Citation
The Bunnell home builder

Material Information

Title:
The Bunnell home builder
Added title page title:
Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
6 volumes : illustrations, ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Travel ( fast )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Periodicals -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
Periodicals. ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Periodicals ( fast )

Notes

Summary:
A newsletter for the owners and potential owners of land in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. Stories spread "the truth about Florida" in a highly-positive light to encourage sales of farmlands in the colony to Florida winter-residents. The main sponsers of the newsletter were the DuPont Land Company and the Bunnell Land Company. The paper seems to have folded soon after the Flagler Tribune began publication as most of the land in the colony had been sold.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (December, 1912)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with May 1918?
Numbering Peculiarities:
May 1918 published as: Mr. Verdenius' latest report on the Bunnell Colony
General Note:
"The truth about Florida"
General Note:
Editor: S. Howard
General Note:
Includes advertisements for homes, farms and land for sale in the Bunnell Colony, Florida in what is now Flagler County.
General Note:
No more published after May 1918?

Record Information

Source Institution:
Flagler County Historical Society
Holding Location:
Flagler County Historical Society
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
on10457 ( NOTIS )
1045798826 ( OCLC )
2018226775 ( LCCN )
on1045798826

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
The Truth About Florida
The Bunnell Home Builder
EDITED BY S. HOWARD
Vol. 1. December, 1912 No
Scene at Bunnell Barbecue, November 9th, Thos. A. Verdenius Addressing Colonists from Auto-See Page 3
The folks who are buying land in the We shall hope to have an occasional letTHE EDITO R'O Bunnell-Dupont colony are not speculators. ter from Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the
PERSONAL PAGE They are earnest men and women who are Bunnell Development Company. We will
seeking permanent homes for themselves ask Mr. Moody to tell us of developments
For some time there has been felt the and their children, and they are wise enough in the colony, of the new roads being built,
need of a regular monthly publication, to to see the future of our colony, and to public buildings being erected, etc. As Mr.
be sent to all Bunnell-Dupont Colony land appreciate the advantages to be found in Moody is a resident of Bunnell, and in owners, and others who are interested in our part of the State. close touch with every feature of its prosecuring homes in the Sunny Southland. gress, all of his information will be firstThe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER has been the To make the HOME BUILDER the success hand.
result, and it goes to you-in this it's first we wish it to be, we must ask the co- You will find a portion of the paper deissue-with a message of good cheer. It operation of each one of our land owners. voted to local happenings in and around goes with the hope and belief that it will Bear in mind that this is your paper, ind Blunnell and Dupont. You will learn of receive a welcome from you, and that you we shall count on you to write us occasional the new arrivals in the colony, of the crops will -find every word in its pages of vital letters, and to give us suggestions as to ,ei ised, and umny little things perinterest to you. what you think would be helpful to our taming to the social life of our people.
We expect to publish the HOME BUILDER people. The Editor will also endeavor to give
during the coming winter months, and There is going to be a QUESTION BOX you from month to month some general inshould it meet with the favor we predict in the HOME BUILDER, beginning with the formation of interest to all Florida land
for it, it will undoubtedly be enlarged and next issue. If you have any questions Von owners. He will write you of his own excontinued indefinitely. "THE TRUTH wish answered regarding the colony-its periences in the State, and give you the
ABOUT FLORIDA" is our motto. You are soil, climate, crops, etc., etc., send them to opinions of men of authority on various subseeking the truth about this much talked of the Editor of the HoMuE BUILDER at once, jects. state; you are anxious to hear what is go- and they will be answered to the best of In. this issue you will find a most intering on in the BUNNELL-DUPONT colony; his ability in the following issue. If he is testing letter from Mr. Thomas A. Verdwhat your future neighbors, who are al- unable to answer your questions, lie will cnius, General Manager of the Bunnell Deready located there, are doing; and what refer them to wiser heads. Make these velopment Company. which gives you the others think of Bunnell. It is just such questions as short and concise as possible, very latest and most up-to-date news of the information as this we propose to give you as we cannot give too much space to the ,colony. Mr. Verdenius has just returned from month to month in the columns of Question Box. froni an extended trip through Florida, and
the HOME BUILDER. a delightful visit to Bunnell. The pictures
And doesn't the name of our little paper Let us have a "heart to heart" corner found in this issue were taken by him
appeal to you? The "HoME BUILDER." The in this little magazine; and won't you land while there.
highest institution of our land is the home, owners and interested friends write us short The Editor hopes to have a number of be it a palace or the most humble cottage. letters for publication? If you have been letters before the next issue of the HoME The possession of a real home is the dream to the colony, tell us what you thought of BUILDER. Tell him what you think of the and aspiration of practically every man and it. Write us of your plans and aspirations paper, and ask any questions you wish to woman. We want to tell you how you may for the future. You can hell) each other lve answered.
obtain a home in Florida, or we want to in this way, and what, after all, is the .\ddress all communications to
help you plan for the most successful de- Bunnell-Dupont Colony, but one large S. HOWARD
velopment of the home you already have family, all working toward the same end, Editor Bunnell Home Builder
there. the making of homes? 1103 Womans Temple, Chicago, I11.




&he BUNNELL HOME~ BUILDER
- With one exception Florida has a greater
THE CALL OF THE SOUTH area than any other State east of the Ms______sissippi river. It measures in all 59,000 square miles, which is equivalent to thirty'SCongressman Champ Clark of Mis- five million acres.
souri, Speaker of the House of Repre- Th tt osse oeta wlehunsentatives, has amended the saying Of dred miles of sea coast, including many
Horace Greeley from "Go West, young land-locked harbors, and possibilities for inman, go West," to "Go South, my boy, land waterways that cannot be equalled in
go South." any part of the world. Arms of the sea
Supplementing this, Speaker Clark forming rivers and lagoons parallel to the said: coast lines, while inland there are many
"The South is the place, and my advice fresh water rivers and lakes that furnish is to go there. You won't eat as much ample water for all purposes.
- ~ -- -- there as you do here in the North. Your Florida's varied resources 'of forest and
Temporary Home of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, clothing must be lighter, and therefore farm, her magnificent fisheries, her great
Located Southeast of Gore Lake less expensive. You won't have to buy phosphate deposits, her fertile soil and
fuel to speak of, and you can allow your her marvelous climate have attracted the Read the Following Letter -horses and cattle to graze in the open attention of the world. In consequence
Written by Mrs. Gray the year round, capital and immigration are turning FlorSometimes it is well to look at a matter from the "Believe me, the South is the poor iaads ail htsaitcashv
. 'woman's" viewpoint. Hence Mrs. Gray's letterdifclynkepgrcodfthSae' will be of interest to others, wives, and mothers, man's land, and you will live to see the difficuly inckeping rorefshs Sat' who expect to make this colony th eir future home: day when it is going to be the richest cosatynreigpors.
DUPONT, FLA., Nov. 20, 19112. part of the United States." Florida's great diversity of products has
Bunnll DvelomentCompnymade her famous, and there is a reason. Chicago, Ill. The truth of the above words can best be The territory of the State extends through
Genteme: XhenMr.Gra deide to realized by the man who has lived in 473 miles of latitude, a narrow peninsula
Genteme: Wen r. raydecdedto loria. his ofcouseis ot he nly protected on the east, west and south by move to Florida, 1 must admit I had mis- sothdan sthis, oft couse is o the on lychi large bodies of salt water. Standard crops givings as to the wisdom of the removal, sotensae u ti h n hc s of all sorts of vegetables and fruits, includas in the past, Mr. Gray has shown a before the eyes of the American people to- ing many tropical and semi-tropical vamarked propensity for moving, and you (lay, and it is a state which has all the rieties, can be raised and shipped every
know about the proverbial "rolling stone." natural resources to make it truly great. month in the year. No other territory in
However, after we were settled on our It is a state which should attract the the Union can do so much.
farm, all my fears vanished. We moved Young' men-the men who have their future Not only is Florida the State for the
on our land the latter part of August, and still to carve out. There are so many young man to make his fortune in, but while the weather was warm, we did not openings to suit the various tastes, and it is the most delightful state in this
suffer with the heat as we did in the North.. always there is the soil to fall back on. whole country for the man and woman who as there is always a pleasant breeze. The man who cannot make a success in have passed the meridian of life and want
The first thing we did was to plant a Florida, properly started, need not look to live in a mild, healthful climate. It is garden and we had radishes three weeks for it elsewhere, the place for the man of ordinary means,
after planting, and string beans and turnips After the Civil War when the South was and I say without fear of successful consix weeks after planting, and we are now in the throes of the Reconstruction period, tradiction that ONE CAN LIVE BETTER eating Irish potatoes which were planted many Southern men took their families AND ON A LESS AMOUNT OF MONEY
the latter part of September. and migrated to the West, where their sons IN FLORIDA THAN ANY OTHER STATE
I think this country is undoubtedly the and daughters grew up as Western citizens, IN THE UNION.
best location to be found for the raising of and helped build up that part of our great Some here of course make a greater sucpoultry. My chickens are doing fine, they country. For such a long time the young cess than others, but what one can do anhave always been remarkably healthy, the man starting out to make his fortune never other may also. One must needs have only fault I have to find with them is, they considered the Southland as a desirable knowledge how to work, and a real willinglay all the time and show no disposition point, and thus it has been overlooked from ness to work. to set, which is a disappointment to me, year to year. Did you know, that
as I had planned to raise a lot of young AtlsthpepeothNotteEs SoeFriagwrsavraizd$40
chickens this Fall. But now I am going Ad a the este awake aNdorh the past aScrae Forid grnwes inv Feraryed$1.0
to get an incubator, so will no longer have adteWs r wkadfrteps rt o re esi eray
reason to find fault with them on that three or four years people have been pour- Others have receive d $8.00 a crate for
score.ing into the South at a tremendous rate. string beans in early winter.
We are planning to have our potatoes They are quick to see and grasp the oppor- NwIihptte nArlhv ruh
in the ground the early part of January, tutesmin aeNewy Sh.nadiside as high as $8.00 a barrel.
and have them ready for market about April bcmnaNeSot.Strawberries have sold for $1.00 a quart. 1st, when they will command the best What is true of the South as a whole Ansondwnteltofrusad
prices, is especially true of Florida, only that there veeads onse don theloist ofuritse land
This country is blessed with ideal climate has been even a, greater interest shown in vegtae raiedrl sing loriadngt tesat and soil conditions, and as Mr. Gray's this grand state than elsewhere. If one ~itraderysrn ots
health has improved wonderfully since corn- turn-, to the soil for a livelihood he may No wonder Florida is being settled so ing here. I feel satisfied that we have at raise such a variety of crops to great ad- rapidly by a very desirable class of thrifty last found a permanent home, vantage, not merely corn and oats, and homeseekers!
Yours truly, oats and corn, which are the staples in the Truly Florida is today, and
Mns. W. H. GRAY. -midldle West. ever the land of opportunity.




Uhe BUNNXLL HOME BUILDER
BUNNELL HAS BIG BARBECUE
Settlers Spend Delightful Day Together
Have a Fine Dinner and Listen toSpeeches
The folks at Bunnell and Dupont fully In Chicago a few weeks ago I had the The primary requisites to success are
realize that "all work and no play makes pleasure of listening to many political here-ideal location, splendid transportation
Jack a dull boy," consequently they have speeches, delivered by some of the most facilities, productive soil, and such men as
an occasional day of recreation and reunion, famous men of our country, and one by Messrs. Moody and Lambert back of the
and Saturday, November 9th, was one of our next President, Gov. Woodrow Wilson. proposition. It is up to us to bring results.
these days. Gathered around Gov. Wilson was a coterie I am reminded of what is needful in the
The weather was ideal. The sun shone of prominent men, justly proud to be there; erection of a home. Here is the brick, the
brightly, and it was such a November day but I say to you in all sincerity that I lime, the lumber and the tools. Just one
as one finds only in Florida. Nature indeed esteem it a greater privilege to be here in thing more is necessary-the mechanic who did her best toward making the barbecue at this capacity today than to have been can transform this raw material into a
Bunnell a grand success. among those men. beautiful structure, and WE ARE THE
Most of the colonists came into Bunnell It has not been my pleasure to have met MECHANICS HERE.
at an early hour and met Mr. Verdenius, all of you before, for many have made Bun- Yesterday at noon I arrived in Palatka,
who had come down from Chicago for the nell their home since I was here the last where I spent the night. In the evening
occasion. It was a general handshake, a time. However, I have corresponded with I was invited by some of the members of
"how do you do?" "glad to see you," "you the majority of you, and before I return the ialatka Board of Trade to accompany
are looking well," "when did you arrive to Chicago I hope to have the opportunity tm to Hastigs, our sister city, just 12
in the colony?" etc., etc. of becoming personally acquainted with each miles to the north of us, and far famed
About 3 P. M. Mr. I. I. Moody drove his one. for her Irish potatoes.
beautiful Cadillac car up in front of the Let me say to you that although I cannot
Bunnell State Bank, from which the speak- be here in person every day, in spirit and ou 50 ember o the Pl a to
ers addressed the people, who were gathered in thought I spend most of my hours right mobiles to assist in the organization of a in the shade of the covered walk. What a here among you. I am continually thinkcontrast the scene presented to those from ing and planning for the betterment of our Hastings Board of Trade. I wish you could the North, thinking of the folks there in colony, and quite often I am thinking aloud, have been t that meeting. The enthusitheir heavy overcoats and furs, while here for my good wife at home assures me that have in Hastings people, those whom we
summer dresses were in evidence, and many she listens to "BUNNELL" three times woul cl "live wes" in Cho, bu
men were in their shirt sleeves, and were a day, for seven days out of every week would call "live wires" in Chicago, but
' nevertheless they can't beat us here at
enjoying the day more than they could a (And she listens pretty patiently, too). Bunnell.
Fourth of July celebration in their former And, by the way, I haven't failed to write Northern homes, her since coming back to Florida that the A number of speeches were made, and I
State looks better to me this time than it had the pleasure of talking to these men There was just one disappointing feature
of the picnic, and that was that the Hon. has ever done before, and as I look around for a few minutes. A Board of Trade with Win. Jordan, Mayor of Jacksonville, who Bunnell and into your faces here today, I eighty-four members was organized in HastWm. Jnight, andoI hopecyesvmorethan
is one of the stockholders of the Bunnell say again that this is the best spot in the ings that night, and I hope, yes, more than i tate, that, I fully expect to see the same thing
Development Company, was unable to be htate.
present and address the people, owing to Were I actuated by no other motive than here in Bunnell before very long.
pressing duties in Jacksonville. However, selfishness (and I assure you that this is I want to tell you of just one speech I
we expect him to meet with the colonists at not my feeling), I could not be else than heard there, which was made by a Mr. some later date. interested in you and in this community, Brown, one of the old settlers of Hastings,
. Mr. George Mawman of Palatka, Florida, for my success is only obtained as success who came there about 12 years ago from
comes to you.Oho .Brw wa hfismnwo
and Dr. Wright of Jacksonville made splen- Ohio. Mr. Brown was tle first mai who
did addresses. We would like to give the This is not a "one man's" cause. It is tried to raise potatoes at Hastings for
readers of the HOME BULDER their speeches not just Mr. Moody's, yours, or mine-but commercial purposes. He brought to Florin full, but space will not permit. it is ours, and every good family we induce ida with him about three barrels of potatoes,
Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius of Chicago, to come here, every good word we speak and before planting time came had eaten at
General Manager of the Bunnell Develop- for the colony, every improvement we make least a third of them. Well, what was
ment Company, spoke as follows: here (be it large or small), every left lie planted, and shipped his first crop
fence that is built, every acre that is (16 barrels) to Philadelphia, receiving for
Dear Friends: Will you not permit me cleared, every furrow that is plowed adds same $9.00 per barrel. He could not, of
to address you thus? On such an occasion just so much more value to the property course, realize that this was the beginning
as this I dislike using the formal greeting of each individual, and makes the com- of so wonderful an industry, which was
of "Ladies and gentlemen!" In my heart I munity just that much better to live in. destined to make St. Johns County famous.
know you all; I feel that not one of you You are benefited; I am benefited; yes, and Mr. Brown's success led others to folare strangers to me, and I claim the right the state of Florida at large. low his example, and that spring one Florto call you MY FRIENDS. Therefore, my partners, for that is what idian meeting another said: "Do you know,
You have no idea how much pleasure it we are in the fullest sense of the word, let I am going to raise potatoes next year?
gives me to be here with you today. I us stand shoulder to shoulder, and make That d- d Yankee made more money from
have come all the way from Chicago for this this colony the greatest in the state. Let his one crop of potatoes than I have made occasion, and I feel it a privilege and an us aim for large things. Not only should all the year."
honor to stand here in this automobile and we hitch our wagon to a star, but let it be speak to you for a few minutes. the highest star in the zenith. Continued an Page 4




UBUNNELL HOME BUILDER
BUNNELL BARBECUE I never weary talking about the Bunnell- After Fulton had completed his first
Continued from page 3 Dupont Colony, but I must not detain you steamboat, he announced a day on which it
But I must make my story short. You long today. I only want to add that as I should make its maiden trip. It was a much
all know what Hastings has done and is have made this flying trip through Florida discussed time, and when the day arrived
doing. They had more than 9,000 acres in my heart has ached for the people in the crowds of people gathered on the banks of potatoes last spring, and next spring they North, and especially in Chicago. There the Hudson River. There were pessimists
hope to ship 300,000 barrels of Irish pota- you will find men and women spending their in that crowd, the same kind of pessimists toes out of Hastings, as new fields are weary days in shops and factories; untold who live today. One of the number was an
being cleared every day, and made ready numbers of little children with pinched, old lady who was certain that the experifor planting. white faces, struggling to live in the ment would prove a failure. "Oh," said
Now what reason in the world is there crowded tenement districts, contending with she, "he will never make that thing go.
for Bunnell colonists not doing as well as the foul air and insufficient food. While The idea of running a boat without sails. those of Hastings, or even better? We here there is room for so many folk, with Ie will never do it in the world." have their experience to profit by, and we pure air and sunny skies free to all, and today know better how to do things. You I am determined more than ever before to The all important moment arrived,
all know that one commission man from spread the gospel of Florida, and especially engine began to puff, the wheel to turn,
New York, who last spring bought a 20- of its greatest colony-Bunnell-Dupont. and the first steamboat was under way.
acre field of potatoes about one mile from Within a few years we shall not be re- Then the old lady changed her mind. She the place where we now stand, pronounced ferred to as a "second Hastings," but we became excited, and jumping up and down that field of potatoes the best he had seen will have outdistanced that prosperous com- exclaimed, "He can never stop it, he can in Florida, no other place excepted. munity. Florida, and this colony in par- never stop it."
Our soil is equally as good, if not bet- ticular, has only started to grow. Bunnell
ter, than that of Hastings; our transporta- is but a baby just beginning to creep. So it has been in regard to Florida.
tion the same, and we are but 12 miles When a baby tries to walk it is sure to People have been critically looking on and
further south, which is to our advantage get a few hard knocks and to fall on its saying, "You never can make a success of rather than otherwise. nose more than once, but it never lets these it. It can't be done." But now they are
Gentlemen, I say to you we have a great knocks interfere with its progress. Every beginning to open their eyes, and many are proposition here. I sometimes think greater colony has to go through its infant stages, saying today, "Why you can never keep than any of us realize. When Hastings but our "baby" is a boy, a whopping big it from being a success."
was as young as Bunnell she did not begin boy, and just give him a chance. He will to have such advantages as do we. Here soon be a man. After the speeches came the dinner, and
is a town with modern improvements, sur- Yesterday morning I met in Jackson- such a dinner as it was too. It was a
passing Hastings. We have had our elec- ville one of those fellows known as a regular big family party, and every one
tric light plant for many months, while Pessimist, the sort of a person I haven't seemed to be having a good time.
Hastings was lighted by electricity last a bit of use for. He couldn't say anything The barbecue-picnic was indeed a big
night for the first time. Here we have an good for Florida, nor see any of her pos- success, and the people returned to their excellent school, which is growing and being sibilities; in fact, I doubt if lie could see homes determined to work harder for the enlarged to meet the needs of new pupils. much of good in the whole world. I told advancement of the Bunnell-Dupont Colony,
Here is a good church, a state bank, and him a story before I left, and now I am realizing that it is going to be just what
many beautiful homes. going to tell it to you. we make it.
The electric car line to the coast is not
a thing of the past by any means, and we
AND AROUND BUNNELL hope to have it in the very near future.
Mr. L. N. Hall, formerly of Jackson- Another general merchandise store has
been added to Bunnell's business houses.
ville, Ill., but now stationed at St. Augus- Mr. Stone has opened a nicely stocked store
tine, paid Bunnell a recent visit to inspect
his 20-acre farm here, He was so well in the concrete block, and is doing a good
his 0-are armhere Hewasso ellbusiness. pleased that he let a contract to have 20
acres cleared immediately. Mr. G. W. Kinney, with wife and son,
Mr. J. A. Button and wife of Rochester. have arrived in Bunnell from Utah, and
N. Y., are pleasantly located in the Hotel will make this their permanent home. Mr.
Bunnell for the winter. Mr. Button is Kinney has placed a house order for luminspecting the Bunnell tract with the view ber and will build on his farm.
of buying a farm and developing it at Frank Vincent is supplying the local
once. He expects to build a nice home here. F. E. C. Ry. Depot at Bunnell market with fine string beans from his
Mr. G. R. Tolman of Washington, D. C., farm near Bunnell.
who has purchased a partly improved farm At last the painter's brush has put the Mrs. Chas. Vogel and son of Blue Island
near the town limits of Bunnell, is making finishing touches on the Florida East Coast are recent arrivals and are occupying Judge plans to erect a handsome bungalow Termninal Station at Bunnell, and it is a Heath's home in Silver Valley, until they thereon, beauty. The colors are appropriate, white can build on their farm. They expect Mr.
Mr. I. I. Moody, accompanied by Mr. representing the "blossom," green repre- Vogel down very soon.
W. W. Snow of St. Augustine, left Friday senting the "leaf," and the yellow repre- C. C. McEacheron and wife of Palatka
night for Baxley, Georgia, and returned senting the "fruit." Capt. Bell, the agent arrived last week and will make Bunnell
Monday night. They drove Mr. Moody's at this place, says lie is suffering from a their future home. Mr. McEachern will
car back and had a quick and enjoyable swelling of his feet, and his feet and sup- hold a position with the firm of Lambert
trip. posed to be in sympathy with his head. & Moody.




Ehe BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Long-haired Riflemen of Jacksonville and Miss Ann Bardin spent the week-end St. Augustine have been in camp a few with MAr. and Mrs. Doe l)ean at Dinner Is
miles east of Bunnell. They succeeded in land, returning Sunday evening. killing a few bears, squirrels, turkeys and
.7ern part of the colony, was in town one Everybody is biusy clearing land. Keeps day this week, and was loud in his praises a fellow dodging stumps that are being of that section.
blown out with ldynamiite. When you hear _the report. look out for the flying debris. Mr. (L V. ) Durrance, located in the north- east part of the colomy, brought us in a
Hotel 13unnell has become inadequate to mighty fine specimen of ribbon cane and acconiimmod(ate its patronage. It will be sweet potatoes. We hope you will come
- enlarged and impl)roved at once. again, Mr. Durranee.
Mr. Hubbard Moving Household Goods to His Mr. G. C. Coleman, who has recently pur- Messrs. ('heney & Gibson of C(harlotte.
Farm Near Dupont chased valuable property here in the way N. C., have rented the lergsion plice, two
of mill equipments, seems to understand miles northwest of town. They stopped offl
Bunnell is to have a barrel factory, his business. We predict for himni success. here through curiosity, and found it too
and in time to supply the farmers for their good a place to leave.
next crop of Irish potatoes. Ma j. J. Frank Lambert made a trip to
Jacksonville on important business. Concrete sidewalks are being laid on SecR. P. Kelly of Canada arrived last week ond street. Residences are proposed in the
and inspected his farm in the Bunnell .same section.
tract. Mr. Kelly was delighted with conditions as he found them here, and will There is preaching at the Firs.t Alethobegin to improve his farm as soon as pos- (l dist church each Sunday morning and evensible. ing. Sunday school every Sunday afternoon
at 3 o'clock.
Some fine hunting is being had near
Bunnell on the canal, and yesterday two Mr. L. B. Knox of the Knox Orange
bears were brought in and shipped to Grove, was a visitor here one d ay this week.
Jacksonville. Always glad to see him. Mr. Knox enjoys the confidence of his fellowmien and
Mr. G. C. Taylor of Colorado arrived a has the gooil of the country at heart.
few days ago for the purpose of inspecting
his farm near Bunnell, and hlie expects to Twenty-eighlit workmien are in camp about
begin improving it soon. four miles east of town. and are bu-y build
ing good public roads through this section.
The Bunnell public school opened Novem- Let the good work go on.
her 4th with Mr. J. H. Barnes as principal.
Miss Irene Bettes is the assistant, and the
school has an enrollment of about 50 pupils losilph (onxay and family of Eldn, Mo..
at the present time. ha'v moved on their farmi in the southern
Potato Field of Mr. W. A. Mack. Almost part of the colony. Mr. Conway brought Ready for Harvesting. Mr. 'Mack's
Sweet potatoes are being hauled to Bun- Second Potato Crop in Nine Months his horses, cows and log with hiim, and is
nell every day by the wagon load and ready to go to work.
shipped to the northern markets. Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Hubbard, formerly r. C. F. Turner ha ass e his duti,
of Chicago, have moved out on their farm F T er it iiel e
Thanks for Thanksgiving. Do your duty four miles south of town, and seem to be a Field Manager for the unel evelopand make somebody feel good. very much at home in their new quarters. ment Conipa.y an1 will move his family
here at once.
Hon. I. I. Moody is spending this week W. A. Cockran of Ocean City was in
in south Florida, combining pleasure with town a few days ago. He was jolly and MIrs. J. B. Boaz and soni Gerheardt, arbusiness, happy. rived Saturday from Tanpa, and are stopMr. Robert White and wife of Lucas, ping for the present with AIr. R. L. Byrd.
Kansas, are here. Mr. White has pur- Mr. J. B. Boaz seems to be the busiest Mr. and Mrs. Boaz expect to make Bunnell
chased the Howe property on Church street, man in Bunnell these days. He may well their future home, and will go to housewhere they will make their future home. be, as he is the Manager of the Bunnell keeping as soon as the carlpeniters can erect
Potato and Supply Company. their house.
One trip to "Mack's Place" will con- -- --__-vince you. There you will find beans, cab- Mr. A. Lambert, located two miles south. The Bunnell Potato and Supply Company bage, radishes, tomatoes, lettuce, Irish po- has the finest cabbage and onions we have has opened upl) offices in the Bank Building. tatoes, sweet potatoes, pineapples, straw- seen this season. Mr. Lambert is a "Shore- with .J. B. Boaz as General Manager. Tihe berries and frying-size chickens growing to nuff" farmer. firm is composed of some of the best and
perfection. C. D. Hagadorn has purchased a reg- most successful business men in Florida
This part of the country is being filled istered Poland-China sow, which is a beauty. and New York. They themselves will plant up with slick, high-headed mules and red The days of the razorback are numbered in about 40 acres to "spuds," thus showing wagons. What meaneth this? this locality. their faith by their works.




6'he BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
Mr. Verdenius Writes of His Recent Trip to Florida
Tells of Many New Improvements in the Bunnell-DuPoint Colony 4
CHICAGO, ILL., Nov. 22, 1912. the stumps and fallen timber are being one house right after another. There was
To the Readers of the BUNNELL HOME destroyed. nothing like that six months ago.
BUILDER: New families are moving to Bunnell and One day before I left Florida, our Field
I am more than pleased to have the op- Dupont each week, coming from all over Manager took me out in the car in the
portunity, in this, the first issue of the the United States; at least two or three neighborhood of Gore Lake, and I was deIIOME BUILDER, Of telling you of my recent families come in every week. Most of these lighted with the improvements being made trip to Florida and of the many changes folks have been to Bunnell before and know in that part of the colony. I visited Mr.
since I was there, about six months ago. just what the place is like, and now they G., who has lately located here, coming
But just a word first about the HOME are bringing their families, their household from Spokane, Washington, and he showed
BUILDER. We have needed such a paper as goods and their livestock and are getting me what he had done in the few brief
this for a long time, and I know that you established as fast as possible. The first weeks since his arrival. He has a cornall are going to be much pleased with it. two days I was in Bunnell there arrived fortable temporary home, and a. fine garden
To the readers who already own farms at one family from Indiana, one from Mon- with all kinds of growing vegetables. There
Bunnell and Dupont, it will be like a letter tana, and later two families from Wisconsin was an air of prosperity about the place from "home" each month, and you can came to locate. which I liked mighty well.
know all about what is going on in the You have read that "out of the abund- AnothrdyIbdtepaseofvicolony. I believe this little magazine will ance of the heart, the mouth speaketh." he day Ioad thoe pleasrte ouisthbe the medium whereby we shall all get Well, when you are in the Bunnell-Dupont ingas arge porng gforcooenear thoe souhin closer touch with each other, and thus Colony you can know just what the people describe the magnificent scene this grove
Will the paper be a real success, are thinking, about, for everywhere you
Ony etedy onigI eure fo ha cneraiosonte ujet o ler presented. The roses were in full bloom,
Onlyyeserdy mrnig I etunedfro her coveratins n te sujecs o clar- while the various trees were hanging heavy a two weeks' visit to Florida, and it is ing, the next potato crop (which will be with their offerings of Japanese. persimreally too soon for ine to get away from planted some time in January), the best Mons, rare grape-fruit, kumquats, oranges
the delights of the trip and settle down way to do this, and the best way to do and tangerines. Mr. Knox, one of the
to details. Florida is so beautiful now. that. owners of this grove, told me that last year
I traveled from the east of it to the west, ________________ he shipped 10,000 boxes of oranges alone
and far down the coast, but I came backfrmhsgoean hexpcstdos
again to Bunnell and it looked the best well this season. Judging from the abundof al tome. -ance of fruit I saw, I am led to believe
I will not attempt to go into the fullest h ilhv otobei on hs
details about the colony, for elsewhere inliwllhvnotubendigtis thispapr yo wil larn f te loal ap-Just north of this grove is to be found this papere you s wil ern ofmsn the clhp the beautiful winter home of George W.
p~ictuires found in this issue of the HOME Pris
BUILDER Will Convince you more thann any- New roads are being built here now; new
thing else of the life and development in bridges also, and the county has almost
the colony. ___________________ 30 men busy on road building. This work
Our people at Bunnell are beginning to A Newly Cleared Field Near Dupont is under the supervision of Mr. 1. I. Moody,
get settled and to plan for their corning Note New Homes in the Distance President of the Bunnell Development Comyear's crop. There is a feeling of confidence pany, and one of the Road Commissioners
there, a stability about the place and about I took a trip south of Bunnell, down of St. Johns County. A fine highway has
the people which was real joy to observe, the Moody Road, then over to Dupont, an- been completed from the Knox Orange
The day I arrived at Bunnell they had a other one out in the direction of Gore Lake, Grove connecting with the Kings Road and fine picnic-a barbecue, and I certainly and south of that, and they are the busiest Moody Road, leading into Bunnell. Anappreciated the hearty reception given me lot of people in that community you ever other road has been completed from Bunby our colonists there. We had so much saw. One man was building his fence; an- nell to Espanola to the north of us, and
to talk over with each other, that the day other was plowing, while two new arrivals this road will later be extended into Hastwas all too short. The following days 1 (one from Chicago, and the other from ings. Mr. Moody is going to open up sevspent visiting our colonists in all parts of Salt Lake City, Utah), were hard at work eral miles of roads through our colony durthe tract. getting their new homes completed. And ing the coming winter.
You begin to understand and appreciate they may well be busy, for both of these One of our settlers, who has recently
what is happening when you go to a certain men expect to have from 10 to 20 acres in located in our colony, having formerly lived section of the colony, where a few months potatoes by January 15th. at Blue Island, Ill., has invented a very
ago was to be found nothing but the virgini Another one of the colonists informed me fine stump puller. This man has been in soil and scattered trees, and now find little that he expected to receive at least $2,000.00 the colony only a few weeks, and has about homes here and there in all directions, for his crop of Irish potatoes next season, ten acres of his land already cleared. He
cleared land, fences, barns and growing He is planning and working for that has applied for a patent for this stump
gardens. amount, and I for one, believe he will get puller and assured me that he would be
One especially observes the activities it. fully equipped and able next spring to
throughout the colony when night falls, and There are a number of new homes now -clear at least from three to five acres a
then is to be seen in all directions as far west of Dupont, between Dupont and the day. This will certainly be a great asset
as thme eye can look, great bonfires where Moody Road. You can stand and count: to the colony.




Mhe BUNNELL HOMEC BUILDER
While at Bunnell I had the pleasure of as much interested in its success as I Buy ten acres of land in Florida, from
meeting Mr. J. B. Boaz, General Manager could possibly be myself. Therefore I feel
of the Bunnell Potato and Supply Company, I. have the right to lay before you at all The Bunnell Development Co.
with offices in the Bunnell Bank Building. times plans for the colony's future. at $5 per month. Then with a few hundred
This Company deals in Irish potatoes, sweet A few weeks ago I mailed to each land dollars get busy on your land. You'll soon
atoes, fertilizer and barrels. Mr. Boaz owner of this company one of our new be independent.
0 explained the purpose of the organization booklets, entitled "A LITTLE FARM, A
to me, which is as follows: When the corn- BIG LIVING," and asked if you would not WHY THE SMALL FARM?
pany finds a farmer who is willing to work, give me the names of some friends who Some people who have been accustomed
but who does not have the ready capital would be interested in securing homes at to farming on a large scale do not appear
with which to work properly, they enter Bunnell. Some responded at once; others to comprehend that as much can be made
into a contract with him to furnish him have not done so as yet. If you are one off of one acre of Florida land as off of
with seed potatoes, fertilizer and barrels. who has not, won't you do this now. Con- four acres of land in many other sections When the crop is ready for market the sider it as a duty, and send me the names of the country, but if these will stop to
company is willing to handle these potatoes and addresses of those who are interested consider the facts in the case they will
for the farmer, or buy them outright at and who would like to be near you in your see that this is so.
the highest market price, charging a fair Florida home. With very little labor Bunnell-Dupont
commission for so doing. What is good enough for you, is good Qolony land can be made to yield three
I believe this company is destined to be enough for your friends, -so tell them about crp aye.Whnteerosanb
a great factor in the building up of the Bunnell. We want to sell every remaining grown on one acre, that acre becomes as
Bunnell-Dupont Colony, and we welcome farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony this valuable as four acres would be in the
them to our community. winter, and we can do it before the year North and the ratio is considerably more
Another new improvement I noted in is out if you will every day talk to some prco hnteNrbr adi aal
Bunnell was the new Florida East Coast one in your shop, your store, your office of producing.
Railroad depot. It is three or four times 'or wherever you may spend your time, about Here 'there need be no six months of
larger than the former one, and mighty nice the greatest colony in Florida, BUNNELL- enocdilesbtvry ayi te
looking in every way. DUPONT. ya a eue rftby famnwl
An extension has been added to the Bun- Again I say that I believe in the Bunnell- yecae uthse rofyita itl abmansil
nell Public School building, and they ex- Dupont colony and its future as I havc moeaneerylewlbebeto ak
pect at least 901 children to be enrolled in never done before. You who have bought twice as much as he would in the North
the school during the term. There will, of homes here have chosen wisely, and you and West with the same labor.
course, have to be more additions as our wvho have not, should act promptly. The cost of building is reasonable and
land owners locate on their farms, but all Yours very truly, taxes are very low. The school facilities
these needs will be taken care of when the are excellent.
time arrives. One point of exceptional interest that
every person interested in this colony sol
remember, is that three crops per annuim
COME TO FLORIDA can be grown, and the farmer will have
money coming in regularly after the first
-When a man goes to start a farm in one crop, or at the end of a few months. In
of the prairie States of the West he must the North the farmer usually gets pay for be well supplied with money. The money his products only in the fall.
returns per acre there are so small that VWorking men who are housed up in mills
only by cultivating a large acreage by and shops and factories the year through means of machine tools can farming be and barely eke out an existence would do
made to pay; consequently, 160 acres, at well to investigate the possibilities of farmleast, of high-priced land must be bought, ing in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony. together with costly implements and strong _____________teams to pull them. The severe winters
make good dwellings and outbuildings necesPartly Finished Home of Mr. Hubbard, sary, and where lumber must be freighted
Formerly of Chicago
several hundred miles this is a costly item.
A number of families are already located As no fence posts can be had for less than 'o
in the vicinity of Dupont, and they are 50 cents each, it takes a small fortune to
endleavoring to get the required number of fence in the land. A deep well is another children of a school age in that locality, item of expense, and if the settler has a so that a school may be established at Du- few cattle he must have a wind mill or pont. some other engine to pump the water with.
As I said before, there is really more Anywhere east of the Missouri River a c tivity in the colony than I have ever capacious ditch or two, often a couple of
seen before. Just one thing more is needed miles long, must be dug in order to make
-and that is MORE PEOPLE, to come and parts of the farm productive. Then the
settle on their farms and help push the fuel question. If the settler lives far from
work along. a railroad he must spend several days of
I have always considered those who each cold season hauling high-priced stove
bought land from me, as partners with me coal, and he is often lucky if he can get in the upbuilding of this colony. By this' any at all. Every particle of wood used I mean that every man and woman who has in repair of buildings, fences or tools, must
bought land in this colony should be just be bought. Banana Tree in Yard of Dr. St. Peter, at Bunnell




Ube BUNNELL HOME BUILDER
GREAT:VALUE OF FLORIDA We are always worrying about something "And I have said, and I say it over,
in Florida. Many thought when the orange As the years go on and the world goes over, trees were killed the State was ruined.' 'Twere better to be content and clever And Products of Florida Soil as Explained They now know that the freeze was the In tending of Live Stock and tossing of
by Times Union foundation of a greater prosperity than Clover,
The man who has a habit of hunting the State had ever known before. There In the grazing of Live Stock and growinAla ,
trouble has already begun worrying over was uneasiness as to the future when the of grain,
what will happen to Florida when her phosphate boom collapsed from the rich- Than a strong man striving for fame and
population engaged in horticulture becomes ness of the State in phosphate deposits. gain."
large enough to glut the markets for early They now see that an ephemeral specula- --Joaqwin Miller.
vegetables with Florida products! If any tion has given place to an industry that worrying is to be done over this, why not will remain profiable for centuries. Unlet California do it? easiness is felt as to the time when the When 6,000 acres of celery land near
The growing of early vegetables is highly turpentine industry will move away from Sanford sell for a quarter-million dollars
profitable to Florida, but with the most lack of material. It has been the experi- we are forced to observe that other celery successful farmers this early crop is only ence of the past that when we have lost centers might be easily found. Hastings
one of several. While it is the most profit- one thing we have found a better, and as was advertised by an experimental farm able one, the farmers of Florida could leave a matter of fact we have not yet lost any- until it became a farm indeed-the celery it out and still make more money than thing-the loss was only seeming-merely lands about Sanford were considered valuefarmers in other States generally make. a postponement of growth. less during the orange boom. Buy your
At Hastings experiment is being made land -and start an experimental fam to
with the cultivation of rice after the pota- It is claimed that an Orlando boy raised demonstrate its possibilities. Florida toes have been gathered. One grower there $19.25 worth of radishes on a rod square Times-Union.
sold the product of one acre in rice for $25 of ground. This is equal to a return of as it stood in the field. The production more than $3,000 to the acre. Celery,
of it had cost him only $3.50. It is quite strawberries nor oranges are "in it" with probable that rice will be grown at Hast- this. DO YOU KNOW THAT
ings to a considerable extent as a second
crop and no farmer need consider himself
in hard luck if he can clear over $20 per The average workers earn less than
acre on a by-product. WHY IT IS SAFE TO BUY Twelve Hundred Dollars ($1200) a year?
Florida is nearer than California to the LAND NOW They work a lifetime for others.
great markets and when production of any Statistics assert that forty (40) per cent
commodity becomes so heavy in this State of the wage earners would fill the potters
as to depreciate its price California will There was a time when some land com- field were it not for their friends. Fifty
feel the loss much more than Florida will. panics and real estate concerns thought it (50) per cent are compelled after the age It takes much more time and costs much necessary, in order to sell Florida land, to! of sixty (60) to subsist on charity, or are
more money to transport products 3,000 draw largely on their imaginations. Per- creatures of pity.
miles than 1,000 miles. If there is ever
a reduction of acreage on account of falling haps they hardly believed in the country We are a Nation of Tenants. Only ten
themselves; at least they seemed to fear (10) per cent of our entire population are
prices the reduction will take place in that their prospective customers would not property owners.
California and will tend to relieve the be satisfied with plain facts, and therefore, Do you desire that your children and
pressure in Florida. not all of them, we are sorry to say, ad- your children's children will be homelessBut this State can produce nearly every hered strictly to the truth, dependents? Or do you choose to be absoproduct of the temperate zone and produce itoat a profit. The heavy crops that the That day has passed, to return no more. lutely FREE, and leave your kindred a
Wesatdepends on can be grown profitably Men and women are buying farm homes, and heritage of independence, and own a home
in this State. Sugar cane flourishes as well they are doing it with their eyes open. They for yourself and family?
here as in Louisiana, leaf tobacco as well as e going to see and understand what they These are facts that men and women
in Connecticut, rice as well as in South are buying, and they have a right to do so. have to face. How much easier it will be Carolina, Georgia or Louisiana. All these What people want is the Plain, Unvar- to meet old age if you have a comfortable
things are additional to our tropical or nished Truth, and the plain, unvarnished home of your own, and do not have to
semi-tropical products. It is evident that truth is good enough to sell good land. look to the charity of others. It requires
if the agricultural contest ever progresses to The land in the Bunnell-Dupont tract is such a small amount of money to secure the survival of the fittest, Florida will be so good, and the proposition so attractive a choice farm in the Bunnell-Dupont Colfound to be the fittest. from every standpoint, that it is sometimes ony, and I know of no investment which
Over in Europe, Italy comes nearer than feared that the public may doubt some of equals it.
any other country to having a climate .ike the statements made regarding it. If you are so fortunate as to already
that of Florida, but it has not as wide a This paper is published for the purpose own one of these farms, do you not want
range of products. Italy has an area of of telling the TRUTH about Florida in to add to your holdings, or purchase, ad
110,550 square miles and a population of general; St. Johns County and the East ditional land for your children? If yo w
32,475,253. Florida's area is 58,680- Coast more especially, and the Bunnell- want to do your friends a kindness, tell
slightly more than one-half that of Italy- Dupont tract in particular. them of Bunnell and how they too may
and her population is 751,139, only one-for- We want to keep in touch with every man secure homes for themselves in this land tieth that of Italy. Our State will not be and woman who is interested in securing a of flowers. There are a few farms left for as crowded as Italy is until it has twenty Florida home, and we shall make only such sale in this colony, and your order accomtimes as many people as now live here. statements as we can substantiate, so that panied by first monthly payment will secure
Florida can easily support 15,000,000 peo- when people go to look over the colony one of these for you.
pie. they will not be disappointed. DO NOT PROCRASTINATE.




Full Text

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plllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH 1 The Truth About Florida | | The Bunnell Home Builder | | EDITED BY S. HOWARD | IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW Vo/. /. "December, 1912 jVo. 1 Scene at Bunnell Barbecue p November 9th Thos. A. Verdenius Addressing Colonists from Auto — See Page 3 TKISD EDUTOR 9 ^ PERSONAL PAGE For some time tliere has been felt the need of a regular monthly publication, to be sent to all Bunnell-Dupont Colony land owners, and others who are interested in securing homes in the Sunny Southland. The Bunnell Home Builder has been the result, and it goes to you — in this it’s first issue—with a message of good cheer. It goes with the hope and belief that it will receive a welcome from you, and that you will 'find every word in its pages of vital interest to you. We expect to publish the Home Builder during the coming winter months, and should it meet with the favor we predict for it, it will undoubtedly be enlarged and continued indefinitely. “THE TRUTH ABOUT FLORIDA” is our motto. You are seeking the truth about this much talked of state; you are anxious to hear what is go ing on in the BUNNELL-DUPONT colony; what your future neighbors, who are al ready located there, are doing; and what others think of Bunnell. It is just such information as this we propose to give you from month to month in the columns of the Home Builder. And doesn’t the name of our little paper appeal to you? The “Home Builder.” The highest institution of our land is the home, be it a palace or the most humble cottage. The possession of a real home is the dream and aspiration of practically every man and woman. We want to tell you how you may obtain a home in Florida, or we want to help you plan for the most successful de velopment of the home you already have there. The folks who are buying land in the Bunnell-Dupont colony are not speculators. They are earnest men and women who are seeking permanent homes for themselves and their children, and they are wise enough to see the future of our colony, and to appreciate the advantages to be found in our part of the State. To make the Home Builder the success we wish it to be, we must ask the co operation of each one of our land owners. Bear in mind that this is your paper, and we shall count on you to write us occasional letters, and to give us suggestions as to what you think would be helpful to our people. There is going to be a QUESTION BOX in the Home Builder, beginning with the next issue. If you have any questions you wish answered regarding the colony — its soil, climate, crops, etc., etc., send them to the Editor of the Home Bluloer at once, and they will be answered to the best of his ability in the following issue. If he is unable to answer your questions, he will refer them to wiser heads. Make these questions as short and concise as possible, as we cannot give too much space to the Question Box. Let us have a “heart to heart” corner in this little magazine; and won’t you land owners and interested friends write us short letters for publication? If you have been to the colony, tell us what you thought of it. Write us of your plans and aspirations for the future. You can help each other in this way, and what, after all, is the Bunnell-Dupont Colony, but one large family, all working toward the same end, the making of homes? We shall hope to have an occasional let ter from Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development Company. We Mill ask Mr. Moody to tell us of developments in the colony, of the new roads being built, public buildings being erected, etc. As Mr. Moody is a resident of Bunnell, and in close touch with every feature of its pro gress, all of his information will be first hand. You will find a portion of the paper de voted to local happenings in and around Bunnell and Dupont. You will learn of the new arrivals in the colony, of the crops being raised, and many little things per taining to the social life of our people. The Editor Mill also endeavor to give you from month to month some general in formation of interest to all Florida land owners. He will write you of his own ex periences in the State, and give you the opinions of men of authority on various sub jects. In, this issue you will find a most inter esting letter from Mr. Thomas A. Verd enius, General Manager of the Bunnell De velopment Company, which gives you the very latest and most up-to-date news of the colony. Mr. Verdenius has just returned from an extended trip through Florida, and a delightful visit to Bunnell. The pictures found in this issue were taken by him while there. The Editor hopes to have a number of letters before the next issue of the Home Builder. Tell him u'hat you think of the paper, and ask any questions you nisli to have answered. Address all communications to S HOWARD Editor Bunnell Home Builder 1103 Womans Temple Chicago HI.

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me BUMMELIL HOME BUILDER Temporary Home of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, Located Southeast of Gore Lake Read the Following Letter Written by Mrs. Gray Sometimes it is well to look at a matter from the “woman's” viewpoint. Hence Mrs. Gray's letter will be of interest to others, wives, and mothers, who expect to make this colony their future home: Dupont, Fla., Nov. 20, 1912. Bunnell Development Company, Chicago, Ill. Gentlemen: When Mr. Gray decided to move to Florida, I must admit 1 had mis givings as to the wisdom of the removal, as in the past, Mr. Gray has shown a marked propensity for moving, and you know about the proverbial “rolling stone.” However, after we were settled on our farm, all my fears vanished. We moved on our land the latter part of August, and while the weather was warm, we did not suffer with the heat as we did in the North, as there is always a pleasant breeze. The first thing we did was to plant a garden and we had radishes three weeks after planting, and string beans and turnips six weeks after planting, and we are now eating Irish potatoes which were planted the latter part of September. I think this country is undoubtedly the best location to be found for the raising of poultry. M'y chickens are doing fine, they have always been remarkably healthy, the only fault I have to find with them is, they lay all the time and show no disposition to set, which is a disappointment to me, as I had planned to raise a lot of young chickens this Fall. But now I am going to get an incubator, so will no longer have reason to find fault with them on that score. We are planning to have our potatoes in the ground the early part of January, and have them ready for market about April 1st, when they will command the best prices. This country is blessed with ideal climate and soil conditions, and as Mr. Gray’s health has improved wonderfully since com ing here. I feel satisfied that we have at last found a permanent home. Yours truly, Mbs. W. H. Gray. THE CALL OF THE SOUTH Congressman Champ Clark of Mis souri, Speaker of the House of Repre sentatives, has amended the saying of Horace Greeley from “Go West, young man, go West,” to “Go South, my boy, go South.” Supplementing this, Speaker Clark said: “The South is the place, and my advice is to go there. You won’t eat as much there as you do here in the North. Your clothing must be lighter, and therefore less expensive. You won’t have to buy fuel to speak of, and you can allow your horses and cattle to graze in the open the year round. “Believe me, the South is the poor man’s land, and you will live to see the day when it is going to be the richest part of the United States.” The truth of the above words can best be realized by the man who has lived in Florida. This, of course, is not the only southern state, but it is the one which is before the eyes of the American people to day, and it is a state which has all the natural resources to make it truly great. It is a state which should attract the young men—the men who have their future still to carve out. There are so many openings to suit the various tastes, and always there is the soil to fall back on. The man who cannot make a success in Florida, properly started, need not look for it elsewhere. After the Civil War when the South was in the throes of the Reconstruction period, many Southern men took their families and migrated to the West, where their sons and daughters grew up as Western citizens, and helped build up that part of our great country. For such a long time the youngman starting out to make his fortune never considered the Southland as a desirable point, and thus it has been overlooked from year to year. At last the people of the North, the East and the West are awake, and for the past three or four years people have been pour ing into the South at a tremendous rate. They are quick to see and grasp the oppor tunities on every hand, and it is indeed becoming a New South. What is true of the South as a whole is especially true of Florida, only that there has been even a greater interest shown in this grand state than elsewhere. If one turns to the soil for a livelihood he may raise such a variety of crops to great ad vantage, not merely corn and oats, and oats and corn, which are the staples in the middle West. With one exception Florida has a greater area than any other State east of the Mis sissippi river. It measures in all 59,000 square miles, which is equivalent to thirtyfive million acres. The State possesses more than twelve hun dred miles of sea coast, including many land-locked harbors, and possibilities for in land waterways that cannot be equalled in any part of the world. Arms of the sea forming rivers and lagoons parallel to the coast lines, while inland there are many fresh water rivers and lakes that furnish ample water for all purposes. Florida’s varied resources of forest and farm, her magnificent fisheries, her great phosphate deposits, her fertile soil and her marvelous climate have attracted the attention of the world. In consequence capital and immigration are turning Floridaward so rapidly that statisticians have difficulty in keeping record of the State’s constantly increasing progress. Florida’s great diversity of products has made her famous, and there is a reason. The territory of the State extends through 473 miles of latitude, a narrow peninsula protected on the east, west and south by large bodies of salt water. Standard crops of all sorts of vegetables and fruits, includ ing many tropical and semi-tropical va rieties, can be raised and shipped every month in the year. No other territory in the Union can do so much. Not only is Florida the State for the young man to make his fortune in, but it is the most delightful state in this whole country for the man and woman who have passed the meridian of life and want to live in a mild, healthful climate. It is the place for the man of ordinary means, and I say without fear of successful con tradiction that ONE CAN LIVE BETTER AND ON A LESS AMOUNT OF MONEY IN FLORIDA THAN ANY OTHER STATE IN THE UNION. Some here of course make a greater suc cess than others, but what one can do an other may also. One must needs have knowledge how to work, and a real willing ness to work. Did you know, that Some Florida growers have realized $14.00 a crate for green peas in February ? Others have received $8.00 a crate for string beans in early winter. New Irish potatoes in April have brought as high as $8.00 a barrel. Strawberries have sold for $1.00 a quart. And so on down the list of fruits and vegetables raised in Florida during the late winter and early spring months. No wonder Florida is being settled so rapidly by a very desirable class of thrifty homeseekers! Truly Florida is today, and ever the land of opportunity.

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BUJNME.LL HOME BUILDER BUNNELL HAS BIG BARBECUE Settlers Spend Delightful Day Together Have a Fine Dinner and Listen to -Speeches The folks at Bunnell and Dupont fully realize that “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” consequently they have an occasional day of recreation and reunion, and Saturday, November 9th, was one of these days. The weather was ideal. The sun shone brightly, and it was such a November day as one finds only in Florida. Nature indeed did her best toward making the barbecue at Bunnell a grand success. Most of the colonists came into Bunnell at an early hour and met Mr. Verdenius, who had come down from Chicago for the occasion. It was a general handshake, a “how do you do?” “glad to see you,” “you are looking well,” “when did you arrive in the colony ?” etc., etc. About 3 P. M. Mr. I. I. Moody drove his beautiful Cadillac car up in front of the Bunnell State Bank, from which the speak ers addressed the people, who were gathered in the shade of the covered walk. What a contrast the scene presented to those from the North, thinking of the folks there in their heavy overcoats and furs, while here summer dresses were in evidence, and many men were in their shirt sleeves, and were enjoying the day more than they could a Fourth of July celebration in their former Northern homes. There was just one disappointing feature of the picnic, and that was that the Hon. Wm. Jordan, Mayor of Jacksonville, who is one of the stockholders of the Bunnell Development Company, was unable to be present and address the people, owing to pressing duties in Jacksonville. However, we expect him to meet with the colonists at some later date. Mr. George Mawman of Palatka, Florida, and Dr. Wright of Jacksonville made splen did addresses. We would like to give the readers of the Home Bulder their speeches in full, but space will not permit. Mr. Thomas A. Verdenius of Chicago, General Manager of the Bunnell Develop ment Company, spoke as follows: Dear Friends: Will you not permit me to address you thus? On such an occasion as this I dislike using the formal greeting of “Ladies and gentlemen!” In my heart I know you all ; I feel that not one of you are strangers to me, and I claim the right to call you MY FRIENDS. You have no idea how much pleasure it gives me to be here with you today. I have come all the way from Chicago for this occasion, and I feel it a privilege and an honor to stand here in this automobile and speak to you for a few minutes. In Chicago a few weeks ago I had the pleasure of listening to many political speeches, delivered by some of the most famous men of our country, and one by our next President, Gov. Woodrow Wilson. Gathered around Gov. Wilson was a coterie of prominent men, justly proud to be there; but I say to you in all sincerity that I esteem it a greater privilege to be here in this capacity today than to have been among those men. It has not been my pleasure to have met all of you before, for many have made Bun nell their home since I was here the last time. However, I have corresponded with the majority of you, and before I return to Chicago I hope to have the opportunity of becoming personally acquainted, with each one. Let me say to you that although I cannot be here in person every day, in spirit and in thought I spend most of my hours right here among you. I am continually think ing and planning for the betterment of our colony, and quite often I am thinking aloud, for my good wife at home assures me that she listens to “BUNNELL” three times a day, for seven days out of every week (and she listens pretty patiently, too). And, by the way, I haven’t failed to write her since coming back to Florida that the State looks better to me this time than it has ever done before, and as I look around Bunnell and into your faces here today, I say again that this is the best spot in the state. Were I actuated by no other motive than selfishness (and I assure you that this is not my feeling), I could not be else than interested in you and in this community, for my success is only obtained as success comes to you. This is not a “one man’s” cause. It is not just Mr. Moody’s, yours, or mine—but it is ours, and every good family we induce to come here, every good word we speak for the colony, every improvement we make here (be it large or small), every fence that is built, every acre that is cleared, every furrow that is plowed adds just so much more value to the property of each individual, and makes the com munity just that much better to live in. You are benefited; I am benefited; yes, and the state of Florida at large. Therefore, my partners, for that is what we are in the fullest sense of the word, let us stand shoulder to shoulder, and make this colony the greatest in the state. Let us aim for large things. Not only should we hitch our wagon to a star, but let it be the highest star in the zenith. The primary requisites to success arc here — ideal location, splendid transportation facilities, productive soil, and such men as Messrs. Moody and Lambert back of the proposition. It is up to us to bring results. I am reminded of what is needful in the erection of a home. Here is the brick, the lime, the lumber and the tools. Just one thing more is necessary — the mechanic who can transform this raw material into a beautiful structure, and WE ARE THE MECHANICS HERE. Yesterday at noon I arrived in Palatka, where I spent the night. In the evening I was invited by some of the members of the Palatka Board of Trade to accompany them to Hastings, our sister city, just 12 miles to the north of us, and far famed for her Irish potatoes. About 50 members of the Palatka Board of Trade went over to Hastings in auto mobiles to assist in the organization of a Hastings Board of Trade. I wish you could have been at that meeting. The enthusi asm of the people was contagious. They have in Hastings people, those whom we would call “live wires” in Chicago, but nevertheless they can’t beat us here at Bunnell. A number of speeches were made, and I had the pleasure of talking to these men for a few minutes. A Board of Trade with eighty-four members was organized in Hast ings that night, and I hope, yes, more than that, I fully expect to see the same thing here in Bunnell before very long. I want to tell you of just one speech I heard there, which was made by a Mr. Brown, one of the old settlers of Hastings, who came there about 12 years ago from Ohio. Mr. Brown was the first man who tried to raise potatoes at Hastings for commercial purposes. He brought to Flor ida with him about three barrels of potatoes, and before planting time came had eaten at least a third of them. Well, what was left he planted, and shipped his first crop (16 barrels) to Philadelphia, receiving for same $9.00 per barrel. He could not, of course, realize that this was the beginning of so wonderful an industry, which was destined to make St. Johns County famous. Mr. Brown’s success led others to fol low his example, and that spring one Flor idian meeting another said: “Do you know, I am going to raise potatoes next year? That d-d Yankee made more money from his one crop of potatoes than I have made all the year.” Continued on Page 4

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62*0 BUHMEEE HOME BTOILDER, Mr. Verdenius Writes of His Recent Trip to Florida Tells of Many New Improvements in the Bunnell-DuPoint Colony Chicago, III., Nov. 22, 1912. To the Headers of the Bunnell Home Builder: I am more than pleased to have the op portunity, in this, the first issue of the Home Builder, of telling you of my recent trip to Florida and of the many changes since I was there, about six months ago. But just a word first about the Home Builder. We have needed such a paper as this for a long time, and I know that you all are going to be much pleased with it. To the readers who already own farms at Bunnell and Dupont, it will be like a letter from “home” each month, and you can know all about what is going on in the colony. I believe this little magazine will be the medium whereby we shall all get in closer touch with each other, and thus will the paper be a real success. Only yesterday morning I returned from a two weeks’ visit to Florida, and it is really too soon for me to get away from the delights of the trip and settle down to details. Florida is so beautiful now. I traveled from the east of it to the west, and far down the coast, but I came back again to Bunnell and it looked the best of all to me. I will not attempt to go into the fullest details about the colony, for elsewhere in this paper you will learn of the local hap penings there. These news items and the pictures found in this issue of the Home Builder will convince you more than any thing else of the life and development in the colony. Our people at Bunnell are beginning to get settled and to plan for their coming year’s crop. There is a feeling of confidence there, a stability about the place and about the people which was real joy to observe. The day I arrived at Bunnell they had a fine picnic — a barbecue, and I certainly appreciated the hearty reception given me by our colonists there. We had so much to talk over with each other, that the day was all too short. The following days 1 spent visiting our colonists in all parts of the tract. You begin to understand and appreciate what is happening when you go to a certain section of the colony, where a few months ago was to be found nothing but the virgin soil and scattered trees, and now find little homes here and there in all directions, cleared land, fences, barns and growing gardens. One especially observes the activities throughout the colony when night falls, and then is to be seen in all directions as far as the eye can look, great bonfires where the stumps and fallen timber are being destroyed. New families are moving to Bunnell and Dupont each week, coming from all over the United States; at least two or three families come in every week. Most of these folks have been to Bunnell before and know just what the place is like, and now they are bringing their families, their household goods and their livestock and are getting established as fast as possible. The first two days I was in Bunnell there arrived one family from Indiana, one from Mon tana, and later two families from Wisconsin came to locate. You have read that “out of the abund ance of the heart, the mouth speaketh.” Well, when you are in the Bunnell-Dupont Colony you can know just what the people are thinking about, for everywhere you hear conversations on the subjects of clear ing. the next potato crop (which will be planted some time in January), the best way to do this, and the best way to do that. A Newly Cleared Field Near Dupont Note New Homes in the Distance I took a trip south of Bunnell, down the Moody Road, then over to Dupont, an other one out in the direction of Gore Lake, and south of that, and they are the busiest lot of people in that community you ever saw. One man was building his fence; an other was plowing, while two new arrivals (one from Chicago, and the other from Salt Lake City, Utah), were hard at work getting their new homes completed. And they may well be busy, for both of these men expect to have from 10 to 20 acres in pol atoes by January 15th. Another one of the colonists informed me that he expected to receive at least $2,000.00 for his crop of Irish potatoes next season. He is planning and working for that amount, and I for one, believe he will get it. There are a number of new homes now west of Dupont, between Dupont and the Moody Road. You can stand and count one house right after another. There was nothing like that six months ago. One day before I left Florida, our Field Manager took me out in the car in the neighborhood of Gore Lake, and I was de lighted with the improvements being made in that part of the colony. I visited Mr. G., who has lately located here, coming from Spokane, Washington, and he showed me what he had done in the few brief weeks since his arrival. He has a com fortable temporary home, and a fine garden with all kinds of growing vegetables. There was an air of prosperity about the place which I liked mighty well. Another day I had the pleasure of visit ing a large orange grove near the south eastern portion of our colony. No one could describe the magnificent scene this grove presented. The roses were in full bloom, while the various trees were hanging heavy with their offerings of Japanese persim mons, rare grape-fruit, kumquats, oranges and tangerines. Mr. Knox, one of the owners of this grove, told me that last year he shipped 10,000 boxes of oranges alone from his grove, and he expects to do as well this season. Judging from the abund ance of fruit I saw, I am led to believe he will have no trouble in doing this. Just north of this grove is to be found the beautiful winter home of George W. Perkins. New roads are being built here now; new bridges also, and the county has almost 30 men busy on road building. This work is under the supervision of Mr. I. I. Moody, President of the Bunnell Development Com pany, and one of the Road Commissioners of St. Johns County. A fine highway has been completed from the Knox Orange Grove connecting with the Kings Road and Moody Road, leading into Bunnell. An other road has been completed from Bun nell to Espanola to the north of us, and this road will later be extended into Hast ings. Mr. Moody is going to open up sev eral miles of roads through our colony dur ing the coming winter. One of our settlers, who has recently located in our colony, having formerly lived at Blue Island, Ill., has invented a very fine stump puller. This man has been in the colony only a few weeks, and has about ten acres of his land already cleared. He has applied for a patent for this stump puller and assured me that he would be fully equipped and able next spring to clear at least from three to five acres a day. This will certainly be a great" asset to the colony.

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