Citation
Search for yesterday

Material Information

Title:
Search for yesterday a history of Levy County, Florida
Creator:
Levy County Archives Committee (Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Bronson, Fla
Publisher:
Levy County Archives Committee
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Chapter 24, May, 2003
Physical Description:
28 volumes : ; 28 cm +

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Biography -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genealogy -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Levy County ( fast )
Genre:
Biography. ( fast )
Genealogy. ( fast )
History. ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Biography ( fast )
Genealogy ( fast )
History ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes index as v.29.
General Note:
"A Bicentennial publication."
General Note:
Chapter three has title: Slowpoke. Chapter nine has title: The High Sheriff.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
024053741 ( ALEPH )
06316718 ( OCLC )
00711645 ( LCCN )
Classification:
F317.L6 S44 1977 ( lcc )
975.9/77 ( ddc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




Search fior ?Iei erca u



A History

of

Levy County, Florida


Chapter Twenty-four



Published By The
Levy County Archives Committee

Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners
May 2003
Bronson, Florida


A Bicentennial Publication



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries













https://archive.org/details/searchforyesterd2420levy








Se arch 37o r ?e te ra



A History of

Levy County, Florida


Chapter Twenty-four



Published By The
Levy County Archives Committee

Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners
May 2003
Bronson, Florida

A Bicentennial Publication

Copyright @ 2003
Levy County Archives Committee





































The Kiln at the Gulf Hammock Sawmill

This article was written by Russel P. Comeaux with information furnished by Mrs. Eliza Holmes of Otter Creek, her son, Glen Holmes of Chiefland, and Mr. Lindon Lindsey. Russel and Mr. Lindsey are members of the Levy County Archives Committee.

Why The Lumber Dry Kilns At Gulf Hammock Became Bomb Shelters
The lumber companies, possibly Grove-Dowling and later Pat-Mac, had 10 buildings used as kilns to dry lumber. These buildings were constructed of concrete, brick and tile.
From 1956-59, Fidel Castro led a revolution in the country of Cuba which resulted in the overthrow of the Fulgencio Batista Regime and sent him into exile. Shortly after, Cuba, under Castro, became friendly with Russia and the country turned communist. In 1962, the Russians decided to armn Cuba with missiles and/or rockets. Parts of the United States, especially Florida, would be well within the range of these missiles and rockets. Due to this threat, the United States started patrolling the high seas around Cuba to intercept any shipment of such cargo. For a while this was quite a tense situation and the scare that this may have resulted in further military action caused many people living near these abandoned kilns to start planning their use as bomb shelters.
The following pages describe the civil defense rules and regulations for planning, restoration, and the description of the buildings. They also include survey of the houses and people of Gulf Hammock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey.
Rules and Regulations of Fallout Shelters of Gulf Hammock and Otter Creek area
The rules and regulations committee met December 11, 1962. This special committee was appointed to set the rules and regulations by which the fallout shelter program can be started. Both Gulf Hammock and Otter Creek were represented on this committee. It was agreed by the committee that:









1. Three men with building knowledge be appointed to supervise the building of the shelters. Those appointed were: Building Chairman, Clyde Williams, Emil Boettcher and John Meeks.
2. Space in the fallout shelter will be $7.00 per person. Since this cost covers only materials and not the cost of labor, each male adult will be required to work a certain amount of hours, which will be determined later. If a person in unable to work, he may pay someone selected by the building committee to work in his place.
3. Any family needing to pay in installments will be given up to six months to pay with a minimum of $15.00 per month.
4. Receipts will be issued for all money collected. Each receipt shall show number in family, shelter assignment, space number, and balance owed on account (if any).
5. Automatic assignment to the shelter will be made in the order in which a family pays for their place.
6. Any ill, aged (that is unable to care for themselves), physically disabled or injured persons will be placed in a separate medical unit near bathroom facilities. This will insure better and more adequate medical and nursing care.
7. Each family will be responsible for their own food, clothing, medical supplies, bedding, and other personal articles. No unnecessary space consuming articles will be permitted.
8. Alcoholic beverages will be for medicinal purposes only and administered under the supervision of the social-welfare committee.
9. Each shelter will elect their own individual committee by majority vote of its members. These committees will consist of: Chief Warden, Wardens, and social-welfare. All shelters will still function as a whole unit under the committee already established by the Zone 1 General Chairman and Zone Director. 10. All members will be required to respect the authority of their committee officers and have proper respect for those housed within the shelter.

Survey of Dry Kilns in
Gulf Hammock, Florida
December 2, 1962.

85'











There are ten such dry kilns as diagramed above, five of which will take very much work and money to secure against radioactive fallout. Only the top half of the 16-foot ends will have to be secured. The remaining five kilns will have to be repaired substantially, especially the walls, before they could be used for shelters.
The tops of the kilns are covered by four inches of reinforced concrete and two inches of tile. There is a one foot siding around the top of the kilns, which would allow a foot of dirt to be put on top of the kilns. This would safely take care of any fallout that landed on the roof of the kilns. There is 1360 square feet of room inside each kiln, allowing 15 square feet per person; this space would take care of ninety (90) people.













-t<4.4. $
449<* S.


-4~t> 4


3< S
-4< 1


-A
'3,

4*,
<3
2K


3 4.
.4933 <~


&


~ A>'
<~< 3<





~z>it ~t







44- Q<4

04 1 < ~&<\c><~s 4< it'< 4 N
4< 3<, 4>'
<&-*'~ 4<. A<%<*,~ >3<~< A

<1 fl

View of the kiln in 1996


F 4


j3


34<4


am


2<

1~4<<
44<
2W *.~4m


4?


More views of the kiln in 1996





































A view of the water tank at the Pat & Mac Sawmill

There are 146 white and 92 colored residents in and around the city of Gulf Hammock, Florida. Mr. John Swilley has a fallout shelter and a house that can be made into a temporary shelter. In summary, there are 140 white and 92 colored residents whose houses offer, and have no potential to offer, protection against radioactive fallout.
The hotel at Gulf Hammock was surveyed as to its possibilities for radioactive fallout protection. The lower hallway of the hotel can be secured with approximately 3,000 sand bags. There are 690 square feet in this hallway, which will protect approximately 46 people.

SURVEY OF THE HOUSES OF GULF HAMMOCK, FLORIDA
AS TO THEIR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT

WHITE COLORED

OWNER NO. IN HOUSE OWNER NO. IN HOUSE

John Swilley 6 Clyde Myers 2
George Bird 5 Dan Carney 2
Paul Casey 3 Roosevelt Hopkins 3
Brad Williams 2 Albert Harrel 2
Mrs. Colson 2 Frank Brooks I
Lewis Baldree 2 Geichie Holmes 6
Bugs Watkins 7 Jamem Padgett 2









Fleet Williams Clyde Williams Sr. Rufus Smith Terry Matthews Mrs. Mandy Perryman Willie Berryhill Mrs. Alice Gordan Carl Cullpepper Sam Standridge Atlanta Clyatt Fred Hamilton Little Boy Williams Junior Williams Lewis Renfore Haygood Elizey Bufford Holmes John Moody Goerge Birdsey John Atkerson Slim Crawly Ben Morris Bill Booker Mrs. Maybell Standridge Willard Williams J.C. Hudson Mrs. Ruth Harp Ralph Harrison Mrs. Ruby West Miss Edna Collin Jay Ellzey J.L. McCall Sonny Crews Monroe Killcrease Earnest (Red John) Davis Mrs. Izetta Ellzey Willis Crews Richard Hudson Gordon Faircloth Lawrence Curry


POPULATION OF WILLIAMS James Goodbread 3
Mr. McMullen 1


Mrs. Ellen Smith
Steve Gore, Jr.
Clarence Maxwell Mrs. Evie Maxwell Mrs. Dicie Peterson
Ed Tucker
Jimmy Davis
Steve Gore, Sr.
Mrs. Fanny Meeks
Miss Julie Lowe
Mrs. Betty Tompkins
Mrs. Essie Yearty Mrs. Lula Yearty
Mrs. Missouri Cobb
Lloyd Albutton
John White
Andy Sandlin
Wafford Ellzey Murriel Watson Irene Williams James Nichols
James Standridge James B. Congers
Frank Debs Tony Gore John Smith Nick West
Mrs. Carabell Smith Howard Williams Sr.
Ed Penner
Rice Watson
Mrs. Ruth Revells
Mudric Meeks L.C. Williams Johnny Crew D.L. Duncan
Brox Deas
H.O. Faircloth


FISH CAMP
Mr. Anderson Arthur Green


TOTAL WHITE POPULATION OF ELLZEY, OTTER CREEK AND


WILLIAMS FISH CAMP 290


























Another view of the mill.




















A view of the kiln in 1996


A CIVIL DEFENSE REPORT ON THE COMMUNITIES OF
ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA
DECEMBER 13, 1962

WHITE POPULA TION OF ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA


NO. IN HOUSE


OWNER


NO. IN HOUSE


John Meeks Jack Meeks Rufus Meeks Emil Boettcher Claude Rogers


7
7
2
5
2


Lawrence Lee Harry McElveen Dale Atkerson George Cooper Calvin Hill


OWNER


6
3
4
2
3


AS









Grandma Watkins Williams Thad Barber Lewis Keith Oliver Gore Newton Fralix Carl Hinson Wash Hinson Ray Burnett Elmer Dykes Bob Pollard James Hilton Warren Owens Bill Gavins Haste Pendarvis Auther Berryhill John Yearty Bill Olgle Hamp Beckett Dewitt Watson Will Watson Maie Osteen Bill Dingham Martin Quick Harry Woods Devere Mills Mack Hodges Larry Geiger Virgil Cox Willis Roberts Robert Hodge L.V. Smith Dicey Smith Estelle Clater J.T. Pennington


Henretta Anderson Jack Brannon Josie Banks Oliver Long George Anna Davis Hardy Richardson G.D. Jefferson Rose Romock Lafayette Richardson Benny Goldwire Jimmy Sheeler Bessie Channey Apples Veal Jim Graham Murrell Hodge Will Dunn Neb


*Houses that can be secured


COLORED POPULATION OF ELLZEY, AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA


NO. IN HOUSE


OWNER


NO. IN HOUSE


Green Wright James Williams Kelly Stokes Mrs. Maggie Polight Mrs. Vera Scott Tom Ferguson


1
2
2
1
7
1


Mrs. Mary Sawyer James Peeples Mrs. Ella Tart Palmer Stucky Willie Alston T.B. Graham Sr.


2
6
1
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
1
12
7
8
2
10


OWNER


2
1
1
1
4
8










Mrs. Belle Dooley Willard Howard Sr. Turner Hughes Roosevelt Daniels Charley Scott Mrs. Lizzie Screen Mrs. Emma Tart Mrs. Sweet Glover Will Smith Dennis Williams Mrs. Carrie Goss Mrs. Fannie Mattox Fulton Strong Mrs. Edna Williams Johnny Glover Richard Strong Mrs. Laura Braxton


1 10
2
2
6
1
1
3

4
1
5
1
1
2
1
1


Kimmie Green Bill Birdsey Rev. Charles Jelks Joe Bridges Johnny Screen Dan Thompson Wimpie Mose
Frank Brooks O.T. Thompson R.L. Stacy Felix Langston Mrs. Mary Richards Merrill McNeal Sr. Thomas Howard Sr. Nathan Collie


TOTAL COLORED POPULATION OF ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK


109


SUMMARY


There are ninety-one white houses in Otter Creek and Ellzey, Florida, which houses two hundred and ninety persons. There are forty-five colored houses in the same communities which house one hundred and nine persons. None of the above one hundred and thirty-six houses with a total of three hundred and ninety-nine persons offer any protection against radioactive fallout.
A survey of the town s builders was made. Only one building, the elementary schoolhouse at Otter
Creek, Florida could be converted into a fallout shelter. The schoolhouse hallway has approximately 1440 squ-re feet and will accommodate approximately 100 persons. It will take 3300 sand bags to secure the above hallway. This building cannot be secured until an emergency is called, thus making an added burden in securing the building.
The dry kilns, six miles south of the communities of Otter Creek and Ellzey offer adequate shelters for the three hundred and ninety-nine unprotected inhabitants. These kilns can accommodate almost the population of Gulf Hammock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey. For approximately six hundred dollars, a kiln (not including labor), each kiln can be adequately secured on the accommodate ninety persons. There are seven such kilns, which will secure a total of five hundred and forty persons. The total populations of Gulf Hammock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey, and their outlying areas are six hundred and ninety seven persons.



















































'4
















4$




44




.4.t








4' 4'




4 ~ ~44>
44444/4444444 44444 4 4
Q)4 ~4*4 44 ~<44 <44> ~










C ~'4,&$4< 4 44
<4" 44'&
4 4444 4











V
1444 44'



44 44

4444 444 /
>4















/


4/" '> 44 /44



A view of the smoke stacks at the Pat & Mac Sawmill.









Russel Pierre Comeaux was born and lived for 19 years in South Louisiana (Bayou and Swamp Country) in the small town of Paincourtville which is in Assumption Parish. Like many other families in that area and very much like many families in Levy County, we were very poor but didn't seem to realize it. My dad, Cyprien, worked first in the sugar cane fields and later in the sugar mill. My mom, Julie Landry, was a homemaker.
So you ask, "What the heck is a Cajun doing involved in The Levy County Archives Committee?"
Well, my wife Shirley Meeks was born and raised in Levy County (Judson and Otter Creek). From the time I first visited Levy County in 1962, I liked the area and the friendly people. In 1970, I was working as an Air Traffic Controller in New Orleans and was able to secure a transfer in the same job capacity at the Orlando Executive Airport. So Shirley and I and our three little boys, Bruce, Brent, and Bart, packed up all of our belongings in a U-Haul truck and moved. I worked at the Orlando Airport for 20 years and then transferred to the Gainesville Airport from which I retired in 1998. When I started working at the Gainesville Airport in 1990, we made our home in Chiefland.
Now comes the history part. I am almost ashamed to admit I didn t care much about history until about 1995 and now I can't get enough of it. It started for me by reading a chapter (book) or two of "The Search for Yesterday" which is a history of Levy County places and people. By then I had an appetite to buy all of the chapters and read them. Soon after I met my good friends Lindon and later Donna Lindsey and he invited me to come to the Levy County Archives Committee meetings. I attended a meeting, became a member, and have given time and help with book sales at specials events. Lindon and I scheduled and met



















I ka




Pat and Mac Sawmill at Gulf Hammock before the fire.
with 13 older citizens of Levy County, interviewed them on tape and soon will have these tapes transcribed and will have the cassette tape, a paper copy, and a floppy disk of these interviews available at The Archives Committee office for public use.








This Information was Submitted by Abbie Jean Rodgers Richner


Alfred' Rodgers
1829-1908

Alfred Rodgers was born 18 Jul 1829 (grave stone shows 15 Oct 1834) in Kingston, New York, on the Hudson River. He was born of English parents who owned an apple orchard in the area. He was reared in New York and as a young man he attended either the Columbia Institute or Academy in New York. He had a brother named John and a sister named Mary Jane. Mary Jane married Adams and
settled Near Killeen, TX. She died at age 79.

Alfred left his family in New York, migrated west and became a wagon master for the government overland mail from Salt Lake City, Utah, to San Franscisco, CA. He made a total of three trips, which covered about 1,200 miles. On the first trip, he mastered 26 wagons, the second 36, and the third 52 wagons. Indians wounded him three times on these trips. All the wounds were from arrows and the most serious was received on the first trip. Indians also captured him, but it is not clear whether it was during one of these trips or if it was when he was scouting. In any case, he made friends with the Indian tribe and the chief gave him a stick pinned with red dots on it and said if he were captured again he was to show the stick and he would be released. He was captured again by another tribe and when he showed the stick he was released.

Then, Alfred returned to the East Coast to Savannah, GA. There he saw Martha Ann Roe sitting on her front porch steps and realized she was the most beautiful girl that he had ever seen (according to a story related by his son, Guy Whitman Rodgers). Alfred and Martha were married 26 Feb 1871. After their marriage, they moved near Quitman, Brooks, Co., GA. While they lived there, they spent several days in an old gristmill weathering out a hurricane. The old mill was constructed of hand-hewn logs and held together with wooden pegs. The roof was nailed with square nails.

Alfred died 18 Jul 1908 (grave marker shows 17 Jan 1909). He is buried in Chiefland, FL.
Martha Ann Roe was born 15 Aug 1850 near Milledgeville, GA. She was an orphan and had to work for her keep. She worked for different farms in the area around Savannah. She joined the Baptist Church in Statenville, GA, and was baptized in the Alapaha River on 29 Apr 1888. Her son, Guy Whitman Rodgers, was present. She died 21 Jan 1933 and is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Martha had two brothers, Andrew and Thomas E. Roe. Andrew lived in GA and Tom was living with Martha Ann and two of her children in 1910, Chiefland, FL. Tom was born 4 Aug 1843 and died 29 Apr 1917. He is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Andrew Roe had three children: Dan, Albert, and Laura Ann (m. Bennett).


Alfred and Martha Ann had the following children:
+A. Claude Eugene2 Rodgers: 1871-1961
B. Willie2 Rodgers: b. 15 Aug 1873; d. 18 Aug 1873 near Homerville, GA
C. Mary Jane Bulah2Rodgers: b. 15 Sep 1874; d. 3 Aug 1876 near Homerville, GA
+D. Benjamin Alfred2 Rodgers: 1876-1974
+E. Guy Whitman2 Rodgers: 1881-1955
F. John Frederick "Jack"2 Rodgers: b. 22 Dec 1883; d. 11 Aug 1900 near Homerville, GA
+G. Travis Plant2 Rodgers: 1886-1943
H. Charles Cyrus2 Rodgers: b. 5 Jul 1891, GA; d. 15 Jan 1925; bur Chiefland Cemetery; WW-I
I. Ola Bernice2 Rodgers: 1893-1953 (See: Wood Family).


A. Claude Eugene2 Rodgers: b. 12 Dec 1871 near Savannah, Ga, and d. 18 Jul 1961 (bur. Chiefland









Cemetery. He m. Lawson Tomlinson, 19 Mar 1900, Ciinch Co., GA. Lawson was b. 18 Feb 1872 in GA and d. I Apr 1952; bur Chiefland Cemetery. Claude played a vital role in the turpentine industry of Levy County. The 1910 Census shows him in the Levyville Precinct, owner of a Turpentine Company. In 1920 he is listed in the Chiefland Precinct. Their children:

+1. Robert PurdV Rodgers: b. 1 Dec 1900; d. 21 Mar 1982 +2.George Hubbard3 Rodgers: 22 Jan/Feb 1902; d. Jan 1980
3. William Jennings3 Rodgers: b. 20 Dec 1904; d. 20 Dec 1986, res. of Ocala, FL.
4. John Marcus3 Rodgers: b. 29 Nov 1906. Did he d. I I Aug 1992, res. of Jacksonville, FL.
5. Mildred Catherine3 Rodgers: b. 8 Dec 1909, FL +6. James Claude3 Rodgers: b. 11 Feb 1911
7. Jack Julius3 Rodgers: b. 10 Nov 1912, FL 8. Mary Elizabeth3 Rodgers: b. 29 Jan 1919 (Families for 1-2, and 6 listed below).


1. Robert Purdy3 Rodgers: b. 1 Dec 1900, GA; d. 21 Mar 1982; m. Dora Elise Williams, 29 Jun
1925. Purdy and Elise made their home in Chiefland and reared their daughters there. Purdy played a vital role in the turpentine industry in the area. Elise was b. 29 Apr 1904, Pavo, GA, and d. 23 Feb 1988, Newnan, GA. In her later years, she had gone to Grantville, GA, to be near her daughter, Anne Elise Rodgers Hall. She was an outstanding teacher in the Chiefland Elementary School for
39 years. She and Purdy are buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Their children and grandchildren:

a. Anne Elise4 Rodgers: b. 18 Sep 1926, Chiefland; d. 26 May 1992, Pocatello, ID; bur
Grantville, GA; m. Morris Alfred Hall, Sr., 9 Aug 1958. Morris was b. 5 May 1919 & d.
Feb 1978; bur Grantville, GA. Children:

(1). Morris Alfred' Hall, Jr.: b. 24 May 1959; living in Pocatello, ID, 1992; m/1 Tammy
Hayes, 10 Dec 1986; m/2 Michele Bruno, 20 Aug 1994. Children:

(a). Nicole Denise Hall (by w# 1): b. 1989 (b). Annelise Jean6 Hall (by w#2): b. 1995
(c). Mikaila Morise6 Hall (by w#2): b. 1997

(2). Purdy Norman5 Hall: b. 3 Jun 1961; living in Grantvill, GA, 1992; m. Melony Reed
Tribble, 24 Jun 1995. Child:

(a). Justin Matthew6 Hall

b. Abby Jean4Rodgers: b. 8 Dec 1927, Chiefland; living in Lakeland, FL, 1988; later, living in
Homosassa, FL; m./ Gustaf Willis Fisher, 8 Dec 1951; m/2 William Eugene Richner, 18
Aug 1988. Gustaf was b. 1920 and d. Dec 1999. Children and grandchildren by Gustaf:

(1). Carl Gusta([ Fisher: b. 24 Jul 1953; living in Ft. White, FL, 1988; m. Lori Beth
Lindsey, 8 Oct 1983. Children:

(a). Sarah Elizabeth Fisher: b. 16 Aug 1990 (b). Elise Catherine6 Fisher: b. 16 Aug 1990

(2). Curtis Robert" Fisher: b. 23 Feb 1957; living in Orlando, 1988; m. Mona Kay Burris,
15 Dec 1984.











2. George Hubbard3 Rodgers: 22 Jan 1902, GA; d. Jan 1980, resident of Lady Lake, FL; bur
Chiefland Cemetery; m. Hilda C. Hilda was b. 1906.


6. James Claude3 Rodgers: b. 11 Feb 1911, Levy Co., FL; d. 8 Jul 1978, res. of Gulf Hammock;
bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Judith S. Judith was b. I1 Nov 1919.



D. Benjamin Alfred2 Rodgers: b. 30 Dec 1876, Brooks Co., GA; d. 22 Apr 1964; bur Chiefland
Cemetery; m. Eula J. Tomlinson, 30 Aug 1909, Levy Co., FL. Eula was b. 12 Apr 1878, GA; d. 12 Jan 1950, resident of Chiefland; bur Chiefland Cemetery. Eula was the sister of Claude's wife, Lawson. In 1910, Benjamin Alfred was listed as a turpentine woodsman in the Levyville Precinct, Levy Co. FL. In 1920, the family is listed in the Chiefland Precinct. In addition to their son, Franklin, Capitola Tomlinson (b. ca 1896-1897) was with Ben and Eula. Capitola "Miss Cap" was
Eula's sister.

Ben owned and operated Rodger's Grocery Store in Chiefland. The original store was an old wooden building located near his house about one block of the main highway that now runs through town.
His house is being restored by his granddaughter and her husband, Karen and John Pankow of Chiefland. In his last years, he turned his business over to his son, Franklin. Franklin built a new
building on the main highway. One child:

1. Benjamin Franklin3 Rodgers: b. 27 Feb 1917; d. 14 Mar 1990, Gainesville, FL (hospital); bur
Chiefland, FL; m. Sarah E. Lewis from Williston. Sarah was b. 9 Dec 1918, daughter of Adolphus and Jessie Westbrook Lewis of Williston. Sarah d. 10 Mar 1990 and is buried in the
Chiefland Cemetery. Children and grandchildren:

a. Wayne4 Lewis: b 2 May 1946, Gainesville (Hosp.); d. 10 May 6 1989 Jacksonville; bur.
Chiefland Cemetery; m. Robbie Children:
(1). James5 Rodgers; (2). Misty5 Rodgers; (3). Lee Ann5 Rodgers; (4). Aimee5 Rodgers;
&(5). Elizabeth5 Rodgers.
b. Ben4 Rodgers
c. Plant4 Rodgers: m. Vickie
d. Anne4 Rodgers: m. Beard
e. Karen4 Rodgers: m. John Pankow

E. Guy Whitman2 Rodgers: 8 Jul 1881, Homerville, GA; d. 7 Sep 1955; bur Riverside Memorial
Park Cemetery, Jacksonville, FL. He m. Roxie Haddock "Scrap" Barlow, 3 Jan 1901. She was b. 27 Jul 1885 and d. 7 Aug 1949. She is buried beside her husband. In 1910, he was listed as a woodsman in the Ellzey Precinct, Levy County. They were a Mutt and Jeff pair as Guy was over six feet tall and
Roxie was 4 ft 10 in.

Guy quit school while he was in the third grade. He was pretty much a self-made man; and, even though his early jobs were menial and laborious, he quickly learned how to better himself. In the early days, he dipped gum pots on pine trees, drove wagons and many other tasks associated with the
turpentine business.









They moved to Fowltown, GA, where he got a job as a woods rider (foreman). They lived there for three years and two of their daughters were born there. Having returned to Homerville, he worked as a laborer until he got a job near Crystal River, FL, as superintendent for the Knight Brothers. While at this location, the third daughter, Willie Campbell Rodgers, was born. Willie was named after Guy's brother, Willie, and Dr. Campbell, the doctor who delivered her.

Guy was involved in the turpentine business for many years and moved to many towns in South Georgia and North Florida. Some are no longer on the map, but some that remain are Homerville, GA, Lake Butler, and Trenton, FL. They lived in a small town just north of Baldwin, FL, called Bryceville.

Guy's first step into his own business was when he bought a small sawmill and shingle mill. He cut lumber, cypress shingles and crossties for fifteen months and then sold the business.

Then, he decided to go to OK. He left his family in Lake Butler, FL. The Interstate Coal Co. of Dawson, OK, employed him as a weightmaster. He lived with Dr. and Mrs. Jackson for six months and returned to Florida. After several short-term jobs, the family moved to Baldwin, FL. Here he worked for Mr. J. M. Saucer in his turpentine business and in the grocery store. The Saucer store was located on U.S. 13 across the street from the old Post Office. Working for Mr. Saucer was not a comfortable situation for him; therefore, he decided to go into business for himself. Mr. Saucer didn't want him to leave and said that when he came crawling back there would be no job for him.

In 1926, he built and opened a combination grocery store and gas station, this store, the ACME Grocery, was located at about the same place that Westinghouse Factory is located on U.S. 90 in Baldwin, FL. This station burned down after a few years. It caught fire when a car hit a gas truck that was off-loading gas. Either the driver of the car or the truck was burned to death in this accident.

Having been bitten by the bug, he realized that the grocery business was what he wanted. He built a new store just a short distance from the old store but on the opposite side of the highway. This store was also called the ACME Grocery. The store had living quarters in the back where they lived. They built a house behind what was the original Petrey Brothers' Garage, but they never lived in it. They rented it to several people and finally sold it to J. C. Petrey. Guy and "Scrap" (Roxie) operated the store together until Scrap's death in 1949. Guy continued to operate the store until his health deteriorated in 1954. His daughter, Lucille, helped him until his death in 1955.

Lucille bought out her sister's interest in the store and operated it until about 1964. It was rented for seN 2ral years and then sold.

Guy died 7 Sep 1955 at the home of his daughter on Yellow Water Road. He had been bedridden with multiple sclerosis for several months. Children of Guy and Scrap:

1. Ora Lee3 Rodgers: b. 14 Aug 1903 (SS lists this date as 1902); d. 2 Jun 1976, resident of
Jacksonville; bur Riverside Memorial Park, Jacksonville; m. Roderick Clifford Campbell, Sr., who was b. 8 Dec 1894 and d. 21 Apr 1958; bur Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery. Children
and grandchildren:

a. Roderick a. Clifford4 Campbell, JR.: b. 24 Oct 1926; d. 21 Aug 1998, resident of
Jacksonville; m. Dorothy Louise Dixon. Dorothy was b. 20 May 1930.

b. Malcom Eugene4 Campbell: b. 20 Jun 1928; m.
(1) Michael Wayne' Campbell: b. 2 Jan 1950
(2). Katheryn Elaine" Campbell: b. 23 Sep 1954










c. William Wallace4 Campbell: b. 16 Feb 1931; m. Laura Annette Glover who was b. 22 Jan
1937.
(1). Mark William5 Campbell: b. 8 Jan 1960

d. Eula Lucille4 Campbell: b. 7 Apr 1934; d. 23 Oct 1935

e. Stuart McQuaid4 Campbell, Sr.: b. 17 Mar 1937; m. Hilda Elaine Morgan
(1). Stuart McQuaid5 Campbell, Jr.: b. 15 Feb 1961
(2). Scott Morgan5 Campbell:

f. Mildred Janette4 Campbell: b. 19 Jan 1939; m. Jack Donald Arrendale who was b. 8 Dec
1937.

g. Joyce Carol4 Campbell: b. 29 Aug 1943

2. Roxie Lucille3 Rodgers: b. 13 Jan 1905, GA; d. 21 Nov 1978 (SS: Armed Forces); rn/I James
Richard Williams who was b. 16 Feb 1896 and d. 18 Dec 1973, resident of Jacksonville; m/2 Alan Ray King; m/3. Roy Lamance Turknett (Is this the Roy Turknett who was b. 2 Apr 1893
and d. Jul 1969, resident of Jacksonville)? Children by James Richard Williams:

(a). George Roger4 Williams: b. 18 Jul 1936: m. Marcia Elaine Summers who was b. 3 Jun
1941.
(b). James Ronald4 Williams: b 13 Jan 1941; m. Phyllis Ann Blevins who was b. 12 Sep 1943.


G. Travis Plant2 Rodgers: b. 23 Sep 1886, GA; d. 9 Aug 1943; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Minnie
Mae Hunnicut, 27 Sep 1908. Minnie was b. 16 Jan 1889 and d. 1 Jul 1951. She m/2
Fox. She is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Daughter:

1. Talula Voncile3 Rodgers: b. ca 1909; d. 2 Feb 2003 in Orlando; bur Lake Wales, FL; m. Walter
W. Woolfolk who was b. 6 Mar 1909 and d. 27 Jun 1995, Orlando; bur Lake Wales, FL. Two
daughters:

a. Kay4 Woolfolk: m. Elliotte; lived in NC in 2003.
b. Deana Voncile4Woolfolk: m. Costner; lived in Orlando in 2003.


(Information provided by members of the Rodgers Family)

















W1,1






V




3 ps



__ 3~ : 4 d AA







luI


. .~ . . - - . . . . . . . . .




I I,.* ,.


Service Station and Restaurant owned by "T" and Elsie Coleman in Chiefland



















A


Elise & Purdv Rodgers (son of Claude & Lawson Rodgers) with their daughters, Abby Jean & Anne Elise 1935.


On the right is Voncile Rodgers Woolfolks in front of the first school house. It was in back of Graham Carter's home. Taken in the 1920's. (Do not know the other person)


$


Elijah Tucker, Walker, Jennings Hill, Earl Hudson, Jack Meeks, Jennings & Hubbard Rodgers (sons of Claude & Lawson Rodgers), Joseph Tomlinson (brother to Lawson Tomlinson Rodgers), and Lee Weimer.


Purdy & Elise Rodgers


A:





Robert Purdy Rodgers Turpentine Operator 1941-1970, Chiefland, Florida. Lived December 1, 1900 to March 21, 1982.


Picture shows Purdy checking out pine tree cat face using a clay cup to collect turpentine & resin. Purdy had operations at Lebanon Station & Sumner in Levy County. He also had operations in Taylor, Dixie, Sumter, and Polk Counties.


S




~F


o.





























/V


Rodgers Family Reunion Circa 1930
Left side (Seated): Ola Rodgers Wood, holding son Gwvnn, Eula Tom inson Rodgers. (Standing) First row: Capitola Tomlinson, Grandmother Martha Roe Rodgers (Alfred's wife), Claude Eugene Rodgers, Plant Rodgers. Second row: Hubbard Rodgers, Margurite Johnson Rodgers (Jenning's wife), Elise Williams Rodgers (Purdy's wife), Moses Wood, Jennings Rodgers, Lawson Tom linson Rodgers (Claude's wife). Right side (Seated): Benjamin Alfred Rodgers. Children (Seated): Elizabeth Rodgers, Mozelle Wood, Mary Wood, Anne Elise Rodgers, Abbye Jean Rodgers, Franklin Rodgers (Ben & Eula's son). Photo was taken at Ola Rodgers and Moses Wood's home in Chiefland, Florida.














A


Claude & Lawson (Tomlinson) Rodgers 50th Anniversary. March 14, 1900, Dupont, Georgia. Anniversary was held March 19, 1950 at Purdy & Elise Rodgers home in Chiefland


C>
ILl


4
4,


Pr


Pictured left to right(Seated): Elizabeth Simmons, Lawson Ionlinson Rodgers,Claude Rodgers, Mildred Spears. (Standing): Jennings, Jack, Hubbard, Purdy, James "Jim", Marcus. Picture taken at Rodgers 50th Anniversary.





































Masonic Hall Chiefland, Florida


Old Chiefland School House Circa 1914-1915


na 000.4FQ
































~.M M&*#4~ na.&a~**~A


Elise & Purdi' Rodgers Home 1946
Chiefland, Florida. Built in 1912. Ola Rodgers & Mose Woodfirst owned the house. No paved street in front.








Absalom B.' Wood Early Settler of Levy County


Absalom B. Wood, b. ca 1810, SC, was in Levy County as early as 1860. He is listed in the Wekiva Precinct in the 1860 Census. He married Margaret A. Davis who was b. ca 1821 in GA. He must have died before 1885. The 1885 Census shows Margaret and her son, Thomas, living with the Charles McCall family. Children:

A. Clary A.2 Wood: b. 1834-1835 B. Caroline2 Wood: b. 1838-1839
C. Salintha C.2 Wood: b. 1841-1842
D. Nelson J.2 Wood: b. 1842-1843
+E. John Wesley2 Wood: b. 22 May 1845, GA
F. Wilson2 Wood: b. ca 1846
+G. Jesse Leroy2 Wood: b 13 May 1849 +H. Jefferson J./S.2 Wood: b. 1851-1852
I. Sarah L. M. A.2 Wood: b. ca 1854; m. William Emanuel
J. Thomas J.2 Wood: b. 1855-1856
K. Mary J.2 Wood: b. 1856-1857
+L. Elafair S./ Alphia2 Wood: b. 17 Apr 1860; d. 18 May 1897


E. John Wesley2 Wood: b. 22 May 1845, GA; d. 19 May 1920/1924; bur Ebenezer Cemetery.
John Wesley served in the 1" Regt. Infantry Reserve in the Civil War. There are 30 pages of information on him at the State Archives relative to his pension application which was filed in
Levy County in 1897. This material is listed under #A-06420.

He m. Louisa Lucinda McCall on 6 Aug 1883, Levy Co., FL. Louisa was b. 21 Jan 1857, GA, and d. 11 Feb 1897, She is buried with her husband in Ebenezer Cemetery. The census records for 1885, 1900, and 1910 show the family in Levyville District. The children below
are all listed as being born in Levy Co., FL.

1. William3 Wood: b. 1883-1884
2. Leila3 Wood: b. ca Mar 1886 (Did she m. Eugene Hogan)??
3. John J.3 Wood: b. 27 Nov 1887; d. 26 Jan 1919; bur Ebenezer Cemetery
4. Ellen L.3 Wood: b. 17 May 1891; d. 23 Jun 1954; bur Ebenezer Cemetery; m.
Shinholser.
5. Janie M.3 Wood: b. ca Aug 1893; m. William Henry Parkerson, who was b. ca Jul 1887,
FL.
6. Zora3 Wood: b. ca Jan 1895 7. Zona3 Wood: b. ca Jan 1895
8. McKinley3 Wood: b. ca Apr 1896


F. Jesse Leroy2 Wood, Sr.: b. 13 May 1849, FL; d. 22 Aug 1923; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. His
will was signed 22 Feb 1923 and probated 24 Aug 1923, Levy County. Census records for









1880- 1910 show the family in the Levyville Dist.; and the 1920 shows them in the Chiefland District.
Leroy m/ Sarah Jane McGowan on 30 Nov 1871, Levy County. She was the mother of all of Leroy's children listed below. He m/2 Ella Robinson, 30 Jun 1921; and he m/3 Lorena Hudson on 25 May 1922. Sarah Jane was b. Dec 1848, FL; d. 15 Nov 1920; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. Children:

+ 1. Sarah Eugenia- Wood: b. 9 Sep 1872
2. Joseph Nelson3 Wood: b. 7 Oct 1874; d 1937; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Ethel G. Willis ca 1905,
Levy County. Ethel was b. 29 Jul 1884 and d. Feb 1972, resident of Chiefland. She is bur in Chiefland
Cemetery. No children. In 1910, their nephew, Charlie4 Emanuel, was living with them.
+ 3. Robert Eli3 Wood: b. 18 Nov 1875
4. Jasper Wesley3 Wood: b. 1877; d. 13 Oct 1899
5. Margaret "Maggie"3 Wood: b. ca Oct 1879
+ 6. Lydia Frances3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1882
+ 7. Leroy "Lee"3 Wood, Jr.: b. 23 Feb 1883
+ 8. Sewilda Margaret3 Wood: b. 23 Apr 1885
+ 9. Moses Elijah3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1888
10. Gladys Evelyn Wood: b. (She is listed as under age 21 in her father's will in 1923).


1. Sarah Eugenia3 Wood: b. 9 Sep 1872; d. 1 May 1853/1858; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. She
m. William P. Geiger, 12 May 1890, Levy County. William, son of Enoch and Julia Geiger, was b. 19 Nov 1866, Levy County, and d. 2 Jan 1935. He is buried with his wife in
the Ebenezer Cemetery. Census records show him living in the Judson area. Children:

a. Elvie4 Geiger: b. 12 May 1891, Levy Co.; d. 17May 1978, resident of Summerfield,
FL.; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. John Perry Hudson, 3 Jun 1909, Levy County. John
Perry Hudson was b. 7 Dec 1872 and d. 27 Jan 1946; bur Chiefland Cemetery.

b. Cleveland "Cleve"4 Geiger: b. 19 Feb 1968; d. Jul 1968 (Trenton address); bur
Ebenezer Cemetery. His wife, Edna A. was b. 4 Oct 1897 and d. Oct 1975,
resident of Gainesville. She is buried at Ebenezer with Cleve.

c. Paul4 Geiger: b. Dec 189d. Ozella4 Geiger: Mar 189e. William "Willie"4 Geiger, Jr.: b. 4 Feb 1906; d. 4 Feb 1906; bur Ebenezer Cemetery


3. Robert Eli3 Wood: b. 18 Nov 1875; d. 3 Jun 1911; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. He m.
Susie E. Markey ca 1896. Susie, daughter of John H. Markey, was b. 1877-1878, FL.
According to census records (1910, Judson), she had 4 children with only one living.
Known child:

a. Martha Jane Wood: b. 19 Sep 1897; d. 8 Jun 1984; bur Pine Grove Cemetery. She m.
Aaron Columbus "Lum" Arrington on 7 Nov 1915. Lum was b. 20 Mar 1892 and d.
4 Feb 1981. He is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery. Children:







(1). Violets Arrington: b. 25 Sep 1916; m. Ernest Ward on 19 Dec 1936. Ernest was
b. 2 Mar 1911, Chiefland, and d. 4 Mar 1986. He is buried in Long Pond
Cemetery.
(2). Robert Ercelle5 Arrington: b. 1916-1917; d. Dec 1936
(3). Clyde5 Arrington:b. ca 1918
(4). Audrey5 Arrington: b. ca 1923; m. William David Farquaharson
(5). Columbus J. "Lum"5 Arrington


6. Lydia Frances3 Wood: b. ca 1882, Levy Co.; m. George Drew Folks onlO Oct 1901, Levy
County. George Drew Folks was b. 16 Nov 1876 and d. 30 Mar 1915. He is buried in
Ebenezer Cemetery. In 1920, Lydia was living with her parents and the following children:

a. Floyd4 Folks: b. 1901-1902, Chiefland; m. Zetha Faircloth. Daughter:
(1). Zelma Floydine5Folks: b. 14 Sep 1923, Chiefland; d. 9 Sep 1993; bur Pine Grove
Cemetery. She m. Thomas Reuben Swilley who was b. 3 Sep 1923 and d. 23 Aug
1972; bur Pine Grove Cemetery (WW-II and Korea)
b. Doile4 Folks: b. 1904-1905
c. Armond P.4 Folks: b. 27 Nov 1907; d. 27 Dec 1987, resident of Cedar Key; bur Cedar
Key Cemetery; m. Annie Evelyn who was b. 16 Apr 1916 and d. 5 Oct 1985.
She is buried with her husband in Cedar Key. Children:
(1). Thomas5 Leroy Folks: b. 1903-1904, Chiefland; d. Sep 2000, Cedar Key.
(2). Irene5 Folks
d. Mildred4 Folks: b. 1909-1910

7. Leroy "Lee"3 Wood, Jr.: b. 23 Feb 1883, Chiefland; d. 29 Nov 1952; bur Chiefland Cemetery. He m/i Nellie May Hudson on 22 May 1904; he m/2 Cebelle Faircloth.
Nellie was b. 8 May 1884 and d. 15 Sep 1918. She is buried in Rocky Hammock
Cemetery. Cebelle was b. 13 Nov 1899 and she is buried in Chiefland Cemetery.

8. Sewilda Margaret3 Wood: b. 23 Apr 1885, Levyville; d. 12 May 1969; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Rollin Hudson on 26 Mar 1905, Levy County. Rollin, brother of Nellie May Hudson Wood, was b. 5 Sep 1880, Levy County and d. 5 May 1954. He is buried in Chiefland Cemetery. In 1910, the family lived in Levyville where Rollin was a merchant.
In 1913, Rollin opened the first general store in Chiefland. Children:

a. Gladys Muriel4 Hudson: b. 1 Mar 1906, New Town Community; d. 7 Jun 1996,
Gainesville (Hospital), resident of Chiefland; bur Hardeetown Cemetery. She m.
Vaughn Bernard Hardee on 12 Jul 1922. Vaughn was b. 12 Mar 1896 and d. 4 May
1999. He is buried in the Hardeetown Cemetery. One son:
(1). Charles Vaughn5 Hardee: b. 19 Dec 1923, Cedar Key; d. 12 Mar 2001, Ayers
Center, Trenton, FL; bur Hardeetown Cemetery, WW-II. He m. Faunita Inel Durrance on 6 Apr 1946, Levy County. Fanita is the daughter of Henry David and
Corene Eliza Clyatt Durrance. She was b. 18 Nov 1927, Levy County. Children:








(a). Carole Diane6 Hardee: b. 15 Oct 1949; m. H. E. "Hank" Peterson, Jr., 4
Sep 1971.
(b). Christopher Charles6 Hardee: b. 6 Jul 1957; m. Fanny Lanier.

b. Earl J.4 Hudson: b. 22 Jul 1907: d. 4 Dec 1993; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Lena
Pickens. Earl owned and operated several businesses in Chiefland. He owned and operated Hudson Grocery for 65 years and a chain of Hudson stores in several other
Florida counties. Children:
(1). James Rollin5 Hudson
(2). Earline5 Hudson: m. Jim Smith

9. Moses Elijah3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1888, Levyville Community; d. 5 Mar 1953: bur Chiefland
Cemetery. He m. Ola Bernice Rodgers, daughter of Alfred and Martha Roe Rodgers, on 19 Nov 1913 in Levyville. Graham Carter, J.P., performed the ceremony. She was b. 10 Nov
1893 and d. 13 Oct 1980, Hillsborough Co.; bur Chiefland Cemetery.

After their marriage, they moved to help settle the town of Chiefland where a railroad had just been laid. Moses had accepted a partnership in a general mercantile business known as "Carter and Wood." This business served a very large area for the period from 1913 through most of the 1940's. Moses also served as Postmaster- in conjunction with the store until a separate facility was built in the 1920's to serve the expanding population. He was active in the community, having served on the Chiefland City Council for many years and as Chairman of the School Board of Trustees for more than twenty years. In addition, he served as a principal stockholder in the Chiefland Development Company whose purpose was to offer land at low cost for city development

Moses owned 240 acres of good farmland about one-half mile east of Chiefland where
he proved to be a successful part-time farmer. He and a share-cropping family first operated the farm. The primary crops were corn and peanuts to feed cattle and hogs; but they also raised crops such as watermelons, sugar cane, and tobacco. He was the son of a successful
farmer and rancher, and he had worked on his father's farm as early as age eight.

He and Ola started the construction of their home in Chiefland immediately after
moving there. Their home was one of the very first in town. Until it was completed, they lived with Moses' sister and brother-in-law, Sewilda and Rollin Hudson. Their two daughters were born in their first house. In 1926, they built a new home. This was a brick structure and it was, for many years, the only brick home in town. This brick house is located approximately one block west of the city cemetery. Their son, Julian Gwynn Wood,
was born there in 1928.

The family members were active members in the First Baptist Church in Chiefland. Ola
and Moses lived in Chiefland until 1949. At that time, failing health had forced the closing of the store, and they moved to Tampa to be near their two daughters. The farm was sold









shortly thereafter. Most of it was sold to the state to comprise a pine nursery to provide seedling trees to landowners. The remainder was sold to Earl Hudson for expansion of his adjacent farm.

Moses died 5 Mar 1953, Hillsborough Co., at age 64. Ola lived until age 87 when she died 13 Oct 1980, Hillsborough County. Their children:

a. Sara Mozelle4 Wood: b. 2 Dec 1921, Chiefland; d. 30 Jan 1998, Tampa, FL. She
m. Robert Diaz on 20 Jun 1943, Chiefland, FL. Robert was b. 14 Feb 1919 in Tampa,
FL.

Mozelle attended schools in Chiefland, graduating from Chiefland High School at
age 16. She then attended Florida State College for Women (now Florida State University). She graduated from F.S.C.W. in 1942 with a BS degree in Education.
Following graduation, she taught Home Economics in Bronson High School. In 1943, during the period of WW-II, she left teaching and accepted a secretarial position at Camp Blanding, FL. There she met Robert Diaz who became her husband on 20 Jun 1943 in
the First Baptist Church of Chiefland.

After Robert's discharge from the military, they moved to Tampa. Later, Mozelle
returned to college to renew her teaching certificate in Special Education. She taught at Lavoy Elementary School and retired from there. The family was active in the St. John
Presbyterian Church, Tampa. Child:

(1). Robert Earl5 Diaz: b. 29 Nov 1944; m/l. Irene Arce on 26 Dec 1967; m/2 Maida
Payne on 28 Dec 1986. Maida was b. 10 Oct 1947. Children by Irene:

(a). Robert Alan Diaz: b. 27 Sep 1968, Tampa.
(b). Desiree Ann6 Diaz: b. 30 Mar 1972, Tampa.


b. Mary Millicent4 Wood: b. 22 Oct 1924, Chiefland, FL; m/l Elisha Clyatt Sapp, son of
Isaac Daniel and Margaret Drucilla Bass Sapp, on 9 Nov 1946 in Chiefland; m/2
Murray George Thomas on 9 Jul 1972, Tampa.

Mary graduated from Chiefland High School in 1942. WW-II had just begun and
Mary accepted a job at Camp Blanding Headquarters, She worked there for one year, and then left to attend F.S.C.W. in Tallahassee. She also worked in the State Department of
Education while in school.

On 9 Nov 1946, Mary and Elisha Clyatt were married at her parents' home in
Chiefland. She accompanied her husband, who was a Chief Petty Officer in the U.S.
Navy, while he was on assignment in: San Diego; Hawaii; recruiting duty in Tampa; Norfolk, VA; and Trinidad. While in Trinidad, E. C. became ill and was medically retired from the Navy in Oct 1955. He died after a long illness from a brain tumor on 17 Feb
1963.










Mary worked at Pierce Jr. High School as secretary for 22 years prior to retirement.
Mary and her second husband, Murray George Thomas, were active members of Bethel
Temple Assembly of God in Tampa. Children by E. C. Sapp:

(1). Mary Carol5 Sapp: b. 1 Oct 1949, Jacksonville, FL; m. Luther David Crews on 9
Mar 1969. Luther David Crews was b. 25 Oct 1947. Children:
(a). Emily Carol Crews: b. 14 Jun 1973, Bradenton, FL
(b). Matthew David6 Crews: b. 9 Apr 1975, Bradenton, FL

(2). Kathryn Ann' Sapp: b. 28 Oct 1941, Tampa; m. Willard Brimm on 4 Jan 1980.
Willard was b. 9 Nov 1947. Child:
(a). Willard Travis Brimm: b. 10 Oct 1987, Tampa, FL


c. Julian Gwynn4 Wood: b. 20 Sep 1928, Chiefland; m/1 Ella Jean Aman; m/2 Phoebe
Ann Cowen-Westerman on 1 Jul 1967, Canon City, CO. Ella Jean was b. 24 Jul 1934 in Tampa and d. 14 Aug 1996, Orlando, FL. Phoebe Ann was b. 10 Dec 1932 in Brush CO.
Children by Ella Jean:

(1). Gwenith Jean5 Wood: b. 23 Dec 1955, Stillwater, OK; m. Thomas William
McKee on 12 Mar 1977, Orlando, FL. Thomas William was b. 15 Oct 1951.
(a). Matthew McKee: b. 21 Dec 1979, Winter Park, FL

(2). Mark Edward5 Wood: b. 7 Dec 1959, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL; m. Kathleen
Marie Burns on 28 Jul 1980, Rapid City, SD. She was b. 15 Jul 1959, SD.
(a). Mary Louise6 Wood: b. 4 Sep 1976, Spearfish, SD; m. Michael Leslie Pollard
on 2 Nov 1996 in Ellicott, CO. Michael was b. 1 Jun 1968. They have one
daughter, Amber Renee Pollard .


L. Elafair/Alaphia2 Wood: b. 17 Apr 1860, Levy Co.; d. 18 May 1897; bur Ebenezer
Cemetery. She m. William Emanuel on 23 Dec 1883, Levy Co., FL. William was b. ca Aug
1861-1862 in FL. He m/2 Cora Lee Perryman. Children:

1. Anna/Emma3 Emanuel: b. ca Sep 1884, Levy County; m. Thomas M. Philpot on 10 Jan
1904, Levy County. He was b. ca Dec 1881, son of Thomas W. and Emily Wester Philpot.
2. Charles L.3 Emanuel: b. 14 Feb 1888, Levy County; d. 23 Jan 1969; bur Ebenezer
Cemetery.


(Information provided by the Wood Family)





























SSt






Carter & Wood s Store Chiefland Street









THE LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT 22 Oct 1896


Qualified Electors for November 3, 1896


Erwood, Fred


Bachman. Sol Barci, J, M. Bean, S. L. Bean. Samuel Blakey. E. T. Boothby, Joseph Boyd. G. A. Burford, Thomas

Camp. W. N. Carter, Ira J. Chandler, A. Chesser, B. A. Chesser, J. W. Childers, George Childers, Lewis J. Coarsey, H. Coarsey, J. B., Sr. Coarsey, W. B. Cobb, James Colson, C. D. Colson, P. M. Colson, W. J. Coulter, W. R. Cox, John Cribb. W. P. Cubberly, Fred

Darden, George C. Davis, C. H. Denham, H. W. Dimon, E. M.

Eagan, James E. Epperson, W. J.


Faircloth, W. B. Farmer, 0. J. Fletcher, W. S. Friedman, Ben Frierson, Peter

Geiger, J. S. Gomm, William Graham, David, Sr. Graham, David, Jr. Grissett, Nick Gunn, Frank

Hafele, Chris Hall, C. C. Harrod, A. F. Hatcher, Isham Highsmith, S. H. Hines, B. T.

Inebnit, U. W.

Jackson, E. P, Jackson, J. M., Sr. Jackson, J. 0. Jackson, John F. Jenkins, J. J. Johnson, John F. Jones, J. E. Jump, James W.

Kirkland, J. P.

Lambert. E. H. Lee, Caleb


Bronson, #1:

Arnold. W. F.


Lewis, Henry Lewis, J. H. Lewis, L. B. Lewis, 0. B. Lindsay, C. A. Lloyd, H. B. Long, A. Long, T. L. Lynn, A. J. Lynn, Andrew W.

McElveen, D. R. McLendon, W. H. McLeod, Alexander McLeod, W. P.

Markham, J. E. Miller. B. F. Miller. I. B. Mooney, J. W. Morgan, T. D. Munden, Isaac

Nobles, L. D. Nobles, William

Osteen, J. S. Osteen, Sol

Parker, J. S. Parker, J. W. Parker, W. J. Patterson, Gilbert Perryman, A. D. Pinnell, E. A. Pinnell, F. S. Porter. J. B.









Bronson, #1 (continued):

Prevatt, Joseph Richardson, S. C. Ricks, J. D. Ridlon, John F. Rover, Solomon Russell, C. H. Russell, J. J. Russell, William

Sale, J. C. Sanchez, F. R. Sanchez, G. B. Sanders, A. M. Sanders, J. W. Sanders, 0. N. Sapp, Wiley Scarbrough, S. E. Shands, T. W. Sheppard, Nathaniel L. Siford, J. D. Simons, G. M. Smith, Alfred Smith, B. 0. Smith, D. A.


Levyville, #2:

Adams, James Allen, J. T. Allen, R. L. Allen, William Appel, Louis Arline, D. H. H.

Bagley, B. C. Bagley, C. T. Barrow, J. L. Barrow, N. B. Barrow, T. E. Beck, G. A. Beck, J. C., Jr.


Smith, E. C. Smith, G. H. Smith, Henry M. Smith, J. B. Smith, J. F. Smith, Lovett B. Smith, M. B. Smith, P. H. Smith, R. L. Smith, T. R. Smith, T. W. Smith, V. E. Smith, W. A. Smith, W. F. Spillane, Cornelus Stewart, G. W. Stewart, J. M. Strickland, J. P. Sutton, H. S.

Thomas, Harris (?) Thompson, John Tindale, W. A. Tindale, W. J.


Beck, John C. Beck, M. M. Booth, James Bryant, S. B. Butler, F. A.

Cannon, James Carter, Graham Carter, John L. Carter, N. R., Jr. Carter, N. R. Sr. Clonts, M. A. Clyatt, M. Clyatt, S. J.


Tompkins, W. P. Tousey, 0. C. Townsend, T. 0. Trotter, J. H. Turner, S. P.

Vinzant, F. R.

Walker, D. S. Walker, Elias Walker, Elisha Walker, Joseph Watson, J. J. Welch, Joseph Wellman, Conrad Whitehurst, G. E. Wideman, E. W. Wilkinson, S. W. Wilkinson, Thomas Wilkinson, William Williams, G. C. Williams, J. J. Williams, W. R. Wilson, Archie Wilson. C. S.


Clyatt, W. W. Collier, James Cook, H. D. Creech, J. A.

Dees, C. A. Dees, E. P. Dees, F. P. Dees, J. J. Dixon, Miles Drummond, C. 0. Drummond, Hade Drummond, J. S. Durrance, H. A.









Levyville, #2 (continued):

Emanuel. William

Faircloth. T. S. Faircloth, Daniel Faircloth, I. W. Faircloth, J. William Faircloth, John Faircloth, T. J. Fleming, J. T. Fleming, J. W. Fleming, L. S. Fletcher, C. C. Fletcher, Willie Folks, T. B.

Ganus, Willis Goldwire, Andrew Goldwire, Jerry Goldwire, Norman Goode, Lee Goode, Wesley Gore, John P. Gore, W. Simon Graham, A. G.

Hardee, Emmet R. Hardee, J. Owen Hardee, J. S. Hardee, S. B. Hardee. S. L. Hardee, 0. D. Hare, Willis Hatcher, F. M. Hatcher, J. K. Hatcher, J. R. Highsmith, Sol F. Hinton, M. N. Hires, M. N. Hodge, John Hogan, T. C. Horn, W. R. Hudson, J. P. Hudson. S. W. Hudson, Williue G.


Janney, E. L.

King, J. Israel Kirkland, 0. B.

Lewis, James Lewis, John H. Lynn, Andrew D.

McBryant, John McCall, R. M. McGrath, J. R. McHenry, A. McHenry, A., Jr. McIntyre, Henry McIntyre, Warren

Markey, J. Mock, R. D. Mooney, Biancerd Morgan, J. H.

Norris, Ed

Oglesby, Isaac H. Osteen, W.

Perryman, J. F. Phelps, J. P., Jr. Phelps, J. T. Phelps, Marion Phelps, R. E. L. Phelps, W. L. Philpot, John Philpot, Thomas Potts, Allen Prevatt, J. M. Prevatt, Thomas J. Prevatt, W. M. Price, A. A.

Quincey, J. W. Quincey, Samuel


Roberts, Dennis Roberts, Frank Roberts, Frank, Jr. Robinson, W. H. Rogers, Isaac W.

Sanderson, Lee Sheppard, J. D. Sheppard, S. F. Simmons, Richard Simms, Samuel Smith, Bryant Smith, Hampton Spence, H. F. Studstill, F. Studstill, H. Studstill, John Studstill, W. J. Swindal, J. T.

Tillis, A. L. Tillis. Thomas Tindale, William Tomlinson, Charles Tompson, Jacob Turner, J. S. Tyson, Charles

Wade, Edmund Wade, James Wanamaker, J. F. Waterson, John Watts, H. F. Weeks, Silas Wilder, Richard Wilkinson, Alfred Wilkinson, D. L. Wilkinson, Dan L. Wilkinson, T. J. Williams, Wilson Wilson, Joseph, Jr. Wimer, G. L. Wimer, John C. Wood, J. N.









Levyville, #2 (continued):


Wood, J. W. Wood, Leroy


Worthington, J. C. Wynn, J. D.


Otter Creek, #3:

Barksdale, J. M. Beck, M. A. Beck, Thomas, J. Blitch, L. M. Burke, George T. Bums, Phillip Cannon, H. H. Cannon, Madison Cannon, William Cason, C. W. Collier, E. C. Collier, J. S. Crews, J. L.

Daniels, J. H. Dees, M. C.

Easter, W. A. Ellzey, R. M.

Faircloth, Levi Figgs, William

Hartman, Samuel Hillier, G. W. Hopping, J. p. Howard, C. K. Howard, S. T. Hudson, G. V.


Hudson, W. Jack

Ishie, W. F.

Jacobie, J. H. Johnson, Ezekiel

Kirkland, C. P. Kirkland, E. L. Kirkland, G. V. Kirkland, J. S. Kirkland, 0. H. P.

Lane, T. R. Liferage, Tony Maxwell, George Maxwell, James Meeks, D. C. Meeks, D. N. Meeks, L. C. Meredith, J. F. Merritt, A. J. Munden, D. J.

Oglesby, G. W. Oglesby, J. J. Omans, R. J. Osteen, Harvey Osteen, J. F.


Osteen, J. N.

Pinner, A. E. Plummer, David Proctor, R. D.

Richardson, Albert Ricks, R. C.

Sheppard, H. H. Sheppard, S. A. Stephens, Isham Strickland, R. M. Strong, David Strong, Robert Strong, W. M. Strong, William

Thompson, L. W. Turner, C. V.

Watkins, J. I. S. Watson, W. T. Wilson, Joseph Worthington, G. H. Worthington, S. E. Worthington, S. R. Yearty, T. J.









Cedar Key, #4:


Ahrens. Christian Alston, Crummie Anderson. W. H. Andrews. J. M.

Barnes, W. H. Barnes, Walter G. Benson, C. H. Bevil. R. L. Bishop, M. N. Bishop, Madison Blackwood. William Bozeman. Sam Bozeman, T. E. Bozeman, William A. Brantley, J. L. Bryant, Sydney B. Bunker. F. G.

Cannon, Sol Canty. William Cardy, G. G. Carroll, Sam W. Clarke, R. W. Clay, H. R. Coachman, Ben Collins, C. Richard Collins, J. C. Collins, J. L. Collins, T. P. Condry, S. L. Crevasse, A. W. Crevasse, H. W. Crevasse, J. N. Crevasse, J. W. Crevasse, Joe M. Crumpton, H. A. H. Crumpton, John A.

Daniels, Robert T. Davis, Daniel W. Deer, J. S. Delano, John Depew, Daniel


Dorsett, A. M. Dozier, R. M. Driver. H. Dyson, A.

Edwards, William

Fagan, W. D. Finlayson, W. D. Freely, Michael

Gardner, Charles H. Golden, Daniel Grimes, G. F.

Hale, F. E. Harrod, William Havens, C. W. Herlong, J. H. Hodges, J. C. Hodges, J. L. Hodges, T. R. Hodges, W. Randolph Howard, Ben

Johns, J. F. Johns, W. H. Johnson, C. C. Jones, A. B. Jones, Archer Jones, Robert H. Joshua, Josh

Kelly, Henry Kennedy, john King, Alfred King, Hamp King, T. Butler Kinslow, William

Launt, B. Lewis, Jask Lisenby, James M. Lowe, Henry A.


Lucas, G. T. Lutterlow, E. J. Lutterlow, J. B. Luttrell, B. F.

McBride, John McCall, R. L. McCollum, James McCormick, C. G. McCreary, R. McCreary, William T. McGrew, J. C. McIlvane, E. H. McLeod, A. E. McLeod, Alex McKenchinie, F. E.

Martin, Boston Mays, James H. Miller, Everette Miller, John C. Mitchell, J. R. Moore, J. S. Moore, William M. Moyers, George W. Moyers, S. G.

Nobles, C. H.

O'Neill, Albert F. O'Neill, E. F.

Picket6t, James M. Pittman, Decatur Porter, Abe Price, Harry C.

Rolf, D. T.

Schlemmer. Christian Schlemmer, Nicholas Schmidt, H. C. Scofield, W. P. Simons, Jeff








Cedar Key, #4 (cont.):

Sistrunk, G. M. Smith, B. F. Smith, Charles A. Smith, J. H. Sparks, H. S. Stapleton, Frank Stapleton, Robert Stewart, James Sutton, J. H.

Taylor, Charles H. Tempie, L. H.


Lebanon, #5:

Altman, D. Benson, W. C. Blitch, D. W. Brown, J. H.

Chesser, F. W. Chesser, J. A.

Davis, Henry Dyas, Aaron Dyas, Henry Dyas, J. F.

Folks, D. S. Folks, J. J. Foster, J. T.

Gaines, C. C. Gibbons, L. D.

Hathcox. W. K. Hodge, J. D. Hodge, T. J.


Tooke, J. B.

Vincent, G. M.

Walker, R. T. Walker, T. A. Walker, T. W. Watkins, T. M. Webster, C. W. White, E. J. White, Hamilton B. White, W. R.


Johnson, H. H. Kelly, B. W. King, R. T. Levins, W. R.


Mott, A. B.


Nichols, A. H. Nichols, L. E. Nichols, L. W.

Pendarvis, G. A. Priest, R. P.

Riggs, H. W. Riggs, S. J.

Sheppard, U. R. Starling, J. L. Starling, L. D. Stephens, I. C.


Whitman, C. H. Whitman, St. Claire Williams, J. A. Williams, J. E. Williams, J. Lon Williams, John, Sr. Williams, Joshua W. Wilson, Archie D. Wilson, Joseph J. Wilson, W. Wish, Charles


Stephens, J. J. Stephens, J. S. Stephens, James M.

Trotter, W. W.

Vogt, John W.

Weeks, James Weeks, W. E. Williams, F. L. Williams, W. B.


Young, J. A.










Williston, # 7:


Abercrombie, L. D. Abercrombie, Lewis Abercrombie, 0. L.

Barton, W. M. Bateman, A. H. Bateman, Ed Beamer, B. Boyer, C. W. Brewer, Claud Brewer, E. H.

Campbell. C. N. Clancy, M. A. Clark, William


Davis, W. C. Days, A. G. Days, Horace DePass, M. H. Edwards, S. W. Edwards, Will Epperson, J. B.


Frazier, S. M. Fugate, I. T. Fugate, R. M. Fugate, R. M., Jr.

Garrison., James L. Gary, Floyd

George, David George, Mark Gibson, Dave Gibson, L. W. Gornto, J. M. Green, Peter

Hale. C. P. Hale, S. C. Hale, J. V. Hall, J. E. Harrod, F. A.


Harvey, John Hawkins, Balaam Hawkins, J. A. Hawkins, Luther Hester, L. C. Holland, Dan Holland, Solomon Howard, A. W.

Jordan, George Jordan, Robert

King, H. H. King, P. N.

Landrum, R. Lee, Alex Limbaugh, D. M. Long, James H. Lowman, B. B. Lowman, B. M. Lowman, G. B. Lowman, W. S.

McDonell, Charles

Malphurs, J. N. Mann, H. t. Mattair, H. P. Miller, John Mixson, A. J. Mixson, J. J. Mixson., J. M. Mixson, E. S. Moore, D. F. Moore, W. W. Morton, C. T.

Nelson, H. G. Nelson. J. H.

Newsom, D. P.

Peacock, J. B.


Phillips, S. Phinney, D. S. Pope, D. L. Potts, Henry Powell, Richard Price, E. C. Primus, August

Rawls, I. N. Reddick, J. P. Reddick, T. T. Rhodes, R. A. Riley, E. D. Roach, J. J. H. Roach, J. M. Roach, 0. J. Robinson, J. E. Rover, John

Sistrunk, M. M. Smith, A. W. Smith, J. W. Smith, T. N. Smith, William Spates, White Spikes, Abram Stinson, Ned Strain, A. T. Strain, Ed Strain, Ed, Jr.

Terry, E. T. Thomas, William Tyner, D. B. Tyner, J. B. Tyner, J. J.

Wade, Thomas Wallace, D. T. Wallace, Dan Wallace, Obie Waters, Amos Waters, Charles Westbrook, J. T.








Williston, #7 (cont.):


Westbrook, T. H. Westbrook, W. I. Williams, D. E. Williams, J. T.


Willis, B. F. Willis, D. B. Willis, G. M. Willis, G. W.


Willis, J. J. Willis, J. L. Willis, J. M. Willis, J. R. Willis, L. R.


Stafford Pond, # 6:

Armstrong, C. Armstrong, D. M.

Blitch, J. S. Blitch, N. A. Blitch, N. L. Brooks, B. G. Brooks, Badger Brooks, Thomas


Chairs, R. C. Chancy, Sam DeBusk, Alex


Epperson, J. I. George, Joseph Guess, J. R.


Hill, J. K.


Evins, T. J. Lewis, A. L. Lewis, Jesse Limbaugh, R. G. Limbaugh, T. N.

Melon, Stephen


Newmans, H. Newmans, J.

Plummer, Joseph Randall, G. M.

Simms, Wesley Sistrunk, J. S. Sneller, P. 0. Stanley, E. T. Strickland, H. T.

Tison, W. S.

Watson, C. K.


Sumner, #9:

Arline, J. E. Barnes, J. S. Carson, S. C. Cason, W. H. Coleman, John

Edwards, Ransom Goodson, M. M. Hall, Bachus Hall, Isaac Hall, James


Hall, T. P. Hall, W. J. Higginbotham, George Hudson, J. M. Hudson, John P.


Ingram, Samuel Ingram, W. F. Jacobs, C. M. Little, J. P. Miller, S. J.


Morgan, John Pearson, J. J. Roland, G. M. Roland, J. E.

Shiver, James Simmons, F. T. Smith, L. W. Surles, J. E. H. Wright, W. E. Yearty, W. E.








Judson, #10:


Adams, J. H. Adams, J. W. Arrington, G. W. Asbell, Moses

Barry, F. P. Bass, James Beauchamp, A. C. Brown, J. M. Buckalew, F. M.

Carter, W. P. Clyatt, 0. S. Crook, J. B.

Davis. B. J. Dexter, Charles Dikes, John Dikes, Richard Dixon, L. D. DuPree, Jacob F.


Elliott, G. E.


Felder, C. M. Fralix, Jackson Futch, W. 0.

Garner, Henry Garner, S. H. Geiger, William

Hall, Peter W. Harris, H. L. Harris, William Harris, William, Sr. Hatcher, J. J. Hays, H. K. Hays, W. H. Hiers, J. M.


Highsmith, W. H. Horn, E. F. Horn, J. R. Horn, J. N. Horn, R. L.

Jones, C. T. Jones, J. A. Jones, J. D.

Keen, Moses Kidd, J. C. King, I. L.

Lafield, H. S. Lewis, William Lock, J. W.

McCall, L. L. McCall, R. W. McCall, T. G. McCall, W. H.

McElroy, A. McElroy. C. E. McElroy, Charles W. McElroy, F. N. McElroy, John T. McElroy, W. B. McGowen, Frank McGowen, J. N. McGowen, John McIntyre, Warren

Martin, W. J.

Norris, E. Norris, Pompey

Overstreet, J. A.


Overstreet, J. M. Overstreet, J. W.

Perryman, W. R. Philpot, R. P. Polk, L. V. Purvis, William

Raulerson, R. M. Richardson, S. M. Rush, A. M. Rush, E. W.

Sanchez, A. B. Sanchez, John B. Sandlin, M. L. Sash, John Shaw, J. W. Sheffield, J. K. Stockman, J. F. Stockman, J. H. Sullivan, J. D. Swindal, C. C. Swindal, I. H.

Tew, S. M. Ticker, R. S. Tucker, W. H.

Walker, W. C. Ward, D. L. Ward, Edward Watson, L. W. Watson, W. J. Watson, W. W. Watt, William Weeks, C. B. Weeks, W. W. White, Samuel Whitney, J. W. Williams, C. H.









Morriston, # 8:

Allen, Twiggs Armstrong, D. N.

Barber, J. J. Barrow, C. E. Blitch, F. W. Blitch, W. H. H. Boyett, J. W. Brown, henry Butler, J. H. Butler, Thomas

Callaway, C. C. Chance, I. N. Curry, J. R.

Dennis, Lorenzo

Forbes, E. W. Fountain, B. J.

Gary, Thomas I. George, Barnett

Hall, J. M. Harralson, K. E.


Shell Pond, #11:

Bigham, W. R. Boatley, Harry Brewer, Thomas Brown, A. L. Brown, Calvin Campbell, C. H. DePass, James P. Dunn, Taylor Gaines, Reuben Gatling, George


Hill, G. T. Hill, R. L. Hughey, W. A. Hughey, W. F. Humphrey, W. S.

Jennings, B. S. Johnson, J. J. Jones, C. M.

McCullough, Elgin

Matthews, J. D. Matthews, W. F. Mills, J. B. Murrell, G. D. Murrell, L. B.

Page, peter Pedrick, B. A. Pedrick, G. W. Pedrick, I. S. Pedrick, John S. Peterson, F. W. Pitts, Frank Pitts, Frank, Jr.


Griffin, A. J. Guess, C. A. Harrell, J. W. Helveston, S. P. Holland, L. T. Holland, Milo Kelly, Thomas Kyler, Frank McCorquodale, J. B. McDonell, F. S.


Polk, W. I. Priest, Emery Priest, G. R. Priest, J. J. Priest, Lawton Priest, R. G. Priest, Wiley

Roberts, Allen Roberts, Frank

Shealy. G. M. Shearouse, J. E. Stanley, Jacob Stanley, John B. Stephens, G. A. Stephens., H. A. Stephens, S. B. W. Strawn, J. M.

Tillis, S. S.

Walker, S. S. Williams, A. M. Wright, J. C.

Young, Emmet


McDonell, G. F. Mattair, Anderson Melton, Burrell Miller, Alex M. Morse, D. L. Pinkney, Davis Reddick, Romeo Ross, Richard Williams, T. B. Williams, W. B.









Red Hollow, # 12: Adams, A, S. Billups. J. W. Blalock. Ivey Blalock, J. W. Chason, J. J. Davis, George Davis, W. M. Dexter, Will Durrance, J. W. Fletcher, G. W. Gay, W. H. Griffin, M.

Hays, Henry


Hogan, J. W. Hogan, S. T. Johnson, W. F. Jones, W. A. Kidd, Isaac W. Lightsey. Jacob Lynn, W. D. McCollister, P. A.


Meredith, I. F. Mullis, E. Mullis, R.

Owens, C. H.


Rogers. H. S.

Sheffield, I. S. C. Sheffield, S. Stringfellow, C. C. Stringfellow, J. C. Sullivant, H. Sullivant, R.

Tedder, J. E. M. Tindale, Ezekiel Tison, R. L. Tison, S. H.

Ward, E. W. Ward, L. A. Watson, S. A. Wood, Samuel









Notice: The following names have been stricken from the previous list Otter Creek, # 3: J. W. Carter; S. H. Worthington; & Dick James. Cedar Key, # 4: Bradshaw Campbell; A. L. Crumpton; Frank Furstnow; James Green;; Daniel Golden, Jr.; J. C. Hallaway; W. F. Havens; & S. G. Robinson. Lebanon, # 5: John S. Campbell. Stafford Pond, # 6: L. T. Pedrick. Williston, # 7: W. T. Craig; Oscar Wayne; & W. P. Williams. Sumner, # 9: S. C. Gause.

Judson, # 10: J. P. Phelps, Sr.








Book Discloses Details Of Hunt For Soviet Subs
By Vladimir Isachenkov
Associate Press Writer

MOSCOW- Hunted down by the U.S. Navy off Cuba during the 1962 missile crisis, a furious Soviet submarine commander ordered a nuclear-tipped torpedo armed for action but then controlled his anger and brought the sub to the surface, where American ships were waiting.
The previously unknown incident which might have pushed the two superpowers closer to nuclear war is disclosed in a book released this week.
The book, written by Russian journalist Alexander Mozgovoi, tells the story four Soviet submarines engaged in a cat-and-mouse game with the U.S. Navy off Cuba at the height of the Cuban missile crisis. It is based on interviews with former submariners.
The four diesel submarines, which were armed with both conventional and nuclear-tipped torpedoes, sailed from the Arctic Kola Peninsula. They managed to pass unnoticed through U.S. and NATO cordons in the northern Atlantic, but were spotted by the Navy as they approached Cuba. The submarines needed to come to the surface often to charge their batteries, and that made them easy marks for the U.S. antisubmarine cordons around the communist island.
Captain Valentin Savitsky's B-59 submarine was quickly spotted by Navy patrol aircraft when it appeared on the surface. American destroyers rushed to block the submarine and began dropping stun grenades to force it to resurface, said Vadim Orlov, who was in charge of the submarine's radio intelligence at the time.
"The Americans encircled us and began dropping grenades that were exploding right next to us," Orlov was quoted as saying in the book. "It felt like sitting in a metal barrel with someone hitting it with a sledgehammer. The crew was in shock."
The bombardment went on for several hours, and some sailors lost consciousness as oxygen ran low and temperatures inside the submarine soared above 122 degrees.
After an especially strong explosion shook the submarine, "Savitsky got furious and ordered an officer in charge of a nuclear-tipped torpedo to arm the weapon," Orlov said in the book.
"There may be a war raging up there, and we are trapped here turning somersaults!" Savitsky cried, according to Orlov. "We are going to hit them hard. We shall die ourselves, sink them all but not stain the navy's honor!"
The submarines' commanders could use conventional torpedoes only on order from the navy chief, and the use of nuclear torpedoes could only be authorized by direct order from the Soviet defense minister, the book said. However, the close surveillance by the U.S. Navy made it hard for submarines to resurface for scheduled communications sessions.
Savitsky eventually controlled his anger and ordered the submarine to the surface. It was dark, but the area was brightly lit by searchlights from U.S. ships and a U.S. helicopter buzzing overhead. "We felt like a wolf hunted down," Orlov remembered. "It was a beautiful but frightful scene."
The book has not been translated into English. Its Russian title, "Kubinskaya Samba Kvarteta Fokstrotov," translates to "Cuban Samba of the Foxtrot Quartet."
A spokesman for the Russian Defense Ministry on Friday refused to comment on the incident described in the book. However, Mozgovoi is deputy editor of Russia's military trade magazine, Military Parade, the mouthpiece of the military-industrial complex, and his book is considered quite credible.
Mozgovoi said that according to his conversations with submariners, Savitsky was the only one of four submarine commanders to consider unauthorized use of a weapon, but added that it was hard to blame him.
"Savitsky s crew was under terrible pressure at the moment, both psychologically and physically," Mozgovoi said by telephone.
Savitsky himself is not quoted in the book; he had died by the time Mozgovoi began work on it.










The Bomb and The Kids
Early during World War II, the Coast Guard moved into Cedar Keys. They were stationed on Second Street. Their boats patroled the coast line. Then the Army moved across the street and they also had boats. These boats would pull targets for the planes to shoot at. There were bombing ranges north and south of Cedar Key also. Sometimes these planes would bomb an oyster bar. This story is about their bombs.
Blake, Dorothy, and Lizzie Bell Lindsey were visiting Margarite and Gladys Beckham in Hungry Bend (which is on the east side of Cedar Key). Blake told them about a bomb he knew about. He said it was out of the water, and you could see it. Everyone wanted to go see it. They got a boat and poled down to Carrigan's Reef. There, they found the bomb.
The kids decided to bring it back to town and put it under the Beckham's house. The house is about three feet off the ground. It took some time for them to get it on the net table of the boat, but they did. On the way back home they passed Mr. Lindsey, who was going fishing, he wanted to know what they were doing. Blake said they had gone oystering. To hide the bomb, they put their coats over it, and Lizzie Bell was sitting on it.
When they got back to the dock, which was in front of Mr. Beckham's house, they decided to wait until dark. So Blake, Dorothy, and Lizzie Bell went home for supper. While they were gone, a boy had seen the bomb and told the Coast Guard. When they returned to the Beckham's house, the Coast Guard stopped them. Dorothy got real mad, that was their bomb! Blake's brother Jesse was stationed in Cedar Key and they put him guard over the bomb all night.
The next day at school, they told us the bomb would be dropped by a plane. You should've heard the sound, it made the windows rattle.
I know that an angel was in that boat that day.


This is the type of boat the kids used for getting the bomb















>5*



45 4'


SN. Zr


'~1


>4W


A g

el 8 484&;~w "5 1 A


r 4












S .5


Side exit door of the Cedar Key Movie Theater.

Submitted by Kathryn Harris.


V



















































































































- -7'- 7-7- >














UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09770 9744




Full Text

PAGE 1

A History of Levy County, Florida & & & Chapter Twenty-four & & & Published By The Levy County Archives Committee Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners May 2003 Bronson, Florida A Bicentennial Publication

PAGE 2

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/searchforyesterd2420levy

PAGE 3

A History of Levy County, Florida & & & Chapter Twenty-four & & & Published By The Levy County Archives Committee Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners May 2003 Bronson, Florida A Bicentennial Publication Copyright 2003 Levy County Archives Committee

PAGE 4

The Kiln at the Gulf Hammock Sawmill This article was written by Russel P. Comeaux with information furnished by Mrs. Eliza Holmes of Otter Creek, her son, Glen Holmes of Chiefland, and Mr. Lindon Lindsey. Russel and Mr. Lindsey are members of the Levy County Archives Committee. Why The Lumber Dry Kilns At Gulf Hammock Became Bomb Shelters The lumber companies, possibly Grove-Dowling and later Pat-Mac, had 10 buildings used as kilns to dry lumber. These buildings were constructed of concrete, brick and tile. Prom 1956-59, Pidel Castro led a revolution in the country of Cuba which resulted in the overthrow of the Pulgencio Batista Regime and sent him into exile. Shortly after, Cuba, under Castro, became friendly with Russia and the country turned communist. In 1962, the Russians decided to arm Cuba with missiles and/or rockets. Parts of the United States, especially Plorida, would be well within the range of these mis siles and rockets. Due to this threat, the United States started patrolling the high seas around Cuba to inter cept any shipment of such cargo. Lor a while this was quite a tense situation and the scare that this may have resulted in further military action caused many people living near these abandoned kilns to start plan ning their use as bomb shelters. The following pages describe the civil defense rules and regulations for planning, restoration, and the description of the buildings. They also include survey of the houses and people of Gulf Hammock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey. Rules and Regulations of Fallout Shelters of Gulf Hammock and Otter Creek area The rules and regulations committee met December 11, 1962. This special committee was appointed to set the rules and regulations by which the fallout shelter program can be started. Both Gulf Hammock and Ot ter Creek were represented on this committee. It was agreed by the committee that:

PAGE 5

1. Three men with building knowledge be appointed to supervise the building of the shelters. Those ap pointed were: Building Chairman, Clyde Williams, Emil Boettcher and John Meeks. 2. Space in the fallout shelter will be $7.00 per person. Since this cost covers only materials and not the cost of labor, each male adult will be required to work a certain amount of hours, which will be deter mined later. If a person in unable to work, he may pay someone selected by the building committee to work in his place. 3. Any family needing to pay in installments will be given up to six months to pay with a minimum of $15.00 per month. 4. Receipts will be issued for all money collected. Each receipt shall show number in family, shelter as signment, space number, and balance owed on account (if any). 5. Automatic assignment to the shelter will be made in the order in which a family pays for their place. 6. Any ill, aged (that is unable to care for themselves), physically disabled or injured persons will be placed in a separate medical unit near bathroom facilities. This will insure better and more adequate med ical and nursing care. 7. Each family will be responsible for their own food, clothing, medical supplies, bedding, and other per sonal articles. No unnecessary space consuming articles will be permitted. 8. Alcoholic beverages will be for medicinal purposes only and administered under the supervision of the social-welfare committee. 9. Each shelter will elect their own individual committee by majority vote of its members. These commit tees will consist of: Chief Warden, Wardens, and social-welfare. All shelters will still function as a whole unit under the committee already established by the Zone 1 General Chairman and Zone Director. 10. All members will be required to respect the authority of their committee officers and have proper re spect for those housed within the shelter. Survey of Dry Kilns in Gulf Hammock, Florida December 2, 1962. There are ten such dry kilns as diagramed above, five of which will take very much work and money to secure against radioactive fallout. Only the top half of the 16-foot ends will have to be secured. The re maining five kilns will have to be repaired substantially, especially the walls, before they could be used for shelters. The tops of the kilns are covered by four inches of reinforced concrete and two inches of tile. There is a one foot siding around the top of the kilns, which would allow a foot of dirt to be put on top of the kilns. This would safely take care of any fallout that landed on the roof of the kilns. There is 1360 square feet of room inside each kiln, allowing 15 square feet per person; this space would take care of ninety (90) people.

PAGE 6

View of the kiln in 1996 More views of the kiln in 1996

PAGE 7

A view of the water tank at the Pat & Mac Sawmill There are 146 white and 92 colored residents in and around the city of Gulf Hammock, Florida. Mr. John Swilley has a fallout shelter and a house that can be made into a temporary shelter. In summary, there are 140 white and 92 colored residents whose houses offer, and have no potential to offer, protection against radioactive fallout. The hotel at Gulf Hammock was surveyed as to its possibilities for radioactive fallout protection. The lower hallway of the hotel can be secured with approximately 3,000 sand bags. There are 690 square feet in this hallway, which will protect approximately 46 people. SURVEY OF THE HOUSES OF GULF HAMMOCK, FLORIDA AS TO THEIR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT WHITE COLORED OWNER NO. IN HOUSE OWNER NO. IN HOUSE John Swilley 6 Clyde Myers 2 George Bird 5 Dan Carney 2 Paul Casey 3 Roosevelt Hopkins 3 Brad Williams 2 Albert Harrel 2 Mrs. Colson 2 Frank Brooks 1 Lewis Baldree 2 Geichie Holmes 6 Bugs Watkins 7 Jamem Padgett 2

PAGE 8

Fleet Williams 4 Clyde Williams Sr. 2 Rufus Smith 5 Terry Matthews 4 Mrs. Mandy Perryman 1 Willie Berryhill 4 Mrs. Alice Gordan 5 Carl Cullpepper 4 Sam Standridge 4 Atlanta Clyatt 1 Fred Hamilton 1 Little Boy Williams 8 Junior Williams 4 Lewis Renfore 2 Haygood Ellzey 3 Bufford Holmes 4 John Moody 2 Goerge Birdsey 2 John Atkerson 4 Slim Crawly 2 Ben Morris 4 Bill Booker 5 Mrs. Maybell Standridge 1 Willard Williams 8 J.C. Hudson 12 Mrs. Ruth Harp 1 Ralph Harrison 4 Mrs. Ruby West 1 Miss Edna Collin 1 Jay Ellzey 8 J.L. McCall 3 Sonny Crews 3 Monroe Killcrease 1 Earnest (Red John) Davis 5 Mrs. Izetta Ellzey 2 Willis Crews 3 Richard Hudson 3 Gordon Faircloth 1 Lawrence Curry 4 POPULATION OF WILLIAMS James Goodbread 3 Mr. McMullen 1 Mrs. Ellen Smith 1 Steve Gore, Jr. 4 Clarence Maxwell 2 Mrs. Evie Maxwell 1 Mrs. Dicie Peterson 1 Ed Tucker 1 Jimmy Davis 4 Steve Gore, Sr. 3 Mrs. Fanny Meeks 3 Miss Julie Lowe 1 Mrs. Betty Tompkins 7 Mrs. Essie Yearty 1 Mrs. Lula Yearty 2 Mrs. Missouri Cobb 2 Lloyd Albutton 4 John White 4 Andy Sandlin 2 Wafford Ellzey 2 Murriel Watson 4 Irene Williams 2 James Nichols 3 James Standridge 4 James B. Congers 1 Frank Debs 2 Tony Gore 2 John Smith 2 Nick West 2 Mrs. Carabell Smith 1 Howard Williams Sr. 3 Ed Penner 1 Rice Watson 2 Mrs. Ruth Revells 1 Mudric Meeks 4 L.C. Williams 7 Johnny Crew 8 D.L. Duncan 6 Brox Deas 1 H.O. Faircloth 1 FISH CAMP Mr. Anderson 2 Arthur Green 7 TOTAL WHITE POPULATION OF ELLZEY, OTTER CREEK AND WILLIAMS FISH CAMP 290

PAGE 9

A view of the kiln in 1996 A CIVIL DEFENSE REPORT ON THE COMMUNITIES OF ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA DECEMBER 13,1962 WHITE POPULA TION OF ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA OWNER NO. IN HOUSE OWNER NO. IN HOUSE John Meeks 7 Lawrence Lee 6 Jack Meeks 7 Harry McElveen 3 Rufus Meeks 2 Dale Atkerson 4 Emil Boettcher 5 George Cooper 2 Claude Rogers 2 Calvin Hill 3

PAGE 10

Grandma Watkins 3 Henretta Anderson 2 Williams 2 Jack Brannon 6 Thad Barber 10 Josie Banks 1 Lewis Keith 3 Oliver Long 2 Oliver Gore 5 George Anna Davis 2 Newton Fralix 2 Hardy Richardson 2 Carl Hinson 2 G.D. Jefferson 2 Wash Hinson 2 Rose Romock 4 Ray Burnett 4 Lafayette Richardson 4 Elmer Dykes 4 Benny Goldwire 4 Bob Pollard 5 Jimmy Sheeler 4 James Hilton 2 Bessie Channey 1 Warren Owens 3 Apples Veal 12 Bill Gavins 2 Jim Graham 7 Haste Pendarvis 6 Murrell Hodge 8 Auther Berryhill 2 Will Dunn 2 John Yearty 6 Neb 10 Bill Olgle 2 Hamp Beckett 2 Dewitt Watson 4 Will Watson 7 Maie Osteen 4 Bill Dingham 4 Martin Quick 2 Harry Woods 1 Devere Mills 3 Mack Hodges 2 Larry Geiger 2 Virgil Cox 2 Willis Roberts 2 Robert Hodge 3 L.V. Smith 8 Dicey Smith 2 Estelle Clater 4 J.T. Pennington 2 *Houses that can be secured COLORED POPULATION OF ELLZEY, AND OTTER CREEK, FLORIDA OWNER NO. IN HOUSE OWNER NO. IN HOUSE Green Wright 1 Mrs. Mary Sawyer 2 James Williams 2 James Peeples 1 Kelly Stokes 2 Mrs. Ella Tart 1 Mrs. Maggie Polight 1 Palmer Stucky 1 Mrs. Vera Scott 7 Willie Alston 4 Tom Ferguson 1 T.B. Graham Sr. 8

PAGE 11

Mrs. Belle Dooley 1 Kimmie Green 1 Willard Howard Sr. 10 Bill Birdsey 3 Turner Hughes 2 Rev. Charles Jelks 2 Roosevelt Daniels 2 Joe Bridges 4 Charley Scott 6 Johnny Screen 2 Mrs. Lizzie Screen 1 Dan Thompson 1 Mrs. Emma Tart 1 Wimpie 1 Mrs. Sweet Glover 3 Mose 1 Will Smith 1 Frank Brooks 2 Dennis Williams 4 O.T. Thompson 1 Mrs. Carrie Goss 1 R.L. Stacy 5 Mrs. Fannie Mattox 5 Felix Langston 2 Fulton Strong 1 Mrs. Mary Richards 1 Mrs. Edna Williams 1 Merrill McNeal Sr. 5 Johnny Glover 2 Thomas Howard Sr. 4 Richard Strong 1 Nathan Collie 2 Mrs. Laura Braxton 1 TOTAL COLORED POPULATION OF ELLZEY AND OTTER CREEK 109 SUMMARY There are ninety-one white houses in Otter Creek and Ellzey, Florida, which houses two hundred and ninety persons. There are forty-five colored houses in the same communities which house one hundred and nine persons. None of the above one hundred and thirty-six houses with a total of three hundred and ninety-nine persons offer any protection against radioactive fallout. A survey of the town s builders was made. Only one building, the elementary schoolhouse at Otter Creek, Florida could be converted into a fallout shelter. The schoolhouse hallway has approximately 1440 square feet and will accommodate approximately 100 persons. It will take 3300 sand bags to secure the above hallway. This building cannot be secured until an emergency is called, thus making an added bur den in securing the building. The dry kilns, six miles south of the communities of Otter Creek and Ellzey offer adequate shelters for the three hundred and ninety-nine unprotected inhabitants. These kilns can accommodate almost the popu lation of Gulf Hammock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey. For approximately six hundred dollars, a kiln (not in cluding labor), each kiln can be adequately secured on the accommodate ninety persons. There are seven such kilns, which will secure a total of five hundred and forty persons. The total populations of Gulf Ham mock, Otter Creek, and Ellzey, and their outlying areas are six hundred and ninety seven persons.

PAGE 12

A view of the smoke stacks at the Pat & Mac Sawmill.

PAGE 13

Russel Pierre Comeaux was born and lived for 19 years in South Louisiana (Bayou and Swamp Coun try) in the small town of Paincourtville which is in Assumption Parish. Like many other families in that area and very much like many families in Levy County, we were very poor but didnÂ’t seem to realize it. My dad, Cyprien, worked first in the sugar cane fields and later in the sugar mill. My mom, Julie Landry, was a homemaker. So you ask, "What the heck is a Cajun doing involved in The Levy County Archives Committee?" Well, my wife Shirley Meeks was born and raised in Levy County (Judson and Otter Creek). From the time I first visited Levy County in 1962, I liked the area and the friendly people. In 1970, I was working as an Air Traffic Controller in New Orleans and was able to secure a transfer in the same job capacity at the Orlando Executive Airport. So Shirley and I and our three little boys, Bruce, Brent, and Bart, packed up all of our belongings in a U-Haul truck and moved. I worked at the Orlando Airport for 20 years and then transferred to the Gainesville Airport from which I retired in 1998. When I started working at the Gainesville Airport in 1990, we made our home in Chiefland. Now comes the history part. I am almost ashamed to admit I didn t care much about history until about 1995 and now I canÂ’t get enough of it. It started for me by reading a chapter (book) or two of "The Search for Yesterday" which is a history of Levy County places and people. By then I had an appetite to buy all of the chapters and read them. Soon after I met my good friends Lindon and later Donna Lindsey and he invited me to come to the Levy County Archives Committee meetings. I attended a meeting, became a member, and have given time and help with book sales at specials events. Lindon and I scheduled and met Pat and Mac Sawmill at Gulf Hammock before the fire. with 13 older citizens of Levy County, interviewed them on tape and soon will have these tapes transcribed and will have the cassette tape, a paper copy, and a floppy disk of these interviews available at The Ar chives Committee office for public use.

PAGE 14

This Information was Submitted by Abbie Jean Rodgers Richner Alfred 1 Rodgers 1829-1908 Alfred Rodgers was bom 18 Jul 1829 (grave stone shows 15 Oct 1834) in Kingston, New York, on the Hudson River. He was bom of English parents who owned an apple orchard in the area. He was reared in New York and as a young man he attended either the Columbia Institute or Academy in New York. He had a brother named John and a sister named Mary Jane. Mary Jane married _Adams and settled Near Killeen, TX. She died at age 79. Alfred left his family in New York, migrated west and became a wagon master for the government overland mail from Salt Lake City, Utah, to San Franscisco, CA. He made a total of three trips, which covered about 1,200 miles. On the first trip, he mastered 26 wagons, the second 36, and the third 52 wagons. Indians wounded him three times on these trips. All the wounds were from arrows and the most serious was received on the first trip. Indians also captured him, but it is not clear whether it was during one of these trips or if it was when he was scouting. In any case, he made friends with the Indian tribe and the chief gave him a stick pinned with red dots on it and said if he were captured again he was to show the stick and he would be released. He was captured again by another tribe and when he showed the stick he was released. Then, Alfred returned to the East Coast to Savannah, GA. There he saw Martha Ann Roe sitting on her front porch steps and realized she was the most beautiful girl that he had ever seen (according to a story related by his son, Guy Whitman Rodgers). Alfred and Martha were married 26 Feb 1871. After their marriage, they moved near Quitman, Brooks, Co., GA. While they lived there, they spent several days in an old gristmill weathering out a hurricane. The old mill was constructed of hand-hewn logs and held together with wooden pegs. The roof was nailed with square nails. Alfred died 18 Jul 1908 (grave marker shows 17 Jan 1909). He is buried in Chiefland, FL. Martha Ann Roe was bom 15 Aug 1850 near Milledgeville, GA. She was an orphan and had to work for her keep. She worked for different farms in the area around Savannah. She joined the Baptist Church in Statenville, GA, and was baptized in the Alapaha River on 29 Apr 1888. Her son, Guy Whitman Rodgers, was present. She died 21 Jan 1933 and is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Martha had two brothers, Andrew and Thomas E. Roe. Andrew lived in GA and Tom was living with Martha Ann and two of her children in 1910, Chiefland, FL. Tom was bom 4 Aug 1843 and died 29 Apr 1917. He is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Andrew Roe had three children: Dan, Albert, and Laura Ann (m. _Bennett). Alfred and Martha Ann had the following children: +A. Claude Eugene 2 Rodgers: 1871-1961 B. Willie 2 Rodgers: b. 15 Aug 1873; d. 18 Aug 1873 near Homerville, GA C. Mary Jane Bulah 2 Rodgers: b. 15 Sep 1874; d. 3 Aug 1876 near Homerville, GA +D. Benjamin Alfred 2 Rodgers: 1876-1974 +E. Guy Whitman 2 Rodgers: 1881-1955 F. John Frederick “Jack” 2 Rodgers: b. 22 Dec 1883; d. 11 Aug 1900 near Homerville, GA +G. Travis Plant 2 Rodgers: 1886-1943 H. Charles Cyrus 2 Rodgers: b. 5 Jul 1891, GA; d. 15 Jan 1925; bur Chiefland Cemetery; WW-I I. Ola Bernice 2 Rodgers: 1893-1953 (See: Wood Family). A. Claude Eugene2 Rodgers: b. 12 Dec 1871 near Savannah, Ga, and d. 18 Jul 1961 (bur. Chiefland

PAGE 15

Cemetery. He m. Lawson Tomlinson, 19 Mar 1900, Ciinch Co., GA. Lawson was b. 18 Feb 1872 in GA and d. 1 Apr 1952; bur Chiefland Cemetery. Claude played a vital role in the turpentine industry of Levy County. The 1910 Census shows him in the Levyville Precinct, owner of a Turpentine Company. In 1920 he is listed in the Chiefland Precinct. Their children: +1. Robert Purdy 3 Rodgers: b. 1 Dec 1900; d. 21 Mar 1982 +2.George Hubbard 3 Rodgers: 22 Jan/Feb 1902; d. Jan 1980 3. William Jennings 3 Rodgers: b. 20 Dec 1904; d. 20 Dec 1986, res. of Ocala, FL. 4. John Marcus 3 Rodgers: b. 29 Nov 1906. Did he d. 11 Aug 1992, res. of Jacksonville, FL. 5. Mildred Catherine 3 Rodgers: b. 8 Dec 1909, FL +6. James Claude 3 Rodgers: b. 11 Feb 1911 7. Jack Julius 3 Rodgers: b. 10 Nov 1912, FL 8. Mary Elizabeth 3 Rodgers: b. 29 Jan 1919 (Families for 1-2, and 6 listed below). 1. Robert Purdy 3 Rodgers: b. 1 Dec 1900, GA; d. 21 Mar 1982; m. Dora Elise Williams, 29 Jun 1925. Purdy and Elise made their home in Chiefland and reared their daughters there. Purdy played a vital role in the turpentine industry in the area. Elise was b. 29 Apr 1904, Pavo, GA, and d. 23 Feb 1988, Newnan, GA. In her later years, she had gone to Grantville, GA, to be near her daughter, Anne Elise Rodgers Hall. She was an outstanding teacher in the Chiefland Elementary School for 39 years. She and Purdy are buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Their children and grandchildren: a. Anne Elise 4 Rodgers: b. 18 Sep 1926, Chiefland; d. 26 May 1992, Pocatello, ID; bur Grantville, GA; m. Morris Alfred Hall, Sr., 9 Aug 1958. Morris was b. 5 May 1919 & d. Feb 1978; bur Grantville, GA. Children: (1) Morris Alfred 5 Hall, Jr.: b. 24 May 1959; living in Pocatello, ID, 1992; m/1 Tammy Hayes, 10 Dec 1986; m/2 Michele Bruno, 20 Aug 1994. Children: (a) Nicole Denise 6 Hall (by w# 1): b. 1989 (b) Annelise Jean 6 Hall (by w#2): b. 1995 (c) Mikaila Morise 6 Hall (by w#2): b. 1997 (2) Purdy Norman 5 Hall: b. 3 Jun 1961; living in Grantvill, GA, 1992; m. Melony Reed Tribble, 24 Jun 1995. Child: (a). Justin Matthew 6 Hall b. Abby Jean 4 Rodgers: b. 8 Dec 1927, Chiefland; living in Lakeland, FL, 1988; later, living in Homosassa, FL; m/1 Gustaf Willis Fisher, 8 Dec 1951; m/2 William Eugene Richner, 18 Aug 1988. Gustaf was b. 1920 and d. Dec 1999. Children and grandchildren by Gustaf: (1) Carl Gustaf 6 Fisher: b. 24 Jul 1953; living in Ft. White, FL, 1988; m. Lori Beth Lindsey, 8 Oct 1983. Children: (a) Sarah Elizabeth 6 Fisher: b. 16 Aug 1990 (b) Elise Catherine 6 Fisher: b. 16 Aug 1990 (2) Curtis Robert 5 Fisher: b. 23 Feb 1957; living in Orlando, 1988; m. Mona Kay Burris, 15 Dec 1984.

PAGE 16

2. George Hubbard 3 Rodgers: 22 Jan 1902, GA; d. Jan 1980, resident of Lady Lake, FL; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Hilda C._. Hilda was b. 1906. 6. James Claude 3 Rodgers: b. 11 Feb 1911, Levy Co., FL; d. 8 Jul 1978, res. of Gulf Hammock; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Judith S._. Judith was b. 11 Nov 1919. D. Benjamin Alfred 2 Rodgers: b. 30 Dec 1876, Brooks Co., GA; d. 22 Apr 1964; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Eula J. Tomlinson, 30 Aug 1909, Levy Co., FL. Eula was b. 12 Apr 1878, GA; d. 12 Jan 1950, resident of Chiefland; bur Chiefland Cemetery. Eula was the sister of Claude’s wife, Lawson. In 1910, Benjamin Alfred was listed as a turpentine woodsman in the Levyville Precinct, Levy Co. FL. In 1920, the family is listed in the Chiefland Precinct. In addition to their son, Franklin, Capitola Tomlinson (b. ca 1896-1897) was with Ben and Eula. Capitola “Miss Cap” was Eula’s sister. Ben owned and operated Rodger’s Grocery Store in Chiefland. The original store was an old wooden building located near his house about one block of the main highway that now runs through town. His house is being restored by his granddaughter and her husband, Karen and John Pankow of Chiefland. In his last years, he turned his business over to his son, Franklin. Franklin built a new building on the main highway. One child: 1. Benjamin Franklin 3 Rodgers: b. 27 Feb 1917; d. 14 Mar 1990, Gainesville, FL (hospital); bur Chiefland, FL; m. Sarah E. Lewis from Williston. Sarah was b. 9 Dec 1918, daughter of Adolphus and Jessie Westbrook Lewis of Williston. Sarah d. 10 Mar 1990 and is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Children and grandchildren: a. Wayne 4 Lewis: b 2 May 1946, Gainesville (Hosp.); d. 10 May 6 1989 Jacksonville; bur. Chiefland Cemetery; m. Robbie_. Children: (1). James 5 Rodgers; (2). Misty 5 Rodgers; (3). Lee Ann 5 Rodgers; (4). Aimee 5 Rodgers; &(5). Elizabeth 5 Rodgers. b. Ben 4 Rodgers c. Plant 4 Rodgers: m. Vickie_ d. Anne 4 Rodgers: m._Beard e. Karen 4 Rodgers: m. John Pankow E. Guy Whitman 2 Rodgers: 8 Jul 1881, Homerville, GA; d. 7 Sep 1955; bur Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery, Jacksonville, FL. He m. Roxie Haddock “Scrap” Barlow, 3 Jan 1901. She was b. 27 Jul 1885 and d. 7 Aug 1949. She is buried beside her husband. In 1910, he was listed as a woodsman in the Ellzey Precinct, Levy County. They were a Mutt and Jeff pair as Guy was over six feet tall and Roxie was 4 ft 10 in. Guy quit school while he was in the third grade. He was pretty much a self-made man; and, even though his early jobs were menial and laborious, he quickly learned how to better himself. In the early days, he dipped gum pots on pine trees, drove wagons and many other tasks associated with the turpentine business.

PAGE 17

They moved to Fowltown, GA, where he got a job as a woods rider (foreman). They lived there for three years and two of their daughters were bom there. Having returned to Homerville, he worked as a laborer until he got a job near Crystal River, FL, as superintendent for the Knight Brothers. While at this location, the third daughter, Willie Campbell Rodgers, was bom. Willie was named after Guy’s brother, Willie, and Dr. Campbell, the doctor who delivered her. Guy was involved in the turpentine business for many years and moved to many towns in South Georgia and North Florida. Some are no longer on the map, but some that remain are Homerville, GA, Lake Butler, and Trenton, FL. They lived in a small town just north of Baldwin, FL, called Bryceville. Guy’s first step into his own business was when he bought a small sawmill and shingle mill. He cut lumber, cypress shingles and crossties for fifteen months and then sold the business. Then, he decided to go to OK. He left his family in Lake Butler, FL. The Interstate Coal Co. of Dawson, OK, employed him as a weightmaster. He lived with Dr. and Mrs. Jackson for six months and returned to Florida. After several short-term jobs, the family moved to Baldwin, FL. Here he worked for Mr. J. M. Saucer in his turpentine business and in the grocery store. The Saucer store was located on U.S. 13 across the street from the old Post Office. Working for Mr. Saucer was not a comfortable situation for him; therefore, he decided to go into business for himself. Mr. Saucer didn’t want him to leave and said that when he came crawling back there would be no job for him. In 1926, he built and opened a combination grocery store and gas station, this store, the ACME Grocery, was located at about the same place that Westinghouse Factory is located on U.S. 90 in Baldwin, FL. This station burned down after a few years. It caught fire when a car hit a gas truck that was off-loading gas. Either the driver of the car or the truck was burned to death in this accident. Having been bitten by the bug, he realized that the grocery business was what he wanted. He built a new store just a short distance from the old store but on the opposite side of the highway. This store was also called the ACME Grocery. The store had living quarters in the back where they lived. They built a house behind what was the original Petrey Brothers’ Garage, but they never lived in it. They rented it to several people and finally sold it to J. C. Petrey. Guy and “Scrap” (Roxie) operated the store together until Scrap’s death in 1949. Guy continued to operate the store until his health deteriorated in 1954. His daughter, Lucille, helped him until his death in 1955. Lucille bought out her sister’s interest in the store and operated it until about 1964. It was rented for se\ eral years and then sold. Guy died 7 Sep 1955 at the home of his daughter on Yellow Water Road. He had been bedridden with multiple sclerosis for several months. Children of Guy and Scrap: 1. Ora Lee 3 Rodgers: b. 14 Aug 1903 (SS lists this date as 1902); d. 2 Jun 1976, resident of Jacksonville; bur Riverside Memorial Park, Jacksonville; m. Roderick Clifford Campbell, Sr., who was b. 8 Dec 1894 and d. 21 Apr 1958; bur Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery. Children and grandchildren: a. Roderick a. Clifford 4 Campbell, JR.: b. 24 Oct 1926; d. 21 Aug 1998, resident of Jacksonville; m. Dorothy Louise Dixon. Dorothy was b. 20 May 1930. b. Malcom Eugene 4 Campbell: b. 20 Jun 1928; m._ (1) Michael Wayne 5 Campbell: b. 2 Jan 1950 (2) Kathervn Elaine 5 Campbell: b. 23 Sep 1954

PAGE 18

c. William Wallace 4 Campbell: b. 16 Feb 1931; m. Laura Annette Glover who was b. 22 Jan 1937. (1). Mark William 5 Campbell: b. 8 Jan 1960 d. Eula Lucille 4 Campbell: b. 7 Apr 1934; d. 23 Oct 1935 e. Stuart McQuaid 4 Campbell, Sr.: b. 17 Mar 1937; m. Hilda Elaine Morgan (1) Stuart McQuaid 5 Campbell, Jr.: b. 15 Feb 1961 (2) Scott Morgan 5 Campbell: f. Mildred Janette 4 Campbell: b. 19 Jan 1939; m. Jack Donald Arrendale who was b. 8 Dec 1937. g. Joyce Carol 4 Campbell: b. 29 Aug 1943 2. Roxie Lucille 3 Rodgers: b. 13 Jan 1905, GA; d. 21 Nov 1978 (SS: Armed Forces); m/1 James Richard Williams who was b. 16 Feb 1896 and d. 18 Dec 1973, resident of Jacksonville; m/2 Alan Ray King; m/3. Roy Lamance Turknett (Is this the Roy Turknett who was b. 2 Apr 1893 and d. Jul 1969, resident of Jacksonville)? Children by James Richard Williams: (a) George Roger 4 Williams: b. 18 Jul 1936: m. Marcia Elaine Summers who was b. 3 Jun 1941. (b) James Ronald 4 Williams: b 13 Jan 1941; m. Phyllis Ann Blevins who was b. 12 Sep 1943. G. Travis Plant 2 Rodgers: b. 23 Sep 1886, GA; d. 9 Aug 1943; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Minnie Mae Hunnicut, 27 Sep 1908. Minnie was b. 16 Jan 1889 and d. 1 Jul 1951. She m/2 __ Fox. She is buried in the Chiefland Cemetery. Daughter: 1. Talula Voncile 3 Rodgers: b. ca 1909; d. 2 Feb 2003 in Orlando; bur Lake Wales, FL; m. Walter W. Woolfolk who was b. 6 Mar 1909 and d. 27 Jun 1995, Orlando; bur Lake Wales, FL. Two daughters: a. Kay 4 Woolfolk: m. _Elliotte; lived in NC in 2003. b. Deana Voncile 4 Woolfolk: m._Costner; lived in Orlando in 2003. (Information provided by members of the Rodgers Family)

PAGE 19

Service Station and Restaurant owned by "T" and Elsie Coleman in Chiefland.

PAGE 20

Elise & Purdy Rodgers (son of Claude & Lawson Rodgers) with their daughters, Abby Jean & Anne Elise 1935. Elijah Tucker, Walker, Jennings Hill, Earl Hudson, Jack Meeks, Jennings & Hubbard Rodgers (sons of Claude & Lawson Rod gers), Joseph Tomlinson (brother to Lawson Tomlinson Rodgers), and Lee Weimer. On the right is Voncile Rodgers Woolf oiks in front of the first school house. It was in back of Graham CarterÂ’s home. Taken in the 1920's. (Do not know the other person) Purdy & Elise Rodgers y y

PAGE 21

Robert Purdy Rodgers Turpentine Operator 1941-1970, Chiejland, Florida. Lived December 1, 1900 to March 21, 1982. Picture shows Purdy checking out pine tree cat face using a clay cup to collect turpentine & resin. Purdy had operations at Lebanon Station & Sum ner in Levy County. He also had operations in Taylor, Dixie, Sumter, and Polk Counties.

PAGE 22

Rodgers Family Reunion Circa 1930 Left side (Seated): Ola Rodgers Wood, holding son Gwynn, Eula Tominson Rodgers. (Standing) First row: Capitola Tomlinson, Grandmother Martha Roe Rodgers (AlfredÂ’s wife), Claude Eugene Rod gers, Plant Rodgers. Second row: Hubbard Rodgers, Margurite Johnson Rodgers (Jenning's wife), Elise Williams Rodgers (PurdyÂ’s wife), Moses Wood, Jennings Rodgers, Lawson Tomlinson Rodgers (ClaudeÂ’s wife). Right side (Seated): Benjamin Alfred Rodgers. Children (Seated): Elizabeth Rod gers, Mozelle Wood, Mary Wood, Anne Elise Rodgers, Abbye Jean Rodgers, Franklin Rodgers (Ben & EulaÂ’s son). Photo was taken at Ola Rodgers and Moses WoodÂ’s home in Chiefland, Florida.

PAGE 23

Claude & Lawson (Tomlinson) Rodgers 50th Anniversary. March 14, 1900, Du pont, Georgia. Anniversary was held March 19, 1950 at Purdy & Elise Rodgers home in Chiefland. Pictured left to right(Seated): Elizabeth Simmons, Lawson Tomlinson Rod gers,Claude Rodgers, Mildred Spears. (Standing): Jennings, Jack, Hubbard, Pur dy, James "Jim”, Marcus. Picture taken at Rodgers 50th Anniversary.

PAGE 24

Masonic Hall Chiefland, Florida Old Chiefland School House Circa 1914-1915

PAGE 25

Elise & Purdy Rodgers Home 1946 Chiefland, Florida. Built in 1912. Ola Rodgers & Mose Wood first owned the house. No paved street in front.

PAGE 26

Absalom B. 1 Wood Early Settler of Levy County Absalom B. Wood, b. ca 1810, SC, was in Levy County as early as 1860. He is listed in the Wekiva Precinct in the 1860 Census. He married Margaret A. Davis who was b. ca 1821 in GA. He must have died before 1885. The 1885 Census shows Margaret and her son, Thomas, living with the Charles McCall family. Children: A. Clary A. 2 Wood: b. 1834-1835 B. Caroline 2 Wood: b. 1838-1839 C. Salintha C. 2 Wood: b. 1841-1842 D. Nelson J. 2 Wood: b. 1842-1843 +E. John Wesley 2 Wood: b. 22 May 1845, GA F. Wilson 2 Wood: b. ca 1846 +G. Jesse Leroy 2 Wood: b 13 May 1849 +H. Jefferson J./S. 2 Wood: b. 1851-1852 I. Sarah L. M. A. 2 Wood: b. ca 1854; m. William Emanuel J. Thomas J. 2 Wood: b. 1855-1856 K. Mary J. 2 Wood: b. 1856-1857 +L. Elafair S./Alphia 2 Wood: b. 17 Apr 1860; d. 18 May 1897 E. John Wesley 2 Wood: b. 22 May 1845, GA; d. 19 May 1920/1924; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. John Wesley served in the 1 s t Regt. Infantry Reserve in the Civil War. There are 30 pages of information on him at the State Archives relative to his pension application which was filed in Levy County in 1897. This material is listed under #A-06420. He m. Louisa Lucinda McCall on 6 Aug 1883, Levy Co., FL. Louisa was b. 21 Jan 1857, GA, and d. 11 Feb 1897, She is buried with her husband in Ebenezer Cemetery. The census records for 1885, 1900, and 1910 show the family in Levyville District. The children below are all listed as being bom in Levy Co., FL. 1. William 3 Wood: b. 1883-1884 2. Leila 3 Wood: b. ca Mar 1886 (Did she m. Eugene Hogan)?? 3. John J. 3 Wood: b. 27 Nov 1887; d. 26 Jan 1919; bur Ebenezer Cemetery 4. Ellen L. 3 Wood: b. 17 May 1891; d. 23 Jun 1954; bur Ebenezer Cemetery; m. Shinholser. 5. Janie M. 3 Wood: b. ca Aug 1893; m. William Henry Parkerson, who was b. ca Jul 1887, FL. 6. Zora 3 Wood: b. ca Jan 1895 7. Zona 3 Wood: b. ca Jan 1895 8. McKinley 3 Wood: b. ca Apr 1896 F. Jesse Leroy 2 Wood, Sr.: b. 13 May 1849, FL; d. 22 Aug 1923; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. His will was signed 22 Feb 1923 and probated 24 Aug 1923, Levy County. Census records for

PAGE 27

18801910 show the family in the Levyville Dist.; and the 1920 shows them in the Chiefland District. Leroy m/1 Sarah Jane McGowan on 30 Nov 1871, Levy County. She was the mother of all of Leroy’s children listed below. He m/2 Ella Robinson, 30 Jun 1921; and he m/3 Lorena Hudson on 25 May 1922. Sarah Jane was b. Dec 1848, FL; d. 15 Nov 1920; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. Children: + 1. Sarah Eugenia 3 Wood: b. 9 Sep 1872 2. Joseph Nelson 3 Wood: b. 7 Oct 1874; d 1937; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Ethel G. Willis ca 1905, Levy County. Ethel was b. 29 Jul 1884 and d. Feb 1972, resident of Chiefland. She is bur in Chiefland Cemetery. No children. In 1910, their nephew, Charlie 4 Emanuel, was living with them. + 3. Robert Eli 3 Wood: b. 18 Nov 1875 4. Jasper Wesley 3 Wood: b. 1877; d. 13 Oct 1899 5. Margaret “Maggie” 3 Wood: b. ca Oct 1879 + 6. Lydia Frances 3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1882 + 7. Leroy “Lee” 3 Wood, Jr.: b. 23 Feb 1883 + 8. Sewilda Margaret 3 Wood: b. 23 Apr 1885 + 9. Moses Elijah 3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1888 10. Gladys Evelyn Wood: b._ (She is listed as under age 21 in her father’s will in 1923). 1. Sarah Eugenia 3 Wood: b. 9 Sep 1872; d. 1 May 1853/1858; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. She m. William P. Geiger, 12 May 1890, Levy County. William, son of Enoch and Julia Geiger, was b. 19 Nov 1866, Levy County, and d. 2 Jan 1935. He is buried with his wife in the Ebenezer Cemetery. Census records show him living in the Judson area. Children: a. Elvie 4 Geiger: b. 12 May 1891, Levy Co.; d. 17May 1978, resident of Summerfield, FL.; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. John Perry Hudson, 3 Jun 1909, Levy County. John Perry Hudson was b. 7 Dec 1872 and d. 27 Jan 1946; bur Chiefland Cemetery. b. Cleveland “Cleve” 4 Geiger: b. 19 Feb 1968; d. Jul 1968 (Trenton address); bur Ebenezer Cemetery. His wife, Edna A._, was b. 4 Oct 1897 and d. Oct 1975, resident of Gainesville. She is buried at Ebenezer with Cleve. c. Paul 4 Geiger: b. Dec 189 d. Ozella 4 Geiger: Mar 189 e. William “Willie” 4 Geiger, Jr.: b. 4 Feb 1906; d. 4 Feb 1906; bur Ebenezer Cemetery 3. Robert Eli 3 Wood: b. 18 Nov 1875; d. 3 Jun 1911; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. He m. Susie E. Markey ca 1896. Susie, daughter of John H. Markey, was b. 1877-1878, FL. According to census records (1910, Judson), she had 4 children with only one living. Known child: a. Martha Jane 4 Wood: b. 19 Sep 1897; d. 8 Jun 1984; bur Pine Grove Cemetery. She m. Aaron Columbus “Lum” Arrington on 7 Nov 1915. Lum was b. 20 Mar 1892 and d. 4 Feb 1981. He is buried in Pine Grove Cemetery. Children:

PAGE 28

(1) Violet 5 Arrington: b. 25 Sep 1916; m. Ernest Ward on 19 Dec 1936. Ernest was b. 2 Mar 1911, Chiefland, and d. 4 Mar 1986. He is buried in Long Pond Cemetery. (2) Robert Ercelle 5 Arrington: b. 1916-1917; d. Dec 1936 (3) Clyde 5 Arrington:b. ca 1918 (4) Audrey 5 Arrington: b. ca 1923; m. William David Farquaharson (5) Columbus J. “Lum” 5 Arrington 6. Lydia Frances 3 Wood: b. ca 1882, Levy Co.; m. George Drew Folks onlO Oct 1901, Levy County. George Drew Folks was b. 16 Nov 1876 and d. 30 Mar 1915. He is buried in Ebenezer Cemetery. In 1920, Lydia was living with her parents and the following children: a. Floyd 4 Folks: b. 1901-1902, Chiefland; m. Zetha Faircloth. Daughter: (1). Zelma Floydine 5 Folks: b. 14 Sep 1923, Chiefland; d. 9 Sep 1993; bur Pine Grove Cemetery. She m. Thomas Reuben Swilley who was b. 3 Sep 1923 and d. 23 Aug 1972; bur Pine Grove Cemetery (WW-II and Korea) b. Doile 4 Folks: b. 1904-1905 c. Armond P. 4 Folks: b. 27 Nov 1907; d. 27 Dec 1987, resident of Cedar Key; bur Cedar Key Cemetery; m. Annie Evelyn_who was b. 16 Apr 1916 and d. 5 Oct 1985. She is buried with her husband in Cedar Key. Children: (1) Thomas 5 Leroy Folks: b. 1903-1904, Chiefland; d. Sep 2000, Cedar Key. (2) Irene 5 Folks d. Mildred 4 Folks: b. 1909-1910 7. Leroy “Lee” 3 Wood, Jr.: b. 23 Feb 1883, Chiefland; d. 29 Nov 1952; bur Chiefland Cemetery. He m/1 Nellie May Hudson on 22 May 1904; he m/2 Cebelle Faircloth. Nellie was b. 8 May 1884 and d. 15 Sep 1918. She is buried in Rocky Hammock Cemetery. Cebelle was b. 13 Nov 1899 and she is buried in Chiefland Cemetery. 8. Sewilda Margaret 3 Wood: b. 23 Apr 1885, Levyville; d. 12 May 1969; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Rollin Hudson on 26 Mar 1905, Levy County. Rollin, brother of Nellie May Hudson Wood, was b. 5 Sep 1880, Levy County and d. 5 May 1954. He is buried in Chiefland Cemetery. In 1910, the family lived in Levyville where Rollin was a merchant. In 1913, Rollin opened the first general store in Chiefland. Children: a. Gladys Muriel 4 Hudson: b. 1 Mar 1906, New Town Community; d. 7 Jun 1996, Gainesville (Hospital), resident of Chiefland; bur Hardeetown Cemetery. She m. Vaughn Bernard Hardee on 12 Jul 1922. Vaughn was b. 12 Mar 1896 and d. 4 May 1999. He is buried in the Hardeetown Cemetery. One son: (1). Charles Vaughn 5 Hardee: b. 19 Dec 1923, Cedar Key; d. 12 Mar 2001, Ayers Center, Trenton, FL; bur Hardeetown Cemetery, WW-II. He m. Faunita Inel Durrance on 6 Apr 1946, Levy County. Fanita is the daughter of Henry David and Corene Eliza Clyatt Durrance. She was b. 18 Nov 1927, Levy County. Children:

PAGE 29

(a) Carole Diane 6 Hardee: b. 15 Oct 1949; m. H. E. “Hank” Peterson, Jr., 4 Sep 1971. (b) Christopher Charles 6 Hardee: b. 6 Jul 1957; m. Fanny Lanier. b. Earl J. 4 Hudson: b. 22 Jul 1907; d. 4 Dec 1993; bur Chiefland Cemetery; m. Lena Pickens. Earl owned and operated several businesses in Chiefland. He owned and operated Hudson Grocery for 65 years and a chain of Hudson stores in several other Florida counties. Children: (1) Janies RolliiC Hudson (2) Earline 5 Hudson: m. Jim Smith Moses Elijah 3 Wood: b. 2 Sep 1888, Levyville Community; d. 5 Mar 1953: bur Chiefland Cemetery. He m. Ola Bernice Rodgers, daughter of Alfred and Martha Roe Rodgers, on 19 Nov 1913 in Levyville. Graham Carter, J.P., performed the ceremony. She was b. 10 Nov 1893 and d. 13 Oct 1980, Hillsborough Co.; bur Chiefland Cemetery. After their marriage, they moved to help settle the town of Chiefland where a railroad had just been laid. Moses had accepted a partnership in a general mercantile business known as “Carter and Wood.” This business served a very large area for the period from 1913 through most of the 1940’s. Moses also served as Postmaster in conjunction with the store until a separate facility was built in the 1920’s to serve the expanding population. He was active in the community, having served on the Chiefland City Council for many years and as Chairman of the School Board of Trustees for more than twenty years. In addition, he served as a principal stockholder in the Chiefland Development Company whose purpose was to offer land at low cost for city development Moses owned 240 acres of good farmland about one-half mile east of Chiefland where he proved to be a successful part-time farmer. He and a share-cropping family first operated the farm. The primary crops were com and peanuts to feed cattle and hogs; but they also raised crops such as watermelons, sugar cane, and tobacco. He was the son of a successful farmer and rancher, and he had worked on his father’s farm as early as age eight. He and Ola started the construction of their home in Chiefland immediately after moving there. Their home was one of the very first in town. Until it was completed, they lived with Moses’ sister and brother-in-law, Sewilda and Rollin Hudson. Their two daughters were bom in their first house. In 1926, they built a new home. This was a brick structure and it was, for many years, the only brick home in town. This brick house is located approximately one block west of the city cemetery. Their son, Julian Gwynn Wood, was bom there in 1928. The family members were active members in the First Baptist Church in Chiefland. Ola and Moses lived in Chiefland until 1949. At that time, failing health had forced the closing of the store, and they moved to Tampa to be near their two daughters. The farm was sold

PAGE 30

shortly thereafter. Most of it was sold to the state to comprise a pine nursery to provide seedling trees to landowners. The remainder was sold to Earl Hudson for expansion of his adjacent farm. Moses died 5 Mar 1953, Hillsborough Co., at age 64. Ola lived until age 87 when she died 13 Oct 1980, Hillsborough County. Their children: a. Sara Mozelle 4 Wood: b. 2 Dec 1921, Chiefland; d. 30 Jan 1998, Tampa, FL. She m. Robert Diaz on 20 Jun 1943, Chiefland, FL. Robert was b. 14 Feb 1919 in Tampa, FL. Mozelle attended schools in Chiefland, graduating from Chiefland High School at age 16. She then attended Florida State College for Women (now Florida State University). She graduated from F.S.C.W. in 1942 with a BS degree in Education. Following graduation, she taught Home Economics in Bronson High School. In 1943, during the period of WW-II, she left teaching and accepted a secretarial position at Camp Blanding, FL. There she met Robert Diaz who became her husband on 20 Jun 1943 in the First Baptist Church of Chiefland. After RobertÂ’s discharge from the military, they moved to Tampa. Later, Mozelle returned to college to renew her teaching certificate in Special Education. She taught at Lavoy Elementary School and retired from there. The family was active in the St. John Presbyterian Church, Tampa. Child: (1). Robert Earl 5 Diaz: b. 29 Nov 1944; m/1. Irene Arce on 26 Dec 1967; m/2 Maida Payne on 28 Dec 1986. Maida was b. 10 Oct 1947. Children by Irene: (a) Robert Alan 6 Diaz: b. 27 Sep 1968, Tampa. (b) Desiree Ann 6 Diaz: b. 30 Mar 1972, Tampa. b. Mary Millicent 4 Wood: b. 22 Oct 1924, Chiefland, FL; m/1 Elisha Clyatt Sapp, son of Isaac Daniel and Margaret Drucilla Bass Sapp, on 9 Nov 1946 in Chiefland; m/2 Murray George Thomas on 9 Jul 1972, Tampa. Mary graduated from Chiefland High School in 1942. WW-II had just begun and Mary accepted a job at Camp Blanding Headquarters, She worked there for one year, and then left to attend F.S.C.W. in Tallahassee. She also worked in the State Department of Education while in school. On 9 Nov 1946, Mary and Elisha Clyatt were married at her parentsÂ’ home in Chiefland. She accompanied her husband, who was a Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, while he was on assignment in: San Diego; Hawaii; recruiting duty in Tampa; Norfolk, VA; and Trinidad. While in Trinidad, E. C. became ill and was medically retired from the Navy in Oct 1955. He died after a long illness from a brain tumor on 17 Feb 1963.

PAGE 31

Mary worked at Pierce Jr. High School as secretary for 22 years prior to retirement. Mary and her second husband, Murray George Thomas, were active members of Bethel Temple Assembly of God in Tampa. Children by E. C. Sapp: (1) Mary CaroE Sapp: b. 1 Oct 1949, Jacksonville, FL; m. Luther David Crews on 9 Mar 1969. Luther David Crews was b. 25 Oct 1947. Children: (a) Emily Carol 6 Crews: b. 14 Jun 1973, Bradenton, FL (b) Matthew David 6 Crews: b. 9 Apr 1975, Bradenton, FL (2) Kathryn Ann 5 Sapp: b. 28 Oct 1941, Tampa; m. Willard Brimm on 4 Jan 1980. Willard was b. 9 Nov 1947. Child: (a). Willard Travis Brimm: b. 10 Oct 1987, Tampa, FL c. Julian Gwynn 4 Wood: b. 20 Sep 1928, Chiefland; m/1 Ella Jean Aman; m/2 Phoebe Ann Cowen-Westerman on 1 Jul 1967, Canon City, CO. Ella Jean was b. 24 Jul 1934 in Tampa and d. 14 Aug 1996, Orlando, FL. Phoebe Ann was b. 10 Dec 1932 in Brush CO. Children by Ella Jean: (1) Gwenith Jean 5 Wood: b. 23 Dec 1955, Stillwater, OK; m. Thomas William McKee on 12 Mar 1977, Orlando, FL. Thomas William was b. 15 Oct 1951. (a). Matthew 6 McKee: b. 21 Dec 1979, Winter Park, FL (2) Mark Edward 5 Wood: b. 7 Dec 1959, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL; m. Kathleen Marie Burns on 28 Jul 1980, Rapid City, SD. She was b. 15 Jul 1959, SD. (a). Mary Louise 6 Wood: b. 4 Sep 1976, Spearfish, SD; m. Michael Leslie Pollard on 2 Nov 1996 in Ellicott, CO. Michael was b. 1 Jun 1968. They have one daughter, Amber Renee Pollard L. Elafair/Alaphia 2 Wood: Â’o. 17 Apr 1860, Levy Co.; d. 18 May 1897; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. She m. William Emanuel on 23 Dec 1883, Levy Co., FL. William was b. ca Aug 1861-1862 in FL. He m/2 Cora Lee Perryman. Children: 1. Anna/Emma 3 Emanuel: b. ca Sep 1884, Levy County; m. Thomas M. Philpot on 10 Jan 1904, Levy County. He was b. ca Dec 1881, son of Thomas W. and Emily Wester Philpot. 2. Charles L. 3 Emanuel: b. 14 Feb 1888, Levy County; d. 23 Jan 1969; bur Ebenezer Cemetery. (Information provided by the Wood Family)

PAGE 32

Carter & Wood s Store Chiefland Street

PAGE 33

THE LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT 22 Oct 1896 Bronson, #1: Arnold. W. F. Bachman. Sol Barci, J, M. Bean. S. L. Bean, Samuel Blakey, E. T. Boothby, Joseph Boyd, G. A. Burford, Thomas Camp. W. N. Carter, Ira J. Chandler, A. Chesser, B. A. Chesser, J. W. Childers, George Childers, Lewis J. Coarsey, H. Coarsey, J. B., Sr. Coarsey, W. B. Cobb, James Colson, C. D. Colson, P. M. Colson, W. J. Coulter, W. R. Cox, John Cribb. W. P. Cubberly, Fred Darden, George C. Davis, C. H. Denham, H. W. Dimon, E. M. Eagan, James E. Epperson, W. J. Qualified Electors for November 3, 1896 Erwood, Fred Faircloth, W. B. Farmer, O. J. Fletcher, W. S. Friedman, Ben Frierson, Peter Geiger, J. S. Gomm, William Graham, David, Sr. Graham, David, Jr. Grissett, Nick Gunn, Frank Hafele, Chris Hall, C. C. Harrod, A. F. Hatcher, Isham Highsmith, S. H. Hines, B. T. Inebnit, U. W. Jackson, E. P, Jackson, J. M., Sr. Jackson, J. O. Jackson, John F. Jenkins, J. J. Johnson, John F. Jones, J. E. Jump, James W. Kirkland, J. P. Lambert, E. H. Lee, Caleb Lewis, Henry Lewis, J. H. Lewis, L. B. Lewis, O. B. Lindsay, C. A. Lloyd, H. B. Long, A. Long, T. L. Lynn, A. J. Lynn, Andrew W. McElveen, D. R. McLendon, W. H. McLeod, Alexander McLeod, W. P. Markham, J. E. Miller. B. F. Miller. I. B. Mooney, J. W. Morgan, T. D. Munden, Isaac Nobles, L. D. Nobles, William Osteen, J. S. Osteen, Sol Parker, J. S. Parker, J. W. Parker, W. J. Patterson, Gilbert Perryman, A. D. Pinnell, E. A. Pinnell, F. S. Porter, J. B.

PAGE 34

Bronson, #1 (continued): Prevatt, Joseph Richardson, S. C. Ricks, J. D. Ridlon, John F. Rover, Solomon Russell, C. H. Russell, J. J. Russell, William Sale, J. C. Sanchez, F. R. Sanchez, G. B. Sanders, A. M. Sanders, J. W. Sanders, O. N. Sapp, Wiley Scarbrough, S. E. Shands, T. W. Sheppard, Nathaniel L. Siford, J. D. Simons, G. M. Smith, Alfred Smith, B. O. Smith, D. A. Smith, E. C. Smith, G. H. Smith, Henry M. Smith, J. B. Smith, J. F. Smith, Lovett B. Smith, M. B. Smith, P. H. Smith, R. L. Smith, T. R. Smith, T. W. Smith, V. E. Smith, W. A. Smith, W. F. Spillane, Comelus Stewart, G. W. Stewart, J. M. Strickland, J. P. Sutton, H. S. Thomas, Harris (?) Thompson, John Tindale, W. A. Tindale, W. J. Tompkins, W. P. Tousey, O. C. Townsend, T. O. Trotter, J. H. Turner, S. P. Vinzant, F. R. Walker, D. S. Walker, Elias Walker, Elisha Walker, Joseph Watson, J. J. Welch, Joseph Wellman, Conrad Whitehurst, G. E. Wideman, E. W. Wilkinson, S. W. Wilkinson, Thomas Wilkinson, William Williams, G. C. Williams, J. J. Williams, W. R. Wilson, Archie Wilson. C. S. Levyville, #2: Adams, James Allen, J. T. Allen, R. L. Allen, William Appel, Louis Arline, D. H. H Bagley, B. C. Bagley, C. T. Barrow, J. L. Barrow, N. B. Barrow, T. E. Beck, G. A. Beck, J. C., Jr. Beck, John C. Beck, M. M. Booth, James Bryant, S. B. Butler, F. A. Cannon, James Carter, Graham Carter, John L. Carter, N. R., Jr. Carter, N. R. Sr. Clonts, M. A. Clyatt, M. Clyatt, S. J. Clyatt, W. W. Collier, James Cook, H. D. Creech, J. A. Dees, C. A. Dees, E. P. Dees, F. P. Dees, J. J. Dixon, Miles Drummond, C. O. Drummond, Hade Drummond, J. S. Durrance, H. A.

PAGE 35

Levyville, #2 (continued): Emanuel, William Faircloth. T. S. Faircloth, Daniel Faircloth, I. W. Faircloth, J. William Faircloth, John Faircloth, T. J. Fleming, J. T. Fleming, J. W. Fleming, L. S. Fletcher, C. C. Fletcher, Willie Folks, T. B. Ganus, Willis Goldwire, Andrew Goldwire, Jerry Goldwire, Norman Goode, Lee Goode, Wesley Gore, John P. Gore, W. Simon Graham, A. G. Hardee, Emmet R. Hardee, J. Owen Hardee, J. S. Hardee, S. B. Hardee, S. L. Hardee, O. D. Hare, Willis Hatcher, F. M. Hatcher, J. K. Hatcher, J. R.. Highsmith, Sol F.. Hinton, M. N. Hires, M. N. Hodge, John Hogan, T. C. Horn, W. R. Hudson, J. P. Hudson. S. W. Hudson, Williue G. Janney, E. L. King, J. Israel Kirkland, O. B. Lewis, James Lewis, John H. Lynn, Andrew D. McBryant, John McCall, R. M. McGrath, J. R. McHenry, A. McHenry, A., Jr. McIntyre, Henry McIntyre, Warren Markey, J. Mock, R. D. Mooney, Biancerd Morgan, J. H. Norris, Ed Oglesby, Isaac H. Osteen, W. Perryman, J. F. Phelps, J. P., Jr. Phelps, J. T. Phelps, Marion Phelps, R. E. L. Phelps, W. L. Philpot, John Philpot, Thomas Potts, Allen Prevatt, J. M. Prevatt, Thomas J. Prevatt, W. M. Price, A. A. Quincey, J. W. Quincey, Samuel Roberts, Dennis Roberts, Frank Roberts, Frank, Jr. Robinson, W. H. Rogers, Isaac W. Sanderson, Lee Sheppard, J. D. Sheppard, S. F. Simmons, Richard Simms, Samuel Smith, Bryant Smith, Hampton Spence, H. F. Studstill, F. Studstill, H. Studstill, John Studstill, W. J. Swindal, J. T. Tillis, A. L. Tillis. Thomas Tindale, William Tomlinson, Charles Tompson, Jacob Turner, J. S. Tyson, Charles Wade, Edmund Wade, James Wanamaker, J. F. Waterson, John Watts, H. F. Weeks, Silas Wilder, Richard Wilkinson, Alfred Wilkinson, D. L. Wilkinson, Dan L. Wilkinson, T. J. Williams, Wilson Wilson, Joseph, Jr. Wimer, G. L. Wimer, John C. Wood, J. N.

PAGE 36

Levyville, #2 (continued): Wood, J. W. Wood, Leroy Worthington, J. C. Wynn, J. D. Otter Creek, #3: Barksdale, J. M. Beck, M. A. Beck, Thomas, J. Blitch, L. M. Burke, George T. Bums, Phillip Cannon, H. H. Cannon, Madison Cannon, William Cason, C. W. Collier, E. C. Collier, J. S. Crews, J. L. Daniels, J. H. Dees, M. C. Easter, W. A. Ellzey, R. M. Faircloth, Levi Figgs, William Hartman, Samuel Hillier, G. W. Hopping, J. p. Howard, C. K. Howard, S. T. Hudson, G. V. Hudson, W. Jack Ishie, W. F. Jacobie, J. H. Johnson, Ezekiel Kirkland, C. P. Kirkland, E. L. Kirkland, G. V. Kirkland, J. S. Kirkland, O. H. P. Lane, T. R. Liferage, Tony Maxwell, George Maxwell, James Meeks, D. C. Meeks, D. N. Meeks, L. C. Meredith, J. F. Merritt, A. J. Munden, D. J. Oglesby, G. W. Oglesby, J. J. Omans, R. J. Osteen, Harvey Osteen, J. F. Osteen, J. N. Pinner, A. E. Plummer, David Proctor, R. D. Richardson, Albert Ricks, R. C. Sheppard, H. H. Sheppard, S. A. Stephens, Isham Strickland, R. M. Strong, David Strong, Robert Strong, W. M. Strong, William Thompson, L. W. Turner, C. V. Watkins, J. I. S. Watson, W. T. Wilson, Joseph Worthington, G. H. Worthington, S. E. Worthington, S. R. Yearty, T. J.

PAGE 37

Cedar Key, #4: Ahrens. Christian Alston, Crummie Anderson. W. H. Andrews. J. M. Barnes, W. H. Barnes, Walter G. Benson, C. H. Bevil, R. L. Bishop, M. N. Bishop, Madison Blackwood. William Bozeman. Sam Bozeman, T. E. Bozeman, William A. Brantley, J. L. Bryant, Sydney B. Bunker, F. G. Cannon, Sol Canty, William Cardy, G. G. Carroll, Sam W. Clarke, R. W. Clay, H. R. Coachman. Ben Collins, C. Richard Collins, J. C. Collins, J. L. Collins, T. R Condry, S. L. Crevasse, A. W. Crevasse, H. W. Crevasse, J. N. Crevasse, J. W. Crevasse, Joe M. Crumpton, H. A. H. Crumpton, John A. Daniels, Robert T. Davis, Daniel W. Deer, J. S. Delano, John Depew, Daniel Dorsett, A. M. Dozier, R. M. Driver. H. Dyson, A. Edwards, William Fagan, W. D. Finlayson, W. D. Freely, Michael Gardner, Charles H. Golden, Daniel Grimes, G. F. Hale, F. E. Harrod, William Havens, C. W. Herlong, J. H. Hodges, J. C. Hodges, J. L. Hodges, T. R. Hodges, W. Randolph Howard, Ben Johns, J. F. Johns, W. H. Johnson, C. C. Jones, A. B. Jones, Archer Jones, Robert H. Joshua, Josh Kelly, Henry Kennedy, john King, Alfred King, Hamp King, T. Butler Kinslow, William Launt, B. Lewis, Jask Lisenby, James M. Lowe, Henry A. Lucas, G. T. Lutterlow, E. J. Lutterlow, J. B. Luttrell, B. F. McBride, John McCall, R. L. McCollum, James McCormick, C. G. McCreary, R. McCreary, William T. McGrew, J. C. Mcllvane, E. H. McLeod, A. E. McLeod, Alex McKenchinie, F. E. Martin, Boston Mays, James H. Miller, Everette Miller, John C.. Mitchell, J. R. Moore, J. S. Moore, William M. Moyers, George W. Moyers, S. G. Nobles, C. H. OÂ’Neill, Albert F. OÂ’Neill, E. F. Picket6t, James M. Pittman, Decatur Porter, Abe Price, Harry C. Rolf, D. T. Schlemmer, Christian Schlemmer, Nicholas Schmidt, H. C. Scofield, W. P. Simons, Jeff

PAGE 38

Cedar Key, #4 (cont.): Sistrunk, G. M. Tooke, J. B. Whitman, C. H. Smith, B. F. Whitman, St. Claire Smith, Charles A. Vincent, G. M. Williams, J. A. Smith, J. H. Williams, J. E. Sparks, H. S. Walker, R. T. Williams, J. Lon Stapleton, Frank Walker, T. A. Williams, John, Sr. Stapleton, Robert Walker, T. W. Williams, Joshua W. Stewart, James Watkins, T. M. Wilson, Archie D. Sutton, J. H. Webster, C. W. Wilson, Joseph J. White, E. J. Wilson, W. Taylor, Charles H. White, Hamilton B. Wish, Charles Tempie, L. H. White, W. R. *** Lebanon, #5: Altman, D. Johnson, H. H. Stephens, J. J. Benson, W. C. Stephens, J. S. Blitch, D. W. Kelly, B. W. Stephens, James M Brown, J. H. King, R. T. Chesser, F. W. Levins, W. R. Trotter, W. W. Chesser, J. A. Vogt, John W. Davis, Henry Mott, A. B. Weeks, James Dyas, Aaron Nichols, A. H. Weeks, W. E. Dyas, Henry Nichols, L. E. Williams, F. L. Dyas, J. F. Nichols, L. W. Williams, W. B. Folks, D. S. Pendarvis, G. A. Young, J. A. Folks, J. J. Priest, R. P. Foster, J. T. Gaines, C. C. Riggs, H. W. Riggs, S. J. Gibbons, L. D. Hathcox. W. K. Sheppard, U. R. Starling, J. L. Hodge, J. D. Starling, L. D. Hodge, T. J. Stephens, I. C.

PAGE 39

Williston, # 7: Abercrombie, L. D. Abercrombie, Lewis Abercrombie, O. L. Barton, W. M. Bateman, A. H. Bateman, Ed Beamer, B. Boyer, C. W. Brewer, Claud Brewer, E. H. Campbell, C. N. Clancy, M. A. Clark, William Davis, W. C. Days, A. G. Days, Horace DePass, M. H. Edwards, S. W. Edwards, Will Epperson, J. B. Frazier, S. M. Fugate, I. T. Fugate, R. M. Fugate, R. M., Jr. Garrison., James L. Gary, Floyd George, David George, Mark Gibson, Dave Gibson, L. W. Gomto, J. M. Green, Peter Hale, C. P. Hale, S. C. Hale, J. V. Hall, J. E. Harrod, F. A. Harvey, John Hawkins, Balaam Hawkins, J. A. Hawkins, Luther Hester, L. C. Holland, Dan Holland, Solomon Howard, A. W. Jordan, George Jordan, Robert King, H. H. King, P. N. Landrum, R. Lee, Alex Limbaugh, D. M. Long, James H. Lowman, B. B. Lowman, B. M. Lowman, G. B. Lowman, W. S. McDonell, Charles Malphurs, J. N. Mann, H. t. Mattair, H. P. Miller, John Mixson, A. J. Mixson, J. J. Mixson., J. M. Mixson, E. S. Moore, D. F. Moore, W. W. Morton, C. T. Nelson, H. G. Nelson, J. H. Newsom, D. P. Peacock, J. B. Phillips, S. Phinney, D. S. Pope, D. L. Potts, Henry Powell, Richard Price, E. C. Primus, August Rawls, I. N. Reddick, J. P. Reddick, T. T. Rhodes, R. A. Riley, E. D. Roach, J. J. H. Roach, J. M. Roach, O. J. Robinson, J. E. Rover, John Sistrunk, M. M. Smith, A. W. Smith, J. W. Smith, T. N. Smith, William Spates, White Spikes, Abram Stinson, Ned Strain, A. T. Strain, Ed Strain, Ed, Jr. Terry, E. T. Thomas, William Tyner, D. B. Tyner, J. B. Tyner, J. J. Wade, Thomas Wallace, D. T. Wallace, Dan Wallace, Obie Waters, Amos Waters, Charles Westbrook, J. T.

PAGE 40

Williston, #7 (cont.): Westbrook, T. H. Willis, J. J. Westbrook, W. I. Willis, B. F. Willis, J. L. Williams, D. E. Willis, D. B. Willis, J. M Williams, J. T. Willis, G. M. Willis, J. R. Willis, G. W. Willis, L. R. ********** Stafford Pond, # 6: Armstrong, C. Epperson, J. I. Newmans, H. Armstrong, D. M. George, Joseph Newmans, J. Blitch, J. S. Guess, J. R. Plummer, Joseph Blitch, N. A. Randall, G. M. Blitch, N. L. Hill, J. K. Brooks, B. G. Simms, Wesley Brooks, Badger Evins, T. J. Sistrunk, J. S. Brooks, Thomas Lewis, A. L. Sneller, P. 0. Lewis, Jesse Stanley, E. T. Chairs, R. C. Limbaugh, R. G. Strickland, H. T. Chancy, Sam Limbaugh, T. N. Tison, W. S. DeBusk, Alex Melon, Stephen Watson, C. K. Sumner, #9: Arline, J. E. Hall, T. P. Morgan, John Barnes, J. S. Hall, W. J. Pearson, J. J. Carson, S. C. Higginbotham, George Roland, G. M. Cason, W. H. Hudson, J. M. Roland, J. E. Coleman, John Hudson, John P. Shiver, James Edwards, Ransom Ingram, Samuel Simmons, F. T. Goodson, M. M. Ingram, W. F. Smith, L. W. Hall, Bachus Jacobs, C. M. Surles, J. E. H. Hall, Isaac Little, J. P. Wright, W. E. Hall, James Miller, S. J. Yearty, W, E.

PAGE 41

Judson, #10: Adams, J. H. Adams, J. W. Arrington, G. W. Asbell, Moses Barry, F. P. Bass, James Beauchamp, A. C. Brown, J. M. Buckalew, F. M. Carter, W. P. Clyatt, O. S. Crook, J. B. Davis, B. J. Dexter, Charles Dikes, John Dikes, Richard Dixon, L. D. DuPree, Jacob F. Elliott, G. E. Felder, C. M. Fralix, Jackson Futch, W. O. Gamer, Henry Gamer, S. H. Geiger, William Hall, Peter W. Harris, H. L. Harris, William Harris, William, Sr. Hatcher, J. J. Hays, H. K. Hays, W. H. Hiers, J. M. Highsmith, W. H. Horn, E. F. Horn, J. R. Horn, J. N. Horn, R. L. Jones, C. T. Jones, J. A. Jones, J. D. Keen, Moses Kidd, J. C. King, I. L. Lafield, H. S. Lewis, William Lock, J. W. McCall, L. L. McCall, R. W. McCall, T. G. McCall, W. H. McElroy, A. McElroy. C. E. McElroy, Charles W. McElroy, F. N. McElroy, John T. McElroy, W. B. McGowen, Frank McGowen, J. N. McGowen, John McIntyre, Warren Martin, W. J. Norris, E. Norris, Pompey Overstreet, J. A. Overstreet, J. M. Overstreet, J. W. Perryman, W. R. Philpot, R. P. Polk, L. V. Purvis, William Raulerson, R. M. Richardson, S. M Rush, A. M. Rush, E. W. Sanchez, A. B. Sanchez, John B. Sandlin, M. L. Sash, John Shaw, J. W. Sheffield, J. K. Stockman, J. F. Stockman, J. H. Sullivan, J. D. Swindal, C. C. Swindal, I. H. Tew, S. M. Ticker, R. S. Tucker, W. H. Walker, W. C. Ward, D. L. Ward, Edward Watson, L. W. Watson, W. J. Watson, W. W. Watt, William Weeks, C. B. Weeks, W. W. White, Samuel Whitney, J. W. Williams, C. H.

PAGE 42

Morriston, # 8: Allen, Twiggs Armstrong, D. N. Barber, J. J. Barrow, C. E. Blitch, F. W. Blitch, W. H. H. Boyett, J. W. Brown, henry Butler, J. H. Butler, Thomas Callaway, C. C. Chance, I. N. Curry, J. R. Dennis, Lorenzo Forbes, E. W. Fountain, B. J. Gary, Thomas I. George, Barnett Hall, J. M. Harralson, K. E. Shell Pond, #11: Bigham, W. R. Boatley, Harry Brewer, Thomas Brown, A. L. Brown, Calvin Campbell, C. H. DePass, James P. Dunn, Taylor Gaines, Reuben Gatling, George Hill, G. T. Hill, R. L. Hughey, W. A. Hughey, W. F. Humphrey, W. S. Jennings, B. S. Johnson, J. J. Jones, C. M. McCullough, Elgin Matthews, J. D. Matthews, W. F. Mills, J. B. Murrell, G. D. Murrell, L. B. Page, peter Pedrick, B. A. Pedrick, G. W. Pedrick, I. S. Pedrick, John S. Peterson, F. W. Pitts, Frank Pitts, Frank, Jr. Griffin, A. J. Guess, C. A. Harrell, J. W. Helveston, S. P. Holland, L. T. Holland, Milo Kelly, Thomas Kyler, Frank McCorquodale, J. B. McDonell, F. S. Polk, W. I. Priest, Emery Priest, G. R. Priest, J. J. Priest, Lawton Priest, R. G. Priest, Wiley Roberts, Allen Roberts, Frank Shealy. G. M. Shearouse, J. E. Stanley, Jacob Stanley, John B. Stephens, G. A. Stephens., H. A. Stephens, S. B. W. Strawn, J. M. Tillis, S. S. Walker, S. S. Williams, A. M. Wright, J. C. Young, Emmet McDonell, G. F. Mattair, Anderson Melton, Burrell Miller, Alex M. Morse, D. L. Pinkney, Davis Reddick, Romeo Ross, Richard Williams, T. B. Williams, W. B.

PAGE 43

Red Hollow,# 12: Adams, A, S. Hogan, J. W. Rogers, H. S. Billups, J. W. Hogan, S. T. Sheffield, I. S. C. Blalock, Ivey Johnson, W. F. Sheffield, S. Blalock, J. W. Jones, W. A. Stringfellow, C. C. Chason, J. J. Kidd, Isaac W. Stringfellow, J. C. Sullivant, H. Davis, George Lightsev. Jacob Sullivant, R. Davis, W. M. Lynn, W. D. Tedder, J. E. M. Dexter, Will Tindale, Ezekiel Durrance, J. W. McCollister, P. A. Tison, R. L. Fletcher, G. W. Meredith, I. F. Tison, S. H. Mullis, E. Ward, E. W. Gay, W. H. Mullis, R. Ward, L. A. Griffin, M. Watson, S. A. Owens, C. H. Wood, Samuel Hays, Henry

PAGE 44

Notice: The following names have been stricken from the previous list Otter Creek, # 3: J. W. Carter; S. H. Worthington; & Dick James. Cedar Key, # 4: Bradshaw Campbell; A. L. Crumpton; Frank Furstnow; James Green Daniel Golden, Jr.; J. C. Hallaway; W. F. Havens; & S. G. Robinson. Lebanon, # 5: John S. Campbell. Stafford Pond, #6: L. T. Pedrick. Williston, #7: W. T. Craig; Oscar Wayne; & W. P. Williams. Sumner, # 9: S. C. Gause. Judson, # 10: J. P. Phelps, Sr.

PAGE 45

Book Discloses Details Of Hunt For Soviet Subs By V ladimir Isachenkov Associate Press Writer MOSCOWHunted down by the U.S. Navy off Cuba during the 1962 missile crisis, a furious Soviet submarine commander ordered a nuclear-tipped torpedo armed for action but then controlled his anger and brought the sub to the surface, where American ships were waiting. The previously unknown incident which might have pushed the two superpowers closer to nuclear war is disclosed in a book released this week. The book, written by Russian journalist Alexander Mozgovoi, tells the story four Soviet submarines en gaged in a cat-and-mouse game with the U.S. Navy off Cuba at the height of the Cuban missile crisis. It is based on interviews with former submariners. The four diesel submarines, which were armed with both conventional and nuclear-tipped torpedoes, sailed from the Arctic Kola Peninsula. They managed to pass unnoticed through U.S. and NATO cordons in the northern Atlantic, but were spotted by the Navy as they approached Cuba. The submarines needed to come to the surface often to charge their batteries, and that made them easy marks for the U.S. anti submarine cordons around the communist island. Captain Valentin SavitskyÂ’s B-59 submarine was quickly spotted by Navy patrol aircraft when it appeared on the surface. American destroyers rushed to block the submarine and began dropping stun grenades to force it to resurface, said Vadim Orlov, who was in charge of the submarineÂ’s radio intelligence at the time. "The Americans encircled us and began dropping grenades that were exploding right next to us," Orlov was quoted as saying in the book. "It felt like sitting in a metal barrel with someone hitting it with a sledgehammer. The crew was in shock." The bombardment went on for several hours, and some sailors lost consciousness as oxygen ran low and temperatures inside the submarine soared above 122 degrees. After an especially strong explosion shook the submarine, "Savitsky got furious and ordered an officer in charge of a nuclear-tipped torpedo to arm the weapon," Orlov said in the book. "There may be a war raging up there, and we are trapped here turning somersaults!" Savitsky cried, ac cording to Orlov. "We are going to hit them hard. We shall die ourselves, sink them all but not stain the navyÂ’s honor!" The submarinesÂ’ commanders could use conventional torpedoes only on order from the navy chief, and the use of nuclear torpedoes could only be authorized by direct order from the Soviet defense minister, the book said. However, the close surveillance by the U.S. Navy made it hard for submarines to resurface for scheduled communications sessions. Savitsky eventually controlled his anger and ordered the submarine to the surface. It was dark, but the area was brightly lit by searchlights from U.S. ships and a U.S. helicopter buzzing overhead. "We felt like a wolf hunted down," Orlov remembered. "It was a beautiful but frightful scene." The book has not been translated into English. Its Russian title, "Kubinskaya Samba Kvarteta Fokstrotov," translates to "Cuban Samba of the Foxtrot Quartet." A spokesman for the Russian Defense Ministry on Friday refused to comment on the incident described in the book. However, Mozgovoi is deputy editor of RussiaÂ’s military trade magazine. MilitaryÂ’ Parade the mouthpiece of the military-industrial complex, and his book is considered quite credible. Mozgovoi said that according to his conversations with submariners, Savitsky was the only one of four submarine commanders to consider unauthorized use of a weapon, but added that it was hard to blame him. "Savitsky s crew was under terrible pressure at the moment, both psychologically and physically," Moz govoi said by telephone. Savitsky himself is not quoted in the book; he had died by the time Mozgovoi began work on it.

PAGE 46

The Bomb and The Kids Early during World War II, the Coast Guard moved into Cedar Keys. They were stationed on Second Street. Their boats patroled the coast line. Then the Army moved across the street and they also had boats. These boats would pull targets for the planes to shoot at. There were bombing ranges north and south of Cedar Key also. Sometimes these planes would bomb an oyster bar. This story is about their bombs. Blake, Dorothy, and Lizzie Bell Lindsey were visiting Margarite and Gladys Beckham in Hun gry Bend (which is on the east side of Cedar Key). Blake told them about a bomb he knew about. He said it was out of the water, and you could see it. Everyone wanted to go see it. They got a boat and poled down to CarriganÂ’s Reef. There, they found the bomb. The kids decided to bring it back to town and put it under the BeckhamÂ’s house. The house is about three feet off the ground. It took some time for them to get it on the net table of the boat, but they did. On the way back home they passed Mr. Lindsey, who was going fishing, he wanted to know what they were doing. Blake said they had gone oystering. To hide the bomb, they put their coats over it, and Lizzie Bell was sitting on it. When they got back to the dock, which was in front of Mr. BeckhamÂ’s house, they decided to wait until dark. So Blake, Dorothy, and Lizzie Bell went home for supper. While they were gone, a boy had seen the bomb and told the Coast Guard. When they returned to the BeckhamÂ’s house, the Coast Guard stopped them. Dorothy got real mad, that was their bomb! BlakeÂ’s brother Jesse was stationed in Cedar Key and they put him guard over the bomb all night. The next day at school, they told us the bomb would be dropped by a plane. You shouldÂ’ve heard the sound, it made the windows rattle. I know that an angel was in that boat that day. This is the type of boat the kids used for getting the bomb

PAGE 47

Side exit door of the Cedar Key Movie Theater. Submitted by Kathryn Harris.

PAGE 48

\

PAGE 52

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09770 9744