indeed a very profitable and easy growing crop. The sugar cane need not lie replanted for three or four years and will bring the owner a net profit of from $150.00 to $250.00 Mr. Gettert in a Field of Sugar Cane, near Bunnell an acre. I saw the finest Sea Island cotton growing in that territory and, as you know, the Sea Island cotton is the very best cot ton that can be raised and can be only grown successfully in Florida and in the southern part of Georgia. While 1 was at Bunnell I visited several large and small orange groves. I under stand that there is a very heavy inquiry and a great market for early oranges, espe cially on account of the great damaging frost which killed so many orange trees in California last year. I had the pleasure of eating some of the most delicious grape fruit I ever tasted and I wish to say that this fruit alone will bring the owner a handsome profit. Last year grapefruit was sold for $3.62 a box, f. o. b. the packing house, to the Florida Citrus Fruit Exchange. I talked to various people who told me that their grapefruit grove brought them about $500.00 an acre per year — and this fruit can be produced for about fifty cents a box. I could go on and tell you a great deal more about my trip hut I fear that I would take up too much valuable space in your paper, but as actions speak louder than words, I wish to say that I have made up my mind to form a syndicate among my friends to purchase several hundred acres of land in the new tract of the Bunnell Development Company. I was on this new tract with Mr. Verdenius. I inspected it thoroughly and I consider it as good lane as I have seen in the state of Florida. It is a fine sandy loam and has a good clay subsoil at a depth of about eighteen inches. I predict, a great future for Bunnell. Wishing you and the Bunnell Develop ment Company, and all connected with the company, a great success, I am Sincerely yours, H.'C. GETTERT, (Illinois).

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EUNNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month ^GNNELL SCHOOL OPENED MONDAY ^xhe Bunnell graded school opened Mon day with the largest enrollment of previous years. All pupils were assembled in the main room, and strange to say, many states were represented by the enrolling of pupils, whose parents have recently moved into this section. When the enrollment was made the prin cipal gave a short talk, why pupils should procure an education and why parents should educate their children. Superintendent D. 1). Corbett, of St. Au gustine, after being introduced by the prin cipal, gave an encouraging and interesting talk to the school, which was much appre ciated. Several parents accompanied their children the first morning, showing an in terest in the school. The pupils were given instructions re garding their grade work for the year 1913-14 and the books to be used in the various grades as the course of study. It is predicted that this will be a very interesting school year for Bunnell. The principal, Prof. Buchanan, was formerly the principal of the Sopchoppy High School, which used to be the best school in that county, and we trust that the parents of the children will give Prof. Buchanan their hearty co-operation. SCHOOL AT DUPONT OPENED MONDAY County Superintendent of Public Instruc tion D. I). Corbett opened the new school at DuPont Monday. The opening attend ance was most creditable and is still growing. The right public spirit was shown by providing a good sized school house and site. This spirit is bound to win favor with the county school officials. Rev. Allen left Tuesday night for his home in Titusville after conducting a very successful revival meeting at the Meth odist church. Mr. W. H. Cochran reports that he has his farm “Meadow Hill” in fine shape for a spring crop. COL. F. S. McELHERNE ARRIVES IN BUNNELL Col. F. S. McElherne, of Chicago, who is owner of twenty acres of Bunnell land, has arrived in the city and has begun the clearing of his land preparatory to plant ing a crop tliis winter. He has employed a crew of men who are busy getting his land in shape for the plow. He will also clear and put in cultivation a tract of land owned by Mr. J. A. Banker. Col. McElherne is well pleased witli this country and advises all who own land here to get busy and have it cleared and put ktfider cultivation so they can reap the ^profits which are sure to come if it is prop erly farmed. We welcome Col. McElherne to our midst and predict success for him, as he is going at it in the right way. Let others follow the course taken by the Colonel. Mr. S. K. Yarnell has contracted with the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. to build him a cottage on his farm just south of Bunnell. F. E. C. RAILWAY TO BE DOUBLE TRACKED Line Will Be Built Along Coast From Ormond to St. Augustine The question of doubling the Florida East Coast track has been often discussed. A substantial report is now out to the effect that this double tracking will be under way within the next three months. A direct line will be built from St. Augus tine to Ormond and will follow the old Kings Road, which crosses the Bunnell Development Company’s land five miles east of Bunnell and one mile this side of Ocean City. When this is completed the people who own land east of Bunnell will have railroad transportation within easy reach of them. Preparatory to taking care of the rapidly increasing traffic, the railroad company has just purchased and received twelve no-ton locomotives of the Pacific type, and more are ordered. Mr. O. C. Mosby is bringing in some very fine string beans, radishes and turnip greens, for which he is receiving nice prices from the local merchants. The Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. is building two houses at Korona this week. One for Charley Zibert and the other for Frank Lovze. Mr. W. A. Sapp, cashier Bunnell State Bank, has rented the Lambert & Moody Cottage on Railroad street, where he will keep house. Mrs. Sapp is expected to ar rive Sunday. The farmers are enjoying garden truck grown by them on their gardens, which they have made for the coming winter. They are already eating radishes, green peppers and cucumbers, and lots of other good things are rapidly on their way, which will supply them all winter. Mr. Hagadorn has just finished harvest ing a fine crop of cowpea hay and will not be forced to buy any more northern grown hay, as he says that our own is superior to that grown in the north and also can be grown at a much cheaper price. Mr. G. W. Durrance brought a fine load of watermelons to town today. Sweet potatoes are plentiful now. Every one has some to sell. Mr. Doughty has sold his hay at a net profit of $40.00 per acre. Mr. W. A. Mack has six acres of fine fall Irish potatoes. Mr. Scholen also has some fine potatoes. Mr. Gray will plant about five acres of oranges and grapefruit this season. Mr. Cookman caught several fine bass this week. They weighed about twenty-one pounds each. W. H. COCHRAN GETS CONTRACT TO SHELL ROAD TO VOLUSIA COUNTY At the meeting of the county commis sioners held in St. Augustine Tuesday the contract for shelling that portion of the John Anderson highway commencing at the home of Mr. McLoud, east of Bunnell, and running from there to Ocean City, thence south to the Volusia county line, was awarded to W. 11. Cochran, of Bunnell. Mr. Cochran has finished shelling road from Bunnell to Espanola and is now work ing on the mile stretch north of Espanola. He hopes to finish this mile within a few days, after which he will begin work on his new contract. He will put his entire force on this job and it will not take him long to finish it, as he will not be bothered by having to wait on shell, since lie will get his own shell out from the mine on the canal about fifteen miles north of Ocean City and will float them to the different landings. This stretch of the road will be in per fect shape by the time the tourists begin to come through. NEW PUBLIC ROAD TO BE OPENED The county commissioners are advertis ing the opening of a public highway from Bunnell to DuPont along the east rightof-way of the Florida East Coast railway. As soon as this stretch of road is de clared public, work will begin and it will be opened. It will be graded and ditched after which it will be hard-surfaced. This is another step forward for Bunnell and DuPont. It will connect these two towns with a good automobile road and will make it possible to travel the entire distance within fifteen minutes. Mr. Robt. Hamilton, who has a contract to shell the Deen road, is kept busy, for the work has started and everything is going along nicely. The work is being done systematically. DEVELOPMENT COMPANY HAS CREW AT WORK ON ROAD TO THE BEACH Monday morning the Development Com pany started a crew of men to building a driveway from the east side of the canal at Ocean City to the beach, which, as soon as completed and the ferry boat is put in, will make it possible to drive to the wa ter’s edge of the Atlantic. As soon as this work is completed there will be several houses built on the beach, which will be occupied by summer tourists and local families, as this is a most de lightful place to spend the summer. The road to Ocean Beach is progressing rapidly and will be completed in a short time. Tn addition to his original purchase, Mr. J. L. Nuss bought the George Moody farm and will build a nice house shortly. Mr. H. B. Koch reports that he has a fine field of young peppers and expects to make a bunch of money.

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ms BUNNELL HOME BUILDER. “ Whither Thou Goest I Will Go” A Remarkable Letter of Courage and Cheer Those words of Ruth, as she left her homeland to share the fortunes of one whom she had learned to love, reminds me of an incident of pecu liar interest. A young minister, who had been selected to enter the mission field in a hitherto neglected part of Africa, was giving a farewell message to friends whom he might never meet again. “Before I was married,” the preacher said, “I re minded my intended wife that, as a Metho dist minister, I knew not where the con ference would send me to labor for the Lord — possibly to some far distant post. Her reply was that of the true woman, ‘I will go to the end of the world with you!’ ” — And as I looked at that young wife sit ting beside me, with an infant in her arms, I read in her eyes the trust and confidence that knew not fear; and in the after years, when the story of those pioneer missionaries became known, the courage and devotion of that young wife and mother, amidst difficulties and trials, proved that she was indeed an ideal helpmate for a good man. It seems so sad to meet a woman who, from motives of fear or selfishness, will allow herself to become an obstacle in the path of her husband’s progress, and espe cially so when the way lies open for him to rise from the ranks of wage-earner to a position where he may become a land proprietor and his own master. Indeed, one marvels that so many women are content to see their husbands toiling daily, with only this outlook, that presently, as the years pass, they will be thrust aside to make way for younger men. Yet, I have known wives to absolutely refuse their consent to a change for better, freer con ditions, because it would involve separation from friends and relatives. From wage slavery to freedom; from a dependency SPLENDID YIELD OF CORN FOR ST. JOHNS Now Being Harvested; Is Selling Readily for $ 1 80 Per Bag Corn harvesting here is now fully under way and much satisfaction is being had over the splendid yield. This has undoubtedly been a corn year all over the South and Florida, and this county particularly has its full share. Some of the fields here are yielding 50 bushels to tlxe acre. This is this section’s secondary crop after the potatoes have been harvested. This is a crop of vast importance to the state and too little attention is being paid to it. The West has a shortage this year of over five hundred millions of bushels. The South has come to the front with fully seven hundred and fifty millions of bushels, with Florida’s quota of 11,000,000, better by 2 000,000 bushels than last year. upon the weekly or monthly pay-day, to a condition of independence and affluence, is assuredly an alluring outlook to the man who knows all too well that his period of usefulness in the labor market is limited; and yet, there are wives who apparently forget that strong and natural as are the claims of kindred, yet a woman’s husband and children have a prior claim upon her affections, even though it should cost a severance of all other ties. Men give up their best in strength and labor (often for a bare living wage), only to be cast aside when those precious gifts have been used up by the strain of daily toil. Human nature is continually protesting against the heavy burdens it is compelled to bear, while many a constitution taxed to its limit, pleads mutely for a chance to re cuperate and recover lost forces in a pure and health-giving climate. One such instance came under my notice recently. A lady told me that her brother, whose health had broken down in Mon treal, was ordered by his physician to win ter in Florida, and his simple testimony is worth recording in his own words. “Directly I reach Florida, I feel that it is possible to breathe without distress; and before I am there a week my cough leaves me. I have passed two winters there and it certainly is an ideal climate for regain ing one’s health.” As I read each month the various tes timonies of settlers in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, I long for the time when I shall bid adieu to cold winters and snow-clad regions. The pictures and prospects are so alluring that one envies those already set tled in Florida. It is also delightful to read of men whom ill health has disabled, and who have found strength and regained lost powers in its vitalizing climate. In deed, both my husband and I are contin ually looking forward to the time when we also shall be numbered among the busy Home Builders of the Bunnell-DuPont colony. MARIE WALSHE, (Canada). REPORTED SHORTAGE MAKES CAB BAGE RISE Conditions Get Better for Florida Growers; the Prices Go Higher The cabbage situation gets better and better for the grower. The reported short age has stimulated the demand with active results. The northern market is steadily rising. Florida has the biggest cabbage crop now on its fields than has been known before and will yield a big money return. St. Johns county farmers are preparing to put in a reasonable acreage and fully expect it to be a paying crop. Our planters will do well to immediately plant their seed beds and by the time the plants are matured enough to set out they will know in a definite manner if the crop is really going to pay. If not, they can leave the seed beds alone and be at no loss. Plant your beds and watch the market. We do not think you will destroy your beds. Mrs. Ma rie Walshe ADDITIONAL LOCAL ITEMS. Mr. G. Miller, of Dunedin, Fla., has moved into the building in North Bunnell owned by the Bunnell State Bank. We welcome Mr. Miller to our midst. F. A. Rich, who started into the liver’} business the first of October in Bunnell, is doing a nice business. Mr. W. H. Bacher has been remodeling the Bunnell telephone lines for the past week. G. C. McArn & Co. are opening an upto-date grocery store in the store room adjoining the Bunnell Meat & Ice Co. in the Tribune building. Mr. F. L. Byrd had a crew of men at work this week making extensive improve ments in Bunnell water works system. Rev. S. Travel of Climax, Ga., was in town a few days recently inspecting his property here. The farmers around Bunnell are busy hay making. The Johnson Lumber & Supply Co. is building a cottage for Mrs. Porter on her lot near the home of F. A. Rich. Mrs. Porter and daughter will move in as soon as it is completed. Mr. J. B. Sumner, of Effingham, 111., was in Bunnell for the past few days. Mr. Sumner is very well pleased with the cli mate here and says we have a mighty fine country. Through the kindness of Agent Bell the Bunnell fans are getting the accounts of the world’s series of baseball as each play is made. Mr. Bell announces the play in less than one minute after it is made. Bunnell is full of land buyers and homeseekers this week. Everybody is on the jump getting ready for the winter crops and things are beginning to look like we are going to have a big winter’s business. The dance at the Tribune Hall Thursday night was well attended. Mayor Heath will leave Sunday for points in Georgia where he will spend a few days. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, of Wilson, Ind., were down this week looking over their purchases here. Mr. Wilson expects to build on his place. SILOS AND CORN St. Johns farmers are fast learning to stop the leaks in farming methods. The farmers of Florida are more or less waste ful because crops are so easily raised. To save the waste is to save the soil. With six silos constructed, each holdffi 100 tons, our farmers are getting the most out of their corn. Left in the field with the fodder, corn stalks are worth about $2 per acre, cut and put into silos while green these same stalks with the fodder are worth nearly $15.00 per acre. If the West could utilize its corn stalks the present shortage of corn would be offset by millions of tons of high grade feed in silos. Disaster teaches us to husband the surplus we waste every day of our lives.