Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
Vol. 1 August, 1913 No.9
If You Own IF YOU OWN LAND, YOU'RE A PART OWNER OF THE WORLD. and where men,
Land You're a .mbtz :, M: ByJoba T. women and children have a
Part Owner of T chance to enjoy
the World A good health,'and
T.HE F C where they. may
The cartoon lead nrmal, hapearing this title a .PY lives.
spearedd some ."Back to the
me ago in the -farm" is an ex*ihicago Daily pression .hat will
bune, and is echo in the hearts
,ere reproduced .-*'of men- and wov courtesy of the A men so long as
_:tist, Mr. John nZA 5 conditions in the
cheon.........
. McCutcheon. cities are as they
It is a remarka- are. Thousands of.
:le little picture, ( men and women
ad you should fil (-are living in
Vtudy it well. It is crb w ded tenelike a song with- -.. meats and eking
-ut words. You o.ut an existence,
can grasp its who can see nothmeaning without ing Thead of them
any comments. A f year after year but
Have you ever the same grind
given this a and heartache.
-hought, that "if you own land you are a part The solution of this great problem is"Back to owner of the world?" Think about it, and if the Farm" and the sooner they learn this the you already own a piece of land, be thankful for happier they will be. t; if you do not, make up your mind to have It is a wonderful thing to be able to portray it at once-no matter what may be the per- such eagerness and longing with a few strokes of ional sacrifice now. the pen, such as McCutcheon has depicted in
What a world of pathos and tragedy there the faces of this father, mother and children. is in this picture, and still there is HOPE. It is a picture to set you thinking, and if you These poor people can look away from the already have solved this problem for yourself; city, beyond the smoke and grime, to the hand this magazine on to some one else who country, where each one may have pure air, has yet to learn that "If You Own Land, water and milk, fresh fruit and vegetables, You're a Part Owner of the World."




Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
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6e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER'.
Florida in Summer
A l w a y s i n though living in Chicago at the present gone to two or three different hotels. preparing a n time I feel that I can speak with authority Many of these winter hotels charge fabuarticle for the on this subject, since I made my home in lous prices, that are beyond the reach of Home Builder I Florida for two years, and in fact the first the man of ordinary means, but even these endeavor to se- time I took my family to the state it was exorbitant rates do not keep the hotels front: et a subject in the month of August. doing a thriving business, and many of them
ec I want you to believe that I am always are filled to overflowing during the entire
thia t will b e gladly to answer your questions personally, tourist season. b e u e ficial to for I consider this an important part of my All of these facts, in my opinion. prove those who con- duties, but as this article will likely be that Florida has an ideal winter climate. template mak- read by the majority of our buyers through- but I wonder if my next statement will be ing their home out the United States and Canada, I trust accepted as readily when I say that Florida in our colony, it may be the means of removing the erro- also has an ideal summer climate. Neveror in Florida neous impression that seems to prevail in theless, this statement is true. It is a fact sooner or later; the minds of so many (and I do not know that it is hot in Florida in summer, but
and, indeed, I why) that Florida is impossible as a place there must be hot weather at some sensor believe this of residence during the summer months, of the year in every state where land is
should be the and that all sorts of dangers lurk there. ,worth anything. It takes heat to grow purpose of Should I attempt to discuss Florida's crops, and a country would be a failure
e v e r y article magnificent winter climate with the people without the warm growing months, but bear written for our little magazine. And here of the north and northwest, I believe there this in mind-it is not any warmer in FlorI wish to say that if any of our readers would be but little chance for argument. I ida in summer than in our northern states, would like.me to write on any special topic, am quite certain that no one would be fool- and cooler than it is in some of them. let me know what it is. or write the editor ish enough to contradict my statement when If you doubt this statement, write to of the Home Builder and suggest the sub- I say that for eight or nine months of the your nearest Government Weather Bureau ject you would like to have discussed year Florida is the most ideal state, as re and enclose a stamped envelope. Ask Uncle
through the pages of this magazine. gards climate, that can be found anywhere. Sam for some old weather reports; also, if
In the Chicago and Bunnell offides let- It is unnecessary to take space to prove this you wish to do so, write to the Weather ters from land owners are received daily assertion, for I believe it is an established Bureau at Jacksonville or St. Augustine, containing a great many questions. Some fact that Florida's winter climate cannot Fla. But for your convenience I will give
of these men and women have never been be surpassed anywhere. you below a table showing the average ternto Florida, and it often keeps me on the To confirm this statement one has but to perature, based on a ten-year average, from
jump to answer every question. At differ- note the vast tide of immigration to Flor- the United States Weather Bureau statisent seasons of the years certain questions ida each winter. People of wealth from tics at St. Augustine, about 30 miles north
predominate, but the one which is agitating every state, and from abroad, come to spend of our colony; and at Ormond, about 25 the minds of our northern land owners just their winters in Florida, for the favored miles to the south of us. Study these fignow is about the weather. We are being ones of earth flit from place to place seek- tires carefully and they will give you a comasked: ing the best, and their return to this balmy prehensive idea of what to expect in temWHAT ABOUT YOUR SUMMERS? I state each winter proves the attractiveness perature in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony.
of Florida's winter climate. St. Augustine Ormond
HOW HOT IS IT IN FLORIDA? The mammoth hotels scattered over the Degrees Degrees
For instance, I received a letter this state are filled to overflowing during these
morning from one of our buyers which read months, and nowhere can you find more January .................. 56 58
in part as follows: "I certainly wish I magnificent hotels than in Florida, espe- February ................. 61 58
could be in Florida for a week or so to cially along the east coast. The largest March .................... 62 64
really see how hot it is.. Today it is so family hotel in the world is located south April ..................... 68 69
blamed hot here it is enough to roast a of our Bunnell-Dupont Colony, and a num- May ...................... 73 77
man. Right now it is 98 in the shade, and ber of moder-n hotels are located at our June ...................... 78 70
if it is any hotter than that in the Bunnell- county seat, St. Augustine, some of them July ..................... 80 80
Dupont Colony I should like to know it." having cost a half million dollars and more. August ................... 80 80
This and scores of similar inquiries have St. Augustine, I am told, can accommodate September ................. 77 79
led me to believe that it would be a saving about six thousand tourists. I had occasion October .................. 65 72
of time, to ourselves and to our buyers, if to spend a night in St. Augustine some November ................ 63 64
I should tell you in this issue the real time ago, and found considerable difficulty December ........ 58 57
facts concerning the summers in Florida, in securing a room for the night; in fact,
as I personally experienced them. Al- I was not able to secure one until I had Average annual temperature 68 69
JS
Hotels
Ponce de Leon
and
Alcazar
at
St. Augustine,
" Florida
L 7
"Florida comes as near beinis a Paradise for mankind as can be iounc iniAmeriwa."




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
By Thomas A. Verdenius
Look at your daily paper and note the so bad as a summer shut up in the confines
-ather reports for Chicago, New York, St. A .0 of a large city, and especially how the chil?aul,'etc., and compare these with the fig- dren are to be pitied in such surroundings.
res I have given you above. Go practically I have been reading in thie papers of the
f far north as you like, you will find peo- crusade that is to be waged in Chicago
:e who are overcome with heat, and you again this summer for the children. The
_n read in the daily papers of many sun- I i mortality is fearful indeed among the lit-rokes. I think I have received more in- tie folks each summer in thile tenement see,Iiries from Canada about our summer tions of our large cities, and it is a great
weather than from any other part of the work of humanity, that of relieving these untry. little ones. What a difference between
I recall the summer of 1911 which I spent these unfortunate children and those who
.I Florida. During that time I was con- live in Florida in the country. There they
stantly receiving letters of inquiry about play out of doors all day long, or lie in
:he climate, for if you remember, the sum- hammocks in the shade, and they are rosy,
ier of 1911 was, as northern visitors to Swimming Pool HotelAlcazar tanned and happy-and all this in a semiFlorida told me, almost unbearable. But breath of air. not a leaf stirred. and no tropical clime, that appears to be such a
iose who came to Florida stated they cooling breezes could reach this valley such bugbear to many folks.
found more comfort and could sleep better as fan our cheeks in Florida in the summer Do not be prejudiced about something :here than in the north. time. you are not familiar with. Of course, I say
A few weeks ago we here in Chicago The hot part of the day in Florida is the summer months are less pleasant than
suffered intensely during a hot spell that from 11 a. m. until 3 p. m. From that hour those of the spring, fall and winter, but I .asted for several days. The papers con- it gradually cools off, until at 5 or 6 o'clock repeat again that one can live in Florida :ained many accounts of prostrations from the weather is perfect, and one almost re- comfortably the year around. :he heat, and also a number of deaths re- grets the hours e must spend in sleep, it It is strange that men will content themulted from same. A few days later I met is so pleasant to sit out of doors. I used to selves with such rudimentary reasoning as cg so pleasant to sitate Thut ofo doors thseet
i friend who had just arrived in Chicago sit on my porch night after night when to matters of climate. They know that the
:rom Florida, and he stated that at that the day's work was over. The air was cool polar regions are the coldest, and the equa:ime the weather was not at all imcom- and invigorating, and one could give him- tonrial regions the hottest, and they jump
ortable in Florida. self up to the beauty of the summer night. at the conclusion that the nearer the pole
I have experienced some hot days in Flor- I could hear the night birds calling to each one gets the colder he finds the country, ila, but never did I see it warmer than 9S other from the trees nearby, and the tin- and the nearer he approaches the equator in the shade, and this for only a few hours. kling of the cow bells in the distance gave the hotter it gets. This idea is much nearer The heat is entirely different from what we a pleasant accompaniment to one's quiet correct in winter than in summer.
a pleasant accompaniment to one's quiet
.ave in the north. One can work in the musings. The moonlight nights are incom- Of course the sum's rays shine more diun all day and not be overcome by the parable in Florida. and hbw can one fail rectly on Florida than on Kansas, but in
neat, and if you seek the shade you will al- to feel like working and doing his best all uid-summer they shine about an hour and Ways find a cool breeze there: while at day long, even in summer, when hlie obtains a half less per day in Florida. On June
:ight one can sleep in comfort-which is such rest of body and mind during the 21st the sun rises in Kansas at 4:30 and
indeed impossible in the north in hot night sets at 7:30. This makes a day of fifteen
weather. These heaven-sent breezes are Let us consider what the summer means hours and a night of only nine. In Florida
rafted to the inhabitants of Florida from to the Florida farmer. We will say, for the sun rises on that day at 5:15 and sets
the east and from the west-from the broad the sake of argument, that the summers are at 6:45. This makes a day of only thirteen A.tlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. 'o lying no better there than in the north, then we hours and a half and a night of ten and out on sidewalks at Bunnell to obtain a will see what advantages the Florida farm- one-half. So while in Kansas the earth
breath of fresh air, as many must do in eras have over those in the northern states. in the middle of summer is heating six
,-ities like Chicago. In the north the fannrmer must grow his hours longer than it is cooling; in Florida
Such long, hot days we have here in Chi- crops during three or four months. The it is heating only three hours longer than
:ago, when people are fairly gasping for extremely short growing season keeps him it is cooling and this in part accounts for breath, and when there is no relief from on the go from early morning until late at the fact that while the summers are longer the excessive heat day or night. We watch night, and he must do most of the hard in Florida than in Kansas, they are not
the weather reports and long for a respite, work on the farm while the weather is hot. as hot. The sea breeze that sweeps over and when it does come it is so sudden we It is true that in Florida we raise some Florida accounts for the balance of it
are not prepared for it. A cold wind comes crops all the year around; when one crop is Go to Bunnell this summer if you can, from the lake and a chilly rain follows, and gone another is planted, but after all dur- and stay a week or ten days, and if you do much sickness often results therefrom. ing the summer months work slackens up a I believe you will agree with me that the
Florida's climate is often compared with bit. During these months the northern summers in Florida are all right.
that of California, but I have found it ,to farmers supply the home markets, and be vastly different. I have been in both there is no need to import produce from states in summer and in winter, but the cli- the south. At this time the south raises mate of Florida surpassed by far the cli- erops for home consumption, such as corn, mate of California, just as Florida sur- I cow peas, velvet beans, peanuts, sweet potapasses California in ninmany other ways-with toes, etc., and they have all kinds of good the exception, that California is more de- things to eat. and for the market-waterveloped; but this I say, if half the money melons, cantaloupes. plums, peaches, pears. was spent in Florida that has been spent etc.
on California, she would be far ahead of So you see the Florida farmer can take
the "golden state." life a little easy during these three or four
California, as you know, has a number of months, for pretty soon the rainy season valleys that are very delightful at some sea- will be over, and by that time the north is sons of the year, but in the summer time beginning to feel the autumn frosts, and hle heat in these valleys is intense. The soonii the cold of winter, and then the southpeople are practically in a basin and the orn farmers will get into harness, plant sun's rays fall upon them all day long their fall crop and have it ready for marwithout mercy. I have seen the thermome- ket by the latter part of December. ter register 110 degrees in the shade in To the city person of the north a sumthe Sacramento Valley, in the northern part mer in Florida will be a most happy surof the state. It seemed there was not a prise, for in my mind there is nothing quite Sea bathing, a perpetual delight in Florida
A hot day in Florida is-just hot; but a hot day in the north is almost unbearable




6he BUNELL NHLOME BUILADER~
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
Mr. J. Jeppson is bringing in some extra BUNNELL ROADS TO BE WORK ON DRAINAGE
fine tomatoes, for. which he is receiving 20 HARD SURFACED. CANALS CONTINUING
cents a dozen. which equals $3.60 per crate. The Bunnell Development Company haOne Hundred and Fifty Carloads of Shell cut over three miles of main canals and Dr. M. S. Peter is having his farm just to Be Used. ditches within the past six weeks and the
south of Bunnell on the 1oody road put 0e the county coisiSon good work continues. The main canal on
in first-class condition for the fall crops ers held in St. Augustine the expenditure the east side of Bunnell. which is being cut He is doing some extensive clearing. We ofs the $70,000 for road hnprovement re- seven feet wide and six feet deep, is already look for the doctor to be one of the main ently authorized by the legslature was one-half mile in length and when completed
potato growers of this section next season, taken up. Eighteen thousand dollars of t it will be over a mile long. It will be cut was appropriated for bridge work, and the the entire distance through Sections G and balance, fifty-two thousand dollars, is to be 7 and will empty into Gore Lake. When Mr. 0. C. Mosby of Black Point continues expended on road improvement, this canal has been completed the farmers
buying milch cows preparatory to entering The commissioners decided to begin lay- in that section can drain their lands perthe dairy business. The people of Bunnell ing the shell on the main roads at once. fectly by cutting lateral ditches to this are anxiously awaiting the day when he Advertisements for bids on six lnmdred ears canal.
will furnish them with fresh milk and but- of shell were ordered. Bids for hauling Besides this canal, several others are beter. Mayor Heath says if Mosby will fur- and distributing the shell were ordered ad- ing cut on all sides. Let the good work nish him all the buttermilk he can drink vertised.
he will be satisfied for life. The appropriation for shell in and around go on.
Bunnell includes one hundred and fifty cars ROAD IMPROVEMENT.
Mr. H. B. Koch of the Black Point see- to be distributed as follows: Fifty cars
tion is having work done on two acres of on road from Bunnell to Ocean City, fifty At a meeting of the county commissionhis land, preparatory to setting it to pep- cars on the road from Bunnell to Espanola ers held in St. Augustine Tuesday the highpers. Mr. Koch is on to his job when it and lifty cars on the road from Bunnell to way from the Duval County line to Byrds. comes to farming. He has only been here St. -Johns Park. Espanola is to receive fifty just south of Hastings, and from one mile about six months and has already got his ears to be distributed between Espanola and north of Espanola through Bunnell to the ten-acre tract in fine shape for growing Bunnell. Volusia County line was ordered staked out
truck. He informs us that he has bought and put in shape for the shell. The Deen
his last bale of hay, as he has plenty of A good many tomatoes are being shipped road, which connects Bunnell and St. Johns
hay harvested from his place to last him from the Bunnell colony now. Silcox Bros. Park will be shelled from the Park coming besides he has a fine patch of cowpeas corn- made a shipment of two hundred crates this way for three miles, also from Buning. i from Ocean City Monday. These tomatoes nell towards the Park the road will receive
were grown just north of Ocean City and a coat of shells for three miles.
were sent to market over the canal boat
Mr. D. M. Dowdy is finding ready sale line. Latest returns from tomato shipments FARMERS PICNIC AT GORE LAKE. for his table corn at 15 cents a dozen. netted the growers $1.60 per crate. The picnic given by the Bunnell Farmers'
-- Society of Equity at Gore Lake, Friday.
At the examination held in Bunnell Sat- July 4, was well attended. Sonie speakers Si- urday for the purpose of qualifying appli- that had been expected failed to arrive.
cants for the postmastership at Espanola. 'Mr. W. L. Bartlett made a talk, and Rev.
f rs. Biirnsted was the only applicant. L. D. Haynes led in prayer ait the dinner.
Beside, the excellent dinner, with ample
-fr. Tom Byrd ofquantity of barbecued meats, fifteen gallons nell Saturday. Mr. Byrd is manager of of ice cream and plenty of lemonade was
the Hastings baseball team and wvas here served free to the crowd. There was enough to arrange a game between these two for all to eat and some to spare.
points.
If you visit Bunell in the near future.
i The Bunnell Development Company has be sure and visit Mr. Dowdy's cornfield.
let. the contract for the building of a con- The corn was planted April 10. and the crete vault in their office building for the stalks are from eleven to twelve feet high tuse of the company. and each stalk has from two to three ears
of good corn.
The bill authorizing the commissioners
Field oFtomatoes and'corn grown in the colony of St. Johns County to issue 370,000 in war- W T. BOBNS ABOUT
rants to secure funds for improving the ST. JOHNS COUNTY.
F. R. Allen, better known as "Whisper- roads has been signed by Governor Tram- "The best naval orange I have ever
ing" Allen, who is considered by the _New mall and is now a law. eaten in flavor, I picked this afternoon
York potato buyers, the best grower and from the orchard of Mr. F. A. Bettes, not
packer of Florida -potatoes, has just fin- Eggs went to thirty-five cents a dozen four miles from your city. It resembled ished shipping his crop of tomatoes from Mlonday. 'Mr. Farmer did you realize that our Thompson navel rather than the Washhis Almero farm. just east of Bunnell. Thirty-six hens would bring you in $1.05 infgton.
Mr. Allen, as an all-round successful each day now. If you haven't any liens get "'Gentlemen, I tell you this in strict confarmer, has grown successfully on his farm busy and get you some. You would be fidence. I buy my grapefruit through the
several fine crops of alfalfa. watermelons, Isurprised at the revenue von will realize winter from Deal, the leading grower in potatoes and cabbage, and now he has from the coming winter. Santa Barbara, Cal. They cost me thirty
added tomatoes to his successful crops. cents apiece and come from Florida. The
George Durrence continues to rake in the conditions are ideal for producing grapeThe corn and hay merchants who have rash with his weekly load of watermelons. -fruit in your State!'
been depending on St. Johns County to buy Rev. !Richardson preached at the Gilbert
their feed stuff had better make other ar- Mr. G. E. Hanser of Coolmont, Ind.., was School House Sunday morning. rangements as the county has one of the in Bunnell last Thursday.
beatcros o con ad hy t besee inThe heavy rains Saturday did a great deal best crops of corn and hay to be seen in *.,f zood t h rp rudBnel
any part of the United States, and to Mr. Elam Charles of Hohenwald, Tenn.. to the crops around Bunnell.
think this is their second crop this season arrived Sunday to accept a position with M r. R. Brown of Palatka will open up on the same ground. Can you beat it' -Mr. Ed. Johnson. a shoe repair shop here.
"Delightful summers, and winters so mild that the wintertime is the best drowinl season, make Florida a real Paradise for the farmer or trucker."




Che BUNNELL HOM BUILDER
As Contributed by the Bunnell Correspondent During the Month
The Knights of Pythias had a big time. : ......
The St. Johns Lodge. No. 8. of Palatka. I
were at Bunnell to install Mohawk Lodge,
"' o. 128. I
In the St. Johns Tribune of last week :e .editor, Mr. Boaz, writes as follows:
"Don't think for a minute that the cost
living comes high in Bunnell. The editor :-.d for his dinner M.Londay the following:
7ried chicken, sliced tomatoes, corn on the
:b,. Irish potatoes, cooked tomatoes and
-uffed eggs, which -were all grown at his
ime by the madam."
We now understand why the editor is
- ch a hustler and that the Tribune, only
wenty-three weeks old, has over one thou- BIG MASONIC CELEBRATION.
and subscribers. Who should have the The Hiram Boys of Bunnell Lodge, No. 200, F. & A. M., celebrated the anniversary of
.edit? The editor or his wife? St. John the Baptist the 24th.
R. W. D. D. G. M. Silas B. Wright of DeLand, Fla., was the orator of the day, who Agent Bell of the Florida East Coast is well informed in the mystic art, and gave the boys a very inspiring talk; in fact, all
Railway reports three solid cars of mer- of us feel better by having heard him. .:;Idise in one day list week for Bunnell A barbecued dinner, consisting of mutton, pork, beef and venison, together with all
wcsay that business is dull in Florida the necessary viands and et ceteras to accompany the same, that go to make up a temptida menu to tickle the palate of epicures. The "usual" ball game was the feature of :.irig thesumme. ng
ring the summer. the afternoon--only they had three instead of one.
A well regulated dance was enjoyed in the evening in the large and spacious town hall Mr. Corbitt Sullivan arrived Sunday aft- over the Tribune Building, the music being furnished by the Atlantic Beach orchestra. :noon and has taken a position with Car- Everybody was there and everybody enjoyed the occasion very much. A repetition is :-rs' Drug Store. demanded.
The "four hundred set" of St. Augustine were present, motoring over after supper. Mr. F. S. Crowson of Crowson's Corner
_'a1 in the city Saturday. He reports crops
,)king fine at his home. FLORIDA LOOMS UP STRONGLY AS 94 and more. Chicago and Kansas City had
SUMMER RESORT. six, and New York and Pittsburg had five.
____A third diagram illustrates on the face w Article Entitled Florida's Summer Climate of drawings of thermometers the highest
to Appear in Board of Trade temperatures of various sections of the
. Bulletin. country as shown at the most central cities
_ as follows: Northern section. Pittsburg,
INTERESTING COMPARISONS. 100; western section, Kansas City, 104;
central section, Louisville, 104; eastern secJuly Temperature in Jacksonville Below tion, Boston, 104; southern section, JackThat in Northern andWestern Cities. sonville, 94.
A fourth diagram shows the average for
- Florida looms up strongly as a summer the four seasons drawn from charts for
resort according to statistics appearing ii thirty years back. This shows for JacksonS__j the leading article of the July number of ville the following average temperatures:
the Board of Trade Bulletin which will January, February and March, 58.5; April,
Vew store adjoining Tribune Building in Bunnell come off the press before the end of this I May and June, 74.5; July, August and Sepweek. tember, 84.1; October. November and DeUnder the efficient management of Mr. The title of the article is "Florida's Sum- cember. 62.8.
7red Kaiser, the Bunnell Meat and Ice mer Climate: a Misunderstood Quantity.' Copies of the bulltiu will be widely cir_ompany opened their doors for business It was prepared by Secretary H. H. Rich- culated in places where the fine showing for
Mondayy morning in the Willingham market ardson, of the board of trade, from an ex- .acksonvh as an all-the-year resort will Moody Boulevard. They will remain in tensive collection of official data obtained be most effective. There are a number of
:his building for the next two weeks when from the weather bureau. Four diagrams other interesting articles and statistical
-hey will move into their commodious quar- drive in the main points more directly than compilations in the July nunber.-Times:-rs in the new Tribune Building. columns of space could. Union, July, 1911.
It is the intention of this company to The first diagram shows the maximum
* imcdiately put on a regular meat and ic temperature for the first fifteen days of For several months we have mailed you,
agon and deliver meats and ice to Dupont, July in Boston, New York, Louisville, Pitts- either at the request of yourself or a friend, Bulow, St. Joseph, Sapplings and other burg, St. Louis, Chicago, Kansas City and our literature, including the Bunnell Home
: -arby points, making regular trips. Those Jacksonville. Jacksonville had only one of Builder. We are always glad to send this esiring meats or ice at these points can the fifteen days when the temperature was magazine to anyone who is interested in all them up and place their order and it 94-that was July 1. Boston, for instance, Florida; but if for any reason you do not
-:ill be delivered to them without any ex- had only four of the fifteen days when it care to receive it any longer, we shall con:ra cost. was below 94, and the chief range was, sider it a great favor if you will drop us a
They will carry a full line of meats con- around 100 and to as high as 104. The postal and we will take your name from
ting of all kinds of steaks, roasts, chops, comparison with other cities shows propor- our mailing list and not annoy you with Sausage, cured meats and everything found tionately in favor of Jacksonville as for the our literature any longer. .We believe it is
.n a first-class market. cooler of the cities named. not more than right that you should let us
-The opening of this company here is an- The second diagram shows that Jack- know, if you are not interested.
-cher step forward for Bunnell, and the sonville had only one day in the period of BUNNELL HOME BUILDER,
e-ople of this section are to be congratu- comparison when the thermometer went to S. Howard, Editor.
,ated on having a nice up-to-date market 94. Boston, Louisville and St. Louis had Room 1103, 108 S. La Salle Street,
n their midst. nine days of. the same period when it was Chicago, Il.
"The cities cry, 'Keep the boy on the farm,' and then advertise for him to quit."




be BUNNXLL HOME BUILDEXR
H he temperature has climbed well into the ---Wo's, but the sky is nearly overcast with IMPORTANT
L 7 clouds, which shield the ground from the
~?' 4'' iI~C~1'Kdirect rays of the sun. In the west the REDTI
1 clouds begin to bank, and by early after- READ THIS
noon the first mutterings of thunder are The Bunnell Development company, attbe present
iead (:radu ally the sky grows dlark as time. is spending thousands of dollars on improveWe are now in the midst of summer- ments in the colony, such as the building of new
the season of the year when it would seem the storm approaches; then the squall loads. improving old ones, building bridges. etc.
that folks would be the least interested in comes on and the temperature falls 15 or It is therefore very essential that every buyer should 20 degrees in as many minutes. During do his or her part in the development of the colon)
by keeping up the monthly payments as promptly
Florida, but Bun ell-upont is certainly the next few minutes the lightning flashes as possible. Most of our buyers are now doing this. liroeng at e bing l there, and aen and the thunder rolls, while the rain falls To the few who are not we trust this reminder will
in g e n s y in torents; all the elements are in n be sufficient. If you do not make your payments
visiting the colony as they did in mid- int~ns l h lmnsaei nu- promptly. you are standing In the way of progress in
winter. People are becoming educated in roar. In less than half an hour the storm the colony.
regard to Florida, and are learning that passes on to the eastward; the sun peeps BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
regrdto loida ad re eanin tat out from a clearing sky and maps its rainthey can enjoy life in Florida in summer as
well as in winter, bow upon the back of the receding storm.
We wish to call your attention to the The air has a peculiar freshness and exhilseveral articles appearing in this issue in aeration about it now, which all Nature reference to the Summer Climate of Flor- seems to imbibe. The sun declines in a FLORIDA'S SUMMERS ARE GOOD
ida. We believe that this is information clear west, but the energy of the sunbeams ENOUGH FOR MR- BROWN.
you have been seeking, and you may rest is expended in the evaporation of the surassured that it is absolutely reliable. face moisture, and not as sensible heat;
therefore the temperature of the air continues relatively low. Night comes on. Well, ,\r. Verdenius, I see in my paper
The Editor has not received many let- The stars shine from a. cloudless sky, and a where the heat up North is fierce. Up as
ters lately from land owners and others fresh breeze springs up to add further com- Hamilton, Ohio, it went up to 117 an who have visited the colony, and we wish fort to the glorious night. The clear sky bursted the thermometer. Here we have to remind you that a letter from each of permits an unhampered radiation of heat cool breeze all the time. One day it was
you would be very acceptable. We trust from the ground; so that. as the night ad- up to 91 with a cool breeze, while the same
that if you have not already written a vances, there comes a chill in the air that day at my old Indiana home it was 104 anc
letter for the Home Builder that you will causes us to draw up the cover to keep us a hot steam and no breeze. I have not do this at once, so that your letter may comfortably warm. Finally morning dawns, missed a day's work since I came to Florappear in the September issue. "Variety is to begin the sequence of the preceding day. ida. I am fifty-five years old and feel like the spice of life"-so help us make the When the press dispatches tell us that I was only sweet sixteen. When I left the
Home Builder bright and spicy by giving the North and West are suffering from the cold N-orth, December 3, I felt as if I was
us your various ideas on Bunnell-Dupont visitation of a *summer hot wave and that one hundred years old. No more North for
and its possibilities, the people there are panting for breath; me. I expect to spend my last days it
when information comes to us that a popu- Florida-the finest climate in the world. THE SUMMER CLIMATE OF THE FLOR- lation, unable to rest at night on account It beats California. California people are
of heat, seeks the open parks in search of coming to Florida by the hundreds of famiIDA PENINSULA.
an absent breeze; when later we read the lies, and land is going higher and higher.
By T. Frederick Davis, in The Florida mortality list and learn of the deaths re- No one can make a mistake by buying land
Review. suiting from heat prostration; then we, in in Bunnell. Only a few more years and
When the North shivers in the grasp of Florida, should recognize the benefits of the all of Florida's land will be sold and people the blizzard and the ground there is coy- delightful breezes and offer thanks for the will have to pay from $200 up to $1,006 ered with a mantle of snow, then the hu- pleasant, restful nights, which characterize per acre. I am here and know whereof I man tide turns toward the balmy atmos- our summer season, speak. H. E. BROWN.
phere and the bright, blue skies of Florida.
With the approach of spring-time, our ..
friends from the North return to their
homes, carrying with them associations
and recollections that often find a place
in print. Thus, year after year, books and -....
magazine articles are written, in which the
charms of our climate play an important
role. So the fame of Florida's winter climate extends throughout the length and
breadth of our great country; in song and
story it has been given to all the world.
But the impression prevailing among our
friends of the North seems to be that our
summers are composed of destructive thunder-storms and intolerable heat; because
our winters are mild, they infer that the
summers are insufferably hot. ---k
The same causes that modify the winter 'Iv
cold contribute to tempering the heat of
summer. Like the thumb of a giant hand, .
the Florida peninsula extends far into the "-____ .. I
sea, and from this fact results a climate
that is almost oceanic in its equability. BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY PRODUCES SOME FAT MEN.
The vast water areas on each side ensure A few days ago a gentleman who had just returned from Bunnell was in the Chicag.
a free circulation of the air and a pleasant office. He was highly pleased with the colony and its possibilities, but laughingly said breeze across the State almost incessantly. that lie found the colony lacking in just one thing-some fat men, and he did not kn,: : The atmosphere does not stagnate here. whether Florida could produce big men like himself. he weighing about 200 pounds.
Let us describe a characteristic midsummer I told my friend that he was wrong there, but he replied that I would have to
day and night. The sun rises in a cloudless show him-hence the pictures of the fat men appearing on this page. These pictures sky. As he mounts higher in the heavens, were taken on the streets of Bunnell. and should be proof sufficient for all doubters of the temperature of the air likewise begins the fact that Florida does produce large men. to rise. About 8 or 9 o'clock the sky be- These gentlemen are native Floridians. I have met them a number of times at
comes partly overcast with cumulus clouds, Bunnell, and this little article is simply to prove that not only do we raise big potatoes. while the wind freshens a. little. By noon mammoth watermelons and splendid corn in Bunnell-Dupont, but also good sized men.
"A man isn't no-cessarily worthless because his neighbor is worth more."




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
MR. HOUSE OF NEW MEXICO TELLS OF NO Other State Affords Such Delight to Those
HIS FLORIDA TRIP
Jul 5,D T 913 Advanced in Years as Florida
July 5, 1913.
I purchased a twen- July 6, 1913. of the places I have lived in. for climate
ty-acre tract in the and health, and as for your colony and the
Bunnell Dupont col- \-r. T. A. Verdenius, an.sfrorcln n h
Bunnell Dupont col M Bunnell lands, Mr. Verdenius, will say it
ony at Bunnell, Flor- Chicago, Ill is fine. I located two tracts of twenty
ida, without seeing Dear Sir and Friend: acres each for parties in Oklahoma. One of
same. I made an in- them was here in May to see his tract and
spection of my land This is Sunday. I have before me the was well pleased with same.
ond the 9th of June Home Builder and have read your article in As for raising crops here, we can raise and I was more than it, HOW 1IUCH MONEY SHOULD A MAN practically everything that you can north.
pleased with my allotment and the fu- HAVE TO START SUCCESSFULLY IN My wife just got some roasting ears. I
: took one ear and measured it. It measured
ture prospects of the THE BUNNELL COLONY. I think you are took12 inches longer and measured eighteen rows ofured colony. I found a fine very honest and square in your answer. 2el lo eland ad t n is ro
set of men, ready to well-filled kernels. Now this corn is growMr. C. C. House ing where Ave dug Irish potatoes-35 barMr. c. c. Houe do anything in their Now, I will try and tell you a little of rels on 220 rods square. These potatoes poerfo m rels on 220 rods square. These potatoes
power for ime. my experience in different states that I were dug the last few days of April. We
Bunnell is a modern little town with ce- soApi. e
nent walks, and the town is still growing. have lived in. I am now over sixty-eight have watermelons-fine ones, too. Our Any one would do well to purchase a tract years old and was raised in Stephenson grapes are ripe now and they are fine. I
Sthe Bunnell-Dupont colony. I found a have oranges and grapefruit growing, all
Sthe B nell-Dupont colony. I found a Couty, Illinois. I was a member of Corn- inside of three years. I had a very limited
-lendid black sandy loam soil. pany C, 46th Illinois Infantry. I lived one amount of capital and we were not able to
While there I visited the noted Hastings year in Wisconsin; I lived fifteen years in hire help. My "better half" and I did all otato district, twelve miles north, and Iowa; I lived in Idaho and have been in the the work ourselves, so will say if a man is Sinnot afraid to work he can accomplish more )a the same ground where potatoes had states and territories west of the Missouri here in the same length of time than he
:een harvested in early spring, corn stood River, as far southwest as Alice, Texas. I can up North and with more comfort. He
-houlder high. lived a number of years in Arkansas, and I can have fresh vegetables the year around.
I am pleased to speak a word for the came from Tennessee to Florida, where lots I had better quit for this time. I will
olony and expect to move there as soon of my northern friends thought we would say to our northern friends: Come and see
possible. CHAS. C. HOUSE. I us and we will show you. Come one, come
(New Mexico.) be eaten up with mosquitoes, and starve. all---you are all welcome.
But I tell you that they were badly mis- I wish you and the Bunnell-Dupont coltaken. As you know, we live a little west ony success, for some of the men of the of the town of Bunnell. We arrived here company are my personal friends. MR. READING FINDS IT EASY TO SAVE the 25th of October, 1910, and started clear- Yours truly,
WHEN HE HAS- AN INCENTIVE ing our ten acres. F. D. BARMING(3TON.
Bunnell and I. We bought our land when we lived in (Box 34, Bunnell, Fla.)
Tennessee and paid for it cash without see- Editor's Note: If any one writes Mr.
Although being a man of good health I ing it. Will say right here that Florida is Barmington for information, please enclose vas never able to put away a dollar. I good enough for me. It beats all the rest return postage.
ad always desired to own a piece of land
omrnewhere, as an insurance for old age,
mnd one day, much to the credit of those who gave me the opportunity, I read about
the easy payment plan to buy a home in
.Florida. The statements in the literature
ont me were so straightforward and sane,
uid contracts so simple, that I soon realzed the honesty and aim of the men back
f the deal. so I bought ten acres.
AND THIS IS THE RESULT.
Today I have a ten-acre tract all paid
for, which is already worth twice as much
ais I paid for it. I am laying aside every dollar I can, so when the time comes I can
,huIll times and panics, good-bye to high rents
:tad high cost of living, and probably by that
time Bunnell will be a prosperous city, and
my land worth a real fortune to me; otherwise. if I had not been wise enough to grasp
the great opportunity offered me by the comn,any, I would still be with the majority
of wage earners, with nothing but a week's
wages coming. I have not deprived my/ pvments. I have simply been taught how
to save a few dollars with a great advanage. and to provide for myself and family
i better future.
G(EO. READING, JR. From Chicago, Ill., to Bunnell, Fla., by Automobile. Mr. Szabelshi and party left Chicago
(Connecticut.) by Auto on July 5th for Bunnell-Du Pont Colony
"The possibilities of a Florida Farm are only limited by the ability of its owner."




Che BUNNELL HOME BUILDER .
WHY THE PRICE OF OUR LAND WAS
ADVANCED. The Summer Will Soon Be Gone, Likewise All thi
Recently we have been the recipients of Unsold Land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony
a number of letters asking why we advanced
the price of our Bunnell-Dupont Colony
land to $35 and $40 an acre. The answer
to this question is very simple indeed. Our Land is Sellin Very Rapidly
Farm lands are increasing in value everywhere. Land that could have been bought Sin e eWa A to
in Canada some years ago for $10 an acre the Price Was Advance o
is now selling at from $50 to $75 an acre.
In the West land is selling today for $100
an acre that could have been purchased ten
years ago for $25 an acre.
The population of the United States will
double itself within the next twenty-five
Years. At that rate, we shall have almost
one hundred and eighty million people in
this country twenty-five years hence. 50 cents an acre down and 50 cents an acre a
This mighty army of men, women and
children must be fed and clothed, and all month until paid for
that they shall eat and wear must come
from Mother Earth directly or indirectly. If you wish to secure a farm in the Bunnell-DuPont coloil,
Every year, you see, our population rapidly b
increases, and that means more mouths t you had better mail me your order AT ONCE. As I have to>.
feed, more bodies to clothe, and consequently you many times, our Motto is "first come, first served." I a:land that must produce all this is bound g tms ur arn i s frs m e, firtswervd.l a .
to increase in value. giving you fair warning. Before many months we will advan(The time -when you could secure land from the price of every acre of our land to $40.00, and very soon it wi: Uncle Sam free of cost is practically passed. be $50.00 an- acre, and it is dirt cheap even at that-price. The days when you could buy grazing land
in New Mexico for ten cents an acre are The same land we sell at Bunnell for $35.00 and $40.00 a
no more. I know one man who refused to
buy land in the Hastings' District, now fa- acre now, on the easy payment plan, would cost you at HastingMous as the largest potato producing sec twelve miles north of us, from $200.00 to $300.00 an acre, cash. tion of the South, for eighteen cents an acre,
and this same land is selling now for from
$200 to $300 an acre cash. We also have some fine lots for sale at Ocean City $75.00
Some of the land in the 3unnell-Dupont $150.00 a lot-terms cash, and some fine residence lots in Bunne. Colony originally sold for $20 an acre; later for $50.00 apiece and upwards-$5.00 down and $5.00 each mont for $25; then for $30; and now for $35 and
$40 an acre. Why did we advance the price until paid for. of our land? Because it is cheaper today
for $50 than it was once for half this If you do not want a farm in Florida, buy a lot in Ocear:
amount. City. This is a real beauty spot-its location is ideal. It 1.
When we started the- Bunnell-Dupont especially spo-t is de al.
Colony we told our buyers that we were y suitable for retired people and those who wish t:
going to have a town; that there would be secure a winter home in Florida. If you live in Ocean Cit.
a bank, electric light plant, stores, school
church, water works, barrel factory, hard you can enjoy the delightful salt sea breezes from the grearoadis through the country, and that they uta oral ya e
ro, thouh hecom ,' n tatthy Atlantic, just at your door, all the year around. It it a re-,-woul some day see colonists scattered all health resort. A few months spent here and your rheuover the tract, raising crops and shipping them to the North-but that was all in the matism, catarrh, throat or heart trouble are things cf
future. Today we can say that we have the past. now accomplished all of these things. We
do not have to 'talk about what we are
going to do, but we can show what has al- Ocean City is located on the Florida East Coast Cana
ready been done. and the Florida East Coast Railroad is going to build a roa:
However, we are still improving our tract, close to Ocean City. Small steamers and yachts pass u:
Right now we are spending thousands of d dOwn the canal daily. This spot is a paradise for th
dollars each month for development work, an
and the more improvements we make. the sportsman, as the finest fishing, hunting, boating and bathmore the country is developed. the more
valuable the land will become, and it is only ing are to be enjoyed here. a question of a few years until theefarms
in our colony will sell for hundreds of do]- Lots are selling fast and if you want one of them you h1'r.
lars an acre. better act QUICKLY before the best are gone. Write for ft.
The value of land in the South has particulars regarding Ocean City and Bunnell lots, also farms increased more rapidly than in any other
Iart of the United States, and we fully be- Bunnell-DuPont colony, and ask for plats of the above mentione lieve that land values in the Bunell-Dupont towns.
Colony will increase 100 per cent within the
next few years. A. V ELD IV U S
The question is answered. We are sure 7HO M A b VE R D E Ii U
that you understand now why we advanced I1' the price of laud in the Bunnell-Dupont 10S South LaSalle St. Chicago, Illinoi
Colony.
"Always struggle to do forward. Be on the onward march."




6e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER-Florida in Summer
Al way s i n though living in Chicago at the present gone to two or three different hotels.
preparing a n time I feel that I can speak with authority Many of these winter hotels charge. fabuarticle for the on this subject, since I made my home in Ious prices, that are beyond the reach of Home Builder I Florida for two years, and in fact the first the man of ordinary means, but even these endeavor to s- time I took my family to the state it was exorbitant rates do not keep the hotels from4 lect a subject in the month of August. doing a thriving business, and many of them
I want you to believe that I am always are .filled to overflowing during the entire that will b e glad to answer your questions personally, tourist season. b e n e ficial to for I consider this an important part of my All of these facts, in my opinion, prove those who eon- duties, but as this article will likely be I that Florida has an ideal winter climate, template mak- read by the majority of our buyers through- but I wonder if my next statement will be ing their home out the United States and Canada, I trust accepted as readily when I say that Florida in our colony, it may be the means of removing the erro- also has an ideal summer climate. Neveror in Florida neous impression that seems to prevail in theless, this statement is true. It is a fact sooner or later; the minds of so many (and I do not know that it is hot in Florida in summer, but
and, indeed, I why) that Florida is impossible as a place there must be hot weather at some season b e iev e this of residence during the summer months, of the year in every state where land is
should be the and that all sorts of dangers lurk there. worth anything. It takes heat to grow purpose of Should I attempt to discuss Florida's crops, and a country would be a failure
e v e r y article magnificent winter climate with the people without the warm growing months, but bear written for our little magazine. And here of the north and northwest, I believe there this in mind-it is not any warmer in FlorI wish to say that if any of our readers would be but little chance for argument. I ida in summer than in our northern states, would like -ine to write on any special topic, am quite certain that no one would be fool- and cooler than it is in some of them. let me know what it is, or write the editor ish enough to contradict my statement when If you doubt this statement, write to of the Home Builder and suggest the sub- I say that for eight or nine months of the your nearest Government Weather Bureau ject you would like to have discussed year Florida is the most ideal state, as re- and enclose a stamped envelope. Ask Uncle
through the pages of this magazine. gards climate, that can be found anywhere. Sam for some old weather reports; also, if
In the Chicago and Bunnell offices let- It is unnecessary to take space to prove this you wish to do so, write to the Weather ters from land owners are received daily assertion, for I believe it is an established Bureau at Jacksonville or St. Augustine, containing a great many questions. Some fact that Florida's winter climate cannot Fla. But for your convenience I will give
of these men and women have never been be surpassed anywhere. you below a table showing the average ternto Florida. and it often keeps me on the To confirm this statement one has but to perature, based on a ten-year average, from
jump to answer every question. At differ- note the vast tide of immigration to Flor- the United States Weather Bureau statisent seasons of the years certain questions ida each 'winter. People of wealth from tics at St. Augustine, about 30 miles north
predominate, but the one which is agitating every state, and from abroad, come to spend of our colony; and at Ormond, about 25 the minds of our northern land owners just their winters in Florida, for the favored miles to the south of us. Study these fignow is about the weather. We are being ones of earth flit from place to place seek- ures carefully and they will give you a cornasked: ing the best, and their return to this balmy prehensive idea of what to expect in ternWHAT ABOUT YOUR SUMMERS? state each winter proves the attractiveness perature in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony.
of Florida's winter climate. St. Augustine Ormond
HOW HOT IS IT IN FLORIDA? The mamnf6th hotels scattered over the Degrees Degrees
For instance, I received a letter this state are filled to ovei-flowing during these
morning from one of our buyers which read months, and nowhere can you find more January .................. 56 58
in part as follows: "I certainly wisa I magnificent hotels than in Florida, espe- February ................. 61 58
could be in Florida for a week or so to cially along the east coast. The largest March ..................... 62 64
really see how hot it is.. Today it is so family hotel in the world is located south April ..................... 68 69
blamed hot here it is enough to roast *a of our Bunnell-Dapont Colony, and a num- May ...................... 73 77
man. Right now it is 98 in the shade, and ber of modern hotels are located at our June ...................... 78 70
if it is any hotter than that in the Bunnell- county seat, St. Augustine, some of them July ...................... 80 80
Dupont Colony I should like to know it." having cost a half million dollars and more. August ................... 80 80
This and scores of similar inquiries have St. Augustine, I am told, can accommodate September .................77 79
led me to believe that it would be a saving about six thousand tourists. I had occasion October ................... 65 72
of time, to ourselves and to our buyers, if to spend a night in St. Augustine some November ................. 63 64
I should tell you in this issue the real time ago, and found considerable difficulty December --------- ----- 58 57
facts concerning the summers in Florida, in securing a room for the night; in fact,
as I personally experienced them. Al- I was not able to secure one until I had Average annual temperature 68 69
": : ... :"Hotels
Ponce do Leon
and
Akazar
~at
St. Augustine,k i ane
Florida
"Florida comes as near beinil a Paradise for mankind as can be foiinc injAmerica."




Full Text

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The Truth About Florida | The Bunnell Home Builder § j§ Edited by S. HOWARD M 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. §| f IlllllllillllllllllllllllllWllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllli^ %  r oI. 1 August, 1013 JVo* 9 If You Own i^and You’re a Part Owner of the World The cartoon tearing this title appeared some "me ago in the r hie a go DailyTribune, and is re re reproduced :y courtesy of the ireist, Mr. John 7. McCutcheon. It is a remarka ble little picture, and you should study it well. It is 'ike a song with out words. You tan grasp its meaning without any comments. Have you ever g ive n this a thought, that “if you own land you are a part owner of the world?” Think about it, and if you already own a piece of land, be thankful for :t; if you do not, make up your mind to have :t at once—no matter what may be the per sonal sacrifice now. What a world of pathos and tragedy there is in this picture, and still there is HOPE. These poor people can look away from the city, beyond the smoke and grime, to the country, where each one may have pure air, water and milk, fresh fruit and vegetables. and where men, women and children have a chance to enjoy good health, and where they, may lead normal, hap py lives. “Back to the farm” is’an ex pression .hat will echo in the hearts of men and wo men so long as conditions in the cities are as they are. Thousands ofmen and women are 1 i v i n g in crowded tene ments and eking o.ut an existence, who can see noth ing ahead of them year after year but the same grind and heartache. The solution of this great problem is “Back to the Farm” and the sooner they learn this the happier they will be. It is a wonderful thing to be able to portray such eagerness and longing with a few strokes of the pen, such as McCutcheon has depicted in the faces of this father, mother and children. It is a picture to set you thinking, and if you already have solved this problem for yourself; hand this magazine on to some one else who has yet to learn that “// You Own Land, You're a Part Owner of the World. ” IF YOU OWN LAND, YOU'RE A P ART OWNER OF THE WORLD. fCoprHBn:: 1912: By John T. McCutciMn.]

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/bunnellhomebuildv1no_8

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me BUMHEEE HOME BU2EDER. FI orida in Summer Always in preparing a n article for the Home Builder I endeavor to se lect a subject that will b e bene fieial to those who con template mak ing their home in our colony, or in Florida sooner or later; and, indeed, I believe this should be the j purpose of; every article I written for our little magazine. And here I I wish to say that if any of our readers would like me to write on .any special topic. | let me know what it is, or write the editor %  of the Home Builder and suggest the sub' jeet you would like to have discussed through the pages of this magazine. In the Chicago and Bunnell offices let ters from land owners are received daily containing a great many questions. Some of these men and women have never been to Florida, and it often keeps me on the jump to answer every question. At differ ent seasons of the years certain questions predominate, but the one which is agitating j the minds of our northern land owners just 1 now is about the weather. We are being i asked: WHAT ABOUT YOUR SUMMERS? HOW HOT IS IT IN FLORIDA? For instance, I received a letter this j morning from one of our buyers which read in part as follows: "I certainly wisn I could be in Florida for a week or so to really see how hot it is., Today it is so blamed hot here it is enough to roast a man. Right now it is 98 in the shade, and if it is any hotter than that in the BunnellDupont Colony I should like to know it.” Tills and scores of similar inquiries have : led me to believe that it would be a saving of time, to ourselves and to our buyers, if ; I should tell you in this issue the real facts concerning the summers in Florida, J as I personally experienced them. Al; though living in Chicago at the present time I feel that I can speak with authority on this subject, since I made my home in Florida for two years, and in fact the first time I took my family to the state it was in the month of August. I want you to believe that I am always glad to answer your questions personally, for I consider this an important part of my duties, but as this article will likely be read by the majority of our buyers through out the United States and Canada, I trust it may he the means of removing the erro neous impression that seems to prevail in the minds of so many (and I do not know why) that Florida is impossible as a place of residence during the summer months, and that all sorts of dangers lurk there. Should I attempt to discuss Florida’s j magnificent winter climate with the people of the north and northwest, I believe there would be but little chance for argument. I am quite certain that no one would be foolj ish enough to contradict my statement when I say that for eight or nine months of the i year Florida is the most ideal state, as re| gards climate, that can be found anywhere. It is unnecessary to take space to prove this assertion, for I believe it is an established fact that Florida's winter climate cannot be surpassed anywhere. To confirm this statement one has but to note the vast tide of immigration to Florj ida each winter. People of wealth from j every state, and from abroad, come to spend their winters in Florida, for the favored ones of earth flit from place to place seek ing the best, and their return to this balmy state each winter proves the attractiveness of Florida’s winter climate. The mammoth hotels scattered over the state are filled to overflowing during these months, and nowhere can you find more magnificent hotels than in Florida, especially along the east coast. The largest i family hotel in the world is located south j of our Bunnell-Dupont Colony, and a num ber of modem hotels are located at our j county seat, St. Augustine, some of them : having cost a half million dollars and more. St. Augustine, I am told, can accommodate about six thousand tourists. I had occasion to spend a night in St. Augustine some time ago, and found considerable difficulty in securing a room for the night; in fact, j I was not able to secure one until I had gone to two or three different hotels. Many of these winter hotels charge fabu lous prices, that are beyond the reach of the man of ordinaiy means, but even these exorbitant rates do not keep the hotels fron doing a thriving business, and many of then are filled to overflowing during the entire tourist season. All of these facts, in my opinion, prove that Florida has an ideal winter climate, but I wonder if my next statement will be accepted as readily when I say that Florida also has an ideal summer climate. Never theless, this statement is true. It is a fact that it is hot in Florida in summer, but there must be hot weather at some season of the year in every state where land is .worth anything. It takes heat to grow crops, and a country would be a failure without the warm growing months, but bear this in mind—it is not any' warmer in Flor ida in summer than in our northern states, and cooler than it is in some of them. If you doubt this statement, write to your nearest Government Weather Bureau and enclose a stamped envelope. Ask Uncle Sam for some old 'weather reports; also, if you wish to do so, write to the Weather Bureau at Jacksonville or St. Augustine, Fla. But for your convenience I will give you below a table showing the average tem perature, based on a ten-year average, from the United States Weather Bureau statis tics at St. Augustine, about 30 miles north of our colony; and at Ormond, about 25 miles to the south of us. Study these fig ures carefully and they will give you a com prehensive idea of what to expect in tem perature in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. St. Augustine Ormond Degrees Degrees January 56 58 February 61 58 March 62 64 April 68 69 May. 73 77 •June. 7S 70 •Tulv. 80 80 August SO 80 September. 77 79 October 65 72 November 63 64 December ;. 5S 57 Average annual temperature 68 69 Hotels Ponce do Leon and Alcazar at St. Augustine, Florida Florida cornea as near bein^ a Paradise for mankind as can be .fount injAmerica,”

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?fre BUHNELE HOME BUILDER By Thomas A. Verdenius Look at your daily paper and note the leather reports for Chicago, New York, St. Paul, etc., and compare these with the fig ures I have given you above. Go practically .far north as you like, you will find peo ple who are overcome with heat, and you n read in the daily papers of many sun strokes. I think I have received more initries from Canada about our summer eatlier than from any other part of the -ountry. f recall the summer of 1911 which I spent ,n Florida. During that time I was con stantly receiving letters of inquiry about :he climate, for if you remember, the sum mer of 1911 was, as northern visitors to Florida told me, almost unbearable. But those who came to Florida stated they j found more comfort and could sleep better :here than in the north. A few weeks ago we here in Chicago i suffered intensely during a hot spell that j asted for several days. The papers con fined many accounts of prostrations from :he heat, and also a number of deaths re sulted from same. A few days later I met friend who had just arrived in Chicago from Florida, and he stated that at that rime the weather was not at all uncom fortable in Florida. I have experienced some hot days in Flor ida, but never did I see it warmer than 9S in the shade, and this for only a few hours. The heat is entirely different from what we nave in the north. One can work in the sun all day and not be overcome by the neat, and if you seek the shade you will al ways find a cool breeze there: while at night one can sleep in comfort—which is indeed "impossible in the north in hot weather. These heaven-sent breezes are .vafted to the inhabitants of Florida from die east and from the west—from the broad Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. No lying out on sidewalks at Bunnell to obtain a breath of fresh air, as many must do in •ities like Chicago. Such long, hot days we have here in Chi cago, when people are fairly gasping for ; breath, and when there is no relief from the excessive heat day or night. We watch the weather reports and long for a respite, nnd when it does come it is so sudden we i are not prepared for it. A cold wind comes from the lake and a chilly rain follows, and much sickness often results therefrom. Florida’s climate is often compared with | that of California, but I have found it do I be vastly different. I have been in both states in summer and in winter, but the cli mate of Florida surpassed by far tlie clii mate of California, just as Florida surj passes California in many other ways—with j the exception, that California is more de, veloped; but this I say, if half the money was spent in Florida that has been spent ‘ on California, she would be far ahead of i the ‘‘'golden state.” California, as you kuow, has a number of valleys that are very delightful at some seaj sons of the year, but in the summer time the heat in these valleys is intense. The i people are practically in a basin and the sun’s rays fall upon them all day long without mercy. I have seen the thermome ter register 110 degrees in the shade in the Sacramento Valley, in the northern part of the state. It seemed there was not a Swimming Pool, Hotel Alcazar breath of air, not a leaf stirred, and no cooling breezes could reach this valley such as fan our cheeks in Florida in the summer time. The hot part of the day in Florida is from 11 a. m. until 3 p. m. From that hour it gradually cools off. until at 5 or 6 o'clock the weather is perfect, and one almost re grets the hours he must spend in sleep, it is so pleasant to sit out of doors. I used to sit on my porch night after night when the day’s work was over. The air was cool and invigorating, and one could give hintself up to the beauty of the summer night. [ could hear the night birds calling to each other from the trees nearby, and the tin kling of the cow bells in the distance gave a pleasant accompaniment to one’s quiet inusings. The moonlight nights are incom parable in Florida, and bow can one fail to feel like working and doing his best all day long, even in summer, when he obtains such rest of body and mind during the night? Let us consider what the summer means to the Florida farmer. We will say, for the sake of argument, that the summers are no better there than in tlie north, then we will see what advantages the Florida farm ers have over those in the northern states. 1 n the north the fanner must grow his crops during three or four months. The extremely short growing season keeps him on the go from early morning until late at night, and iie must do most of the hard work on the farm while the weather is hot. It is true that in Florida we raise some crops all tlie year around: when one crop is gone another is planted, but after all dur ing the summer months work slackens up a bit. During these months the northern fanners supply the home markets, and there is no need to import produce from tlie south. At this time tlie south raises crops for home consumption, such as corn, cow peas, velvet beans, peanuts, sweet pota toes, etc., and they have all kinds of good things to eat, and for the market—water melons, cantaloupes, plums, peaches, pears, etc. So you see the Florida farmer can take life a little easy during these three or four months, for pretty soon the rainy season will he over, and by that time the north is beginning to feel the autumn frosts, and soon tlie cold of winter, and then the south ern farmers will get into harness, plant their fall crop and have it ready for mar ket by the latter part of December. To the city person of the north a sum mer in Florida will be a most happy sur prise, for in my mind there is nothing quite so bad as a summer shut up in the coniines of a large city, and especially how the chil dren are to be pitied in such surroundings. I have been reading in the papers of the crusade that is to be waged in Chicago again this summer for the children. The mortality is fearful indeed among the lit tle folks each summer in the tenement sec tions of our large cities, and it is a great work of humanity, that of relieving these little ones. What a difference between these unfortunate children and those who live in Florida in the country. There they play out of doors all day long, or lie in hammocks in the shade, and they are rosy, tanned and happy—and all this in a semitropical clime, that appears to be such a bugbear to many folks. Do not be prejudiced about something you are not familiar with. Of course, I say the summer months are less pleasant than those of the spring, fall and muter, but I repeat again that one can live in Florida comfortably the year around. It is strange that men will content them selves with such rudimentary reasoning as to matters of climate. They know that the polar regions are the coldest, and the equa torial regions the hottest, and they jump at the conclusion that the nearer the pole one gets the colder lie finds the country, and the nearer he approaches the equator the hotter it gets. This idea is much nearer correct in winter than in summer. Of course the sun’s rays shine more di rectly on Florida than on Kansas, hut in mid-summer they shine about an hour and a half less per day in Florida. On June 21st the sun rises in Kansas at 4:30 and sets at 7:30. This makes a day of fifteen hours and a night of only nine. In Florida the sun rises on that day at 5:15 and sets at 0:45. This makes a day of only thirteen hours and a half and a night of ten and one-half. So while in Kansas the earth in the middle of summer is heating six hours longer than it is cooling; in Florida it is heating only three hours longer than it is cooling and this in part accounts for tlie fact that while the summers are longer in Florida than in Kansas, they are not as hot. Tlie sea breeze that sweeps over Florida accounts for the balance of it. Go to Bunnell this summer if you can, and stay a week or ten days, and if you do 1 believe you will agree with me that the summers in Florida are all right. Sea bathing, a perpetual delight in Florida A kot day in. Florida is—just kot; but a kot day in tke nortk is almost unbearable

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_ Wh@ BUNHELL HOME BUIUDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont Mr. J. Jeppson is bringing in some extra fine tomatoes, for winch he is receiving 20 cents a dozen, which equals $3.60 per crate. Dr. II. S. Peter is having his farm just south of Bunnell on the Moody road put in first-class condition for the fall crops. He is doing some extensive clearing. We look for the doctor to be one of the main potato growers of this section next season. Mr. O. C. Mosby of Black Point continues buying mileh cows preparatory to entering the daily business. The people of Bunnell are anxiously awaiting the day when he will furnish them with fresh milk and but ter. Mayor Heath says if Mosby will fur nish him all the buttermilk he can drink he will be satisfied for life. Mr. H. B. Koch of the Black Point sec tion is having work done on two acres of his land, preparatory to setting it to pep pers. Mr. Koch is on to his job when it comes to farming. He has only been here about six months and has already got his ten-acre tract in tine shape for growing truck. He informs us that he has bought his last bale of hay, as he has plenty of ] hay harvested from his place to last him, 1 besides he has a fine patch of cowpeas comj ing. Mr. D. M. Dowdy is finding ready sale for his table corn at 15 cents a dozen. Field of tomatoes and corn grown in the colony F. R. Allen, better known as “'Whisper’ ing"' 5 Allen, who is considered by the Xew York potato buyers, the best grower and j packer of Florida potatoes, has just fin'• ished shipping his crop of tomatoes from his Almero farm, just east of Bunnell. Mr. Allen, as an all-round successful farmer, has grown successfully on his farm several fine crops of alfalfa, watermelons, potatoes and cabbage, and now he has added tomatoes to his successful crops. The corn and hay merchants who have been depending on St. Johns County to buy their feed stuff had better make other ar rangements as the county has one of the best crops of corn and hay to be seen in any part of the United States, and to think this is their second crop this season on the same ground. Can you beat it? BUNNELL ROADS TO BE HARD SURFACED. One Hundred and Fifty Carloads of Shell to Be Used. At a meeting of the county commission ers held in St. Augustine the expenditure or the $70,000 for road improvement re cently authorized by the legislature was taken up. Eighteen thousand dollars of it was appropriated for bridge work, and the balance, fifty-two thousand dollars, is to be expended on road improvement. The commissioners decided to begin lay ing the shell on the main roads at once. Advertisements for bids on six hundred cars of shell were ordered. Bids for hauling and distributing the shell were ordered ad vertised. The appropriation for shell in and around Bunnell includes one hundred and fifty cars to be distributed as follows: Fifty cars on road from Bunnell to Ocean City, fifty c-ars ou the road from Bunnell to Espanola and fifty ears on the road from Bunnell to St. Johns Park. Espanola is to receive fifty cars to be distributed between Espanola and Bunnell. A good many tomatoes are being shipped from the Bunnell colony now. Silc-ox Bros, made a shipment of two hundred crates from Ocean City Monday. These tomatoes were grown just north of Ocean City and were sent to market over the canal boat line. Latest returns from tomato shipments netted the growers $1.60 per crate. At the examination held in Bunnell Sat urday for the purpose of qualifying appli cants for the postmastership at Espanola, Mrs. Burnsted was the only applicant. Mr. Tom Byrd of Hastings was in Bun nell Saturday. Mr. Byrd is manager of the Hastings baseball team and was here to arrange a game between these two points. The Bunnell Development Company has let the contract for the building of a con%  Crete vault in their offiee building for the use of the company. The bill authorizing the commissioners ; of St. Johns County to issue $70,000 in war rants to secure funds for improving the roads has been signed by Governor I'rammell and is now a law. Eggs went to thirty-five cents a dozen Monday. Mr. Farmer did you realize that thirty-six hens would bring you in $1.05 each day now. If you haven’t any hens get busy and get you some. You would be surprised at the revenue you will realize from the coming winter. George Durrence continues to rake in the cash with his weekly load of watermelons. Mr. CL E. Hanser of Coolmont, Ind., was in Bunnell last Thursday. Mr. Elam Charles of Hohenwald, Tenn.. arrived Simday to accept a position with Mr. Ed. Johnson. WORK ON DRAINAGE CANALS CONTINUING The Bunnell Development Company lias cut over three miles of main canals and ditches within the past six weeks and the good work continues. The main canal on the east side of Bunnell, which is being cut seven feet wide and six feet deep, is already one-half mile in length and when completed it will be over a mile long. It will be cut the entire distance through Sections C and 7 and will empty into Gore Lake. When this canal has been completed the farmers in that section can drain their lands per fectly by cutting lateral ditches to this canal. Besides this canal, several others are be ing cut on all sides. Let the good work go on. ROAD IMPROVEMENT. At a meeting of the county commission ers held in St. Augustine Tuesday the high way from the Duval County line to Byrds, just south of Hastings, and from one mile north of Espanola through Bunnell to the Volusia County line was ordered staked out and put in shape for the shell. The Deen road, which connects Bunnell and St. Johns Park will be shelled from the Park coming this way for three miles, also from Bun nell towards the Park the road will receive a coat of shells for three miles. FARMERS PICNIC AT GORE LAKE. The picnic given by the Bunnell Farmers' Society of Equity at Gore Lake, Friday, July 4, was well attended. Some speakers that had been expected failed to arrive. Mr. W. L. Bartlett made a talk, and Rev. L. D. Haynes led in prayer at the dinner. Besides the excellent dinner, with ample quantity of barbecued meats, fifteen gallons of ice cream and plenty of lemonade was served free to the crowd. There was enough for all to eat and some to spare. H you visit Bunnell in the near future, be sure and visit Mr. Dowdy's cornfield. The corn was planted April 10, and the stalks are from eleven to twelve feet high and each stalk has from two to three ears of good corn. WHAT MR. BURBANK SAID ABOUT ST. JOHNS COUNTY. “The best naval orange I have ever eaten in flavor, I picked this afternoon from the orchard of Mr. F. A. Bettes, not four miles from your city. It resembled our Thompson navel rather than the Wash ington. “Gentlemen, I tell you this in strict con fidence. I buy my grapefruit through the winter from Deal, the leading grower in Santa Barbara, Cal. They cost me thirty cents apiece and come from Florida. The conditions are ideal for producing grape fruit in your State.” Rev. Richardson preached at the Gilbert School House Sunday morning. The heavy rains Saturday did a great deal of good to the crops around Bunnell. Mr. R. Brown of Palatka will open up a shoe repair shop here. Delightful summers, and winters so mild that the wintertime is the best growing season, make Florida a real Paradise for the farmer or trucker.”

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BUHHELL HOME BUILDER As Contributed by the Bunnell Correspondent During the Month The Knights of Pythias had a big time. The St. Johns Lodge, No. 8, of Palatka. vere at Bunnell to install Mohawk Lodge, No. 128. In the St. Johns Tribune of last week the editor, Mr. Boaz, writes as follows: "Don't think for a minute that the cost ; living comes high in Bunnell. The editor _.ul for his dinner Monday the following: Tried chicken, sliced tomatoes, com on the :ob, Irish potatoes, cooked tomatoes and stuffed eggs, which were all grown at his tome by the madam.” We now understand why the editor is -ueh a hustler and that the Tribune, only iwenty-three weeks old, has over one thou-and subscribers. Who should have the redit? The editor or his wife? Agent Bell of the Florida East Coast .railway reports three solid cars of mer-aandise in one day last week for Bunnell merchants, and still people (who don’t -mow) say that business is dull in Florida Tiring the summer. Mr. Corbitt Sullivan arrived Sunday aftmoon and has taken a position with Car ers’ Drug Store. Mr. F. S. Crowson of Crowson’s Corner as in the city Saturday. He reports crops oking fine at his home. Veto store adjoining Tribune Building in Bunnell Under the efficient management of Mr. Fred Kaiser, the Bunnell Meat and Ice Tompany opened their doors for business Monday morning in the Willingham market :u Moody Boulevard. They will remain in this building for the next two weeks when they will move into their commodious quar ters in the new Tribune Building. It is the intention of this company to .mmediately put on a regular meat and ice wagon and deliver meats and ice to Dupont, Bulow, St. Joseph, Sapplings and other nearby points, making regular trips. Those tesiring meats or ice at these points can all them up and place their order and it will be delivered to them without any ex:ra cost. They will carry a full line of meats con. sting of all kinds of steaks, roasts, chops, -ausage, cured meats and everything found in a first-class market. The opening of this company here is anTcher step forward for Bunnell, and the people of this section are to be congratu lated on having a nice up-to-date market ;n their midst. BIG MASONIC CELEBRATION. The Hiram Boys of Bunnell Lodge, No. 200, F. Sr, A. M., celebrated the anniversary of St. John the Baptist the 24th. R. W. D. D. G. M. Silas B. Wright of DeLaud, Fla., was the orator of the day, who is well informed in the mystic art, and gave the boys a very inspiring talk; in fact, all of us feel better by having heard him. A barbecued dinner, consisting of mutton, pork, beef and venison, together with all the necessary viands and et ceteras to accompany the same, that go to make up a tempt ing menu to tickle the palate of epicures. The “usual” ball game was the feature of the afternoon—only they had three instead of one. A well regulated dance was enjoyed in the evening in the large and spacious town hall over the Tribune Building, the music being furnished by the Atlantic Beach orchestra. Everybody was there and everybody enjoyed the occasion very much. A repetition is demanded. The “four hundred set” of fcit. Augustine were present, motoring over after supper. FLORIDA LOOMS HP STRONGLY AS SUMMER RESORT. Article Entitled Florida’s Summer Climate to Appear in Board of Trade Bulletin. INTERESTING COMPARISONS. July Temperature in Jacksonville Below That in Northern and Western Cities. i Florida looms up strongly as a summer resort according to statistics appearing in the leading article of the July number of the Board of Trade Bulletin which will come off the press before the end of this week. The title of the article is “Florida's Sum mer Climate: a Misunderstood Quantity.” It was prepared by Secretary H. H. Rich ardson, of the board of trade, from an ex1 tensive collection of official data obtained from the weather bureau. Four diagrams drive in the main points more directly than columns of space could. The first diagram shows the maximum temperature for the first fifteen days of July in Boston, New York, Louisville, Pitts burg, St. Louis, Chicago, Kansas City and : Jacksonville. Jacksonville had only one of the fifteen days when the temperature was 94—that was July 1. Boston, for instance, had only four of the fifteen days when it was below 94, and the chief range was, around 100 and to as high as 104. The j comparison with other cities shows propor tionately in favor of Jacksonville as for the cooler of the cities named. The second diagram shows that Jack sonville had only one day in the period of comparison when the thermometer went to j 94. Boston, Louisville and St. Louis had j nine days of-the same period when it was j 94 and more. Chicago and Kansas City had six, and New York and Pittsburg had five. A third diagram illustrates on the face of drawings of thermometers the highest temperatures of various sections of the country as shown at the most central cities as follows: Northern section. Pittsburg, 100; western section, Kansas City, 104; central section, Louisville, 104; eastern sec tion, Boston, 104; southern section, Jack sonville, 94. A fourth diagram shows the average for the four seasons drawn from charts for thirty years back. This shows for Jackson ville the following average temperatures: January, February and March, 58.5; April, May and June, 74.5; July, August and Sep tember, 84.1; October. November and De cember. 62.8. Copies of the bulletin will be widely cir culated in places where the fine showing for •Jacksonvile as an all-the-year resort will be most effective. There are a number of other interesting articles and statistical compilations in the July number.—TimesUnion, July, 1911. For several months we have mailed you, either at the request of yourself or a friend, our literature, including the Bunnell Home Builder. We are always glad to send this magazine to anyone who is interested in Florida; but if for any reason you do not care to receive it any longer, we shall con sider it a great favor if you will drop us a postal and we will take your name from our mailing list and not annoy you with our literature any longer. .We believe it is not more than right that you should let us know, if you are not interested. BUNNELL HOME BUILDER, S. Howard, Editor. Room 1103, 108 S. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. “Tke cities cry, ‘Keep the boy on tbe farm,’ and then advertise for him to quit.

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6c SUHHELL HOME BUILDER A WO213) WITH THE EDITOR We are now in the midst of summer— the season of the year when it would seem that folks would be the least interested in Florida, but Bunnell-Dupont is certainly proving the exception to the rule, and men and women are buying land there, and are visiting the colony as they did in mid winter. People are becoming educated in regard to Florida, and are learning that they can enjoy life in Florida in summer as well as in winter. We wish to call your attention to the several articles appearing in this issue in reference to the Summer Climate of Flor ida. We believe that this is information you have been seeking, and you may rest assured that it is absolutely reliable. The Editor has not received many let ters lately from land owners and others who have visited the colony, and we wish to remind you that a letter from each of you would lie very acceptable. We trust that if you have not already written a letter for the Home Builder that you will do this at once, so that your letter may appear in the September issue. “Variety is the spice of life”—so help us make the Home Builder bright and spicy by giving us your various ideas on Bunnell-Dupont and its possibilities. THE SUMMER CLIMATE OF THE FLOR IDA PENINSULA. By T. Frederick Davis, in The Florida Review. When the North shivers in the grasp of the blizzard and the ground there is cov ered with a mantle of snow, then the hu man tide turns toward the balmy atmos phere and the bright, blue skies of Florida. With the approach of spring-time, our friends from the North return to their homes, carrying with them associations and recollections that often find a place in print. Thus, year after year, books and magazine articles are written, in which the charms of our climate play an important role. So the fame of Florida’s winter cli mate extends throughout the length and breadth of our great country; in song aud story it has been given to all the world. But the impression prevailing among our friends of the North seems to be that our summers are composed of destructive thun der-storms and intolerable heat; because our winters are mild, they infer that the summers are insufferably hot. The same causes that modify the winter cold contribute to tempering the heat of summer. Like the thumb of a giant hand, the Florida peninsula extends far into the sea, and from this fact results a climate that is almost oceanic in its equability. The vast water areas on each side ensure a free circulation of the air and a pleasant breeze across the State almost incessantly. The atmosphere does not stagnate here. Let us describe a characteristic midsummer day and night. The sun rises in a cloudless sky. As he mounts higher in the heavens, the temperature of the air likewise begins to rise. About 8 or 9 o’clock the sky be comes partly overcast with cumulus clouds, while the wind freshens alittle. By noon the temperature has climbed well into the j 90’s, but the sky is nearly overcast with 1 clouds, which shield the ground from the j i direct, rays of the sun. In the west the | clouds begin to bank, and by early after1 noon the first mutterings of thunder are heard. Gradually the sky grows dark as the storm approaches; then the squall comes on and the temperature falls 15 or 20 degrees iu as many minutes. During the next few minutes the lightning flashes 1 and the thunder rolls, while the rain falls in torrents; all the elements are in an up roar. In less than half an hour the storm passes on to the eastward; the sun peeps out from a clearing sky and maps its rain bow upon the back of the receding storm. The air has a peculiar freshness and exhil aration about it now, which all Nature \ seems to imbibe. The sun declines iu a clear west, but the energy of the sunbeams is expended in the evaporation of the sur face moisture, and not as sensible heat; therefore the temperature of the air con1 tinues relatively low. Night comes on. The stars shine from a cloudless sky, and a fresh breeze springs up to add further com fort to the glorious night. The clear sky permits an unhampered radiation of heat from the ground; so that, as the night ad vances, there comes a chill in the air that causes us to draw up the cover to keep us comfortably warm. Finally morning dawns, to begin the sequence of the preceding day. When the press dispatches tell us that the North and West are suffering from the visitation of a summer hot wave and that the people there are panting for breath; when information comes to us that a popu lation, unable to rest at night on account of heat, seeks the open parks in search of an absent breeze; when later we read the j mortality list and learn of the deaths rei suiting from heat prostration; then we, in Florida, should recognize the benefits of the delightful breezes and offer thanks for the pleasant, restful nights, which characterize our summer season. IMPORTANT READ THIS The Bunnell Development Company, atthe present time, is spending thousands of dollars on improve ments in the colony, such as the building of new roads, improving old ones, building bridges, etc. It is therefore very essential that every buyer ghoul<’ do his or her part in the development of the colon-, by Keeping np the monthly payments as promptly as possible. Most of our buyers are now doing this. To the few who are not we trust this reminder will be sufficient. If you do not make your payments promptly, you are standing in the way of progress in the colony. BUNNELL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY FLORIDA’S SUMMERS ARE GOOD ENOUGH FOR MR. BROWN. Well, Mr. Verdenius, I see in my paper | where the heat up North is fierce. Up at | Hamilton, Ohio, it went up to 117 and | bursted the thermometer. Here we have a j cool breeze all the time. One day it was j up to 91 with a cool breeze, while the same day at my old Indiana home it was 104 and a hot steam and no breeze. I have not missed a days work since I came to Flor ida. I am fifty-five years old and feel like I was only sweet sixteen. When I left the cold North, December 3, I felt as if I was one hundred years old. No more North for me. I expect to spend my last days in Florida—the finest climate in the world. | It beats California. California people are coming to Florida by the hundreds of famij lies, and land is going higher and higher. No one can make a mistake by buying land in Bunnell. Only a few more years and all of Florida’s land will be sold and people will have to pay from $200 up to $1,000 per acre. I am here and know whereof 1 speak. H. E. BROWN. BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY PRODUCES SOME FAT MEN. A few days ago a gentleman who had just returned from Bunnell was in the Chicago | office. He was highly pleased with the colony and its possibilities, but laughingly said that he found the colony lacking in just one thing—some fat men, and he did not kn.^ 1 j whether Florida could produce big men like himself, he weighing about 200 pounds. I told my friend that he was wrong there, but he replied that I would have to i show him—hence the pictures of the fat men appearing on this page. These pictures were taken on the streets of Bunnell, and should be proof sufficient for all doubters of ; the fact that Florida does produce large men. These gentlemen are native Floridians. I have met them a number of times at I Bunnell, and this little article is simply to prove that not only do we raise big potatoes, i mammoth watermelons and splendid corn in Bunnell-Dupont, but also good sized men. “A man isn’t necessarily worthless because his neighbor is worth more.”

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Whe BUHHEL1L HOME BUILDER HR. HCITSE OF NEW MEXICO TELLS HIS FLORIDA TRIP July 5, 1913. I purchased a tweni ty-ac-re tract in the j Bunnell Dupont coli ony at Bunnell, Florj ida, without seeing I same. I made an in spection of my land i oh the 9th of June j and I was more than pleased with my al lotment and the fu ture prospects of the colony. I found a line set of men. ready to do anything in their power for me. Bunnell is a modern little town with ce ment walks, and the town is still growing. Any one would do well to purchase a tract n the Bunnell-Dupont colony. I found a iplendid black sandy loam soil. While there I visited the noted Hastings otato district, twelve miles north, and found improved land selling very high. In the same ground where potatoes had .sen harvested in early .spring, corn stood -houlder high. I am pleased to speak a word for the olony and expect to move there as soon is possible. CHAS. C. HOUSE. (blew Mexico.) MR. READING FINDS IT EASY TO SAVE WHEN HE HAS AN INCENTIVE Bunnell and I. Although being a man of good health I vas never able to put away a dollar. I had always desired to own a piece of land -omewhere, as an insurance for old age, and one day, much to the credit of those who gave me the opportunity, I read about j the easy payment plan to buy a home in Florida. The statements in the literature sent me were so straightforward and sane, and contracts so simple, that I soon real ized the honesty and aim of the men back of the deal, so f bought ten acres. AND THIS IS THE RESULT. Today I have a ten-acre tract all paid for, which is already worth twice as much as I paid for it. I am laying aside every dollar I can, so when the time comes I can say good-bye to wage slavery, good-bye to dull times and panics, good-bye to high rents and high cost of living, and probably by that time Bunnell will be a prosperous city, and my land worth a real fortune to me: other wise. if I had not been wise enough to grasp the great opportunity offered me by the com pany, I would still be with the majority of wage earners, with nothing hut a week’s wages coming. I have not deprived my '“nily of anything in order to keep up my payments. I have simply been taught how t-o"save a few dollars with a great advan tage, and to provide for myself and family a better future. GEO. READING, JR. (Connecticut.) No Other State Affords Such Delight to Those Advanced in Years as Florida July 6, 1913. Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Chicago, Ill. Dear Sir and Friend: This is Sunday. I have before me the Home Builder and have read your article in it, HOW MUCH MONEY SHOULD A MAN HAVE TO START SUCCESSFULLY IN THE BUNNELL COLONY. I think you are very honest and square in your answer. Now, I will try and tell you a little of my experience in different states that I have lived in. I am now over sixty-eight years old and was raised in Stephenson County, Illinois. I was a member of Com pany C, 46th Hlinois Infantry. I lived one year in Wisconsin: I lived fifteen years in Iowa; I lived in Idaho and have been in the states and territories west of the Missouri River, as far southwest as Alice. Texas. I lived a number of years in Arkansas, and I came from Tennessee to Florida, where lots of my northern friends thought we would he eaten up with mosquitoes, and starve. But I tell you that they were badly mis taken. As you know, we live a little west of the town of Bunnell. We arrived here the 25th of October, 1910, and started clear ing our ten acres. We bought our land when we lived in Tennessee and paid for it cash without see ing it. Will say right here that Florida is good enough for me. It beats all the rest of the places I have lived in, for climate and health, and as for your colony and the Bunnell lands, Mr. Verdenius, will say it is fine. I located two tracts of twenty acres each for parties in Oklahoma. One of them was here in May to see his tract and was well pleased with*same. As for raising crops here, we can raise practically everything that you can north. My wife just got some roasting ears. I took one ear and measured it. It measured 12 inches long and had eighteen rows of well-filled kernels. Now this corn is grow ing where we dug Irish potatoes—35 bar rels on 220 rods square. These potatoes were dug the last few days of April. We have watermelons—fine ones, too. Our grapes are ripe now and they are fine. I have oranges and grapefruit growing, all inside of three years. I had a very limited amount of capital and we were not able to hire help. My ""better half” and I did all the work ourselves, so will say if a man is not afraid to work he can accomplish more here in the same length of time than he can up North and with more comfort. He can have fresh vegetables the year around. I had better quit for this time. I will say to our northern friends: Come and see us and we will show you. Come one, come all—you are all welcome. I wish you and the Bunnell-Dupont col ony success, for some of the men of the company are my personal friends. Yours truly, F. D. BARMINGTON. (Box 34, Bunnell, Fla.) Editor’s Note: If any one writes Mr. Barmington for information, please enclose return postage. From Chicago, III., to Bunnell, Fla., by Automobile. Afr. Szabelshi and party left Chicago by Auto on July 5th for Bunnell—Du Pont Colony “The possibilities of a Florida Farm are only limited by the ability of its owner.”

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&ih<& ESU BABIED ILL ]B llJ SLIDES o -WHY THE PRICE OF OUR LAND WAS ADVANCED. The Summer Will Soon Be Gone, Likewise All th> Keccutly we have been the recipients of a number of letters asking why we advanced the price of our Bunnell-Dupont Colony land to $35 and $40 an acre. The answer to this question is very simple indeed. Farm lands are increasing in value every where. Land that could have been bought in Canada some years ago for $10 an acre is now selling at from $50 to $75 an acre. In the West land is selling today for $100 an acre that could have been purchased ten years ago for $25 an acre. The population of the United States will double itself within the next twenty-five years. At that rate, we shall have almost one hundred and eighty million people in this country twenty-five years hence. This mighty army of men, women and children must be fed and clothed, and all that they shall eat and wear must come from Mother Earth directly or indirectly. Every year, you see, our population rapidly increases, and that means more mouths to feed, more bodies to clothe, and consequently land that must produce all this is bound to increase in value. The time when you could secure land from Uncle Sam free of cost is practically passed. The days when you could buy grazing land in New Mexico for ten cents an acre are no more. I know one man who refused to buy land in the Hastings’ District, now fa mous as the largest potato producing sec tion of the South, for eighteen cents an acre, and this same land is selling now for from $200 to $300 an acre cash. Some of the land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony originally sold for $20 an acre; later for $25: then for $30; and now for $35 and $40 an acre. Why did we advance the price of our land? Because it is cheaper today for $50 than it was once for half this amount. When we started the Bunnell-Dupont Colony we told our buyers that we were going to have a town; that there would be a bank, electric light plant, stores, school, church, water works, barrel factory, hard roads through the country, and that they would some day see colonists scattered all over the tract, raising crops and shipping thorn to the North—but that was all in the future. Today we can say that we have now accomplished all of these things. We do not have to talk about what we are going to do, but we can show what has al ready been done. However, we are still improving our tract. Right now we are spending thousands of dollars each month for development work, and the more improvements we make, the more the country is developed, t he more valuable the land will become, and it is only a question of a few years until the Harms in our colony will sell for hundreds of dol lars an acre. The value of land in the South has increased more rapidly than in any other part of the United States, and we fully be lieve that land values in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony will increase 100 per cent within the next few years. The. question is answered. Wc are sure that you understand now why we advanced the price of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Unsold Land in the Bunnell-Dupout Colony Our Land is Selling Very Rapidly Since the Price Was Advanced to $35 and $40 an Acre 50 cents an acre down and 50 cents an acre a month until paid for If you wish to secure a farm in the Burmell-DuPont coloi. you had better mail me your order AT ONCE. As 1 have toi you many times, our motto is “first come, first served.” I au giving you fair warning. Before many months we will ad vane the price of every acre of our land to $40.00, and very soon it wi. be $50.00 an acre, and it is dirt cheap even at that price. The same land we sell at Bunnell for $35.00 and $40.00 a: acre now, on the easy payment plan, would cost you at Hasting' twelve miles north of us, from $200.00 to $300.00 an acre, cash. We also have some fine lots for sale at Ocean City— $75.00 t $150.00 a lot—terms cash, and some fine residence lots in Bunnu for $50.00 apiece and upwards— $5.00 down and $5.00 each monk until paid for. If you do not want a farm in Florida, buy a lot in Ocean City. This is a real beauty spot—its location is ideal. It i especially suitable for retired people and those who wish t secure a winter home in Florida. If you live in Ocean Cir you can enjoy the delightful salt sea breezes from the grea' Atlantic, just at your door, all the year around. It it a res. health resort. A few months spent here and your rheu matism, catarrh, throat or heart trouble are things c the past. Ocean City is located on the Florida East Coast Cana! and the Florida East Coast Railroad is going to build a roa: close to Ocean City. Small steamers and yachts pass u: and down the canal daily. This spot is a paradise for thsportsman, as the finest fishing, hunting, boating and bath ing are to be enjoyed here. Lots are selling fast and if you want one of them you hu better act QUICKLY before the best are gone. Write for fu particulars regarding Ocean City and Bunnell lots, also farms ; Bunnell-DuPont colony, and ask for plats of the above mentione towns. THOMAS A. VEKDENIUS 108 South LaSalle St. Chicago, Illinoi? Always struggle to go forward. Be on the; onward march.”

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