Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
U The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
Vol1. I October, 19,13 NVO. .1 1
TH D T RS DON'T FORGET THE The Editor wishes WOULD RATHER On another page of
TH E E ITO R9P R I Z E LETTER to remind all those GO TO JAIL THAN this issue you will
CONTEST. who are going to LEAVE FLORIDA. read what one man
thinks of Florida,
PERSO NA Lenter the prize let- the state of his adoption. He would rather
ter contest, that they must not fail to live in jail in Florida than be compelled
PA G Ehave their letters in the hands of the Edi. to spend the remainder of his life in the
_____________tor later than November 10, 1913, so North. Perhaps this man was a little exthattheycanbe pintd inourAnnier- travagant in his statement, but he wanted DO THINGS TURN I was discussing thtte a epitdi u nie- to make his meaning clear, and when you
OUT AS WE EX- with a friend the sary (December) number, and so that the read of his experience you will understand
PECT? other day the pos- prizes may be awarded before that date. why hie loves Florida.
sibilities of the Dntfrealotaevyoeisn- FLORIDA! There is something musical
Bunnell-Dupont colony, when he suddenly Dntfrealohtevyoeisn- in the sound of this name. Those of us who
exclaimed, "But things don't always turn titled to enter this contest. Just write a have lived there instinctively think of long out there as you hope for. Your spring letter about the Bunnell-Dupont colony in happy days, wonderful moonlight nights,
potato crop was not up to your expecta- your own way, tell what you think of it, rippling waters and sin ging birds. We
tions."wa think of beautiful flowers, abundant vegeS"Ah no, my friend," I replied, "things whtyou saw there, what you expect to do tation, light, warmth, comfort and cheer.
don't always turn oult in life as we expect there, etc., etc. Prizes will be awarded ac- No wonder that Florida becomes a cheror hope for. If they did, this would be a cording to the interest of the letter, rather ished spot to the men and women who Paradise on earth. It is true the potato than on its grammatical construction. have lost their grip on life, and whom ill
crop was not quite as large as we expected, Adesyultertohealth has rendered unfit for work in the owing to the fact that we had a little too' drs orltest rigorous north. To he told that one has
muchrai at he ron tim, bt yu S.HOWRD, but a few months to live and then to have
much rain sat thnellwron tie but yoou S.HWtwenty-nine years added to one's life, and
dnaeont sfay t.nl-Dpn s ogo Editor Bunnell Home Builder, still be in good health, is enough to make
"Thnk f cndiion ths smme in1103 Woman's Temple, Chicago, ill, any one love the locality that has made
iss f ori n Oklhma aun er i possible this new lease on life.
Kansas, Misui kaoaadohrThere are so many instances of this kind
states. The crops have been practically w ih eae ewr tnigo h
burned up and man and beast have suffered steemt crelt:Wneri akovle Flordida, on e
for water. Many people left their homesstetcrrinJkovleFrdaoe
in the cities in their automobiles, each day, summer day not long ago, and chanced to
after the sun had set, and drove out into hear one man telling another of what Florthe country, stopping when they found an ida had done for him. We could not help
elevation of ground, where there seemed to lu but listen, and feel some of the stranger's
be a slight breeze, and there they would enthusiasm, as with shining eyes and happy
spen th log selteingnigts.voice, lie told how he had come to Florida spen th log selteingnigts.broken in health and spirit, hut he had "Right here in our beautiful Illinois, the indeed found the "Fountain of Youth" in
farmers in some parts have scarcely had a -this sunny land, and longed to recommend
half or a third of a crop, and it will re- it to others.
quire all they raised this season to feed JIust another little story from real life:
their live stock until the next crop can We met an old soldier in Florida, who origbe rased.inally lived in New York State. This man "Conditions were nothing like this in had been afflicted with rheumatism for
Florida these past months, the weather many years, in fact had been unable to do
was not -nearly so hot, and even though one any work for twenty years.
crop was not quite up to expectations the Finally hie decided to see what Florida
Bunnell farmers immediately prepared the wouldI do for him, although he doubted that
land for another, and then again for a anything could help him. After he had been
third crop, for Bunnell-Dupont is a three- in the state a short time he began to grow
crop community." better and strongoer. He cut thetibr
My friend had no further arguments to built his own little home, made imber,
offer. He had not thought of things in fences and had a garden that was the
this light, but promised me that he would pride of his heart. He was able to work
Iink seriously of an investment at Bun- all day on his little farm, and felt stronger
V nell this fall. and happier than he had in a score of years.
And when he had left, I fell to musing, When one listens to these life stories,
and these words from Goldsmith came to and sees what has been accomplished by
me- people who were considered down and out,
"And those who came to scoff, hie is led to exclaim, "Truly, Truth is
Remained to pray." Scene on Moody Road near Ocean City stranger than fiction."
"A little honest effort put forth in the development of your Florida farm and you have made your start toward real comfort and independence."




6he BUNNXLL HOMX BUILDER
4I
Water Front of St. Augustine
ST. AUGUSTINE, THE CITY BEAUTIFUL
Oldest City in the United States and County Seat of St. width, and hard and smooth, it is not to be compared
Johns County, in Which Our Colony Lands are Located. with the handicraft of man.
St. Augustine, as every schoolboy knows, is the oldest One who has never visited this quaint old city cannot city in the United States, being founded in 1565 by imagine the delights it affords. Here is a commingling Pedro Menedez de Avilles. Landing at this spot on the of the old and the new, the oldest house in the United day dedicated to St. Augustine, States almost in a stone's throw of magnificent modern he names the place in honor of hotels; the narrowest street in the United States is but
this saint. Of all the places a few feet from the broad boulevards. There are scores
passed along the coast none im- of interesting places to visit in pressed the Spanish explorer so St. Augustine and suburbs, and favorably, and he took posses- every northern man and woman
sion of the Indian village of Se- who visits Florida should plan to Old House, St. Francis St. looe, which formerly occupied spend a day or two at least at the site of this delightful city. old St. Augustine. Every BunSituated on the beautiful Matanzas Bay, with the nell land owner should not fail
broad Atlantic a mile away, St. Augustine enjoys all to visit St. Augustine when he the advantages of a coast city, with none of the draw- inspects his land. Memorial Psbytterin
backs, as none of the undesirable element Here is a delightful place to hurcOh
that frequents shipping centers is found study some of the ancient history of America. One
here. In connection with the location of the may visit the Cathedral, the oldest church in the United
city may be mentioned the splendid beaches States; the City Gate, bearing evidence of
which are reached by trolley car or by a the Spanish regime, should be seen, likewise
drive through beautiful wooded country. the old Slave Market, Treasury Street, AnasParks are scattered over the city at conve- tasia Island, etc.
nicnt points and the very mild climate per- St. Augustine has been occupied by Spanmits one to enjoy them at all times of the The Cathedral ish, French, English and Americans, and year. Beautiful driveways extend from the bears the imprint of its several occupants,
city for miles, while on the ocean beach Nature pro- making it one of the most interesting cities
vides a driveway, or automobile course, such as the in the western world. Juan Ponce de Leon
ingenuity of man cannot rival. Three hundred feet in was the first European to set foot on its
The City Gates
Fort Marion
"The South has the land and the resources. Its only problem now is to 'Get Next' to the prospective settler and investor."-Leslie'ls Weekly.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
shores, and the halo of colony. St. Augustine
romance which is inter- is already the mecca for woven with the famous old automobile parties, the
knight's search for the unrivaled hotel accomFountain of Youth still modations offering wove wih te fmousold autmbleni patrtineste clings to the old town. splendid entertainment
Old Ft. Marion s t ill for all visitors.K
frowns down on the little St. Augustine is the
city, a page from the early county seat of St. Johns history of St. Augustine. County, one of the richOn every hand the visitor est agricultural sections St. George Street in Quaint St Augustin
will find relics of a bygone in tie country. It has age to rivet his attention. tie most ejuable climate of any city Slumbering for centuries an(l the summers are as delightful as the, winters arc,
amid its orange groves and pleasant.
flowering gardens, St. Aug- Without doubt the healthfulness of St. Augustine is
ustine was awakened about due to its location. This city, according to the V united
TreasuryStreet a quarter of a century ago States Government statistics, is the most healthful in to new life. Direct railroad the country, and according to the last report of the connection with Jackson- State Commissioner of Agriculture has the smallest
ville was established, and the life-giving climate and nat- death rate of any city in the State. The abundant supural beauty of the place came into prominence imme- ply of pure artesian water no doubt contributes to the diately after the old town was rendered accessible to health of the community. the outside world, and the pioneer tourists and winter St. Augustine is up to date in every respect. Th(. visitors were followed by thousands. streets of the city are paved with vitrified brick and
Mr. Henry M. Flagler came on the scene shortly after asphalt; electric lights illuminate the city; an electric the completion of the railroad to Jacksonville and in- car line connects the city with the beautiful bathing vested millions in beautifying the city and building its beaches on Anastasia Island, and extends five miles magnificent hotels, which have become world renowned, paralleling the ocean; electric cars operate in the city, The fame of St. Augustine spread and the system taps all the submrbs.
over the civilized world, and in addi- (hie of the finest gas plants in the
tion to those who came to renew co*mtry supplies gas for illuininattheir lease on life, flocked the wealth ing and cooking purposes. The city
and fashion of the great cities. -i -owns its waterworks, which are not Pleasure seekers found here an ideal
playground, the business man found surpassed by that of any city. Ara place for relaxation and proteges tesian wells are the source of water
of fashion found congenial company SUl)I)ly, and the water is absolutely
and environment. c free from all impurities. The city
Diversity of amusement and recre- has a very efficient paid fire de)artation are other features that should Old SlaveMarket mert, and a competent sanitary
appeal to the person contemplating force. A splendid public library is
a change of home. The ocean and open to visitors as well as residents.
salt water streams adjacent to St. Augustine offer the The beautiful city located in the same county, and best fishing, finest surf bathing and boating to be found so near Bunnell, is of especial interest to all Bimnellanywhere. The vast stretches of woods offer splendid I)upont colony land owners. It is the place you will hunting. visit on county court days, and a delightful place to
Attractive drives rpay be taken to various points of take your family at any season of the year. interest near the city and within a year splendid roads will connect St. Augustine with Jacksonville to the north, and before long a fine
hard road, which is now under construction, will be
completed from St. Augustine to the Bunnell-DuPont
The Sea
Wall
The Plaza
and
"The South needs the immigrant as does no other section of the country. It has a home and work for all who will come."-Leslie's Weekly.




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
Mr. Chas. G. Stratton and wife of Mt. only putting the shell down according to Mr. J. Brunton has a nice bungalow on
Vernon, Ill., are spending some time in Bun- specifications, but he is going to the extra his land on the Moody road. nell. expense of not allowing his wagons to drive
over the shell whereby they would grind it You should see the sugar cane on the DurThe Farmers' Institute held a very suc- into dust by the time the shelling was cor- rance place. Mr. Durrance states that !,a cessful meeting at the school building last pleted. To do this he is compelled to haul though this is called "the lazy man's crop'IMW Saturday. by the side roads, thus making the haul at he will make from $75 to $150 per acre.
least a third further. The young people enjoyed a dance in the
Mr. E. B. Longrier, who has been spend-evening, which was ing some time in Jacksonville, returned to The Miller Brothers have one of the fin- given by the Bunnell Cornet Band. Bunnell last week. He is busy this week est crops of sweet potatoes to be seen in
gathering his sweet potato crop. this part of the country-about ten acres- Mr. C. H. Anderson and family of Milwauwhich, from present indications, will yield kee, Wis., arrived in Bunnell Monday and at least three hundred bushels per acre. expect to make this their future home.
Mr. W. A. Mack also has a fine crop of Mr. D. Henson, who lives south of Bunsweet potatoes and has just completed the nell, brought in a load of fine watermelons planting of six acres of Irish potatoes. He Monday for which he received good prices. also has just finished harvesting a fine
crop of corn. Mr. and Mrs. J. F Brunton of Streator,
Ill., are spending sovermi days here looking
Mr. D. Brown has his land in fine condi- over the land with tht expectation of purtion for a crop, which he will soon be chasing a tract.
_ planting. _Another additIion has been made to the
Mr. Jepson is having splendid success Polish colony, here. Messrs. G. Waszowski
raising Eucalyptus trees from seed and al- and K. Waszowski of Buffalo, N. Y., have. ready has some fine young trees. He states purchased sixty acres and expect to make their home here.
Mr. Sler, of Oregon, inspecting his land in the Mrs. Frances R. Brinley arrived from New
Bunnell-Dupont Colony York last week and is staying at Hotel Bung te nell. She has purchased land here and comes
Among the new dwelling houses that will to stay. Her people are now traveling
be erected in Bunnell within the next two through the country from New York and
months are those of Fred R. Kaiser, J. C. are expected to arrive here some time soon.
Johnson, J. B. Boaz and Bunnell State Bank.
Chairman Moody informs us that the road FARMERS' INSTITUTE GIVE BIG BARbetween Espanola and Hastings is being BECUE AT BUNNELL ON SEPgraded and will soon be in shape for regu- TEMBER 17TH.
lar travel. Precisely at 10 o'clock today, the farmers
assembled at the Academy on Church street,
Among those attending the district meet- about three hundred in number, where was
ing of the Knights of Pythias at Palatka convened the first Farmers' Institute ever
Thursday from Bunnell were Knights C. F. held in this end of the county. At 10:15
Turner, George Moody, M. Stone, J. B. Boaz Dupont-King's Road Highway. now being con- President W. M. McCloud called the meetand Esquire L. S. Cody. atructed through the colony. Picture
taken at Dupont ing to order, announced the program for
tthe day, and introduced Mayor Heath of
Mr. F. S. Crowson, who lives west of Bun- Bunnell, who delivered the welcoming adnell, was in town last week. Mr. Crowson that if others would plant more trees and dress. has stored three hundred bushels of corn spend a little time beautifying their homes President McCloud then introduced Col. from his small acreage this summer. When the country would soon be a "Land of Flow- A. P. Spencer of Gainesville, Fla., who is it comes to farming Mr. Crowson is there ers" in truth as well as in name. connected with the Florida Agricultural Exwith the goods. Mr. M. Stone, our leading merchant, is
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bacher and daughter, building a fine residence on his town lots Miss Helen, of Waverly, Iowa, arrived in and also one on his nearby farm and will
Bunnell last Thursday. They come to make soon have two of the most attractive houses
their home here and at present are living in the community. in the residence on Church street, vacated The Bunnell band has lately purchased a by Mr. Cauble. Mr. Bacher intends to build I on his lot on Moody boulevard in the near ne player piano for their hall.
future. Mr. Geo. R. Tolman is having his land put
The Bunnell State Bank has just issued in first-class shape by first plowing under a a splendid statement of the conditions of crop of cowpeas and then broadcasting a ton
the bank at the close of business September f rock phosphate per acre. This, he thinks,
the ankat te coseof bsinss Spteber is much better than chemical fertilizer. 9th. This is an exceptionally good state i
ment for a bank in a town the size of The road running east from DuPont to
Bunnell, especially during the dull sum- the old King's road is nearing completion mer months. The officers are to be com- and will make a great improvement for Dumended for their efforts in giving Bunnell Pont. Sample offish caught in the Bunnell-Dupont
such a strong institution.__The Korona road is also being rapidly Colony
We predict that the blue ribbon will be pushed forward.
awarded to Mr. W. I1. Cochran when the )erimental Station, in the Extension Decommissioners inspect the shelling of the We will soon have a shell road from Bun- apartment. Mr. Spencer's theme was the
roads that have been contracted in different nell to Hastings, as the contractors are dis- handling of the soil in this portion of the sections of the county. Mr. Cochran is not tributing shell at the rate of six cars daily. state, which he discussed in an interesting
"Agriculture is the hope of the nation."




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
manner for about an hour. Prof. J. R. Letter from Mr.Verdenius, Who is Now in Florida
Watson, Etymologist of the Florida from er enus, is in
Experimental Station at Gainesville, was
next introduced and entertained his hearers S. Howard, Editor Home Builder. loc tions, in Forida. I have listened to
.or nearly an hour. His very sensible and Dear 'Mr. loward:--1 ani writing you their pitiful stories about their crop failreasonable talk was conclusive evidence that from Bunnell so that you can publish this res this year, mon account of lack of rain, he knew what he was talking about. letter in the next issue of the Ilome Builder, and terrific heat, atnd I believe a great numA few taps of the Academy bell an- for I amn very busy here and will not be back her of farmers from Kansas, (O)klahoma, Misnounced the dinner hour, when the audience to Chicago for several days. souri, and other places of the Middle West
repaired to the beautiful grove nearby, The Bninell iorrespoldent informs me going to by lantd ii Florida and make
where'a barbecue dinner awaited them. Mr. that le has umiled you for the October sheir permanent home, for here if there
I. I. Moody contributed the meat and bread number of the Home Builder plenty of news should hamppei to be one crop failure there for the feast, and the ladies were only re- ite. of th e .l plenty is always the cliauce for two more crops
quired to bring the necessary pies, cakes, items regarding the colony so anything I that year. Comparisons like these are salads, t might say along this line would be mere sometimes necessary to make men apprecirepetition, and I shall only confine myself ate conditions in Florida. After dinner the people returned to the to conditions generally. I am sure you realize that I could write
Academy, where they were further enter- From the records here I find that about considerably more about this great State,
tained by Messrs. Watson and Spencer. The seventy-five per cent of our buyers have per- but I know that within a few days the Bun
subjects touched on by the speakers were sonally visited Bunnell and inspected.their nell ome Builder will go to press, and per
veyitrsigto our farmers, relating to frsan th wyte.tir nell I home Builder will go to press, and per
very interesting to our farmers, relating to farms and the way the new settlers are haps you have no room even for this letter; the preparation of land, forage crops and coming in now indicates that a great many however, when I return to Chicago within a general farming. more families will locate here this fall. If couple of weeks I will give you a detailed
Then came the ball game between Bun- they come fully prepared, the sooner the report of what I saw at Bunnell for the
nell and Espanola, which was well played better, for it means success and prosperity November issue of your magazine.
and very exciting, the official count stand- for all. The land is here and the people Trusting that everything is K. in the are coming rapidly and I am pleased to Trsting tat everything is K. ir the
tell you that we are getting the very finest Chicago office, I am, type of settlers here. Not the cheap riff-raff Yours very truly,
of humanity, who drift aimlessly from place THOS, A. VERDENI [US.
to place, but the earnest, sincere HOME
BUILDERS the community makers. ROAD TO BE SHELLED TO VOLUSIA
Every colonist who has moved here from the COUNTY
north, the east and the west, seems to have COUNTY.
started out with the determination to win,
and I have not seen a single one who has Will Commence at McCloud's and Extend to shown any traces of disappointment, but Volusia County Line.
rather have met with encouragement from
many of our settlers, which means so much
to us all. Nature seems to work hand in At a meeting of the County Commissionhand with man here and to yield much ers held in St. Augustine Tuesday they ormore bountifully than in any other State. dered advertisements placed calling for bids Land values are increasing throughout for the shelling of that part of the John
the State. On this trip I have visited variGlimpseofG. W. Durrance's farm near Bunnell ous communities. Some of these colonies Anderson highway commencing at the home have not done half the development work of J. T. McCloud and extending south to the
that we have done at Bunnell. Their loca- Volusia County line.
ing 9 to 4 in favor of Bunnell. This is tion, transportation and soil conditions are With exceptions of a short distance beteing 9 o ieso of fve is is not nearly so favorable as ours, but still tween Espanola and Byrd's, this completes
the first of a series of five games which they ask from $80.00 to $100.00 cash per tween Espanola and Byrd's, this completes
these two teams propose to th e championship.e acre for their land. I feel that each buyer the contracting of a hard surface road who shall be entitled to the championship should congratulate himself on the splendid through the county, via St. Augustine, Elkwas well patronized; a large delegation be- investment he has made in this colony, and ton, Hastings, Byrd's, Espanola, Bunnell and ing present from Dupont, St. John's Park of these farms cancer belief purchat before long none Ocean City; intersecting the Volusia Counand Espanola. Music was furnished for of these farms can be purchased from their
the entire program, both day and night, by present owners for two or three times the ty line at Knox & Bead's orange grove, and the Bunnell orchestra, whose soul-stirring price they have paid us for them. when finished will be in fine shape for those
music was very much appreciated both by Never did I like Florida so well as on crossing the county. Besides being a great
guests and home folks. The day was a suc- this trip. The summer months in Florida improvement over the old road, which traycessful and joyous one in every particular. have always been considered by northern ersed the unpopulated part of the county,
Chief McKnight upon being interviewed, people to be something dreadful, but I want erased the unpopulated part of the county,
said: "I have never seen a more orderly to tell you that Florida, this year, was the the new road will enable the travelers to
said: "I have never seen a more orderly.
crowd. Everybody seemed to be on their coolest State in the Union. I have talked pass through that part of the county which
good behavior, and no law was broken, and with a number of Florida men whose busi- is being developed, thereby showing to them no ordinance ever. fractured." ness took them to the north during the the many advantages of St. John's County.
summer and each one of them assured me Bids were also advertised for the conthat he found more comfort in Florida than struction of an 800-foot bridge across Deep CISCO-LEONHART. any place in the North. We have practi- Creek just east of Hastings.
cally no humidity here. The salt sea breezes Bids for surfacing the Deen road at St. from the ocean are ever present, especially John's Park were opened and the contract Miss Pauline Cisco, daughter of Mr. and in the *Bunnell-Dupont colony, since we are was awarded to Robt. Hamilton, whose bid ars. C. E. Cisco of Bunnell, and Mr. Charles so ideally located, almost touching the At- was $2.55 per cubic yard. ceonhart of Jacksonville were married in lantic Ocean. I believe very few men can ap- The First National Bank of St. Augustine Jacksonville last Monday evening. preciate Florida as I do today, after having advised the Board that they would take the
The couple came to Bunnell Tuesday to been cooped up in my office in Chicago all whole bond issue of $70,000 at par, provided summer. that the money should be deposited with
spend two weeks with the bride's parents. I have met here a great number of men the bank and the bonds be redeemed in
They will reside in Jacksonville. from the Middle West, who are looking for blocks of $5,000, which the Board accepted.
"The hope of agriculture is applied science."




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Intensely Interesting Letter from a Florida Woman
[Here is another letter from "a woman's viewpoint." It will be of interest to every man, woman and On this particular night the party was child who contemplates locating in Florida some day. We are sure you will enjoy reading it more than once. The writer has been very kind to give this splendid advice to the readers of the Home Builder given in a grove of giant live oak trees. The but she requeststhather namebe omitted and we must, of course,complywiththisrequest.]-TheEditOr. nightingales sang in the nearby trees and the voices of the negroes singing in their
To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: with which you can buy land at Bunnell- quarters down the road made a weird so
Some months ago I chanced to see a copy Dupont, but it is better to have your land of music that is unforgetable.
of your interesting little magazine, and out of debt first. Then you will have that I have found that men generally love the through the courtesy of Mr. Verdenius, I worry off your mind and be able to go country life and they love Florida with its
have been reading it ever since. The splen- to work in earnest, opportunities for making a living in the
did letters from prospective colonists and Be sure to get your garden started first, great out of doors, but women, as a rule, the helpful articles found in this magazine and I am certain that you wives and are more prejudiced against the country and
from month to month, have been of much mothers will take delight in looking after less able to'see the opportunities here. Bear
interest to me, and I believe that as a your garden as much as your strength al- in mind, however, that if you are dependwoman who has adopted Florida for my lows. Beautify your place also, which you ing on a salary it will not always last. Men
home, I can offer some helpful sugges- can do with but little cost. Set out, as with gray hair and bent shoulders are being
tions to future settlers and especially to soon as possible, a few pecan trees around crowded out in the competition of city life, the wives and mothers who are going to your house and cultivate these carefully. and my advice to every man and woman is'
locate in Florida. Properly nourished they grow rapidly and to get a little home of your own, free of
I do not live in the Bunnell-Dupont col- furnish beautiful shade, and rater valu- debt, and be independent for the rest of ony, but I have been there and I say to able- nuts. Before your trees are large your lives.
you, sincerely, that I consider you fortu- enough to give shade make some rustic As has been stated before, if you seek
nate who have farms at Bunnell. arbors and train vines to grow over these. them properly, "health, wealth and happiThere are many things to bear in mind You can soon have a beauty spot out of ness await you in Florida."
when moving from one section of the coun- doors where you may spend many hours try to another, and you must remember during the long summer days. Plant flow- NO MORE SUMMER EXCURSIONS FOR
that you are coming to a comparatively ers around your yard and garden and look THESE MEN. THEY WISH FOR
new country here and you will find condi- after these, as well as your vegetables. BREEZY FLORIDA.
tions quite different from what they are They may not bring in any income but The following letter was written by a
in the north, but be glad that you will they will be a joy to the eye and make Florida man visiting in Illinois, and aphave the privilege of doing your share in your work more pleasant. peared in a recent Florida paper.
the development of this great state. Some day when there is a little spare Decatur, Ill., Aug. 16, 1913.
Come to Florida with the determination time, have your husband or son go to the I don't know whether you have ever been
to accept conditions as you find them and woods and get one or two young water oak here or not but believe me, 1 wfsh I was
be happy. I have one friend who lived trees. Set these out near your well where back in cool Florida. The first question
here many months in a tent. She had a water can often be poured on the roots. people ask is: "Ain't it hot down there?"
well put down, and a Dutch oven built just They are magnificent trees and will be al- Only a person who has been in Florida can outside her tent door where she baked de- most priceless to you in a few years. appreciate the joke after getting into this
vicious bread and pastries. Her home was Be sure to get some orange and grape- hot bake oven up here.
only a tent but it was really a charming fruit trees set out at once-a few at least When I tell my friends of the North that
spot, for with a woman's touch she had for home use. Care for these and you I slept between blankets and a comfort
made it a "real" home. Her hospitality will be rewarded within a few years with over me while South a few days ago, they
under her canvas roof was as gracious as an abundance of delicious citrus fruit, express doubts as to the truth. Believe
that of any woman of wealth and her Your husbands, sons and brothers will me, I haven't needed any extras up here
friends were always welcome to an after- be very busy at first getting the land in in the way of covering. noon lunch of home-made bread and but- shape and crops ready for market. You The thermometer hit the hundred mark
ter and "genuine" milk from her own Jer- will want to be making money also and again today. Not like Florida, cool in the
sey cow. you will find poultry very profitable in- shade with breezes to let you know life's
This tent was set up at the edge of a deed. You can also make money from worth living.
little grove of pine trees and never did I your garden and I advise every Florida Surprisingly great interest is being taken
find my friend more happy in her later farmer-man or woman-to raise some by northern people in Florida.
home than she was in her first little tent hogs. They bring high prices here. Some say go to Florida in winter to keep
among the pines. When first I came to Florida I felt warm. I say, as everyone who has been
However, my advice is always to erect strange and sometimes unhappy, but not in Florida in the summer says, "go to
some kind of a house, if possible, for every for long. The climate is so delightful, the Florida in the summer to keep cool." woman is not so easily satisfied with a possibilities for success so numerous, and Yours truly, I. S. H.
tent. Make up your mind that if you the people so cordial that I would not concannot have everything you have been ac- sider living elsewhere. The next is an interview with Dr. S. on
customed to -in the north that you won't Unless you, as a Bunnell colonist, have his return to Florida recently from Kansas
complain, but that you will do your part an abundance of money with which to hire City. Dr. S. was Florida's delegate to the in the making of a permanent home in this your work done, you will find plenty of National Association of Dentists, which
beautiful new country. hard work to do at first, but it is just met at Kansas City on July 8th.
Let me advise you, however, to "sit down the same as it is in the north-when you When asked as to what amount of pleasand count the cost" before you move to are working for yourself and for a home ure he extracted from his trip, the Dr. literFlorida. Do not come here with $300.00 of your own, you find work sweet. How- ally threw up both hands and said:
or $400.00 and then blame the country if ever, it need not be all work here. I as- 'None, not even a little piece as big as
you make a failure, as you likely will do. sure you, for the chances for recreation are a Florida kumquat. I don't mean to intiHave enough to build a little house, a few many. Here one may enjoy a picnic out mate that the people of Kansas'City didn't
necessary outbuildings, some fence, and of doors practically every day of the year. do everything in their power to make our enough so that you can purchase poultry, You can get up fishingparties, boating and stay profitable and pleasant, but the heat a cow, if possible, seeds, implements, etc. bathing parties. In season you will find it was so terrific it was impossible to enjoy Count on having some ready cash to tide great sport to roast oysters on the beach. anything. Hot, why, man, it was 107
you over the time while you are building, I know that I never found anything more in the shade in Kansas City
clearing, planting and growing your first delightful than the moonlight parties 1 106 at St. Joseph, and one night the thercrops. have attended here in Florida. One I want mometer registered 100 at 12 o'clock in
My advice to every one coming to Flor- to tell you of briefly. It seems to me that the sleeping car.
ida to live is to have your farm paid for the moon shines differently in Florida than "No more summer trips for me. Florida before you move to it. I realize that this any other place. It has a peculiar radiance is the coolest place I know of, and Iere 1 is not necessary under the splendid terms and floods the earth with its mellow light, am going to stay."
"Farming is mankind's greatest industry, and the soil is its greatest physical asset."




Uha BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
H hunting and Fishing in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony alone. Ducks do not like whole grain, but
prefer soft food. When winter approaches
they may be fed twice a day, at night addEvery man with good red blood in his quite so heavy, but far more beautiful in ing animal meal or cooked meat, but in sumveins, who has bought a farm in the Bun- appearance and extremely game and hard to mer grass is sufficient. Their runs, if they nell-Dupont Colony, is looking forward, I capture. The law provides that no person are confined, must be kept clean. If grass
dare say, to enjoying some delightful sport shall kill more than two wild turkeys in i scarce give finely cut clover twice a day
the form of hunting and fishing. No any one day, nor more than five wild tur- in shinier, with turnips at night.-National
doubt you have read of the wonderful fish keys in any one year. Quail and partridge Poultry Magazine.
to be found in Florida waters, or you have abound in large numbers. Quail are espelistened to the thrilling stories told by those cially numerous throughout this part of WOULD RATHER BE
who have spent their vacations in fishing Florida. The statutes have it unlawful for IN PEN IN FLORIDA
and hunting throughout Florida. If this one person to kill more than twenty quail
in any one day, or for a party of two or Than to Move Away, Says Maine Man Who more persons to kill more than forty quail Has Been in the State.
in any one day. Twenty-nine years ago there caine to
Wild (lucks are thick at certain seasons Florida, from Maine, a mn:1 whose physiof the year around Gore Lake and near clan told him he had but a few weeks to
Ocean City. The law protects ducks within live. This gentleman has just returned to a mile of certain cities along the coasts of Maine for a short visit, the first for nineFlorida, and where thus protected the wild teen years, and this is what lie said before ducks become quite tame and swim about leaving:
in the harbors like domesticated birds- "If I was forced to decide between going
Other game birds in Florida are wild to the penitentiary or being banished from
geese, swans and brant, rails, coots, mud- Florida, I would take the penitentiary end hens and gallinules, shore birds, plovers, surf of the stick. birds, snipe, woodcock, sand pipers, tattlers "Twenty-iiine ears ago my physician in and curlews, grouse, prairie chickens, par- Maine told me I had but a short time to bridges, turtle doves and pigeons live, and to at once put my affairs in such
Fresh water fish that can be found in shape that my people would have no diffilakes and creeks around Bunnell and Dupont culty in settling up my estate when 'it was are black bass, bream, pickerel, trout, perch all over.' anid cat. Salt water fish in the canal and "I have been back to Maine once-nineocean are red snappers, flounders, sheeps- teen years ago-and I am going back this head, pomIpano, Spanish mackerel, blue fish, time just to let the people there see how a shad, mullet, kingfish, barracuda, whiting, man looks after lie has been told he vas channel bass, croakers, drum and blackfish. 'all in, down and out' twenty-nine years ago. The size of the fish caught in fresh waters Today I an enjoying the very best of Quail hunting near Bunnell varies Mrom ten to fifteen pounds in weight, health, as does also ny sister, and it is only
while those caught in the salt waters are in the picking and packing season that
feature of Florida life holds an attraction frequently from twenty to fifty pounds in I employ help to assist in caring for my
for you, let me say that youwill not be dis- weight. two orange and grapefruit groves.
appointed when you go to Bunnell-Dupont. Our Engineer, Mr. Johnson, of Bunnell, "This will probably be my last trip back
There is perhaps no section of the United caught a sea bass some time ago that to my old home, for conditions there have
States that offers such opportunities to tie weighed almost sixty pounds. changed so that I am a stranger, and I intrue sportsman as Florida, and there is no If you have a few days to spare, be sure tend to put in the next six weeks telling
more favored locality in the State than and take your fishing tackle with you when those Yankees that Florida is the best place
Bunnell. you visit the colony, on earth for a man to live, it matters not
whether lie has millions of dollars or only a
Those who expect to do some hunting and FEED FOR DUCKS. few dimes, We live here every day in the
fishing in the State would do well to read year, and there is plenty of work for anyone
up on the new game laws that have recently who has energy enough to (1o it."
gone into effect. The hunting season opens
on November 20th, and closes on February IMPORTANT
20th. Florida has excellent laws for the
protection of its game, and game wardens PLEASE READ
in each county who see that the laws are The Bunnell Development
not violated. Company at the present time
Non-residents are required to purchase a ind
license for hunting, which will cost $10. is Spending thousands of dolDeer during the past year was very plentiful lars on improve ents in he
around Bunnell, and some of our colonists colony, such as the building of
have told me of having most delightful veni- new roads, improving old
son dinners.
Wild turkeys are as plentiful as deer in ones, building bridges, etc.
our locality, and the prize is well worth It is therefore very essengoing after. The bird is as tall as a tame tial that every buyer should do
turkey, but more slender and perhaps not his or her part in the development of the colony, by keeping
up the monthly payments as
promptly as possible. Most of
our buyers are now doing this.
To the few who are not, we
Ducks raised at Bunnell by Mrs. B. trust this reminder will be
In summer it is not advisable to feed sufficient. If you do not make
ducks on grain except in limited quantities. your payments promptly, you If they can get grass they need only one are standing in the way of
meal a day, composed of cooked turnips or
potatoes thickened with bran, and in very progress in the colony. Fishing is good at Ocean City warm weather they will thrive on grass BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
"The most unhappy nran or woman on earth is the one who rises in the morning with nothing to do and wonders how he will pass off the day."--Leslie M. Shaw.




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
FLORIDA, THE LAND OF PROMISE. Every Bunnell-Dupont Land
Some of the Reasons Why There Is Such a
Rush to This State and Why It
WilCntne Owner Should, be Our Agent
Florida is the only tropical portion of the
United States. It lies almost surrounded Wem a thtyusolbe ur gntfr orow itrss
by water; it is approached on both sides by Wema thtyusolbe ur gntfr orow itrss
thCufsrawic5a ednyt more especially than that you should be a salesman for us
purify the air which filters over and
through the lands of Florida, and its ports WE OFFER 10 PER CENT COMMISSION ON ALL SALES MADE TO' are open to vessels from all parts of the
world, thereby giving it the very best of NEW BUYERS THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF OUR OLD BUYERS
transportation facilities. It is tapped by
the great railroad systems of the continent, Cm iso ob rdtdo oracutwt sa ata
which open up to it more than fifty millions C m iso ob rdtdo oracutwt sa ata
of p~eople. money ispaid in on the land
And as to climate, Florida has a climate
that is unsurpassed, which every man of W aeti fe eas ehv nyavr iie ubro
medical science admits is ideal for almost W aeti fe eas ehv nyavr iie ubro
every form of health building. It has long farms left for sale, among which are several caused by lapsed payments on been the playground of the rich, and within the part of some of our purchasers. We desire to sell every acre of our land its borders are located the palaces and coun- this coming winter, so as to enable us to devote our time exclusively to the try estates of America's most wealthy and ubidn n eeomn forcln ngnrl
aristocratic set. ubidn n eeomn forcln ngnrl
Florida positively feeds the North and In some instances these available tracts, caused through lapsed
East during the winter months, and so far accounts, are extremely well located. Every unsold tract is well worth as the delicacies consumed in the North and double the price we ask, when you consider the immense amount of developEast are concerned, Florida is, because of mn okta a led ae lcadtefc htteBnel
its geographical location and its nearness mn okta a led ae lcadtefc htteBnel
to those markets, the only available section Dupont colony is known all over the State as THE MOST SUCCESSFUL of this country for such supply. AND ATTRACTIVE COLONIZATION PROPOSITION TO BE FOUND
If one will but take a map of the United ANYWHERE IN AMERICA. States and glance at it, he will be at once
convinced of these facts from a geographical We have repeatedly stated in our literature that farms like ours are viewpoint alone. The great transportation selling at Hastings, or at Sanford, for from $200.00 to $500.00 an acre, while lines of Florida have done much to. enhance we sell land, at the present time, for only $35.00 and $40.00 an acre, but the value of Florida products, and to furnish exettrasthprcofaloranto$00anceinheerfur. swift transportation for such products to exettrasthprcofalorlnto$00anceinheerfure the great markets of the country, as well as If you will give us the names of any prospective buyers we will mail to see that they are kept in the highest them our literature, including order blank, etc., or if you will fill out the state of perfection during such a journey, coupon below and mail to us we will send your friends the Bunnell Home The question is frequently asked why
Florida products bring a higher price to the Builder, free of cost, for six months. producers than other farm products in this If you have any friends who are interested in Florida, you will confer country. The answer is simply this: Flor- a great favor on them and benefit yourself by inducing them to buy in
ida products are harvested at a time when BnnlDuotan reebrththesnrorlndaealslte
the remainder of this country is generally in Bunl-uotan reebrththesnrorlndaealslte
idleness, and consequently the Florida prod- quicker we shall be able to devote all our time to the upbuilding of the ucts reach the market when there is abso- colony, and the advance in value of the land will increase even more rapidly lutely no competition and prices are the than it has heretofore. very highest. The only competitor of Flor- BN ELDVLP ETCMAY
ida, if it may be called such, is California, BN ELDVLP ETCM A Y
and that State lies so far away from the
Northern and Eastern markets that, with Cut out this Coupon andnmail it to our sales. office at Chicago. the increased cost of delivering its products to these markets, it is placed absolutely
beyond the limits of competing with Florida. THOS. A. VERDENIUS-BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO.
It is also a fact that, as a rule, Florida prod.ncts mature from thirty to sixty days ear- 108 South La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.
hier than those of California.
These are some of the reasons that Flor- Below are the names and addresses of some of my acquaintances who are interested in
ida is having such a rush of settlers to her securing homes in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Please send them the Bunnell Home Builder idle lands. So great is the demand for Flor- for six months. ida lands that some of the great capitalists
of the country are purchasing large tracts
of land in various parts of the State. They N am e -Street and No. City State___know that the rush to Florida will continue
now that it has started so strongly, and that Name Street and No. City State___it will be here in Florida like it was in the
West, where great fortunes were made by NmeSreanNoCiytt___the land grabbers.Nae- tetndoCiyst
But at the present time there are thousands and hundreds of thousands of acres Name Street and No. City State___of good land in Florida that can be bought
in small tracts. This is certainly the day Name- ____________Street and- No. City- State__of opportunity in Florida. The time to buy
a farm tract in Florida is now.-Jacksonville Metropolis. (Wieyour own name here)
"Remember--There is but one crop of soil."




Full Text

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Plllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll | The Truth About Florida | | The Bunnell Home Builder | 1 Edited by S. HOWARD 1 = st §| 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW Vo/1 October, 1913 JWo. 11 DO THINGS TURN I was discussing OUT AS WE EXwith a friend the PECT? other day the pos sibilities of the Bunnell-Dupont colony, when he suddenly exclaimed, “But things don’t always turn out there as you hope for. Your spring potato crop was not up to your expecta tions.” “Ah no, my friend,” I replied, “things don’t always turn out in life as we expect or hope for. If they did, this would be a Paradise on earth. It is true the potato crop was not quite as large as we expected, owing to the fact that we had a little too much rain at the wrong time, but you dare not say Bunnell-Dupont is no good on account of that. “Think of conditions this summer in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and other states. The crops have been practically burned up and man and beast have suffered for water. Many people left their homes in the cities in their automobiles, each day, after the sun had set, and drove out into the country, stopping when they found an elevation of ground, where there seemed to be a slight breeze, and there they would spend the long sweltering nights. “Right here in our beautiful Illinois, the farmers in some parts have scarcely had a half or a third of a crop, and it will re quire all they raised this season to feed their live stock until the next crop can be raised. “Conditions were nothing like this in Florida these past months, the weather was not nearly so hot, and even though one crop was not quite up to expectations the Bunnell farmers immediately prepared the land for another, and then again for a third crop, for Bunnell-Dupont is a threecrop community.” My friend had no further arguments to offer. He had not thought of things in this light, but promised me that he would riliink seriously of an investment at Bun nell this fall. And when he had left, I fell to musing, and these words from Goldsmith came to me— “And those who came to scoff, Remained to pray.” DON’T FORGET THE The Editor wishes PRIZE LETTER to remind all those CONTEST. who are going to enter the prize let ter contest, that they must not fail to have their letters in the hands of the Edi tor later than November 10, 1913, so that they can be printed in our Anniver sary (December) number, and so that the prizes may be awarded before that date. Don’t forget also that every one is en titled to enter this contest. Just write a letter about the Bunnell-Dupont colony in your own way, tell what you think of it, what you saw there, what you expect to do there, etc., etc. Prizes will be awarded ac cording to the interest of the letter, rather than on its grammatical construction. Address your letters to S. HOWARD, Editor Bunnell Home Builder, 1103 Woman’s Temple, Chicago, Ill. Scene on Moody Road near Ocean City WOULD RATHER On another page of GO TO JAIL THAN this issue you will LEAVE FLORIDA. read what one man thinks of Florida, the state of his adoption. He would rather live in jail in Florida than be compelled to spend the remainder of his life in the North. Perhaps this man was a little ex travagant in his statement, but he wanted to make his meaning clear, and when you read of his experience you will understand why he loves Florida. FLORIDA! There is something musical in the sound of this name. Those of us who have lived there instinctively think of long happy days, wonderful moonlight nights, rippling waters and singing birds. We think of beautiful flowers, abundant vege tation, light, warmth, comfort and cheer. No wonder that Florida becomes a cher ished spot to the men and women who have lost their grip on life, and whom ill health has rendered unfit for work in the rigorous north. To be told that one has but a few months to live and then to have twenty-nine years added to one’s life, and still be in good health, is enough to make any one love the locality that has made possible this new lease on life. There are so many instances of this kind we might relate: We were standing on the street corner in Jacksonville, Florida, one summer day not long ago, and chanced to hear one man telling another of what Flor ida had done for him. We could not help but listen, and feel some of the stranger’s enthusiasm, as with shining eyes and happy voice, he told how he had come to Florida broken in health and spirit, but he had indeed found the “Fountain of Youth” in this sunny land, and longed to recommend it to others. Just another little story from real life: We met an old soldier in Florida, who orig inally lived in New York State. This man had been afflicted with rheumatism for many years, in fact had been unable to do any work for twenty years. Finally he decided to see what Florida would do for him, although he doubted that anything could help him. After he had been in the state a short time he began to grow better and stronger. He cut the timber, built his own little home, made his own fences and had a garden that was the pride of his heart. He was able to work all day on his little farm, and felt stronger and happier than he had in a score of years. When one listens to these life stories, and sees what has been accomplished by people who were considered down and out, lie is led to exclaim, “Truly, Truth is stranger than fiction.” “A little honest effort put forth in the development of your Florida farm and you have made your start toward real comfort and independence.”

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me BUMMJSLIL HOME BUILDER Water Front of St. Augustine ST. AUGUSTINE, THE CITY BEAUTIFUL Oldest City in the United States and County Seat of St. Johns County, in Which Our Colony Lands are Located. St. Augustine, as every schoolboy knows, is the oldest city in the United States, being founded in 1565 by Pedro Menedez de Avilles. Landing at this spot on the day dedicated to St. Augustine, he names the place in honor of this saint. Of all the places passed along the coast none im pressed the Spanish explorer so favorably, and he took posses sion of the Indian village of SeOid House, St. Franci. St. looe, which formerly occupied the site of this delightful city. Situated on the beautiful Matanzas Bay, with the broad Atlantic a mile away, St. Augustine enjoys all the advantages of a coast city, with none of the draw backs, as none of the undesirable element that frequents shipping centers is found here. In connection with the location of the city may be mentioned the splendid beaches which are reached by trolley car or by a drive through beautiful wooded country. Parks are scattered over the city at conve nient points and the very mild climate per mits one to enjoy them at all times of the year. Beautiful driveways extend from the city for miles, while on the. ocean beach Nature pro vides a driveway, or automobile course, such as the ingenuity of man cannot rival. Three hundred feet in width, and hard and smooth, it is not to be compared with the handicraft of man. One who has never visited this quaint old city cannot imagine the delights it affords. Here is a commingling of the old and the new, the oldest house in the United States almost in a stone’s throw of magnificent modern hotels; the narrowest street in the United States is but a few feet from the broad boulevards. There are scores of interesting places to visit in St. Augustine and suburbs, and every northern man and woman who visits Florida should plan to spend a day or two at least at old St. Augustine. Every Bun nell land owner should not fail to visit St. Augustine when he inspects his land. Memorial Presbyterian Here is a delightful place to study some of the ancient history of America. One may visit the Cathedral, the oldest church in the United States; the City Gate, bearing evidence of the Spanish regime, should be seen, likewise the old Slave Market, Treasury Street, Anas tasia Island, etc. St. Augustine has been occupied by Span ish, French, English and Americans, and bears the imprint of its several occupants, making it one of the most interesting cities in the western world. Juan Ponce de Leon was the first European to set foot on its The Cathedral “The South has the land and the resources. Its only problem now is to ‘Get Next’ to the prospective settler and investor.”— Leslie's Weekly.

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me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Treasury Street shores, and the halo of romance which is inter woven with the famous old knight’s search for the Fountain of Youth still clings to the old town. Old Ft. Marion still frowns down on the little city, a page from the early history of St. Augustine. On every hand the visitor will find relics of a bygone age to rivet his attention. Slumbering for centuries amid its orange groves and flowering gardens, St. Aug ustine was awakened about a quarter of a century ago to new life. Direct railroad connection with Jackson ville was established, and the life-giving climate and nat ural beauty of the place came into prominence imme diately after the old town was rendered accessible to the outside world, and the pioneer tourists and winter visitors were followed by thousands. Mr. Henry M. Flagler came on the scene shortly after the completion of the railroad to Jacksonville and in vested millions in beautifying the city and building its magnificent hotels, which have become world renowned. The fame of St. Augustine spread over the civilized world, and in addi tion to those who came to renew their lease on life, flocked the wealth and fashion of the great cities. Pleasure seekers found here an ideal playground, the business man found a place for relaxation and proteges of fashion found congenial company and environment. Diversity of amusement and recre ation are other features that should appeal to the person contemplating a change of home. The ocean and salt water streams adjacent to St. Augustine offer the best fishing, finest surf bathing and boating to be found anywhere. The vast stretches of woods offer splendid hunting. Attractive drives qiay be taken to various points of interest near the city and within a year splendid roads will connect St. Augustine with Jacksonville to the north, and before long a fine hard road, which is now un der construction, will be completed from St. Augus tine to the Bunnell-DuPont Old Slave Market colony. St. Augustine is already the mecca for automobile parties, the’ unrivaled hotel accommodations offering splendid entertainment for all visitors. L St. Augustine is the | county seat of St. Johns County, one of the rich est agricultural sections St. George Street in Quaint St* Augustin in the country. It has the most equable climate of any city in the United States, and tlie summers are as delightful as the winters are pleasant. Without doubt the healthfulness of St. Augustine is due to its location. This city, according to the United States Government statistics, is the most healthful in the country, and according to the last report of the State Commissioner of Agriculture has the smallest death rate of any city in the State. The abundant sup ply of pure artesian water no doubt contributes to the health of the community. St. Augustine is up to date in every respect. The streets of the city are paved with vitrified brick and asphalt; electric lights illuminate the city; an electric car line connects the city with the beautiful bathing beaches on Anastasia Island, and extends five miles paralleling the ocean; electric cars operate in the city, and the system taps all the suburbs. One of the finest gas plants in the country supplies gas for illuminat ing and cooking purposes. The city owns its waterworks, which are not surpassed by that of any city. Ar tesian wells are the source of water supply, and the water is absolutely free from all impurities. The city has a very efficient paid fire depart ment, and a competent sanitary force. A splendid public library is open to visitors as well as residents. The beautiful city located in the same county, and so near Bunnell, is of especial interest to all BunnellDupont colony land owners. It is the place you will visit on county court days, and a delightful place to take your family at any season of the year. The Sea Wall The Plaza and Monument “The South needs the immigrant as does no other section of the country. It has a home and work for all who will come.”— Leslie’s Weekly.

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Ufte BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont Mr. Chas. G. Stratton and wife of Mt. Vernon, Ill., are spending some time in Bun nell. The Farmers’ Institute held a very suc cessful meeting at the school building last Saturday. Mr. E. B. Longcrier, who has been spend ing some time in Jacksonville, returned to Bunnell last week. He is busy this week gathering his sweet potato crop. Mr. Siler, of Oregon, inspecting his land in the BunnellD upont Colony Among the new dwelling houses that will be erected in Bunnell within the next two months are those of Fred R. Kaiser, J. C. Johnson, J. B. Boaz and Bunnell State Bank. Chairman Moody informs us that the road between Espanola and Hastings is being graded and will soon be in shape for regu lar travel. Among those attending the district meet ing of the Knights of Pythias at Palatka Thursday from Bunnell were Knights C. F. Turner, George Moody, M. Stone, J. B. Boaz and Esquire L. S. Cody. only putting the shell down according to specifications, but he is going to the extra expense of not allowing his wagons to drive over the shell whereby they would grind it into dust by the time the shelling was com pleted. To do this he is compelled to haul by the side roads, thus making the haul at least a third further. The Miller Brothers have one of the fin est crops of sweet potatoes to be seen in this part of the country—about ten acres— which, from present indications, will yield at least three hundred bushels per acre. Mr. W. A. Mack also has a fine crop of sweet potatoes and has just completed the planting of six acres of Irish potatoes. He also has just finished harvesting a fine crop of corn. Mr. D. Brown has his land in fine condi tion for a crop, which he will soon be planting. Mr. Jepson is having splendid success raising Eucalyptus trees from seed and al ready has some fine young trees. He states Dupont-King’s Road Highway, now being con structed through the colony. Picture taken at Dupont Mr. F. S. Crowson, who lives west of Bun nell, was in town last week. Mr. Crowson has stored three hundred bushels of corn from his small acreage this summer. When it comes to farming Mr. Crowson is there with the goods. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bacher and daughter, Miss Helen, of Waverly, Iowa, arrived in Bunnell last Thursday. They come to make their home here and at present are living in the residence on Church street, vacated by Mr. Cauble. Mr. Bacher intends to build on his lot on Moody boulevard in the near future. The Bunnell State Bank has just issued a splendid statement of the conditions of the bank at the close of business September 9th. This is an exceptionally good state ment for a bank in a town the size of Bunnell, especially during the dull sum mer months. The officers are to be com mended for their efforts in giving Bunnell such a strong institution. We predict that the blue ribbon will be awarded to Mr. W. Id. Cochran when the commissioners inspect the shelling of the roads that have been contracted in different sections of the county. Mr. Cochran is not that if others would plant more trees and spend a little time beautifying their homes the country would soon be a “Land of Flow ers” in truth as well as in name. Mr. M. Stone, our leading merchant, is building a fine residence on his town lots and also one on his nearby farm and will soon have two of the most attractive houses in the community. The Bunnell band has lately purchased a fine player piano for their hall. Mr. Geo. R. Tolman is having his land put in first-class shape by first plowing under a crop of cowpeas and then broadcasting a ton of rock phosphate per acre. This, he thinks, is much better than chemical fertilizer. The road running east from DuPont to the old King’s road is nearing completion and will make a great improvement for Du Pont. The Korona road is also being rapidly pushed forward. We will soon have a shell road from Bun nell to Hastings, as the contractors are dis tributing shell at the rate of six cars daily. Mr. J. Brunton has a nice bungalow on his land on the Moody road. You should see the sugar cane on the Durrance place. Mr. Durrance states that though this is called “the lazy man’s crop’ he will make from $75 to $150 per acre. The young people enjoyed a dance in the Tribune Hall Friday evening, which was given by the Bunnell Cornet Band. Mr. C. H. Anderson and family of Milwau kee, Wis., arrived in Bunnell Monday and expect to make this their future home. Mr. D. Henson, who lives south of Bun nell, brought in a load of fine watermelons Monday for which he received good prices. Mr. and Mrs. J. F Brunton of Streator, Ill., are spending several days here looking over the land with the expectation of pur chasing a tract. Another addition has been made to the Polish colony here. Messrs. G. Waszowski and K. Waszowski of Buffalo, N. Y., have purchased sixty acres and expect to make their home here. Mrs. Frances R. Brinley arrived from New York last week and is staying at Hotel Bun nell. She has purchased land here and comes to stay. Her people are now traveling through the country from New York and are expected to arrive here some time soon. FARMERS’ INSTITUTE GIVE BIG BAR BECUE AT BUNNELL ON SEP TEMBER 17TH. Precisely at 10 o’clock today, the farmers assembled at the Academy on Church street, about three hundred in number, where was convened the first Farmers’ Institute ever held in this end of the county. At 10:15 President W. M. McCloud called the meet ing to order, announced the program for the day, and introduced Mayor Heath of Bunnell, who delivered the welcoming ad dress. President McCloud then introduced Col. A. P. Spencer of Gainesville, Fla., who is connected with the Florida Agricultural Ex perimental Station, in the Extension De partment. Mr. Spencer’s theme was the handling of the soil in this portion of the state, which he discussed in an interesting “Agriculture is the hope of the nation.”

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fce BUHNELL HOMEBUILDER Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month Letter from Mr. Verdenius, Who is Now in Florida manner for about an hour. Prof. J. R. Watson, Etymologist of the Florida Experimental Station at Gainesville, was next introduced and entertained his hearers •for nearly an hour. His very sensible and reasonable talk was conclusive evidence that he knew what he was talking about. A few taps of the Academy bell an nounced the dinner hour, when the audience repaired to the beautiful grove nearby, where a barbecue dinner awaited them. Mr. I. I. Moody contributed the meat and bread for the feast, and the ladies were only re quired to bring the necessary pies, cakes, salads, etc. After dinner the people returned to the Academy, where they were further enter tained by Messrs. Watson and Spencer. The subjects touched on by the speakers were very interesting to our farmers, relating to the preparation of land, forage crops and general farming. Then came the ball game between Bun nell and Espanola, which was well played and very exciting, the official count standGlimpse of G. W. Durrance*s farm near Bunnell ing 9 to 4 in favor of Bunnell. This is the first of a series of five games which these two teams propose to play to decide who shall be entitled to the championship. In the evening there was a dance, which was well patronized; a large delegation be ing present from Dupont, St. John’s Park and Espanola. Music was furnished for the entire program, both day and night, by the Bunnell orchestra, whose soul-stirring music was very much appreciated both by guests and home folks. The day was a suc cessful and joyous one in every particular. Chief McKnight upon being interviewed, said: “I have never seen a more orderly crowd. Everybody seemed to be on their good behavior, ar.d no law was broken, and no ordinance ever, fractured.” CISCO-LEONHART. Miss Pauline Cisco, daughter of Mr. and jftlrs. C. E. Cisco of Bunnell, and Mr. Charles 'Leonhart of Jacksonville were married in Jacksonville last Monday evening. The couple came to Bunnell Tuesday to spend two weeks with the bride’s parents. They will reside in Jacksonville. S. Howard, Editor Home Builder. Dear Mr. Howard: — I am writing you from Bunnell so that you can publish this letter in the next issue of the Home Builder, for I am very busy here and will not be back to Chicago for several days. The Bunnell correspondent informs me that he has mailed you for the October number of the Home Builder plenty of news items regarding the colony, so anything I might say along this line would be mere repetition, and I shall only confine myself to conditions generally. From the records here I find that about seventy-five per cent of our buyers have per sonally visited Bunnell and inspected .their farms, and the way the new settlers are coming in now indicates that a great many more families will locate here this fall. If they come fully prepared, the sooner the better, for it means success and prosperity for all. The land is here and the people are coming rapidly and I am pleased to tell you that we are getting the very finest type of settlers here. Not the cheap riff-raff of humanity, who drift aimlessly from place to place, but the earnest, sincere HOME BUILDERS — the community makers. Every colonist who has moved here from the north, the east and the west, seems to have started out with the determination to win, and I have not seen a single one who has shown any traces of disappointment, but rather have met with encouragement from many of our settlers, which means so much to us all. Nature seems to work hand in hand with man here and to yield much more bountifully than in any other State. Land values are increasing throughout the State. On this trip I have visited vari ous communities. Some of these colonies have not done half the development work that we have done at Bunnell. Their loca tion, transportation and soil conditions are not nearly so favorable as ours, but still they ask from $80.00 to $100.00 cash per acre for their land. I feel that each buyer should congratulate himself on the splendid investment he has made in this colony, and it is my sincere belief that before long none of these farms can be purchased from their present owners for two or three times the price they have paid us for them. Never did I like Florida so well as on this trip. The summer months in Florida have always been considered by northern people to be something dreadful, but I want to tell you that Florida, this year, was the coolest State in the Union. I have talked with a number of Florida men whose busi ness took them to the north during the summer and each one of them assured me that he found more comfort in Florida than any place in the North. We have practi cally no humidity here. The salt sea breezes from the ocean are ever present, especially in the .Bunnell-Dupont colony, since we are so ideally located, almost touching the At lantic Ocean. I believe very few men can ap preciate Florida as I do today, after having been cooped up in my office in Chicago all summer. I have met here a great number of men from the Middle West, who are looking for locations in Florida. I have listened to their pitiful stories about their crop fail ures this year, on account of lack of rain, and terrific heat, and I believe a great num ber of farmers from Kansas, Oklahoma, Mis souri, and other places of the Middle West are going to buy land in Florida and make this their permanent home, for here if there should happen to be one crop failure there is always the chance for two more crops that year. Comparisons like these are sometimes necessary to make men appreci ate conditions in Florida. I am sure you realize that I could write considerably more about this great State, but T know that within a few days the Bun nell Home Builder will go to press, and per haps you have no room even for this letter, however, when I return to Chicago within a couple of weeks I will give you a detai'-ed report of what T saw at Bunnell for the November issue of your magazine. Trusting that everything is O. K. in the Chicago office, I am, Yours very truly, THOS, A. VERDENIUS. ROAD TO BE SHELLED TO VOLUSIA COUNTY. Will Commence at McCloud’s and Extend to Volusia County Line. At a meeting of the County Commission ers held in St. Augustine Tuesday they or dered advertisements placed calling for bids for the shelling of that part of the John Anderson highway commencing at the home of J. T. McCloud and extending south to the Volusia County line. With exceptions of a short distance be tween Espanola and Byrd’s, this completes the contracting of a hard surface road through the county, via St. Augustine, Elkton, Hastings, Byrd's, Espanola, Bunnell and Ocean City; intersecting the Volusia Coun ty line at Knox & Bead’s orange grove, and when finished will be in fine shape for those crossing the county. Besides being a great improvement over the old road, which trav ersed the unpopulated part of the county, the new road will enable the travelers to pass through that part of the county which is" being developed, thereby showing to them the many advantages of St. John’s County. Bids were also advertised for the con struction of an 800-foot bridge across Deep Creek just east of Hastings. Bids for surfacing the Deen road at St. John’s Park were opened and the contract was awarded to Robt. Hamilton, whose bid was $2.55 per cubic yard. The First National Bank of St. Augustine advised the Board that they would take the whole bond issue of $70,000 at par, provided that the money should be deposited with the bank and the bonds be redeemed in blocks of $5,000, which the Board accepted. “The hope of agriculture is applied science.”

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me BUNMELL HOME BUILDER Intensely Interesting Letter from a Florida Woman [ Here is another letter from “a -woman’s -viewpoint.” It will he of interest to every man, woman and child who contemplates locating in Florida some day. We are sure you will enjoy reading it more than once. The writer has been very kind to give this splendid advice to the readers of the Home Builder but she requests that her name be omitted andwemust, of course, comply with this request.] — The Editor To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: Some months ago I chanced to see a copy of your interesting little magazine, and through the courtesy of Mr. Verdenius, I have been reading it ever since. The splen did letters from prospective colonists and the helpful articles found in this magazine from month to month, have been of much interest to me, and I believe that as a woman who has adopted Florida for my home, I can offer some helpful sugges tions to future settlers and especially to the wives and mothers who are going to locate in Florida. I do not live in the Bunnell-Dupont col ony, but I have been there and I say to you, sincerely, that I consider you fortu nate who have farms at Bunnell. There are many things to bear in mind when moving from one section of the coun try to another, and you must remember that you are coming to a comparatively new country here and you will find condi tions quite different from what they are in the north, but be glad that you will have the privilege of doing your share in the development of this great state. Come to Florida with the determination to accept conditions as you find them and be happy. I have one friend who lived here many months in a tent. She had a well put down, and a Dutch oven built just outside her tent door where she baked de licious bread and pastries. Her home was only a tent but it was really a charming spot, for with a woman’s touch she had made it a “real” home. Her hospitality under her canvas roof was as gracious as that of any woman of wealth and her friends were always welcome to an after noon lunch of home-made bread and but ter and “genuine” milk from her own Jer sey cow. This tent was set up at the edge of a little grove of pine trees and never did I find my friend more happy in her later home than she was in her first little tent among the pines. However, my advice is always to erect some kind of a house, if possible, for every woman is not so easily satisfied with a tent. Make up your mind that if you cannot have everything you have been ac customed to in the north that you won’t complain, but that you will do your part in the making of a permanent home in this beautiful new country. Let me advise you, however, to “sit down and count the cost” before you move to Florida. Do not come here with $300.00 or $400.00 and then blame the country if you make a failure, as you likely will do. Have enough to build a little house, a few necessary outbuildings, some fence, and enough so that you can purchase poultry, a cow, if possible, seeds, implements, etc. Count on having some ready cash to tide you over the time while you are building, clearing, planting and growing your first crops. My advice to every one coming to Flor ida to live is to have your farm paid for before you move to it. I realize that this is not necessary under the splendid terms with which you can buy land at BunnellDupont, but it is better to have your land out of debt first. Then you will have that worry off your mind and be able to go to work in earnest. Be sure to get your garden started first, and I am certain that you wives and mothers will take delight in looking after your garden as much as your strength al lows. Beautify your place also, which you can do with but little cost. Set out, as soon as possible, a few pecan trees around your house and cultivate these carefully. Properly nourished they grow rapidly and furnish beautiful shade, and later valu able nuts. Before your trees are large enough to give shade make some rustic arbors and train vines to grow over these. You can soon have a beauty spot out of doors where you may spend many hours during the long summer days. Plant flow ers around your yard and garden and look after these, as well as your vegetables. They may not bring in any income but they will be a joy to the eye and make your work more pleasant. Some day when there is a little spare time, have your husband or son go to the woods and get one or two young water oak trees. Set these out near your well where water can often be poured on the roots. They are magnificent trees and will be al most priceless to you in a few years. Be sure to get some orange and grape fruit trees set out at once — a few at least for home use. Care for these and you will be rewarded within a few years with an abundance of delicious citrus fruit. Your husbands, sons and brothers will be very busy at first getting the land in shape and crops ready for market. You will want to be making money also and you will find poultry very profitable in deed. You can also make money from your garden and I advise every Florida farmer — man or woman—to raise some hogs. They bring high prices here. When first I came to Florida I felt strange and sometimes unhappy, but not for long. The climate is so delightful, the possibilities for success so numerous, and the people so cordial that I would not con sider living elsewhere. Unless you, as a Bunnell colonist, have an abundance of money with which to hire your work done, you will find plenty of hard work to do at first, but it is just the same as it is in the north—when you are working for yourself and for a home of your own, you find work sweet. How ever, it need not be all work here. I as sure you, for the chances for recreation are many. Here one may enjoy a picnic out of doors practically every day of the year. You can get up fishing parties, boating and bathing parties. In season you will find it great sport to roast oysters on the beach. I know that I never found anything more delightful than the moonlight parties I have attended here in Florida. One I want to tell you of briefly. It seems to me that the moon shines differently in Florida than any other place. It has a peculiar radiance and floods the earth with its mellow light. On this particular night the party was given in a grove of giant live oak trees. The nightingales sang in the' nearby trees and the voices of the negroes singing in their quarters down the road made a weird sor^ of music that is unforgetable. I have found that men generally love the country life and they love Florida with its opportunities for making a living in the great out of doors, but women, as a rule, are more prejudiced against the country and less able to see the opportunities here. Bear in mind, however, that if you are depend ing on a salary it will not always last. Men with gray hair and bent shoulders are being crowded out in the competition of city life, and my advice to every man and woman is to get a little home of your own, free of debt, and be independent for the rest of your lives. As has been stated before, if you seek them properly, “health, wealth and happi ness await you in Florida.” NO MORE SUMMER EXCURSIONS FOR THESE MEN. THEY WISH FOR BREEZY FLORIDA. The following letter was written by a Florida man visiting in Illinois, and ap peared in a recent Florida paper. Decatur, Ill., Aug. 16, 1913. I don’t know whether you have ever been here or not but believe me, 1 wish I was back in cool Florida. The first question people ask is: “Ain’t it hot down there?” Only a person who has been in Florida can appreciate the joke after getting into this hot bake oven up here. When I tell my friends of the North that I slept between blankets and a comfort over me while South a few days ago, they express doubts as to the truth. Believe me, I haven’t needed any extras up here in the way of covering. The thermometer hit the hundred mark again today. Not like Florida, cool in the shade with breezes to let you know life’s worth living. Surprisingly great interest is being taken by northern people in Florida. Some say go to Florida in winter to keep warm. I say, as everyone who has been in Florida in the summer says, “go to Florida in the summer to keep cool.” Yours truly, I. S. H. The next is an interview with Dr. S. on his return to Florida recently from Kansas City. Dr. S. was Florida’s delegate to the National Association of Dentists, which met at Kansas City on July 8tli. When asked as to what amount of pleas ure he extracted from his trip, the Dr. liter ally threw up botli hands and said: “None, not even a little piece as big as a Florida kumquat. I don’t mean to inti mate that the people of Kansas City didn’t do everything in their power to make our stay profitable and pleasant, but the heat was so terrific it was impossible to enjoy anything. Hot, why, man, it was 107 in the shade in Kansas City anil 106 at St. Joseph, and one night the ther mometer registered 100 at 12 o’clock in the sleeping car. “No more summer trips for me. Florida is the coolest place I know of, and jiere I am going to stay.” “ Farming is mankind's greatest industry, and the soil is its greatest physical asset.”

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BUNHE,L.IL home builder Hunting and Fishing in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony quite so heavy, but far more beautiful in appearance and extremely game and hard to capture. The law provides that no person shall kill more than two wild turkeys in any one day, nor more than five wild tur keys in any one year. Quail and partridge abound in large numbers. Quail are espe cially numerous throughout this part of Florida. The statutes have it unlawful for one person to kill more than twenty quail in any one day, or for a party of two or more persons to kill more than forty quail in any one day. Wild ducks are thick at certain seasons of the year around Gore Lake and near Ocean City. The law protects ducks within a mile of certain cities along the coasts of Florida, and where thus protected the wild ducks become quite tame and swim about in the harbors like domesticated birdsOther game birds in Florida are wild geese, swans and brant, rails, coots, mudhens and gallinules, shore birds, plovers, surf birds, snipe, woodcock, sand pipers, tattlers and curlews, grouse, prairie chickens, par tridges, turtle doves and pigeons. Fresh water fish that can be found in lakes and creeks around Bunnell and Dupont are black bass, bream, pickerel, trout, perch and cat. Salt water fish in the canal and ocean are red snappers, flounders, slieepsliead, pompano, Spanish mackerel, blue fish, shad, mullet, kingfish, barracuda, whiting, channel bass, croakers, drum and blackfish. The size of the fish caught in fresh waters varies from ten to fifteen pounds in weight, while those caught in the salt waters are frequently from twenty to fifty pounds in weight. Our Engineer, Mr. Johnson, of Bunnell, caught a sea bass some time ago that weighed almost sixty pounds. If you have a few days to spare, be sure and take your fishing tackle with you when you visit the colony. FEED FOR DUCKS. Fishing it good at Ocean City Ducks raised at Bunnell by Mrs. B. In summer it is not advisable to feed ducks on grain except in limited quantities. If they can get grass they need only one meal a day, composed of cooked turnips or potatoes thickened with bran, and in very warm weather they will thrive on grass Every man with good red blood in his veins, who has bought a farm in the Bunnell-l)upont Colony, is looking forward, I dare say, to enjoying some delightful sport m the form of hunting and fishing. No doubt you have read of the wonderful fish to be found in Florida waters, or you have listened to the thrilling stories told by those who have spent their vacations in fishing and hunting throughout Florida. If this Quail hunting near Bunnell feature of Florida life holds an attraction for you, let me say that you'will not be dis appointed when you go to Bunnell-Dupont. There is perhaps no section of the United States that offers such opportunities to tne true sportsman as Florida, and there is no more favored locality in the State than Bunnell. Those who expect to do some hunting and fishing in the State would do well to read up on the new game laws that have recently gone into effect. The hunting season opens on November 20th, and closes on February 20th. Florida has excellent laws for the protection of its game, and game wardens in each county who see that the laws are not violated. Non-residents are required to purchase a license for hunting, which will cost $10. Deer during the past year was very plentiful around Bunnell, and some of our colonists have told me of having most delightful veni son dinners. Wild turkeys are as plentiful as deer in our locality, and the prize is well worth going after. The bird is as tall as a tame turkey, but more slender and perhaps not alone. Ducks do not like whole grain, but prefer soft food. When winter approaches they may be fed twice a day, at night add ing animal meal or cooked meat, but in sum mer grass is sufficient. Their runs, if they are confined, must be kept clean. If grass is scarce give finely cut clover twice a day in summer, with turnips at night. — National Poultry Magazine. WOULD RATHER BE IN PEN IN FLORIDA Than to Move Away, Says Maine Man Who Has Been in the State. Twenty-nine years ago there came to Florida, from Maine, a man whose physi cian told him he had but a few weeks to live. This gentleman has just returned to Maine for a short visit, the first for nine teen years, and this is what he said before leaving: “If I was forced to decide between going to the penitentiary or being banished from Florida, I would take the penitentiary end of the stick. “Twenty-nine years ago my physician in Maine told me I had but a short time to live, and to at once put my affairs in such shape that my people would have no diffi culty in settling up my estate when ‘it was all over.’ “J have been back to Maine once—nine teen years ago — and I am going back this time just to let the people there see how a man looks after he has been told he was ‘all in, down and out’ twenty-nine years ago. Today I am enjoying the very best of health, as does also my sister, and it is only in the picking and packing season that I employ help to assist in caring for my two orange and grapefruit groves. “This will probably be my last trip back to my old home, for conditions there have changed so that 1 am a stranger, and I in tend to put in the next six weeks telling those Yankees that Florida is the best place on earth for a man to live, it matters not whether he has millions of dollars or only a few dimes, We live here every day in the year, and there is plenty of work for anyone who has energy enough to do it.” IMPORTANT PLEASE READ The Bunnell Development Company at the present time is spending thousands of dol lars on improvements in the colony, such as the building of new roads, improving old ones, building bridges, etc. It is therefore very essen tial that every buyer should do his or her part in the develop ment of the colony, by keeping up the monthly payments as promptly as possible. Most of our buyers are now doing this. To the few who are not, we trust this reminder will be sufficient. If you do not make your payments promptly, you are standing in the way of progress in the colony. BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY “The most unhappy man or woman on earth is the one who rises in the morning with nothing to do and wonders how he will pass off the day .”—-Leslie M. Shaw.

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* BL7HMELIL IOME BUILDER FLORIDA, THE LAND OF PROMISE. Some of the Reasons Why There Is Such a Rush to This State and Why It Will Continue. Florida is the only tropical portion of the L T nited States. It lies almost surrounded by water; it is approached on both sides by tiie gulf stream, which has a tendency to purify the air which filters over and through the lands of Florida, and its ports are open to vessels from all parts of the world, thereby giving it the very best of transportation facilities. It is tapped by the great railroad systems of the continent, which open up to it more than fifty millions of people. And as to climate, Florida has a climate that is unsurpassed, which every man of medical science admits is ideal for almost every form of health building. It has long been the playground of the rich, and within its borders are located the palaces and coun try estates of America’s most wealthy and aristocratic set. Florida positively feeds the North and East during the winter months, and so far as the delicacies consumed in the North and East are concerned, Florida is, because of its geographical location and its nearness to those markets, the only available section of this country for such supply. If one will but take a map of the United States and glance at it, he will be at once convinced of these facts from a geographical viewpoint alone. The great transportation lines of Florida have done much toenhance the value of Florida products, and to furnish swift transportation for such products to the great markets of the country, as well as to see that they are kept in the highest state of perfection during such a journey. The question is frequently asked why Florida products bring a higher price to the producers than other farm products in this country. The answer is simply this: Flor ida products are harvested at a time when the remainder of this country is generally in idleness, and consequently the Florida prod ucts reach the market when there is abso lutely no competition and prices are the very highest. The only competitor of Flor ida, if it may be called such, is California, and that State lies so far away from the Northern and Eastern markets that, with the increased cost of delivering its prod ucts to these markets, it is placed absolutely beyond the limits of competing with Florida. It is also a fact that, as a rule, Florida prod nets mature from thirty to sixty days ear lier than those of California. These are some of the reasons that Flor ida is having such a rush of settlers to her idle lands. So great is the demand for Flor ida lands that some of the great capitalists of the country are purchasing large tracts of land in various parts of the State. They know that the rush to Florida will continue now that it has started so strongly, and that it will be here in Florida like it was in the West, where great fortunes were made by the land grabbers. But at the present time there are thou sands and hundreds of thousands of acres of good land in Florida that can be bought in small tracts. This is certainly the day of opportunity in Florida. The time to buy a farm tract in Florida is now.—Jackson ville Metropolis. Every Bunnell-Dupont Land Owner Should be Our Agent We mean that you should be our agent for your own interests more especially than that you should be a salesman for us WE OFFER 10 PER CENT COMMISSION ON ALL SALES MADE TO NEW BUYERS THROUGH THE EFFORTS OF OUR OLD BUYERS Commission to be credited on your account with us as fast as money is paid in on the land We make this offer because we have only a very limited number of farms left for sale, among which are several caused by lapsed payments on the part of some of our purchasers. We desire to sell every acre of our land this coming winter, so as to enable us to devote our time exclusively to the upbuilding and development of our colony in general. In some instances these available tracts, caused through lapsed accounts, are extremely well located. Every unsold tract is well worth double the price we ask, when you consider the immense amount of develop ment work that has already taken place, and the fact that the BunnellDupont colony is known all over the State as THE MOST SUCCESSFUL AND ATTRACTIVE COLONIZATION PROPOSITION TO BE FOUND ANYWHERE IN AMERICA. We have repeatedly stated in our literature that farms like ours are selling at Hastings, or at Sanford, for from $200.00 to $500.00 an acre, while we sell land, at the present time, for only $35.00 and $40.00 an acre, but expect to raise the price of all our land to $40.00 an acre in the near future. If you will give us the names of any prospective buyers we will mail them our literature, including order blank, etc., or if you will fill out the coupon below and mail to us we will send your friends the Bunnell Home Builder, free of cost, for six months. If you have any friends who are interested in Florida, you will confer a great favor on them and benefit yourself by inducing them to buy in Bunnell-Dupont, and remember, that the sooner our lands are all sold, the quicker we shall be able to devote all our time to the upbuilding of the colony, and the advance in value of the land will increase even more rapidly than it has heretofore. BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. Cut out this Coupon and mail it to our sales office at Chicago. THOS. A. VERDENIUS—BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT CO. 108 South La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. Below are the names and addresses o£ some of my acquaintances who are interested in securing homes for six months. in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Please send them the Bunnell Home B> Name Street and No. City State Name Street and No. State Name Street and No. State Name Street and No. City State Name Street and'No. City State (AVrite your own name here ). < “ Remember—There is but one crop of soil.”