Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
Edited by S. HOWARD
1103-108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, 1ll.
Vol. 1 March, 1913 ,No. 4
Editor's Personal People are longing for, striving for-Inde- There are several reasons why this is so.
Editois P rso al pendence. It can't be found in tihe cities The freedom of thie outdoor life revitalizes
Page where living is so high, and where there and gives abundant energy, and the increase
are a score of men for every job. No man of energy, coupled with exuberance (
"Back to the Land", The Editor wishes can be more independent than the one who spirits, most bountifully equips one for the
IS the Solution o to call your atten- owns a piece of land, a possession that is prosecution of his labors, and makes him
tion to the cartoon not affected by bank failures, fires or Wall doubly ambitious for large undertakings. Many Problems on this page. So Street panics. Then if lie will take up farming as a
many things must be learned in the "School serious, business-like calling, he has, in
of Experience," and one problem that men these modern tinies, every aid to economical.
and women today are wrestling with is the labor-saving production, of which he can
high cost of living. This little sketch is make capital for profitable earnings.
worthy of your study and consideration. The oft-quoted expression, "We are the
Every day the increase in the cost of heirs of all the ages" is in nothing more
living is being brought more forcibly to true than in this industry. We use varieties
your door and you are realizing that it of seed the experience of those who have
costs more to live now than it did ten gone before have proven best suited to our
years ago. If present day prices are af- needs. Selection and breeding have niade
fecting you now, what do you expect of those now in use better than ever before;
the next ten years? r implements have been evolved from tlie
Thinking men declare that the next dec- - %/ brains of practical men which enables us to
ade will witness one of the greatest strug- V do our work rapidly and elliciently; spraygles in the history of the civilized world. W ing for fungus and insect enemies has been
It will be a mighty struggle against the wrought for us by our scientific workers,
high cost of living problems and will in- / and methods of harvesting, transporting
volve every nation under the sun. In our and marketing that promote success.
own country, for instance, the increase of These are our heritages. Let us take
the cost of food since 1900 has been more them, which means we must study and
than 40%. ofthsiuaio i apply the principles that have been worked
The cause and cure of this situation is out for us at the expense of so much time,
attracting the attention of all classes of labor and money; succeed because we inpeople alike. During the last Presidential You will not always have the oppor- terpret and use them correctly, and transcampaign many theories purporting to solve tunity of securing good land. It's being mit them to our children improved by the question were advanced, but none of the taken up very rapidly, and it is the wise what we have learned. candidates, in my estimation, touched the man who sees his opportunity and grasps it No education is more interesting, more real vital spot in the present situation, now. varied, or aids more in insuring success than
The majority of nations are not produc- SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY WILL the study of Agriculture.
ing food to equal the consumption by their BUY A FARM-HOME IN THE BUNNELLinhabitants, und these people are flocking DUPONT COLONY.
to this country as the only alternate to When you were
threatened starvation. Pv ss the Good t h r o u g I reading
According 'to circular No. 38, issued by What Farming M u c hI has been News Along your February isthe Secretary of the U. S. Department of Now Offers as written about the sue of the Bunnell
Agriculture, the population of the United tendency of the Rome Builder did you hand it to a
States has increased during the past ten a Vocation young man in the friend or neighbor? It contained so much
years 21%, while during this same period past to leave the farm and seek his for- interesting matter concerning the colonists the increase in farm land acreage has been tune in the crowded centers of population, and the success they are making in their less than 5%, or an increase in population and the more crowded avocations of these new home, that it would be a shame to of 16% over and above that of farm land centers. deprive your friends of all the good things
acreage. It is conceded by all who are Whether this has been responsible or therein. Be liberal.
conversant with the situation, that our not, the fact must be admitted that the If you have not already done this, do
population will increase more in the next tide of public opinion regarding the prefer- it now; and when you are through ,vitli ten years than in the past ten. The Fed- ence of metropolitan life has changed, and this issue, pass it along also. Every numeral Government reports that ALL possible the drift now is rather from the city to ber of this little magazine contains the increase of farmland can be only 9% of the country, with "back-to-the-soil" nailed latest news of the colony and many helpthe present acreage. If the population is to the mast-head, as the slogan of those fitl suggestions to all land owners. The increasing so much more rapidly than is the who find in the new order of things a more letters coming to this office week after week possible increase of the acreage of farm independent, healthful and happy life-a from satisfied men and women who have
land, does it not seem reasonable to expect chance which many look upon as coming visited the colony and the stories of the
good land to advance in price in propor- out of a state of mere existence into the progress being made by those already lotion to the increase of population? fullness and idealness of rational living. cated on their lands, many of which are
Capital, too, is fully awake to these con- Whatever may be said in favor of the printed in the Home Builder, ought to be
ditions and is fast buying up. all the favor- exciting pleasures and attractions and read by everyone. able lands and putting the price out of the nerve-straining demands of city residence, Let your friends and neighbors share witi reach of the man of limited means. The it is being increasingly admitted that for vou in reading of this wonderful country-time, however, has not YET arrived when a given amount of energy invested by the this land of sunshine and flowers-this colit is impossible for a few to secure a good individual, rural life pays by far the big- ony where independence is within the reach piece of and. gest dividends, of all.




Me BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Seventy Thousand Dollars Soon to Be Spent for
Good Roads in St. John's County
AUGUSTA GRAVEL TO BE USED FOR PAVING
The following articles appeared during from different sections of the country. surfaced and it is all in good condition the month of February in the St. Augustine Eugene Masters offered a vote of thanks This road has been worked recently. Record, and give an idea of the tremendous to the members of the committee for their The party also made the trip from Bui-. interest now being shown in road building services and to the board for the action nell to Espanola over the new road just in our section of St. Johns County: taken. This was carried unanimously by completed and opened up this week. It -is
Seventy thousand dollars will be expended those present. five miles long and thirty-five *feet in width
upon the highways of St. Johns county An investigation made as to the prices and a splendid highway.
within the next few months, obtainable resulted in the board closing a Eight miles of the thirteen mile road conThe John Anderson boulevard will be contract direct with the Cement Gravel necting St. Johns Park and Bunnell has
paved straight through to the Duval county Company of Augusta, Ga., which will effect been hardsurfaced with natural material. line. a saving of from ten to fourteen dollars A reddish clay thrown up on the grade was
The highway to Elkton and to Hastings a car over the price heretofore paid. This mixed with sand on the surface and made' will be paved its entire distance, will total up to between five and eight a roadway as smooth and firm as any shell
Two miles of laterals will be paved at hundred dollars saving on each mile paved, road in the county.
Hastings. An order was placed for ten carloads Commissioner Moody will keep ten men
One and one-half miles of laterals will be of gravel a day to be shipped, the bulk of at work during the winter on the old paved at Elkton. this to go at first on the Jacksonville road, Kings road south from Pellicer creek to
Augusta gravel will be used. but some to go to Hastings for the lateral the county line, keeping it in good shape
Under a new contract direct with parties work in order that it may be completed for the winter traffic.
in Augusta a saving of from ten to fifteen before the potato shipping season opens. dollars a car on the gravel will be effected. The Jacksonville road will be in splendid Ocean City News
This in substance is the result of the condition in a few weeks and it is expected
meeting of the county commissioners yes- that it will be all hardsurfaced early in the This is surely an ideal place for fruit. terday and marks the beginning of a high- spring and that work will then be in full Mr. and Mrs. Cookman have only been way improvement project which is destined swing upon the paving of the road to here two years and have a fine young
to bring all St. Johns together and to do Elkton and Hastings. orange grove of 300 trees started, besides
more for the development of St. Johns a variety of other fruits. A few orange
county than any move made in many years; and peach trees are in bloom.
At 3 o'clock in the afternoon the citizens Much Has Been Done in the C.F. Turner of the Bunnell Developcommittee, appointed in the morning and Bunnell Colony ment Co., with three other gentlemen froi
consisting of President G. S. Meserve of Vermont, Pennsylvania and Utah were
the Board of Trade, B. Genovar, G. B. Built to a large extent by private par- Ocean City visitors Tuesday. Mr. Turner
Lamar, G. W. Waller of Hastings and ties southern St. Johns county has a sys- took them up to the oyster bed in a row
James L. Middleton of Elkton, went into tem of good roads that everyone in the boat. On returning with the boat loaded
executive session with the board to devise county should be proud of. County Coin- with oysters they reported having the ways and means for the financing of a missioners Faver and Roberts feel that way time of their lives.
program of highway improvement. The about it after a trip of inspection over all Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Moore of Grandexecutive session lasted a little over thirty the roads in Commissioner Moody's district ville, 0., and sister, Mrs. Ella Humphrey, minutes. it Tuesday afternoon and yesterday morning of Columbus, O., are pleasantly located in
When it ended Col. W. A. MacWilliams in the latter's automobile. They are high one of Cookman's cottages, and tell us they
who has been selected as spokesman for the in their praise of the work that has been are enjoying every minute. Mr. Moore board and the members of the committee, done there. supplies their table with plenty of oysters,
submitted a statement of what had been duck and fish. He and Mr. Cookman got
done. seven ducks recently. Mr. Moore has two
He stated that a decision had been beautiful lots here and expects to build
reached to raise seventy thousand dollars in in the near future.
the manner followed heretofore in raising Although this place is in its infancy it
road funds, citizens giving their notes and affords many pleasures. One cannot get
these being taken up by the county by lonely, several beautiful passenger boats
these~~~~~~~ bein take and dow the cut ylnlsvrlb autif l aileye bse
warrants legalized by the legislature. With glide up and down the canal daily, besides
this amount it had been decided that the gaily-decked private cruisers and large
Jacksonville road can be hardsurfaced its freight boats.
entire length, the road to Elkton and Hast- We expect a fine company of people from
ings paved and laterals placed at both of Bunnell to partake in an oyster roast and
those potato cities. .... fish fry very soon.
tHis announcement was greeted with ap- .
plause from the many spectators present Bunnell Bank Meetin.
Beautiful shell road running from I. I. Moody Re-elected President-Bank in
_ _St. Augustine toward Bunnell' Splendid Conditicn.
The annual meeting of the stockholders
From St. Augustine the John Anderson of the Bunnell State Bank was recently
highway was followed to the south end of held and was most pleasing to all those the county. The party went to the Vol- connected with tlte institution. The stateusia line by way of Green's Island and the ment of the bank's condition was excellent famous Knox and Bede grove. This is and showed that the institution had made
twelve miles from Bunnell and the con- 27 per cent. Of this ten per cent was denecting road is in splendid condition. It cared in dividends and the balance was has been opened up all of the twelve miles carried to the surplus and undivided profits and cleared. Mr. Knox has also contributed account.
to the work on this highway. Three or This financial institution has filled a long
four miles of the road out of Bunnell has felt want in Southern St. Johns and its been hardsurfaced and the rest is in good remarkable growth and its condition speak shape. splendidly for the growth of that section
Another road traversed leads from Bun- as a financial institution, and is always an nell five miles to tie county line on the index to the prosperity of any community. southwest side of the Florida East Coast It has quickly taken its place as one of One of the colony roads'_built by the Company Railway. A mile of this has been hard- the leading state banks of Florida.




Mhe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
A semi-weekly paper, known as the
"Florida is the Most Prosperous Courier- Gazette, published in the far-oft
State oManhas just this morning been
0 0 received by the Editor. It contains a very
S tate ini the U nion interesting letter from a subscriber who is
wintering in Florida, and we take pleasure
Says Gov. Gilchrist, in Leslie's 'Weekly in quoting from this letter, as follows:
____________________________________ ____________________________________ "After several days in Jacksonville, we proceeded down the East Coast to St. AuEver since Albert W. Gilchrist was United States. Florida peavine and beggar- gust inc and Bunnell. They are the two
inaugurated governor of the State of Flor- weed hay-two or three tons per acre-is extremes-St. Augustine being the oldest ida, in January, 1909, he has continuously now regarded as good hay as can be pro- city and Bunnell the youngest city. endeavored to avail himself of every oppor- duced anywhere in the world. Our people "We have spent hut little time in St. tunity to advertise the resources and supe- largely specialize. In one county fully five Augustine, hut several days in Bunnell. riority of Florida in the magazines and thousand acres are planted in paper-shell hlere the Bunniell Development Company has newspapers, not only in Florida, but in pecans. in other sections strawberries are opened a large tract on the East Coast, )aid other States and in other countries. Gov- raised almost exclusively, from eight hun- it out in sections, and is rapidly selling the ernor Gilchrist contributed a large part of dred to one thousand quarts per acre. In farms. The town of Bunnell is only two such communications to various publica- one community Irish potatoes are raised; years old, but is, a very attractive place, tions during his term of office, in others train loads of celery; in others well laid out, with broad streets, concrete
The following intensely interesting arti- tomatoes, eggplant, beans and other vege- walks, telephone and electric lights, and the cle by Governor Gilchrist appeared in Les- tables. In more southern portions of the East Coast Railroad runs directly through lie's Weekly of December 12. 1912, under State, tropical and semi-tropical fruits are the center of the town. The people are buythe head, "Good Times in Florida." grown exclusively. Last year, over one of ing the land rapidly, and there is every
"Florida extends through fully five hun- the several trunk lines of railroads in Flor- prospect that in another two years the place dred miles of latitude and has twelve hun- ida, 28,000 carloads of fruits, vegetables will be wonderfully increased in size and dred miles of water front. It is bounded and melons were shipped. We grow cane population. The land is adapted to orange
on the west and south by the Gulf of from which from five hundred to one thou- and vegetable growing. They are clearing
Mexico and on the east by the gulf stream, sand gallons of syrup are produced to the and plowing and getting it ready to put Owing to the peculiar shape of Florida acre, in a big potato crop in FeYbruary.
the gulf stream is formed. If there was "The rays of our warm winter sun are ."Bunnell is only twelve miles from Ilastno Florida there would be no gulf stream, concentrated in, and the dew drops are ings, which has made such a success in The State is now sending out the gulf crystallized in, these fruits and vegetables, potato raising. They prophesy a 400,000 stream of its various products to all parts They are shipped to various parts of our barrel crop in St. Johns County this cornof the United States. It is a great mineral common country, gladdening the hearts of ing April. State, producing half of the phosphate of our far-away brothers and making life "There is a fine class of people coming to
the United States and one-third of that of worth living to them. Bunnell from Canada, Maine, Michigan and
the world. Fullers earth is mined in var- "Cattle, sheep, poultry, horticulture and other States. They seem to be workers, ious portions of the State. Fine clay for agriculture flourish throughout the State. judging from the way they are clearing the porcelain is also mined. It is a great naval Manufacturing and mining and the fisher- land and getting it ready for planting. stores and lumber producing State. It is ies of the State are rapidly developing. Bunnell has a good saw mill where the big one of the most healthful States in the The manufactured products of the State pine trees are converted into lumber for
Union, the death rate being less than that represent fully eighty-seven dollars per house building. of any other State and of any country in capita. Our soil produces as much per "Mr B., formerly of Belfast, Maine, is the
Europe. acre of products to which it is suited as only contractor here, lie keeps a big crew
"Our climate is a great asset. Due to it, does any State in the Union. of men at work and would engage more
thousands of people visit Florida as tour- 'Our State is being settled with good if he could get then. ists and thousands of people come here to citizens. According to the census of 1910, "Neat little cottages are going up all make their homes. The benefit of the the rate of increase in our population around. There are the best of facilities for
climate in extending the lives of worthy was 42.2 per cent, being double the 21.1 transportation, and the products get into men and women ten, fifteen or twenty years per cent of the nation at large. 'Every the northern markets whlen they bring the cannot be estimated, little movement has a meaning all its own.' best prices. No shipping to commission
"In many of the Western States, in par- It appears that people are beginning to merchants. The buyers come to Bunnell ticular, much attention is given to irriga- know a good thing when they see it. There and take the products directly from the tion. Through its rivers and lakes, Florida are fully thirty-five hundred miles of im- farmer. is undoubtedly the best watered State in proved hard roads in Florida. Churches and "If any of our Maine farmers are interall the Union. Artesian water may be school houses are increasing. Illiteracy is ested at all, just write to the Bunnell Defound in most portions of Florida. Irriga- decreasing. velopment Company, Bunnell, Florida, and
tion can be cheaply done. However, irriga- "Florida is the most prosperous State in they will gladly send you descriptive circution is rarely used,. the Union. Its population is more national lars. Having seen for ourselves, we can
"Though not a corn-producing State, in than that of any other State. All worthy assure you that the circulars and testimonseveral counties in Florida from sixty to people receive a hearty welcome in Florida. ials are not overdrawn, hut are just as corseventy bushels of corn per acre have been So much good could be said of Florida that, rect and conservative as they can be madle. raised. A bale of cotton to the acre is if I tried to tell it, it would take from This company will be more than pleased often raised. Florida raises fully one-third now until the last reverberating echoes of to answer any questions that may be of all the sea island cotton produced in the Gabriel's horn." asked."
41
-49,
Newly cleared land on three farms in the colony. These fields are all planted to potatoes at the present time




V'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Letters of Interest from Bunnell-Dupont ColonylLand-O
-From Illinois, Tennessee, Maine,
To the Readers of The Bunnell Home Bunnell Development Company, Bunnell, being most upright men in all their dealBuilder: Florida: ings, awd any proposition they might offer
confidence is one of the great essentials Gentlemen-I made a visit to your colony would be strictly honest.
in regard to many and most things; it is in the summer of 1910. At that time Bun- I am glad that I have a farm in this colan element that enters largely into the nell was in her infancy and although I ony, and I hope to improve it as soon as
inestinent of money from any viewpoint, felt that the future held something in store possible. Yours very truly, When a man in moderate circumstances is for your little city and the country sur- WILLIAM CLAUDE WELLS,
about to invest all that he possesses in rounding it, I never dreamed that the de- California.
the purchase of a home or a farm he wants velopment would be so rapid. to know .lhat the people with whom he I am here on the grounds today. Have
does business are reliable and honest and been out in most every direction and have hopes that his own best interests will figure come in touch with the farmers. Most of Dear Sir-We have received during the in the deal. Truth in regard to location, them, I presume, bought their land as I past year many circulars in regard to the
climate, crops, transportation facilities, did, by mail, without ever seeing it, and Bunnell-DuPont colony, and we were very health and success, a square deal in re- I will say in every instance I find these much interested in reading them, but we gard to facts that are vital factors in men in high spirits, and there is no reason placed little faith in the correctness of their
bringing about his ultimate well being from why they should not be. descriptions of the place.
every viewpoint. The climate is ideal; the land is easy There has been so many land deals of
These sentiments were very strongly en- to get into a state of cultivation, and I an uncertain nature, to speak in the mildest tertained by the writer eighteen months will say frankly that I have never in my terms, that although we were interested
ago when the matter of the purchase of a life seen such prolific growth. The gardens we would not think of advancing the first farm or two in Bunnell, Florida, was at this time of the year are as fine as ever payment without seeing and judging for brought to our attention. We wanted a they could be in mid-summer in northern ourselves the truth of the statements made
future home, a place where we could make states. in your circulars sent out over the counenough money from the land to keep us in I find that the folks who are coming try.
comfort, and afford ultimate relief from here to make this their permanent home, In December we came south and visited
the strenuous life we lead-our portion for are in almost every instance good, honest Bunnell. We spent three days looking the more years than we care to enumerate, men, such as it takes to make a country- colony over and found everything exactly
We liked Florida; it sounded good to us; men who have their whole hearts in busi- as described, only mwch more attractive not a literal land of ease and comfort at ness, and there is not a question of a doubt than written description could be. once, but a land of great capacity along that within a very short time the lands We found the beginning of a city, and
financial lines if we found the right locality, will all be taken and put into a state of we have no doubt that two more years We had friends and acquaintances all over cultivation; in fact any way you start added to its two years of existence will
the state. We wrote, questioned and in- out from Bunnell you find people engaged in make a decided change in its size and value.
terrogated from every viewpoint, the planting of their crops, the cultivation Its location is exceptionally fine, and railWe had an ardent friend at Boynton, for of those crops already planted and growing, road facilities unsurpassed. The East instance, where land was $235 an acre, the clearing of land and the building of Coast Road runs directly through the cenfive-acre farms, one-third down, one-third homes. tral part of the town and its leading highfor two years, glowing promises, but too And now to you, who would like to in- way, the Moody Road, runs straight to the
much money. Made other investigation, vest but are afraid take it from me, a ocean, a distance of about seven miles. If
similar conditions obtained. We felt almost Tennesseean, who is neither ashamed of his I should write longer I should only repeat discouraged, when the Bunnell, St. Johns state or his name, that if you want a good many of the good things already said, and County, proposition was suggested for con- investment, if you want a place you can which we found by word of the people themsideration. We found no promoters; land really call HOME, where you can revel in selves were entirely correct.
at $30 per acre, remarkably easy payments; God's glorious sunshine twelve months in Mr. Moody and Mr. Turner we found very
a verification of every statement made in the year, and make a living easier than courteous and anxious to show us the land
regard to the qualities of the soil; trans- you ever made it before in your life, come and not simply talk it up. The result of portation first class and possibilities be- to Bunnell, while the Opportunity to do so our stay was that we bought a twenty acre yond estimate for the future if we would knocks at your door. farm, although it's not possible at present
do our part. A town site with a bank, Within the near future I expect to open for us to improve and live on it, but we
church, school, an electric light plant, water up a general builders' and farmers' supply trust that in a few years we may be able power and hotel the outcome of the en- store here. I expect to invest thousands of to do so. We are satisfied that it is a ergy of the men who own the land and dollars here, because I want to make it my good investment.
who are earnest, single hearted, interested, future home, and am not afraid of the MR. AND MRS. R. ANSON CRIE,
benevolent men, determined to found a col- proposition. Maine.
ony of whom they could be proud, with I wish I had room here to say all the
whom they could enter into the well being good things that I could conscientiously say of each and every one who became a mem- for this town and surrounding country,
ber of the colony. but as space is limited I will stop by asking Mr. S. Howard:
We bought in Bunnell two farms and two you not to just take my word for it, but Dear Sir-I received the Bunnell Home
town lots; if we had a family we would come and see for yourself. Builder; it is what we need. I have read
own fifty acres, but twenty acres will make ED JOHNSON, it through and am satisfied that it will be
a man more than comfortable and give him Tennessee. of great help to our colony. I have been
luxuries. in the colony nine months and have cleared
Florida, like Canaan of old, is a land of Bunnell Development Company: part of my land, and will be back there
as soon as I can get thins in shape here
"milk and honey." As a health giving (,entlemen-I am enclosing pass-book with to leave. I am satisfied that everybody
proposition Florida is unequalled; no zero payment. I hope to be able to finish pay- to la Ioamht atisied tha n vieDy
tempratue, ~ ne~uale~l opethat has bought or will buy in Bunnell-Dutemperature, but tropical conditions obtain ments on my farm in the near future. Pont colony will have a good investment
in lavish abundance. I so much like to read the Bunnell Home for the time is coming when improved land
One can have all the delights of fruit Builder. I think you have developed be- like that in Bunnell-DuPont colony will be
and flowers, ocean and balmy breezes in yond imagination since February, 1911. 1 in demand.
Florida. Horace Greeley said, "Go West, hope the colony will continue to do as well, Wishing you and also the Bunneli-DuPont
young man." We say to you, "Young man and I am sure that it will.
or old man, go South; if you want pros- I want to thank you for your fair deal- colony success, I am,
perity, go South." ings with me. I have known Mr. Moody Respectfully yours,
HELEN COMBS, M. D., for a good many years, and can say that J. F. VON HOENE,
Chicago. he and all of his family bear the name of Washington.




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
ners. Note How Widely Scattered these People Are
g ton, Canada, Missouri and Maryland
Mr. Thos. Verdenius: I have a word to say about Bunnell my- I was there two years ago this January.
Dear Sir-I was somewhat delayed on self. It is just a year since our party I am glad that the people of different
the road to Bunnell, but at the same time went to Bunnell to select our farms. Mr. states are awake. I hope to be one more pleased to say that I got there 0. K., and Verdenius received us in Jacksonville, and in our little town, as soon as I can sell my also enjoyed my visit very much indeed. I must say he certainly treated us royally property. W1hen I arrived in Florida it
I found Mr. Turner easily and he certainly and showed us all around Jacksonville and was just like going in a new world. I candid all he could to make my visit to the then he took us to St. Augustine, showed not express the pleasure and enjoyment I colony a good and enjoyable one. It was a us all around that beautiful city, from saw in the land of roses. People are in
pleasure for him to answer any questions there to an orange grove in the suburbs, the dark if they do not buy at Bunnell.
and show me the land. I was surprised to where we had the picture taken that has You can send ine sonic of your literlearn from him as we went over the colony been published in the small booklet, "A ature to give to my friends, for I want
that most of the land was sold. I con- LITTLE FARM-A BIG LIVING." From them to know all about this wonderful coltinually asked him about different tracts St. Augustine we went to Bunnell, the big- ony. Yours very truly,
and his reply was "that is all sold." This gest surprise of all, It rained all the W. J. APPLEBY,
sounds yery good. Settlers who are coming while we were in Bunnell, but not very Maryland.
into Bunnell will find it much different than hard. We went out to select our farm just
going into the prairie province of Canada, the same, which was not necessary, for United States Weather Bureau
where for miles no one lives. In Bunnell, the Bunnell ground is all good. I did not
no matter where you glance you can see see a bad piece in the colony. What I Statistics
houses scattered everywhere. I must say did see was cabbage and lettuce and all The following table of temperature and
that I believe Bunnell has a great future kinds of vegetables in February; hens with rainfall, based on a ten-year average from ahead of her, and that people cannot do their chicks, and men with strings of fish United States Weather Bureau statistics,
wrong in investing here. The land is fine wherever I looked, and Bunnell a town of will give the prospective homeseeker a cornand I have been around in Florida, but about two hundred homes. prehensive idea of what to expect in ternthe land in your colony is certainly fine. If I began telling you all I saw, I would perature and rainfall along the East Coast
I saw pineapple and strawberries ripe. The never get through. of Florida:
gardens were in excellent shape. Many Yours very truly, T-Mean monthly and
acres of potatoes were planted. These peo- J. H. WEDDE, average temperature
ple you have there will make a headway. Missouri. in degrees.
The climate is just lovely, flowers all My dear Sir: R-Average monthly and
around, cool breezes blowing from the t o t a 1 precipitation,
ocean, roses blooming, it makes one feel I am taking the pleasure in writing these inches and tenths.
that life is worth living. I was quite few lines about Florida for I have bought St.
taken up with the place although I did not ten acres there not over a month ago, and Augustine Ormond
feel much like farming when I saw you, the reason I bought land was because my T R T' R
but after seeing your land and the possi- father and two brothers have bought also. January ............... 56 3.0 58 3.6
bilities there are for a man that will work My eldest brother has been to Florida and February .............. 61 2.0 58 2.8
I certainly could not do with less than he takes the paper from there. I believe March ................. 62 2.9 64 3.0
twenty acres. if he missed getting his Florida paper he April .................. 68 2.0 69 2.0
I only wish I could stay in this land of would be ready to start for Bunnell right May .................. 73 4.4 77 4.6
sunshine, but business calls me back to away. June .................. 78 4.9 70 5.2
British Columbia, Canada, at present. But He and I expect to roll into good old Flori- Juny.................78 4.9 70 5.2
I can assure you that I want no more of da next September if we can, for I am July .................80 6.0 80 3.4
tired of the cold winds in the north since August................80 5.0 80 5.2
freezing winters in the North, but am go- I have heard of Florida, where the sun eptember ............. 77 7.4 79 7.2
ing to arrange to be in the Sunny South shines all the time. October ................. 65 4.1 72 6.3
to stay, and that before long. I have vis- Yours ael thuly, November .............. 63 3.2 64 3.4
ited the places down between St. Augustine Yours very truly, December .............58 2.5 57 2.9
and Daytona, looked over the lands, but RALEIGH BAILEY, .............58 2.5 5 .9
you net lttl ton ad god andis heIllinois. Annual ................ 8 48.1 69 50.6
your neat little town and good land is the Eio' t R aebe e
best I have seen. Editor's Note-Requests have been reYours truly, My dear Mr. Verdenius: ceived from time to time for a report in
S. J. HARRISON, I received your letter and the Bunnell the Home Builder of the average monthly
British Columbia, Canada. Home Builder about our dear little town, temperature in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony.
Bunnell. I was so glad to look over those The table above gives this information both pages to see so many improvements since as to temperature and average monthly
Mr. S. Howard: rainfull. This table is for St. Augustine
Dear Sir-The first three issues of the 7 'and Ormond, but as St. Augustine is about
Bunnell Home Builder received and certain- 25 miles north of our colony, and Ormond
ly want to thank you for them. Mrs. but 10 miles to the south, one can judge
Wedde and I are so interested we read every very accurately as to the temperature at
word they contained, and are anxiously Bunnell.
awaiting the next one.
Boating scene near Ocean City A mid-winter scene in Canada Orange Grove near Bunnell
WHICH DO YOU PREFER, "WINTER SNOWS" OR "SUNNY SKIES?"




6he BUNNELL HOM BUILDER
Every Day Happenings In and Around
Bunnell and Dupont
Win. Schaper and wife of Minden, Nebr., The First Quarterly Conference of
were registered at the Hotel Bunnell for 4 Bunnell Methodist Episcopal church, w
several days last week. Mr. Schaper has was to be held at the church on the 4th
a ten acre farm on the Moody road, towards inst.; has been postponed for one month.
the ocean.
Fred R. Bettes, of St. Augustine, spent
Sunday in Bunnell, visiting his sister, Miss Through the efforts of Messrs. F. L.
Irene Bettes, who is the assistant in the Byrd and F. A. Rich there is a possibility
Bunnell School. of the farmers residing near Bunnell having a free rural delivery mail route estabMrs. P. Curry and family, of Georgia, lished' in the near future. The proposed
hearing of Bunnell's fame, spent a fow route is to cover the following territory:
days here last week, looking over the col- Carrier to leave Bunnell in the morning,
ony. covering Deen road .to Braun's corner,
thence across Haw creek to the Saplings
L. E. Springer, of Pennsylvania, was a Turpentine Still, thence to Bunnell over
recent visitor and before returning home the south end of the Moody road, arriving
he purchased a twenty acre farm on the in Bunnell about 2 p.m.
Moody road.
J. H. Winterowd, of Salt Lake City, Among the many improvements for BunUtah, was here for a few days last week nell is the handsome two-story brick buildand purchased 20 acres of ]and. View of a portion of Mr. Belsky's Farm ing which is to occupy the corner across
Note the beautiful palmettoes, and the track from the Florida East Coast
B. E. Hubbard and wife of Grand Rap- grass, waist high Railway depot.
ids, Mich., arrived last week, and will visit The foundation was laid this week and
Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Hubbard, on their farm Mr. A. Belsky of Rochester, New York, the work will be rushed to completion.
in the western part of the colony, was in Bunnell recently to inspect land The building will be seventy feet in length
for himself and friends. Mr. Belsky was with a fifty foot frontage on Broad street.
Weatherington and friend, Joe so pleased with conditions as he found The building will be known as the Tribune
C. W. Kentucky, n Bn ll n them here that he purchased 60 acres building. The ground floor will contain two
Achweier, of Kenucy, are in Bunne, in- of potato land. Mr. Belsky and his friends rooms 25x70. The second floor will conhere, and Mr. Achweier will also purchase now have 100 acres of land in our colony, tain four offices 20x20 and a dancing hall
one before he returns home. 30x50.
Mr. M. Stone, one of Bunnell's up-to-date The lower floors will be occupied by the W. A. Brock, one of Bunnell's farmers, merchants, has purchased ten acres of land Tribune and an up-to-date general merbrought into town the other day an ex- east of town which he expects to farm chandise store.
tremely large head of lettuce, which he next year. If Mr. Stone proves to be as
says grew on his place without work, fer- good a farmer as lie is a merchant, we pretilizer or rain. If this be true, we would diet some fine crops from his farm. like to see some of Mr. Brock's garden
"sass" that had care, etc. The barrel factory is working overtime
I. I. Moody, accompanied by C. P. Town- getting barrels ready for the coming crop send, of St. Augustine, made a flying trip of potatoes. They have about two thousen, o S. Agutin, mdea fyig tip sand on hand now and are setting up
to Augusta last week in the interest of and o hndnwd a re s
St. Johns County, to consider the advis- about two hundred daily. ability of using Georgia gravel to hard
surface the roads of St. Johns County. Mr. Emmett Deen of Brandentown,
At the last meeting of the County Commis- Florida, is spending some time in Bunnell. sioners, they decided to raise $70,000.00 to Mr. Deen contemplates entering the mercanuse in building roads in this county. tile business here.
S. J. Harrison, of British Columbia, Can- Mr. and Mrs. K. Schmidt, of Jackson- .......
ada, is a recent enthusiastic visitor to Bun- ville, arrived in the city last week. They nell. Mr. Harrison bought land here be- are stopping at the home of F. L. Byrd.
fore his visit and he has taken an option Mr. Schmidt has accepted a position with Mr. Bartlett's furniture being unloaded
on an additional 20 acres. His report on the Carter Drug store. at Bunnell
the conditions here will bring 20 families
to Bunnell. MThere have been some very important
_o__unn__l. Mr. Those. H. Lang, an experienced printer improvements made at the Florida East
The new brick building is being rushed and newspaper man of Calhoun, Ga., ar- Coast Railway depot in Bunnell during the
to completion as rapidly as possible. The rived in the city Monday and has taken past month. The depot and walk-ways on
brick are all on the ground and in a few charge of the mechanical department of the north and south sides are brilliantly lighted weeks another handsome building will be Tribune. We welcome Mr. Lang to our with electric lights; new seats and oil
added to Bunnell. Part of the building city. heaters have been added to both waiting
will be occupied by the "St. Johns Tribune," rooms, which is a great comfort to its many
Bunnell's newspaper, and will also contain Mr. R. W. Moore has sold his house and passengers. Watch out for other improve-4 a builders' supply house, and grocery store, lot on Moody Boulevard to Mrs. C. J. Mil- ments in the near future.
ler. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have moved out
Dr. St. Peter was exhibiting a radish to Ocean City, where they expect to erect
Dr. t. ete wa exhbitng raish a nice home in the near future.
Wednesday that he raised in his garden, Following are the church services at the
which was certainly a wonder. The radish M. E. Church in Bunnell:
measured 11 inches in circumference, 28 Mr. C. F. Turner, field manager for Bun- Preaching-Sunday, 11 a. m.
inches from tip to tip and weighed 2% nell Development Co., is kept very busy Preaching-Sunday, 7 p. m.
pounds. The doctor is certainly some these days showing the purchasers their Sunday School-Sunday, 3 p. m.
farmer. property. Rev. Haynes, Pastor.




MeBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Growing Sugar Cane in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony
By I. I. MOODY
Growing Cane for Syrup Will Be One of Florida's Greatest Industries
W over four hundred years ago the sugar Cane can be planted either in the fall that will extract 50 to 60 per cent of the
cane was introduced into Florida. The or the spring. For fall planting November total weight of the cane in juice, and seed cane was imported from the West In- is the best month, and for spring planting, capable of grinding 40 tons of cane per dies and extensively cultivated by the February or March. The soil should be day. This complete could be erected for
Jesuit Fathers as far back as 1518, al- thoroughly plowed -deep plowing essen- about $3,000.00.
though it was first introduced in 1493 by tial-well harrowed, and the whole put in- The supply of high-grade Florida syrup Columbus on his second voyage. From that to first-class tilth not later than October is never equal to the demand, and if the time its cultivation and the accompanying for fall planting, and November or Decem- Florida farmers would only co-operate and industry of making syrup or sugar from ber for the spring planting. Harvesting build central evaporating plants, the industhe cane has been constantly carried on commences in our county in November or try could be extended until llorida syrup
in a greater or less degree. December. would be in every market of the world,
The yield of cane per acre can generally where the call for it is insistent. be estimated at 20 tons per acre under The development of our colony is propresent conditions of cultivation in Florida, gressing rapidly-so rapidly indeed as to and one man can attend to 20 acres. With be almost beyond belief. The Bunnell barproper fertilizer and improved labor-saving rel factory will supply all our colonists and devices one man could grow 30 acres, and nearby farmers with barrels this season. the yield should be increased by at least The potato industry at Bunnell is bound 10 tons per acre. to be one of great importance, not only
Cane may be used for two purposes -for to our own settlers, but to St. Johns syrup or sugar, but until we can have a County at large.
sugar refinery at Bunnell cane will be I believe in Florida, and I believe in enraised for syrup. A fair price for good couraging her farmers in raising staple
i syrup in five gallon cans is 40 cents per crops -potatoes, sugar cane, etc., etc., but This cane mill ninShws thepresent meho gallon. With a yield of 30 gallons to the it is hard to understand why one of her ton, the gross yield per acre would be greatest sources of wealth, that of cane
In former years vast sugar cane planta- $240.00. growing and syrup making remains aptions existed in. Florida, notably on the It is hardly necessary to go further into parently dormant.
Halifax river, and ruins of old sugar re- figures to show that in any event growing I trust that the time may soon come
fineries are to be seen just a few miles cane is a profitable undertaking, but greater when the farmers in our community will from Bunnell. However, for some reason benefits and profits can be obtained by a have enough acres planted to sugar cane
or other, the industry was allowed to de- centralization of the industry in different that a mill in Bunnell will become a necescline. sections rather than by individual growing sity.
That this should be so is almost, one of the cane and making the syrup.
might say, a national calamity. No state The horse-mill and kettle, it may at once
in the entire sugar belt of the United be stated, is wasteful and comparatively Have you read our booklet on BunStates can produce cane equal to that of expensive; nor is the miller extracting all nell-"A Little Farm, A Big Living!" Florida in sugar content or of a~finer grade. that should come to him. It is best in the The climatic conditions of Florida are pe- absence at present of central mills for the if not, write for it to General Sales culiarly favorable for its growth and ma- farmers to club together and erect a small Office, 108 S. La Salle St., Chicago turity; the soils are pre-eminently adapted mill a well-built horizontal, 3-roll mill, to its culture. powerfully constructed, driven by steam,
Yet all this vast area, these great opportunities for a live and profitable industry
a fear of overstocking the markets that"A-n nornc m en
are being allowed to run to waste. Is it ? i
causes this apathy and drives the Florida
farmer to consider other, but less staple A nnoim eem ent
crops? This should not be, for the American people are the greatest consumers of
sugar in the world, and yet sugar is the Just as we go to prese,
only agricultural product which the United o
States imports. word is received that Mr.
Florida, with her superior climate and I. I. Moody, President of the
soil, when once she awakens and puts her Bunnell Development Cornshoulder to the wheel, when .once her farmers begin to think and combine practical pany, has been appointed by
knowledge and labor with capital and skill, the Governor of Florida as a
now seeking profitable employment, could
almost of herself solve the American sup- Delegateto the FederalGood
ply of sugar in the cane belt of the United Roas Aoctio tod e held
States.Roads Association to be held Beet sugar never could, and never will, in Wqshington, D. C., on
compete with that produced from cane, March 6th.
where and when the supply of the latter
meets the demand. The beet grower knows This will be a very interesting
-this and would himself naturally gravitate announcement to all readers of the
-the cane belt where his profits will be Bunnell Home Builder. It shows the
greater and his crops more certain. high standing of the President of our
Any soil in Florida that will produce Company in his own state, and as a
a fair crop of corn will produce a corre- Delegate to this National meeting
sponding crop of sugar cane, but like other means much to the Bunnell-Dupont
crops, the richer the soil and the better it Colony.
is prepared, so much will the crop be im- Nothing can be more helpful to
proved and the product increased.
Fine cane can be raised on the pine our Colony as a whole than good
land, with its clay sub-soil, such as we roads, and the articles on another
have in our colony, and this has been dem- page of this issue indicate that these
onstrated by several of our settlers who roads will soon be a certainty.
have from one to five acre patches. A field of sugar cane ,




6he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Florida's Unlimited Possibilities
As Enumerated by MR. J. R. GANT
The Following Letter should be Carefully Read by Every' Reader of the "Home Builder"
A few weeks ago while down in the cen- effects, which were few, to the place where to diversify their farming, finding out Ino tral part of Florida, I was stopping one he lived for thirty-six years, dying at the ~and more the possibilities of the soil night at a hotel, and happened to get into good old age of three score and fifteen. that it was capable of yielding far more When these few people came here they profit per acre than their groves had ever conversation in the hotel office with the found a wild free country for the most done. They dug deeper and deeper into
writer of the following letter, I became so the soil each year, getting more and more
interested in this gentleman, and so im- f or their labors, with a three and sometir es presed ithhisknolede o famin ineven four crops a year, so that they began presed wth is kowldge f frmin into care but very little whether oranges Florida, that before leaving I asked him wudee rwhr gi rnt
for a letter for the Home Builder, which is Today in this section of the State large
prined elo. M. Gat hs ben eryareas of land that once contained fine orprined elo. M. Gat hs ben eryange groves are now given over to truck modest in his letter, omitting to tell of the adfedcos n h epeaehpy
success he has made in agricultural lines or idsrosadpopru.Iko flu
of the beautiful home he has been able to in Florida that a few years ago would
establish from the profits of his farm. scarcely produce anything, but with the new
THOMA A. ERDEIUS.order of things-better preparation, better THOMA A. ERDEIUS.cultivation, diversification of crops, intelligence and determination-the results are
Mr. homa A. erdeiuswondrous to behold. Your little magazine, the Bunnell HomeIamlvnon yfthrsam. oe
Builder, received and read with much pleas- of the land has been in constant cultivaure, also your little booklet, "A Little to o it er.I ilpouemr
Farm-A Big Living." now than it ever did, and as the soil grows
Several years ago I had the pleasure of deeper each year the crops are better and
riding horse-back over some of the country better as the years go by. I consider that
in which Bunnell now stands. That was there is no limit to this land with proper
before the East Coast Railroad was built.caean IblivI a grw nyhg
I was very much impressed with the coun- adapted to this section and get as good a
try and knew that some day it would be yield, if not better, than in almost any
found out and settled up by people who other state. Here we raise corn, oats, sweet
would realize the possibilities of the land, and Irish potatoes, any of the legumes,
and that the whole of flaw Creek country truck of all kinds, watermelons, etc., with
would be in cultivation and that it would a thrifty herd of swine to follow this up.
make good. And I am not surprised to learn Now the thing for a man to do is to
as much through your magazine. thoroughly prepare the soil for the crop he
I know you have the soil and all it needs MR. J. R. GANT expects to raise. Add. humus to the soil
is men of intelligence and perseverance. One of Florida's successful farmers by planting and growing cow peas, velvet
Those who come with determination will beans, etc., and plowing or discing them
succeed and make happy, contented and part, abounding in game and fish. Then under each year. Turn the soil a little
prosperous farmers. You must know that the larger farms began to grow smaller; deeper and every time you do this you are this State holds out possibilities second to the people were content to hunt and fish building up and increasing your crop, until none. Here we have an ideal country as and cultivate small patches of corn and in a very few years you, have a good soil to climate, soil and seasons. Occasionally potatoes for home consumption, planting an and can keep it good by the same method. for a short time we have little extremes occasional orange tree about their -premises, When your crop is planted give it frein temperature, rainfall and drought, but more for ornament and shade than for the quent and very shallow cultivation. This as a whole we never notice them. The f ruit. is as essential here as any other country.
days are pleasant, the nights cool and rest- Then about thirty years ago when the Tell your people not to expect too much to ful; crops growing all the time and making railroads came through this part of the start with. "It rains dollars in Florida," good, and we have good markets for our country and oranges could be shipped to but these dollars have to be dug up, not products in season, market, the farms grew less and less until picked up, and the sooner the farmer learns
My grandparents came here from Georgia there were scarcely any cultivated lands that the better it ,will be for laim. He in 1835, and cleared up a large plantation, except in orange groves. People began to won't have to work any harder here than having slaves by the hundred to house and come and settle thick and fast, orange anywhere else, and no other state offers feed, and it took, as my grandfather groves, both large and small, were set out such opportunities as Florida; however, the
thought, a lot of land to supply the neces- and in a few years were bearing, and mil- soil yields up-.nothing without an effort. sities. He cultivated this farm for about lions of boxes were shipped out which fur- Our climate will give you health, happitwenty-five years, planting cotton, corn, nished almost all the revenue coming back ness and the joy of living. potatoes, etc. Today that plantation holds for sustenance of man and beast. With best wis hes for you and yours, I am
an incorporated town and the remainder is Everywhere it was oranges, oranges, or- Very respectfully yours,
cut up into small farms, from which hun- anges; no one doing or trying to do any- J. R. GAXT.
dredls of thousands of crates of early vege- thing else, and when it seemed that all tables are shipped at seasons when they there was to do was to grow an orange bring high prices, and make hundreds of tree into bearing and live comfortably and strange to say, some of the very slaves little extremes of cold came and laid bare R E E
after being -freed lived on this same plan- to the ground all those beautiful trees, and _____________tation until they died (the last one only almost every tree in the then famous orfew years ago), the owners of nice little ange belt was killed. THE BU N LL
farms of their own, and a prosperous and Then it was that the people were sore H-OME BUILDER
respected people. tried. Did they "holler?" Did Congress Is sent free each month to all
After 1835 a few people came to this or any one come to the rescue? Was there Bunell-Dupont Colony land
community, more to visit my grandparents any assistane whatever for these people? owners. If you do not own a
tha anthig esebutho!whe thy N. Nneandth relizng hathadfarm at Bunnell, but are mnthananyhin ele, bt l! wen heyNo. one an thy relizng hathadterested in this colony and beheld the country they were filled with a happened, went back to their farms and would like to receive a copy
desire to locate here also. In 1850 my began to farm as they had never farmed of this magazine each month
father came from Georgia, and be also was before, asking favors of none 'but with the oidly Rfo ittot03,j
filled with admiration for the new country, determination to win, Most of the game ofcRo 13
and in 1851 he moved all of his personal having disappeared by this time they began 108 S. La Salle Street, ChiCago, Ill.




Full Text

PAGE 1

|pillllllll[l!lll[[|[||[|||[||lllllllllllll!!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliy 1 The Truth About Florida I | The Bunnell Home Builder I 1 Edited by S. HOWARD jH 1103—108 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill. lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliw Vo/. 1 March 1913 JSfo. 4 Editor’s Personal Page “Back to the Land” The Editor wishes w c? i r to call your attenIs the Solution oi tion to the ^toon Many Problems on this page. So many things must be learned in the “School of Experience,” and one problem that men and women today are wrestling with is the high cost of living. This little sketch is worthy of your study and consideration. Every day the increase in the cost of living is being brought more forcibly to your door and you are realizing that it costs more to live now than it did ten years ago. If present day prices are af fecting you now, what do you expect of the next ten years? Thinking men declare that the next dec ade will witness one of the greatest strug gles in the history of the civilized world. It will be a mighty struggle against the high cost of living problems and will in volve every nation under the sun. In our own country, for instance, the increase of the cost of food since 1900 has been more than 40%. The cause and cure of this situation is attracting the attention of all classes of people alike. During the last Presidential campaign many theories purporting to solve the question were advanced, but none of the candidates, in my estimation, touched the real vital spot in the present situation. The majority of nations are not produc ing food to equal the consumption by their inhabitants, and these people are flocking to this country as the only alternate to threatened starvation. According to circular No. 38, issued by the Secretary of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the population of the United States has increased during the past ten years 21%, while during this same period the increase in farm land acreage has been less than 5%, or an increase in population of 16% over and above that of farm land acreage. It is conceded by all who are conversant with the situation, that our population will increase more in the next ten years than in the past ten. The Fed eral Government reports that ALL possible increase of farmland can be only 9% of the present acreage. If the population is increasing so much more rapidly than is the possible increase of the acreage of farm land, does it not seem reasonable to expect good land to advance in price in propor tion to the increase of population? Capital, too, is fully awake to these con ditions and is fast buying up. all the favor able lands and putting the price out of the reach of the man of limited means. The time, however, has not YET arrived when it is impossible for a few to secure a good piece of land. People are longing for, striving for — Inde pendence. It can’t be found in the cities where living is so high, and where there are a score of men for every job. No man can be more independent than the one who owns a piece of land, a possession that is not affected by bank failures, fires or Wall Street panics. taken up very rapidly, and it is the wise man who sees his opportunity and grasps it now. SEVENTEEN CENTS A DAY WILL BUY A FARM-HOME IN THE BUNNELLDUPONT COLONY. There are several reasons why this is so. The freedom of the outdoor life revitalizes and gives abundant energy, and the increase of energy, coupled with exuberance of spirits, most bountifully equips one for the prosecution of his labors, and makes him doubly ambitious for large undertakings. Then if he will take up farming as a serious, business-like calling, he has, in these modern times, every aid to economical, labor-saving production, of which he can make capital for profitable earnings. The oft-quoted expression, “We are the heirs of all the ages” is in nothing more true than in this industry. We use varieties of seed the experience of those who have gone before have proven best suited to our needs. Selection and breeding have made those now in use better than ever before; implements have been evolved from the brains of practical men which enables us to do our work rapidly and efficiently; spray ing for fungus and insect enemies has been wrought for us by our scientific workers, and methods of harvesting, transporting and marketing that promote success. These are our heritages. Let us take them, which means we must study and apply the principles that have been worked out for us at the expense of so much time, labor and money; succeed because we in terpret and use them correctly, and trans mit them to our children improved by what we have learned. No education is more interesting, more varied, or aids more in insuring success than the study of Agriculture. What Farming Now Offers as a Vocation past to leave the far M uc h has been written about the tendency of the young man in the m and seek his for tune in the crowded centers of population, and the more crowded avocations of these centers. Whether this lias been responsible or not, the fact must be admitted that the tide of public opinion regarding the prefer ence of metropolitan life has changed, and the drift now is rather from the city to the country, with “back-to-the-soil” nailed to the mast-head, as the slogan of those who find in the new order of things a more independent, healthful and happy life — a chance which many look upon as coming out of a state of mere existence into the fullness and idealness of rational living. Whatever may be said in favor of the exciting pleasures and attractions and nerve-straining demands of city residence, it is being increasingly admitted that for a given amount of energy invested by the individual, rural life pays by far the big gest dividends. P; ss the Good News Along Home Builder did friend or neighbor? When you were through reading your February is sue of the Bunnell you hand it to a It contained so much interesting matter concerning the colonists and the success they are making in their new home, that it would be a shame to deprive your friends of all the good things therein. Be liberal. If you have not already done this, do it now; and when you are through with this issue, pass it along also. Every num ber of this little magazine contains the latest news of the colony and many help ful suggestions to all land owners. The letters coming to this office week after week from satisfied men and women who have visited the colony and the stories of the progress being made by those already lo cated on their lands, many of which are printed in the Home Builder, ought to be read by everyone. Let your friends and neighbors share with you in reading of this wonderful country — this land of sunshine and flowers — this col ony where independence is within the reach of all.

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&th> TOMHEEE HOME BUILDER Seventy Thousand Dollars Soon to Be Spent for Good Roads in St. John’s County AUGUSTA GRAVEL TO BE USED FOR PAVING The following articles appeared during the month of February in the St. Augustine Record, and give an idea of the tremendous interest now being shown in road building in our section of St. Johns County: Seventy thousand dollars will be expended upon the highways of St. Johns county within the next few months. The John Anderson boulevard will be paved straight through to the Duval county line. The highway to Elkton and to Hastings will be paved its entire distance. Two miles of laterals will be paved at Hastings. One and one-half miles of laterals will be paved at Elkton. Augusta gravel will be used. Under a new contract direct with parties in Augusta a saving of from ten to fifteen dollars a car on the gravel will be effected. This in substance is the result of the meeting of the county commissioners yes terday and marks the beginning of a high way improvement project which is destined to bring all St. Johns together and to do more for the development of St. Johns county than any move made in many years. At 3 o’clock in the afternoon the citizens’ committee, appointed in the morning and consisting of President G. S. Meserve of the Board of Trade, B. Genovar, G. B. Lamar, G. W. Waller of Hastings and James L. Middleton of Elkton, went into executive session with the board to devise ways and means for the financing of a program of highway improvement. The executive session lasted a little over thirty minutes. When it ended Col. W. A. MaeWilliams who has been selected as spokesman for the board and the members of the committee, submitted a statement of what had been done. He stated that a decision had been reached to raise seventy thousand dollars in the manner followed heretofore in raising road funds, citizens giving their notes and these being taken up by the county by warrants legalized by the legislature. With this amount it had been decided that the Jacksonville road can be hardsurfaced its entire length, the road to Elkton and Hast ings paved and laterals placed at both of those potato cities. His announcement was greeted with ap plause from the many spectators present One of the colony roadslbuilt by the Company from different sections of the country. Eugene Masters offered a vote of thanks to the members of the committee for their services and to the board for the action taken. This was carried unanimously by those present. An investigation made as to the prices obtainable resulted in the board closing a contract direct with the Cement Gravel Company of Augusta, Ga., which will effect a saving of from ten to fourteen dollars a car over the price heretofore paid. This will total up to between five and eight hundred dollars saving on each mile paved. An order was placed for ten carloads of gravel a day to be shipped, the bulk of this to go at first on the Jacksonville road, but some to go to Hastings for the lateral work in order that it may be completed before the potato shipping season opens. The Jacksonville road will be in splendid condition in a few weeks and it is expected that it will be all hardsurfaced early in the spring and that w r ork will then be in full swing upon the paving of the road to Elkton and Hastings. Much Has Been Done in the Bunnell Colony Built to a large extent by private par ties southern St. Johns county has a sys tem of good roads that everyone in the county should be proud of. County Com missioners Faver and Roberts feel that way about it after a trip of inspection over all the roads in Commissioner Moody’s district Tuesday afternoon and yesterday morning in the latter’s automobile. They are high in their praise of the work that has been done there. Beautiful shell road running from St. Augustine toward Bunnell From St. Augustine the John Anderson highway was followed to the south end of the county. The party went to the Vol usia line by way of Green’s Island and the famous Knox and Bede grove. This is twelve miles from Bunnell and the con necting road is in splendid condition. It lias been opened up all of the twelve miles and cleared. Mr. Knox has also contributed to the work on this highway. Three or four miles of the road out of Bunnell has been hardsurfaced and the rest is in good shape. Another road traversed leads from Bun nell five miles to the county line on the southwest side of the Florida East Coast Railway. A mile of this has been hard surfaced and it is all in good condition. This road has been worked recently. The party also made the trip from Bun nell to Espanola over the new road just completed and opened up this week. It is five miles long and thirty-five feet in width and a splendid highway. Eight miles of the thirteen mile road con necting St. Johns Park and Bunnell has been liardsurfaced with natural material. A reddish clay thrown up on the grade was mixed with sand on the surface and made a roadway as smooth and firm as any shell road in the county. Commissioner Moody will keep ten men at work during the winter on the old Kings road south from Pellicer creek to the county line, keeping it in good shape for the winter traffic. Ocean City News This is surely an ideal place for fruit. Mr. and Mrs. Cookman have only been here two years and have a fine young orange grove of 300 ti'ees started, besides a variety of other fruits. A few orange and peach trees are in bloom. C. F. Turner of the Bunnell Develop ment Co., with three other gentlemen from Vermont, Pennsylvania and Utah were Ocean City visitors Tuesday. Mr. Turner took them up to the oyster bed in a row boat. On returning with the boat loaded with oysters they reported having the time of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Moore of Grandville, 0., and sister, Mrs. Ella Humphrey, of Columbus, 0., are pleasantly located in one of Cookman’s cottages, and tell us they are enjoying every minute. Mr. Moore supplies their table with plenty of oysters, duck and fish. He and Mr. Cookman got seven ducks recently. Mr. Moore has two beautiful lots here and expects to build in the near future. Although this place is in its infancy it affords many pleasures. One cannot get lonely, several beautiful passenger boats glide up and down the canal daily, besides gaily-decked private cruisers and large freight boats. \Ve expect a fine company of people from Bunnell to partake in an oyster roast and fish fry very soon. Bunnell Bank Meeting I. I. Moody Re-elected President—Bank in Splendid Condition. The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Bunnell State Bank was recently held and was most pleasing to all those connected with the institution. The state ment of the bank’s condition was excellent and showed that the institution had made 27 per cent. Of this ten per cent was de clared in dividends and the balance was carried to the surplus and undivided profits account. This financial institution has filled a long felt want in Southern St. Johns and its remarkable growth and its condition speak splendidly for the growth of that section as a financial institution, and is always an index to the prosperity of any community. It has quickly taken its place as one of the leading state banks of Florida.

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m<9 BUMNEEE HOME BUILDER ‘‘Florida is the Most Prosperous State in the Union” Says Gov. Gilchrist, in Leslie's Weekly Ever since Albert W. Gilchrist was inaugurated governor of the State of Flor ida, in January, 1909, he has continuously endeavored to avail himself of every oppor tunity to advertise the resources and supe riority of Florida in the magazines and newspapers, not only in Florida, but in other States and in other countries. Gov ernor Gilchrist contributed a large part of such communications to various publica tions during his term of office. The following intensely interesting arti cle by Governor Gilchrist appeared in Les lie’s Weekly of December 12, 1912, under the head, “Good Times in Florida.” “Florida extends through fully five hun dred miles of latitude and has twelve hun dred miles of water front. It is bounded on the west and south by the Gulf of Mexico and on the east by the gulf stream. Owing to the peculiar shape of Florida the gulf stream is formed. If there was no Florida there would be no gulf stream. The State is now sending out the gulf stream of its various products to all parts of the United States. It is a great mineral State, producing half of the phosphate of the United States and one-third of that of the world. Fullers earth is mined in var ious portions of the State. Fine clay for porcelain is also mined. It is a great naval stores and lumber producing State. It is one of the most healthful States in the Union, the death rate being less than that of any other State and of any country in Europe. “Our climate is a great asset. Due to it, thousands of people visit Florida as tour ists and thousands of people come here to make their homes. The benefit of the climate in extending the lives of worthy men and women ten, fifteen or twenty years cannot be estimated. “In many of the Western States, in par ticular, much attention is given to irriga tion. Through its rivers and lakes, Florida is undoubtedly the best watered State in all the Union. Artesian water may be found in most portions of Florida. Irriga tion can be cheaply done. However, irriga tion is rarely used. “Though not a corn-producing State, in several counties in Florida from sixty to seventy bushels of corn per acre have been raised. A bale of cotton to the acre is often raised. Florida raises fully one-third of all the sea island cotton produced in the United States. Florida peavine and beggarweed hay—two or three tons per acre—is now regarded as good hay as can be pro duced anywhere in the world. Our people largely specialize. In one county fully five thousand acres are planted in paper-shell pecans. In other sections strawberries are raised almost exclusively, from eight hun dred to one thousand quarts per acre. In one community Irish potatoes are raised; in others train loads of celery; in others tomatoes, eggplant, beans and other vege tables. In more southern portions of the State, tropical and semi-tropical fruits are grown exclusively. Last year, over one of the several trunk lines of railroads in Flor ida, 28,000 carloads of fruits, vegetables and melons were shipped. We grow cane from which from five hundred to one thou sand gallons of syrup are produced to the acre. “The rays of our warm winter sun are concentrated in, and the dew drops are crystallized in, these fruits and vegetables. They are shipped to various parts of our common country, gladdening the hearts of our far-away brothers and making life worth living to them. “Cattle, sheep, poultry, horticulture and agriculture flourish throughout the State. Manufacturing and mining and the fisher ies of the State are rapidly developing. The manufactured products of the State represent fully eighty-seven dollars per capita. Our soil produces as much per acre of products to which it is suited as does any State in the Union. “Our State is being settled with good citizens. According to the census of 1910, the rate of increase in our population was 42.2 per cent, being double the 21.1 per cent of the nation at large. ‘Every little movement has a meaning all its own.’ It appears that people are beginning to know a good thing when they see it. There are fully thirty-five hundred miles of im proved hard roads in Florida. Churches and school houses are increasing. Illiteracy is decreasing. “Florida is the most prosperous State in the Union. Its population is more national than that of any other State. All worthy people receive a hearty welcome in Florida. So much good could be said of Florida that, if I tried to tell it, it would take from now until the last reverberating echoes of Gabriel’s horn.” A semi-weekly paper, known as the Courier-Gazette, published in the far-off State of Maine, has just this morning been received by the Editor. It contain a very interesting letter from a subscriber who is wintering in Florida, and we take pleasure in quoting from this letter, as follows: “After several days in Jacksonville, we proceeded down the East Coast to St. Au gustine and Bunnell. They are the two extremes — St. Augustine being the oldest city and Bunnell the youngest city. “We have spent but little time in St. Augustine, but several days in Bunnell. Here the Bunnell Development Company has opened a large tract on the East Coast, laid it out in sections, and is rapidly selling the farms. The town of Bunnell is only two years old, but is a very attractive place, well laid out, with broad streets, concrete walks, telephone and electric lights, and the East Coast Railroad runs directly through the center of the town. The people are buy ing the land rapidly, and there is every prospect that in another two years the place will be wonderfully increased in size and population. The land is adapted to orange and vegetable growing. They are clearing and plowing and getting it ready to put in a big potato crop in February. “Bunnell is only twelve miles from Hast ings, which has made such a success in potato raising. They prophesy a 400,000 barrel crop in St. Johns County this com ing April. “There is a fine class of people coming to Bunnell from Canada, Maine, Michigan and other States. They seem to be workers, judging from the way they are clearing the land and getting it ready for planting. Bunnell has a good saw mill where the big pine trees are converted into lumber for house building. “Mr. B., formerly of Belfast, Maine, is the only contractor here. He keeps a big crew of men at work and would engage more if he could get them. “Neat little cottages are going up all around. There are the best of facilities for transportation, and the products get into the northern markets when they bring the best prices. No shipping to commission merchants. The buyers come to Bunnell and take the products directly from the farmer. “If any of our Maine farmers are inter ested at all, just write to the Bunnell De velopment Company, Bunnell, Florida, and they will gladly send you descriptive circu lars. Having seen for ourselves, we can assure you that the circulars and testimon ials are not overdrawn, but are just as cor rect and conservative as they can be made. This company will be more than pleased to answer any questions that may be asked.” Newly cleared land on three farms in the colony. These fields are all planted to potatoes at the present time

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BUNNELL HOME BUILDER Letters of Interest from Bunnell-Dupont Colon y|Land-0 —From Illinois, Tennessee, Maine, Ifcai To the Readers of The Bunnell Home Builder: Confidence is one of the great essentials in regard to many and most things; it is an element that enters largely into the investment of money from any viewpoint. When a man in moderate circumstances is about to invest all that he possesses in the purchase of a home or a farm he wants to know that the people with whom he does business are reliable and honest and hopes that his own best interests will figure in the deal. Truth in regard to location, climate, crops, transportation facilities, health and success, a square deal in re gard to facts that are vital factors in bringing about his ultimate well being from every viewpoint. These sentiments were very strongly en tertained by the writer eighteen months ago when the matter of the purchase of a farm or two in Bunnell, Florida, was brought to our attention. We wanted a future home, a place where we could make enough money from the land to keep us in comfort, and afford ultimate relief from the strenuous life we lead—our portion for more years than we care to enumerate. We liked Florida; it sounded good to us; not a literal land of ease and comfort at once, but a land of great capacity along financial lines if we found the right locality. We had friends and acquaintances all over the state. We wrote, questioned and in terrogated from every viewpoint. We had an ardent friend at Boynton, for instance, where land was $235 an acre, five-acre farms, one-third down, one-third for two years, glowing promises, but too much money. Made other investigation, similar conditions obtained. We felt almost discouraged, when the Bunnell, St. Johns County, proposition was suggested for con sideration. We found no promoters; land at $30 per acre, remarkably easy payments; a verification of every statement made in regard to the qualities of the soil; trans portation first class and possibilities be yond estimate for the future if we would do our part. A town site with a bank, church, school, an electric light plant, water power and hotel —the outcome of the en ergy of the men who own the land and who are earnest, single hearted, interested, benevolent men, determined to found a col ony of whom they could be proud, with whom they could enter into the well being of each and every one who became a mem ber of the colony. We bought in Bunnell two farms and two town lots; if we had a family we would own fifty acres, but twenty acres will make a man more than comfortable and give him luxuries. Florida, like Canaan of old, is a land of “milk and honey." As a health giving proposition Florida is unequalled; no zero temperature, but tropical conditions obtain in lavish abundance. One can have all the delights of fruit and flowers, ocean and balmy breezes in Florida. Horace Greeley said, “Go West, young man.” We say to you, “Young man or old man, go South; if you want pros perity, go South.” HELEN COMBS, M. D., Chicago. Bunnell Development Company, Bunnell, Florida: Gentlemen — I made a visit to your colony in the summer of 1910. At that time Bun nell was in her infancy and although I felt that the future held something in store for your little city and the country sur rounding it, I never dreamed that the de velopment would be so rapid. I am here on the grounds today. Have been out in most every direction and have come in touch with the farmers. Most of them, I presume, bought their land as I did, by mail, without ever seeing it, and I will say in every instance I find these men in high spirits, and there is no reason why they should not be. The climate is ideal; the land is easy to get into a state of cultivation, and I will say frankly that I have never in my life seen such prolific growth. The gardens at this time of the year are as fine as ever they could be in mid-summer in northern states. I find that the folks who are coming here to make this their permanent home, are in almost every instance good, honest men, such as it takes to make a country — men who have their whole hearts in busi ness, and there is not a question of a doubt that within a very short time the lands will all be taken and put into a state of cultivation; in fact any way you start out from Bunnell you find people engaged in the planting of their crops, the cultivation of those crops already planted and growing, the clearing of land and the building of homes. And now to you, who would like to in vest but are afraid — take it from me, a Tennesseean, who is neither ashamed of his state or his name, that if you want a good investment, if you want a place you can really call HOME, where you can revel in God’s glorious sunshine twelve months in the year, and make a living easier than you ever made it before in your life, come to Bunnell, while the Opportunity to do so knocks at your door. Within the near future I expect to open up a general builders’ and farmers’ supply store here. I expect to invest thousands of dollars here, because I want to make it my future home, and am not afraid of the proposition. I wish I had room here to say all the good things that I could conscientiously say for this town and surrounding country, but as space is limited I will stop by asking you not to just take my word for it, but come and see for vourself. ED JOHNSON, Tennessee. Bunnell Development Company: Gentlemen — I am enclosing pass-book with payment. I hope to be able to finish pay ments on my farm in the near future. I so much like to read the Bunnell Home Builder. I think you have developed be yond imagination since February, 1911. I hope the colony will continue to do as well, and I am sure that it will. I want to thank you for your fair deal ings with me. I have known Mr. Moody for a good many years, and can say that he and all of his family bear the name of being most upright men in all their deal ings, and any proposition they might offer would be strictly honest. I am glad that I have a farm in this col ony, and I hope to improve it as soon as possible. Yours very truly, WILLIAM CLAUDE WELLS, California. Dear Sir—We have received during the past year many circulars in regard to the Bunnell-DuPont colony, and we were very much interested in reading them, but we placed little faith in the correctness of their descriptions of the place. There has been so many land deals of an uncertain nature, to speak in the mildest terms, that although we were interested we would not think of advancing the first payment without seeing and judging for ourselves the truth of the statements made in vour circulars sent out over the country.‘ In December we came south and visited Bunnell. We spent three days looking the colony over and found everything exactly as described, only much more attractive than written description could be. We found the beginning of a city, and we have no doubt that two more years added to its two years of existence will make a decided change in its size and value. Its location is exceptionally fine, and rail road facilities unsurpassed. The East Coast Road runs directly through the cen tral part of the town and its leading high way, the Moody Road, runs straight to the ocean, a distance of about seven miles. If I should write longer I should only repeat many of the good things already said, and which we found by word of the people them selves were entirely correct. Mr. Moody and Mr. Turner we found very courteous and anxious to show us the land and not simply talk it up. The result of our stay was that we bought a twenty acre farm, although it’s not possible at present for us to improve and live on it, but we trust that in a few years we may be able to do so. We are satisfied that it is a good investment. MR. AND MRS. R. ANSON CRIE, Maine. Mr. S. Howard: Dear Sir—I received the Bunnell Home Builder; it is what we need. I have read it through and am satisfied that it will be of great help to our colony. I have been in the colony nine months and have cleared part of my land, and will be back there as soon as I can get things in shape here to leave. I am satisfied that everybody that has bought or will buy in Bunnell-Du Pont colony will have a good investment for the time is coming when improved land like that in Bunnell-DuPont colony will be in demand. Wishing you and also the Bunnell-DuPont colony success, I am, Respectfully yours, J. F. VONHOENE, Washington.

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m@ BUNM&IL1L HOME BUILDER. ners. Note How Widely Scattered these People Are lAgton, Ganada, Missouri and Maryland Mr. Thos. Verdenius: Dear Sir—I was somewhat delayed on the road to Bunnell, but at the same time pleased to say that I got there 0. K., and also enjoyed my visit very much indeed. I found Mr. Turner easily and he certainly did all he could to make my visit to the colony a good and enjoyable one. It was a pleasure for him to answer any questions and show me the land. I was surprised to learn from him as we went over the colony that most of the land was sold. I con tinually asked him about different tracts and his reply was “that is all sold.” This sounds very good. Settlers who are coming into Bunnell will find it much different than going into the prairie province of Canada, where for miles no one lives. In Bunnell, no matter where you glance you can see houses scattered everywhere. I must say that I believe Bunnell has a great future ahead of her, and that people cannot do wrong in investing here. The land is fine and I have been around in Florida, but the land in your colony is certainly fine. I saw pineapple and strawberries ripe. The gardens were in excellent shape. Many acres of potatoes were planted. These peo ple you have there will make a headway. The climate is just lovely, flowers all around, cool breezes blowing from the ocean, roses blooming, it makes one feel that life is worth living. I was quite taken up with the place although I did not feel much like farming when I saw you, but after seeing your land and the possi bilities there are for a man that will work I certainly could not do with less than twenty acres. I only wish I could stay in this land of sunshine, but business calls me back to British Columbia, Canada, at present. But I can assure you that I want no more of freezing winters in the North, but am go ing to arrange to be in the Sunny South to stay, and that before long. I have vis ited the places down between St. Augustine and Daytona, looked over the lands, but your neat little town and good land is the best I have seen. Yours truly, S. J. HARRISON, British Columbia, Canada. Mr. S. Howard: Dear Sir—The first three issues of the Bunnell Home Builder received and certain ly want to thank you for them. Mrs. Wedde and I are so interested we read every word they contained, and are anxiously awaiting the next one. Bouting scene near Ocean City WHICH DO I have a word to say about Bunnell my self. It is just a year since our party went to Bunnell to select our farms. Mr. Verdenius received us in Jacksonville, and I must say he certainly treated us royally and showed us all around Jacksonville and then he took us to St. Augustine, showed us all around that beautiful city, from there to an orange grove in the suburbs, where we had the picture taken that has been published in the small booklet, “A LITTLE FARM — A BIG LIVING.” From St. Augustine we went to Bunnell, the big gest surprise of all. It rained all the while we were in Bunnell, but not very hard. We went out to select our farm just the same, which was not necessary, for the Bunnell ground is all good. I did not see a bad piece in the colony. What I did see was cabbage and lettuce and all kinds of vegetables in February; hens with their chicks, and men with strings of fish wherever I looked, and Bunnell a town of about two hundred homes. If I began telling you all I saw, I would never get through. Yours very truly, J. H. WEDDE, Missouri. My dear Sir : I am taking the pleasure in writing these few lines about Florida for I have bought ten acres there not over a month ago, and the reason I bought land was because my father and two brothers have bought also. My eldest brother has been to Florida and he takes the paper from there. I believe if he missed getting his Florida paper he would be ready to start for Bunnell right away. He and I expect to roll into good old Flori da next September if we can, for I am tired of the cold winds in the north since I have heard of Florida, where the sun shines all the time. Yours very truly, RALEIGH BAILEY, Illinois. My dear Mr. Verdenius: I received your letter and the Bunnell Home Builder about our dear little town, Bunnell. I was so glad to look over those pages to see so many improvements since A mid-winter scene in Canada YOU PREFER, “WINTER SNOWS’* OR “S I was there two years ago this January. I am glad that the people of different states are awake. 1 hope to be one more in our little town, as soon as I can sell my property. When I arrived in Florida it was just like going in a new world. I can not express the pleasure and enjoyment I saw in the land of roses. People are in the dark if they do not buy at Bunnell. You can send me some of your liter ature to give to my friends, for I want them to know all about this wonderful col ony. Yours very truly, W. J. APPLEBY, Maryland. United States Weather Bureau Statistics The following table of temperature and rainfall, based on a ten-year average from United States Weather Bureau statistics, will give the prospective homeseeker a com prehensive idea of what to expect in tem perature and rainfall along the East Coast of Florida: T — Mean monthly and average temperature in degrees. R — Average monthly and total precipitation, inches and tenths. St. Augustine Ormond T R T R January 5 6 3.0 58 3.6 February .61 3.0 58 2.8 March .62 2.9 64 3.0 April .68 2.0 69 2.0 May .73 4.4 77 4.6 June .78 4.9 70 5.2 •July .80 6.0 80 3.4 August .80 5.0 80 5.2 September .. .77 7.4 79 7.2 October ..65 4.1 72 6.3 November .63 3.2 64 3.4 December .58 2.5 57 2.9 Annual .68 48.1 69 50.6 Editor’s Note — Requests have been re ceived from time to time for a report in the Home Builder of the average monthly temperature in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. The table above gives this information both as to temperature and average monthly rainfull. This table is for St. Augustine and Ormond, but as St. Augustine is about 25 miles north of our colony, and Ormond but 10 miles to the south, one can judge very accurately as to the temperature at Bunnell. Orange Grove near Bunnell SKIES?’’

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6 BUMMELIL HOME BUILDER Every Day Happenings In and Around Bunnell and Dupont Win. Sehaper and wife of Minden, Nebr., were registered at the Hotel Bunnell for several days last week. Mr. Sehaper has a ten acre farm on the Moody road, towards the ocean. Fred It. Bettes, of St. Augustine, spent Sunday in Bunnell, visiting his sister, Miss Irene Bettes, who is the assistant in the Bunnell School. Mrs. P. Curry and family, of Georgia, hearing of Bunnell’s fame, spent a few days here last week, looking over the col ony. L. E. Springer, of Pennsylvania, was a recent visitor and before returning home he purchased a twenty acre farm on the Moody road. J. H. Winterowd, of Salt Lake City, Utah, was here for a few days last week and purchased 20 acres of land. B. E. Hubbard and wife of Grand Rap ids, Mich., arrived last week, and will visit Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Hubbard, on their farm in the western part of the colony. C. W. Weatherington and friend, Joe Achweier, of Kentucky, are in Bunnell, in specting. Mr. Weatherington owns a farm here, and Mr. Achweier will also purchase one before he returns home. W. A. Brock, one of Bunnell’s farmers, brought into town the other day an ex tremely large head of lettuce, which he says grew on his place without work, fer tilizer or rain. If this be true, we would like to see some of Mr. Brock’s garden “sass” that had care, etc. I. I. Moody, accompanied by C. P. Town send, of St. Augustine, made a flying trip to Augusta last week in the interest of St. Johns County, to consider the advis ability of using Georgia gravel to hard surface the roads of St. Johns County. At the last meeting of the County Commis• sioners, they decided to raise $70,000.00 to 'use in building roads in this county. S. J. Harrison, of British Columbia, Can ada, is a recent enthusiastic visitor to Bun nell. Mr. Harrison bought land here be fore his visit and he has taken an option on an additional 20 acres. His report on the conditions here will bring 20 families to Bunnell. The new brick building is being rushed to completion as rapidly as possible. The brick are all on the ground and in a few weeks another handsome building will be added to Bunnell. Part of the building will be occupied by the “St. Johns Tribune,” Bunnell’s newspaper, and will also contain a builders’ supply house, and grocery store. Ur. St. Peter was exhibiting a radish Wednesday that he raised in his garden, which was certainly a wonder. The radish measured 11 inches in circumference, 28 inches from tip to tip and weighed 2% pounds. The doctor is certainly some farmer. View of a portion of Mr. ltelsky’s Farm Note the beautiful palmettoes, and grass, waist high Mr. A. Belsky of Rochester, New York, was in Bunnell recently to inspect land for himself and friends. Mr. Belsky was so pleased with conditions as he found them here thati he purchased 60 acres of potato land. Mr. Belsky and his friends now have 100 acres of land in our colony. Mr. M. Stone, one of Bunnell’s up-to-date merchants, has purchased ten acres of land east of town which he expects to farm next year. If Mr. Stone proves to be as good a farmer as he is a merchant, we pre dict some fine crops from his farm. The barrel factory is working overtime getting barrels ready for the coming crop of potatoes. They have about two thou sand on hand now and are setting up about two hundred daily. Mr. Emmett Deen of Brandentown, Florida, is spending some time in Bunnell. Mr. Deen contemplates entering the mercan tile business here. Mr. and Mrs. K. Schmidt, of Jackson ville, arrived in the city last week. They are stopping at the home of F. L. Byrd. Mr. Schmidt has accepted a position with the Carter Drug store. Mr. Thos. H. Lang, an experienced printer and newspaper man of Calhoun, Ga., ar rived in the city Monday and has taken charge of the mechanical department of the Tribune. We welcome Mr. Lang to our city. Mr. R. W. Moore has sold his house and lot on Moody Boulevard to Mrs. C. J. Mil ler. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have moved out to Ocean City, where they expect to erect a nice home in the near future. Mr. C. F. Turner, field manager for Bun nell Development Co., is kept very busy these days showing the purchasers their property. The First Quarterly Conference of thj Bunnell Methodist Episcopal church, which was to be held at the church on the 4th inst.; has been postponed for one month. Through the efforts of Messrs. F. L. Byrd and F. A. Rich there is a possibility of the farmers residing near Bunnell hav ing a free rural delivery mail route estab lished in the near future. The proposed route is to cover the following territory: Carrier to leave Bunnell in the morning, covering Deen road to Braun’s corner, thence across Haw creek to the Saplings Turpentine Still, thence to Bunnell over the south end of the Moody road, arriving in Bunnell about 2 p. m. Among the many improvements for Bun nell is the handsome two-story brick build ing which is to occupy the corner across the track from the Florida East Coast Railway depot. The foundation was laid this week and the work will be rushed to completion. The building will be seventy feet in length with a fifty foot frontage on Broad street. The building will be known as the Tribune building. The ground floor will contain two rooms 25x70. The second floor will con tain fouc offices 20x20 and a dancing hall 30x50. The lower floors will be occupied by the Tribune and an up-to-date general mer chandise store. Mr. Bartlett's furniture being unloaded at Bunnell There have been some very important improvements made at the Florida East Coast Railway depot in Bunnell during the past month. The depot and walk-ways on north and south sides are brilliantly lighted with electric lights; new seats and oil heaters have been added to both waiting rooms, which is a great comfort to its many passengers. Watch out for other improve ments in the near future. Following are the church services at the M. E. Church in Bunnell: Preaching — Sunday, 11 a. m. Preaching — Sunday, 7 p. m. Sunday School—Sunday, 3 p. m. Rev. Haynes, Pastor.

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m<2 BUMHEEE HOME BUHEBER Growing Sugar Cane in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony Growing Cane ver four hundred years ago the sugar cane was introduced into Florida. The seed cane was imported from the West In dies and extensively cultivated by the Jesuit Fathers as far back as 1518, al though it was first introduced in 1493 by Columbus on his second voyage. From that time its cultivation and the accompanying industry of making syrup or sugar from the cane has been constantly carried on in a greater or less degree. This cane mill shows the present method^ of obtaining syrup I In former years vast sugar cane planta tions existed inFlorida, notably on the Halifax river, and ruins of old sugar re fineries are to be seen just a few miles from Bunnell. However, for some reason or other, the industry was allowed to de cline. That this should be so is almost, one might say, a national calamity. No state in the entire sugar belt of the United States can produce cane equal to that of Florida in sugar content or of a finer grade. The climatic conditions of Florida are pe culiarly favorable for its growth and ma turity; the soils are pre-eminently adapted to its culture. Yet all this vast area, these great oppor tunities for a live and profitable industry are being allowed to run to waste. Is it a fear of overstocking the markets that causes this apathy and drives the Florida farmer to consider other, but less staple crops? This should not be, for the Ameri can people are the greatest consumers of sugar in the world, and yet sugar is the only agricultural product which the United States imports. Florida, with her superior climate and soil, when once she awakens and puts her shoulder to the wheel, when .once her farm ers begin to think and combine practical knowledge and labor with capital and skill, now seeking profitable employment, could almost of herself solve the American sup ply of sugar in the cane belt of the United States. Beet sugar never could, and never will, compete with that produced from cane, where and when the supply of the latter meets the demand. The beet grower knows this and would himself naturally gravitate the cane belt where his profits will be greater and his crops more certain. Any soil in Florida that will produce a fair crop of corn will produce a corre sponding crop of sugar cane, but like other crops, the richer the soil and the better it is prepared, so much will the crop be im proved and the product increased. Fine cane can be raised on the pine land, with its clay sub-soil, such as we have in our colony, and this has been dem onstrated by several of our settlers who have from one to five acre patches. By I. I, MOODY for Syrup Will He One of Florida's Greatest Industries Cane can be planted either in the fall or the spring. For fall planting November is the best month, and for spring planting, February or March. The soil should be thoroughly plowed — deep plowing essen tial — weil harrowed, and the whole put in to first-class tilth not later than October for fall planting, and November or Decem ber for the spring planting. Harvesting commences in our county in November or December. The yield of cane per acre can generally be estimated at 20 tons per acre under present conditions of cultivation in Florida, and one man can attend to 20 acres. With proper fertilizer and improved labor-saving devices one man could grow 30 acres, and the yield should be increased by at least 10 tons per acre. Cane may be used for two purposes — f or syrup or sugar, but until we can have a sugar refinery at Bunnell cane will be raised for syrup. A fair price for good syrup in five gallon cans is 40 cents per gallon. With a yield of 30 gallons to the ton, the gross yield per acre would be $240.00. It is hardly necessary to go further into figures to show that in any event growing cane is a profitable undertaking, but greater benefits and profits can be obtained by a centralization of the industry in different sections rather than by individual growing of the cane and making the syrup. The horse-mill and kettle, it may at once be stated, is wasteful and comparatively expensive; nor is the miller extracting all that should come to him. It is best in the absence at present of central mills for the farmers to club together and erect a small mill — a well-built horizontal, 3-roll mill, powerfully constructed, driven by steam, A field of sugar cane that will extract 50 to 60 per cent of the total weight of the cane in juice, and capable of grinding 40 tons of cane per day. This complete could be erected for about $3,000.00. The supply of high-grade Florida syrup is never equal to the demand, and if the Florida farmers would only co-operate and build central evaporating plants, the indus try could be extended until Florida syrup would be in every market of the world, where the call for it is insistent. The development of our colony is pro gressing rapidly -— so rapidly indeed as to be almost beyond belief. The Bunnell bar rel factory will supply all our colonists and nearby farmers with barrels this season. The potato industry at Bunnell is bound to be one of great importance, not only to our own settlers, but to St. Johns County at large. I believe in Florida, and I believe in en couraging her farmers in raising staple crops —potatoes, sugar cane, etc., etc., but it is hard to understand why one of her greatest sources of wealth, that of cane growing and syrup making remains ap parently dormant. I trust that the time may soon come when the farmers in our community will have enough acres planted to sugar cane that a mill in Bunnell will become a neces sity. Have you read our booklet on Bun nell—“A Little Farm, A Big Living!” If not, write for it to General Sales Office, 108 S. La Salle St., Chicago Important Announcement Just as we go to press, word is received that Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development Com pany, has been appointed by the Governor of Florida as a Delegate to th e Federal Good Roads Association to be held in Wqshington, D. C., on March 6th. This will be a very interesting announcement to all readers of the Bunnell Home Builder. It shows the high standing of the President of our Company in his own state, and as a Delegate to this National meeting means much to the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Nothing can be more helpful to our Colony as a whole than good roads, and the articles on another page of this issue indicate that these roads will soon be a certainty.

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