Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Forida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.
Vol. I April, 1913 No. 5
TIH EDITOR 'S into their faces and read their letters, you BUNNELL-DUPONT The editor wishes
can form a good idea of the kind of men COLONY FARMERS to call your attenPERSONAL PAGE you will have for neighbors when you locate ARE NOT LEFT TO tion to the assistin the colony. WORK OUT THEIR ance which is given
400th ANNIVERSARY So many inter- Some people are prone to believe that SALVATION ALONE to the farm e rs
OF THE DISCOVERY eating stories much which has been written about Bunnell- around Bunnell and
OF FLORIDA TO BE have been woven Dupont has been written with a view to l)upont, the earnest men who are willing
CELEBRATED IN ST. around Florida, the sale of its land, and is scarcely to be to work, but who do not have the means
AUGUSTINE from its dis- credited. But you cannot doubt such let- to cultivate their land properly.
covery in 1513 by ters, written by men who have no land to The Bunnell Potato & Supply Company,
Ponce de Leon, who was searching for the sell, as we take pleasure in printing on which is composed of the officers of the
Fountain of Youth, through the stormy another page. These men studied condi- Bunnell Development Company and other
(lays rwhen Spain, Francetions in the colony and satisfied themselves business men of Bunnell, was organized for
contending for her possession, and later of its merit, and their letters only verify the purpose of furnishing the farmers in when the Seminole Indians were being sub- again what we have told you from month their community with seed, fertilizer and
jugated, down to the present time when to month in the pages of the Home Builder. barrels, thus enabling the farmers to plant
jugated, down to the present time when and grow their potatoes without having
this great State has been able to make a ny eady cash. Their plan of operation
name for herself in agricultural lines. ready cash. Their plan of operation
***************** is as follows:
St. Augustine is to hold a celebration in
honor of the 400th anniversary of the dis- When they find a farmer who is willing
covery of Florida. The celebration as Winter u tt bitr to work, this company e enters into a Vonplanned will be most unique. It will con- tract with hinm to furnish him with the
tinue for three days from April 1st to 3rd. necessary seed, fertilizer and barrels for
Thue brat wl bm inh natu of ra. OH, the winter sunshine's beaming the growing and marketing of his spring
The celebration will be in the nature of a 0n It
carnival, a fete and an exhibition. The Like a benediction down crop, and the farmer gives a promissory
State will assist the St. Augustine people, Upon the Land of Flowers, note due -and payable when his crop i,
who will raise at least $10,000 for the oc- In the country and the town. harvested and marketed; in other words,
casion. the company really takes a mortgage on
. the potato crop), not on the land. The fete will be a great advertisement THE mocking birds are singing,o e land.
for St. Augustine and Florida. Thousands Just as happy as can be, When the crop is ready for shipment, tihe
of tourists will visit the ancient city upon Bunnell Potato & Supply Company either
that occasion and will tell their friends While the roses all are flinging handles the farmer's potatoes on consignand neighbors about it when they return Their fragrance rapturously. ment, or buys them from him at a stated
to their Northern homes. price f. o. b. shipping point, said price to
This celebration will be of much interest OH, the rippling, dreamy river be the top of the market.
to all Bunnell-Dupont colony land owners. Laughs and runs to meet the sea, At the present time this company has
St. Augustine is the county seat of St. And Miss Florida's red lips quiver over $50,000 outstanding among the farmJohns county, and is but a short distance ers of this community, which action proves
from Bunnell. It is an interesting fact to As she says, "Come, come to me." stronger than words the faith these men
know that our colony is not isolated from have in the land and in the settlers who
the things of interest in the world today, OH, the winter sunshine's beaming have located there.
but is in close touch with this great anni- And the place with joy runs rife, The editor has studied conditions in variversary. In the land of milk and honey, ous colonies throughout the State of Florida,
On another page you will find an article Where there's health and wealt hut does not know of another community
Where there's health and wealth eiesuhbcnra-isiv t
entitled "Ponce de Leon Celebration" which which receives such backing as is given to
recently appeared in a Georgia paper. It and life. -Exchange. the farmers around Bunnell. The majority
tells of Florida's marvelous growth as seen of land companies market their land and
by the people of a neighboring state. o feel that all responsibility ends there.
Men and women locate on their farms with
a small amount of money and are not able
The editor will be pleased at any time to to get along until their land is producing. MANY INTERESTING Don't fail to read receive letters from men and women who They fail, and they often blame the entire
LETTERS IN THIS IS- on another page have visited Bunnell and from the men State and declare that "Florida is no good,"
SUE FROM FUTURE of this issue the and women who are now located there. The when if they had been so fortunate as to
CITIZENS OF BUN- splendid letters only difficulty in publishing these latter have been located at Bunnell, they would
NELL from future citi- letters is that our colonists are besieged have received the assistance they so sorely
zens of the Bun- with letters of inquiry which they do not needed. nell-Dupont colony, who have inspected have the time to answer. The editor is To you, men and women who have altheir farms and are pleased to recommend ready to answer any questions regarding ready bought farms in the Bunnell-Dupont
the colony. These letters are from thought- this colony, or to refer them to the officers coloily, I want to say that you have been ful, intelligent men whose opinions are of the Bunnell Development Company, but fortunate indeed in your choice of a home;
worthy of your consideration. They were our readers must bear in mind that the and to you men and women who expect to
written by professional men, farmers, busi- colonists are busy men and women and do locate in Florida some day, but cannot deness men, and men employed in the shops not have a great deal of time for letter (ide where you should buev--conlider well
and factories. writing, especially at this season of the what I have told you and make up your
We are pleased to reproduce the pictures year. mind that Bunnell offers you more tdayv
of a number of these men, and as you look "A hint to the wise is sufficient." than any other communnity in Florida.




She BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A FLORIDA BUNGALOW-No. 2
By GEO. R. TOLMAN, Architect, Washington, D. C.
This is the second article and plan for a F'lorida home furnished us by Mr. Tolman. The first sketch appeared in the Februa.ry issue of the Buannell Home Builder. We are sure that these articles will prove very interesting to those who contemplate the erection of a home in Florida in the near future.
We have here a
somewhat larger bungalow than that shown in the February issue.
The main piazza faces
east, the southern por- -c ....e
tion to be a sleeping
porch. Probably any
one with incipient con- O
sumption could soon T
throw it off by sleep- L 3 Z
ing here the year
around, Bunnell being
not only a future gar- .........
den spot, but likewise
a sanitarium. -.
The living room for
universal use is the
principal room, which
___ together with the
broad piazzas will afMr. Geo. R. Tolman ford ample space for
in Florida lounging, or inviting
one's soul to peace and
rest. The back porch c
is the same handy affair as s h o w n on
sketch No. 1 for general domestic use. As it
faces the west, it may be screened from the
sun by trained vines with flowers. .
Kitchen is large for the house, but not too
large. Cool closet gives off from it with ,
wire screened windows both sides for a play
of cool air, also perpetual shade (shade in
Florida is remarkably cool). All closets to a few can be quite annoying, and therefore The small dormer windows are not really
have ample shelves, it is best to use precautions against them, needed, being kind of fifth wheels to the
To return to the living room-no bed- the same as we do in the North, and all coach, applied for much the same reason as
rooms give off directly from it-a very de- openings should be wire screened. Twelve the devil painted his tail a sky blue-for
-irable feature. The lobby, or passage, will meshes to the inch is usual-less will do. style.
give access to all bedrooms and bathroom The open fireplace is generous in width, The outside weather covering of walls to
without passing through the living room. with brick or tile hearth. Do not have the he "ship lap" siding, laid about five inches
The bathroom is something most of us fireplace exceed thirty inches in height, less to the weather. Roofs, shingles, or "rubare addicted to. It may be fitted complete would be better, but you may have it as beroid" or some of the numerous standard
with porcelain lined tub, bowl and water wide as you prefer. Old "Count Rumford," waterproof felt sheet material. All inside
closet with first-class brass nickel plate ad- a wandering Yankee of pre-revolutionary and outside work, except shingles, to be
juncts for $150.00, hot and cold water laid days, who was indeed a rare bird for the painted.
on, including kitchen sink in same work- period, being a thinker and experimenter It may be well to bear in mind if finish
manship. Water to be heated by a water in a day when they depended on prayer and trim is called for to be painted, a less
back in kitchen range, and conveyed in pipes and not fertilizer for crops, experimented expensive quality of stock may be used.
iiii~eroro nd to bath oom, nclos d in a- fi-eplces, rote a tre tisesnvthe ,qanlexpe sive ualit ofmtockbay be used
7 ~on fireplaces, wrote a treatise on them, and underground to bathroom, eiclosed in wa- ofWhen wood is finished on the natural wood,
terproof compo pipes of sectional form-all found the openings when exceeding the in such a way as to show the natural rain,
included height mentioned, would not draw well.
iii duties. elear stuff free from knots and imperfecModern practice has confirmed his conclu- cla*tt refo nt n mefc
The bedrooms are fair sized with ample siodern practice has confirmed his conclu-s, tions must be used, also greater care, which
sions. masepne utb ie nstigi
closet room, latter to have portieres in- Chimney to be one full brick thick in all means expense, must be given in setting i
stead of hung doors, outside walls. Lay the brick with wide place, and protecting from soiling and inThe windows are shown high, covered with white joints in living room, exposed to view, jury during the execution of the work.
wire netting. They may have horizontal with a wooden or stone mantel; bricks all However, if one can afford it, finish on
sliding glazed sash behind them for stormy to be plain stock brick, but may be laid the natural wood makes a more artistic
weather. (To slide on truck rollers.) These in an ornamental pattern. All this will and desirable job, that will improve with pockets to be furred in, covered with compo be a sort of "hall mark" on your bungalow, age and be a living joy forever. board; the studs being set flatwise, forming which may be plain but of good pedigree. Plant fruit and shade trees with plenty
a wall six inches thick on the frame at such The attic to be used for light storage. of flowers about this bungalow, and its
points. If one prefers, they may have the reached by a scuttle in ceiling of lobby. homely lines will be in keeping with them.
reglnlar double hung box windows set any
height they like, but such windows will
not 'ive the same amount of light or air as g THE BUNNELL HOME BUILDER is
the sliding ones may be made to give. In E E sent free each month to all Bunnell-DuWe ase the whole opening is available, in
the other only one-half of the window. The pont Colony land owners. If you do not own a farm
'xpniIse wVold be about the same in either at Bunnell, but are interested in this colony, and
case whichever form of window were to be ised. would like to receive a copy of this magazine each
'Thle sleeping porch should be enclosed month, also the interesting booklet, "A LITTLE FARM,
11,t,, with ,,ie netting,. entered by a ft.y A BIG LIVING," write to Thomas A. Verdenius, room
dooIr. i nIosq i ios, by t he way, are rareLa Salle birds in Florida pine lands, at Buniell, but 1103, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, Ill.




Uho BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
PONCE DE LEON CELEBRATION
AT ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA
April 1st to 3d, 1913
Juan Ponce de Leon is heralded as pre- the wonderful climate and perhaps some ido as co s ercd by modern intelligence,
paring to make another visit to the scenes of the tall pans that may have looked but it is to be admitted that Ponce de l.eon
of his quest for the fountain of eternal down upon him when hlie marched in search looked for it amid surrounLdings, that seemed youth. After a lapse of four hundred years, of the fabled fountain, most favorable to its existence. The winter
hlie is to visit the ancient city of St. Augus- No other section of the country has de- sinne of Floride is like tie bal of li tine and his discovery of what is now the veloped mthe joy oorr In the blossoms of its
great State of Florida is to be celebrated the past few years. It has grown and is rag o es and its great ies of clover
fittingly with a six-day series of interesting growing rapidly in wealth and population, and l countless othr blooms the bees ind events, beginning March 31. It is building great cities and substantial nct foi hiel t h :n honey that
In the early part of the year 1513 Ponce towns, and large sections that not many nettr f dligtl i e a mase honey of
de Leon set sail from Porto Rico in search to n a d laguetonsht n t a y IIIt Ime as, dliglitfil ;I- \ as the hoey oif de Leon set sail from Porto ico in search years ago were wildernesses now produce lmettfs. The lhrida orange is without
of the fountain of youth, which tradition citrus and other fruits and truck crops said existed somewhere in the direction in which bring hundreds of thousands of dol a peer, and thus are produced ilngredients
icn which bring hundreds of thousands of dol- of that ambrosia, w which, though it did not which the winds carried his ship. On lars annually in the markets of the coun- produce the immortality of the gods on
March 27, 1513, he landed on what is now pr mu S, amded te v o t egod on
the site of St. Augustine. Shortly after- ry. Olympus, aided thin most delightful in
ward he was wounded in a fight with An idea of the greatness and substantial maintaining it.
Indians, and was carried to Cuba, where he character of the business growth of Florida No wonder that Ponce de Leon went to died. Ponce de Leon was one of those may be gained from the fact that in ten Florida in search of eternal youth. lie did
Spanish adventurers-who incidentally be- years the resources of its banking institu- not find it, but after him great numbers came discoverers-who loved adventure for tions have increased from $18,000,000 to of men have gone to Florida in search of itself. It has been said by some historians $85,000,000, a gain of nearly 500 per cent. homes amnid pleasant surroundings, of occuthat hlie accompanied Columbus on the great The figures seem almost unbelievable, but pation and opportunities for profitable invoyage of discovery, but that is not definite, they are official and accurate, having been vestment, and they have found these things. He was, however, a member of an expedi- taken from the records of the office of the Thousands of others- -men of wealth
tion to Hispanola and later became governor state comptroller general. The resources of have fled from the relentless cold of winter of a part of the island. Afterward he was the banks consist very largely of their de- in other sections and gone to Florida sent to Porto Rico as governor, fell out with posits-money which belongs to the people in search of sunshine. They have found it, the powers above him and then set forth of Florida to whom practically all the and they have built orange groves on the
on the search that resulted in his dis- capital stocks, surplus and undivided profits banks of limpid lakes and on the seashore
covery of Florida. of the institution belong. So that the in- magnificent residences that are like palaces
If Ponce de Leon had re-visited Florida crease in the resources of the banks may in a pleasant land.
even less than a hundred years ago hlie be regarded as an indication of general busi- No wonder old Ponce de Leon will revisit
doubtless would have found little trouble in ness growth and prosperity in Florida. Florida. He would stay if he could. Here's
recognizing it, but when he comes next Searching for a fountain of eternal youth luck to him.-Industrial Index, Columbus,
month he will find nothing familiar except might not have been a sensible thing to Ga.
DON'T FORGET THAT Don't wait until another winter comes TRUCK FARMING IN FLORIDA
SCOMING to purchase your farm-home at Bunnell.
ANOTHER WINTER IS COMING The land will be considerably higher in Today Florida is the greatest celery proprice by that time; the best farms will be ducing State in the Union. When winter snows were drifted high, taken and you will be left wondering why
how many times did you think of Florida? you failed to take advantage of your op- Chase & Co., who handled a celery rop
When the cold winds whistled about your portunity. off 120 acres, after deducting their conhome, and the winter's supply of coal grew 'mission, returned $106,028.16 to the growless and less, did you not often turn with Don't let the first robin of spring make ers; an average of about $884 an acre. longing eyes to the land where "the sun you forget Florida-but remember, Another
loginges ays and where "in Winter Is Coming. Will you be ready for IHenry P. Chappell, nine years ago a railshines always and where the mocking bird it
ever sings?" it? road agent at $65 a month, was one of
ever sings ? the pioneers who planted celery. Today
Now the days are growing longer, and -his income is $25,000 a year--half as much
soon they will be growing warmer, and as the salary of the President of the United
summer will be upon us; but don't forget States.
that another winter is coming. Don't be A. T. Rosseter, president of the Sanford
like the man who could not mend his roof & Everglades Railroad, has made $50,000 in
when it was raining, and who didn't need the last five years raising celery and lettuce
it mended when the rain ceased. on Florida land that a few years ago was
considered worthless.
Don't put off buying a home in Florida considered worthless.
because the weather is fairly comfortable Last year George C. Chamberlain realized
in the North. Good weather don't last long $24,000 from ten acres of land. His celery
in the northern states, and here we are yielded $1,650 an acre, followed with emgg
always subjected to sudden changes in the plant, which sold for $650 an acre more.
weather, so harmful to those with delicate L. C. Pace made $40,000 net on forty
constitutions, acres of celery followed by lettuce, lie
The very best time to buy a home at then had one sure crop left. either corn
Bunnell is right now, and arrange to go or sweet potatoes, before it was again time
to see your land during the summer. You to plant celery.
know that Florida is perfect in the winter, C. P. Williams, formerly a locomotive
and you will find it not half so bad as you engineer, has made $30,000 in the last three
expect in the summer. One great advantage years raising celery on five acres of land.
in securing your home along the east coast Rudolph Warner obtained a net profit
is that you will have the cooling breezes last spring of $980 from a fraction over
from the ocean all during the summer five acres of Irish potatoes.
months. It is always cool in the shade These merely show what can be d(lone.
in Florida in summer, and the nights are Happy picnic party in orange grove It takes brains, energy and a little capital,
pleasant and restful. near Bunnett but the possibilities are here.-Exchange.




56e BUNNXLL HOMEX BUILDER
This is8 What Some 'of;j Your Future- jNeidhbors, Who HO
MR. McELHERNE GIVES AN UNBIASED South, and the soils being identical, the Spaniards selected for the site of their
OPINION ON THE BUNNELL-DUPONT people of the Bunnell-Dupont colony will al- famous Fort Marion.
COLONY ways have a separate, quick income aside _COLNYfrom the citrus fruit enterprise, arising I reasoned that the particular part of
To the Readers of from this early marketable food product. Florida that had for so many ages constithe Bunnell Home tuted a magnet for so many races, savage
Builder: Ha ving re- The company, too, aware of the approach and civilized, should not only be the safer turned from a per- of these great crops, has erected a barrel place, but ight also contain something sonal investigation factory in Bunnell, where they are turning good for me. I investigated personally and OI.of the Bunnell-Du- out sufficient barrels for the farmers to xvas not disappointed.
pont colony, in Flor- ship their potatoes in when ready. It is too bad that this good land, sold in
ida in February, and As to the water, I found that of the sur- 10 and 20 acre pieces, at $30.00 per acre and which resulted in1 face wclls a few feet deep, like the water payable at $5.00 per month, and now being my purchasing some~ in such wells in other states, not very so rapidly taken up, is so limited in quanland and town lots satisfactory, but if the farmer there will tityr.
there and aving just dig as deep as lie has to dig in Illinoi
been raised on a for good water, he wvill find it. Of course Of course there will always be Florida farm in northern even then the water of some wells will be lands of little value for sale, and across Illinois, and having found to be better than that of others, but which railways run; and also good lands later owned and culi- this is the case in every state, over which no railways run, and with nothMr. F. S. McElherne tivated lands in I oeoe oto h ooyi n ing certain except a promise as to their
South Dakota, I feel Iuodoie over monste of the lon minra ever coming, but this offer at Bunnell, of that I am competent iactuale cland onle wi the folaer good land, bordering on the ocean, with its to express an intelligent opinion as to the inata utvto ~ h ololad breezes passing over it; the great Florida
soil, products, climate, health, etc., in that I did not hear one complaint as to the soil, East Coast Railway passing right across colony, crops, water, climate, health or treatment it; with two neat, new towns on that railhead gaistas received by them at the hands of the colony *road, with necessary factories; the town After all that I had her gis s company. All seemed peace and harmony of Ocean City on the east side and on the
well as in favor of Florida, I must say that among all thpeletr.oca casndtepieofadbu
I was almost surprised to find the dry land b h epetee
andgoo sol Ifond t Bnnel.The people of Bunnell and vicinity are a $30.00 per acre, payable in installments of
courteous, refined and kindly people who $5.00 per month-is a combination of adFlorida is not of great elevation above impressed me very favorably. Upon inquiry vantages that will rarely, if ever again, be~ sea-level, is flat and much of it is wet and I could hear of but one person in the whole presented to the homeseeker in Florida. swampy, especially in the southern parts, colony who wished to relinquish or part Yours respectfully,
but it has its high and dry tracts as well with his land, and he was an old manl who FRANK S. McELHERNE,
as its swamps and wet spots, like any did not bring enough money with him to (Illinois).
other state, and wherever it is dry or even keep him until his first crop receipts. In________low and capable of being drained, and the fact, the only regret I heard expressed, soil good, it is very productive-three crops and that from those longest there, was that MADE GOOD FRIENDS AT BUNNELL a year being the usual thing. they did not take up more land when they Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius,
I found the soil in the above colony could have gotten it near them. All seemed Dear Friend-As I have just returned!I
divided into two general classes: First, twatmrfrom a very pleasant visit to your colony, the dark, sandy loam famous for its great Most if not all of these farmers, expect will say I was delighted beyond expression at crop yields and especially of Irish potatoes, to set out citrus fruit orchards when they the beauty and grandeur in and around vegetables, etc., and second, the moire light get tlieir farms in shape and when a few your colony. colored soil which is more adapted to the quick returns from their great potato crops The climate is delightful in the extreme; growth~ of the orange, grapefruit, sweet will enable them financially to carry out the land is the most beautiful I ever beheld, potatoes, etc. their plans. and last but not least, your people gave us
But either of those soils will grow any I lovstdtefmu nx&Bah a reception and entertainment almost unof these and other crops with good returns, orange grove about ten miles from Bunnell. equalled anywhere. I must say I was loathe I am only naming the products that these While by no means the largest, it is one to leave the kind friends and acquaintances respective soils are especially good for, of the most noted citrus fruit groves in 1 made while visiting your lovely little city Illinois has its "corn belt," but that does Florida. The oranges, grapefruit, lemons, Bunnell. Your field manager, Mr. Turner, not mean that this "belt" will grow -nothing tangerines, etc., were all ripe and falling is certainly the right man in the right place. but corn. It simply means that it is better upon the ground almost faster than they I expect to purchase land in your colony
for corn than other lands are. could be gathered, while the delicate blos- in the near future, just as soon as I can
The land west of Bunnell and the railroad soms heralded the new fruit; and the sights make some little financial arrangements. track, sloping towards the St. Johns river in the adjoining buildings where were Yours very truly,
and its tributary creeks as it does, is lower washed, assorted, boxed and shipped away J. S. TALLY,
with some wet spots through it, but the those luscious beauties, all in February, (Mississippi).
farmers who have been cultivating this presented to the northern eye and mind a ______land for years claim that even the low rare and fascinating fruit dream. DILKSCOLD WElATHER SINCE
spots on the land can be drained and I Teciaeapast evr elh.VSTT UNL
found every one of those farmers prosper- Teciaeapast evr elh.VSTT UNL
ous, enthusiastic and declaring this to be Imet several persons who went there with the best land in the colony. catarrh, etc., and who seem to have gotten Dear Sir-I am once more back on the
rid of their afflictions. I was attracted to plank gettings things in order after my trip The large acreage of potatoes, about 4 this particular section of Florida because it to Bunnell. We have six inches of snow, inches above ground in February, all over was to the Indians a noted spot before the and it is as cold as dreamland up here. the colony, certainly looked fine, and as the discovery of this country by Columbus. It I did not mind it before I was down to farmers expect to have this great crop on was within the boundaries of this county Bunnell the same as I do now, because I did W the market by or before May 1st, and before that their fabled legends induced Ponce de not know the difference. But to me now the crops of most other states come in, Leon to land in his pursuit of the fountain there is no place like Florida, and I will their income from this early crop alone of perpetual youth. It was in this vicinity be back there as soon as I can get ready. will be large, to say nothing of the two that the French Huguenots selected for I cannot praise Bunnell half enough.
following crops in the same year. their settlement. It was at St. Augustine, I want to interest my friends in securing
now the county seat of the county in which farms near me.
Bunnell being but twelve miles in a direct the Bunnell-Dupont colony land is located, Yours very truly,
line from Hastings, the most famous potato the oldest city in America, and the most L. E. SPRINGER,
district in Florida, if not in the whole beautiful city in the South, that the (Pennsylvania).




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
e Recently Visited the Colony, Think of Bunnell-Dupont
DR. BUSSEN SAYS BUNNELL-DUPONT BE A PRODUCER AND THEN YOU WILL EVERYTHING 0. K.
COLONY IS FAR IN ADVANCE OF NOT COMPLAIN OF THE HIGH COST T, th, Edior th Iinijell Ilonie Builder:
OTHER SECTIONS OF THE OF LIVING I. wish you would
~~~~~STATE O IIGlw~ o ol
have t his letter
My Dear Mr. Verdenius: Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Inlt, ieo inhvd in your
I-i " Aslhavejust re" Deal, Sir lt is nt ill intentin in writ"-.. a (r's )~ ~e i
in- you this letter to supply you with any
spection of Florida information concerning the advantages of my opinion of the
lands and colonies I the Bunnell-D)upont Colony, for these V0o uiinell-Iiipont cotwill relate conditions were familiar with before you undertook to oov.
as I found them. I market this fine tract of land; but there i first want to
traveled over the F. will be a great number of people who will a that all of this
E. C. R. 11. as far read the Bunnell hIome Builder who have 't,
as Palin Beach and not as yet investigated the possibilities af-t ida being nothing
will frankly admit forded the homeseeker and investor by the hut swanips, snakes
that I found no bet- Bmnell-Dupont Colony of Florida, and to and malaria fever.
ter nor more pros- these I wish to offer a few suggestions. f went to Florida
perous communities I have worked on a salary for large cor- Mr A Beish on the 2Sth, of Janthan Bunnell and porations, and know that it is practically uary, 1913, for the
Dupont. From my impossible for a man with a family to purposee of inspectDr. L. H. Bussen observations of con- save any of his earnings and live as alI" i y lad in the Iuninell-l)upont colony,
ditions as they are in Florida, I concluded American citizen should live. The cause of which t had bought without seeing. t
that the above named towns and communi- this is laid to the high cost of living. This found everything fine, and ] was very
ties are far in advance of most of the other in a large measure is true, so my advice is pleased with my land and that allotted to places I visited. The land around these -get on the right side of the high cost my friends. Ve have dark sandy loam,
towns is well settled with contented, happy of living proposition, and then you will be and no swamps.
families and the towns, particularly Bun- all right. Be a PRODUCER, and then you Mr. C. F. Turner of the Bunnell Develnell,st dance ha wide wga will not complain of the high prices the opmnit Company, took me out in the coinFor instance, Bunnell has wide, well gradedyou ill pany's touring car through different seestreets, cement walks, electric lights and is be receiving part of them. s of the colony which they rave for
in all other respects up to the mark for a sale. I saw the farms which were already
town of its size\and age. This brings up the much talked of back planted to potatoes, and they looked
What impressed me most, however, is to the soil proposition. On all sides we mighty fine. I saw nice gardens with letthe fact that the Bunnell Development hear the cry of "back to the land," and tuce, radishes, pineapples, etc., and I saw
Company is not only. selling land, but they thousands of city bred people who are tired nice orange and grapefruit groves.
are doing all in their power to help the of the old hand-to-mouth existence are obey- The Bunnell-Dupont colony is very nicely settlers in every respect, and are also build- ing this call, and are leaving the crowded located, with the railroad running through ing up Bunnell. That is the main reason streets and tenements. the colony. The climate in Florida is very
why I would advise everyone who intends Many, however, are making the mistake nice, and the scenery is just grand.
to, or would like to have a home in Florida of settling in the far off northern wilder- Bunnell is a nice little town with electric to strongly consider Bunnell, because the ness of Canada and the United States, where lights, cement sidewalks, four general stores, Bunnell Development Company is not only they will have six months cold winter to barber shop, drug store, shoe shop, church,
satisfied to sell land, but they want every combat. This is only leaving one struggle school house, bank, post-office and facsettler in their colony to succeed and they to take up another. These people should stories.
certainly do all they can to help the set- come to Bunnell, Florida, where they will Now if any one wishes to buy a farm
terms. A good many of the Florida land find nature a kinder landlord, and the soil of the Bunnell Development Company he
sellers are only anxious to sell their land the most productive of the entire country can safely do so. It is eot necessary for and don't care a snap what happens to the and most easily tilled, you to o there first, if you haven't the
buyer after they have his money. money to spare to make the trip there
If people could see and study conditions On the Bunnell-Dupont tract I saw vege- and back. You can write to the Bunnell
as I did, I am sure they would be pleased station growing as luxuriantly as I have ever Company and send your first payment and to settle in a community like Bunnell, seen it grow anywhere, and was told by the they will reserve you a farm. I did not
Florida. farmer that he had not used an ounce of hear any one say they were dissatisfied.
I am well satisfied and pleased to have fertilizer. Everybody there seemed to be getting along
had the chance to see Bunnell and I am Of course Florida, like all other states, all right and to be enjoying themselves.
waiting anxiously for the time when I can has its good and poor soil, but I found My friends and myself bought our land
go there and live on the farm which I bought less poor soil on the Bunnell-Dupont tract through the Bunnell Decelopment Company's ohile there. Respectfully yours, than any other tract that I investigated representative, Mr. Verdenius, whose offices
L. t BUSSEN (No. Dakota). while going over Florida, so I decided to are at 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago,
L.__If.________(No._Dakota). buy before it was too late, and my advice ill. He is a gentleman who believes inl
to those not bought yet is to act fair play. He gives you facts only as they
at once, as I understand that there is very exist.
little of this tract yet for sale. Yours very truly,
The fact that the farms in the Bunnell A. BELSKY,
Dupont Colony are very nearly all sold, and (New York.)
sold to a class of people who intend in the
near future to make their homes here, is an BUNNELL HOME BUILDER LIKE A asset that you should not overlook when LETTER FROM "HOME"
buying a farm, as you will have near neigh- Dear Mr. Verdenius: bors whose improvements will also add In subscribing for, and receiving the St.
value to yours. Johns Tribune, had concluded that the
W" I have investigated the Bunnell Develop- HOME BUILDER had merged into it.
- ment Company, and find the officers of this As you are still publishing the Home
company reliable men and abundantly able Builder, will you be kind enough to send financially to make good any contract or me the January and February numbers? guarantee they make. The paper seems so "Homey" that I want
With best wishes, I remain, to keep all the numbers.
Yours truly, Sincerely,
H. T. HOTCHKIN, G. MORSE,
Along the East Coast Canal, near Ocean City Illinois. (New Jersey).




Uhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
More Letters of Interest. When You Visit Bunnell
"THERE IS MORE IN THE MAN THAN accuracy. In a country like Florida with It is every worker's duty, whether he
IN THE LAND" an immense area of good lands that are or she is in the factory, behind the desk
]I~r. Thomas A. Verdenius, still cheap and open to settlers on easy or serving at the counters of our great
Chicago, Ill. terms, the man who looks forward to a stores, to provide for themselves and those
It is with pleas- life on a farm should also resolve to be- dependent upon them, a home which they
- ure that I look for- come the owner and tiller of land. It is can in reality call their own.
wvard each month to not a question of mere muscular strength I have been, in the earlier years of my
- my copy of the and endurance, for the old proverb tells us life, a traveler in various parts of the B un n el1 H ome "There is more in the man than in the world-Australia, New Zealand, South
Builder, which keeps land." Africa, East and West Indies. Was also
me in touch with I am pleased to state that the condi- through the leading countries of Europe,
current events in tions I found in Bunnell were as repre- including Holland and Belgium and the and around Bunnell. sented in the literature I had read, and I United States and Canada, where I am at Some time ago I look back to my trip with interest and present residing, though I trust that it
received some liter- pleasure, for I formed the acquaintance of will not be long until I exchange the rigors ature relative to quite a numoer of mighty fine people which of a Canadian winter for the sunshiny Florda and, Bn- 1 hope to renew in the future. climate of Florida, and often considered the
nlinpriua, Wishing the Bunnell Development Coin- advisability of seeking out a suitable lo_______ I and which I must pany and all the colonists every success, I cation where I could secure a HOME in say was very inter- wish to remain, the true sense and meaning of the word,
MT. A. A. Allan esting reading. I be- Yours very truly, where my wife and self could settle, with
came interested and ANDREW A. ALLAN, opportunity afforded to have a few acres
wrote the Bunnell Development Company (Missouri.) of good soil, where after years of toil and
for further information, and on receipt of labor in the crowded cities, we could go in
same decided to purchase a twenty-acre THE DUTY OF EVERY MAN TO PRO- for rearing poultry and cultivating vegefarm in your colony, IEAHM GANTODAE tables and fruits with a decent climate
Like a good many more of your Colo- VIEAHM GIS L G. where one need not be frozen in for over
nists, I was desirous of seeing what I was My Dear Mr. Verdenius: six months of the year and spending our
p~aying for, and particularly to find out ___________ Allow me now the savings in the purchase of fuel, coal and
if the literature I had read was not a privilege of writing wood, in order to keep the house warm and
little exaggerated, so I decided to make as a member of the ward off those enemies that attack and
the trip and see for myself. Bunnell-Dupont col- claim so many victim s-bronch itis, pulmonic
On arriving at Bunnell I was agreeably ony of Home Build- troubles, asthma and the white plague,
surprised to find quite a modern little ers, where myself consumption, which is so prevalent in Cantown already built up, having a large hotel, and wife expect, ada.
fine residences, bank, office buildings, stores, about the end of After a great deal of inquiry and invesetc., and which I must state are a credit this year, to per- tigations in many parts, I am very glad
to a new community, at that time scarcely manently settle and that we have succeeded in obtaining what
two years old. take part with our we needed in Bunnell, Florida, where climate,
Accompanied by the Field Manager I u t ui r e neighbors soil and opportunities exist. With -fair
went over the tract, and was greatly im- and friends in mak- amount of work and, attention to our
pressed by what I saw. Here was an im- ing our colony, "the twenty-acre farm, we expect to realize a
inense tract of fertile land being developed pr'emier section o cmfral liinwtot eaiss r
by a number of new settlers; new homes the state of Flor- anxiety as to the future.
were being built on every hand; road be- Mr. A. WI. Walaize ida." Yours very truly,
ing made ~vith a good shell surface, and My object in writ- ARTHUR W. WALSHE,
everybody working with that contented igthis little article for the pages of the (Canada.)
spirit that leads to Success. I stayed in Bunnell Home Builder, a journal which cerBunnell several days and during that time tainly reflects credit upon the members of BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY A DEI visited a number of the colonists, talked the directorate of the Bunnell Develop- LIGHTFUL PLACE
with them about their prospects and got ment Company and all others connected Dear Sir-I visited your land in the Buntheir ideas as to what the future had in with them, is to tell those who may be nl-uotCln atweadM.Tr
store for them. desirous of improving their present condi- nell-Dupornt c oln laweekan. Tur
Each and every one to whom I spoke tion and are still hesitating about pur- nae wa vry nice and acm odlfating oveh
gladly gave the information desired, and chasing a ten or twenty acre tract in the care M.Tlyanmslfllorth they were unanimous in declaring that Bunnell-DuPont colony, how it was I de- Colnyme in the auto. Hepirttoo usd toc
B~unnell soil could not be beaten in any cided upon purchasing a twenty-acre farm farnmbe oithe Iriash pto and trukea part of the country-they saw a bright, lot for myself and wife, for both of us are fam whcwsasowtusttiseindependent future before them, and they believers in the doctrine of equal rights for son of the year. He carried us to the orange were in Bunnell to stay. They spoke very men and women, though we decidedly dis- groves and we ate oranges fresh from the
highly of the Bunnell Development Coin- approve of militant suffragettes. trees, which was a treat to a north Mississippany's officials, and right here I wish to The natural desire of all well-meaning, pian. They are so much better picked ripe say from my own observation that I found self-respecting men and women who have frompe te tres. ta uld re n
Mr. Moody and his officers a very conserva- arrived at the years of discretion and are sipdt s tive set of business men, looking well after still engaged in the Battle of Life, is or Then Mr. Turner took us to the Atlantic the colonists' interests and the welfare should be (especially if God has blessed ocean, and it was worth the expense of our of all. The future of Bunnell is assured them with children) that they may be en- trip to see that great body of water and wvithi such people as these, and I predict abled to secure a homestead where in the enjoy the salt sea breezes. We next visited in a very short time that all the land declining years of their lives, they may be Ocean City and saw another young orange
will be settled and Bunnell will grow to able to settle down at that critical time grove, and many other interesting things be one of the principal towns of St. Johns when their wage earning powers have be- that I can't mention just now. County. come lessened and the manager or super- I visited your colony expecting to find
The location is all that could be desired, intendent of the factory or the corporation some objections, for one will find them being only a few miles from the Atlantic to which they have given the best years of everywhere, but I can conscientiously say coast, and one can enjoy the pleasures of their lives, informs them, possibly in a very that my admiration overran any objeca seaside resort-bathing, boating, fishing, suave manner, but oftener in a brutal fash- tions, and I want to be one of the -colonists etc., to their heart's content, ion, that they must give way for younger not later than October 1st.
In conclusion, will say from a colonist's employees, as they were growing too old With best wishes to you and all the coloviewvpoint, it is essential to bear in mind for their 'work. How many are thus turned nists, I am, that the main requirements are intelligent adrift without one thought or care of Yours respectfully,
brainwork, good judgment and the power to what is to become of them from those for L. J. COUILSTON,
look ahead with a reasonable degree of whom they have worked faithfully. (Mississippi).




66e BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
We Should Like to Have a Letter From You
THE MAN THAT TOOK TWO CHANCES by now. But the land I bought has paid
Editor Bunn e l1 all the loss I had in cattle, and has made Home Builder: me a rich man besides. It was not my own
When the herd law smartness by any means that has made
was p a ss ed in me rich. It was simply the increase in
western Nebraska the value of my land. I took two chances
there were hundreds and I won on the LAND."
of thousands of How many, 0, how many there are of 0
range cattle to be us who will try anything and everything
moved across the under the sun but fail to take the other
line into Wyoming. "chance"-Land, when it has been l)roven ..
By the fall and over and over again that it is the one safe
winter of 1888 there investment when all others fail.
were but few "Slow There are thousands of acres of good land
Elk," as the grang- in Florida that can be bought on the easiest
...... ers (homesteaders) kind of terms, which will in a few years be
call the range cattle, worth many times what it is today. I
Mr. L. S. Russell left. refer especially to St. Johns County, and
There were al- particularly to the tract owned-by the Bun- ready a large number of homesteaders set- nell Development Company. Picture made Feb. 12, 19)3, by Mr. J. P. Parker.
tled here and there over the buffalo grass Take my word for it, and take the "other Over 12 feet of *now in Canada. Which do
covered prairies, who, as the old saying chance," and like the hero of my story, you prefer-winter snows or sunny skies?
went, "bet $14.00 against the Government's though you may lose in your pet vocation, ANOTHER CANADIAN WHO IS ANXI160 acres of land that they could stay on you will win out on the paddle that says OUS TO RETURN TO BUNNELL
their claims five years and not starve to "Land." I have been over a large portion )ear Sir-I received the package of litdeath." of the United States and Canada, and I erature 0. K. and thank you very much for
Most of them came to the conclusion honestly believe that land values in Florida it. Well, Mr. Verdenius, you want to know
after a trial, if they "won the bet" they are going to go up higher and faster than what I think of the Bunnell-Dupont Colony.
must restock the range and live off the in- any other place I know of. I was at Bunnell from the 20th to the 28th
crease of their herds, which proved a suc- L. S. RUSSELL, of May, 1912. I went to see my 20-acre
cess for a few years, but as new settlers (Idaho). farm in Section 29, and after I had looked
kept coming in the range was again over- the land over and dug several holes down
st cked. As long as there was grass enough to the clay I decided to take 20 acres more.
left in the fall to hold the snow through I asked your field manager if there was any
the winter, there was plenty of moisture to vacant land alongside of mine. He said
start new grass in the spring; if not, there there was 20 acres to the south of mine,
would be no grass the following year, and and so I took that.
that was what happened. Consequently I was very much )leased with the quality
many were compelled to sell and that caused of the soil and I brought two small boxes
a big drop, but the big blizzard, as it is of it home with me to show my friends.
referred to, swept over that country a few I found the location of the colony ideal,
years later, killing a large per cent, and and I was very iuch surprised at the prices
that raised the price of cattle above normal. the people were getting for their products.
Land was cheap in those days. But few Everybody seemed happy and contented.
considered it of any value except for the 1 believe the man that doesn't get a piece
grass. I have seen many good quarter sectss I haese aygl qurerse of IBunnell-Dupont colony land is missing a
tions there (160 acres) sold at from $500 n
to $1,200. About that time irrigation was great treat and a big piece of money, for
tried and proved a success, and this brings that land is bound to go up in price very
me down to my story. rapidly.
There was a cowboy in these parts who I am going to try hard to be in Florida
Ther wa a owby inthee prtswhothis coing summer if possible. had a small bunch of cattle of his own,
but his ambition was to be a "cattle baron." .B. PARKER, (Alberta, Can
Therefore, lie interested a friend in the East
in his scheme who furnished the money, and WHY FLORIDA FARMERS BUY SEED
told him to go the limit, which he did. POTATOES FROM THE NORTH
He bought cattle and was also compelled The question has arisen in the minds of
to buy land for a home ranch, hay land some of our land owners, after reading the
for winter feed and more range. recent article on potatoes in the Home
Cattle were already high in the year Builder, as to the reason for seed potatoes
19001 the B. & M. had just built a branch being purchased in the North? They have
up the river from Bridgeport, and every- wanted to know if our people could not
body thought that cattle were going to raise their own potatoes for seed.
keep on going up-and they did go to $44 The Verdenius family and a friend enjoying For fear that this question may be puzper head for common stock. an outinginFlorida zling other readers of the Home Builder,
This cowboy was considered a good stock we wish to explain this matter more fully.
man and conservative judge of cattle, but TEXAS DOES NOT SUIT THIS MAN- When the farmers in Florida raise potafor some reason he got excited and paid HE WANTS TO GO TO BUNNELL toes and are ready to ship them North in
these long prices for a large part of his Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, the early spring, the prices they obtain are
herd. In a short time thereafter cattle Dear Sir-I received your letter a few so good that they are not willing to keep
-ommenced to drop in price and nearly days ago and am interested in securing a any on hand as seed for the next crop. So
e'ry one in our neighborhood predicted home in Florida. If you have a weekly all the good potatoes are barreled and
-,at this man would go broke, but lie didn't, paper published in Bunnell, I would like to shipped away to all parts of the North We failed to "take notice" that land values have a copy of it. where people are ready to pay fancy prices
were going up, and the first thing we knew You can tell the people in your town that for them. the land that this man had bought for a there is a big snow on the ground here at Then when the North raises her potato
small sum was worth from five to ten times this writing, and we are not done picking crop the Southern farmers are able to buy more than lie had paid for it. cotton yet. There is nothing green except- enough for seed cheaper than they cduld
I had the pleasure of hearing this man ing a little wheat and oats. afford to keep their own potatoes which
tell his own story one day, and this is what Yours truly, are so valuable in the early spring time.
lie said: "If I had depended on cattle alone W. J. BLEWETT, The whole secret of the Florida farmers'
I would have been broke and down and out (Texas). great success is they can raise things at a
time when the North cannot, and are therefore able to dictate their own prices.




Ehe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont
As contributed by the Bunnell correspondent during the month
Dr. L. H. Bussen of North Dakota visited Seven cars of Miami road rock have ar4
the colony recently. While here he pur- rived and are being laid along the loading
chased ten acres and reserved three hundred track of the Florida East Coast road, which
and twenty acres. will make the hauling easy for the potato
, growers this season.
Mr. H. L. Graham, post office inspector,
was in the city Thursday. While here he Mr. J. S. Tally and L. J. Coalaton of
will go over the proposed rural route. Mississippi were recent visitors to the Bunf nell tract and were very pleased with the
Mr. Kuhn and family of Rochester are country here.
building on their property near Mr. Cards,
with whom they are stopping. Mr. Walter Barnhill of Illinois recently
visited the colony to inspect his farm. He
Mr. Chas. Weatherington of Kentucky was entirely satisfied with his land and
was in the city for the past ten days. conditions generally in the colony.
While here he purchased more land and expects to send several families down. Mr. W. O. McLaughlin is a visitor to
Bunnell. He is well pleased with his farm.
Mr. F. S. Crowson was in town Sunday.
He was all smiles. Said he had a good New arrivals inspecting the Colony Mr. J. P. Schweier of Kentucky was a
stand of potatoes. Chairman Moody and Editor Boaz at- recent visitor to the Bunnell-Dupont colony
tended the meeting of the county coinmmis- and purchased ten acres of land. Mr. G. W. Moore of Ocean City was in sioners at St. Augustine Tuesday.
Bunnell Monday with quite a string of trout Mr. F. S. McElhern spent a considerable
which he caught in the canal, time in the colony recently. He was pleased
Mr. IT. V. Gillespie returned to his home with the land and purchased a farm for in Tennessee Saturday after spending sev- himself. eral days around Bunnell. He is very
pleased with his farm here. Dr. L. A. Carter, our efficient druggist,
- has rented the storeroom recently occupied
Mr. James Finch returned last week to by D. M. Deen. His present storeroom has
Aibia, Indiana, after a visit of several days grown too small for his increasing busiwith Mr. W. L. Bartlett and family. ness. He will enlarge his stock of drugs
and add a complete line of paints, staMr. and Mrs. I. I. Moody were in St. tionery and jewelry to his present stock.
Augustine to hear the speech of William
Jennings 'Bryan last Thursday.
Mr. A. I. Willingham has opened a meat
market in his building at the rear of the
Loading barrels at Bunnell barrel factory Tribune building.
The Tribune office at Buninell has just
installed a new Fairbanks-Morse engine to Mrs. L. R. Bell has leased the Hotel Bunpull the presses and is now prepared to do nell to Mrs. Joseph Conway, who took all kinds of job printing. charge on the 1st. Mrs. Bell has leased the
Cates house and moved in.
A party composed of Mr. George Moody
and family, Mr. J. F. Lambert and family, Mr. J. W. Molphurs was in town Saturday Potato barrels on street ofBunnell, being hauled
and Mr. B13. L. Lambert spent Sunday at with a loid of sweet p6ta7toes which he to the farm
Knox & Bead's orange grove. shipped South. Mr. Molphurs is a great A good road booster party composed of
potato grower, having raised 1,000 bushels G.W. Waller, J. K. Owens, G. B. Lamar, the ast easo. G.W. Waller, J. K. Owens, G. B. Lamar,
Mr. J. L. McClellon of Daytona was in the past season. N. L. Taylor, J. L. Middleton, W. B. EdBunnell Monday in the interest of his nov- minster, A. I-L Faver, Seth Perkins and I. I.
elty mill. Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Cisco, accompanied Moody covered the route of the Jbhn
by Councilman Saalfield and wife of Ram- Anderson highway from St. Augustine to Mr. J. F. Lambert has erected two water sey, N. J., guests of Mr. Cisco and family, Bunnell last Friday. They left St. Augustanks, one at his home and the other at went over to the beach and orange grove tine in automobiles early Friday morning,
the home of Mr. J. B. Boaz. Sunday. Mr. Saalfield expects to visit St. inspecting the route as far south as Gofer
Augustine and other notable points in Ridge. From there they drove to Bee Tree
Mr. Frank Vincent will soon open up a Florida before returning to his home in branch, and on to Bunnell, where Chairman
tonsorial parlor in the building to be va- New Jersey. Moody had dinner awaiting them at Hotel
cated by Dr. Carter. It will be up-to-date Bunnell.
in every particular. Tie will install both Mr. and Mrs. I. I. Moody left Wednesday The party reports favorably on this route tub and shower bath fixtures, for Washington, D. C., where they go to as being the proper route for the highway
attend the Good Roads Convention, to be built.
Mr. Edgerton, of California. was in Bunnell Friday looking for a business opening. Messrs. Oliver and Wesley Silox while Dr. St. Peter knows how to grow strawy.. fishing in the canal at Ocean City last berries to perfection. He has raised some
Mr. Ed. Johnson of Hohenwald, Tenn., Saturday, caught 160 fish ranging in length fine ones in his garden this season.
will move his family to Bunnell in the near from 12 to 24 inches. future. Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Hubbard of Grand
Mr. Martin Nelson is enlarging his restan- Rapids, Mich., after spending some time at Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Loughridge of Ocean rant by building a kitchen in the rear. Bunnell as the guests of their brother, Mr.
City attended church at Biunnell Sunday When completed it will give Mr. Nelson L. F. Hubbard, left last week for other
morning. more room, which hlie very much needs. parts in Florida before returning home.




Full Text

PAGE 1

The Truth About Forida | The Bunnell Home Builder 1 || Edited by S. HOWARD §} §§ 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. [1 Vol. 1 April, 1913 JWo. 5 THE EDITOIR. 9 ^ FERSOHAL PAGE 400th ANNIVERSARY So many interOF THE DISCOVERY esting stories OF FLORIDA TO BE have been woven CELEBRATED IN ST. around Florida, AUGUSTINE from its dis covery in 1513 by Ponce de Leon, who was searching for the Fountain of Youth, through the stormy days when Spain, France and England were contending for her possession, and later when the Seminole Indians were being sub jugated, down to the present time when this great State has been able to make a name for herself in agricultural lines. St. Augustine is to hold a celebration in honor of the 400th anniversary of the dis covery of Florida. The celebration as planned will be most unique. It will con tinue for three days from April 1st to 3rd. The celebration will be in the nature of a carnival, a fete and an exhibition. The State will assist the St. Augustine people, who will raise at least $10,000 for the oc casion. The fete will be a great advertisement for St. Augustine and Florida. Thousands of tourists will visit the ancient city upon that occasion and will tell their friends and neighbors about it when they return to their Northern homes. This celebration will be of much interest to all Bunnell-Dupont colony land owners. St. Augustine is the county seat of St. Johns county, and is but a short distance from Bunnell. It is an interesting fact to know that our colony is not isolated from the things of interest in the world today, but is in close touch with this great anni versary. On another page you will find an article entitled “Ponce de Leon Celebration” which recently appeared in a Georgia paper. It tells of Florida’s marvelous growth as seen by the people of a neighboring state. MANY INTERESTING Don’t fail to read LETTERS IN THIS ISon another page SUE FROM FUTURE of this issue the CITIZENS OF BUNsplendid letters NELL from future citi zens of the Bun nell-Dupont colony, who have inspected their farms and are pleased to recommend the colony. These letters are from thought ful, intelligent men whose opinions are worthy of your consideration. They were written by professional men, farmers, busi ness men, and men employed in the shops and factories. We are pleased to reproduce the pictures of a number of these men, and as you look into their faces and read their letters, you can form a good idea of the kind of men you will have for neighbors when you locate in the colony. Some people are prone to believe that much which has been written about BunnellDupont has been written with a view to the sale of its land, and is scarcely to be credited. But you cannot doubt such let ters, written by men who have no land to sell, as we take pleasure in printing on another page. These men studied condi tions in the colony and satisfied themselves of its merit, and their letters only verify again what we have told you from month to month in the pages of the Home Builder. I M tntpr j^unaljinF | Oh, ie winter sunshine’s beaming Like a benediction down Upon the Land of Flowers, In the country and the town. The locking birds are singing, Just as happy as can be, S While the roses all are flinging Their fragrance rapturously. Oh, ie rippling, dreamy river Laughs and runs to meet the sea, g And Miss Florida’s red lips quiver As she says, “Come, come to me.” Oh, ie wintey sunshine’s beaming And the place with joy runs rife, In the land of milk and honey. Where there’s health and wealth and life. —Exchange. i The editor will be pleased at any time to receive letters from men and women who have visited Bunnell and from the men and women who are now located there. The only difficulty in publishing these latter letters is that our colonists are besieged with letters of inquiry which they do not have the time to answer. The editor is ready to answer any questions regaining this colony, or to refer them to the officers of the Bunnell Development Company, but our readers must bear in mind that the colonists are busy men and women and do not have a great deal of time for letter writing, especially at this season of the year. “A hint to the wise is sufficient.” BUNNELL-DUPONT The editor wishes COLONY FARMERS to call your attenARE NOT LEFT TO tion to the afesistWORK OUT THEIR ance which is given SALVATION ALONE to the farmers around Bunnell and Dupont, the earnest men who are willing to work, but who do not have the means to cultivate their land properly. The Bunnell Potato & Supply Company, which is composed of the officers of the Bunnell Development Company and other business men of Bunnell, was organized for the purpose of furnishing the farmers in their community with seed, fertilizer and barrels, thus enabling the farmers to plant and grow their potatoes without having any ready cash. Their plan of operation is as follows: When they find a farmer who is willing to work, this company enters into a con tract with him to furnish him with the necessary seed, fertilizer and barrels for the growing and marketing of his spring crop, and the farmer gives a promissory note due and payable when his crop is harvested and marketed; in other words, the company really takes a mortgage on the potato crop, not on the land. When the crop is ready for shipment, the Bunnell Potato & Supply Company either handles the farmer’s potatoes on consign ment, or buys them from him at a stated price f. o. b. shipping point, said price to be the top of the market. At the present time this company has over $50,000 outstanding among the farm ers of this community, which action proves stronger than words the faith these men have in the land and in the settlers who have located there. The editor has studied conditions in vari ous colonies throughout the State of Florida, but does not know of another community which receives such backing as is given to the farmers around Bunnell. The majority of land companies market their land and feel that all responsibility ends there. Men and women locate on their farms with a small amount of money and are not able to get along until their land is producing. They fail, and they often blame the entire State and declare that “Florida is no good,” when if they had been so fortunate as to have been located at Bunnell, they would have received the assistance they so sorely needed. To you, men and women who have al ready bought farms in the Bunnell-Dupont colony, I want to say that you have been fortunate indeed in your choice of a home; and to you men and women who expect to locate in Florida some day, but cannot de cide where you should buy — consider well what I have told you and make up your mind that Bunnell offers you more today than any other community in Florida.

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Sa BUNNELL HOME BUILDER A FLORIDA BUNGALOW^No. 2 By GEO. R. TOLMAN, Architect, Washington, D. C. This is the second article and plan for a Florida home furnished us by Mr. Tolman. The first sketch appeared in the February issue of the Bunnell Home Builder. We are sure that these articles will prove very interesting to those who contemplate the erec tion of a home in Florida in the near future. We have here a somewhat larger bun galow than that shown in the February issue. The main piazza faces east, the southern por tion to he a sleeping porch. Probably any one with incipient con sumption could soon throw it off by sleep ing here the year around, Bunnell being not only a future gar den spot, but likewise a sanitarium. The living room for universal use is the principal room, which together with the broad piazzas will af ford ample space for lounging, or inviting one’s soul to peace and rest. The back porch is the same handy affair as shown on sketch No. 1 for general domestic use. As it faces the west, it may be screened from the sun by trained vines with flowers. Kitchen is large for the house, but not too large. Cool closet gives off from it with wire screened windows both sides for a play of cool air, also perpetual shade (shade in Florida is remarkably cool). All closets to have ample shelves. To return to the living room—no bed rooms give off directly from it—a very de sirable feature. The lobby, or passage, will give access to all bedrooms and bathroom without passing through the living room. The bathroom is something most of us are addicted to. It may be fitted complete with porcelain lined tub, bowl and water closet with first-class brass nickel plate ad juncts for $150.00, hot and cold water laid on, including kitchen sink in same work manship. Water to be heated by a water back in kitchen range, and conveyed in pipes underground to bathroom, enclosed in wa terproof compo pipes of sectional form—all included. The bedrooms are fair sized with ample closet room, latter to have portieres in stead of hung doors. The windows are show n high, covered with wire netting. They may have horizontal sliding glazed sash behind them for stormy weather. (To slide on truck rollers.) These pockets to be furred in, covered with compo board; the studs being set flatwise, forming a wall six inches thick on the frame at such points. If one prefers, they may have the regular double hung box windows set any height they like, but such windows will not give the same amount of light or air as the sliding ones may be made to give. In one case the whole opening is available, in the other only one-half of the window. The expense would be about the same in either case whichever form of window were to be used. The sleeping porch should be enclosed plete with wire netting, entered by a fly door. Mosquitoes, by the way, are rare birds in Florida pine lands, at Bunnell, but a few can be quite annoying, and therefore it is best to use precautions against them, the same as we do in the North, and all openings should be wire screened. Twelve meshes to the inch is usual—less will do. The open fireplace is generous in width, with brick or tile hearth. Do not have the fireplace exceed thirty inches in height, less would be better, but, you may have it as wide as you prefer. Old “Count Rumford,” a wandering Yankee of pre-revolutionary days, who was indeed a rare bird for the period, being a thinker and experimenter in a day when they depended on prayer and not fertilizer for crops, experimented on fireplaces, wrote a treatise on them, and found the openings when exceeding the heighth mentioned, would not draw well. Modern practice has confirmed his conclu sions. Chimney to be one full brick thick in all outside walls. Lay the brick with wide white joints in living room, exposed to view, with a wooden or stone mantel; bricks all to be plain stock brick, but may be laid in an ornamental pattern. All this will be a sort of “hall mark” on your bungalow, which may be plain but of good pedigree. The attic to be used for light storage, reached by a scuttle in ceiling of lobby. The small dormer windows are not really needed, being kind of fifth wheels to the coach, applied for much the same reason as the devil painted his tail a sky blue—for style. The outside weather covering of walls to be “ship lap” siding, laid about five inches to the weather. Roofs, shingles, or “rubberoid” or some of the numerous standard waterproof felt sheet material. All inside and outside work, except shingles, to be painted. It may be well to bear in mind if finish and trim is called for to be painted, a Ies* expensive quality of stock may be used. When wood is finished on the natural wood, in such a way as to show the natural grain, clear stuff free from knots and imperfec tions must be used, also greater care, which means expense, must be given in setting in place, and protecting from soiling and in jury during the execution of the work. However, if one can afford it, finish on the natural wood makes a more artistic and desirable job, that will improve witli age and be a living joy forever. Plant fruit and shade trees with plenty of flowers about this bungalow, and its homely lines will be in keeping with them, F month, A BIG REE! THE BUNNELL HOME BUILDER is sent free each month to all BunnelLDupont Colony land owners. If you do not own a farm at Bunnell, but are interested in this colony, and would like to receive a copy of this magazine each also the interesting booklet, “A LITTLE FARM, LIVING,” write to Thomas A. Verdenius, room 1103, 108 La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. Mr. Geo. R. Tolman in Florida

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BUNMELL HOME BUILDER PONCE DE LEON CELEBRATION AT ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA Juan Ponce de Leon is heralded as pre paring to make another visit to the scenes of his quest for the fountain of eternal youth. After a lapse of four hundred years, lie is to visit the ancient city of St. Augus tine and his discovery of what is now the great State of Florida is to be celebrated fittingly with a six-day series of interesting events, beginning March 31. In the early jJart of the year 1513 Ponce de Leon set sail from Porto ltico in search of the fountain of youth, which tradition said existed somewhere in the direction in which the winds carried his ship. On March 27, 1513, he landed on what is now the site of St. Augustine. Shortly after ward he was wounded in a fight with Indians, and was carried to Cuba, where he died. Ponce de Leon was one of those Spanish adventurers—who incidentally be came discoverers—who loved adventure for itself. It has been said by some historians that he accompanied Columbus on the great voyage of discovery, but that is not definite. He was, however, a member of an expedi tion to Hispanola and later became governor of a part of the island. Afterward he was sent to Porto Rico as governor, fell out with the powers above him and then set forth on the search that resulted in his dis covery of Florida. If Ponce de Leon had re-visited Florida even less than a hundred years ago he doubtless would have found little trouble in recognizing it, but when he comes next month he will find nothing familiar except DON’T FORGET THAT ANOTHER WINTER IS COMING When winter snows were drifted high, how many times did you think of Florida? When the cold winds whistled about your home, and the winter’s supply of coal grew loss and less, did you not often turn with longing eyes to the land where “the sun shines always and where the mocking bird ever sings?” Now the days are growing longer, and soon they will be growing warmer, and summer will be upon us; but don’t forget that another winter is coming. Don’t be like the man who could not mend his roof when it was raining, and who didn’t need it mended when the rain ceased. Don’t put off buying a home in Florida because the weather is fairly comfortable in the North. Good weather don’t last long in the northern states, and here we are always subjected to sudden changes in the weather, so harmful to those with delicate constitutions. The very best time to buy a home at Bunnell is right now, and arrange to go to see your land during the summer. You know that Florida is perfect in the winter, and you will find it not half so bad as you expect in the summer. One great advantage in securing your home along the east coast is that you will have the cooling breezes from the ocean all during the summer months. It is always cool in the shade in Florida in summer, and the nights are pleasant and restful. April 1st to 3d, 1913 the wonderful climate and perhaps some of the tall palms that may have looked down upon him when he marched in search of the fabled fountain. No other section of the country has de veloped more rapidly than has Florida in the past few years. It has grown and is growing rapidly in wealth and population. It is building great cities and substantial towns, and large sections that not many years ago were wildernesses now produce citrus and other fruits and truck crops which bring hundreds of thousands of dol lars annually in the markets of the coun try. An idea of the greatness and substantial character of the business growth of Florida may be gained from the fact that in ten years the resources of its banking institu tions have increased from $18,000,000 to $85,000,000, a gain of nearly 500 per cent. The figures seem almost unbelievable, but they are official and accurate, having been taken from the records of the office of the state comptroller general. The resources of the banks consist very largely of their de posits—money which belongs to the people of Florida to whom practically all the capital stocks, surplus and undivided profits of the institution belong. So that the in crease in the resources of the banks may be regarded as an indication of general busi ness growth and prosperity in Florida. Searching for a fountain of eternal youth might not have been a sensible thing to Don’t wait until another winter comes to purchase your farm-home at Bunnell. The land will be considerably higher in price by that time; the best farms will be taken and you will be left wondering why you failed to take advantage of your op portunity. Don’t let the first robin of spring make you forget Florida — but remember, Another Winter Is Coming. Will you be ready for it? Happy picnic party in orange grove near Bunnell do as considered by modern intelligence, but it is to be admitted that Ponce de Leon looked for it amid surroundings that seemed most favorable to its existence. The winter sunshine of Florida is like the balm of life and Florida flowers seem ever to proclaim the joy of living. In the blossoms of its orange groves and its great fields of clover and in countless other blooms the bees find nectar from which they make honey that must be as delightful as was the honey of Hymettus. The Florida orange is without a peer, and thus are produced ingredients of that ambrosia, which, though it did not produce the immortality of the gods on Olympus, aided them most delightfully in maintaining it. No wonder that Ponce de Leon went to Florida in search of eternal youth. He did not find it, but after him great numbers of men have gone to Florida in search of homes amid pleasant surroundings, of occu pation and opportunities for profitable in vestment, and they have found these things. Thousands of others — men of wealth — have fled from the relentless cold of winter in other sections and gone to Florida in search of sunshine. They have found it, and they have built orange groves on the banks of limpid lakes and on the seashore magnificent residences that are like palaces in a pleasant land. No wonder old Ponce de Leon will revisit Florida. He would stay if he could. Here’s luck to him. — Industrial Index, Columbus, Ga. TRUCK FARMING IN FLORIDA Today Florida is the greatest celery pro ducing State in the Union. Chase & Co., who handled a celery crop off 120 acres, after deducting their com mission, returned $106,028.16 to the grow ers; an average of about $884 an acre. Henry P. Chappell, nine years ago a rail road agent at $65 a month, was one of the pioneers who planted celery. Today his income is $25,000 a year—half as much as the salary of the President of the United States. A. T. Rosseter, president of the Sanford & Everglades Railroad, has made $50,000 in the last five years raising celery and lettuce on Florida land that a few years ago was considered worthless. Last year George C. Chamberlain realized $24,000 from ten acres of land. His celery yielded $1,650 an acre, followed with egg plant, which sold for $650 an acre more. L. C. Pace made $40,000 net on forty acres of celery followed by lettuce. He then had one sure crop left, either corn or sweet potatoes, before it was again time to plant celery. C. P. Williams, formerly a locomotive engineer, has made $30,000 in the last three years raising celery on five acres of land. Rudolph Warner obtained a net profit last spring of $980 from a fraction over five acres of Irish potatoes. These merely show what can be done. Tt takes brains, energy and a little capital, but the possibilities are here.—Exchange.

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gfte BUHHEEiL HOME BUILDER This is What Some ^ofj'jYour Future j [Neighbors, Who MR. McELHERNE GIVES AN UNBIASED OPINION ON THE BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY Mr. F. S. McElherne To the Readers of the Bunnell Home Builder: Having re turned from a per sonal investigation of the Bunnell-Dupont colony, in Flor ida in February, and which resulted inv my purchasing somef land and town lots there, and having been raised on a farm in northern Illinois, and having later owned and cul tivated lands in South Dakota, I feel that I am competent to express an intelligent opinion as to the soil, products, climate, health, etc., in that colony. After all that I had heard against as well as in favor of Florida, I must say that I was almost surprised to find the dry land and good soil I found at Bunnell. Florida is not of great elevation above sea-level, is flat and much of it is wet and swampy, especially in the southern parts, but it has its high and dry tracts as well as its swamps and wet spots, like any other state, and wherever it is dry or even low and capable of being drained, and the soil good, it is very productive—three crops a year being the usual thing. I found the soil in the above colony divided into two general classes: First, the dark, sandy loam famous for its great crop yields and especially of Irish potatoes, vegetables, etc., and second, the more light colored soil which is more adapted to the growth, of the orange, grapefruit, sweet potatoes, etc. South, and the soils being identical, the people of the Bunnell-Dupont colony will al ways have a separate, quick income aside from the citrus fruit enterprise, arising from this early marketable food product. The company, too, aware of the approach of these great crops, has erected a barrel factory in Bunnell, where they are turning out sufficient barrels for the farmers to ship their potatoes in when ready. As to the water, I found that of the sur face wells a few feet deep, like the water in such wells in other states, not very satisfactory, but if the farmer there will just dig as deep as he lias to dig in Illinois for good water, he will find it. Of course even then the water of some wells will be found to be better than that of others, but this is the case in every state. I rode over most of the colony in an automobile and consulted with the farmers in actual cultivation of the soil only, and I did not hear one comjdaint as to the soil, crops, water, climate, health or treatment received by them at the hands of the colony company. All seemed peace and harmony among all the people there. The people of Bunnell and vicinity are a courteous, refined and kindly people who impressed me very favorably. Upon inquiry I could hear of but one person in the whole colony who wished to relinquish or part with his land, and he was an old man who did not bring enough money with him to keep him until his first crop receipts. In fact, the only regret I heard expressed, and that from those longest there, was that they did not take up more land when they could have gotten it near them. All seemed to want more. Most if not all of these farmers, expect to set out citrus fruit orchards when they get tneir farms in shape and when a few quick returns from their great potato crops will enable them financially to carry out their plans. But either of those soils will grow any of these and other crops with good returns. I am only naming the products that these respective soils are especially good for. Illinois has its “corn belt,” but that does not mean that this “belt” will grow nothing but corn. It simply means that it is better for corn than other lands are. The land west of Bunnell and the railroad track, sloping towards the St. Johns river and its tributary creeks as it does, is lower with some wet spots through it, but the farmers who have been cultivating this land for years claim that even the low spots on the land can be drained and I found every one of those farmers prosper ous, enthusiastic and declaring this to be the best land in the colony. The large acreage of potatoes, about 4 inches above ground in February, all over the colony, certainly looked fine, and as the farmers expect to have this great crop on the market by or before May 1st, and before the crops of most other states come in, their income from this early crop alone will be large, to say nothing of the two following crops in the same year. Bunnell being but twelve miles in a direct line from Hastings, the most famous potato district in Florida, if not in the whole I also visited the famous Knox & Beach orange grove about ten miles from Bunnell. While by no means the largest, it is one of the most noted citrus fruit groves in Florida. The oranges, grapefruit, lemons, tangerines, etc., were all ripe and falling upon the ground almost faster than they could be gathered, while the delicate blos soms heralded the new fruit; and the sights in the adjoining buildings where were washed, assorted, boxed and shipped away those luscious beauties, all in February, presented to the northern eye and mind a rare and fascinating fruit dream. The climate appears to be very healthy. I met several persons who went there with catarrh, etc., and who seem to have gotten rid of their afflictions. I was attracted to this particular section of Florida because it was to the Indians a noted spot before the discovery of this country by Columbus. It was within the boundaries of this county that their fabled legends induced Ponce de Leon to land in his pursuit of the fountain of perpetual youth. It was in this vicinity that the French Huguenots selected for their settlement. It was at St. Augustine, now the county seat of the county in which the Bunnell-Dupont colony land is located, the oldest city in America, and the most beautiful city in the South, that the Spaniards selected for the site of their famous Fort Marion. I reasoned that the particular part of Florida that had for so many ages consti tuted a magnet for so many races, savage and civilized, should not only be the safer place, but might also contain something good for me. I investigated personally and was not disappointed. It is too bad that this good land, sold in 10 and 20 acre pieces, at $30.00 per acre and payable at $5.00 per month, and now being so rapidly taken up, is so limited in quan tity. Of course there will always be Florida lands of little value for sale, and across which railways run; and also good lands over which no railways run, and with noth ing certain except a promise as to their ever coming, but this offer at Bunnell, of good land, bordering on the ocean, with its breezes passing over it; the great Florida East Coast Railway passing right across it; with two neat, new towns on that rail road, with necessary factories; the town of Ocean City on the east side and on the ocean coast, and the price of land but $30.00 per acre, payable in installments of $5.00 per month — is a combination of ad vantages that will rarely, if ever again, be presented to the homeseeker in Florida. Yours respectfully, FRANK S. McELHERNE, (Illinois). MADE GOOD FRIENDS AT BUNNELL Mr. Thomas A. Yerdenius, Dear Friend—As I have just returned from a very pleasant visit to your colony, will say I was delighted beyond expression at the beauty and grandeur in and around your colony. The climate is delightful in the extreme; the land is the most beautiful I ever beheld, and last but not least, your people gave us a reception and entertainment almost un equalled anywhere. I must say I was loathe to leave the kind friends and acquaintances 1 made while visiting your lovely little city Bunnell. Your field manager, Mr. Turner, is certainly the right man in the right place. I expect to purchase land in your colony in the near future, just as soon as I can make some little financial arrangements. Yours very truly, J. S. TALLY, (Mississippi). DISLIKES COLD WEATHER SINCE VISIT TO BUNNELL Dear Sir—I am once more back on the plank gettings things in order after my trip to Bunnell. We have six inches of snow, and it is as cold as dreamland up here. I did not mind it before I was down to Bunnell the same as I do now, because I did not know the difference. But to me now there is no place like Florida, and I will be back there as soon as I can get ready. I cannot praise Bunnell half enough. I want to interest my friends in securing farms near me. Yours very truly, L. E. SPRINGER, (Pennsylvania).

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m@ BUNN£LL HOME BUILDER \e Recently Visited the Colony, Think o£ Bunnell-Dupont DR. BUSSEN SAYS BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY IS FAR IN ADVANCE OF OTHER SECTIONS OF THE STATE My Dear Mr. Verdenius: As I have just re turned from my in spection of Florida lands and colonies I will relate conditions as I found them. I traveled over the F. E. C. R. R. as far as Palm Beach and will frankly admit that I found no bet ter nor more pros perous communities than Bunnell and Dupont. From my Dr. L. H. Bussen observations of con ditions as they are in Florida, I concluded that the above named towns and communi ties are far in advance of most of the other places I visited. The land around these towns is well settled with contented, happy families and the towns, particularly Bun nell, are far in advance of most towns. For instance, Bunnell has wide, well graded streets, cement walks, electric lights and is in all other respects up to the mark for a town of its size\and age. What impressed me most, however, is the fact that the Bunnell Development Company is not only selling land, but they are doing all in their power to help the settlers in every respect, and are also build ing up Bunnell. That is the main reason why I would advise everyone who intends to, or would like to have a home in Florida to strongly consider Bunnell, because the Bunnell Development Company is not only satisfied to sell land, but they want every settler in their colony to succeed and they certainly do all they can to help the set tlers. A good many of the Florida land sellers are only anxious to sell their land and don’t care a snap what happens to the buyer after they have his money. If people could see and study conditions as I did, I am sure they would be pleased to settle in a community like Bunnell, Florida. I am well satisfied and pleased to have had the chance to see Bunnell and I am waiting anxiously for the time when I can go there and live on the farm which I bought while there. Respectfully yours, L. H. BUSSEN (No. Dakota). Along the East Coast Canal, near Ocean City BE A PRODUCER AND THEN YOU WILL NOT COMPLAIN OF THE HIGH COST OF LIVING Mr. T. A. Verdenius, Dear Sir—It is not my intention in writ ing you this letter to supply you with any information concerning the advantages of the Bunnell-Dupont Colony, for these you were familiar with before you undertook to market this fine tract of land; but there will be a great number of people who will read the Bunnell Home Builder who have not as yet investigated the possibilities af forded the homeseeker and investor by the Bunnell-Dupont Colony of Florida, and to these 1 wish to offer a few suggestions. I have worked on a salary for large cor porations, and know that it is practically impossible for a man with a family to save any of his earnings and live as an American citizen should live. The cause of this is laid to the high cost of living. This in a large measure is true, so my advice is —get on the right side of the high cost of living proposition, and then you will be all right. Be a PRODUCER, and then you will not complain of the high prices the consumers have to pay, for then you will be receiving part of them. This brings up the much talked of back to the soil proposition. On all sides we hear the cry of “back to the land,” and thousands of city bred people who are tired of the old hand-to-mouth existence are obey ing this call, and are leaving the crowded streets and tenements. Many, however, are making the mistake of settling in the far off northern wilder ness of Canada and the United States, where they will have six months cold winter to combat. This is only leaving one struggle to take up another. These people should come to Bunnell, Florida, where they will find nature a kinder landlord, and the soil the most productive of the entire country and most easily tilled. On the Bunnell-Dupont tract I saw vege tation growing as luxuriantly as I have ever seen it grow anywhere, and was told by the farmer that he had not used an ounce of fertilizer. Of course Florida, like all other states, has its good and poor soil, but I found less poor soil on the Bunnell-Dupont tract than any other tract that I investigated while going over Florida, so I decided to buy before it was too late, and my advice to those who have not bought yet is to act at once, as I understand that there is very little of this tract yet for sale. The fact that the farms in the BunnellDupont Colony are very nearly all sold, and sold to a class of people who intend in the near future to make their homes here, is an asset that you should not overlook when buying a farm, as you will have near neigh bors whose improvements will also add value to yours. I have investigated the Bunnell Develop ment Company, and find the officers of this company reliable men and abundantly able financially to make good any contract or guarantee they make. With best wishes, I remain, Yours truly, H. T. HOTCHKIN, Illimoi*. EVERYTHING 0. K. To the Editor of the Bunnell Home Builder: I wish you would have this letter published in your paper, so people in the north can read my opinion of the Bunnell-Dupont col ony. I first want to say that all of this is talk, about Flor ida being nothing but swamps, snakes and malaria fever. I went to Florida on the 28th of Jan uary, 1913, for the purpose of inspect ing my land in the Bunnell-Dupont colony, which I had bought without seeing. 1 found everything fine, and I was very pleased with my land and that allotted to my friends. We have dark sandy loam, and no swamps. Mr. C. F. Turner of the Bunnell Devel opment Company, took me out in the com pany’s touring car through different sec tions of the colony which they have for sale. I saw the farms which were already planted to potatoes, and they looked mighty fine. I saw nice gardens with let tuce, radishes, pineapples, etc., and I saw nice orange and grapefruit groves. The Bunnell-Dupont colony is very nicely located, with the railroad running through the colony. The climate in Florida is very nice, and the scenery is just grand. Bunnell is a nice little town with electric lights, cement sidewalks, four general stores, barber shop, drug store, shoe shop, church, school house, bank, post-office and fac tories. Now if any one wishes to buy a farm of the Bunnell Development Company he can safely do so. It is not necessary for you to go there first, if you haven’t the money to spare to make the trip there and back. You can write to the Bunnell Company and send your first payment and they will reserve you a farm. 'l did not hear any one say they were dissatisfied. Everybody there seemed to be getting along all right and to be enjoying themselves. My friends and myself bought our land through the Bunnell Decelopment Company’s representative, Mr. Verdenius, whose offices are at 108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. He is a gentleman who believes in fair play. He gives you facts only as they exist. Yours very truly, A. BELSKY, (New York.) BUNNELL HOME BUILDER LIKE A LETTER FROM “HOME” Dear Mr. Verdenius: In subscribing for, and receiving the St. Johns Tribune, had concluded that the HOME BLIILDER had merged into it. As you are still publishing the Home Builder, will you be kind enough to send me the January and February numbers? The paper seems so “Homey” that I want to keep all the numbers. Sincerely, G. MORSE, (New Jersey).

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BUNNEILE HOME BUILDER More Letters of Interest. When “THERE IS MORE IN THE MAN THAN IN THE LAND” Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Chicago, III. It is with pleas ure that I look for ward each month to my copy of the Bunnell Home Builder, which keeps me in touch with current events in and around Bunnell. Some time ago I received some liter ature relative to Florida lands, Bun nell in particular, and which’ I must say was very inter esting reading. I be came interested and wrote the Bunnell Development Company for further information, and on receipt of same decided to purchase a twenty-acre farm in your colony. Like a good many more of your colo nists, I was desirous of seeing what I was paying for, and particularly to find out if the literature I had read was not a little exaggerated, so I decided to make the trip and see for myself. On arriving at Bunnell 1 was agreeably surprised to find quite a modern little town already built up, having a large hotel, fine residences, bank, office buildings, stores, etc., and which I must state are a credit to a new community, at that time scarcely two years old. Accompanied by the Field Manager I went over the tract, and was greatly im pressed by what I saw. Here was an im mense tract of fertile land being developed by a number of new settlers; new homes were being built on every hand; road be ing made with a good shell surface, and everybody working with that contented spirit that leads to Success. I stayed in Bunnell several days and during that time I visited a number of the colonists, talked with them about their prospects and got their ideas as to what the future had in store for them. Each and every one to whom I spoke gladly gave the information desired, and they were unanimous in declaring that Bunnell soil could not be beaten in any part of the country — they saw a bright, independent future before* them, and they were in Bunnell to stay. They spoke very highly of the Bunnell Development Com pany’s officials, and right here I wish to say from my own observation that I found Mr. Moody and his officers a very conserva tive set of business men, looking well after the colonists’ interests and the welfare of all. The future of Bunnell is assured with such people as these, and I predict in a very short time that all the land will be settled and Bunnell will grow to be one of the principal towns of St. Johns County. The location is all that could be desired, being only a few miles from the Atlantic coast, and one can enjoy the pleasures of a seaside resort — bathing, boating, fishing, etc., to their heart’s content. In conclusion, will say from a colonist’s viewpoint, it is essential to bear in mind that the main requirements are intelligent brainwork, good judgment and the power to look ahead with a reasonable degree of accuracy. In a country like Florida with an immense area of good lands that are still cheap and open to settlers on easy terms, the man who looks forward to a life on a farm should also resolve to be come the owner and tiller of land. It is not a question of mere muscular strength and endurance, for the old proverb tells us “There is more in the man than in the land.” I am pleased to state that the condi tions I found in Bunnell were as repre sented in the literature I had read, and I look back to my trip with interest and pleasure, for I formed the acquaintance of quite a numoer of mighty fine people which I hope to renew in the future. Wishing the Bunnell Development Com pany and all the colonists every success, I wish to remain. Yours very truly, ANDREW A. ALLAN, (Missouri.) Mr. A. WaUhe THE DUTY OF EVERY MAN TO PRO VIDE A HOME AGAINST OLD AGE. My Dear Mr. Verdenius: Allow me now the privilege of writing as a member of the Bunnell-Dupont col ony of Home Build ers, where myself and wife expect, about the end of this year, to per manently settle and take part with our future neighbors and friends in mak ing our colony, “the premier section of the state of Flor ida.” My object in writ ing this little article for the pages of the Bunnell Home Builder, a journal which cer tainly reflects credit upon the members of the directorate of the Bunnell Develop ment Company and all others connected with them, is to tell those who may be desirous of improving their present condi tion and are still hesitating about pur chasing a ten or twenty acre tract in the Bunnell-DuPont colony, how it was I de cided upon purchasing a twenty-acre farm lot for myself and wife, for both of us are believers in the doctrine of equal rights for men and women, though we decidedly dis approve of militant suffragettes. The natural desire of all well-meaning, self-respecting men and women who have arrived at the years of discretion and are still engaged in the Battle of Life, is or should be (especially if God has blessed them with children) that they may be en abled to secure a homestead where in the declining years of their lives, they may be able to settle down at that critical time when their wage earning powers have be come lessened and the manager or super intendent of the factory or the corporation to which they have given the best years of their lives, informs them, possibly in a very suave manner, but oftener in a brutal fash ion, that they must give way for younger employees, as they were growing too old for their work. How many are thus turned adrift without one thought or care of what is to become of them from those for whom they have worked faithfully. You Visit Bunnell It is every worker’s duty, whether he or she is in the factory, behind the desk or serving at the counters of our great stores, to provide for themselves and those dependent upon them, a home which they can in reality call their own. I have been, in the earlier years of my life, a traveler in various parts of the world—Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, East and West Indies. Was also through the leading countries of Europe, including Holland and Belgium and the United States and Canada, where I am at present residing, though I trust that it will not be long until I exchange the rigors of a Canadian winter for the sunshiny climate of Florida, and often considered the advisability of seeking out a suitable lo cation where I could secure a HOME in the true sense and meaning of the word, where my wife and self could settle, with opportunity afforded to have a few acres of good soil, where after years of toil and labor in the crowded cities, we could go in for rearing poultry and cultivating vege tables and fruits with a decent climate where one need not be frozen in for over six months of the year and spending our savings in the purchase of fuel, coal and wood, in order to keep the house warm and ward off those enemies that attack and claim so many victims—bronchitis, pulmonic troubles, asthma and the white plague, consumption, which is so prevalent in Can ada. After a great deal of inquiry and inves tigations in many parts, I am very glad that we have succeeded in obtaining what we needed in Bunnell, Florida, where climate, soil and opportunities exist. With fair amount of work and attention to our twenty-acre farm, we expect to realize a comfortable living without weariness or anxiety as to the future. Yours very truly, ARTHUR W. WALSHE, (Canada.) BUNNELL-DUPONT COLONY A DE LIGHTFUL PLACE Dear Sir—I visited your land in the Bun nell-Dupont Colony last week, and Mr. Tur ner was very nice and accommodating. He carried Mr. Tally and myself all over the Colony in the auto. He first took us to a number of the Irish potato and truck farms which was a show to us at this sea son of the year. He carried us to the orange groves and we ate oranges fresh from the trees, which was a treat to a north Mississippian. They are so much better picked ripe from the trees than pulled green and shipped to us. Then Mr. Turner took us to the Atlantic ocean, and it was worth the expense of our trip to see that great body of water and enjoy the salt sea breezes. We next visited Ocean City and saw another young orange grove, and many other interesting things that I can’t mention just now. I visited your colony expecting to find some objections, for one will find them everywhere, but I can conscientiously say that my admiration overran any objec tions, and I want to be one of the colonists not later than October 1st. With best wishes to you and all the colo nists, T am, Yours respectfully, L. J. COULSTON, (Mississippi).

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MJNHELL HOMEBUILDER W^e Should Like to Have a Letter From You Mr. L. S. Russell THE MAN THAT TOOK TWO CHANCES Editor Bunnell SjHj Home Builder: A ^bl w j When the herd law ^ was passed in western Nebraska there were hundreds of thousands of range cattle to be moved across the line into Wyoming. A By the fall and ^Br j v winter of 1888 there i i were but few “Slow Elk,” as the grang ers (homesteaders) call the range cattle, left. There were al ready a large number of homesteaders set tled here and there over the buffalo grass covered prairies, who, as the old saying went, “bet $14.00 against the Government’s 160 acres of land that they could stay on their claims five years and not starve to death.” Most of them came to the conclusion after a trial, if they “won the bet” they must rdstock the range and live off the in crease of their herds, which proved a suc cess for a few years, but as new settlers kept coming in the range was again over stocked. As long as there was grass enough left in the fall to hold the snow through the winter, there was plenty of moisture to start new grass in the spring; if not, there would be no grass the following year, and that was what happened. Consequently many were compelled to sell and that caused a big drop, but the big blizzard, as it is referred to, swept over that country a few years later, killing a large per cent, and that raised the price of cattle above normal. Land was cheap in those days. But few considered it of any value except for the grass. I have seen many good quarter sec tions there (160 acres) sold at from $500 to $1,200. About that time irrigation was tried and proved a success, and this brings me down to my story. There was a cowboy in these parts who had a small bunch of cattle of his own, but his ambition was to be a “cattle baron.” Therefore, he interested a friend in the East in his scheme who furnished the money, and told him to go the limit, which he did. He bought cattle and was also compelled to buy land for a home ranch, hay land for winter feed and more range. Cattle were already high in the year 1900; the B. & M. had just built a branch up the river from Bridgeport, and every body thought that cattle were going to keep on going up—and they did go to $44 per head for common stock. This cowboy was considered a good stock man and conservative judge of cattle, but for some reason he got excited and paid these long prices for a large part of his herd. In a short time thereafter cattle commenced to drop in price and nearly •’cry one in our neighborhood predicted Boat this man would go broke, but he didn’t. We failed to “take notice” that land values were going up, and the first thing we knew the land that this man had bought for a small sum was worth from five to ten times more than he had paid for it. I had the pleasure of hearing this man tell his own story one day, and this is what lie said: “If I had depended on cattle alone 1 would have been broke and down and out by now. But the land I bought has paid all the loss I had in cattle, and has made me a rich man besides. It was not my own smartness by any means that has made me rich. It was simply the increase in the value of my land. I took two chances and I won on the LAND.” How many, O, how many there are of us who will try anything and everything under the sun but fail to take the other “chance” — Land, when it has been proven over and over again that it is the one safe investment when all others fail. There are thousands of acres of good land in Florida that can be bought on the easiest kind of terms, which will in a few years be worth many times what it is today. I refer especially to St. Johns County, and particularly to the tract owned by the Bun nell Development Company. Take my word for it, and take the “other chance,” and like the hero of my story, though you may lose in your pet vocation, you will win out on the paddle that says “Land.” I have been over a large portion of the United States and Canada, and I honestly believe that land values in Florida are going to go up higher and faster than any other place I know of. L. S. RUSSELL, (Idaho). The Verdenius family and a friend enjoying an outing in Florida TEXAS DOES NOT SUIT THIS MAN— HE WANTS TO GO TO BUNNELL Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius, Dear Sir — I received your letter a few days ago and am interested in securing a home in Florida. If you have a weekly paper published in Bunnell, I would like to have a copy of it. You can tell the people in your town that there is a big snow on the ground here at this writing, and we are not done picking cotton yet. There is nothing green except ing a little wheat and oats. Yours truly. W. J. BLEWETT, (Texas). Picture made Feb. 12. 1913. by Mr. J. P. Parker. Over 12 feet of snow in Canada. Which do you prefer—winter snows or sunny skies? ANOTHER CANADIAN WHO IS ANXI OUS TO RETURN TO BUNNELL Dear Sir — I received the package of lit erature O. K. and thank you very much for it. Well, Mr. Verdenius, you want to know what I think of the Bunnell-Dupont, Colony. I was at Bunnell from the 20th to the 28th of May, 1912. I went to see my 20-acre farm in Section 29, and after I had looked the land over and dug several holes down to the clay I decided to take 20 acres more. I asked your field manager if there was any vacant land alongside of mine. He said there was 20 acres to the south of mine, and so I took that. I was very much pleased with the quality of the soil and I brought two small boxes of it home with me to show my friends. I found the location of the colony ideal, and I was very much surprised at the prices the people Mere getting for their products. Everybody seemed happy and contented. I believe the man that doesn’t get a piece of Bunnell-Dupont colony land is missing a great treat and a big piece of money, for that land is bound to go up in price very rapidly. I am going to try hard to be in Florida this coming summer if possible. J. B. PARKER, (Alberta, Can ) WHY FLORIDA FARMERS BUY SEED POTATOES FROM THE NORTH The question has arisen in the minds of some of our land owners, after reading the recent article on potatoes in the Home Builder, as to the reason for seed potatoes being purchased in the North? They have wanted to know if our people could not raise their own potatoes for seed. For fear that this question may be puz zling other readers of the Home Builder, we wish to explain this matter more fully. When the farmers in Florida raise pota toes and are ready to ship them North in the early spring, the prices they obtain are so good that they are not willing to keep any on hand as seed for the next crop. So all the good potatoes are barreled and shipped away to all parts of the North where people are ready to pay fancy prices for them. Then when the North raises her potato crop the Southern farmers are able to buy enough for seed cheaper than they cdulil afford to keep their own potatoes which are so valuable in the early spring time. The whole secret of the Florida farmers’ great success is they can raise things at a time when the North cannot, and are there fore able to dictate their own prices.

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m@ BUMME1LIL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont As contributed by the Bunnell correspondent during the month Dr. L. H. Bussen of North Dakota visited the colony recently. While here he pur chased ten acres and reserved three hundred and twenty acres. Mr. H. L. Graham, post office inspector, was in the city Thursday. While here he will go over the proposed rural route. Mr. Kuhn and family of Rochester are building on their property near Mr. Cards, with whom they are stopping. Mr. Chas. Weatherington of Kentucky was in the city for the past ten days. While here he purchased more land and expects to send several families down. Mr. F. S. Crowson was in town Sunday, lie was all smiles. Said he had a good stand of potatoes. Mr. G. W. Moore of Ocean City was in Bunnell Monday with quite a string of trout which he caught in the canal. Loading barrels at Bunnell barrel factory The Tribune office at Bunnell has just installed a new Fairbanks-Morse engine to pull the presses and is now prepared to do all kinds of job printing. A party composed of Mr. George Moody and family, Mr. J. F. Lambert and family, and Air. B. L. Lambert spent Sunday at Knox & BeadÂ’s orange grove. Mr. J. L. McClellon of Daytona was in Bunnell Monday in the interest of his nov elty mill. Mr. .J. F. Lambert has erected two water tanks, one at his home and the other at the home of Mr. J. B. Boaz. Mi'. Frank Vincent will soon open up a tonsorial parlor in the building to be va cated by Dr. Carter. It will be up-to-date in every particular. He will install both tub and shower bath fixtures. Mr. Edgerton, of California, was in Bun nell Friday looking for a business opening. Mr. Ed. Johnson of Flohenwald, Tenn., will move his family to Bunnell in the near future. Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Loughridge of Ocean City attended church at Bunnell Sunday morning. New arrivals inspecting the Colony Chairman Moody and Editor Boaz at tended the meeting of the county commis sioners at St. Augustine Tuesday. Mr. 11. V. Gillespie returned to his home in Tennessee Saturday after spending sev eral days around Bunnell. He is very pleased with his farm here. Mr. James Finch returned last week to Ambia, Indiana, after a visit of several days with Mr. W. L. Bartlett and family. Mr. and Mrs. I. I. Moody were in St. Augustine to hear the speech of William Jennings Bryan last Thursday. Mr. A. II. Willingham has opened a meat market in bis building at the rear of the Tribune building. Mrs. L. R. Bell has leased the Hotel Bun nell to Mrs. Joseph Conway, who took charge on the 1st. Mrs. Bell has leased the Cates house and moved in. Mr. J. W. Molplnirs was in town Saturday with a load of sweet potatoes which he shipped South. Mr. Molphurs is a great potato grower, having raised 1,000 bushels the past season. Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Cisco, accompanied by Councilman Saalfield and wife of Ram sey, N. J., guests of Mr. Cisco and family, went over to the beach and orange grove Sunday. Mr. Saalfield expects to visit St. Augustine and other notable points in Florida before returning to his home in New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. 1. I. Moody left Wednesday for Washington, D. C., where they go to attend the Good Roads Convention. Messrs. Oliver and Wesley Silox while fishing in the canal at Ocean City last Saturday, caught 160 fish ranging in length from 12 to 24 inches. Mr. Martin Nelson is enlarging his restau rant by building a kitchen in the rear. When completed it will give Mr. Nelson more room, which lie very much needs. Seven cars of Miami road rock have ar \ rived and are being laid along the loading track of the Florida East Coast road, which will make the hauling easy for the potato growers this season. Mr. J. S. Tally and L. J. Coalston of Mississippi were recent visitors to the Bun nell tract and were very pleased with the country here. Mr. Walter Barnhill of Illinois recently visited the colony to inspect his farm. He was entirely satisfied with his land and conditions generally in the colony. Mr. W. O. McLaughlin is a visitor to Bunnell. He is well pleased with his farm. Mr. J. P. Schweier of Kentucky was a recent visitor to the Bunnell-Dupont colony and purchased ten acres of land. Mr. F. S. McElhern spent a considerable time in the colony recently. Fie was pleased with the land and purchased a farm for himself. Dr. L. A. Carter, our efficient druggist, has rented the storeroom recently occupied by D. M. Deen. His present storeroom has grown too small for his increasing busi ness. He will enlarge his stock of drugs and add a complete line of paints, sta tionery and jewelry to his present stock. Potato barrels on street of Bunnell, being hauled to the farm A good road booster party composed of G. W. Waller, J. K. Owens, G. B. Lamar, N. L. Taylor, J. L. Middleton, W. B. Edminster, A. FI. Faver, Seth Perkins and I. I. Moody covered the route of the John Anderson highway from St. Augustine to Bunnell last Friday. They left St. Augus tine in automobiles early Friday morning, inspecting the route as far south as Gofer Ridge. From there they drove to Bee Tree branch, and on to Bunnell, where Chairman Moody had dinner awaiting them at Hotel Bunnell. The party reports favorably on this route as being the proper route for the highway to be built. Dr. St. Peter knows how to grow straw berries to perfection. Fie has raised some fine ones in his garden this season. Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Hubbard of Grand Rapids, Mich., after spending some time at Bunnell as the guests of their brother, Mr. L. F. Hubbard, left last week for other parts in Florida before returning home.