Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicado, Ill.
Vol. 1 May, 1913 6No.6
THE EDITOR 'S that he intends vlea'ring it and planting it
_to gra)pefruit and other citrus and serniPERSONAL PAGE tropical fruits.
These noted IImen, financiers, travellers,
tourists and real estate investors placing
their nioney in this section of Florida, preHAVE YOU WHY the editor of the Bun- paring for future hoines, givfs further cviWONDERED nell Home Builder does not dence that our claims for climate and other
give the complete addresses attractive features are reasonable and valid.
give the coplt addressesir i
of the men and women whose letters are Thwse nien are familiar with popular cities
appearing in the pages of the Home Builder over the world, and 1)perhaps no one is better
appearing nthe pe te oe Be posted, in a personal way, with all the cities
each month? Several times we have been in the tinited States than Villian Jennings
asked the reason for this omission, and rvarn
shall tell you WHY. From the fact that for about twenty
It has been our experience in the past years he has traveled and lectured and
when publishing names and addresses in made speeches in every stale and all the
various literature, that the writers of such principal cities, surely Mr. Bryan's decision
letters have been deluged with inquiries, to uimake his home in Florida and to invest
They have written us that every mail his money in unimproved land should be
considj~ered worth thinking over. Jn fact the
brought letters from all over the country, consred worth thinking over. In fact the
which they did not have the time to an- favorable publicity created by these well
swer. Naturally the people who asked known mnanufactu rers, Iblishers, statestse. Naturalel litheple hot ahed ien and capitalists is helping to increase
these questions felt a little hurt if their realty values in this section of the state.
letters were unanswered, and thus it made unpleasantness all around.
You can understand that if a man knows
he will be swamped with mail should his WHAT A WOMAN CAN An interesting
name appear in print, he is loathe to write Florida Home of Thomas Edison DO IF SHE TRIES feature of the
us anything for publication. The omission Home Builder in
of these addresses has been for the pro- its recent issues has been the splendid lettection of our contributors. MARY MEN OF WEALTH ARE BUYING ters from people who have visited the BunPROPERTY FOR WINTER HOMES nell-Dupont Colony. These letters have
The editor wishes to say that the orig- ALONG THE EAST COAST given our little magazine a real "personal"
inals of all these letters are on file in this OF FLORIDA touch, and you will enjoy the ones in this
office, and if any of our readers especially May issue we are sure, especially the ones
wish to write to some one whose name has James Deering of Chicago recently puIr- which have come from the pens of women
appeared in the Home Builder, we will fur- chased sixty acres of land south of the who have purchased farms at Bunnell.
Miami river, from Mrs. Mary E. Brickell, We have long been told that "Where
nish complete address upon request. for $180,000, lcing about three thousand there's a will, there's a way," and these
dollars an are. A few years ago this no letters were written by women who had
doubt could have been purchased for a few foresight and courage enough to make a dollars an acre. It is stated that Mr. Deer- a, when they were convinced that they w'ay, when they were convinced that they
ing intends to make this one of the most should purchase homes at Bunnell. beautiful home places in the state, and
perhaps in the United States, even superior Their letters should be an inspiration to to the Busch home at Pasadena, California, other women who long for independence, because of natural advantages of beautiful but who have hesitated to take the first Biscayne Bay and other favorable features, step towards gaining it. They should put including climniate and location. to share some of the big, broad-shouldered
men, who know that it would be a good
Many wealthy families in different cities thing to buy land in our colony and make are buying property and preparing homes homes for themselves and their families
for all the year as well as winter homes, there, but who are not willing to make any The Deerings, McCormicks, Matthewsons, present sacrifice which might he required to
Collins and many other wealthy anid well- pay for such a home. known world travelers and tourists are There are many splendid, intelligent woamong the investors and new homneseekers men who r a e purcliased farms in the 4-along the Florida east coast, Inen who have purchased farms in the
along the Florida east coast. Bunnell-Dupont Colony for themselves. William .Jennings Bryan, Secretary of There are other women who have encourState, has a home at Miami. lie purchased aged their husbands in making such an inwhat is known as the Punch Bowl property, vestment, and are bravely doing their share south of Miani, last summer, and is now in saving, planning and working, that they
starting improvements for a beautiful imay ultimately obtain independence and winter home and a home any time of the be able to enjoy the comforts of old age
year. Mr. Bryan has also purchased an together, without the fear of an empty larRoasting Oysters near Ocean City additional 40 acres of land, and it is said der or unpaid landlord.




h BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
As contributed by the Bunnell correspondent during the month.
IMr. W. M. Woodruff and son, of Idaho, Rev. C. F. Blackburn, Presiding Elder of Mr. D. F. McDuffy has purchased the resiboth of whom own farms here, arrived this district, preached at the Methodist dence property of Mr. T. S. Doty on the Monday to be here for a short time. Church last Thursday night. west side of the railroad, and will move his
family here in the near future. The deal
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Becker, of Maxwell, Mr. G. D. Johnson, of Atlanta, Georgia, was transacted through the F. L. Byrd real
Florida, who own considerable property i estate agency.
around Bunnell. were here Saturday. s spending some time around Bunnell in estate agency.
around Bunnell. were the interest of "Southern Farming.
Mr. II. C. Fadness. of South Dakota, ar- Mr. A. J. Philips, of Sparks, Neb., the
rived Monday to make Bunnell his home. Misses Irene Bettes, Lillian and Marguer- owner of twenty acres of land east of
Mr. Fadness bought land here some time ite Cochran and Sam Newbill spent Satur- town, arrived Tuesday to locate here perago. da afternoon at Ormond Beach and Day- imanently. He expresses himself as being
ag. day afternoon at Ormond Beach and Day- ell pleased with his land and realizes that
t 'a __ this is a fine country to live in. Mr. Philips
The local Knights Templar, I. I. Moody, will move his family here as soon as he
W. I. C(ochran, George Moody, W. C. Heath Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Turner, Mr. and Mrs. has made some improvements on his place.
and W. A. China, worshipped at the Meth- Ernest Johnson and Miss Anne Bardin spent (dist Church here Easter. Easter is great- Sunday on an outing at Ocean City. Iv revered by Knights Templar everywhere. The Ladies' Aid Society held a meeting
___at the Methodist Church Monday afterMr. I. I. Moody attended the County Mr. J. D. Curran, of Canada, arrived Sat- noon. Besides the regular order of busiCommissioners' meeting at St. Augustine on urday to make his home near Bunnell. Mr. ness the ladies made preparations for the Tussda Curran is the owner of 20 acres of land miscellaneous sale and box supper to be
uesay. on the Moody Road. held at the school house Friday evening.
Mr. L.A. Szabelski and Mr. D. F. Sokolowski
of Chicago, were recent visitors to the colony. The Tribune building is going up fast
Both are great believers in Florida and each now. The brick work will soon be cornone bought forty acres of Bunnell soil. They. pleted. The proprietors expect to have the
expect to make this community their future building completed by May 1st, at which
home. time they will give the first dance in the
new hall, which will be free to all.
Miss Buddell, of New York State, is the
guest of her uncle, Mr. T. S. Doty. MAr. Walter Barnhill, of Illinois, is a recent visitor to the colony, and expresses
Mr. W. A. China, cashier of the Bunnell himself as very pleased with his land and
State Bank, has reently purchased a small the conditions generally in the colony.
farm in section 14, southeast of town.
Mr. J. M. Gaston, of Canton, N. C., who
Rev. L. D). laynes. of the Bunnell M. E. owns considerable St. Johns dirt around
C('hurch, will preach at Volusia next Sunday lIunnell, arrived in the city Saturday and
afternoon. spent a few days here.
Mr. J. WV. Justine, of Dupont, attended
Mr. M. Stone has just added three new the meeting of the Bunnell Masonic Lodge
show cases to his store fixtures. Tuesday night.
Mr. William latch and wife, of Portland, Mr. A. K. Dombrowski spent some time at
Maine, are spending a few (lays in Bunnell. Mr. R. Beeman's beautiful farm in Section 29 Bunnell recently and purchased one quarter BUN L section of land in our colony. He is so enthusiastic
BUNNELL BASEBALL TEAM TO BE that he will contribute an article for our June
Mr. Husic and Dr. Park, of Kentucky, re- ORGANIZED tsat e wi contrute an art or our June
turned to their homes Sunday, after spend- A baseball team will be organized in Bun- issue. ing several d(lays around Bunnell. While here nell next Saturday. There is plenty of mathey reserved several acres of land. teriml around Bunnell to make up a good The office of the Bunnell Potato & Supnine and after practicing some they intend ply Co. is now located in the room of the Mr. F. S. Eckel, a prominent business man to show their championship over St. Johns Buniell State Bank Building made vacant of Hlastings, has purchased from the Bun- Park, D)upont, Espanola and all other neigh- by the moving of Carter's Drug Store. nell Development Company a number of boring teams.
town lots on the Moody Boulevard. This Anyone desiring to get on the team
property has a frontage of three hundred should make it known to Mr. C. F. Turner. and sixty-ive feet on Moody Boulevard and
runs back thirteen hundred and fifty feet Miss Clara A. Towns, of Philadelphia, was to Osceola Street. Mr. J. B. Boaz, of the in Bunnell Tuesday. She contemplates buildSt. Johns Tribune, has purchased a similar ing a winter home here. tract just east of Mr. Eckel's.
Messrs. J. L. and G. P. Yonkers, who are
Mr. W. (). Laughlin. of Iowa, who owns r(cog,nized as two of the best potato growa ten-acre tract near here, was in the city eis in this section, were in Bunnell on busiMonday and expressed himself as being ness Tuesday morning.
well pleased with his property. y ___-_-- Mrs. 11. A. Gates and daughter, of Kansas,
Mr. C. E. Cisco made a business trip to have moved to Bunnell to make their future Unloading car of gravel for new roads
Jacksonville Monday. hme, at Bunnell
Foresight is better than hindsight. Look ahead and see the success that awaits you in Florida




'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
OCEAN CITY BREAKERS MR. GEORGE W. NIX VISITS POTATO
Our little city is fast becoming quite BELT. HE IS AGREEABLY SURpopular, as the number of visitors here the PRISED AT THE RAPID GROWTH
past week will go to prove. Early in the (elre WV. Nix, \ ice-president of the wellweek quite a delegation consisting of 15 or kInown irm of Jhilni Nix & (.. ,,m iion
20 people from St. Johns Park came in and : nwrehaints of New ),olk ( 'it. was a visitor
Scamped on the broad street, known as Lam- at llastinlg, and nearly points las-t week.
bert Avenue, which is being cut through, Mr. Nix lhadl not h(,eon in the State o
and makes an ideal place for campers. Fliorida for the past sixteen ears and he
Friday and Saturday people came in from was agreably surpi isvd at t lhe remarkable
Bunnell and surrounding country until the growth of this secltioi of the State. lie,
number had swelled to between 50 and 60. Little Miss Rich of Bunnell w.th her ponies was engaged imost of thel time looking over There was a merry time along this street. the potato cr(ps, of which seven ( nty-v five per
hunting, fishing and oyster roasts were the F1ORII)A liOTATOIS l OV- t. "ill le ha, l 1 hi hs e, ll,
main attractions; also boating for pastime smdi ii to be well pleased Xi thi h ituawas indulged in. ING FAST NOW. tion.
Thursday quite a party went to the lit, said. "l'Everytlhing looks good to me,
'?each. Those in the party were: Mr. and Thirty Carloads or M\ore \\ere and whilee it is in,ous'ile at the present
Mrs. Charles Laughridge, of Granville, Ohio; Shipped from Our Terri- tine to determine what prices will be realMr. and Mrs. Ned Loughridge, Mr. and Mrs. ized. a great deal depIen(ls o weather conW. A. Cookmnan, Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Moore, tory \Vednesday. ditios, both here and in the Norith and
Mrs. E. M. Humphrey and Mr. Johnny Mc- Hastings, Fla., April 9.-Vith west at the time of shipment.
Cloud. At noon all enjoyed a dinner of
oysters, fish, salads, pies, cake and coffee, a movement totalling twenty- HOGS ARE GREAT MONEY-MAKERS
radishes, and lettuce from the Cookman seven carloads yesterday and FO R FLORIDA FARMER S
garden. FOR FLORIDA FARMERS
Mrs. Humphrey and Mrs. Moore took a shiplTlentS which will probably With 1,iices for l)-f anl pok rulin, ,
trip to Daytona on the passenger boat Re- total between thirty and thirty- "ig ill the miarlkets of the i('ilel Stites,
Public Friday, returning Saturday. They witb thi almost certainlt that tlese prices
report a delightful time. Sieve carloads today, the Hastings will never hIe lower for aon extn iledl rio.l,
a ucilgumini it h the fact that I eu-f c-an be an isi beini"
Mr. McCloud made a flying trip to Gaines- potato crop is now moving rap- \with tinft tat oer an 1e ua- s being
ville on business last week. o ed in the uth for one-hal the
Mr. and Mrs. Boaz and little son were idly. Prices today remained at out in thie North. aind that pork an he
Ocean City visitors Saturday afternoon. $. for N I alnd is eing ioIe-led for thine, cents anil
Mr. Boaz was quite proud of a fine string l$3.50s ler pound in thIe Suth. it would al)pof blue fish. g No. 2S. New York prices are )i,-ar, that our iiirs who can slire or
A ~ 'pg ~ sit-re th lt lonu-X -hioll i ivel, ill thle best
$4-50 and $3.50. Traffic through .".,. thn money shnih invest in the best
FIRST POTATOES 4 thorohllhred stock they canll get, as early
Mr. A. J. Smothers made the first ship- to the west is improving and this a]i possible. iln o'rd that thIeir returns mav
Mr. A. J. Smothers made the first ship- 001ow in as sOOn1 aS possible .
ment of potatoes from Bunnell Thursday will probably bring prices up- ltn~ i nn be fattind fo the market v
niornmy The shipment consisted of 15 h Iogs canl lie fattenled for thle niarlu-t Nerv
morning. The shipment consisted of 15 w\vard during the next few days. ulweali inl the, folloing nuner: iisi,
barrels of No. Ones and two barrels of No. plant your corn and cultivate it a few
Twos. They were shipped to John Nix & The following telegram was ti is. Next plant peanuts between the
Co., New York, via Clyde line. received by John Nix & Co.: rows of corn. As soon as the corn is gathered. turn your lhos into the field and
JOHNSON LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. AP Seattle WVN Apr 4-13 they will so ,n grow fat on the peauits.
Some Florida farmers buy upl) cliheap hugs
Opens for Business with Mr. Ed Johnson, Jno. Nix & Co. Hastings, Fla. a fatten them in this manner, and sell
Proprietor. Book us for first car potatoes them at a i)llit of 100 per cenit. ltow ever,
a better breed of logs is greatly to be deA new firm for Bunnell is the Johnson COning Seattle suitable long dis- sired tirom,ount toh- stnte anl colonists
6sired thrlollahollt the state,, andl cotlhlists
Lumber & Supply Co., with Mr. Ed Johnson, tance shipment. \Want number from the North are giving their attention
who recently moved his family to this place s k(o this Iatter.
from Hohenwald, Tenn., as proprietor. The one stock. M uiniiun car. Con- eat r quantities of p!r"k are eaten by
company will manufacture building mate- fTirm, wire price at time of ship- the native Floridians than one who is unrial, such as flooring, ceiling, moulding and Afa iliar with tlhe subii((t would imagine,
all kinds of rough and dressed lumber, and mlellt. HA\IIL BROS. a there is therefore a readv market for
will handle all other essentials for the Bunnell potatoes are moving all the hogs which an lhe raised.
building of a home. n'Ihe plsian or woM a Vllin who does not feel
As soon as the Tribune building is com- in small lots. Car load shipmentS inclined to make a living in our colony from
plete the office of the company will be lo- will not begin to move before trucking or general farmnig. shoiuh give his
cated there, where a line of general hard- or her attention to bog rai-inig as well as
ware will be carried. April 21St. to tle poultry industry.
E THE BUNNELL HOME
BUILDER is sent free
each month to all BunnellDupont Colony land owners. If you do not
own a farm at Bunnell, but are interested in this colony, and would like to receive a copy of this magazine each month, also the interestind booklet, "A LITTLE FARM, A
BIG LIVING" write to Thomas A.
Verdenius, room 1103, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.
Potatoes and hogs are great mortgage lifters, but the little old hen with her cackle will do her share towards paying for your farm




Me BUNNELL IOME BUILDER
More Letters from Future Settle
MR. YARNELL, OF THE UNITED STATES people here who have spent winters in
NAVY, TELLS OF HIS IMPRESSIONS Florida who can't see any agricultural pos .
Osibilities in sand. Because I am a woman OF BUNNELL men think I am no judge, but I know that
To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: what has been done can be done again,
I would like to say a few words about but I know, too, that money does not grow
the Bunnell Development Company and the W WIIon weeds or trees in Florida any more than
hzind in the Iunnell-Dupont Colony, through it does in Illinois, and one must work
thlags f th e Bu ilder.Dont flony theh -wherever he goes-even the rascals who live
the pages of the Home Builder. If the by skinning other men, -have to work to
__te an oplen cud fullynelizeuwhat save themselves from the law, which I call
they can (1 on ten acres of Bunnell-Dupont a precarious way of gaining a livelihood.
hand, they would not have to be told twice There is a fortune for any one who will
about it. go to Florida and accept the conditions as
I left New York last August, the worst they are and who does not insist on purtime of the year to go and see the land I suing the same methods he has always folhad bought from the Bunnell Development lowed in the corn belt. I find that the
Company. Nothing much was growing at most successful farmers everywhere are the
that time of the year except cow peas for men who go on to the land without prejuhay, although one man was cultivating dice or preconceived ideas of farming, but
sweet potatoes as late in the year as it was. with minds amenable to the teachings of
His farm was next to my 30-acre tract, science and common sense, enthusiasm, enWe passed through Hastings, the great ergy and the joy of living, with one's feet
e pon the ground and hands in the earth, but potato country, 12 miles north of Bunnell with minds elevated to the skies.
and the place looked like a western land Saepaesy,"htfosteemr
opening. people all looking prosperous, driv- Shakespeare says, "What fools these moropeingu, 'tope satn l ing auoeros. drIp- tals be." That is just what I think of these
ing up to the station in automobiles. It people who are allowing the last opporcertainly looked good to me. When I ar- unity to escape them for obtaining land at
rived there and found that all these people reasonable prices. There are women on
owned was a potato patch, and that they Mr. S. K. Yarnell the farms of Illinois, renters, paying $8.00
only worked in the winter months, I in- per acre rent at that, who by their idicreased my holdings in the Bunnell-Dupont "THE JOY OF LIVING WITH ONE'S visual efforts make $600.00 to $1,000.00, colony from 30 to 60 acres, as soon as I saw FEET ON THE GROUND AND HANDS who never invest a dollar for profit. They
what others were doing. IN THE EARTH, BUT WITH MINDS might just as well buy homes for themThere were people staying at the Bunnell ELEVATED TO THE SKIES" WRITES selves as to allow all this money to slip
Hotel from all over the West, who had MRS. VANCE IN THE FOLLOWING through their fingers foolishly. It certainly
come to buy land, and none of them took LETTER is foolish to spend so much money without
less than 40 acres. It rained every day Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, having something permanent to show for
while I was there, heavy afternoon show- Dear Sir:-Since apologies seldom are one's labor.
ers, but the water soon soaked away in the satisfactory, I will just say I have care- The opportunity for making money by sandy loam-no mud and no stones in Bun- lessly neglected my duty, and will amend women on the farm is limited only by their
nell. by telling you that I am not only satisfied strength and financial ability. What can
with my purchase of land in. the Bunnell be done in Illinois can so much more easily Before I made this trip a man who had district, but am proud of it, and feel be done in Florida, where their activities are
been in Florida told me that the mosquitoes "puffed up" with myself for having the sa- not restricted by the rigors of winter. there were six inches long, but I only saw gacity to have made the purchase on the It seems I have not said what I intended
one or two small ones. I saw lots of quail faith I have in men's honesty. I believed to in this letter, but I hope you can read and other small game, which can be shot you had what you advertised to have, and between the lines and learn that I am glad,
in season. It is about eight miles from bought on that faith. Then when I visited truly, that I uwn one little ten-acre lot in Bunnell to the Atlantic coast, and there is the colony a year ago I found I had not mis- the Bunnell colony and am talking and nearly always a breeze from the sea. I hope placed that faith, which did not surprise me boosting for Florida. Some day when I to be able to run over there after I go in the least. get money enough I am going onto that lit(town to stay, which will be in a few I visited a great portion of Florida, and tle ten-acre lot myself.
months now. I found Bunnell the neatest, most progres- Suppose I tell you how I am buying my
I want to say that I was shown gener- sive town in all my trip. The man or land. I am buying two other lots the
ous treatment by the representatives of woman who owns a tract of land in this same way, but Bunnell is my favorite. I
the Bunnell Development Company. Bun- colony need have no fear, for the men be- am paying for all of it by the quarters and
nell is a growing town for only three years hind the enterprise are on the ground and dimes I can save from my butter and egg old, modern and up-to-date for its size. are colonists with the rest. If I were a money, which I sell fron- the farm here. They give you a square deal there. It is man I would be in Florida instead of shiv- If you think that easy, I can tell you that surely a poor man's chance. I don't believe ering here in Illinois. We are still having it takes work, good management and courone could find a better spot with all the snow squalls here when we should be in age. I get very little encouragement from
facilities that go with it. the fields, but as yet (March 26th) not a most of my friends. I think they think I
In the Bunnell-Dupont colony they have wheel has turned on the farms of Illinois am either crazy or a fool, but I feel proud early crops, and big prices, from the New and it will be ten days at least before the of myself because I shall have something I York early markets. The shipping faeili- fields can -be entered, can call my very own, and if that time ever
ties for one's truck are the very best, and I have talked Florida to everybody I comes when I find myself in need of it, Ithe climate is ideal. They have a barrel meet, and one man has bought on the shall know where to find rest and a- W
factory at Bunnell now, and there a man strength of my recommendation, but he al- HOME.
with slender means can get his barrels, lowed a man who is selling Florida land I thank you for all the kindness which
fertilizer and seed on time, also can sell in a nearby town to persuade him to in- has been shown me, for the privilege of
his crop there to vest in Everglade land, which I do not rec- owning a tract in -Bunnell, and for the
advantage. ommend, because that land did not have to courtesy of the officials throughout.
Yours very truly, be cleared of timber. Yours truly,
S. K. YARNELL, I have almost persuaded others of my ac- (MRS.) ELVIRA E. L. VANCE,
(United States Navy). quaintance to buy, but there are so many (Illinois).
We strive to put the Northern man upon a Southern paying plan




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
in the Bunnell- Dupont Colony
WHERE A WOMAN "WILLS" THERE IS want to promise you right now that when CONFIDENCE WAS NOT MISPLACED
ALWAYS A "WAY" I go if that land is only one-third as good Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
Dear Mr. Verdenius: as you claim it is, I will come back to Illi- Chicago.
I have just re- nois with more land, that is, as the pur- Well, Friend Ver- ceived your last let- chaser of more land. I don't care if it is denies, as it has
ter, and I am glad $40.00 an acre, and I told him so, for as been some time
to hear that Bun- the fellow said, I am "dead tired" of paying since I wrote you,
nell land is on the rent and giving all to the landlord. I thought I would
boom. Yes, I re- Respectfully yours, write you a few
ceive my Bunnell (MRS.) OSCAR BUCKLEY lines to let you
Home Builder every (Illinois). know that I have
month, and it seems been down to Bunto me that that lit- nell, Florida, to extle paper alone A GOOD REPORT FROM BUNNELL amine my ten
- ought to sell every Dear Mr. Verdenius:- acres, which I purfoot of land that is chased from you by
usl.Will you please send me one dozen copies mail about a year
I unsold, of the April issue of the Bunnell Home ago.
I would give any- Builder? I think that it is a good one, Mr C. W e r a
Mrs.thing in reason to and I have places to put a few. Mr. C. W. Weather.friends told
be one of the busy I want to tell you that my son, who vis- ington me at the time that
bees in the Bunnell cited Bunnell last fall and went out to see I was foolish to
just now, but circumstances are such that my tract when he was there, is back from huy something that I had not seen. Well, we cannot be for a while yet at least, Fin a y o ta thnhe s her e, ints ac frm of course, sometimes it is not real business,
we cnno befor whle et a lest. Florida for the summer. He intends to re- hut I had confidence in your company, and
Now, Mr. Verdenius, I have received three turn next fall and may locate there per- bil Iad ridere in youndceverythind or four letters from you making me some manently. He brings good reports for Flor- vill say right here that I found everything
very good offers and urging me to purchase ida, and especially so for Bunnell. He says suspect. more land, and now I shall tell you some that Bunnell is the prettiest little town facts. Did it ever occur to you that the that he saw in Florida. I looked over two or three hundred acres
Oscar Buckley you have been writing to is Very truly yours, of your land. I found, I think, as good
woman? Well, it is so. Now, I will tryN. WALLING, land as there is anywhere, a fine climate,
to tell you how I came to purchase 10 (Kansas). and as fine a set of gentlemen as I ever met
acres of land at Bunnell, and I will also try in my life, and I have met several. Well,
to tell you how hard it is for me to sell any Mr. Verdenius, I just thought enough of
of your land for you. .. your country to buy ten acres more. I took
When I first saw your ad. I tried to get THERE is all the difference in the a friend with me and he bought ten acres.
Mr. Buckley to purchase a piece of land. world between a DREAM and a 0 got changed from my original location
He said, "No, it might be a humbug." Then PLAN. Don't read this magazine so that I could have twenty acres in one
I wanted him to go down and look at the e from month to month and dream body. I think I got a fine location north
land and if it was all right to buy 40 or about owning a little home of your : of town. I met several of the farmers while
80 acres but he would not. Well then I *own in Florida-some day. there and every one of them seemed to be
wrote for an order blank myself filled it satisfied with their land and home. I am
out and sent it back with my first payment, But begin to SAVE and PLAN foronly regret I
ou.and s i w th y irst paymen that home right now. Invest $5.00 suae i a th minot ae oy fifty
candor more in it, while it may be pr- have is that I am not able to buy fifty
tell you that I had paid in $100.00 on my come i t, while i e instead of twenty acres.
ten acres before my husband learned what When I went down I expected to stay
I had done. You can do it. Once you begin to quie Iwen do ected t stay
save for your HOME, a dozen plans quite awhile, do some fencing and set some
You see, the cows and poultry are mine, will suggest themselves to you for fruit trees on my land, but when I got there
and what money I derive therefrom after saving additional dimes, quarters and the people told me that it was too late in
supplying my house, so I was able to send dollars, every week or every pay-day. the spring to set out the trees, so I had to
in my monthly remittances without him It is all right to have your Day come back home; but if nothing happens I
knowing it. Well, when he did find it out Dreams, but make definite plans to will go down next winter and do some
he only laughed and said that he bet I had have work. If I had had my family with me
bought a blind pig. So you see, Mr. Ver- I could just have stayed there forever.
denies, the rest around here are like my YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE. I am doing all I can with my friends to
husband, they will not spend the money get them interested, but it seems as if they
the trip would cost them to go and look at can't understand time possibilities of the
the land, nor will they buy without seeing THIS LADY IS VERY MUCH PLEASED country some way. I am getting the Bunit. They would rather pay landlords around
here $1,000.00 a year rent, as my husband WITH THE COLONY AFTER A PER- nell Home Builder all right, so just keep
is doing, than to buy a little home for SONAL INSPECTION sending it. I love to read it. I got an
themselves, but you must not think that Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, issue f the St. Johns Tribune, as I was
I have not tried to get some of them to Dear Sir:-I want to say that last Octo- there at tI e time they printed the first issue
buy, for I have, but they are afraid. How- ber I went to Bunnell to look at my land aid I subscribed for it for a year. ever, my husband is perfectly willing now which I had purchased there, and I was If you care to do so, you may publish this
to move South, and we are going to try to very much pleased with it. I want to thank letter in the Home Builder. When you
more after we get there and he had seen you for giving me such a nice ten-acre write to your Bunnell office please give my
move next winter. He said he would buy tract, respects to your field manager, Mr. Turner,
more after we get there and he had seen I think Bunnell has a great future. It is as I think he is as fine a gentleman as I
the land, so you see he is afraid even now all you say, and what is more, the com- ever met. He certainly made me feel at
to take the step. pany is reliable and will do justice to any home in Bunnell.
You see, the busy crop season is now on, one. I will do all I can for the colony. Hopand the oats are to be put out and then I like the Home Builder and look forward ing I may be one of the colonists in the near
follows other crops, so Mr. Buckley could to it the first of every month, future, I am
not get away now, but one thing is sure, Yours very truly, Your friend,
after the busy work is over if he will not MRS. R. A. HAWKINS, C. W. WEATHERINGTON,
go down and see for himself I will, and I (Massachusetts). (Kentucky).
Don't wait for something to turn up-but go and turn something up




6heBUNNLL HOME BUILDER
Wealth Pours in for Florida Farmers
The agriculture of Florida has never been to Florida for her fruits and vegetables; have been wonderful. The increase in popput to anything like its possibilities. In nor would the total output of Alaska gold elation has been large. the old time land was hardly regarded as mines be enough to buy the cigars of Tam- The entire east coast of the State, fr
capital l to be increased, but considered as pa and Key Vest. Jacksonville to Miami, has been entirely
a part of current expenses; the negro help "There are enough golden oranges and changed from wilderness to civilization. Nor
was the capital. grapefruit in her groves this winter to pay did the march of progress stop at Miami.
Even today land with soil so improvable the price-$5,000,000-that the United It extended southward to the extremity of and fielding products so valuable is not States paid to Spain for the territory in the mainland and leaped across to the hereappreciated at its true values and prices 1821. She will have enough cotton and tofore inaccessible Florida keys, causing
are trifling compared to values in the north tobacco, both of high quality, to bring her them to reflect the light of electric lamps, and northwest, where climatic conditions $5.000,000 more; and the lumber that Flori- to echo the whistle of the iron horse, and and market advantages are poor when con- dians shipped from their five seaports in give place to busy and profitable industry. sidered in comparison with Florida. 1908 was sold for $10,000,000. In no less remarkable degree the.west
What Florida needs most is well skilled "Phosphate is probably the most precious coast has also shown development, while
labor-men with a little capital-farmers, product to the State. It is a plant food, in middle Florida the growth in all lines dairymen, fruit raisers, and poultrymen and has been phenomenal.
women who will handle their business in
conformity with the requirements of cli- Railroad building has been carried on at
mate and'plant and animal growth. a rapid rate, and is still being pushed and
- will continue to be pushed until the steel
More attention is now being directed to -I rails penetrate every section, and every
Florida than to any other State. There is navigable river, stream, and lake will pula reason why its resources have not been sate with commerce.
better known. It is an old State and its Towns and cities have grown up everylocation was against it. The people living w ns and sties ae grown and
in te States north of Florida had a vastwhere, and still others are growing and wedstn striving for supremacy. Almost every setcountry west of thenii. Into thatwetr ceastryt the nt has sent its ting sun records the information of a new
wh e iscomnnimunity. New industries are being essurplus. The west is now pretty well
filled and values of land have gone to high tablished in all quarters of the State.
Thrift aiid enterprise are notable everyfigures. where. Land is being cleared; new groves
In casting about for new fields Florida are being planted, and new enterprises of
was again discovered, and facts concerning
it are spreading over the east and west and
people are coming to see the State and
inquiries about it multiply.
It has been discovered that Florida has Cultivating Irish Potatoes. Picture taken
cheap lands as compared with other see- about month ago
tions of the country. It has the widest
diversity of product. It is in a latitude
and has a climate which makes the harvest used to enrich the soil. A village doctor time earlier, with a large part of the prod- was the first to discover it, thirty years uct going upon the market with little com- ago, and since then Florida has sold $60,petition, thus securing the best prices. It 000,000 worth, mostly to Germany and has a longer growing season, with as high other European countries. This sum seems as four crops from the same land during large enough, but it is a trifle compared to the year. what Florida will make from her phosphate Field of Potatoes near Bunnell, now about
when she learns to use every ton of it, at ready to be shipped
It is found, too, that Florida is one of the home, enriching the soil of her own farms
best timbered States, the cost of building and gardens. every nature are springing up all over the
material is reasonable, that it is unneces- Sae n iebs imo nutyge
sary to build expensive frostproof houses, "NWhat with the buried treasure of phos- State, and the busy hum of industry goes that the winter brings no heavy fuel and pate, the riches of her soil and trees and on in every section. The spirit of progress clothing bills, and both home building and waters and workshops, and the earnings of is not confined to any one section of the home supporting expenses are at the mini- the tourist season, the people who now live State-it is State wide and State long. mium. in Florida have a yearly income of more The cause of all this is attributed in a
than $125,000,000. This amount, we may measure to the influence of the natural
Immense Wealth in Florida observe, to the countrymen of Ponce de growth of the country at large, but it is
\Vith her system of rivers and inland Leon, is very nearly equal to the present due mainly to the superior advantages which navigable waters, her extensive coast line governmental revenue of the kingdom of are causing new settlers to rush into the and her great ocean ports at Jacksonville, Spain. State singly and by families. Almost countTampa, Pensacola, and Miami, cheap trans- "It can be said that no other State is less numbers of people in the north and
lportation is an assured feature and coin- farther from the gates of death than Flor- west have had the wonders of Florida rephte control of railroad rates is had. ida. Her average death rate is about six vealed to them, and they are coming to
Concerning the State let us quote from per 1,000, and she has seventy-one veterans take advantage of and to enjoy them.
an article in Ahunsey's Magazine from the who have rounded out a full century and As the population of the United States
pen of Ilerbert N. Casson: are still in the land of the living, increases and the communities of the north
"Florida is a land of many colors-a become denser, the necessity for engaging
rainbow land of green palms, red poinsettias, Spirit of Progress Everywhere in agriculture seems to impel thousands to
blu( waters white beaches and yellow or- "She allows the soil and sunshine to work go to the farms, where life is easier. New
England, the Middle States, nor even the
ages. for her every day, so that farming becomes
great West seems to satisfy these people.
"Men are now finding gold in Florida- a continuous performance. If a crop fails, Nor are the experienced farmers of those
mot in mines, but in forests, farms, fisheries, there is no ed to wait until next year; sections satisfied with their surroundings. factories. Not all the gold that was found you cam plant a new crop tomorrow. They are seeking to better themselves. This
in Nevada and Arizona last year, for in- The growth of Florida is noteworthy. In is possible in Florida.
stance, would equal the wealth that went the twenty years just gone by its strides -Chicago Tribune
There is always a best way of doing everything, if it be but to boil an egg-Emerson




he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
"Don't Be a Slave to the Whistle and the Bell, or the Nickel Alarm Clock."
Read the Follewing Splendid Article by Mr. offices and stores, for they are prisoners least amount that will keep the workers
J. H. Peardon, Who believes That all their days. They are the slaves of the coming to do their bidding.
whistle and the bell, or of a nickel-alarm If this is not true, you may call me a Every Man and Woman Should clock. Rising before it is day, and return- liar. I have worked in a factory and I have
Have a "Chance." ing home in the darkness, they are driven worked as a clerk. Only a few, the neceslike beasts of burden. sary few, get anything like a decent wage.
They are driven by the owners of the The masters and their hired writers encourThe April number of the Home Builder machines, who appropriate all they earn, age us to work harder and get one of the
came the other day like a warm breath handing back only enough to keep soul and high-paid jobs. "There is room at the top,"
from the South, and renewed in my veins body in condition for further service. And they tell us, which is on a par with telling what I call the "Florida fever." all the boys in school that they can become
Maine is a delightful place for a month the President of the United States.
or two in the warmest part of the summer, Land value is the foundation of all value.
but for about nine months of the year we If we would be independent we must have
must wear heavy clothing and huddle up access to the land and own the tools with
to fires in order to be comfortable. which we work. And a better day will come
Last year we had no summer at all, there when the workers wake up to the truths
being, if I remember aright, just two warm which I have here presented. But just now
days. I do remember distinctly that the let every one who can, get a foothold on
frost took my sweet corn before I got a the soil under the most favorable conditions
taste of it. Was he not right who said that possible.
it was a great mistake that the bears and Others have written about the advantages
Indians were ever driven out of this part of the Bunnell-Dupont region. I do not
of the country? know that I can add to what they have
Have you ever noticed the effect of the said. I visited the colony last June. I
weather upon human spirits? When the found the village up-to-date and as represun rises bright and clear, the people you sented. The weather was lovely, none too
meet have a hopeful face and a cheery warm to suit me, and the cultivated lands
"Good-morning," but blot out the sun with were covered with growing vegetables. The
clouds, and let the air be raw and penetrat- people already settled there were for the
ing, and fewer persons are abroad and they most part from the North and West, and
are morose, moody, pessimistic and ready were the sort of people one meets with at
to take offense. I believe that the sun home.
piercing the clouds at the right moment has Mr.- J. H. Peardon If I were alone in the world I should not
been the author of many a good resolution- if they strike and win, the master adds fear to go to Bunnell with very little
Florida is remarkable for the number of the amount he is obliged to pay in extra money, but with a family I should want to its clear days. It is the gem land of the wages to the price of the goods produced, have enough to put my land in shape and South. It is the Egypt for sunshine and and the man who buys those goods passes tide me over the first season. The failbalmy breezes, but, unlike Egypt, does not on the burden to the one who must have ures in Florida are due to getting into the
depend for its sustenance upon a river Nile. what he has to sell, and so on-until it wrong place, and to not having sufficient Tickle its sands and you get a luscious gets back to the striker in the form of in- means to properly prepare the new land. crop; bore down almost anywhere, and up creased cost of living, and he is just where Herein, then, lies the reason why I am gushes an eternal fountain, he was before. now paying for my little Bunnell farm, and
It isn't living to be confined within walls Those who work for others are in the why I am still digging in the North instead the greater part of the year, or to shiver same class with horses, oxen and donkeys. of transferring my labors immediately to in wind and fog when one goes about his Working animals must be housed and fed, the South. As James Whitcomb Riley says:
avocations. I call that imprisonment, and but we figure out to a nicety how that can "I got to thinkin' of it-and it happened I often pity the great mass of men and be most cheaply done. So do our bosses thataway." Yours truly,
women who work for others in factories, figure out their business and determine the J. H. PEARDON, (Maine).
ANOTHER LETTER OF PRAISE
Ronceverte, W. Va., Mch. 26, 1913.
Buinnell Development Co.,
Dear Sirs:-1 am sending you P. 0.
1.oney order for $20.00 final payment on
mv land. Please send deed to the above
addre ss.
........________ I wish to thank you for the kind way
you have treated me in regard to pay- ........
rain Load of Gravel on Side Track at Bunnell. ments, etc. The $200.00 that I paid for HARD SURFACE STREETS AND SIDE- this land is clear money to me. I would Beautiful Road Bordered by Date Palms, Three
Miles From Bunnell Colony j
WALKS FOR BUNNELL have spent it and could not have had anyMessrs. Lambert and Moody continue to thing to show for it now; but thanks to AMBITIOUS ORANGE TREES
improve the city. The latest improvements your easy payment plan I now have five Something unusual in the shape of an ormade by these gentlemen is the laying of acres paid for. I will not be able to visit ange tree has been reported this week by concrete sidewalks and shell streets on the your town before next winter on account Mr. Montgomery, on whose Sanchez Street following streets: State street from Moody usnes place the little trees are growing. The two
boulevard to Lambert avenue; Church street of my business here, but want to spend a trees, which are about nine inches high, from Moody boulevard to Lambert avenue, while with you next winter. With best are eleven months old and are in blossom.
and Lambert avenue from Main street to wishes for a greater Bunnell, To those who are familiar with orange
Church street. The people of Bunnell growing this is quite unusual and numbers
should be proud of the many improvements I am yours very truly, of people have visited Mr. Montgomery's
that these two gentlemen have made in C. L. SWEET. place during the past week to view the
the city. wonder.-St. Augustine Record.
The independent man is the man who owns himself and a little productive land




Me. BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
MR. MILLER GIVES HIS REASONS FOR A Wise Man Changes His Mind-A Fool Never.
LIKING FLORIDA BETTER____________________ _________THAN OREGON
Dear Sir:I have been asked why I like Florida better than Oregon, and I am going to tell you some of -the reasons:
First. It has a better climate. In Florida you do not have to wade through snow, slush, and mud six months in the year, and dust six inches deep the other six months. Second. Florida is a better vegetable country, where three crops can be raised oil the same land each year, while here in Oregon we can raise but one.
Third. There is a better market in Florida. There is no decent market here. Portland is the only market we have. There has been no sale for potatoes here since last September above 50 cents per cwt., and -.-ry slow sale at that. Mine are all in the cave yet from last year--90 sacks-no one to buy them. There are thousands of sacks in cellars and caves in this country that must be fed soon or they will spoil.
Fourth. There is better transportation from Florida.
Fifth. Florida has better wagon roads than we have here. T epcueaoei famnw owsbr-n
Sixth. You can raise a variety of fruits Tepcueaoei famnw owsbr n
in Florida which we cannot here, such as bred in Florida. He could have bought land around Japanese persimmons, figs, bananas, pecans, grape-fruit, and the best oranges I ever ate. Bunnell for a few dollars an acre some years ago, but Seventh. And last but not least, it cost $100.00 an acre here to clear land, while he failed to see his opportunity. in Florida you can get it cleared at an average cost of $15.00 to $20.00 per acre. By and by, the Bunnell Development Company
Yours respectfully,
EE.MILLER, was organized and began selling land for $20.00 an
(Oregon). acre-still he did not buy. Then, the price of the land
HAPY RMEMRACESOF UNNLLwas advanced to $25.00 an acre and he began to wake
Dear Sir:- UP and bought twenty acres of land at $25.00 an acre,
We reached home safely and found this on April 3, 1911. State pretty cold. I certainly can look back with pleasure to my visit to Florida, for we Why did he change his mind ? Because he saw the same
have here today about an inch of snow.
I should enjoy being there again today, to kind of land only twelve miles from Bun nell, which he could
0* vrt h rv n no oemore have purchased for a few dollars an acre a short time ago,
ofthose fine places.
I am enclosing you a few pictures which selling for as high as $200.00 and $300.00 an acre. wve made while in Florida. I think they are pretty fine and will keep some of them to The above picture shows this farmer hauling to town a look at when I feel that I want to refresh my memory of Bunnell. wagon load of potatoes for which he received in the neighborWill be glad if you will kindly arrangeh$35 petisyaspotesreH
to have me receive a copy of Home Builder hood of $.0prbarrel thsyaa oaosaecheap. H
when you have these pictures reproduced. can raise sixty barrels of these potatoes on an acre of the same
VeryS trL yos land he could have bought once for the price which two
(Kentucky). barrels of potatoes bring him this year.
Since this man secured his land at $25.00 an acre, the
LETTER OF APPRECIATION price has been advanced to $30.00 and on June 1st will be
Montreal, Canada, Mch., 1913. advanced again.
Bunnell Development Company, Are you wise enough to see your opportunity? If so, send
Bunnell, Fla. oreItoc, yuno ucae am
Gentlemen: -Enclosed find $25.00 which .in your ore tocif yuhave ntalreadypucaeafrm cancels our indebtedness to your company. I orodri aldbfr ue1t o ilscr
I wish to thank you most heartily foryorodrimaldbfeJue styuwllecea
the generous consideration you have shown Choice farm at $30.00 an acre. me and I hope to know you personally before long, for you certainly do things on Don't delay like the man above-you will always regret the square. Sicrl orit if yudo. Send yororders to
CLIFFORD DEMPSEY. Thomas A. Verdenius, 1103, 108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.




Full Text

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PIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH | The Truth About Florida | | The Bunnell Home Builder | 1 Edited by S. HOWARD 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM y/ol. 1 May 1913 JWo. 6 THE EDITOR'S PEESOMAE PAGE HAVE YOU WHY the editor of the BunWONDERED noil Home Builder does not give the complete addresses of the men and women whose letters are appearing in the pages of the Home Builder each month? Several times we have been asked the reason for this omission, and shall tell you WHY. It has been our experience in the past when publishing names and addresses in various literature, that the writers of such letters have been deluged with inquiries. They have written us that every mail brought letters from all over the country, which they did not have the time to an swer. Naturally the people who asked these questions felt a little hurt if their letters were unanswered, and thus it made unpleasantness all around. You can understand that if a man knows he will be swamped with mail should his name appear in print, he is loathe to write us anything for publication. The omission of these addresses has been for the pro tection of our contributors. The editor wishes to say that the orig inals of all these letters are on file in this office, and if any of our readers especially wish to write to some one whose name has appeared in the Home Builder, we will fur nish complete address upon request. Roasting Oysters near Ocean City Florida Home of Thomas Edison MANY MEN OF WEALTH ARE BUYING PROPERTY FOR WINTER HOMES ALONG THE EAST COAST OF FLORIDA James Deering of Chicago recently pur chased sixty acres of land south of the Miami river, from Mrs. Mary E. Brickell, for $180,000, being about three thousand dollars an acre. A few years ago this no doubt could have been purchased for a few dollars an acre. It is stated that Mr. Deer ing intends to make this one of the most beautiful home places in the state, and perhaps in the United States, even superior to the Busch home at Pasadena, California, because of natural advantages of beautiful Biscayne Bay and other favorable features, including climate and location. Many wealthy families in different cities are buying property and preparing homes for all the year as well as winter homes. The Deerings, McCormicks, Matthewsons, Collins and many other wealthy and wellknown world travelers and tourists are among the investors and new homeseekers along the Florida east coast. William Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State, has a home at Miami. He purchased what is known as the Punch Bowl property, south of Miami, last summer, and is now starting improvements for a beautiful winter home and a home any time of the year. Mr. Bryan has also purchased an additional 40 acres of land, and it is said that he intends clearing it and planting it to grapefruit and other citrus and semitropical fruits. These noted men, financiers, travelers, tourists and real estate investors placing their money in this section of Florida, pre paring for future homes, gives further evi dence that our claims for climate and other attractive features are reasonable and valid. These men are familiar with popular cities over the world, and perhaps no one is better posted, in a personal way, with all the cities in the United States than William Jennings Bryan. From the fact that for about twenty years he has traveled and lectured and made speeches in every state and all the principal cities, surely Mr. Bryan’s decision to make his home in Florida and to invest his money in unimproved land should be considered worth thinking over. In fact the favorable publicity created by these well known manufacturers, publishers, states men and capitalists is helping to increase realty values in this section of the state. WHAT A WOMAN CAN An interesting DO IF SHE TRIES feature of the Home Builder in its recent issues has been the splendid let ters from people who have visited the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. These letters have given our little magazine a real “personal” touch, and you will enjoy the ones in this May issue we are sure, especially the ones which have come from the pens of women who have purchased farms at Bunnell. We have long been told that “Where there’s a will, there’s a way,” and these letters were written by women who had foresight and courage enough to make a way, when they were convinced that they should purchase homes at Bunnell. Their letters should be an inspiration to other women who long for independence, but who have hesitated to take the first step towards gaining it. They should put to shame some of the big, broad-shouldered men, who know that it would be a good thing to buy land in our colony and make homes for themselves and their families there, but who are not willing to make any present sacrifice which might be required to pay for such a home. There are many splendid, intelligent wo men who have purchased farms in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony for themselves. There are other women who have encour aged their husbands in making such an in vestment, and are bravely doing their share in saving, planning and working, that they may ultimately obtain independence and be able to enjoy the comforts of old age together, without the fear of an empty lar der or unpaid landlord.

PAGE 2

BUMNEEL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As contributed by the Bunnell correspondent during the month. Mr. W. M. Woodruff and son, of Idaho, both of whom own farms here, arrived Monday to be here for a short time. Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Becker, of Maxwell, Florida, who own considerable property around Bunnell, were here Saturday. Mr. H. C. Fadness, of South Dakota, ar rived Monday to make Bunnell his home. Mr. Fadness bought land here some time ago. The local Knights Templar, I. I. Moody, W. H. Cochran, George Moody, W. C. Heath and W. A. China, worshipped at the Meth odist Church here Easter. Easter is great ly revered by Knights Templar everywhere. Mr. I. I. Moody attended the County Commissioners’ meeting at St. Augustine on Tuesday. Mr.L. A. Szabelski and Mr. D F. Sokolowski of Chicago, were recent visitors to the colony. Both are great believers in Florida and each one bought forty acres of Bunnell soil. They expect to make this community their future home. Miss Buddell, of New York State, is the guest of her uncle, Mr. T. S. Doty. Mr. W. A. China, cashier of the Bunnell State Bank, has recently purchased a small farm in section 14, southeast of town. Rev. L. I). Haynes, of the Bunnell M. E. Church, will preach at Volusia next Sunday afternoon. Mr. M. Stone has just added three new show cases to his store fixtures. Mr. William Hatch and wife, of Portland, Maine, are spending a few days in Bunnell. Mr. Husic and Dr. Park, of Kentucky, re turned to their homes Sunday, after spend ing several days around Bunnell. While here they reserved several acres of land. Mr. F. S. Eckel, a prominent business man of Hastings, has purchased from the Bun nell Development Company a number of town lots on the Moody Boulevard. This property has a frontage of three hundred and sixty-five feet on Moody Boulevard and runs back thirteen hundred and fifty feet to Osceola Street. Mr. J. B. Boaz, of the St. Johns Tribune, has purchased a similar tract just east of Mr. Eckel’s. Mr. W. 0. Lauglilin, of Iowa, who owns a ten-acre tract near here, was in the city Monday and expressed himself as being well pleased with his property. Mr. C. E. Cisco made a business trip to Jacksonville Monday. Rev. C. F. Blackburn, Presiding Elder of this district, preached at the Methodist Church last Thursday night. Mr. G. D. Johnson, of Atlanta, Georgia, is spending some time around Bunnell in the interest of “Southern Farming.” Misses Irene Bettes, Lillian and Marguer ite Cochran and Sam Newbill spent Satur day afternoon at Ormond Beach and Day tona. Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Turner, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Johnson and Miss Anne Bardin spent Sunday on an outing at Ocean City. Mr. J. D. Curran, of Canada, arrived Sat urday to make his home near Bunnell. Mr. Curran is the owner of 20 acres of land on the Moody Road. Mr. R. Beeman’s beautiful farm in Section 29 BUNNELL BASEBALL TEAM TO BE ORGANIZED A baseball team will be organized in Bun nell next Saturday. There is plenty of ma terial around Bunnell to make up a good nine and after practicing some they intend to show their championship over St. Johns Park, Dupont, Espanola and all other neigh boring teams. Anyone desiring to get on the team should make it known to Mr. C. F. Turner. Miss Clara A. Towns, of Philadelphia, was in Bunnell Tuesday. She contemplates build ing a winter home here. Messrs. J. L. and G. P. Yonkers, who are recognized as two of the best potato groweis in this section, were in Bunnell on busi ness Tuesday morning. Mrs. II. A. Gates and daughter, of Kansas, have moved to Bunnell to make their future home. Mr. D. F. McDuffy has purchased the resi dence property of Mr. T. S. Doty on the west side of the railroad, and will move his family here in the near future. The deal was transacted through the F. L. Byrd real estate agency. Mr. A. J. Philips, of Sparks, Neb., the owner of twenty acres of land east of town, arrived Tuesday to locate here per manently. He expresses himself as being well pleased with his land and realizes that this is a fine country to live in. Mr. Philips will move his family here as soon as he has made some improvements on his place. The Ladies’ Aid Society held a meeting at the Methodist Church Monday after noon. Besides the regular order of busi ness the ladies made preparations for the miscellaneous sale and box supper to be held at the school house Friday evening. The Tribune building is going up fast now. The brick work will soon be com pleted. The proprietors expect to have the building completed by May 1st, at which time they will give the first dance in the new hall, which will be free to all. Mr. Walter Barnhill, of Illinois, is a re cent visitor to the colony, and expresses himself as very pleased with his land and the conditions generally in the colony. Mr. J. M. Gaston, of Canton, N. C., who owns considerable St. Johns dirt around Bunnell, arrived in the city Saturday and spent a few days here. Mr. J. W. Justine, of Dupont, attended the meeting of the Bunnell Masonic Lodge Tuesday night. Mr. A. K. Dombrowski spent some time at Bunnell recently and purchased one quarter section of land in our colony. He is so enthusiastic that he will contribute an article for our June issue. The office of the Bunnell Potato & Sup ply Co. is now located in the room of the Bunnell State Bank Building made vacant by the moving of Carter’s Drug Store. Unloading car of gravel for new roads at Bunnell Foresight is better than hindsight. Look ahead and see the success that awaits you in Florida

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63*0 BUBIMK1LIL HOME BUIBBER OCEAN CITY BREAKERS Our little city is fast becoming quite popular, as the number of visitors here the past week will go to prove. Early in the week quite a delegation consisting of 15 or 20 people from St. Johns Park came in and camped on the broad street, known as Lam bert Avenue, which is being cut through, and makes an ideal place for campers. Friday and Saturday people came in from Bunnell and surrounding country until the number had swelled to between 50 and 60. There was a merry time along this street. Hunting, fishing and oyster roasts were the main attractions; also boating for pastime was indulged in. Thursday quite a party went to the beach. Those in the party were: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Laughridge, of Granville, Ohio; Mr. and Mrs. Neil Loughridge, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cookman, Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Moore, Mrs. E. M. Humphrey and Mr. Johnny Mc Cloud. At noon all enjoyed a dinner of oysters, fish, salads, pies, cake and coffee, radishes, and lettuce from the Cookman garden. Mrs. Humphrey and Mrs. Moore took a trip to Daytona on the passenger boat Re public Friday, returning Saturday. They report a delightful time. Mr. McCloud made a flying trip to Gaines ville on business last week. Mr. and Mrs. Iloaz and little son were Ocean City visitors Saturday afternoon. Mr. Boaz was quite proud of a fine string of blue fish. FIRST POTATOES Mr. A. J. Smithers made the first ship ment of potatoes from Bunnell Thursday morning. The shipment consisted of 15 barrels of No. Ones and two barrels of No. Twos. They were shipped to John Nix & Co., New York, via Clyde line. JOHNSON LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. Opens for Business with Mr. Ed Johnson, Proprietor. A new firm for Bunnell is the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co., with Mr. Ed Johnson, who recently moved his family to this place from Hohenwald, Tenn., as proprietor. The company will manufacture building mate rial, such as flooring, ceiling, moulding and all kinds of rough and dressed lumber, and will handle all other essentials for the building of a home. As soon as the Tribune building is com plete the office of the company will be lo cated Ihere, where a line of general hard ware will be carried. Little Miss Rich of Bunnell with her ponies FLORIDA POTATOES MOV ING FAST NOW. Thirty Carloads or More Were Shipped from Our Terri tory Wednesday. Hastings, Fla., April 9. — With a movement totalling twentyseven carloads yesterday and shipments which will probably total between thirty and thirtyfive carloads today, the Hastings potato crop is now moving rap idly. Prices today remained at $3.50 for No. is and $2.50 for No. 2s. New York prices are $4.50 and $3.50. Traffic through to the west is improving and this will probably bring prices up ward during the next few days. The following telegram was received by John Nix & Co.: AP Seattle WN Apr 4-13 Jno. Nix & Co. Hastings, Fla. Book us for first car potatoes coming Seattle suitable long dis tance shipment. Want number one stock. Minimum car. Con firm, wire price at time of ship ment. HAMILL BROS. Bunnell potatoes are moving in small lots. Car load shipments will not begin to move before April 21 st. MR. GEORGE W. NIX VISITS POTATO BELT. HE IS AGREEABLY SUR PRISED AT THE RAPID GROWTH George W. Nix, vice-president of the wellknown firm of John Nix & Co., commission merchants of New York City, was a visitor at Hastings and nearby points last week. Mr. Nix had not been in the State of Florida for the past sixteen years and he was agreeably surprised at the remarkable growth of this section of the State. He was engaged most of the time looking over the potato crops, of which seventy-live per cent, will be handled by his house. He seemed to be well pleased with the situa tion. He said, “Everything looks good to me, and while it is impossible at the present time to determine what prices will be real ized, a great deal depends on weather con ditions, both here and in the North and West at the time of shipment.” HOGS ARE GREAT MONEY-MAKERS FOR FLORIDA FARMERS With prices for beef and pork ruling so high in the markets of the United States, with the almost certainty that these prices will never be lower for an extended period, with the fact that beef can be and is being produced in the South for one-half the cost in the North, and that pork can be and is being produced for three cents and less per pound in the South, it would ap pear that our farmers who can spare or secure the money should invest in the best thoroughbred stock they can get, as early as possible, in order that their returns may come in as soon as possible. Hogs can be fattened for the market very cheap in the following manner: First, plant your corn and cultivate it a few times. Next plant peanuts between the rows of corn. As soon as the corn is gath ered, turn your hogs into the field and they will soon grow fat on the peanuts. Some Florida farmers buy up cheap hogs and fatten them in this manner, and sell them at a profit of 100 per cent. However, a better breed of hogs is greatly to be de sired throughout the state, and colonists from the North are giving their attention to this matter. Greater quantities of pork are eaten by the native Floridians than one who is un familiar with the subject would imagine, and there is therefore a ready market for all the hogs which can be raised. The man or woman who does not feel inclined to make a living in our colony from trucking or general farming, should give his or her attention to hog raising, as well as to the poultry industry. Verdenius, REE! THE BUNNELL HOME BUILDER is sent free each month to all BunnellDupont Colony land owners. If you do not own a farm at Bunnell, but are interested in this colony, and would like to receive a copy of this magazine each month, also the in teresting booklet, “A LITTLE FARM, A BIG LIVING’ write to Thomas A. room 1103, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. Potatoes and hogs are great mortgage lifters, but the little old hen with her cackle will do her share towards paying for your farm

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER More Letters from Future Settle MR. YARNELL, OF THE UNITED STATES I NAVY, TELLS OF HIS IMPRESSIONS OF BUNNELL To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: I would like to say a few words about the Bunnell Development Company and the land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony, through the pages of the Home Builder. If the Northern people could fully realize what they can do on ten acres of Bunnell-Dupont land, they would not have to be told twice about it. I left New York last August, the worst time of the year to go and see the land I had bought from the Bunnell Development Company. Nothing much was growing at that time of the year except cow peas for hay, although one man was cultivating sweet potatoes as late in the year as it was. His farm was next to my 30-acre tract. We passed through Hastings, the great potato country, 12 miles north of Bunnell and the place looked like a western land opening, people all looking prosperous, driv ing up to the station in automobiles. It certainly looked good to me. When I ar rived there and found that all these people owned was a potato patch, and that they only worked in the winter months, I in creased my holdings in the Bunnell-Dupont colony from 30 to 60 acres, as soon as I saw what others were doing. There were people staying at the Bunnell Hotel from all over the West, who had come to buy land, and none of them took less than 40 acres. It rained every day while I was there, heavy afternoon show ers, but the water soon soaked away in the sandy loam — no mud and no stones in Bun nell. Before I made this trip a man who had been in Florida told me that the mosquitoes there were six inches long, but I only saw one or two small ones. I saw lots of quail and other small game, which can be shot in season. It is about eight miles from Bunnell to the Atlantic coast, and there is nearly always a breeze from the sea. I hope to be able to run over there after I go down to stay, which will be in a few months now. I want to say that I was shown gener ous treatment by the representatives of the Bunnell Development Company. Bun nell is a growing town for only three years old, modern and up-to-date for its size. They give you a square deal there. It is surely a poor man’s chance. I don’t believe one could find a better spot with all the facilities that go with it. In the Bunnell-Dupont colony they have early crops, and big prices, from the New York early markets. The shipping facili ties for one’s truck are the very best, and the climate is ideal. They have a barrel factory at Bunnell now, and there a man with slender means can get his barrels, fertilizer and seed on time, also can sell his crop there to advantage. Yours very truly, S. K. YARNELL, (United States Navy). Mr. S. K. Yarnell “THE JOY OF LIVING WITH ONE’S FEET ON THE GROUND AND HANDS IN THE EARTH, BUT WITH MINDS ELEVATED TO THE SKIES”—WRITES MRS. VANCE IN THE FOLLOWING LETTER Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir: — Since apologies seldom are satisfactory, I will just say I have care lessly neglected my duty, and will amend by telling you that I am not only satisfied with my purchase of land inthe Bunnell district, but am proud of it, and feel “puffed up” with myself for having the sa gacity to have made the purchase on the faith I have in men’s honesty. I believed you had what you advertised to have, and bought on that faith. Then when I visited the colony a year ago I found I had not mis placed that faith, which did not surprise me in the least. I visited a great portion of Florida, and I found Bunnell the neatest, most progres sive town in all my trip. The man or woman who owns a tract of land in this colony need have no fear, for the men be hind the enterprise are on the ground and are colonists with the rest. If I were a man I would be in Florida instead of shiv ering here in Illinois. We are still having snow squalls here when we should be in the fields, but as yet (March 26th) not a wheel has turned on the farms of Illinois and it will be ten days at least before the fields can be entered. I have talked Florida to everybody I meet, and one man has bought on the strength of my recommendation, but he al lowed a man who is selling Florida land in a nearby town to persuade him to in vest in Everglade land, which I do not rec ommend, because that land did not have to be cleared of timber. I have almost persuaded others of my ac quaintance to buy, but there are so many people here who have spent winters in Florida who can’t see any agricultural pos sibilities in sand. Because I am a woman men think I am no judge, but I know that what has been done can be done again, but I know, too, that money does not grow on weeds or trees in Florida any more than it does in Illinois, and one must work wherever he goes—even the rascals who live by skinning other men, have to work to save themselves from the law, which I call a precarious way of gaining a livelihood. There is a fortune for any one who will go to Florida and accept the conditions as they are and who does not insist on pur suing the same methods he has always fol lowed in the corn belt. I find that the most successful farmers everywhere are the men who go on to the land without preju dice or preconceived ideas of farming, but with minds amenable to the teachings of science and common sense, enthusiasm, en ergy and the joy of living, with one’s feet on the ground and hands in the earth, but with minds elevated to the skies. Shakespeare says, “What fools these mor tals be.” That is just what I think of these people who are allowing the last oppor tunity to escape them for obtaining land at reasonable prices. There are women on the farms of Illinois, renters, paying $8.00 per acre rent at that, who by their indi vidual efforts make $600.00 to $1,000.00, who never invest a dollar for profit. They might just as well buy homes for them selves as to allow all this money to slip through their fingers foolishly. It certainly is foolish to spend so much money without having something permanent to show for one’s labor. The opportunity for making money by women on the farm is limited only by their strength and financial ability. What can be done in Illinois can so much more easily be done in Florida, where their activities are not restricted by the rigors of winter. It seems I have not said what I intended to in this letter, but I hope you can read between the lines and learn that I am glad, truly, that I own one little ten-acre lot in the Bunnell colony and am talking and boosting for Florida. Some day when I get money enough I am going onto that lit tle ten-acre lot myself. Suppose I tell you how I am buying my land. I am buying two other lots the same way, but Bunnell is my favorite. I am paying for all of it by the quarters and dimes I can save from my butter and egg money, which I sell from the farm here. If you think that easy, I can tell you that it takes work, good management and cour age. I get very little encouragement from most of my friends. I think they think I am either crazy or a fool, but I feel proud of myself because I shall have something I can call my very own, and if that time ever comes when I find myself in need of it, I shall know where to find rest and a— HOME. I thank you for all the kindness which has been shown me, for the privilege of owning a tract in Bunnell, and for the courtesy of the officials throughout. Yours truly, (MRS.) ELVIRA E. L. VANCE, (Illinois). We strive to put the Northern man upon a Southern paying plan

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@ BUHMELL HOME BUILDER “Don’t Be a Slave to the Whistle and the Bell, or the Nickel Alarm Clock.’’ Read the Following Splendid Article by Mr. J. H. Peardon, Who believes That Every Man and Woman Should hfHave a “Chance.” The April number of the Home Builder came the other day like a warm breath from the South, and renewed in my veins what I call the “Florida fever.” Maine is a delightful place for a month or two in the warmest part of the summer, but for about nine months of the year we must wear heavy clothing and huddle up to fires in order to be comfortable. Last year we had no summer at all, there being, if I remember aright, just two warm days. I do remember distinctly that the frost took my sweet corn before I got a taste of it. Was he not right who said that it was a great mistake that the bears and Indians were ever driven out of this part of the country? Have you ever noticed the effect of the weather upon human spirits? When the sun rises bright and clear, the people you meet have a hopeful face and a cheery “Good-morning,” but blot out the sun with clouds, and let the air be raw and penetrat ing, and fewer persons are abroad and they are morose, moody, pessimistic and ready to take offense. I believe that the sun piercing the clouds at the right moment has been the author of many a good resolution. Florida is remarkable for the number of its clear days. It is the gem land of the South. It is the Egypt for sunshine and balmy breezes, but, unlike Egypt, does not depend for its sustenance upon a river Nile. Tickle its sands and you get a luscious crop; bore down almost anywhere, and up gushes an eternal fountain. It isn’t living to be confined within walls the greater part of the year, or to shiver in wind and fog when one goes about his avocations. I call that imprisonment, and I often pity the great mass of men and women who work for others in factories, offices and stores, for they are prisoners all their days. They are the slaves of the whistle and the bell, or of a nickel-alarm clock. Rising before it is day, and return ing home in the darkness, they are driven like beasts of burden. They are driven by the owners of the machines, who appropriate all they earn, handing back only enough to keep soul and body in condition for further service. And Mr. J. H. Peardon if they strike and win, the master adds the amount he is obliged to pay in extra wages to the price of the goods produced, and the man who buys those goods passes on the burden to the one who must have what he has to sell, and so on—until it gets back to the striker in the form of in creased cost of living, and he is just where he was before. Those who work for others are in the same class with horses, oxen and donkeys. Working animals must be housed and fed, but we figure out to a nicety how that can be most cheaply done. So do our bosses figure out their business and determine the least amount that will keep the workers coming to do their bidding. If this is not true, you may call me a liar. I have worked in a factory and I have worked as a clerk. Only a few, the neces sary few, get anything like a decent wage. The masters and their hired writers encour age us to work harder and get one of the high-paid jobs. “There is room at the top,” they tell us, which is on a par with telling all the boys in school that they can become the President of the United States. Land value is the foundation of all value. If we would be independent we must have access to the land and own the tools with which we work. And a better day will come when the workers wake up to the truths which I have here presented. But just now let every one who can, get a foothold on the soil under the most favorable conditions possible. Others have written about the advantages of the Bunnell-Dupont region. I do not know that I can add to what they have said. I visited the colony last June. I found the village up-to-date and as repre sented. The weather was lovely, none too warm to suit me, and the cultivated lands were covered with growing vegetables. The people already settled there were for the most part from the North and West, and were the sort of people one meets with at home. If I were alone in the world I should not fear to go to Bunnell with very little money, but with a family I should want to have enough to put my land in shape and tide me over the first season. The fail ures in Florida are due to getting into the wrong place, and to not having sufficient means to properly prepare the new land. Herein, then, lies the reason why I am now paying for my little Bunnell farm, and why I am still digging in the North instead of transferring my labors immediately to the South. As James Whitcomb Riley says: “I got to thinkin’ of it—and it happened thataway.” Yours truly, J. H. PEARDON, (Maine). Train Load of Gravel on Side Track at Bunnell. HARD SURFACE STREETS AND SIDE WALKS FOR BUNNELL Messrs. Lambert and Moody continue to improve the city. The latest improvements made by these gentlemen is the laying of Concrete sidewalks and shell streets on the following streets: State street from Moody boulevard to Lambert avenue; Church street from Moody boulevard to Lambert avenue, and Lambert avenue from Main street to Church street. The people of Bunnell should be proud of the many improvements that these two gentlemen have made in the city. ANOTHER LETTER OF PRAISE Ronceverte, W. Va., Mch. 26, 1913. Bunnell Development Co., Dear Sirs: — I am sending you P. 0. money order for $20.00 final payment on mv land. Please send deed to the above address. I wish to thank you for the kind way you have treated me in regard to pay ments, etc. The $200.00 that I paid for this land is clear money to me. I would have spent it and could not have had any thing to show for it now; but thanks to your easy payment plan I now have five acres paid for. I will not be able to visit your town before next winter on account of my business here, but want to spend a while with you next winter. With best wishes for a greater Bunnell, I am yours very truly, C. L. SWEET. Beautiful Road Bordered by Date Palms Three Miles From Bunnell Colony. -. AMBITIOUS ORANGE TREES Something unusual in the shape of an or ange tree has been reported this week by Mr. Montgomery, on whose Sanchez Street place the little trees are growing. The two trees, which are about nine inches high, are eleven months old and are in blossom. To those who are familiar with orange growing this is quite unusual and numbers of people have visited Mr. Montgomery’s place during the past week to view the wonder.— St. Augustine Record. The independent man is the man who owns himself and a little productive land

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BUNNELL/ HOME BUILDER MR. MILLER GIVES HIS REASONS FOR LIKING FLORIDA BETTER THAN OREGON Dear Sir:— I have been asked why I like Florida bet ter than Oregon, and I am going to tell you some of the reasons: First. It has a better climate. In Florida you do not have to wade through snow, slush, and mud six months in the year, and dust six inches deep the other six months. Second. Florida is a better vegetable country, where three crops can be raised on the' same land each year, while here in Oregon we can raise but one. Third. There is a better market in Flor ida. There is no decent market here. Port land is the only market we have. There has been no sale for potatoes here since last September above 50 cents per cwt., and very slow sale at that. Mine are all in the cave yet from last year — 90 sacks — no one to buy them. There are thousands of sacks in cellars and caves in this country that must be fed soon or they will spoil. Fourth. There is better transportation from Florida. Fifth. Florida has better wagon roads than we have here. Sixth. You can raise a variety of fruits in Florida which we cannot here, such as Japanese persimmons, figs, bananas, pecans, grape-fruit, and the best oranges I ever ate. Seventh. And last but not least, it cost $100.00 an acre here to clear land, while in Florida you can get it cleared at an av erage cost of $15.00 to $20.00 per acre. Yours respectfully, E. E. MILLER, (Oregon). HAPPY REMEMBRANCES OF BUNNELL Dear Sir:— We reached home safely and found this State pretty cold. I certainly can look back with pleasure to my visit to Florida, for we have here today about an inch of snow. I should enjoy being there again today, to go over to the grove and enjoy some more of those fine places. I am enclosing you a few pictures which we made while in Florida. I think they are pretty fine and will keep some of them to look at when I feel that I want to refresh my memory of Bunnell. Will be glad if you will kindly arrange to have me receive a copy of Home Builder when you have these pictures reproduced. Very truly yours, JAMES I. HOSICK, (Kentucky). LETTER OF APPRECIATION Montreal, Canada, Mch., 1913. Bunnell Development Company, Bunnell, Fla. Gentlemen: — Enclosed find $25.00 which cancels our indebtedness to your company. I wish to thank you most heartily for the generous consideration you have shown me and I hope to know you personally be fore long, for you certainly do things on the square. Sincerely yours, CLIFFORD DEMPSEY. A Wise Man Changes His Mind—A Fool Never. The picture above is of a man who was born and bred in Florida. He could have bought land around Bunnell for a few dollars an acre some years ago, but he failed to see his opportunity. By and by, the Bunnell Development Company was organized and began selling land for $20.00 an acre—still he did not buy. Then the price of the land was advanced to $25.00 an acre and he began to wake up and bought twenty acres of land at $25.00 an acre, on April 3, 1911. Why did he change his mind? Because he saw the same kind of land only twelve miles from Bunnell, which he could have purchased for a few dollars an acre a short time ago, selling for as high as $200.00 and $300.00 an acre. The above picture shows this farmer hauling to town a wagon load of potatoes for which he received in the neighbor hood of $3.50 per barrel this year, as potatoes are cheap. He can raise sixty barrels of these potatoes on an acre of the same land he could have bought once for the price which two barrels of potatoes bring him this year. Since this man secured his land at $25.00 an acre, the price has been advanced to $30.00 and on June 1st will be advanced again. Are you wise enough to see your opportunity? If so, send in your order at once, if you have not already purchased a farm. If your order is mailed before June 1st, you will secure a choice farm at $30.00 an acre. Don’t delay like the man above—you will always regret it if you do. Send your orders to Thomas A. Verdenius, 1103,108 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.