Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
- The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
V1ol. 1 September, 1913 JVo. 10
By and by the conversation turned to FLORIDA FOR That Florida is destined
T] D i A I Florida, and then to our disappointment, we CATTLE to become the greatest
found that our acquaintance from the West cattle raising state east of
0 10 PLA, I \ was not a fair-minded man, but was biased the 'Missisippi is a fact that gains credence
S ,in his opinions. He knew that Florida was by those who have studied conditions, and
P1 not a fit state for a man to live in, that a brief review of a few statistics will show
there was nothing good about it-neither its the growth of the cattle raising industry climate, its soil, its crops or its possibilities, in the last ten years. CANADIAN IMMI- The Canadian immi- He refused to listen to the things we tried Climate, as an asset has never been adeGRATION FIGURES gration figures for to tell him. Then we thought of a plan we quately valued by the livp stock raisers of
SHOW FALLING the first three often use on people who are talking at the United States. Florida posesses unOFF IN NUMBER OF months of the fiscal random, and who know it all. We simply limited possibilities in this line.
-AMERICANS CROSS- y e a r just issued said, 'Were you ever in Florida?' and our Cattle and hogs can be and are being
ING THE LINE showed an increase voluble friend had to admit with reluctance raised in Florida under the most favorable
of British and Euro- that he had never been there, conditions, at the least expense, and closer
pean immigrants over the same period last That settled it. We didn't waste any to remunerative markets than in any other
year, and a heavy decrease in immigration more time trying to tell this narrow-minded part of the North American continent. from the United States. American settlers man anything about Florida. Florida is Florida is essentially a agricultural
entering Canada during the first quarter of better off without him. The only thing to state. Her future depends largely upon the this year numbered 44,99S, as against 53,343 say to such a foolish person is, "Go and intelligent development of her agricultural 3n the same period last year. The Canadian see fo before y ou make a more resources. Her timber. inuck, prairie and
government estimates that the American rahi Itatements" other lands are of great productivity and
-ettlers brought with them in cash and ef- wide adaptability, while her climate is unfects upward of $67.000,000. excelled. Upon her greatz agricultural reThe~~~~~eceld Uponl ofteUntdSttsarrn
The people of the United States are and sources vast herds of cattle, hogs and sheep
aave been in an unsettled frame of mind. may subsist the year round at a small cost.
rhey are seeking to better their condition, fHence Florida is already a great beefand to find a suitable place in which to take i producing state, and the hog industry is
up their permanent abode. For many years steadily developing. At county fairs as
they seemed to believe that the Canadian fine cattle, hogs and sheep are exhibited as
Northwest was the only country opened for j can be raised in any state.
settlement, and they flocked into Canada, .....aking an immense amount of money out SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMEN
f the United States, which was used in the I OF
levelopnient of their Canadian farms.PRZ LETRCN S.
However, for some time the tide of immi- PRIZE LETTER CONTEST.
ration has changed. Men and women of This is the tenth issue of the BUNthe United States are finding their desires NELL HOME BUILDER. Only two
more fully realized in the Sunny South than more numbers and our magazine is
in the cold Northwest, and Florida has be- one year old. We a ge planning to
.omc the Mecca of these thousands of home-, make our December issue especially
seekers. attractive. It will be our Anniversary
Al that Florida needs is more capital and Number, and will be larger in size,
more people to cultivate her land, and these 7 and full of good things to read.
two requisites are being rapidly supplied. The Editor will give three prizes
Just give our glorious State a little more --0. for the three best letters on the Buntime, and you will see her many resources pnell-Dupont Colony. This contest is
developed and the entire State blossoming open to all. Write the letters in your
as the rose. own way, and if you have already
written a letter for the Home Builder,
BE FAIR IN YOUR The Editor happened j that will not make any difference.
JUDGMENT to meet a man the Write another for the contest.
other day from one of All letters for the contest must be
the western states. It is a state we have _7 in the hands of the Editor not later
frequently visited, and so made some in- than November 10, 1913, and he requiries about its progress, its development, Little Miss Kruger, formerly of Alberta, Canada, serves the privilege of publishing any etc. Mr. Westerner immediately waxed en- in herflower garden at Bunnell or all of them in the Anniversary
thusiastic, which was perfectly right. He Number.
talked long and fluently about the great- T The following prizes will be given:
Kess of his state, and its superiority over "The season's beat record in Hansas FIRST PRIZE ............... $3.00
cvery other section of the Union. was broken yesterday, when a tempera- SECOND PRIZE .............. 2.00
We congratulated the Westerner on being ture of 114 degrees was registered at THIRD PRIZE ................ 1.00
4o happily situated; we agreed with him Clay Center. At Topeka 105 was the Address all communications to
in many respects, but having spent a num- maximumn."-From Chicago Daily News, S. HOWARD, Editor BUNNELL HOME
ber of months in his native state, we had to August 6, 1913. BUILDER, i '03 Woman's Temple
-dmit that it had a number of disadvantages The same day the highest tempera- Chicago, Ill.
and drawbacks as well as advantages. ture in Bunnell was 88 degrees.
"Oranies grow, they don't drop in your lap. So come serious, not visionary"




. e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Layout for a Typical Twenty Acre Farm at Bunnell
HELPFUL SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE COLONISTs N O Ti
Since having decided to make my future
home in Bunnell, and being without practical 6 o-o GA
farm experience, my spare moments have
been devoted to reading up on farm matters, correspondence and consultation with ex- I
perts and all other means by which I could LAY-OUT TOR TYPI CAL 20ACRE FARM 0 0
ascertain the desired facts.
Being a bit iconoclastic: and wanting to UPN IfLL DUpONT
be shown. I did not believe the prevailing )
system of using chemical fertilizer for each A
crop 'as goo ord n o eIen go om IRST L D TO e ED
mon sense, and I looked for something bet- fD
ter, that would not leave the land poorer a "AU D YsRo1t ATTLf. h r
after cropping than before. Fertilizers may increase the crop, but the soil very little.
This was evidenced to me by the fact that
the best model farms in different sections
of the country, where two lades and more 1 I
had been made to grow where but one grew 0
before, the results were produced without the use of chemical fertilizers at all. More- 0 ; I
over, the soil upon these farms was grow- -- -fuor/Vwome.rie tr
ing stronger and more fertile after each --. .L
crop had been taken off. All this was ac- [
complished by using plenty of humus plowed nuH on YAT 0
under, and where obtainable, by cattle D
manure.
Having given Mr. Verdenius from time to t--- -_ s
time a few samples of what I did or did not o ,w ISOknow about farming, he has urged me to o
overcome my natural timidity and put them 0 w
in a concrete form for the readers of the 0 w
Home Builder--our future settlers.
We will assume the typical farm fronts on i
one road and slopes gently south. After )
fencing and properly ditching, to carry off CArLE P osl4po
the heavy rain fall, we will start in to cultivate the cleared land shown-by straight J. Futww .o"- r
farming, leaving fancy crops and trucking until we and our land are competent to do tw
them justice.
All crops planted will have soiling crops
run in between the rows, at the proper time, V L-ET 5 --YE-OT 0 .Et E pi .
to be harvested in part, but mainly plowed I
under, followed by ground phosphate rock n o.
sown broadcast liberally. Humus is what 0 ,
our land wants, therefore we will burn no '
vegetable fibre, but turn it under and treat ( E Tom oqqa O
as above. Rock phosphate will act chem- l esZV tL._ e
ically on the humus and land, and not being i ,
very soluble, it will not leak away, but stay put.
Sun and air are important factors in soil building. We will plow deep, turn our soil over frequently, mixing the top and lower layers (which also contain plant food more or less dormant) together, aerating it, making it friable and open, and absorbent of the rainfall.
Keel) snmthing growing all the time when
practicable, carrying nitrogen down and bringing up from below all the varied soil elements.
Land needs intelligent and steady cultivation rather than rest. Nature acts in accordance with immutable laws, without reason. It cannot do otherwise.
The cattle pen (which would be better, perhaps, entirely roofed) will have open sides in part, with wide, overhanging eaves. There will be a loft above, with outside hay able portion, too often lost. This will be pen so arranged that by means of the rundoor, chutes down which to pitch forage our manure factory; the cattle to be driven way, cattle may have access to it and runto racks below, storage of bedding, etc. up at night and during bad weather, and ning water at all times, no matter which
The ground should be thickly covered with sometimes fed there, when not "hogging off" field they may be feeding in.
bedding, such as corn stalks and the like, to in the fields. The manure will be trodden down, and we
absorb the liquid manure-the most valu- Reference to the drawing will show the will have to remove it with a pick. It will
"Grasp Your Opportunities Now and Prevent Poverty in Old Ade"




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
By Geo. R. Tollman, Architect, Washington, D. C.
he freely sprinkled with rock phosphate be an assurance for the future, as with lit- VELVET BEAN A VALUABLE CROP.
from time to time, and removed as soon as tle care they are hardy trees and do exceed- Enriches the Land, Produces Well and practicable, being spread upon one selected ingly well in Florida, and make wonderful Brings Good Prices.
Atrip of land at a timue, and not scattered returns, increasing yearly. Our heirs will thinly all over the cleared land. This way be rich by them alone. I ____-__we will eventually bring all our cultivated The house we will build to meet our land up to an even richness-meantime needs, finish of walls and ceiling to be of I
making up for the scarcity of manure by compo board.
turning under and extra cultivation. There will be a complete bathroom. with
One should always bear in mind that one hot and cold water under pressure. The acre of our land, worked for all it will pro- Chico wter nd pany Ti e ur
duce, will give one active man all he wants Zi use c eki Chompanyfill fr-t
to do. Therefore the amount of available i
class, atprcwhcprbbynFlid
labor will determine the amount of land we ph price which probably no Florida
will need as a sta-ter, for cultivating pmber can compete with.
straight farm crops. The remainder of the We can put up the house for shelter and I
land we can clear from time to time and use, leaving the compo board to be put on
turn it into forage crops to be "hogged off" later, which can be done by any one handy by om- cattle and hogs. with tools women do it successfully after
Divded into small fields by movable y have learned to hit the nail and not
fences, we can move them about from field their fingers.
to field, keeping production ahead of con- Hog houses to be floored, and they and sumption. They, by so doing, will not only hen houses and runs moved to new ground Field of Cow Peas on Mr. Tolman's Farm
save much money that could be spent in yearly. Hens located in the orchard will While Florida produced more than threelabor for harvesting, but will enrich the have shade. and their manure is fine for fourths of the phosphate rock mined in the land by their drippings, the trees. Wh iile not shown upon the draw- United States in 1909, and about threeWe will get good beef cattle. say three- ings. we will have plenty of small fruit and eighths of that mined in the world. increasyear-olds, to fatten for the market-all of flowers about the house, arranged not only ing its output materially last year, it has good grade, not scrubs. We will have at for use. but for beauty as well. another money maker in the fertilizer way,
least one Jersey cow, a few hens atd Indian We will remove all pine and resinous the value of which has only recently become
Runner ducks. We will go light on hens at trees. thoroughly burning out the roots. We apparent to the South, which has chiefly first, only for home use. will plant quick growing shade trees where profited b- it. The velvet bean is a legume
The windmill will pump water from well needed. Hogs and cattle must have plenty which promises to be the most valuable field into a high tank. to be distributed by grav- of it. crop the farmer can raise,. inasmuch as it is
ity, Via iron pipe under ound, to all de- Garden on the cultivated strip, of a s one of the seeds of which can be perfected sired parts of the farm as shown. By lear- to suit the family. Under the orchard trees no further north than 200 miles from the lng the cocks part turned, we can have run- will make a good garden spot. Soon all our .ulf according to John M. Scott, animal inning water in all the water troughs. With- land will be garden, so we need not worry dustrialist of the Florida agricultural exout level land, or nearly so, and 30 feet of about periment station. It is a plant which adds
head, we can carn water in any direction. ab on h ich seril plan d o e reWhen we get ready we can use it for irriga- served on which we will plant seed from value to the dry and high lands of Florida, tion, by having a head distributing ditch on our most vigorous plants. We will com- on which alone it grows to perfection.
mer The plant will grow in the cotton belt
the north fence line, with offset ditches run- bu. north of Florida and enrich the soil with
ning south through the cultivated north that expensive plant food, nitrogen, for the
strip. I would strongly advise that all settlers benefit of subsequent crops of cotton, but
The barn is to be of such size as we find pay in full for their land and get a deed the season is too short to mature the seed, needed later. We can use the cattle pen at before settling on it. MNonthly installments as it is a plant of tropical origin. Since first for shelter. There will be a lean-to on coming due at inopportune times are a the great value of the velvet bean for this each side of the barn in which we can store nuisance. There are also accidents and sick- purpose. as well as for fattening cattle and our implements and many other things to be ness to be considered, and the feeling that producing a more abundant flow of milk in quickly available-yet sheltered from sun Ione owns his land is half the battle in de- cows, has been more generally recognized, and rain. We will not leave farm tools out veloping it. the demand in Florida for seed has become
in the fields to rot and rust. but will keep The scheme here outlined will take some so heavy that it is now quoted at $2.50 a them painted, oiled and in order. ready cash to carry out, no matter how bushel, with the prospect of the price rising
The power house to adjoin the barn to carefully we figure it. However, it need not to $3 a bushel. Requiring no fertilizing,
have a 5 H. P. engine, with a line of labor- be done all at once; better go slowly as vet a crop of twenty to thirty bushels to saving farm devices from a grindstone to an means and experience will admit of, keeping the acre can be produced and the soil be left ice cream freezer. It will pay for itself in a out of debt, with a balance in the bank in better condition than before the seed short time. ready for the unforeseen. was planted.
We will plant a good variety of fruit, We have gTeenhouse land, a climate un- Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
large and small, more than enough for home equaled for growing plants; we can afford to Bulletins No. 102 and No. 6, both relating use. We can ship some in combination with experiment and learn the game. Any small to this point. may be had free for the askour neighbors to get the advantage of car failures ought to be an incentive to better ing--Tihes-Uniol. load lots. All will be of best Southern stock effort next time. Luck is work; miracles a SGETO TO U
from best nursery. Variety and quality, not delusion of ignorant and cowardly minds. SUGGESTION TO OUR
quantity, will be our motto on fruit. We One who studies into the reason or the cause SETTLERS.
can well experiment with the choice fruit and effect of things is certain to make good. We would advise each one of
that has been introduced to this country Will we make mistakes? Plenty of them. our land owners to send 5 cents
by the government, and is available for the Oe who does not does lttl bt e to the Superintendent of Public
asking not repeat this mistake in e u we wi Documents, U. S. Printing Office,
We will plant citrus fruit so as to have place. We will overcome most obstacles Washington, D. C., and get Farman all year supply for home use at least, as we meet them, and what we can't, we ers' Bulletin No. 519, which is
but we are not orchard men-straight farm- will go around. As farmers we are pro- the story of Sam McCall's success
ing having our first attention. ducers and not parasites on the body politic. in making his worn-out land proSoft shell pecans take a long time to ma- Aware of our own ignorance, we will gladly duce fifteen- and sixteen-fold, ture, but they are so valuable we must have listen to the advice of experts. and proceed without using a pound of commnera line along, say, the north fence-planted to carry it out. guided by study, observa- cial fertilizer. McCall is an itnot less than 50 feet on centers. These will tion and experience. erate negro, 75 years of age.
"A few Years of Earnest Labor will Bring a Real Age of Ease"




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
Mrs. M. W. Hopkins, of Lawrence, Kansas, was here the first of the week inspecting her property here.
Mr. Bernard Tebbe and family, of Phil]* delphia, have come to Bunnell to reside. At present they are occupying the residence next to Mr. A. Miller's.
Mr. L. A. Errikkila, of Port Arthur, Can-77 ada, left for his home Sunday, after spendA ing several days in Bunnell. He purchased
some land from the Bunnell Development J Company on a former visit to Florida, and
is well pleased with his land and the count try in general.
..Messrs. L. R. Scott and T. W. Beal, of Illinois. were here several days recently k .J.nou ov-er the land they purchased here some time ago.
Mr. Robert White, who lives on Church street, cut a watermelon Sunday afternoon A t..that he raised in his garden. After giving
N" fifteen of his neighbors all they could eat
he had to throw the balance to his hog. When it comes to raising watermelons Mr. .... White is in a class to himself.
Sunday school class of bright faced boys and girls at Bunnell Rev. Arthur S. Pain, of Jamco, Cuba, was
AMONG OUR FARMERS. Mr F. Vincent, sales manager of the Bun- registered at Hotel Bunnell Friday. He is
the owner 'of a tract of land here and came Mr. Mosby is busy digging his crop of nell Potato Company., has taken orders and to inspect it.
sweet potatoes, and is distributing same to is now filling same to the extent of about Mr. W. F. Wagoner, of Illinois, returned the local trade through the Society of 4,000 bushels of sweet potatoes. to his home Tuesday after a pleasant stay
Equity. -of several days in BunnelL Mr. Wagoner
Mr. Koch i. very busy on his farm, and I Mr. A. J. Smithers is harvesting his I reports everything as good as could be ex- sweet potato crop this week. Mr. Smithers owns land here and is well pleased with it. pected. is "there with the goods" when it comes to Ir. James A. Robinson, of Port Arthur
Mr. Cookman of Ocean City is clearing I growing the sweets. Ontario, Canada, arrived last week and
m Ontario, Canada, arrived last week and
some more land and will have a larger gar- spent a few days in Bunnell. He expects
den soon. His orange trees are looking fine. of Mr. C. D. Hagadorn who lives just south to move his family to this place in the
______ ~of Bunnell, has a field of pearl millet -which na uue
near futureRoad building is being continued through- is a beauty, it measuring from ten and one- Mr. Albert Manthea, of Pennsylvania, arouit the community. The Dupont-Kings road half to twelve feet in height. rived Friday and has taken up his resiC' rived Friday and has taken up his resiconnection is almost completed. The Moody dence on the Moody road near the Durrance
road south will be extended one mile in the Mrs. W. L. Rogers of Canada arrived Sun- place. near future. The contract has been awarded day to spen'i some time with Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Millikan, of Chicago,.spent Mr. Cochran of Bunnell to spread about 400 Herman Kruger. several days in Bunnell recently. While
cars of shell on the Espanola road, starting Corn has made a very rapid growth since here they visited Mr. and Mrs. Gray, who at Bnnell; also road to Ocean City and the showers came. and the nimany fields are live near Gore Lake. Mir. Millikan owns
west to J. B. Johnston's on the Deen road, the best grown in the country. a pretty tract of land adjoining Mr. Gray's.
There is a movement on foot to extend the county road south of Bunnell, as far as Dupont along the railroad.
Mr. Allen is getting his land in shape for his fall crop.
The Farmers' Society of Equity held a .
meeting today. They have twenty-three members, with new ones joining at every meeting. They are now ordering seed. lime, fertilizer, etc.. for the members who will, co-operate in the raising of their crops, as well as the selling end.
Mr. Mlack is breaking ground in which he will plant ten acres of Irish potatoes. Mr. C. F. Turner has also planted Irish potatoes.
Mr. Gray reports that hlie has a 450-pound hog, which is a fine demonstration that Iblooded hogs are a success in Florida.
Mr. L. F. tHubbard has the distinction of
r:iising the largest load of wvatermnielons in the colony. He arrived in town this morn- ,
ing with a wagon load of melons, every one of which weighed over 40 pounds, while one beauty tipped the scales at 46 pounds. Bunnell and Espanola baseball teams taken at Bunnell
"Rich men spend thousands for Florida climate. 'Tis yours for laughter, love andilife"




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
LARGE REPAIR SHOP TO OPEN IN EVOLUTION OF A BUNNELL FARM.
BUNNELL.
L. A. Szabelski Will Open Shop as Soon as Building is Completed.
M r. L. A. Szabelski has purchased two ,lots just south of the Tribune building on Moody boulevard and will begin the construetion of a building which will be one hundred foot square, just as soon as he can get the lumber cut. In this building 'Mr. Szabelski will open an up-to-date repair shop, doing all kinds of repair work on
-- automobiles, buggies, wagons, farming im. plemients, gasoline engines, all kinds of
electrical repairs, horse shoeing, wood work of all kinds. in fact he will be prepared to do any kind of repairing.
M Mr. Szabelski has recently moved here from Chicago, having driven through in an auto truck, which he built himself. it taking Th above picture was taken on Mr. Barthim eleven days to make the trip. He has lett's arrival at Bunnell, and appeared in bought very extensively of Bunnell land in -te March Home Builder. The second picsection 32, where he has begun the erection ture gives us a glimpse of his attractive log of his home and outhouses, which consists cabin, while the third shows a portion of of a nice ten room dwelling, garage, stable, t hle t cle red land. Thus we can
A new residence at Bunnell chicken house and tool house. Mr. Bartlett's cleared land. Thus we can
see the evolution of a farm.
BUNNELL BAND IS BEING ORGANIZED He is well satisfied with the country
Under Leadership of C. E. Cisco. and says that a man* can easily make a
Several of the musical talent of Bunnell success here if he has some money to start met Tuesday evening at the home of 'Ir. with and will try. He says that on account
B. Tibee and organized a Bunnell Brass of the nights being so cool and pleasant
Band with a membership of nine as follows: here that he has had better sleep here than C. E. Cisco. H. Kruger, F. A. Rich, J. H. he has had for the past twenty years. McKnight, E. Charles, Chester Rich, B. Tibee and two sons. Mr. J. C. Pinson and family, accompanied
Anyone desiring to join the band or assist by Jno. Oroz, were over to the beach fishin any way will please call on C. E. Cisco. ing Friday and Saturday. They report a fiue eatch and a nice time. .
The Bunnell Meat and Ice Co. has moved fine catch and a nice time.
into its new quarters in the Tribune build- The hens in this section are working ing. overtime. Almost every farmer who comes
Walter Shultz is contemplating opening to town brings a large basket of eggs with a bakery in Bunnell soon. him, which he trades for groceries, thereby
Messrs. Ignacy Tarala and Stanislans saving his cash.
Cycher, of Chicago, are in Bunnell and have N a es
purchased sixty acres of Bunnell land .Mr. Nick Lasch, one of our progressive
rB farmers in the Black Point section, has a
Mr. Gillis Romesyre is bringing in some field of fine broom corn. Mr. Lasch has fine watermelons which he grew on his farm ordered a machine for making brooms and, just south of Bunnell on the Moody road. no doubt. will furnish us with brooms this He is receiving good prices for them. winter.
Mr. John Kampfer, of LaPlata, New t i
Mexico, arrived in Bunnell Saturday. He Reglar terms of the mayor's court will
comes to make this place his home. be held on Monday and Friday afternoons
of each week, beginning August 4th at 4 p. ni. in, the council chamber, Tribune building. Call sessions may be held as necessity Within a few months we can add a picWihi a l~ few months we can add a picdemands. ture of his growing crop, and a few weeks
later another of his crop being shipped. The dance given by the young people of The camera tells the story of progress
Bunnell last Thursday evening was well better than the pen.
attended and all present reported- having a good time.
Shaw's orchestra, consisting of Misses Norma and Esther Shaw and their father, Mr. Shaw. from Palatka arrived on train No. 85 at four o'clock and promptly at eight the dance was on and continued until after midnight.
All who attended spoke highly of the excellent music furnished by the orchestra and the good behavior of the crowd. The Earnest Workers. who served ice cream and cake in the adjoining room, re- .
port a fine evening's business, having sold all their cream and cake, thereby making a nice little amount to apply to the payment .:7:: : .=- ."
Home of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison near Bunnell. nice little amount to apply to the payment
Recent arrivals from British Columbra. of the piano.
"Own your own farm. No strikes, panics or fires can take it from you"




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
What Some of Your Future Neighbors Think of Bunnell
EXTRACT FROM A RECENT LETTER the second crop of corn this year. I brought FOUND BUNNELL'S SUMMER CLIMATE
FROM A BUNNELL HUSTLER several fine ears home with me, and when I DELIGHTFUL.
Who Asks that His Name Be Omitted. left the colonists were cutting their corn DELiu.
and putting it away, getting ready to plant Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius. I like Florida fine. Couldn't run me out their third crop. Dear Sir and Friend: I write to let yoruwith a company of soldiers. I have met I also saw wonderful sweet potatoes in know that I paid a visit to Bunnell to look
many reverses and obstacles since coming the colony, fine peanuts, and had the pleas-i at the ten acres of land I bought of your here, but met them like a man. Things ure of helping eat the finest watermelon I company, and I must say that I am well
sometimes looked mighty "blue," but I had ever tasted in my life, just picked from pleased w ith it, for it looks good to me. I conception enough to see the possibilities the vine. could not have picked a better tract myself.
and great opportunities in front of the man It would be imposible for me to describe \While there I met Mr. 3oody and Mr. that could "stick,' and I am surely going in this letter the many aavantages to be Heath, also Mr. Turner, who took me ove: to try my best to stick. had in the Bunnell-Dupont colony and the Lhe Bunnell-Dapont Colony and showed me
I have traveled over a little more than splendid crops that are being raised there. all the places of interest around there.
half of this great Union of ours, and I I only wish that the people of the North Bunnell-Dupont is certainly a fine place.
must say that Florida presents the best who are unable to go to Florida themselves and the soil is very good. I was at Bunview to me for an ideal place for a man would believe what the rest of us say who nell the first week in July, leaving here to build a nice, comfortable home, make a have been there. y ldacarcel t
handsome living, and enjoy his life to the We took a trip to the Atlantic beach in it i Kentuck and when I arrived at Bunfullest that I have seen yet. the company's automobile which was indeed -nell. I w s surprised to find it cool anI have cow peas and sweet potatoes grow- delightful. The field manager took us comfortable, whi h was a s eeat relief to me. ing on my place now and will put out a through several orange groves which were cMy friends here tried to tell me before
little garden and some five hundred straw- very beautiful. I saw for the first time left that I would sure burn up in Florida berry plants later on. Will also put an dates and figs growing. at that time of the year, but such was no:
acre and one-half to peppers and egg plants, We found the people in that community the ease. On the contrary, it was quit, if my seeds come well, which are already in very friendly, and they had a way of mak- cool there, and I found their second cropz bed. Mly neighbor and I will also set about ing one feel perfectly at home. looking fine.
three acres on a place nearby to peppers Ithinktreisabightfutueinstor and egg plants if we can get enough plants. I 1 think there is a bright future in store
We have enough seeds sown for some six for Bunnell and the far-ners in general iL
acres if they would all come. Of course we 1 that part of Florida, as everything was
will have to be governed largely by the booming when I was there.
weather. I will also perhaps plant a half Please keep on sending the Home Builder
or three-quarters of an acre to beans this I-I think it is fine.
fall. 'Yours truly,
'Tis true enough that it takes brains as
well as brawn nowadays to succeed on the 2 WILLIAM11 BIRCH (Kentucky).
farm, but any man with good sound judg-
ment, not afraid of work and no "Get-rich-. I
quick" idea in his head should get along
here all right. DRIVEWAY TO BEACH TO BE OPENED
SOON.
ONLY SORRY THEY DID NOT KNOW OF Will Install Ferry Boat at Ocean City Until
BUNNELL TEN YEARS AGO. a Bridge is Built.
Dear -Mr. Verdenius: Mrs. Stiles and Daughter Messrs. L I. MHoody, C. F. Turner, E. W.
I will try and write you about my trip Johnson, representing the Blunnell Developto Florida and of my impressions of Bun- ment Company; George Moody, representing
nell, Dupont, and the surrounding country. The enclosed is a picture of myself and the Ocean City Company, and Ed Johnson.
To begin, I left Indianapolis on July 22nd, little daughter taken by the side of the representing the Johnson Lumber & Supply over the Big 4 railroad to Cincinnati, and company automobile. Mv little girl did Co., drove over to Ocean City Friday for from there over the Queen & Crescent road not want to come home; she begged to stay the purpose of examining the ground beto Jacksonville, which was a delightful trip. at Bunnell. and I do not think it will be tween the East Coast canal and the beach From Jacksonville I traveled over the long until we are there to stay. Ir. Stiles to see if it would be possible to build a Florida East Coast railroad to Bunnell, ar- is going down about the first of the year. driveway from the mainland to the ocean. riving there at 12:45 on the 23rd, so you see I went. at this time because I wanted to Upon tetraang to Bunnell they reported it does not take long to make the trip, and iow what the summer weather is like in retunng o Bn ne t rere
I enjoyed every moment of it. Florida, but to my surprise I found it cooler eth ing forr t
I was much pleased when I arrived at and more pleasant at Bunnell than here in
Bunnell. I found it to be everything that Indiana, and the change of water did not It is the intention of the parties interhas been said of it in the Home Builder. hurt. myself or little girl in the least. There ested to build a driveway from Ocean City This fine little town has city water, electric is always a cool breeze there. I stayed along the west side of the canal to a point lights, bank, postoffice, several stores, about ten days and only regret that I six hundred feet south, where they will inschool house, church and many other build- could not have remained longer, stall a ferry boat, which will be used for
ings. I had the pleasure of attending one I am so thankful that we have a farm in the present until a draw bridge can be built.
of the parties given in Bunnell and found the Bunnell-Dupont colony. My husband Then commencing on the east side of the
the people very friendly, full of life and says he only wishes that he had secured it canal they will throw up a hard surface activity, ten years ago, and others in the colony road to the ridge, which is about threemade similar remarks to me while I -as fourths of a mile. By doing this the public
The Florida East Coast Railroad passes there. Yours ver can then drive to the water's edge.
through Bunnell and on through Dupont, y truly,
and there arc real nice depots at each place, MRS. ROSA STILES (Indiana). _As soon as this is completed these parties
so everything is 0. K. in that respect. will build cottages on the beach which wiU
In my opinion Bunnell-Dupont is the California does hate to see things be rented to those desiring to spend their
ideal spot for a country home. It is the coming Florida's way. We landed A- vacaion on the beach.
only place I would ever think of. choosing fred Burbank, nearly as famous as his We predict a great future for Ocean City
for my future home, for it is summer all brother Luther, here, and immediately Beach for it will be unexcelled for both a
the time there. I saw corn growing in the there is a howl front, California. But summer and winter resort just as soon as
colony ,the stalks, I dare say, were five to we got him anyhow. And he selected the developments are made.-St. Joins
six feet in height, and I was told that was good old St. Johns County. Tribune.
"Your hands, money and desire with Florida's climate and soil can make all worry weary"




Me BUNNELL HOME ]BUILDER
Why Every Colonist Should Raise Pecans
Here Are Some Facts and Figures Showing Money to be Made Out of This Nut
The owner of one of our colony farms who has sev- We recommend that the trees be planted in the neigh,_-ral acres in pecaws has a protection for life. Pecans borhood of fifty feet apart, which will net about sevenii-re the easiest crop to grow, cultivate and to harvest, teen trees to the acre. The paper shell pecan must Unlike grain, vegetables, small fruits, oranges and have plenty of room for its branches, and that is the
grapefruits, replanting is not necessary. Once a pecan reason for planting so small a number as seventeen to tree is planted it grows for hundreds of years. the acre. Planting more trees to the acre would of
A pecan orchard is an investment and not a specula- course appear as though you should get more nuts, but, tion. Some pecan trees, even in a wild state, yield as as a matter of fact, your crop w-ill be actually smaller high as 700 pounds of perfect nuts each year, and there and ultimately you will of necessity have to destroy are pecan trees in the United States that are 300 years some trees. old. The pecan belongs to the hickory family, and, like The harvesting of pecan nuts is a very simple process. the hickory tree, is hardy and extremely long lived. All that you have to do is to place a canvas covering
It is a native only of a small part of the world and is beneath the trees and the nuts are knocked off. especially well adapted in the latitude and longitude Paper shell pecan nuts sell anywhere from 50 cents
of the Bunnell-Dulfont 'Colony. to one dollar per pound. Here is a table showing the
The small pecan which we generally find in our actual income and profit on five acres of paper shell
markets is a wild nut that grows without cultivation, pecan trees at the minimum possible price of 25 cents I per pound:
Table Showing Estimate Yield, Income and Profits on Five Acres of Paper Shell Pecan Trees at
Twenty-five Cents Per Pound.
Yield per
Average Yield per 5 acres Income 85
Years Age of Tree 85 trees trees at 25c
I Trees Pounds Pounds a pound
1 6
2 7
S 8 1 85 21.25
_i 95 425 106.25
5 10 10 850 212.50
S.8 13 30 2550 637.50
10 15 50 4250 1,062.50
15 20 100 8500 2,125.00
4 20 25 150 12750 3,187.50
As a matter of faet, no one need worry about the overproduction of pecan nuts. Last year nearly $10,000,000 worth of nuts were imported into the United '.-States, and this country only exported one-half a million dollars' worth of nuts. The pecan will replace this foreign trade in nuts, as it is the king of all nuts. The pecan is a native only of this country and Mexico, so that we need fear no overproduction of nuts in the future. If we were able to supply the world with pecans we would have a ready market in every nation under the sun.
Two- Year Old Pecan Tree in Dr. St. Peter's Orchard East of Bunnell When you think of your farm in Bunnell, make up your mind to grow pecans. They will in no way interThe strong and hardy seed (nut) is planted in the fere with the use of your land between the trees, and
nursery. When the sprout is one year old its top is within five or six years you will have a steady income
entirely removed and a twig or branch from some old' every year, and at the expiration of ten or twelve
healthy bearing tree is grafted upon the young root. years, as can be seen by the table above, you will have
The second year the growth is again cut off, and this an absolute income for life, for your pecan trees will process is repeated for four years. In the fifth year, a live hundreds of years after you have passed away. large and extensive root system having developed, the If you are not in position to move to Bunnell within
tree is permitted to grow, and the result is that it puts the next few years, arrange with the Bunnell Developout a very extensive amount of stems and leaves. 3any ment Company to have five acres of your land cleared, of these trees have a few nuts the next year, but it is fenced, and set out to pecan trees. more conservative to estimate the yield from the third Mr. Verdenius has made a careful study of pecan
year after transplanting, when the trees are actually culture in Florida, and if you care to write to him he Pight years of age. will be glad to give you complete information regardA fine order of pecans can be grown at the sixth ing variety of trees, time of planting, etc., thus while
year, but those who want to go in for the largest re- you are in the North your pecan trees can be working turns, will do well to follow the course above described, for you in Florida.
"Florida is a Summer as well as a Winter resort. Each night you sleep, each day you smile"




6he BUNNELL HOMEIBUILDR
Something About Transportation (Possibly there is not a state in the Union
that has been so misrepresented as Florida.
The following letter by Mr. Henry tells of
Almost every one who is figuring on a This rate from Washington to Florida is a some of the erroneous impressions people
trip to Florida is interested in the question low one, and people in Pennsylvania, Mary- have of Florida.) of railroad fare. Naturally each person land, New Jersey and Delaware can save wishes to obtain a low rate, and the ques- considerable money by buying a local ticket -Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, tion of rates and fares is a very important to Washington and a homeseekers' ticket Chicago, I.
one with all land companies. from that point. Dear Sir: I bought ten acres of land from
After a great deal of urging and due con- There is no better place to obtain infor- you in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony and have sideration, the various railroad companies mation about special rates than in the never seen it. I hear some very queer stories
operating between the Mississippi Valley office of your local ticket agent. If he is regarding that country. I was talking to a States and Florida granted a homeseekers' not in possession of the necessary tariffs man the other day who said he was at Hastrate. This rate applies from Ohio, Michi- describing the special rates, he can easily ings, Fla., for four months several years gan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minne- ascertain the information by writing to his ago, about eight years ago, I believe he said, sota, Iowa and Missouri. The people living general passenger office. If you are -con- and he says when they would go hunting or in tiiese States can obtain a special home- sidering a trip to Florida, go to your agent fishing they would always say, "Put on seekers' rate which is a little more than a a week or two before you plan to leave and your a raincoat and look out for rattleone-way fare. It is effective on the first tell him that you want to know about the snakes." and third Tuesday of each mouth and the cheapest rates to Florida. If he tells you Another tells me they have to put bee
time limit is twenty-five days. Any person that none are in effect, instruct him to nets over their heads while working in the wishing to visit Florida and inspect land write his general passenger agent, and it is gardens, in order to keep the big, black flies which he has purchased or with the inten- only a matter of two or three days before and mosquitoes' off. Another man says, tion of purchasing land has twenty-five he can have a reply, and by seeing him a ayou "can pour water on that land for a
days in which to make the trip and return week or ten days before you leave he will week and in one day you would not know to his home. have ample time. it ever had any water on it at alL" And,
But how about the people who live in Some day the railroads will begin to rec- another gentleman who visits Florida very
the Western States, and in western Can- ognize that anything which helps one see- frequently says there is not an acre of land
ada? How are they to obtain special rates? tion of the country will help the other part. in the whole state of Florida that a man Unfortunately they are discriminated At the present time the railroads are not can make a living on, and that all the good against. The railroad companies operating far sighted enough to see the point. The land has been bought up years ago. But, in the West are engaged in the building up western railroads do not care to see the here comes the "humdinger" of them all. of that part of the country. They want to inhabitants of their districts leave and go "Why," said the man from Florida who encourage people to come west and accord- to the South. They seem to feel that every was regaling his listeners with tales of the ingly grant homeseekers' rates from the family that moves from the West means a wonders of his native state, "Just to show
eastern points to all the Western States. loss in dollars and cents to the particular you how everything grows down there, one They do not want to see the settlers al- railroad entering the locality from which day a hair fell from the tail of a horse down ready on the ground depart for Florida; the family moves. They do not care to see there and fell into a stream of water. This
therefore, they have not seen fit to grant Florida or any other Southern State profit was in the early summer. It grew into a any special rates from such States as North even though the settler himself can benefit snake and then into a larger snake and kept Dakota, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana, his circumstances by making. a change- on growing until one day in August it swalWashington, Oregon, California, and west- This is a "dog in the manger" attitude of lowed the horse that originally had shed it." er Canada. the transportation lines, but some day it Now, I do not believe all these stories.
It is unfortunate that the railroads take will be overcome. That is why I am paying for ten acres of
this attitude. A great deal of pressure has land down there. There are a great many
been brought to change this attitude, but
thusfartherairoas 0 avenotsee ii topeople down in Florida and we do not hear thus far the railroads have not seen fit to of any starving and being eaten up with
grant any reduced rates from the far west-FUTURE. flies, mosquitoes or alligators. They are
ern points. OIIA UUI.
However, to people who live in the Da- Ten years from today there will building towns down there and they don't
kotas, or Nebraska, or Kansas, or Okla- be little difference between the build towns where it is impossible for peohoma, it is possible to save some money price of land in Florida and in pie to stay and make a living. And where
by buying a local ticket to the nearest Iowa. In twenty years if there is there are towns there must be some living
homeseekers' point and there obtain the any difference it will be because human beings and some of the best and
homeseekers' rate. People who live in the Florida land brings the higher most prosperous people. Another thing
North Dakota can buy to M\inneapolis; price. A Western farmer, besides Florida has the best climate and where
those in Nebraska will find Omaha to be making more here than at home there is a good climate there must be somethe nearest homeseekers' point; those going can increase his capital ten-fold thing else good.
from Kansas can obtain a homeseekers' without cost by selling what will Sincerely yours,
ticket from Kansas City, and the same is rise little and buying what--will WM. HENRY.
true of Oklahoma. All of the railroad increase ten-fold in fifteen or Indiana.
agents throughout those States can quote twenty years. In no other way can
the local rate to the nearest homeseekers' a man make for his children betpoint and the homeseekers' rate from that ter provision than by buying SWEET POTATO CROP IS WORTB
point to Florida. As a general rule consid- Florida land while it can be $34,000,000; 90 PER CENT FROM
enable money can be saved, particularly for bought cheaply.-Times-Union. SOUTH.
those people who live in the eastern part of I Washington, D. C., Aug. 1.-Growing and
North Dakota, South Dakota, ,_Nebraska, .handling sweet potatoes, especially in the
Kansas and Oklahoma. BUNNELL CORNET BAND ELECTS south, is discussed in a special bulletin isThere are also a great many people in OFFICERS. sued today by the department of agriculture. It is stated that the money value
New England and the Middle Atlantic The Bunnell Band held a business meeting te It i stated tha n value
States who would like to obtain special last Friday evening in Turner Hall for the of hc 90 was me th
rates. They are much closer to Florida purpose ot electing officers and christening south.
than their friends in the Western States, the band. The band was christened the but nevertheless they like to save money. Bunnell Cornet Band. It was decided to Both the acreage and the value of th&
The southern lines have a special tourists' change the regular meeting nights from crop have risen rapidly in the past decade.
rate, which is a considerable saving. Then, Fridav to Thursday evenings. The bulletin states, however, that the v e
too, the railroads running south from The officers elected were: C. F. Turner, of the crop could easily be doubled on the
Washington, D. C., have a special home- president; Fred A. Rich, secretary and same acreage if the potatoes were more
seekers' rate from Washington to Florida. treasurer; C. E. Cisco, leader. carefully handled and marketed.
"Florida is a real land for real people"




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Florida | The Bunnell Home Builder | m Edited by S. HOWARD M 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillilllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Vol. 1 September, 1913 *0 THE EDITOR’S PERSONAL PAGE CANADIAN IMMIThe Canadian immiGRATION FIGURES gration figures for SHOW FALLING the first three OFF IN NUMBER OF months of the fiscal AMERICANS CROSSrear just issued ING THE LINE showed an increase of British and Euro pean immigrants over the same period last rear, and a heavy decrease in immigration from the United States. American settlers | -ntering Canada during the first quarter of : :his year numbered 44,90S, as against 53,343 in the same period last year. The Canadian government estimates that the American settlers brought with them in cash and ef fects upward of $67,000,000. The people of the United States are and have been in an unsettled frame of mind. They are seeking to better their condition, and to find a suitable place in which to take up their permanent abode. For many years they seemed to believe that the Canadian Northwest was the only country opened for settlement, and they flocked into Canada, raking an immense amount of money out f the United States, which was used in the development of their Canadian farms. However, for some time the tide of immi; gration has changed. Men and women of rhe United States are finding their desires more fully realized in the Sunny South than in the cold Northwest, and Florida has be%  ome the Mecca of these thousands of homeseekers. All that Florida needs is more capital and more people to cultivate her land, and these two requisites are. being rapidly supplied. Just give our glorious State a little more time, and you will see her many resources developed and the entire State blossoming as the rose. BE FAIR IN YOUR The Editor happened JUDGMENT to meet a man the other day from one of rhe western states. It is a state we have frequently visited, and so made some in: quiries about its progress, its development, \ etc. Mr. Westerner immediately waxed eni rhusiastic, which was perfectly right. He calked long and fluently about the great ness of his state, and its superiority over very other section of the Union. We congratulated the Westerner on being j ro happily situated; we agreed with him n many respects, but having spent a num ber of months in his native state, we had to j rdmit that it had a number of disadvantages | jnd drawbacks as well as advantages. By and by the conversation turned to Florida, and then to our disappointment, we foimd that our acquaintance from the West was not a fair-minded man, but was biased in his opinions. He knew that Florida was not a fit state for a man to live in, that there was nothing good about it—neither its climate, its soil, its crops or its possibilities. He refused to listen to the things we tried to tell him. Then we thought of a plan we often use on people who are talking at random, and who know it all. We simply said. Were you ever in Florida?’ and our voluble friend had to admit with reluctance that he had never been there. That settled it. We didn’t waste any more time trying to tell this narrow-minded man anything about Florida. Florida is better off without him. The only thing to say to such a foolish person is, “Go and see for yourself before you make any more rash statements.” Little Miss Kruger, formerly of Alberta, Canada, in her flower garden at Bunnell “The season's heat record in Kansas was broken yesterday, when a tempera ture of 314 degrees was registered at ; Clay Center. At Topeka 105 was the maximum."—From Chicago Daily News, August 6, 1913. The same day the highest tempera! ture in Bunnell was 88 degrees. FLORIDA FOR That Florida is destined CATTLE to become the greatest cattle raising state east of the Missisippi is a fact that gains ci'edence by those who have studied conditions, and a brief review of a few statistics will show I the growth of the cattle raising industry in the last ten years. Climate, as an asset has never been ade quately valued by the live stock raisers of the United States. Florida posesses un limited possibilities in this line. Cattle and hogs can be and are being raised in Florida under the most favorable conditions, at the least expense, and closer to remunerative markets than in any other j part of the North American continent. Florida is essentially an agricultural j state. Her future depends largely upon the j intelligent development of her agricultural | resources. Her timber, muck, prairie and | other lands are of great productivity and j wide adaptability, while her climate is unJ excelled. Upon her great agricultural reI sources vast herds of cattle, hogs and sheep | may subsist the year round at a small cost. Hence Florida is already a great beefproduc-ing state, and the hog industry is steadily developing. At county fairs as fine cattle, hogs and sheep are exhibited as can be raised in any state. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF PRIZE LETTER CONTEST. This is the tenth issue of the BUN NELL HOME BUILDER. Only two more numbers and our magazine is one year old. We are planning to make our December issue especially attractive. It will be our Anniversary Number, and will be larger in size, and full of good things to read. The Editor will give three prizes for the three best letters on the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. This contest is open to all. Write the letters in your own way, and if you have already written a letter for the Home Builder, that will not make any difference. Write another for the contest. All letters for the contest must be in the hands of the Editor not later than November 10, 1913, and he re serves the privilege of publishing any or all of them in the Anniversary Number. The following prizes will be given: FIRST PRIZE .$3.00 SECOND PRIZE 2.00 THIRD PRIZE. 1.00 Address all communications to S. HOWARD, Editor BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, i'03 Woman’s Temple Chicago, Ill. Orange9 gjrow, tLey don’t drop in your lap. So come serious, not visionary”

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BUMMEILIL iOME BU21LOER. Layout for a Typical Twenty-Acre Farm at Bunnell helpful suggestions for fuiure COLONISTS Since having decided to make my future home in Bunnell, and being without practical farm experience, my spare moments have been devoted to reading up on farm matters, correspondence and consultation with ex perts and all other means by which I could ascertain the desired facts. Being a bit iconoclastic, and wanting to be shown, I did not believe the prevailing j system of using chemical fertilizer for each crop was good farming, or even good common sense, and I looked for something bet ter, that would not leave the land poorer after cropping than before. Fertilizers may increase the crop, but the soil very little. This was evidenced to me by the fact that the best model farms in different sections of the country, where two olades and more had been made to grow where but one grew before, the results were produced without the use of chemical fertilizers at all. Moreover, the soil upon these farms was grow ing stronger and more fertile after each crop had been taken off. -d.11 this was ac complished by using plenty of humus plowed under, and where obtainable, by cattle manure. Having given Mr. Verdenius from time to time a few samples of what I did or did not know about farming, he has urged me to overcome my natural timidity and put them in a concrete form for the readers of the Home Builder—our future settlers. We will assume the typical farm fronts on one road and slopes gently south. After fencing and properly ditching, to carry off the heavy rain fall, we will start in to culti vate the cleared land shown—by straight farming, leaving fancy crops and trucking until we and our land are competent to do them justice. All crops planted will have soiling crops ( run in between the rows, at the proper time, to be harvested in part, but mainly plowed j under, followed by ground phosphate rock sown broadcast liberally. Humus is what our land wants, therefore we will burn no vegetable fibre, but turn it under and treat as above. Rock phosphate will act chem ically on the humus and land, and not being very soluble, it will not leak away, but stay put. Sim and air are important factors in soil building. We will plow deep, turn our soil over frequently, mixing the top and lower j layers (which also contain plant food more I or less dormant) together, aerating it, makj ing it friable and open, and absorbent of the rainfall. Keep something growing all the time when practicable, carrying nitrogen down and bringing up from below all the varied soil elements. Land needs intelligent and steady culti vation rather than rest. Nature acts in ac cordance with immutable laws, without rea son. It cannot do otherwise. The cattle pen (which would be better, perhaps, entirely roofed) will have open sides in part, with wide, overhanging eaves. There will be a loft above, with outside hay door, chutes down which to pitch forage to racks below, storage of bedding, etc. The ground should be thickly covered with bedding, such as corn stalks and the like, to absorb the liquid manure—the most valu able portion, too often lost. This will be our manure factory; the cattle to be driven up at night and during bad weather, and j sometimes fed there, when not “hogging off” I in the fields. Reference to the drawing will show the pen so arranged that by means of the run way, cattle may have access to it and run ning water at all times, no matter which field they may be feeding in. The manure will be trodden down, and we will have to remove it with a pick. It will “Grasp Your Opportunities Now and Prevent Poverty in Old Age”

PAGE 3

BUMHEIUL HOME BUILDER By Geo. R. Tollman, Architect, Washington, D. C. be freely sprinkled %  with rock phosphate from time to time, and removed as soon as practicable, being spread upon one selected 'trip of land at a time, and not scattered thinly all over the cleared land. This way we will eventually bring all our cultivated land up to an even richness—meantime making up for the scarcity of manure by turning under and extra cultivation. One should always bear in mind that one acre of our land, worked for all it will pro duce, will give one active man all he wants to do. Therefore the amount of available labor will determine the amount of land we will need as a starter, for cultivating straight farm crops. The remainder of the land we can clear from time to time and ; turn it into forage crops to be ‘‘Logged off” by our cattle and hogs. Divided into small fields by movable fences, we can move them about from field to field, keeping production ahead of con sumption. They, by so doing, will not only save much money that could be spent in labor for harvesting, but will enrich the land by their drippings. We will get good beef cattle, say threeyear-olds, to fatten for the market—all of good grade, not scrubs. We will have at j least one Jersey cow, a few hens and Indian j Runner duc-ks. We will go light on hens at first, only for home use. The windmill will pump water from well into a high tank, to be distributed by grav ity, via iron pipe under ground, to all de sired parts of the farm as shown. By leav ing the cocks part turned, we can have run ning water in all the water troughs. With out level land, or nearly so, and 30 feet of i head, we can carry water in any direction. When we get ready we can use it for irriga tion, by having a head distributing ditch on the north fence line, with offset ditches run ning south through the cultivated north strip. The barn is to be of such size as we find needed later. We can use the cattle pen at first for shelter. There will be a lean-to on each side of the barn in which we can store j our implements and many other things to be quickly available—yet sheltered from sun and rain. We will not leave farm tools out in the fields to rot and rust, but will keep i them painted, oiled and in order. The power house to adjoin the barn to ] have a 5 H. P. engine, with a line of laborj saving farm devices from a grindstone to an j ice cream freezer. It will pay for itself in a short time. We will plant a good variety of fruit, large and small, more than enough for home use. We can ship some in combination with our neighbors to get the advantage of car ; load lots. All will be of best Southern stock from best nursery. Variety and quality, not j quantity, will be our motto on fruit. We ] can well experiment with the choice fruit j that lias been introduced to this country j by the government, and is available for the I asking. We will plant citrus fruit so as to have : an all year supply for home use at least, but we are not orchard men—straight farm ing having our first attention. Soft shell pecans take a long time to mature, but they are so valuable we must have a line along, say, the north fence—planted j not less than 50 feet on centers. These will j be an assurance for the future, as with lit tle care they are hardy trees and do exceed ingly well in Florida, and make wonderful returns, increasing yearly. Our heirs will be rich by them alone. The house we will build to meet our needs, finish of walls and ceiling to be of compo board. There will be a complete bathroom, with hot and cold water under pressure. The Chicago House Wrecking Company will fur nish us a complete bathroom outfit, first class, at price which probably no Florida plumber can compete with. We can put up the house for shelter and use, leaving the compo board to be put on later, which can be done by any one handy with tools: women do it successfully after they have learned to hit the nail and not their fingers. Hog houses to be floored, and they and hen houses and runs moved to new ground yearly. Hens located in the orchard will have shade, and their manure is fine for the trees. While not shown upon the draw ings, we will have plenty of small fruit and flowers about the house, arranged not only for use. but for beauty as well. We will remove all pine and resinous trees, thoroughly burning out the roots. We will plant quick growing shade trees where needed. Hogs and cattle must have plenty of it. Garden on the cultivated strip, of a size to suit the family. Under the orchard trees will make a good garden spot. Soon all our land will be garden, so we need not worry about that. A rich strip of land to be re served on which we will plant seed from our most vigorous plants. We will com mence with the best Southern seed we can buy. I would strongly advise that all settlers pay in full for their land and get a deed before settling on it. Monthly installments coming due at inopportune times are a nuisance. There are also accidents and sick ness to be considered, and the feeling that one owns his land is half the battle in de veloping it. The scheme here outlined will take some ready cash to carry out, no matter how carefully we figure it. However, it need not be done all at once; better go slowly as means and experience will admit of, keeping out of debt, with a balance in the bank ready for the unforeseen. We have greenhouse land, a climate un equaled for growing plants: we can afford to experiment and learn the game. Any small failures ought to be an incentive to better effort next time. Luck is work: miracles a delusion of ignorant and cowardly minds. One who studies into the reason or the cause and effect of things is certain to make good. Will we make mistakes ? Plenty of them. One who does not. does little, but we will not repeat this mistake in one and the same place. We will overcome most obstacles as we meet them, and what we can't, we will go around. As farmers we are pro ducers and not parasites on the body politic. Aware of our own ignorance, we will gladly listen to the advice of experts, and proceed to carry it out. guided by study, observa tion and experience. VELVET BEAN A VALUABLE CROP. Enriches the Land, Produces Well and Brings Good Prices. Field oF Cow Peas on Mr Tolman's Farm While Florida produced more than threefourths of the phosphate rock mined in the United States in 1909, and about threeeighths of that mined in the world, increas ing its output materially last year, it has another money maker in the fertilizer way, I the value of which has only recently become | apparent to the South, which has chiefly profited by it. The velvet bean is a legume which promises to be the most valuable field crop the farmer can raise, inasmuch as it is one of the seeds of which can be perfected no further north than 200 miles from the Gulf, according to John M. Scott, animal in dustrialist of the Florida agricultural ex periment station. It is a plant which adds value to the dry and high lands of Florida, on which alone it grows to perfection. The plant will grow in the cotton belt north of Florida and enrich the soil with that expensive plant food, nitrogen, for the benefit of subsequent crops of cotton, but the season is too short to mature the seed, as it is a plant of tropical origin. Since | the great value of the velvet bean for this purpose, as well as for fattening cattle and producing a more abundant flow of milk in cows, has been more generally recognized, the demand in Florida for seed has become so heavy that it is now quoted at $2.50 a bushel, with the prospect of the price rising to $3 a bushel. Requiring no fertilizing, yet a crop of twenty to thirty bushels to the acre can be produced and the soil be left in better condition than before the seed was planted. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station j Bulletins Xo. 102 and Xo. 6, both relating t to this point, may be had free for the ask| ing.— Times-Union. SUGGESTION TO OUR SETTLERS. We would advise each one of our land owners to send 5 cents to the Superintendent of Public Documents, U. S. Printing Office, Washington, D. C., and get Farm ers’ Bulletin No. 519, which is the story of Sam McCall’s success | in making his worn-out land pro duce fifteenand sixteen-fold, without using a pound of commer cial fertilizer. McCall is an illit erate negro, 75 years of age. “A Few Years of Earnest Labor will Brinj* a Real AjJe of Ease’’

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Wfo BUMMELL HOME BUSLDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont Mrs. M. W. Hopkins, of Lawrence, Kansas, was here the first of the week inspecting her property here. Mr. Bernard Tebbe and family, of Phila^. delphia, have come to Bunnell to reside. At present they are occupying the residence next to Mr. A. Miller’s. .Mr. I. A. Errikkila, of Port Arthur, Can ada, left for his home Sunday, after spend\ ing several days in Bunnell. He purchased some land from the Bunnell Development Company on a former visit to Florida, and i is well pleased with his land and the coun try in general. Messrs. L. R. Scott and T. W. Beal, of Illinois, were here several days recently : ( kiim over the land they purchased here i some time ago. Mr. Robert White, who lives on Church street, cut a watermelon Sunday afternoon that he raised in His garden. After giving fifteen of his neighbors all they could eat he had to throw the balance to his hog. When it comes to raising watermelons Mr. White is in a class to himself. Sunday school class of bright AMONG OTTR FARMERS. Mr. Mosby is busy digging his crop of sweet potatoes, and is distributing same to the local trade through the Society of Equity. Mr. Koch is very busy on his farm, and reports everything as good as could be ex pected. — Mr. Cookman of Ocean City is clearing some more land and will have a larger gar den soon. His orange trees are looking fine. Road building is being continued through out the community. The Dupont-Kings road connection is almost completed. The Moody road south will be extended one mile in the near future. The contract has been awarded Mr. Cochran of Bunnell to spread about 400 ears of shell on the Espanola road, starting at Bunnell; also road to Ocean City and west to J. B. Johnston's on the Deen road. There is a movement on foot to extend the county road south of Bunnell, as far as Dupont along the railroad. Mr. Allen is getting his land in shape for his fall crop. faced boys and girls at Bunnell Mr F. Vincent, sales manager of the Bun nell Potato Company, has taken orders and is now filling same to the extent of about 4,000 bushels of sweet potatoes. Mr. A. -J. Smithers is harvesting his sweet potato crop this week. Mr. Smithers is "there with the goods" when it comes to growing the sweets. Mr. C. D. Hagadorn, who lives just south j of Bunnell, has a field of pearl millet which | is a beauty, it measuring from ten and one. half to twelve feet in height. Mrs. W. L. Rogers of Canada arrived Sun\ day to spent! some time with Mr. and Mrs. Herman Kruger. Corn has made a very rapid growth since 1 the showers came, and the many fields are I the best grown in the country. Rev. Arthur S. Pain, of Jameo, Cuba, was registered at Hotel Bunnell Friday. He is the owner of a tract of land here and came to inspect it.Mr. W. F. Wagoner, of Hlinois, returned to his home Tuesday after a pleasant stay of several days in Bunnell. Mr. Wagoner owns land here and is well pleased with it. Mr. James A. Robinson, of Port Arthur, Ontario, Canada, arrived last week and spent a few days in Bunnell. He expects to move his family to this place in the near future. Mr. Albert Manthea, of Pennsylvania, ar rived Friday and has taken up his resi dence on the Moody road near the Durrance place. Mr. and Mrs. Millikan, of Chicago, spent several days in Bunnell recently. While here they visited Mr. and Mrs. Gray, who live near Gore Lake. Mr. Millikan owns j a pretty tract of land adjoining Mr. Gray’s. Bunnell and Espanola baseball teams taken at Bunnell The Farmers’ Society of Equity held a j meeting today. They have twenty-three members, with new ones joining at every • meeting. They are now ordering seed, lime, i fertilizer, etc., for the members who will co-operate in the raising of their crops, as well as the selling end. Mr. Mack is breaking ground in which he \ will plant ten acres of Irish potatoes. Mr. j C. F. Turner has also planted Irish potaI toes. Mr. Gray reports that he has a 450-pound hog. which is a fine demonstration that blooded hogs are a success in Florida. Mr. L. F. Hubbard has the distinction of raising the largest load of watermelons in the colony. He arrived in town this morn ing with a wagon load of melons, every one of which weighed over 40 pounds, while one beauty tipped the scales at 40 pounds. ‘Rich men spend thousands for Florida climate. ’Tis yours for laughter, love and^life”

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roe BUM^EILIL HOME BUILDER Contributed by Bunnell Correspondent During the Month __ A new residence at Bunnell BUNNELL BAND IS BEING ORGANIZED Under Leadership of C. E. Cisco. Several of the musical talent of Bunnell met Tuesday evening at the home of Mr. B. Tibee and organized a Bunnell Brass Band with a membership of nine as follows: C. E. Cisco, H. Kruger, F. A. Rich. J. H. McKnight. E. Charles, Chester Rich, B. Tibee ( and two sons. Anyone desiring to join the band or assist j in any way will please call on C'. E. Cisco. | The Bunnell Meat and Ice Co. has moved into its new quarters in the Tribune buildi ing. ; Walter Shultz is contemplating opening j a bakery in Bunnell soon. Messrs. Ignacy Tarala and Stanislaus j Cycher, of Chicago, are in Bunnell and have i purchased sixty acres of Bunnell land Mr. Gillis Romesyre is bringing in some fine watermelons which he grew on his farm just south of Bunnell on the Moody road. He is receiving good prices for them. Air. John Kampfer, of LaPlata, New Mexico, arrived in Bunnell Saturday. He i comes to make this place his home. Home of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison near Bunnell. Recent arrivals from British Columbia. LARGE REPAIR SHOP TO OPEN IN BUNNELL. EVOLUTION OF A BUNNELL FARM. L. A. Szabelski Will Open Shop as Soon as Building is Completed. Mr. L. A. Szabelski has purchased two lots just south of the Tribune building on Moody boulevard and will begin the con struction of a building which will be one hundred foot square, just as soon as he can get the lumber cut. In this building Mr. Szabelski trill open an up-to-date repair shop, doing all kinds of repair work on automobiles, buggies, wagons, farming im plements, gasoline engines, all kinds of electrical repairs, horse shoeing, wood work of all kinds, in fact he will be prepared to do any kind of repairing. Mr. Szabelski has recently moved here from Chicago, having driven through in an auto truck, which he built himself, it taking him eleven days to make the trip. He has bought very extensively of Bunnell land in section 32, where he has begun the erection of Ms home and outhouses, which consists of a nice ten room dwelling, garage, stable, chicken house and tool house. He is well satisfied with the country and says that a mancan easily make a success here if he has some money to start with and will tiy. He says that on account of the nights being so cool and pleasant here that he has had better sleep here than he has had for the past twenty years. Mr. J. C. Pinson and family, accompanied by Jno. Oroz, were over to the beach fish ing Friday and Saturday. They report a fine catch and a nice time. The hens in this section are working overtime. Almost every farmer who comes to town brings a large basket of eggs with him, which he trades for groceries, thereby saving his cash. Mr. Nick Lasch, one of our progressive farmers in the Black Point section, has a field of fine broom corn. Mr. Lasch has ordered a machine for making brooms and, no doubt, will furnish us with brooms this winter. Regular terms of the mayorÂ’s court will be held on Monday and Friday afternoons of each week, beginning August 4th at 4 p. hi. in. the council chamber. Tribune build ing. Call sessions may be held as necessity demands. The dance given by the young people of Bunnell last Thursday evening was well attended and all present reportedhaving a good time. Shaw's orchestra, consisting of Misses Norma and Esther Shaw and their father, Mr. Shaw, from Palatka arrived on train No. S5 at four o'clock and promptly at eight the dance was on and continued until after midnight. All who attended spoke highly of the excellent music furnished by the orchestra and the good behavior of the crowd. The Earnest Workers, who served ice cream and cake in the adjoining room, re port a fine eveningÂ’s business, haring sold all their cream and cake, thereby making a nice little amount to apply to the payment of the piano. The above picture was taken on Mr. Bart lettÂ’s arrival at Bunnell, and appeared in --the March Home Builder. The second pic ture gives us a glimpse of his attractive log cabin, while the third shows a portion of Mr. BartlettÂ’s cleared land. Thus we can see the evolution of a farm. ture of his growing crop, and a few weeks later another of his crop being shipped. The camera tells the story of progress better than the pen. i Own your own farm. No strikes, panics or fires can take it from youÂ’

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m& BUHHELL HOME BUILDER Wkat Some of Your Future Neighbors Tbink of Bunnell EXTRACT FROM A RECENT LETTER FROM A BUNNELL HUSTLER Who Asks that His Name Be Omitted. I like Florida fine. Couldn’t run me out with a company of soldiers. I have met many reverses and obstacles since coming here, but met them like a man. Things sometimes looked mighty “blue,” but I had conception enough to see the possibilities and great opportunities in front of the man that could “stick,” and I am surely going to try my best to stick. I have traveled over a little more than half of this great Union of ours, and I must say that Florida presents the best view to me for an ideal place for a man to build a nice, comfortable home, make a handsome living, and enjoy his life to the fullest that I have seen yet. I have cow peas and sweet potatoes grow ing on my place now and will put out a little garden and some five hundred straw berry plants later on. Will also put an acre and one-half to peppers and egg plants, if my seeds come well, which are already in bed. My neighbor and I will also set about three acres on a place nearby to peppers and egg plants if we can get enough plants. We have enough seeds sown for some sis acres if they would all come. Of course we will have to be governed largely by the weather. I will also perhaps plant a half or three-quarters of an acre to beans this fall. ’Tis true enough that it takes brains as well as brawn nowadays to succeed on the farm, but any man with good sound judg ment, not afraid of work and no “Get-richquick” idea in his head should get along here all right. ONLY SORRY THEY DID NOT KNOW OF BUNNELL TEN YEARS AGO. Dear Mr. Yerdenius: I will try and write you about my trip to Florida and of my impressions of Bun nell, Dupont, and the surrounding country. To begin, I left Indianapolis on July 22nd, over the Big 4 railroad to Cincinnati, and from there over the Queen & Crescent road to .Jacksonville, which was a delightful trip. From Jacksonville I traveled over the Florida East Coast railroad to Bunnell, ar riving there at 12:45 on the 23rd, so you see it does not take long to make the trip, and I enjoyed every moment of it. I was much pleased when I arrived at Bunnell. I found it to be everything that has been said of it in the Home Builder. This fine little town has city water, electric lights, bank, postoffice, several stores, school house, church and many other build ings. I had the pleasiue of attending one of the parties given in Bunnell and found the people very friendly, full of life and activity. The Florida East Coast Railroad passes through Bunnell and on through Dupont, and there arc real nice depots at each placS, so everything is 0. K. in that respect. In my opinion Bunnell-Dupont is the ideal spot for a country home. It is the only place I would ever think of choosing | for my future home, for it is summer all the time there. I saw corn growing in the colony ,the stalks, I dare say, were five to six feet in height, and I was told that was the second crop of corn this year. I brought several fine ears home with me, and when 1 left the colonists were cutting their corn and putting it away, getting ready to plant their third crop. I also saw wonderful sweet potatoes in the colony, fine peanuts, and had the pleas ure of helping eat the finest watermelon I ever tasted in my life, just picked from the vine. It would be imposible for me to describe j in this letter the many advantages to be had in the Bunnell-Dupont colony and the splendid crops that are being raised there. I only wish that the people of the North who are unable to go to Florida themselves would believe what the rest of us say who have been there. We took a trip to the Atlantic beach in the company’s automobile which was indeed delightful. The field manager took us through several orange groves whieh were very beautiful. I saw for the first time dates and figs growing. We found the people in that community very friendly, and they had a way of mak ing one feel perfectly at home. i -i Mrs. Stiles and Daughter The enclosed is a picture of myself and little daughter taken by the side of the company automobile. Mv little girl did | not want to come home; she begged to stay j at Bunnell, and I do not think it will be | long until we are there to stay. Mr. Stiles j is going down about the first of the year, i I went, at this time because I wanted to j know what the summer weather is like in j Florida, but to my surprise I found it cooler j and more pleasant at Bunnell than here in Indiana, and the change of water did not hurt myself or little girl in the least. There is always a cool breeze there. I stayed about' ten days and only regret that I could not have remained ronger. I am so thankful that we have a farm in the Bunnell-Dupont colony. My husband 1 says he only wishes that he had secured it j ten years ago, and others in the colony made similar remarks to me while I was there. Yours very truly, MRS. ROSA STILES (Indiana). California does hate to see things coming Florida’s way. We landed Al fred Burbank, nearly as famous as his brother Luther, here, and immediately there is a howl from California. But we got him anyhow. And he selected good old St. Johns County. FOUND BUNNELL’S SUMMER CLIMATE DELIGHTFUL. Mr. Thomas A. Yerdenius. Dear Sir and Friend: I write to let you > know that I paid a visit to Bunnell to look at the ten acres of land I bought of your Company, and I must say that I am well pleased with it, for it looks good to me. i could not have picked a better tract myself While there I met Mr. Moody and Mr. Heath, also Mr. Turner, who took me over the Bunnell-Dupont Colony and showed me j all the places of interest around there. Bunnell-Dupont is certainly a fine place, and the soil is very good. I was at Bun nell the first week in July, leaving her; when it was so hot one could scarcely stand it in Kentucky, and when I arrived at Bun nell I was surprised to find it cool and comfortable, which was a great relief to me. My friends here tried to tell me before I left that I would sure burn up in Florida at that time of the year, but such was no: the case. On the contrary, it was quitcool there, and I found their second crop : looking fine. I think there is a bright future in store for Bunnell and the farmers in general in that part of Florida, as everything wa? booming when I was there. Please keep on sending the Home Builder I think it is fine. Yours truly, WILLIAM BIRCH (Kentucky). DRIVEWAY TO BEACH TO BE OPENED SOON. Will Install Ferry Boat at Ocean City Until a Bridge is Built. Messrs. L I. Moody, C. F. Turner, E. V. j Johnson, representing the Bunnell Develop! ment Company; George Moody, representing the Ocean City Company, and Ed Johnson, representing the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co., drove over to Ocean City Friday for the purpose of examining the ground be tween the East Coast canal and the beach to see if it would be possible to build a driveway from the mainland to the ocean. Upon returning to Bunnell they reported, everything favorable and arranged to begin the work soon. It is the intention of the parties inter ested to build a driveway from Ocean City along the west side of the canal to a point six hundred feet south, where they will in stall a ferry boat, which will be used for the present until a draw bridge can be built. Then commencing on the east side of the canal they will throw up a hard surf actroad to the ridge, which is about threefourths of a mile. By doing this the public can then drive to the waters edge. As soon as this is completed these parties will build cottages on the beach which will be rented to those desiring to spend their vacation on the beach. We predict a great future for Ocean City Beach for it will be unexcelled for both a summer and winter resort just as soon as the developments are made.— St. Johns Tribune. ‘Your Lands, money and desire with. Florida’s climate and soil can make all worry weary’

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BUHHEEIL HOME BUILDER Why Every Colonist Should Raise Pecans H ere Are Some Facts and Figures Stowing Money to be Made Out of Tbis Nut The owner of one of our colony farms who has sev eral acres in pecajus has a protection for life. Pecans are the easiest crop to grow, cultivate and to harvest. Unlike grain, vegetables, small fruits, oranges and grapefruits, replanting is not necessary. Once a pecan tree is planted it grows for hundreds of years. A pecan orchard is an investment and not a specula tion. Some pecan trees, even in a wild state, yield as high as 700 pounds of perfect nuts each year, and there are pecan trees in the United States that are 300 years old. The pecan belongs to the hickory family, and, like the hickory tree, is hardy and extremely long lived. It is a native only of a small part of the world and is especially well adapted in the latitude and longitude of the Bunnell-DuPont Colony. The small pecan which we generally find in our markets is a wild nut that grows without cultivation. Two-Year Old Pecan Tree in Dr. St. Peter's Orchard East of Bunnell The strong and hardy seed (nut) is planted in the nursery. "When the sprout is one year old its top is entirely removed and a twig or branch from some old healthy bearing tree is grafted upon the young root. The second year the growth is again cut off, and this process is repeated for four years. In the fifth year, a large and extensive root system having developed, the tree is permitted to grow, and the result is that it puts out a very extensive amount of stems and leaves. Many of these trees have a few nuts the next year, but it is more conservative to estimate the yield from the third year after transplanting, when the trees are actually eight years of age. A fine order of pecans can be grown at the sixtli year, but those who want to go in for the largest re turns, will do well to follow the course above described. We recommend that the trees be planted in the neigh borhood of fifty feet apart, which will net about seven teen trees to the acre. The paper shell pecan must have plenty of room for its branches, and that is the reason for planting so small a number as seventeen to the acre. Planting more trees to the acre would of course appear as though you should get more nuts, but, as a matter of fact, your crop will be actually smaller and ultimately you will of necessity have to destroy some trees. The harvesting of pecan nuts is a very simple process. All that you have to do is to place a canvas covering beneath the trees and the nuts are knocked off. Paper shell pecan nuts sell anywhere from 50 cents to one dollar per pound. Here is a table showing the actual income ancl profit on five acres of paper shell pecan trees at the minimum possible price of 25 cents per pound: Table Showing Estimate Yield, Income and Profits on Five Acres of Paper Shell Pecan Trees at Twenty-five Cents Per Pound. Yield per Average Yield per 5 acres Income 85 \ ears Age of Tree 85 trees trees at 25c Trees Pounds Pounds a pound 1 6 2 7 3 8 1 85 21.25 4 9 5 425 106.25 5 10 10 850 212.50 8 13 30 2550 637.50 10 15 50 4250 1,062.50 15 20 100 8500 2,125.00 20 25 150 12750 3,187.50 As a matter of faet, no one need worry about the overproduction of pecan nuts. Last year nearly $10,000.000 worth of nuts were imported into the United States, and this country only exported one-half a million dollars' worth of nuts. The pecan will replace this foreign trade in nuts, as it is the king of all nuts. The pecan is a native only of this country and Mexico, so that we need fear no overproduction of nuts in the future. If we were able to supply the world with pecans we would have a ready market in every nation under the sun. When you think of your farm in Bunnell, make up your mind to grow pecans. They will in no way inter fere with the use of your land between the trees, and within five or six years you will have a steady income every year, and at the expiration of ten or twelve years, as can be seen by the table above, you will have an absolute income for life, for your pecan trees will live hundreds of years after you have passed away. If you are not in position to move to Bunnell within the next few years, arrange with the Bunnell Develop ment Company to have five acres of your land cleared, fenced, and set out to pecan trees. Mr. Verdenius has made a careful study of pecan culture in Florida, and if you care to write to him he will be glad to give you complete information regard ing variety of trees, time of planting, etc., thus while you are in the North your pecan trees can be working for you in Florida. “Florida is a Summer as well as a Winter resort. Eack nigkt you sleep, eack day you smile”

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BUNNMJL HOME^BUILDER. Something About Transportation Almost every one who is figuring on a trip to Florida is interested in the question i of railroad fare. Fiaturally each person wishes to obtain a low rate, and the ques| tiou of rates and fares is a very important one with all land companies. After a great deal of urging and due con sideration, the various railroad companies operating between the Mississippi Valley States and Florida granted a homeseekers’ rate. This rate applies from Ohio, Michi gan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minne sota, Iowa and Missouri. The people living in tnese States can obtain a special homeseekers’ rate which is a little more than a one-way fare. It is effective on the first and third Tuesday of each month and the time limit is twenty-five days. Any person wishing to visit Florida and inspect land which he has purchased or with the inten tion of purchasing land has twenty-five day3 in which to make the trip and return to his home. But how about the people who live in the Western States, and in western Can ada? How are they to obtain special rates? Unfortunately they are discriminated against. The railroad companies operating in the West are engaged in the building up of that part of the country. They want to encourage people to come west and aceordingly grant homeseekers’ rates from the eastern points to all the Western States. They do not want to see the settlers al| ready on the ground depart for Florida; j therefore, they have not seen fit to grant any special rates from such States as North Dakota, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon, California, and west ern Canada. It is unfortunate that the railroads take this attitude. A great deal of pressure has j been brought to change this attitude, but thus far the railroads have not seen fit to I grant any reduced rates from the far west1 ern points. However, to people who live in the Dai kotas, or Nebraska, or Kansas, or Okla homa, it is possible to save some money by buying a local ticket to the nearest homeseekers’ point and there obtain the ; homeseekers’ rate. People who live in j North Dakota can buy to Minneapolis: j those in Nebraska will find Omaha to be j the nearest homeseekers’ point; those going j from Kansas can obtain a homeseekers’ j ticket from Kansas City, and the same is true of Oklahoma. All of the railroad j agents throughout those States can quote j the local rate to the nearest homeseekers’ point and the homeseekers’ rate from that point to Florida. As a general rule consid; erable money can be saved, particularly for j those people who live in the eastern part of j North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, I Kansas and Oklahoma. There are also a great many people in New England and the Middle Atlantic | States who would like to obtain special j rates. They are much closer to Florida than their friends in the Western States, but nevertheless they like to save money The southern lines have a special tourists’ rate, which is a considerable saving. Then, too, the railroads running south from ’ Washington, D. C., have a special home! seekers’ rate from Washington to Florida, j This rate from Washington to Florida is a low one, and people in Pennsylvania, Mary land, New Jersey and Delaware can save considerable money by buying a local ticket to Washington and a homeseekers’ ticket from that point. There is no better place to obtain infor mation about special rates than in the office of your local ticket agent. If he is not in possession of the necessaiy tariffs describing the special rates, he can easily ascertain the information by writing to his general passenger office. If you are con sidering a trip to Florida, go to your agent a week or two before you plan to leave and tell him that you want to know about the cheapest rates to Florida. If he tells you that none are in effect, instruct him to write his general passenger agent, and it is only a matter of two or three days before he can have a reply, and by seeing him a week or ten days before you leave he will have ample time. Some day the railroads will begin to rec ognize that anything which helps one sec tion of the country will help the other part. At the present time the railroads are not far sighted enough to see the point. The western railroads do not care to see the inhabitants of their districts leave and go to the South. They seem to feel that every family that moves from the West means a loss in dollars and cents to the particular railroad entering the locality from which the family moves. They do not c-are to see Florida or any other Southern State profit even though the settler himself can benefit his circumstances by making, a change This is a “dog in the manger” attitude of the transportation lines, but some day it will be overcome. FLORIDA’S FUTURE. Ten years from today there will be little difference between the price of land in Florida and in Iowa. In twenty years if there is any difference it will be because the FT oriel a land brings the higher price. A Western farmer, besides making more here than at home can increase his capital ten-fold without cost by selling what will rise little and buying what will increase ten-fold in fifteen or twenty years. In no other way can a man make for his children bet ter provision than by buying FTorida land while it can be bought cheaply.—Tiiues-Union. BUNNELL CORNET BAND ELECTS OFFICERS. The Bunnell Band held a business meeting last Friday evening in Turner Hall for the 7 urpose of electing officers and christening the band. The band was christened the Bunnell Cornet Band. It was decided to change the regular meeting nights from Friday to Thursday evenings. The officers elected were: C. F. Turner, president; Fred A. Rich, secretary and treasurer; C. E. Cisco, leader. (Possibly there is not a state in the Union that has been so misrepresented as Florida. The following letter by Mr. Henry tells of some of the erroneous impressions people have of Florida.) Mr. Thos. A. Verdenius, Chicago, III. Dear Sir: I bought ten acres of land from you in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony and have i never seen it. I hear some very queer stories i regarding that country. I was talking to a man the other day who said he was at Hast ings, Fla., for four months several years ago, about eight years ago, I believe he said, and he says when they would go hunting or fishing they would always say, “Put on your raincoat and look out for rattle snakes.” Another tells me they have to put bee nets over their heads while working in the gardens, in order to keep the big, black flies and mosquitoes off. Another man says, “You can pour water on that land for a week and in one day you would not know it ever had any water on it at all.” And, another gentleman who visits Florida very frequently says there is not an acre of land in the whole state of Florida that a man can make a living on, and that all the good land has been bought up years ago. But, here comes the “humdinger” of them all. "Why,” said the man from Florida who was regaling his listeners with tales of the wonders of his native state, “Just to show you how everything grows down there, one day a hair fell from the tail of a horse down there and fell into a stream of water. This was in the early summer. It grew into a snake and then into a larger snake and kept on growing until one day in August it swal lowed the horse that originally had shed it.” Now, I do not believe all these stories. That is why I am paying for ten acres of land down there. There are a great many people down in Florida and we do not hear of any starving and being eaten up with flies, mosquitoes or alligators. They are building towns down there and they don’t build towns where it is impossible for peo ple to stay and make a living. And where there are towns there must be some living human beings and some of the best and most prosperous people. Another thing, Florida has the best climate and where there is a good climate there must be some thing else good. Sincerely yours, WM. HENRY. Indiana. | SWEET POTATO CROP IS WORTH $34,000,000; 90 PER CENT FROM SOUTH. Washington, D. C., Aug. 1.—Growing and handling sweet potatoes, especially in the south, is discussed in a special bulletin is sued today by the department of agricul ture. It is stated that the money value of the crop in 1909 was more than $34,000,000, of which 90 per cent came from the south. Both the acreage and the value of tbccrop have risen rapidly in the past decade. The bulletin states, however, that the value of the crop could easily be doubled on the j same acreage if the potatoes were more carefully handled and marketed. “Florida is a real land for real people”