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Search for yesterday

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Title:
Search for yesterday a history of Levy County, Florida
Creator:
Levy County Archives Committee (Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Bronson, Fla
Publisher:
Levy County Archives Committee
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Chapter 21, January, 2000
Physical Description:
28 volumes : ; 28 cm +

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Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Biography -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genealogy -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Levy County ( fast )
Genre:
Biography. ( fast )
Genealogy. ( fast )
History. ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Biography ( fast )
Genealogy ( fast )
History ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes index as v.29.
General Note:
"A Bicentennial publication."
General Note:
Chapter three has title: Slowpoke. Chapter nine has title: The High Sheriff.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
024053741 ( ALEPH )
06316718 ( OCLC )
00711645 ( LCCN )
Classification:
F317.L6 S44 1977 ( lcc )
975.9/77 ( ddc )

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Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Search lor e3terday


A History
of
Levy County, Florida




Chapter Twenty-one





Published By The
Levy County Archives Committee
Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners
January 1, 2000
at
Bronson, Florida


A Bicentennial Publication



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries













https://archive.org/details/searchforyesterd2l2OIevy










Search [ior Ye3terda


A History
of
Levy County, Florida




Chapter Twenty-one




Published By The
Levy County Archives Committee
Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners
January 1, 2000 at
Bronson, Florida

A Bicentennial Publication


Levy County Archives Committee, 2000












DEDICA TION















This Chapter is dedicated to Toni Collins for her interest and enthusiasm in furthering Levy County history and heritage. Toni, a native of Pennsylvania, has traced her family for eight generations on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She and husband Jim, a student at the University of Florida, currently live in Williston. In addition to her duties as secretary of the Levy County Archives Committee, Toni is a 1)art-time Levy County Deputy Clerk, President and cofounder of Crime Stoppers of Levy County, and a member of the Levy County Iibrary Advisory Board.

A graduate of Northwestern University, School of Journalism, Evanston, Illinois, Toni spent more than twenty years in print media. In 1984 she made a career change and returned to college to earn her degree as a Legal Assistant attaining National certification in 1997. It was at that time Toni found the subject which interested her most research. She has put that talent to use in not only gathering material for Archives Comnittee publications but also for her speeches and presentations, both historical and genealogical.

Thank you for all you do for Levy County, Toni.

The Levy County Archives Committee January 1, 2000
Bronson, FL


2









CANTONMENT MORGAN Om Seatorse Key


by Toni C. Collins
As the issue of statehood raged in Washington, the Second Seminole Indian War, or Florida War, raged in the interior of the Florida territory.
When General Zachary Taylor became commander of the forces fighting the Seminole Indians in the Territory of Florida in 1838., the US Army and Florida Militia were having little success in driving the roving bands of Indian warriors into south Florida.
Taylor quickly established a chain of 53 new forts and camps, built or improved 848 miles of road and 3,643 feet of causeways and bridges. This network helped not only the US Army, but also civilians and Seminoles traverse the northern and central regions of the territory.
A close look at an 1839 map of the Florida territory compiled by the US Army Corps of Engineers shows that the most important of these roads was the military road that stretched from Picolata on the St. John's River to Fort Brooke at the north end of Tampa Bay.
The road passed southwest from Picolata to Fort Micanopy. From Fort Micanopy the road continued on to Fort Drane, near present day Irvine and another 22 miles south to Fort King, at Ocala. Fort King was 72 miles north of Fort Brooke. A branch of the road led west out of Fort Micanopy to Fort Wakahoote and then eighteen miles further to Fort Wakasasa. It was 20 miles from Fort Wakasasa to Fort Fanning on the Suwannee River.


Another branch of the main road passed west out of Fort King through Fort Hook near present-day Cotton Plant in western Marion County and on into Levy County. Another road heading west dipped south towards Camp Izard, near where present-day State Road 200 crosses the Withlacoochee River, and then west along the river to Fort Clinch.
Taylor solved the problem of equal distribution of the forts by dividing North Florida into a series of sections 20 miles square. The area within each section was guarded by a fort named for the number of the square where the fort was located.
To effectively man the forts, it was necessary to move troops and supplies into the heart of the territory. The Withlacoochee, the Suwannee, the Wacasassa, and other major waterways that emptied into the Gulf of Mexico all provided river access to the interior.
The Cedar Keys, being strategically located to the rivers, provided the military with an ideal staging area for the transfer of troops and supplies from larger vessels to the steamers and smaller vessels that plied the rivers.
At that time, the islands were virtually uninhabited and easy for the government to take over.
The chain of posts created in the area surrounding the Cedar Keys were: Fort No. Four on the mainland of the Cedar Keys, occupied from April 1839 until August 1841; Fort No. Three on Wacassassa Bay near the mouth of the


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Wacassassa River, occupied from April 1839 through June 1840; Fort Clinch, two miles southeast of Inglis on the Withlacooche River, occupied from October 1836 until May 1842; Fort Wacasassa or Fort No. Eight, at the head of the Wacassassa River, occupied from March 1839 until January 1843; and Fort Fanning, located 5 miles south of Wilcox on the east bank of the Suwannee River, occupied from November 1838 until January 1843.
An early government survey map published in 1855 shows four other military posts at Cedar Keys of which little is known. "K" Depot, on the mainland; Fort Wacasassa on Way Key; Camp Morgan, at Cedar Keys; and Cantonment Morgan on Seahorse Key.
Cantonment Morgan was a temporary encampment on Seahorse Key during the declining days of the 2nd Seminole Indian War. There is not a great deal of information available on Cantonment Morgan and perhaps the reason lies in the definition of cantonment a group of more or less temporary buildings for housing troops.
What information that is known has been extracted from journals, letters, and US military post returns on file at the National Archives in Washington.
Post returns are a series of monthly reports on troop and personnel movements that were filed with the Adjutant General's Office in Washington, DC.
The posts returns for the Port of Cantonment Morgan show that from July 1841 until December 1842, the encampment was utilized as a staging area for the receiving, processing and deploying of troops; a hospital for both military troops and Seminole Indians; and an internment camp for captured


Indians being shipped to the west.
The military units which passed through Cantonment Morgan, their strength, the names and duties of the officers, the number of officers present and absent, a list of official communications received, and a record of events were recorded for the period of the official existence of that post. However, the returns for the months of January and March 1842 are missing.
Fri


it1' A

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A US Army Soldier in the uniform of
the Second Seminole Indian War
The Cantonment Morgan post return dated August 1841 shows that General Order 33 issued by the Headquarters of the Florida Army at Fort Brooke, Tampa Bay directed the commander of the 6th US Infantry to re-occupy Cantonment Morgan with two companies.


5







William Hoffman, Captain of Company D did as commanded and the Port of Cantonment Morgan was re-occupied on the 10th day of August 1841 by Company D and Company K of the 6th US Infantry.
The US government had another compelling reason for establishing a military post on Seahorse Key -- the healthy atmosphere. The Indians were not the only threat to soldiers in the Territory of Florida. The summer heat or so called "sickly season" which ran roughly from the end of March to October could reduce the ranks of a company of soldiers very quickly. Illness and death were rampant throughout the ranks at all the camps and forts in the interior. However, the returns of Cantonment Morgan show only three deaths during the occupation of the post.
When Cantonment Morgan was reestablished in 1841 listed among the general staff was Assistant Surgeon, L.A. Birdsall. The post return for August 1841 shows that Dr. Birdsall had no shortage of patients as there were seven privates of Company D and a sergeant and five privates of Company K confined to the hospital during the month.
The "sickly season" also made it hard to recruit citizen soldiers and regulars to form an effective fighting force. Each company had an officer whose job it was to recruit volunteers and each month's return gave the number of recruits needed to bring the company up to capacity.
At the height of the campaign against the Indians the fighting force was composed of friendly Creek Indians; Georgia; Alabama; and Florida


Volunteers, and regular US Army.
However, as the war dragged on, militia and volunteers from Georgia and Alabama were becoming harder and harder to recruit for duty in Florida, especially after fighting against the Creeks broke out in their own states. In addition, citizen soldiers did not feel the commitment of regular soldiers and each month the post returns of Cantonment Morgan listed the number of deserters.
As an incentive to prospective soldiers, the US government awarded bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who engaged in military service on behalf of the United States.
William McCall, a private in Captain Hutton's Company, Florida Volunteers who fought in the Florida or Seminole War, was awarded 40 acres of land in payment for his military service.' The land, found in Township 12 S/Range 14 E, is located west of present day Chief land.
Andrew J. Clyatt, a private in Captain Swilley's Company, Florida Volunteers was awarded 80 acres of land for his service.2 The land, found in Township 12 S/Range 15 E, is located east of US 19 and south of US 27 A near Chief land.
Zachariah Davis redeemed warrant no. 52186' and was deeded 40 acres of land in Township 13 S/Range 15 E, located west of Otter Creek. Davis received the land for service as a Private in Captain Stewart's Company, Florida Volunteers.
When Cantonment Morgan was reestablished by Companies D and K of the 6th US Infantry in August 1841, Company D had two commissioned officers, Capt. William Hoffman, Com-


6







mander and 2nd Lt. E.H. Fitzgerald; one sergeant; one corporal; one drummer; one fifer; and nine privates. Seven of the privates were sick and the other two privates were on extra duty. The return states that 39 recruits were required to bring the company up to full strength.
Company K had two commissioned officers, 1st Lt. Thomas Hendrickson and 2nd Lt. J.D. Bacon; one sergeant; one drummer; one fifer; and 13 privates. Captain Thomas Noel, commander of Company K was absent from his company because he was sick at Baltimore, MD. The sergeant and five privates were sick and confined to the hospital. Also, Company K lost a trooper due to desertion. According to the return, the troop also needed 39 recruits to bring the company to full strength.


It was noted also that there were 1550 musket balls & buckshot cartridges on hand.
Shortly after arriving at Cantonment Morgan, Captain Hoffman was directed to Fort Brooke to become a member of the board conducting a general court martial and 1st Lt. Hendrickson assumed command of the post. Special Order No. 38 from Headquarters of the Florida Army directed the companies of the 3rd Infantry presently stationed at Fort Fanning to proceed to Fort Stansbury on the Ochlockonee River in present day Wakulla County.
The August 1841 return notes that 1st Lt. Edward Johnson, Company D, 6th US Infantry was absent from the post because he was commanding a mounted detachment at Fort Harrison. Fort Harrison was the site of present day Clearwater in Pinellas County.


Rattlesnake
Key,,.


Gomez Key


M
McCrary Cove North
Key


id&e Keys


Deadman's
Key



Seahorse Key


Cedar

Scale
Key





J Atsena Otie
(Depot Key)


Pt


Grassy Key


/.Snake
Key


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The September return shows only one person in the hospital but the number of recruits required increased to 40 due to discharges. Captain Hoffman returned from his duties on the court martial board and resumed his position as post commander on September 11, 1841.
In October, 1841, the Headquarters of the Army of Florida at Tampa detailed two companies of the 6th US Infantry to repair to the Western District of Middle Florida and on October 5, 1841, Company K departed Cantonment Morgan for Middle Florida. The troops joined with other forces to mount a massive assault on the Indians and drive them south of the Caloosahatchee River.
Also in October, Asst. Surgeon Birdsall was transferred to Fort King at present day Ocala and 2nd Lt. EH Fitzgerald was given temporary duty with the 6th Infantry Battalion at Tampa Bay for the benefit of his health.
In December, an infusion of new troops dropped the number of recruits required to 18 and an order from Washington transferred the Headquarters of the 6th Infantry to Fort Brooke at Tampa Bay.
Company D evidently transferred out sometime during the month of January 1842; however, the return for that month is missing. The February return states that the post was reoccupied by Company B, 4th US Infantry on 25 February 1842, Captain R.C. Buchanan commanding.
Sometime during January, 1842, the headquarters of the 9th military department was established at the Cedar Keys. From that date forward, orders were issued from that post. An entry from Letters from the Frontiers,' a jour-


nal of letters from a soldier to his father and brother written by Major General George A. McCall, puts Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Army of Florida and his staff on Depot Key (Atsena Otie), three miles distant from Cantonment Morgan on Seahorse Key.
It was about this time that Colonel Worth stepped up the campaign against the Indians, putting greater pressure on them to surrender. Hot pursuit and continuing solicitations of Indian leaders slowly convinced the Indians to surrender.
In February, 1842 a band of 230 Indians was shipped from Fort Brooke to the western states. That month, Colonel Worth estimated that only 300 Indians remained on the peninsula of Florida. Thinking the hostilities were coming to a close, Worth dismissed some of the regular troops, sending them back to the north. He then asked the government for permission to institute a non-pursuit policy.
The departure of troops through Cantonment Morgan is reflected in the post returns for February.
Companies A, G, H, I & K of the 6th US Infantry under the command of Major Hoffman were posted to Cantonment Morgan waiting to sail for Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, ten miles below St. Louis.
On April 28, 1842, Company B of the 4th US Infantry departed Seahorse Key and Captain W.B. Montgomery, commander of Companies I and K, 8th US Infantry, assumed command of Cantonment Morgan.
In April, 1842, Colonel Worth went into the interior to meet with three of the remaining chieftains: Billy Bowlegs, Tiger Tail and Octiarchie. An arrange-


8








ment was made giving those Indians and their followers a reservation in the southern portion of Florida. In return, they would cease hostilities.
On the 10th of May 1842 Company K, 8th Infantry under the command of Captain Montgomery left Cantonment Morgan for Picolata, to return to the north.


:~p








A Seminole Indian
On that same day, Company D, 4th Infantry arrived at Cantonment Morgan under the command of Brevart Major William M. Graham. When Major Graham docked at Seahorse Key, he had 47 Indians from Halleck Tustenuggee's band with him. Major Graham assumed command of the post. On May 16th, Company C, 4th Infantry arrived under the command of Captain George A. McCall.


On the 19th of May the fifteen member 4th Infantry Band was listed as being present at Cantonment Morgan. The total military strength on the island at this time was 295.
On Special Duty emigrating the Indians were 1st Lt Charles Hoskins and 2nd Lt Sidney Smith of Company B, 4th Infantry.
By Special Order issued at the Cedar Keys on 29 June 1842, Assistant Surgeon Joseph H. Bailey was assigned to the post to attend to the Indians at the Cedar Keys. Corporal James Dunlap, Company D, 8th Infantry was placed in charge of the Indians.
During the month of June, Companies C and D, and the Band, all of the 4th Infantry departed the post. Company 1, 4th Infantry and Company 1, 3rd Infantry arrived.
In July, Company 1, 4th Infantry was directed to sail to Fort Fanning to relieve Company D, 7th Infantry. The men of Company D must have welcomed the opportunity to relax and fish on Seahorse Key.
August 1842 was a busy time at Cantonment Morgan. Asst. Surgeon W.T. Leonard arrived, Asst. Surgeon Bailey having been sent west with the Indians being relocated to the western territories.
Order No. 28 dated 11 August 1842 issued at Cedar Keys announced that hostilities with the Indians within the territory of Florida have ceased and Colonel William J. Worth surrendered command of Military Department No. 9 at Depot Key to Colonel Joseph Vose of the 4th Infantry.
An order directed that the molasses on hand at Military Department No. 9 be issued to the troops.


9








The September return states that Companies F and I, 4th Infantry arrived at Cantonment Morgan from the interior and immediately embarked for New Orleans, together with a detachment of the 2nd Regiment of Dragoons.
In preparation for the abandonment of the post, Washington dispatched General Order No. 55 setting forth the rules for the care and preservation of fortifications being vacated.
Asst. Surgeon Leonard was relieved by Asst. Surgeon D. Herndon, who was then relieved by Asst. Surgeon W.E.


Fullwood, who sailed for New Orleans from Cantonment Morgan with a detachment of the 4th Infantry.
As the month of September 1842 drew to a close, the military strength on Seahorse Key was 192.
Am! tf/en disaster stncf.
On October 6, 1842, Captain J.B. Clark, the commander of Cantonment Morgan and also commander of the 3rd Infantry wrote the following report to Colonel Vose at Headquarters Military Department No. 9, Depot Key:


Sir:
With regrets I have to report the almost totaf destruction of this post and a very
extensive toss of and damage to public property by a tornado during yesterday and fast night.
With the exception of three, two of which are in a precarious situation, aff the sheds
are razed to the ground. The Hospita so much impaired as to be no onger safe, and aff the boats but one smaff barge have been destroyed. Of the grand houses, adjacent sheds and wharf, scarcely a vestige remains to mark the spot where they stood. The Commissary store remains
uninjured. The Is(and presents a scene of devastation and ruin.
Fortunately no fives were ost and not one man seriousLy injured.

Tour obedient servant,
J.B. C(ark

Colonel Vose sent Captain Clark's letter, together with a letter of his own to Army Headquarters, Washington, DC. The Colonel wrote:

Sir,
I regret to inform the Department of War that a hurricane more destructive in its
effects than any which has occurred on this camp since commencement of military operations
in Fforida visited this isandyesterday.
The wind commenced bowing on the afternoon of the 4th instant from the southeast
and increased in vioence with but ittLe variation in direction untif fate in the evening of the
5th.
The water rose to an unprecedented height and aided by the force of the wind, carried
[away] houses, trees, boats, and in fact everything that could not be protected against their
combined action.
Two steamboats and a smaLf stoop were broken Loose from their moorings and driven
ashore on the opposite key towards the mainland where they now fie totaL wrecks. The stoop and one of the steamboats the property of the United States, the other steamer a chartered boat.


10









A very arge amount of public property is lost and nearly the entire quantity in store d.amaged. The store houses are rendered unserviceabte being reft in of sides andflooring. Two farge workshops/carpenters &' blacksmiths were swept off and their contents consisting of tools, etc., lost. Besides these the suttfers store and four other buiffLings occupied by employees of the government were carried off and today the whole island presents a scene of unbefieved desolation. The lumber necessary to repair the store houses woufd have to be purchased and brought here as not afoot of that on hand was saved, and even were it avaifabfe on the spot, I shoufdfeef it my duty to report against its use for that object.
My deliberate opinion is, that this key and aff others in the group should be abandoned for military purposes and after the removal of the Creeks, I woufd recommend the removal of the public property to some other point combining asfar as practicable the two great requisites of economic and convenience and the abandonment of the Depot.

Your obedient servant,
CofonefJoseph Vose


Despite the devastation to the military facility on Seahorse Key, Cantonment Morgan continued to be used as a staging area for troops. The post return for the month of October 1842 shows that there were 191 troops were housed on Seahorse Key, including nine members of the 3rd Infantry regimental band. The return for November shows the number of troops at 135 and the December 1842 post return shows the figure at 161.
The last post return for the Port of Cantonment Morgan is dated December 1842.
By letter dated February 16, 1843, Captain E.B. Babbitt of the 3rd Infantry, the last commander of Cantonment Morgan, informed Brigadier General R. Jones, Adjutant General of the US Army, "theport ofCantonment Moryan now abandoned
The Second Seminole Indian war, which began in 1836, dragged on for seven long years. The Army alone suffered 1,446 deaths; the Marines sixty-


six and the Navy twenty-three. Those figures do not include soldiers who subsequently died from illnesses or wounds incident to the war. Also not included in that figure are non-military deaths of frontier settlers and civilians employed by the military.
In addition, there was a significant, but difficult to enumerate, loss of life among the thousands of volunteers who participated throughout most of the war. For that cost in lives, 3,824 Indians were removed from Florida.
The financial cost of the war was estimated at between thirty and forty million dollars.
As the hostilities with the Indians subsided, Congress enacted a bill on August 4, 1842, entitled The Armed Occupation Act. The act was designed to entice settlers to the unsettled parts of the peninsula of East Florida. Any settler who would build a dwelling, cultivate five acres of land, live there for five years, and protect it from the Indians would receive 160 acres of land.


11










One individual who took advantage of the new act was Augustus Steele. Steele, the US Customs House Officer for Hillsborough County and Postmaster of the Tampa Bay post office redeemed a certificate for 168 acres of land on April 14, 1843. The land, located within Townships 15 & 16 S/Range 16 E,


was known as Depot Key.'
The transfer of Depot Key and other lands in the Cedar Keys to private ownership did not end the US government's interest in this area. Twenty years later the Cedar Keys would again play a role in making history.


1. Levy County Deed Book 5/Page 782 2. Levy County Deed Book 5/Page 783

3. Levy County Deed Book 16/Page 452.

4. McCall, Maj. Gen. George A., Letters from the Frontiers; The University
Presses of Florida; 1974; Gainesville. 5. Levy County Deed Book 18/Page 37.

Picture of US Army Soldier posed by Brian Kepner, reprinted by permission.
Picture of Seminole Indian posed by Victor T. Vasco, reprinted by permission.


12










ZACHARIAH DAVIS
ca 1790 1860

Compiled by EVEL YN YEARTY

Zachariah Davis was born about 1790 in South Carolina. His father is thought to be Zion Davis.

By 1817 Zachariah had migrated to Pulaski County, Georgia. Records there indicate that on March 16, 1817 he married Mary Ann Hagan of North Carolina. The 1818 tax roll listed Zachariah as living in the Davis District of Pulaski County, Georgia. Zachariah and Mary Ann were living in Appling County, Georgia according to the 1820 census.

The children of Zachariah and Mary Ann Hagan Davis are as follows:


1. Cirilla


2. Peter Hagan


b: 1818 m: Moses Cason


b: 1820 1St m:
2nd m:


d: by 1860


d: November, 1877 Mary, before 1854 Rebecca Roundtree Price, 1 Apr 1872


3. Sephrona


4. Samantha 5. Mary Ann 6. Cindarilla 7. Sarah T. 8. Emma L. 9. Rhoda F.


b: 1821 m: Willis R. Medlin b: 1821 m: William J. Hart b: 1825 b: 1829 m: S.R. Armor, 2 Nov b: 1830 m: Peter H. McCaskill b: 1831 b: 1834 m: Lazarous B. Lewis,


d: by 1863


d: unknown


d: unknown d: unknown 1869

d: by 1870


d: by 1860 d: by 1870 31 Jul 1859


13










Census records indicate that all the children were born in Georgia. By 1840 the family moved to Columbia County, Florida, where Zachariah became an Indian fighter. Zachariah and son Peter Hagan enlisted in Capt. A.A. Stewart's Company of the Florida Mounted Militia, commanded by Col. Charles Dell. The unit was active from 18 Aug 1840 until 28 Nov 1840 and was mustered in at Alligator Settlement (present day Lake City).

On 28 Nov 1840, Zachariah re-enlisted in Capt. George E. McLellan's Company of the Florida Foot Militia, to fight the Seminole Indians, serving until June 6, 1841. Peter Hagan Davis is not listed on this muster roll.

On 22 Apr 1843, Zachariah was awarded 160 acres of bounty land for services rendered in the Florida Seminole Indian Wars. This land was located in the Levyville area of present day Levy County, Florida. So the family moved again.

In 1844 they were living in the Long Pond District of Alachua County (now Levy County) where Zachariah voted in the first statewide election on May 26.

The Levy County Commission minutes in 1850 indicate their plans to build a road from Zachariah's house to Cedar Key. Zachariah made good use of that road, moving his family to Cedar Key. In August, 1860, he died in Cedar Key.

Levy County Courthouse records indicate it was not until 1889 that the estate of Zachariah Davis was settled. Judge George W. Willis ordered Henry B. Coulter to sell Zachariah's land to the highest and best bidder on the steps of the Levy County Courthouse in Bronson, Florida.

In observing the 120th anniversary of the Levy County Commission in 1971, the Levy County Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution honoring Peter Hagan Radcliffe (Raddie) Davis of Cedar Key, grandson of Zachariah Davis. At the meeting Mr. Davis noted that his family had been a part of Levy County's history for 120 years. His father, Peter Hagan Davis, allowed the very first Levy County Commissioner's meeting to be held in his home in Levyville in 1850. Mr. Raddie's son, R.B. Davis, and later R.B.'s son, Mike Davis, served on the Levy County Commission.

The Davis family is a true pioneer family, not just in Levy County, but Florida as well.


14










CERTIFICATE FOR LAND
GRANTED TO
ZACHARIAH DAVIS
FOR MILITARY SERVICE

As recorded among the Public Records
of Levy County, Florida
Deed Book 16/Page 452

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME, GREETING:

WHEREAS, in pursuance of the Act of Congress, approved September 28, 1850, entitled "An Act Granting Bounty Land to Certain Officers and Soldiers Who Have Been Engaged in the Military Service of the United States," Warrant No. 52186 for 40 acres, issued in favor of Zachariah Davis, Private Captain Stewarts Company, Florida Volunteers, Florida War, has been returned to the General Land Office, with evidence that the same has been duly located upon the South West quarter, of the North East quarter, of Section Thirty five, in Township Thirteen, containing Forty acres, according to the Official Plat of the Survey of the said Land returned to the General Land Office, by the SURVEYOR GENERAL.

NOW KNOW YE, that there is therefore granted by the United States unto the said Zachariah Davis the tract of land above described: TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said tract of land, with the appurtenances thereof, unto the said Zachariah Davis and to his heirs and assigns forever.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, Franklin Pierce, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, have caused these Letters to be made Patent, and the Seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed.

GIVEN under my hand at the City of Washington, the First day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty four and of the Independence of the United States the seventy-eighth.

U.S. GENERAL LAND OFFICE) BY THE PRESIDENT: Franklin Pierce
OFFICIAL SEAL ATTACHED ) By: M.O.W. Wheeler
M. Granger

Record of Miscellaneous Military)
Grants, Vol. 103, Page 163 )


15










ARMED OCCUPATION BILL FOR FLORIDA August 1842

In August, 1842, an Armed Occupation Bill for Florida was enacted into law. The idea for such a system traced at least as far back as 1838, when Governor Richard K. Call had suggested that the only way to overcome the Seminoles was to establish colonies of settlers to work the land and hold it. Early in 1839 Senator Benton of Missouri had picked up the concept and advanced it as a bill.

Any head of a family could obtain title to 160 acres in Florida subject to the following stipulations: (1) his land must be south of a line running east and west about three miles north of Palatka and ten miles south of Newnansville; (2) he must reside on the land for five years; (3) he must build a house and clear five acres; and (4) he must not settle within two miles of a military post.

The act was to expire at the end of one year, and the grants under it could not exceed a total of 200,000 acres. There were two land offices, Newnansville and St. Augustine. Newnansville was then a town of about 1,000 persons, which had managed to survive in spite of the war. The office of this hamlet issued 942 land patents, while St. Augustine issued only 370. 43 permits were issued in 1842, but 1,274 the next year.

Some of the persons who received lands in Levy County were:


Richard W. McDonnell John Mercer Stafford John Mercer Stafford Hasten H. Johnson Thos E Barrow W.J. G. McDonell F.C. Borstel F.C. Borstel Joseph S. Gill Kendrick B. Johnson Augustus Steele


01 Apr 1859 14 Mar 1846 00 Jan 184? 01 Jan 1849 01 Nov 1848 01 Apr 1859 19 Feb 1859 19 Feb 1859 15 Dec 1856 01 Jan 1849 04 Apr 1843


Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 265 Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 454 Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 455 Levy Co. Deed Bk E/Pg 145 Levy Co. Deed Bk E/Pg 168 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 211 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 414 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 415 Levy Co. Deed Bk L/Pg 310 Levy Co. Deed Bk O/Pg 187 Levy Co. Deed Bk 18/Pg 37


16





1850 FEDERAL CENSUS LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA


Free Inhabitants in Cedar Key, Leiy County, FL 14' day of November 1850


Household


Age Sex


1. STEELE,


2. PARSONS, 3. CREVASSE,

CLARKE,


CREVASSE, 4. CASTILLO,





5. CORRIGAN,


6. WALKER, 7. WILSON,






OGLESBY,


Augustus Elizabeth A. Augusta F. John Thomas Joseph Mary A. Eliza Ann Frances C. Robert John Teresa Joseph John Kennisonnal David Antoinoi Elizabeth Owen Margaret Edward Lewellen J. William Delilah Jerome John Chloe William Joseph Frances John Nancy Sarah Lewis Miram George


50 35
4 48 30 36 27
12
9
7
5
3
2
30 23
7
3
2
45 44
6
21 48 38 16
14 11
8
40 39 16 10
8
6
5
3


Occupation/
Race


Legislator Merchant Speculator Seaman/Fshmn








Seaman/Fshmn





Laborer Farmer Fisherman Fisherman



Carpenter Carpenter


Page 77/147

Place of Birth

NY FL FL Unknown Unknown Italy Canada FL FL FL FL FL FL Spain FL FL FL FL Ireland Ireland FL FL NY AL AL AL AL AL SC GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL


17





Page 77/148


Free Inhabitants in Cedar Key, Levy County, FL 14'" day of November 1850


Household

8. DAY,


9. GOMEZ, 10. MILLER,
MILLER,
SAVAGE,

11. RICHARDS,


Age


Thomas Caroline Elizabeth John Sarah Ann Joseph Sarah Emily Amanda E.H.
Sarah A.


22 18 3/12 30 25 33 31
8
5
40 30


Sex


M
F
F
M
F
M
F
F
F
M
F


Occupation/
Race


Pilot


Seaman/Fshmn

Stevadore


Shipping/Cowman


Enumerator = Hiram T. Mann, Asst. Marshall


18


Place of Birth

England FL FL Portugal GA
Sweden GA
FL FL CT CT





Free Inhabitants in the First District, Leiy County, FL 11' day of November 1850


Household


Age


Sex


Occupation/
Race


Page 78/149


Place of Birth


12. HIGHSMITH, 13. MEDLIN, 14. WILKINSON, 15. TOMLINSON, 16. BOWELS, 17. WESTER, 18. WEEKS,


Isaac Elizabeth James T. Mary A. Charity John T. M. Sydney P. Martha J. Nancy T. Willis R. Sophronal Elias H. Jane Ann Sarah F.L. William J. Joseph Charlotte A. Mary J. Harriett L. Sarah E. Phebe A. Sebastian Milly Candacy Naan Elizabeth William Penny Nancy William Elizabeth John Catharine C. Richard Milly Samuel William Zilphia Elias Aaron Julian Malinda


40 33 13
12 10
8
6
4
2 28 28
8
6
4 6/12
40 22
9
8
4 6/12 33 27
12 10
8
6
4
3 30 16 30 27
8
7
5
4
2
1
24 17
1


Farmer Farmer Farmer Farmer/Stkkpr Tailor Farmer/Stkkpr Farmer/Stkkpr


19


GA GA GA GA GA GA GA
FL FL FL GA
FL FL FL FL GA NC
FL FL FL FL GA GA GA GA GA GA
FL FL NC GA GA GA GA GA
FL FL FL FL GA GA
FL





Free Inhabitants in the First District, Levy County, FL 11' day of November 1850


Page 78/150


Household


19. HART,







20. MORGAN,













21. BARROW, 22. HAGAN,







23. McDONALD, 24. RODGERS, 25. LOVE,


WATERSON,
WALKER,


William J. Samantha Isaac John Jurasha Sophronal Babe Ephraim Mary Seletal A. Malinda Delila Mary William F.M. Almira Fatima Ephriam Henrietta Charity Thomas E. Margaret Charles James F. Amy Francis J. John H.B. Sarah A. Mary A. Martha Peter Nelson Elvey Wm. H.Y.
John Elen Elenor Thomas Polly Ann Sarah F. 1 Robertson Mary


1/12


Age Sex

30 M 27 F 9 M 7 M 5 F 3 F 1 F 40 M 30 F 15 F 14 F 12 F 10 F 9 M 8 F 7 F 4 M 1 F 16 F 43 M 26 F 8 M 7 M 53 F 21 M 22 M 18 F 17 F 15 F 13 M 23 M 27 F 1 M 30 M 26 F 4 F 26 M 20 F
F
26 M 17 F


Occupation/
Race


Farmer







Farmer













Farmer Laborer Farmer Farmer Farmer Farmer Laborer


20


Place of Birth


PA GA
FL FL FL FL FL SC NC
FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL GA GA GA
FL FL GA GA GA GA GA GA GA GA GA
FL GA GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL





Page 79/151


Free Inhabitants in the First District, Levy County, FL 11' day of November 1850


Household


Age


Sex


Occupation/
Race


26. BROWNLOW, 27. BROWNLOW, 28. DAVIS, 29. HARVEY,









30. HARDEE, 31. LANCASTER, 32. PORTER, 33. MAYO,


Benjamin Sarah David Serena Benjamin, Jr. Elizabeth Renvy Sarah James Eliza Simeon Elizabeth Thomas Simeon Hannibald Richard C. Georgi Ann James Virginial Isaac P. Esther Elizabeth M. John S. Isaac B. Henry Elizabeth George W. Mary John William Cynthia Letty Susan Harriett


56 56 17
14 21 17 30
9
7
4 30 39
14 11
9
5
5
4 7/12 32
21
5
4 9/12 27
20 8/12 50
4 40 30 10
6
2


PM Preacher

Laborer

T ?






Farmer


}
}


Twins


Farmer Farmer Farmer


21


Place of Birth


NC NC NC NC NC GA GA GA GA GA GA GA GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL SC GA
FL FL FL SC
FL FL SC
FL SC SC
FL FL FL





Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12' day of November 1850


Household


34. BRYANT, 35. CLYATT,







36. CLYATT, 37. WATERSON,


SIMPSON, 38. TRESPER,





39. RAULERSON,








JONES,
40. MOORE, 41. HUNTER,




SUGGS,
42. BARCO,


Sylvester Elizabeth Sylvester John M. Mariah Madison T. Sarah Mariah E. Montgomery N. Marion F. Andrew J. Caroline M. John Julia L. Maria J. Julia Christian Maria A. Walter C. Emma R. Adelade Lucretia Aaron Moses Caroline America Pelina Harris Alexander Arthur William S. Mary M. Irarene Elijah Sarah Frances M. Marinda Lorenzo James C. Mary Ann Martha J. Emeline


Age


Sex


51
44 20 60 50 19 17
14 11
8
30
20 31
22 4/12 14 62 50 23 16
6
45 14 12 10
8
6
4
3
27 26 26
3
26
21
4
2
20 26
24
7
4


Occupation/
Race

Farmer Laborer Farmer Laborer





Farmer Timber Agent



Farmer Laborer












Farmer Farmer


Farmer



Laborer Farmer


Page 79/152

Place of Birth

GA GA
FL GA SC GA GA GA GA GA GA GA
At Sea GA
FL GA
Germany GA GA GA GA GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL GA GA
FL FL GA GA
FL FL FL


22





Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12' day of November 1850


Household


BARCO,
43. STUDSTILL, 44. COWDEN,



45. ANDREWS,
HOGAN,



46. HOGAN,
SMITH, 47. DANIEL,









48. DANIEL,






49. MOONEY,

WALKER, MOONEY, 50. MORGAN,


Nancy C. Emanuel Rachel Samuel Nancy Lewellen T. Louisanna Mary V. Stephen W. James B. Edward D. Jesse L. Daniel B. Julia A. James Mary Enoch Delilah Rebecca James Nancy Mary H. Martha Minerva Charles B.H. James G. Rebecca William Jane Henry Mary Ann S. Alfred
Sarah Lewellen Lodwick Mariah Alfred
Mary Daniel A. Adaline Lucinda Lydia


Age

7/12 26 25 39 37 11
1
52
20 18 16
14 32 10
8
6
50 39 18 16
14
9
7
3
8/12
24 36 10
7
5
3
40 48 21 14
9
7
5
34 27
9
6


Sex


Occupation/i
Race


Farmer Farmer





Farmer Laborer Laborer Mail Carrier Farmer Laborer






Farmer






Farmer Laborer





Farmer


Page 80/153


Place of Birth


FL GA GA
PA FL FL FL GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL GA
FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL GA
FL FL FL FL NY FL FL FL FL FL FL GA GA
FL FL


23





Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12' day of November 1850


Household


MORGAN,



51. TOMLINSON,

DAVIS,
52. HATCHER,







53. CASON, 54. DAVIS,








55. McGEHEE, 56. JOHNSON,


Duval Craston Franklin Martha William Nancy Mary Ann John R. Margaret E. Wim. R. Malsey J. Sophia H. Sabra Mary C. Moses Civilla Melissa Isabella Hagan R. Narcissa Zachariah Mary Ann Cindarilla Sarah T. Emma L. Rhoda Thomas D. Peter H. James Rebecca Simpson Henry Henry H. Polly
Henry H. Abram Milly Carlisle Mary Michael William


Age


Sex


5
4 3
2
67
74 25 51
44 21 17 11
6 3
40 30
14 11
5
2
60 53
21 20 19 16
20 30 32
21
4 2
37 36 10
8 6
4 3
2
10/12


Occupation/
Race


Farmer Farmer Laborer Farmer






Farmer






Laborer Laborer Farmer Farmer


Page 80/154


Place of Birth

FL FL FL FL SC NC GA NC NC NC NC NC GA
FL GA GA
FL FL FL FL SC NC GA GA GA GA GA GA
Ireland FL FL FL TN
FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL


24





Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12' day of November 1850


Household


57. PETERSON,
PETERSON, 58. JOHNSON, 59. IVY,






60. THOMPSON,







PRESLER,



TISON,
PEOPLES, 61. GORE, 62. MEEKS, 63. SMITH, 64. TRESPER,


Timothy G. Celia Vinson Ann P. Elenor Anthony Zany Michael Polly
Rebecca Tamy James F. Stella Mary John James Rufus Amelia Peter A. Amelia Augusta Adelia David Ann R. Littleton John James Harriett Sarah Aaron George


Age Sex


22 18 38 30
2
35
44 17 11
7
4 35 26 10
8
6
4 9/12
40 36
14 20 24 25
3
60
48 40 10
40 25


Occupation/
Race

Laborer Farmer Farmer Laborer



Farmer







Farmer



Overseer Farmer Blacksmith Farmer Merchant


25


Page 81/155


Place of Birth


FL FL TN
FL FL GA TN
FL FL FL FL OH LA MS MS MS MS
FL LA
KY LA LA
FL FL LA SC SC SC SC
NY GA











State of Florida, Marion County


I, Hiram T. Mann, do certify on Oath that the forgoing schedule No. 1 contains a true enumeration of the free inhabitants of Levy County as enumerated by me in accordance with my oath and instructions to the best of my ability, knowledge and belief.

Hiram T. Mann

Sworn to before me this 26th December 1850

Robert Bullock
Clerk of Court Marion County


Population of Cedar Key = Population of District 1 = Population of District 2 =


47 men, women and children and 11 dwellings 117 men, women and children and 22 dwellings 156 men, women and children and 31 dwellings


Total free population = 320


26















K


HISTORY OF THE PAT

The locomotive engine located on US 98-19 at Gulf Hammock Wayside Park was manufactured by Baldwin Locomotive Works, Eddystone, Pennsylvania in the year 1915.
It could be described as a 2-8-0 locomotive engine because it consists of 2 pilot wheels and 8 drive wheels. You may observe the 8 drive wheels as being very small, only 36 inches in diameter, which gives this engine a tremendous amount of pulling power.
According to a statement of Feat Jones, age 90, presently residing in Williston, the locomotive was purchased by the Dowling Brothers in 1915, and was delivered to them in Odessa, Florida. The engine was name "Abigail" for Will Dowling's daughter, and numbered "3".
The first engineer was named Mr. Page, and the first Hos'tler' was Feat Jones. When Grover joined with Dowling Brothers the engine was moved to Gulf Hammock. Grover-Dowling Hardwood Company went bankrupt and


-MAC LOCOMOTIVE

Paterson-McInnis Lumber Company acquired the engine. Paterson-McInnis changed the name of the locomotive engine to Pat-Mac and used the number "3" and the engine was commonly called the "3 Spot".
The locomotive engine was specially adapted for company owned tram roads and for hauling long trains of heavily loaded log cars with logs from giant trees of the great Gulf Hammock to the saw mill, where the logs were manufactured into lumber.
The last engineer to pull logs with this engine was Robert Payne, and the last Hos'tler of this engine was Feat Jones. Mr. W.B. Paterson, Vice President of the Paterson-Mclnnis Lumber Company and Mr. C.G. Petteway, Treasurer of the company (and later President of Perkins State Bank) played a big part in helping the County acquire this engine, which was presented to the State for display in the Wayside Park.

Compiled by
John F. Yearty


hostler one who services a


locomotive


27





INDEX TO VOLUME 21


ANDREWS ARMOR BABBITT BACON
BAILEY BARCO BARROW BIRDSALL BORSTEL BOWELS BROWNLOW BRYANT BUCHANAN BULLOCK CALL CASON CASTILLO
CLARK CLARKE CLYATT CORRIGAN COULTER COWDEN CREVASSE DANIEL DAVIS 6, 13DAY DELL DOWLING DUNLAP
FITZGERALD FULLWOOD GILL
GOMEZ GORE GRAHAM GRANGER GROVER HAGAN
HARDEE


23 13 11 7 9
22, 23 16, 20
6,8
16 19
21 22 8 26 16
13, 24
17 10 17
6, 22
17
14 23 17 23 15, 21, 24
18
14 27 9
7, 8
10 16 18 25 9 15 27 13, 14, 20
21


HART HARVEY HATCHER HENDRICKSO HERNDON
HIGHSMITH HOFFMAN HOGAN HOSKINS HUNTER HUTTON IVY


JOHNSON 7, JONES
KEPNER LANCASTER
LEONARD LEWIS LOVE MANN
MAYO McCALL McCASKILL McDONALD McDONELL McDONNELL McGEHEE McINNIS McLELLAN MEDLIN MEEKS
MILLER MONTGOMER MOONEY MOORE MORGAN NOEL
OGLESBY PAGE PARSONS


13, 20
21 24 N 7
10 19 6-8 23 9
22 6 25 16, 24, 25 11, 22, 27
12 21
9, 10
13
20
18, 26
21
6, 8, 9
13
20 16 16
24 27
14
13, 19
25 18 Y 8, 9
23
22 20, 23, 24
7 17 27 17


PATERSON PAYNE PEOPLES PETERSON
PETTEWAY PIERCE PORTER PRESLER RADCLIFFE RAULERSON
RICHARDS RODGERS ROUNDTREE SAVAGE SIMPSON
SMITH STAFFORD STEELE
STEWART STUDSTILL SUGGS
SWILLEY TAYLOR THOMPSON TISON TOMLINSON
TRESPER VASCO VOSE
WALKER WATERSON WEEKS WESTER WHEELER WILKINSON
WILLIS WILSON
WORTH YEARTY


27 27 25 25 27 15
21 25
14 22 18
20 13 18
22 9, 23, 25
16 12, 16, 17 6, 14, 15
23
22 6 3 25 25
19, 24 22, 25
12
9-11 17, 20, 23
20, 22
19 19 15 19
14 17
8, 9
13, 27


28








UNIVERSITY OF FLORA 3 1262 09770 9B50













0




Full Text

PAGE 1

A History of Levy County, Florida & & & Chapter Twenty-one & & & Published By The Levy County Archives Committee Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners January 1,2000 at Bronson, Florida A Bicentennial Publication

PAGE 2

Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/searchforyesterd2120levy

PAGE 3

A History of Levy County, Florida & & & Chapter Twenty-one & & & Published By The Levy County Archives Committee Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners January 1,2000 at Bronson, Florida A Bicentennial Publication Levy County Archives Committee, 2000

PAGE 4

DEDICA TION This Chapter is dedicated to Toni Collins for her interest and enthusiasm in furthering Levy County history and heritage. Toni, a native of Pennsylvania, has traced her family for eight generations on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. She and husband Jim, a student at the University of Florida, currently live in Williston. In addition to her duties as secretary of the Levy County Archives Committee, Toni is a part-time Levy County DeputyClerk, President and cofounder of Crime Stoppers of Levy County, and a member of the Levy County Library Advisory Board. A graduate of Northwestern University, School of Journalism, Evanston, Illinois, Toni spent more than twenty years in print media. In 1984 she made a career change and returned to college to earn her degree as a Legal Assistant attaining National certification in 1997. It was at that time Toni found the subject which interested her most research. She has put that talent to use in not only gathering material for Archives Committee publications but also for her speeches and presentations, both historical and genealogical. Thank you for all you do for Levy County, Toni. The Levy County Archives Committee January 1, 2000 Bronson, FL 2

PAGE 5

Oh Seahorse Key by Toni C. Collins As the issue of statehood raged in Washington, the Second Seminole Indian War, or Florida War, raged in the interior of the Florida territory. When General Zachary Taylor be came commander of the forces fighting the Seminole Indians in the Territory of Florida in 1838, the US Army and Florida Militia were having little success in driving the roving bands of Indian warriors into south Florida. Taylor quickly established a chain of 53 new forts and camps, built or im proved 848 miles of road and 3,643 feet of causeways and bridges. This net work helped not only the US Army, but also civilians and Seminoles traverse the northern and central regions of the terri tory. A close look at an 1839 map of the Florida territory compiled by the US Army Corps of Engineers shows that the most important of these roads was the military road that stretched from Picolata on the St. John's River to Fort Brooke at the north end of Tampa Bay. The road passed southwest from Picolata to Fort Micanopy. From Fort Micanopy the road continued on to Fort Drane, near present day Irvine and an other 22 miles south to Fort King, at Ocala. Fort King was 72 miles north of Fort Brooke. A branch of the road led west out of Fort Micanopy to Fort Wakahoote and then eighteen miles further to Fort Wakasasa. It was 20 miles from Fort Wakasasa to Fort Fan ning on the Suwannee River. Another branch of the main road passed west out of Fort King through Fort Hook near present-day Cotton Plant in western Marion County and on into Levy County. Another road heading west dipped south towards Camp Izard, near where present-day State Road 200 crosses the Withlacoochee River, and then west along the river to Fort Clinch. Taylor solved the problem of equal distribution of the forts by dividing North Florida into a series of sections 20 miles square. The area within each section was guarded by a fort named for the number of the square where the fort was located. To effectively man the forts, it was necessary to move troops and supplies into the heart of the territory. The Withlacoochee, the Suwannee, the Wacasassa, and other major waterways that emptied into the Gulf of Mexico all provided river access to the interior. The Cedar Keys, being strategically located to the rivers, provided the mili tary with an ideal staging area for the transfer of troops and supplies from larg er vessels to the steamers and smaller vessels that plied the rivers. At that time, the islands were virtu ally uninhabited and easy for the govern ment to take over. The chain of posts created in the area surrounding the Cedar Keys were: Fort No. Four on the mainland of the Cedar Keys, occupied from April 1839 until August 1841; Fort No. Three on Wacassassa Bay near the mouth of the 3

PAGE 6

Location of Seminole Indian War forts 4

PAGE 7

Wacassassa River, occupied from April 1839 through June 1840; Fort Clinch, two miles southeast of Inglis on the Withlacooche River, occupied from October 1836 until May 1842; Fort Wacasassa or Fort No. Eight, at the head of the Wacassassa River, occu pied from March 1839 until January 1843; and Fort Fanning, located 5 miles south of Wilcox on the east bank of the Suwannee River, occupied from No vember 1838 until January 1843. An early government survey map published in 1855 shows four other military posts at Cedar Keys of which little is known. "K" Depot, on the mainland; Fort Wacasassa on Way Key; Camp Morgan, at Cedar Keys; and Cantonment Morgan on Seahorse Key. Cantonment Morgan was a tempo rary encampment on Seahorse Key during the declining days of the 2nd Seminole Indian War. There is not a great deal of information available on Cantonment Morgan and perhaps the reason lies in the definition of canton ment a group of more or less tempo rary buildings for housing troops. What information that is known has been extracted from journals, letters, and US military post returns on file at the National Archives in Washington. Post returns are a series of monthly reports on troop and personnel move ments that were filed with the Adjutant General's Office in Washington, DC. The posts returns for the Port of Cantonment Morgan show that from July 1841 until December 1842, the encampment was utilized as a staging area for the receiving, processing and deploying of troops; a hospital for both military troops and Seminole Indians; and an internment camp for captured Indians being shipped to the west. The military units which passed through Cantonment Morgan, their strength, the names and duties of the officers, the number of officers present and absent, a list of official communica tions received, and a record of events were recorded for the period of the official existence of that post. How ever, the returns for the months of January and March 1842 are missing. A US Army Soldier in the uniform of the Second Seminole Indian War The Cantonment Morgan post return dated August 1841 shows that General Order 33 issued by the Headquarters of the Florida Army at Fort Brooke, Tampa Bay directed the commander of the 6th US Infantry to re-occupy Cantonment Morgan with two companies. 5

PAGE 8

William Hoffman, Captain of Com pany D did as commanded and the Port of Cantonment Morgan was re-occu pied on the 10th day of August 1841 by Company D and Company K of the 6th US Infantry. The US government had another compelling reason for establishing a military post on Seahorse Key the healthy atmosphere. The Indians were not the only threat to soldiers in the Territory of Florida. The summer heat or so called "sickly season" which ran roughly from the end of March to Octo ber could reduce the ranks of a com pany of soldiers very quickly. Illness and death were rampant throughout the ranks at all the camps and forts in the interior. However, the returns of Can tonment Morgan show only three deaths during the occupation of the post. When Cantonment Morgan was re established in 1841 listed among the general staff was Assistant Surgeon, L.A. Birdsall. The post return for Au gust 1841 shows that Dr. Birdsall had no shortage of patients as there were seven privates of Company D and a sergeant and five privates of Company K confined to the hospital during the month. The "sickly season" also made it hard to recruit citizen soldiers and regu lars to form an effective fighting force. Each company had an officer whose job it was to recruit volunteers and each month's return gave the number of recruits needed to bring the company up to capacity. At the height of the campaign against the Indians the fighting force was composed of friendly Creek Indians; Georgia; Alabama; and Florida Volunteers, and regular US Army. However, as the war dragged on, militia and volunteers from Georgia and Alabama were becoming harder and harder to recruit for duty in Florida, especially after fighting against the Creeks broke out in their own states. In addition, citizen soldiers did not feel the commitment of regular soldiers and each month the post returns of Canton ment Morgan listed the number of de serters. As an incentive to prospective sol diers, the US government awarded bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who engaged in military service on behalf of the United States. William McCall, a private in Captain Hutton's Company, Florida Volunteers who fought in the Florida or Seminole War, was awarded 40 acres of land in payment for his military service. 1 The land, found in Township 12 S/Range 14 E, is located west of present day Chiefland. Andrew J. Clyatt, a private in Cap tain Swilley's Company, Florida Volun teers was awarded 80 acres of land for his service. 2 The land, found in Town ship 12 S/Range 15 E, is located east of US 19 and south of US 27 A near Chief land. Zachariah Davis redeemed warrant no. 52186 3 and was deeded 40 acres of land in Township 13 S/Range 15 E, located west of Otter Creek. Davis received the land for service as a Pri vate in Captain Stewart's Company, Florida Volunteers. When Cantonment Morgan was reestablished by Companies D and K of the 6th US Infantry in August 1841, Company D had two commissioned officers, Capt. William Hoffman, Com6

PAGE 9

mander and 2nd Lt. E.H. Fitzgerald; one sergeant; one corporal; one drummer; one fifer; and nine privates. Seven of the privates were sick and the other two privates were on extra duty. The return states that 39 recruits were required to bring the company up to full strength. Company K had two commissioned officers, 1st Lt. Thomas Hendrickson and 2nd Lt. J.D. Bacon; one sergeant; one drummer; one fifer; and 13 pri vates. Captain Thomas Noel, com mander of Company K was absent from his company because he was sick at Baltimore, MD. The sergeant and five privates were sick and confined to the hospital. Also, Company K lost a trooper due to desertion. According to the return, the troop also needed 39 recruits to bring the company to full strength. It was noted also that there were 1550 musket balls & buckshot cartridges on hand. Shortly after arriving at Cantonment Morgan, Captain Hoffman was directed to Fort Brooke to become a member of the board conducting a general court martial and 1st Lt. Hendrickson assumed command of the post. Special Order No. 38 from Headquarters of the Florida Army directed the companies of the 3rd Infantry presently stationed at Fort Fanning to proceed to Fort Stansbury on the Ochlockonee River in pres ent day Wakulla County. The August 1841 return notes that 1st Lt. Edward Johnson, Company D, 6th US Infantry was absent from the post because he was commanding a mounted detachment at Fort Harrison. Fort Harrison was the site of present day Clearwater in Pinellas County. 7

PAGE 10

The September return shows only one person in the hospital but the num ber of recruits required increased to 40 due to discharges. Captain Hoffman returned from his duties on the court martial board and resumed his position as post commander on September 11, 1841. In October, 1841, the Headquarters of the Army of Florida at Tampa detailed two companies of the 6th US Infantry to repair to the Western District of Middle Florida and on October 5, 1841, Com pany K departed Cantonment Morgan for Middle Florida. The troops joined with other forces to mount a massive assault on the Indians and drive them south of the Caloosahatchee River. Also in October, Asst. Surgeon Birdsall was transferred to Fort King at present day Ocala and 2nd Lt. EH Fitz gerald was given temporary duty with the 6th Infantry Battalion at Tampa Bay for the benefit of his health. In December, an infusion of new troops dropped the number of recruits required to 18 and an order from Washington transferred the Headquar ters of the 6th Infantry to Fort Brooke at Tampa Bay. Company D evidently transferred out sometime during the month of January 1842; however, the return for that month is missing. The February return states that the post was reoccupied by Company B, 4th US Infantry on 25 February 1842, Captain R.C. Buchanan commanding. Sometime during January, 1842, the headquarters of the 9th military depart ment was established at the Cedar Keys. From that date forward, orders were issued from that post. An entry from Letters from the Frontiers 4 a jour nal of letters from a soldier to his father and brother written by Major General George A. McCall, puts Colonel William J. Worth, commander of the Army of Florida and his staff on Depot Key (Atsena Otie), three miles distant from Cantonment Morgan on Seahorse Key. It was about this time that Colonel Worth stepped up the campaign against the Indians, putting greater pressure on them to surrender. Hot pursuit and continuing solicitations of Indian leaders slowly convinced the Indians to surren der. In February, 1842 a band of 230 Indians was shipped from Fort Brooke to the western states. That month, Colo nel Worth estimated that only 300 In dians remained on the peninsula of Florida. Thinking the hostilities were coming to a close. Worth dismissed some of the regular troops, sending them back to the north. He then asked the government for permission to insti tute a non-pursuit policy. The departure of troops through Cantonment Morgan is reflected in the post returns for February. Companies A, G, H, I & K of the 6th US Infantry under the command of Ma jor Hoffman were posted to Cantonment Morgan waiting to sail for Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, ten miles below St. Louis. On April 28, 1842, Company B of the 4th US Infantry departed Seahorse Key and Captain W.B. Montgomery, commander of Companies I and K, 8th US Infantry, assumed command of Can tonment Morgan. In April, 1842, Colonel Worth went into the interior to meet with three of the remaining chieftains: Billy Bowlegs, Tiger Tail and Octiarchie. An arrange8

PAGE 11

merit was made giving those Indians and their followers a reservation in the southern portion of Florida. In return, they would cease hostilities. On the 10th of May 1842 Company K, 8th Infantry under the command of Captain Montgomery left Cantonment Morgan for Picolata, to return to the north. A Seminole Indian On that same day, Company D, 4th Infantry arrived at Cantonment Morgan under the command of Brevart Major William M. Graham. When Major Gra ham docked at Seahorse Key, he had 47 Indians from Halleck Tustenuggee's band with him. Major Graham assumed command of the post. On May 16th, Company C, 4th Infantry arrived under the command of Captain George A. McCall. On the 19th of May the fifteen mem ber 4th Infantry Band was listed as being present at Cantonment Morgan. The total military strength on the island at this time was 295. On Special Duty emigrating the In dians were 1st Lt Charles Hoskins and 2nd Lt Sidney Smith of Company B, 4th Infantry. By Special Order issued at the Cedar Keys on 29 June 1842, Assistant Sur geon Joseph H. Bailey was assigned to the post to attend to the Indians at the Cedar Keys. Corporal James Dunlap, Company D, 8th Infantry was placed in charge of the Indians. During the month of June, Compa nies C and D, and the Band, all of the 4th Infantry departed the post. Com pany I, 4th Infantry and Company I, 3rd Infantry arrived. In July, Company I, 4th Infantry was directed to sail to Fort Fanning to relieve Company D, 7th Infantry. The men of Company D must have welcomed the opportunity to relax and fish on Sea horse Key. August 1842 was a busy time at Cantonment Morgan. Asst. Surgeon W.T. Leonard arrived, Asst. Surgeon Bailey having been sent west with the Indians being relocated to the western territories. Order No. 28 dated 11 August 1842 issued at Cedar Keys announced that hostilities with the Indians within the territory of Florida have ceased and Colonel William J. Worth surrendered command of Military Department No. 9 at Depot Key to Colonel Joseph Vose of the 4th Infantry. An order directed that the molasses on hand at Military Department No. 9 be issued to the troops. 9

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The September return states that Companies F and I, 4th Infantry arrived at Cantonment Morgan from the interior and immediately embarked for New Orleans, together with a detachment of the 2nd Regiment of Dragoons. In preparation for the abandonment of the post, Washington dispatched General Order No. 55 setting forth the rules for the care and preservation of fortifications being vacated. Asst. Surgeon Leonard was relieved by Asst. Surgeon D. Herndon, who was then relieved by Asst. Surgeon W.E. Fullwood, who sailed for New Orleans from Cantonment Morgan with a de tachment of the 4th Infantry. As the month of September 1842 drew to a close, the military strength on Seahorse Key was 192. And then disaster struck. On October 6, 1842, Captain J.B. Clark, the commander of Cantonment Morgan and also commander of the 3rd Infantry wrote the following report to Colonel Vose at Headquarters Military Department No. 9, Depot Key: Sir: With regrets I have to report the almost total destruction of this post and a very extensive toss of and damage to public property by a tornado during yesterday and last night. With the exception of three, two of which are in a precarious situation, all the sheds are razed to the ground. The Hospital so much impaired as to be no longer safe, and all the boats but one small barge have been destroyed. Of the grand houses, adjacent sheds and wharf, scarcely a vestige remains to mark the spot where they stood. The Commissary store remains uninjured. The Island presents a scene of devastation and ruin. Fortunately no lives were lost and not one man seriously injured. Tour obedient servant, J.B. Clark Colonel Vose sent Captain Clark's letter, together with a letter of his own to Army Headquarters, Washington, DC. The Colonel wrote: Sir, I regret to inform the Department of War that a hurricane more destructive in its effects than any which has occurred on this camp since commencement of military operations in Florida visited this island yesterday. The wind commenced blowing on the afternoon of the 4th instant from the southeast and increased in violence with but little variation in direction until late in the evening of the 5th. The water rose to an unprecedented height and aided by the force of the wind, carried [away] houses, trees, boats, and in fact everything that could not be protected against their combined action. Two steamboats and a small shop were broken loose from their moorings and driven ashore on the opposite key towards the mainland where they now lie total wrecks. The sloop and one of the steamboats the property of the United States, the other steamer a chartered boat. 10

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A very large amount of public property is lost and nearly the entire quantity in store damaged. The store houses are rendered unserviceable being reft in of sides and flooring. Two large workshops/carpenters &. blacksmiths were swept off and their contents consisting of tools, etc., lost. Besides these the suttbers store and four other buildings occupied by employees of the government were carried off and today the whole island presents a scene of unbelieved desolation. The lumber necessary to repair the store houses would have to be purchased and brought here as not afoot of that on hand was saved, and even were it available on the spot, I should feel it my duty to report against its use for that object. My deliberate opinion is, that this key and all others in the group should be abandoned for military purposes and after the removal of the Creeks, I would recommend the removal of the public property to some other point combining as far as practicable the two great requisites of economic and convenience and the abandonment of the Depot. Tour obedient servant, Colonel Joseph Vose Despite the devastation to the mili tary facility on Seahorse Key, Canton ment Morgan continued to be used as a staging area for troops. The post return for the month of October 1842 shows that there were 191 troops were housed on Seahorse Key, including nine mem bers of the 3rd Infantry regimental band. The return for November shows the number of troops at 135 and the De cember 1842 post return shows the figure at 161. The last post return for the Port of Cantonment Morgan is dated December 1842. By letter dated February 16, 1843, Captain E.B. Babbitt of the 3rd Infantry, the last commander of Cantonment Morgan, informed Brigadier General R. Jones, Adjutant General of the US Army, “theport of Cantonment Morgan is now abandoned. v The Second Seminole Indian war, which began in 1836, dragged on for seven long years. The Army alone suf fered 1,446 deaths; the Marines sixtysix and the Navy twenty-three. Those figures do not include soldiers who subsequently died from illnesses or wounds incident to the war. Also not included in that figure are non-military deaths of frontier settlers and civilians employed by the military. In addition, there was a significant, but difficult to enumerate, loss of life among the thousands of volunteers who participated throughout most of the war. For that cost in lives, 3,824 Indians were removed from Florida. The financial cost of the war was estimated at between thirty and forty million dollars. As the hostilities with the Indians subsided, Congress enacted a bill on August 4, 1842, entitled The Armed Occupation Act. The act was designed to entice settlers to the unsettled parts of the peninsula of East Florida. Any settler who would build a dwelling, cultivate five acres of land, live there for five years, and protect it from the In dians would receive 160 acres of land.

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One individual who took advantage of the new act was Augustus Steele. Steele, the US Customs House Officer for Hillsborough County and Postmaster of the Tampa Bay post office redeemed a certificate for 168 acres of land on April 14, 1843. The land, located with in Townships 15 & 16 S/Range 16 E, was known as Depot Key. 5 The transfer of Depot Key and other lands in the Cedar Keys to private own ership did not end the US government's interest in this area. Twenty years later the Cedar Keys would again play a role in making history. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 'T s / T' / T v 1 Levy County Deed Book 5/Page 782 2. Levy County Deed Book 5/Page 783 3. Levy County Deed Book 16/Page 452. 4. McCall, Maj. Gen. George A., Letters from the Frontiers; The University Presses of Florida; 1974; Gainesville. 5. Levy County Deed Book 18/Page 37. Picture of US Army Soldier posed by Brian Kepner, reprinted by permission. Picture of Seminole Indian posed by Victor T. Vasco, reprinted by permission. 12

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ZACHARIAH DAVIS ca 1790 1860 Compiled by EVEL YN YEARTY Zachariah Davis was born about 1790 in South Carolina. His father is thought to be Zion Davis. By 1817 Zachariah had migrated to Pulaski County, Georgia. Records there indicate that on March 16, 181 7 he married Mary Ann Hagan of North Carolina. The 1818 tax roll listed Zachariah as living in the Davis District of Pulaski County, Georgia. Zachariah and Mary Ann were living in Appling County, Georgia according to the 1820 census. The children of Zachariah and Mary Ann Hagan Davis are as follows: 1. Cirilla b: 1818 d: by 1860 m: Moses Cason 2. Peter Hagan b: 1820 d: November 1 s t m: Mary, before 1854 2nd m: Rebecca Roundtree Price, 1 A 3. Sephrona b: 1821 d: by 1863 m: Willis R. Medlin 4. Samantha b: 1821 d: unknown m: William J. Hart 5. Mary Ann b: 1825 d: unknown 6. Cindarilla b: 1829 d: unknown m: S.R. Armor, 2 Nov 1869 7. Sarah T. b: 1830 d: by 1870 m: Peter H. McCaskill 8. Emma L. b: 1831 d: by 1860 9. Rhoda F. b: 1834 d: by 1870 m: Lazarous B. Lewis, 31 Jul 1859 13

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Census records indicate that all the children were born in Georgia. By 1840 the family moved to Columbia County, Florida, where Zachariah became an Indian fighter. Zachariah and son Peter Hagan enlisted in Capt. A.A. Stewart's Company of the Florida Mounted Militia, commanded by Col. Charles Dell. The unit was active from 18 Aug 1840 until 28 Nov 1840 and was mustered in at Alligator Settlement (present day Lake City). On 28 Nov 1840, Zachariah re-enlisted in Capt. George E. McLellan's Company of the Florida Foot Militia, to fight the Seminole Indians, serving until June 6, 1841. Peter Hagan Davis is not listed on this muster roll. On 22 Apr 1843, Zachariah was awarded 160 acres of bounty land for services rendered in the Florida Seminole Indian Wars. This land was located in the Levyville area of present day Levy County, Florida. So the family moved again. In 1844 they were living in the Long Pond District of Alachua County (now Levy County) where Zachariah voted in the first statewide election on May 26. The Levy County Commission minutes in 1850 indicate their plans to build a road from Zachariah's house to Cedar Key. Zachariah made good use of that road, moving his family to Cedar Key. In August, 1860, he died in Cedar Key. Levy County Courthouse records indicate it was not until 1889 that the estate of Zachariah Davis was settled. Judge George W. Willis ordered Henry B. Coulter to sell Zachariah's land to the highest and best bidder on the steps of the Levy County Courthouse in Bronson, Florida. In observing the 1 20 th anniversary of the Levy County Commission in 1971, the Levy County Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution honoring Peter Hagan Radcliffe (Raddie) Davis of Cedar Key, grandson of Zachariah Davis. At the meeting Mr. Davis noted that his family had been a part of Levy County's history for 120 years. His father, Peter Hagan Davis, allowed the very first Levy County Commissioner's meeting to be held in his home in Levyville in 1850. Mr. Raddie's son, R.B. Davis, and later R.B.'s son, Mike Davis, served on the Levy County Commission. The Davis family is a true pioneer family, not just in Levy County, but Florida as well. 14

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CERTIFICATE FOR LAND GRANTED TO ZACHARIAH DAVIS FOR MILITARY SERVICE As recorded among the Public Records of Levy County, Florida Deed Book 16/Page 452 THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME, GREETING: WHEREAS, in pursuance of the Act of Congress, approved September 28, 1850, entitled "An Act Granting Bounty Land to Certain Officers and Soldiers Who Have Been Engaged in the Military Service of the United States," Warrant No. 52186 for 40 acres, issued in favor of Zachariah Davis, Private Captain Stewarts Company, Florida Volunteers, Florida War, has been returned to the General Land Office, with evidence that the same has been duly located upon the South West quarter, of the North East quarter, of Section Thirty five, in Township Thirteen, containing Forty acres, according to the Official Plat of the Survey of the said Land returned to the General Land Office, by the SURVEYOR GENERAL. NOW KNOW YE, that there is therefore granted by the United States unto the said Zachariah Davis the tract of land above described: TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said tract of land, with the appurtenances thereof, unto the said Zachariah Davis and to his heirs and assigns forever. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, Franklin Pierce, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, have caused these Letters to be made Patent, and the Seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed. GIVEN under my hand at the City of Washington, the First day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty four and of the Independence of the United States the seventy-eighth. U.S. GENERAL LAND OFFICE ) OFFICIAL SEAL ATTACHED ) BY THE PRESIDENT: Franklin Pierce By: M.O.W. Wheeler M. Granger Record of Miscellaneous Military ) Grants, Vo I. 103, Page 163 ) 15

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ARMED OCCUPATION BILL FOR FLORIDA August 1842 In August, 1842, an Armed Occupation Bill for Florida was enacted into law. The idea for such a system traced at least as far back as 1838, when Governor Richard K. Call had suggested that the only way to overcome the Seminoles was to establish colonies of settlers to work the land and hold it. Early in 1839 Senator Benton of Missouri had picked up the concept and advanced it as a bill. Any head of a family could obtain title to 160 acres in Florida subject to the following stipulations: (1) his land must be south of a line running east and west about three miles north of Palatka and ten miles south of Newnansville; (2) he must reside on the land for five years; (3) he must build a house and clear five acres; and (4) he must not settle within two miles of a military post. The act was to expire at the end of one year, and the grants under it could not exceed a total of 200,000 acres. There were two land offices, Newnansville and St. Augustine. Newnansville was then a town of about 1,000 persons, which had managed to survive in spite of the war. The office of this hamlet issued 942 land patents, while St. Augustine issued only 370. 43 permits were issued in 1842, but 1,274 the next year. Some of the persons who received lands in Levy County were: Richard W. McDonnell 01 Apr 1859 Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 265 John Mercer Stafford 14 Mar 1846 Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 454 John Mercer Stafford 00 Jan 184? Levy Co. Deed Bk D/Pg 455 Hasten H. Johnson 01 Jan 1849 Levy Co. Deed Bk E/Pg 145 Thos E Barrow 01 Nov 1848 Levy Co. Deed Bk E/Pg 168 W.J. G. McDonell 01 Apr 1859 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 211 F.C. Borstel 19 Feb 1859 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 414 F.C. Borstel 19 Feb 1859 Levy Co. Deed Bk J/Pg 415 Joseph S. Gill 15 Dec 1856 Levy Co. Deed Bk L/Pg 310 Kendrick B. Johnson 01 Jan 1849 Levy Co. Deed Bk O/Pg 187 Augustus Steele 04 Apr 1843 Levy Co. Deed Bk 18/Pg 37 16

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1850 FEDERAL CENSUS LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA Free Inhabitants in Cedar Key, Levy County, FL Page 77/147 14 th day of November 1850 Occupation/ Place of Household Age Sex Race Birth 1. STEELE, Augustus 50 M Legislator NY Elizabeth A. 35 F FL Augusta F. 4 F FL 2. PARSONS, John 48 M Merchant Unknown Thomas 30 M Speculator Unknown 3. CREVASSE, Joseph 36 M Seaman/Fshmn Italy Mary A. 27 F Canada CLARKE, Eliza Ann 12 F FL Frances C. 9 F FL Robert 7 M FL CREVASSE, John 5 M FL Teresa 3 F FL Joseph 2 M FL 4. CASTILLO, John 30 M Seaman/Fshmn Spain Kennisonnal 23 F FL David 7 M FL Antoinoi 3 M FL Elizabeth 2 F FL 5. CORRIGAN, Owen 45 M Laborer Ireland Margaret 44 F Ireland Edward 6 M FL 6. WALKER, Lewellen J. 21 M Farmer FL 7. WILSON, William 48 M Fisherman NY Delilah 38 F AL Jerome 16 M Fisherman AL John 14 M AL Chloe 11 F AL William 8 M AL OGLESBY, Joseph 40 M Carpenter SC Frances 39 F GA John 16 M Carpenter FL Nancy 10 F FL Sarah 8 F FL Lewis 6 M FL Miram 5 M FL George 3 M FL 17

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Free Inhabitants in Cedar Key, Levy County, FL 14 th day of November 1850 Household 8. DAY, Thomas Caroline Elizabeth 9. GOMEZ, John Sarah Ann 10. MILLER, Joseph MILLER, Sarah SAVAGE, Emily Amanda 11 RICHARDS, E.H. Sarah A. Age Occupation/ Sex Race Page 77/148 Place of Birth 22 M Pilot England 18 F FL 3/12 F FL 30 M Seaman/Fshmn Portugal 25 F GA 33 M Stevadore Sweden 31 F GA 8 F FL 5 F FL 40 M Shipping/Cowman CT 30 F CT Enumerator Hiram T. Mann, Asst. Marshall 18

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Free Inhabitants in the First District, Levy County, FL Page 78/149 11 th day of November 1850 Occupation/ Place of Household Age Sex Race Birth 12. HIGHSMITH, Isaac 40 M Farmer GA Elizabeth 33 F GA James T. 13 M GA Mary A. 12 F GA Charity 10 F GA John T. M. 8 M GA Sydney P. 6 M GA Martha J. 4 F FL Nancy T. 2 F FL 13. MEDLIN, Willis R. 28 M Farmer FL Sophronal 28 F GA Elias H. 8 M FL Jane Ann 6 F FL Sarah F.L. 4 F FL William J. 6/12 M FL 14. WILKINSON, Joseph 40 M Farmer GA Charlotte A. 22 F NC Mary J. 9 F FL Harriett L. 8 F FL Sarah E. 4 F FL Phebe A. 6/12 F FL 15. TOMLINSON, Sebastian 33 M Farmer/Stkkpr GA Milly 27 F GA Candacy 12 F GA Naan 10 F GA Elizabeth 8 F GA William 6 M GA Penny 4 F FL Nancy 3 F FL 16. BOWELS, William 30 M Tailor NC Elizabeth 16 F GA 17. WESTER, John 30 M Farmer/Stkkpr GA Catharine C. 27 F GA Richard 8 M GA Milly 7 F GA Samuel 5 M FL William 4 M FL Zilphia 2 F FL Elias 1 M FL 18. WEEKS, Aaron 24 M Farmer/Stkkpr GA Julian 17 F GA Malinda 1 F FL 19

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Free Inhabitants in the Fir 11 th day of November 1850 Household 19. H A R T, 20. M O R G A N 21. BARROW, 22. HAGAN, 23. MCDONALD, 24. RODGERS, 25. LOVE, WATERSON, WALKER, District, Levy County, FL William J. Age 30 Sex M Samantha 27 F Isaac 9 M John 7 M Jurasha 5 F Sophronal 3 F Babe 1 F Ephraim 40 M Mary 30 F Seletal A. 15 F Malinda 14 F Delila 12 F Mary 10 F William F.M 9 M Almira 8 F Fatima 7 F Ephriam 4 M Henrietta 1 F Charity 16 F Thomas E. 43 M Margaret 26 F Charles 8 M James F. 7 M Amy 53 F Francis J. 21 M John H.B. 22 M Sarah A. 18 F Mary A. 17 F Martha 15 F Peter 13 M Nelson 23 M Elvey 27 F Wm. H.Y. 1 M John 30 M Elen 26 F Elenor 4 F Thomas 26 M Polly Ann 20 F Sarah F. 11/12 F Robertson 26 M Mary 17 F Page 78/150 Occupation/ Place of Race Birth Farmer PA GA FL FL FL FL FL Farmer SC NC FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL GA Farmer GA GA FL FL GA Laborer GA Farmer GA GA GA GA GA Farmer GA GA FL Farmer GA GA FL Farmer FL FL FL Laborer FL FL 20

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Free Inhabitants in the First District, Levy County, FL 11 th day of November 1850 Page 79/151 Occupation/ Place of Household Age Sex Race Birth 26. BROWNLOW, Benjamin 56 M PM Preacher NC Sarah 56 F NC David 17 M Laborer NC Serena 14 F NC 27. BROWNLOW, Benjamin, Jr. 21 M T ? NC Elizabeth 17 F GA 28. DAVIS, Renvy 30 F GA Sarah 9 F GA James 7 M GA Eliza 4 F G A 29. HARVEY, Simeon 30 M Farmer GA Elizabeth 39 F GA Thomas 14 M GA Simeon 11 M FL Hannibald 9 M FL Richard C. 5 M } Twins FL Georgi Ann 5 F } FL James 4 M FL Virginial 7/12 F FL 30. HARDEE, Isaac P. 32 M Farmer SC Esther 21 F GA Elizabeth M. 5 F FL John S. 4 M FL Isaac B. 9/12 M FL 31. LANCASTER, Henry 27 M Farmer SC Elizabeth 20 F FL George W. 8/12 M FL 32. PORTER, Mary 50 F SC John 4 M FL 33. MAYO, William 40 M Farmer SC Cynthia 30 F SC Letty 10 F FL Susan 6 F FL Harriett 2 F FL 21

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Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL Page 79/152 12 th day of November 1850 Occupation/ Place of Household Age Sex Race Birth 34. BRYANT, Sylvester 51 M Farmer GA Elizabeth 44 F GA Sylvester 20 M Laborer FL 35. CLYATT, John M. 60 M Farmer GA Mariah 50 F SC Madison T. 19 M Laborer GA Sarah 17 F GA Mariah E. 14 F GA Montgomery N. 11 M GA Marion F. 8 M GA 36. CLYATT, Andrew J. 30 M Farmer GA Caroline M. 20 F GA 37. WATERSON, John 31 M Timber Agent At Sea Julia L. 22 F GA Maria J. 4/12 F FL SIMPSON, Julia 14 F GA 38. TRESPER, Christian 62 M Farmer Germany Maria A. 50 F GA Walter C. 23 M Laborer GA Emma R. 16 F GA Adelade 6 F GA 39. RAULERSON, Lucretia 45 F GA Aaron 14 M FL Moses 12 M FL Caroline 10 F FL America 8 F FL Pelina 6 F FL Harris 4 M FL Alexander 3 M FL JONES, Arthur 27 M Farmer FL 40. MOORE, William S. 26 M Farmer FL Mary M. 26 F FL Irarene 3 F FL 41. HUNTER, Elijah 26 M Farmer GA Sarah 21 F GA Frances M. 4 F FL Marinda 2 F FL SUGGS, Lorenzo 20 M Laborer GA 42. BARCO, James C. 26 M Farmer GA Mary Ann 24 F FL Martha J. 7 F FL Emeline 4 F FL 22

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Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12 th day of November 1850 Page 80/153 Household Nancy C. Emanuel Rachel Samuel Nancy Lewellen T. Louisanna Mary V. Stephen W. James B. Edward D. Jesse L. Daniel B. Julia A. James Mary Enoch Delilah Rebecca James Nancy Mary H. Martha Minerva Charles B.H. James G. Rebecca William Jane Henry Mary Ann S. Alfred Sarah Lewellen Lodwick Mariah Alfred Mary Daniel A. Adaline Lucinda Lydia Occupation/ Place of Age Sex Race Birth 7/12 F FL 26 M Farmer GA 25 F GA 39 M Farmer PA 37 F FL 11 M FL 1 F FL 52 F GA 20 M Farmer FL 18 M Laborer FL 16 M Laborer FL 14 F FL 32 M Mail Carrier FL 10 F FL 8 M FL 6 F FL 50 M Farmer GA 39 F FL 18 F FL 16 M Laborer FL 14 F FL 9 F FL 7 F FL 3 F FL 8/12 M FL 24 M Farmer FL 36 F GA 10 M FL 7 F FL 5 M FL 3 F FL 40 M Farmer NY 48 F FL 21 M Laborer FL 14 M FL 9 F FL 7 M FL 5 F FL 34 M Farmer GA 27 F GA 9 F FL 6 F FL BARCO, 43. STUDSTILL, 44. COWDEN, 45. ANDREWS, HOGAN, 46. HOGAN, SMITH, 47. DANIEL, 48. DANIEL, 49. MOONEY, WALKER, MOONEY, 50. MORGAN, 23

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Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL Page 80/154 12 th day of November 1850 Occupation/ Place of Household Age Sex Race Birth MORGAN, Duval 5 M FL Craston 4 M FL Franklin 3 M FL Martha 2 F FL 51. TOMLINSON, William 67 M Farmer SC Nancy 74 F NC DAVIS, Mary Ann 25 F GA 52. HATCHER, John R. 51 M Farmer NC Margaret E. 44 F NC Wm. R. 21 M Laborer NC Malsey J. 17 F NC Sophia H. 11 F NC Sabra 6 F GA Mary C. 3 F FL 53. CASON, Moses 40 M Farmer GA Civilla 30 F GA Melissa 14 F FL Isabella 11 F FL Hagan R. 5 M FL Narcissa 2 F FL 54. DAVIS, Zachariah 60 M Farmer SC Mary Ann 53 F NC Cindarilla 21 F GA Sarah T. 20 F GA Emma L. 19 F GA Rhoda 16 F GA Thomas D. 20 M Laborer GA Peter H. 30 M Laborer GA 55. McGEHEE, James 32 M Farmer Ireland Rebecca 21 F FL Simpson 4 M FL Henry 2 M FL 56. JOHNSON, Henry H. 37 M Farmer TN Polly 36 F FL Henry H. 10 M FL Abram 8 M FL Milly 6 F FL Carlisle 4 F FL Mary 3 F FL Michael 2 M FL William 10/12 M FL 24

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Free Inhabitants in the Second District, Levy County, FL 12 th day of November 1850 Page 81/155 Household 57. PETERSON, Timothy G PETERSON, Celia 58. JOHNSON, Vinson Ann P. Elenor 59. IVY, Anthony Zany Michael Polly Rebecca Tamy 60. THOMPSON, James F. Stella Mary John James Rufus Amelia PRESLER, Peter A. Amelia Augusta Adelia TISON, David PEOPLES, Ann R. Littleton 61. GORE, John 62. MEEKS, James Harriett Sarah 63. SMITH, Aaron 64. TRESPER, George Age Sex Occupation/ Race Place of Birth 22 M Laborer FL 18 F FL 38 M Farmer TN 30 F FL 2 F FL 35 M Farmer GA 44 F TN 17 M Laborer FL 11 F FL 7 F FL 4 F FL 35 M Farmer OH 26 F LA 10 F MS 8 M MS 6 M MS 4 M MS 9/12 F FL 40 M Farmer LA 36 F KY 14 F LA 20 F LA 24 M Overseer FL 25 F FL 3 M LA 60 M Farmer SC 48 M Blacksmith SC 40 F SC 10 F SC 40 M Farmer NY 25 M Merchant GA 25

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State of Florida, Marion County 4 Hiram T. Mann, do certify on Oath that the forgoing schedule No. 1 contains a true enumeration of the free inhabitants of Levy County as enumerated by me in accordance with my oath and instructions to the best of my ability, knowledge and belief. Hiram T. Mann Sworn to before me this 26th December 1850 Robert Bullock Clerk of Court Marion County Population of Cedar Key = 47 men, women and children and 7 7 dwellings Population of District 7 = 7 77 men, women and children and 22 dwellings Population of District 2 156 men, women and children and 31 dwellings Total free population = 320 26

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HISTORY OF THE PAT-MAC LOCOMOTIVE The locomotive engine located on US 98-19 at Gulf Hammock Wayside Park was manufactured by Baldwin Locomo tive Works, Eddystone, Pennsylvania in the year 1915. It could be described as a 2-8-0 locomotive engine because it consists of 2 pilot wheels and 8 drive wheels. You may observe the 8 drive wheels as being very small, only 36 inches in di ameter, which gives this engine a tre mendous amount of pulling power. According to a statement of Feat Jones, age 90, presently residing in Williston, the locomotive was purchased by the Dowling Brothers in 1915, and was delivered to them in Odessa, Florida. The engine was name "Abigail" for Will Dowling's daughter, and num bered "3”. The first engineer was named Mr. Page, and the first Hos'tler 1 was Feat Jones. When Grover joined with Dowling Brothers the engine was moved to Gulf Hammock. Grover-Dowling Hardwood Company went bankrupt and hostler one who services a locomotive Paterson-Mclnnis Lumber Company acquired the engine. Paterson-Mclnnis changed the name of the locomotive engine to Pat-Mac and used the number "3" and the engine was commonly call ed the "3 Spot". The locomotive engine was specially adapted for company owned tram roads and for hauling long trains of heavily loaded log cars with logs from giant trees of the great Gulf Hammock to the saw mill, where the logs were manufac tured into lumber. The last engineer to pull logs with this engine was Robert Payne, and the last Hos'tler of this engine was Feat Jones. Mr. W.B. Paterson, Vice Presi dent of the Paterson-Mclnnis Lumber Company and Mr. C.G. Petteway, Trea surer of the company (and later Presi dent of Perkins State Bank) played a big part in helping the County acquire this engine, which was presented to the State for display in the Wayside Park. Compiled by John F. Yearty 27

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INDEX TO VOLUME 21 ANDREWS 23 HART 13, 20 PATERSON 27 ARMOR 13 HARVEY 21 PAYNE 27 BABBITT 11 HATCHER 24 PEOPLES 25 BACON 7 HENDRICKSON 7 PETERSON 25 BAILEY 9 HERNDON 10 PETTEWAY 27 BARCO 22, 23 HIGHSMITH 19 PIERCE 15 BARROW 16, 20 HOFFMAN 6-8 PORTER 21 BIRDSALL 6, 8 HOGAN 23 PRESLER 25 BORSTEL 16 HOSKINS 9 RADCLIFFE 14 BOWELS 19 HUNTER 22 RAULERSON 22 BROWNLOW 21 HUTTON 6 RICHARDS 18 BRYANT 22 IVY 25 RODGERS 20 BUCHANAN 8 JOHNSON 7, 16, 24, 25 ROUNDTREE 13 BULLOCK 26 JONES 11, 22, 27 SAVAGE 18 CALL 16 KEPNER 12 SIMPSON 22 CASON 13, 24 LANCASTER 21 SMITH 9, 23, 25 CASTILLO 17 LEONARD 9, 10 STAFFORD 16 CLARK 10 LEWIS 13 STEELE 12, 16, 17 CLARKE 17 LOVE 20 STEWART 6, 14, 15 CLYATT 6, 22 MANN 18, 26 STUDSTILL 23 CORRIGAN 17 MAYO 21 SUGGS 22 COULTER 14 McCALL 6, 8, 9 SWILLEY 6 COWDEN 23 McCASKILL 13 TAYLOR 3 CREVASSE 17 McDonald 20 THOMPSON 25 DANIEL 23 McDONELL 16 TISON 25 DAVIS 6, 13-15, 21, 24 McDonnell 16 TOMLINSON 19, 24 DAY 18 McGEHEE 24 TRESPER 22, 25 DELL 14 MclNNIS 27 VASCO 12 DOWLING 27 McLELLAN 14 VOSE 9-11 DUNLAP 9 MEDLIN 13, 19 WALKER 17, 20, 23 FITZGERALD 7, 8 MEEKS 25 WATERSON 20, 22 FULLWOOD 10 MILLER 18 WEEKS 19 GILL 16 MONTGOMERY 8, 9 WESTER 19 GOMEZ 18 MOONEY 23 WHEELER 15 GORE 25 MOORE 22 WILKINSON 19 GRAHAM 9 MORGAN 20, 23, 24 WILLIS 14 GRANGER 15 NOEL 7 WILSON 17 GROVER 27 OGLESBY 17 WORTH 8, 9 HAGAN 13, 14, 20 PAGE 27 YEARTY 13, 27 HARDEE 21 PARSONS 17 28

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