Citation
Search for yesterday

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Title:
Search for yesterday a history of Levy County, Florida
Creator:
Levy County Archives Committee (Fla.)
Place of Publication:
Bronson, Fla
Publisher:
Levy County Archives Committee
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
Chapter 14, June, 1985
Physical Description:
28 volumes : ; 28 cm +

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Biography -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genealogy -- Levy County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Levy County ( fast )
Genre:
Biography. ( fast )
Genealogy. ( fast )
History. ( fast )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Biography ( fast )
Genealogy ( fast )
History ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Includes index as v.29.
General Note:
"A Bicentennial publication."
General Note:
Chapter three has title: Slowpoke. Chapter nine has title: The High Sheriff.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Levy County Archives Committee. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
024053741 ( ALEPH )
06316718 ( OCLC )
00711645 ( LCCN )
Classification:
F317.L6 S44 1977 ( lcc )
975.9/77 ( ddc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Family and Community History

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Full Text
earcr t r
A History
of
Levy County, Florida
Chapter Fourteen
June 1985
Published By The
Levy County Archives Committee
Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners Bronson, Florida
A Bicentennial Publication




Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2018 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries
https ://archive .org/detai Is/searchforyesterd 1419levy




EARLY NEWSPAPERS
By Jack Holland
Newspapers are the daily journals of a corn- ly. Records have not been found to establish the
munity's activities. It is history -recorded on site.. life-span of this newspaper. You will find the chronicals of events which have The Levy County Times began publication in
shaped, are shaping, and will shape the develop- 1879 in Bronson. County record reflect its name
ment of the area and growth of its people by over the next several years; the last report being
reading its newspapers. This chapter takes a look in late 1888. Research did not produce the name
at those Levy County newspapers that recorded of the paper's owner or editor. The Times is
the daily events of the people they served from mentioned in later years in the Levy-Times
the middle of the 1800's to the present. Democrat as being a merger of a new weekly,
The Florida Dispatch of Newsnansville is the The Democrat, with the older paper, The Levy
oldest weekly newspaper of record to serve Levy County Times. The Democrat began its publiCounty. The paper's service began before the cation in 1892 and the first edition carried in its
county was created out of a portion of the west- masthead the name, The Levy-Times Democrat.
ern portion of Alachua County in 1845. Many Two brothers, J. Ira and F. S. Gore began the
subscribers continued to receive the paper even weekly newspaper, Florida State Journal in
after the establishment of the first newspaper of Cedar Key during January 1875. Ira Gore served
record in new county. Legal notices appeared in as editor until around 1883. Records of news
Dispatch as well as the Florida Times-Union, a clippings show Dr. R. H. Mcllvane was serving
young daily published in Jacksonville in the early as editor during 1877. This newspaper provided years. The practice of using out-of-county news- local news and news from around the nation and
papers following the establishment of the first a few foreign countries brought in by the sailing
newspaper within the county was because of the ships. The paper was published on Saturdays. A
need to reach all of the county residents. Early year's subscription was $2.00. This newspaper
small weeklies had localized subscription lists, ceased publishing sometime in the middle or late
Levy County's first newspaper of record was 1880's.
The Telegraph. The first publication appeared From 1890 through 1905 there were frequent
during January of 1860 in Cedar Key. The paper changes in ownership and number of newspapers
was published each Saturday by owner, Charles serving the county. J. Ira Gore, one of the oriW. Blanchard. E. M. Graham served as editor. ginal owner-publishers of the Florida State
A reproduction of a front page of the Telegraph Journal, Cedar Key, showed up in records of
appears within this chapter and illustrates the The Cedar Key Commercial, dated April 12,
typical "tombstone" appearance of newspapers 1890 as editor. It could not be determined if
of that era. The paper was entirely hand-set in a Gore was the owner of this short-lived newssmall shop in the island community. No dates ppr
has been determined when this paper ceased pub- ppr
lication nor are there any indications it merged The Levy Times-Democrat, a combination of a
with other publications appearing on the scene in new and an old newspaper, was first published in
the early 1860's. Bronson by 0. J. Farmer. (See The Levy County
The Bronson Artery, published at Bronson, Times above.) Farmer served as editor in the
was in publication on October 24, 1874 and car- early years. P. B. Butler served as editor during
ried legal advertising for the county. A paper 1915. Other editors were J. C. Sale, 1916; Lydia
must be published for 52 consecutive weeks to be Bell, 1919; and, Farmer again as editor in 1920.
considered an eligible newspaper for a special He had moved to Jacksonville during the intersecond-class mailing permit from the United vening years and worked as a reporter for the
States Postal Service. This was and still held as a Florida Times-Union. Farmer sold The Levy general qualification for papers seeking to carry Times-Democrat to G. M. Sheppard and L. E.
official notices for government agencies. Owners Vause in the early 1920's.
of the paper were J. Ira Gore and another man The Times-Democrat did job printing. This cxnamed Burford (last name). Burford was listed tra activity of printing bullheads, stationary
as editor. This was another small hand-set week- items, programs, etc., became a way-of-life for




R. B. Child, editor and publisher of the Levy County Journal, 1928 to his death in the Fifties.
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Three county editors join the "Goldwater Team", left to right are Jack Holland, Chiefland Citizen; Leonard Hayes, Suwannee Valley News; team leader, Herman Wellman; Elton Cobb, Levy County Journal; and, Frank Weaver, foreman of the Citizen plant. (Taken during the Sixties.)




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small rural newspapers to make needed money. ing the paper he changed the masthead to read,
Today you will find most small weeklies having "The Williston News." This masthead carried a
commercial printing and stationary departmeilts subhead stating it was the successor to The
in with their publishing business. Williston Sun and The Levy Times-Democrat.
It was noted from the issues of The Levy The Williston Sun was purchased by Jack
Times Democrat that it did a good job covering Holland and he continued to print it as The
the local scene, including local government. The Williston News. Several years later Holland sold
Levy Times-Democrat merged several times. It the newspaper to Louie Wadsworth who changed
merged with The Levy County News, The the name back to The Williston Sun. Bess
Williston Sun, The Williston News, and the Williams bought the Sun in 1970 and merged it
Suwannee Valley Sun-News. with her own paper, The Suwannee Valley News
Legal documents in the Levy County court- to form The Suwannee Valley Sun-News.
house revealed a weekly newspaper, The Cedar Among the editors of the Williston paper beKey Commercial, was in existence April 12, 1890. sides Miller were: Vause, Holly, Holland, Lamar
Its editor was J. Ira Gore according to the sig- Nash, Emma Rene Weaver, and Williams.
nature on the "Notice of Publication" attached I. B. Hilson began his publication, The Levy
to the documents. The clippings contained no County News at Bronson in 1923. His brother,
paper date or volume number to assist in esta- J. F. Hilson, served as the first editor and J. L.
blishing how long the paper had been in publica- Santerfeit served as associate editor. On January
tion. Records show that Gore was affiliated with 28, 1927 the newspaper sold to L. E. Vause who
three of the early newspapers of Cedar Key. merged it with The Levy Times-Democrat. The
The Gulf Coaster, another weekly newspaper, new masthead showed the main line to be The
published in Cedar Key during 1893 was identi- Levy County News and a small secondary line
fied through courthouse records. The editor was read, "The Levy Times-Democrat." The first
listed "Editor" Corr. No other mention of the editor of the merger was George Sheaff. He was
paper or Corr was found. followed by Henry Coulter. This paper was pubTwo more weeklies were found in the court- lished on Fridays. One of the unique facts about
house records. The Cedar Key Hustler was being this particular paper was it had an oil editor,
published in 1902 in the island city. The Levy Robert L. Steffey.
County Advocate was identified through the The Cedar Key Breeze was a weekly newspaper
court records as being published in Bronson in printed in Williston and published in Cedar Key.
1904. These papers' publishers and editors have It was owned by G. M. Sheppard and L. E.
not been unearthed. Vause. They began publishing the paper in 1923.
Records of the early 1900's showed conditions A few months after publishing the Breeze,
stable among the county's newspapers. The Levy Vause and Sheppard leased The Williston Sun
Times-Democrat was the largest of the papers (May 8, 1925). The Breeze appeared in the first
and the only paper that appears continuously leased issue of the Sun as a subhead, in the mastduring this era. The Williston Progress, publish- head along with The Levy Times-Democrat. Both ed in Williston, was identified as the only new papers were dropped temporarily from the Sun's
paper during this period. The Progress editor was masthead on March 11, 1926. This was also the J. T. Lewis and the only issue available for yeri- week The Levy Times-Democrat appeared as a fication was during 1918. Bronson paper. The Breeze did not appear in
The arrival of the 1920's heralded a host of either of the two papers' masthead. The Island
new newspapers, mergers, sales, and termina- City News appears a few months later in Cedar
tions of existing papers. Key showing Vause as owner-publisher (Oct. 14,
The Williston Sun began publication in 1921 at 1927).
Williston. The first publishers were Mr. and Mrs. The Island City News was published for over
E. C. Miller. Mr. Miller was the first editor, two years before disappearing from the newsL. E. Vause and G. M. Sheppard leased the paper scene. Vause served as the first editor and
newspaper from the Millers in 1925. A little J. L. Taylor served as the second and final editor
later, Vause purchased The Williston Sun and of the small newspaper.
ran it for many years. The first issue of the Sun The first issue of The Levy County Journal
after the lease carried "Successor to the Levy appeared May 1, 1928 with Roy B. Child as pubTimes-Democrat-Cedar Key Breeze" in its lisher and editor. It was published in Bronson,
masthead. the county site. Child was from Moore Haven
R. J. Holly bought The Williston Sun from where he published The Glades County DemoL. E. Vause and after a few months of publish- crat before coming to Bronson. The Journal's
6




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THE LEVY COUNTY NEVS
THE ONLY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED AND PRINTED IN BRONSON, THE COUNTY SEAT OF LEVY COUNTY, IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEART OF STATE FLANUDA
VOLUME 3, NUMBER 38, BRONSON, LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA, APRIL 8th, 1926 $1.50 A YEAR
Meeting of Notes of Court FULL PROCEEDINGS OF (TAT lA 1 TO M l [ D
Commissioners Proceedings COUNTY COMMISSIONERS [ j\UU O| 13 T IOPA[LLLL R Re
S At U SI. id 1411 titl- Of the Vtoard' I ---;-At a SpaCnial Mi-itig oa thi Car i At u reIular munatin.g of the Ionard of County Conmnissioners", in ani for --of tCounty Cmmission*rs in and for I Circuit Court opened Monda~y A. M. I4vy Cun.t), hhi at th h Clrk'. Office in IIrosan. Fla., .on this the 2n.1 dayt Mr. W. It. Hndges, Chairman of the lomrd of County Commissionurs
Covy cunta, it or Forida held at with Judge A. V. Long ts.sin, with of Aliril A. I). 11',126, with th.e following mes,,drs of the lmierds lreesnt to- after returning Irum Tullahasse where he was in confatrnce with the offk. the (Cl1tk's Office on this the 27th all other attaeuhe of the court pr- wit:- ilts of the State knad ltprtment, announced that State Road Number ThIr.
day of rch. A. D. 1926, with the ent. W. It. HODGE.S, Chairman, teen hx leen designatedl and will be built directly beside the Seaboand Air
following members of the Bos pres- J. I. KIMIII.E. .ine Railway through Ilevy County, pasning through the towns of Meredlth,
eat, to-wit:- The court In giving the char-e to 1. i. C. YArr. Ilrnon, Lennon Otter Creek, EIllzy, Wylly, Rosewood. Sumner and emn to
..It. tiod~ea, Chaiman, the Garand Jury was a very instruc- I W. YVEAIITY,.. .. .. .. ....
W. t. Hodges, Chairman, the Grand t tery instru e W. S. Y ATY, rtlar Key. There has been much discussion an to the location of this eed,
. C e, ive charge. i to heir ludties. E C. PICE. some saying that it should leave the railroad at Otter Creek and erea the
. yet, ra Ju he tr"Car Key-Chiefland road near the old Stage Stand.
W. S. Yearty day reporting the following true bills The minutes of the Regular and Special meetings held during the month Mr. Hodges further tated l that State Road Number NiaeWe will be
MrItode. frter.ttPrtatStteeadNtbeoN-wi. wllh
i.t ano ed by the Chirmn Sta of Florida v Robert Hatcher of March were read, considered and approved as read. built immediately and that one section of It In being advertised to centre.
twa announced by the Chairman State of Florida v Roert Hatcher -- tor now. Thin section being from the 8uwannee River to Brenaem threugI
sht the meeting wasn called for the and Dave Smith, breaking and enter- The bills presnentel, were read, considered and ordered paid in the aggi- Hardeetown and Chiefland. purprat of diIs~n Stat Roadrow and ing.an S ro of discussing State Road No. ing. gate snums from the respecUtiv funds as hereinafter me out to-wit: Levy County. the most ideally located County In the State, will seen
1 ean ronon to Williston. Km State of Florida vn Eddie Chiholn General Revenue Fund .-.................. ............ .. 1,222.50 have plenty of good paved ends, which will be ila keeping with the pr
'pnn Notion by Commissioner Kim larceny. Fine antl Forfeiture Fund .................................. -....1 abe is ma..ng I. other lier.
. the flowing petition was rod. State of Flor s v Joe L m ur Rmoad and Bridge Fund .......................................................................... .3 ,4.0 in oh
We, the underpnetd cities and der in to flt degree. State Aid Fundt frtdge.......... 3,360.76 NO C
taxpayers Of Levy County Florida be State of Florida vs Shelton Spates Notice
liat sdalse that petitions are being murder in the first degree. COUNTY BOND PROJECTS POINTED PIE
circulated with a svew of defeating Satte of Florida vs Thad Ware, Project No. General Expenses ......................................................... 362.66
the present location and progress of murder in the first degree. Project No. S ................................................ .................. ........0. PARAGRAPHS r. .T..re oTret ars
State Road No. 19 thri Levy County There were several civil ca es tried Project No. 4 ................. ...... .................. .....473.29 O. s. a p nt U r of GiJFlora u row surveyed and Dp art e also several criminal cases were di- Project No. 7 ._ ........ ....... ................... 13.0.0 hLadeaIl whrist County, hlat week butchereGl
orida pu Enowlur n d D epartmentofrejec LeAde christ County last week becered
th lit ate Re nad Departmen t of pth e t of. Project No. 8 ...................................... ............ ..................................... 45.0 A I one alf four m nth d si days old
Stte of Florida. earnestly petite Probably the most interesting crne Project No. 10 ................................. ........ 1903.65 dressed 218 pounds was sold to Dater
le of our delea ted authority n was that of Julia Warren, the trial Project No. 19 ....................................... ...........................................52.00 Some cra re panted this moth Fleming Company Gineat, Fla,
s t r to consuming most of Tuesday, the jury and an barvestd next. Some take Mr. Turner wants to know If nyon
-lne your progress on said Road finding her guilty of murder in the The Bank Depositories filed statements of the funds under the Control a year. Fruit trees take sveral I Mr Turnew t to knw f any
Ne It as ow surveyed. laid out and first degree with recommendations of of the Boani of County Commissioners showing receipts disbursements and year. Not trei take ae to n this county a rne e ted mry Is Older that the work o merethe court, which carried a balances on hand in the following manner to-wit: t years to meet egirying This calf was raised an the
maurtke aind completion of said sentence of her natural life in the following manner to-wit: All of them require a hills of Bell, Florida.
MN am not be d.riydlonger. ttgreat deal of care and protection. Mr. Turner will buy all fat e
S y not e lye longer. Is, te prison. BANK OF .LEVY COUNTY The land m t be cleared, the oll at any time, provide ye will
t A. Boy Wil. Picket was found guilty of Pine and Forfeiture Fundi, Receipts 1,083.79; Disbursement., 1,863.62; Bal- prepared, msed or seedlings bought, his price.
jlam Cn. manslaughter ani was sentenced to ances 4,422.27. the younr plants cultivated and
* B. liteksa, state prison for five years. frtheyllssed.c Generally they must be
* A. an, On account of illness of Col. W. W. CITIZENS IHANK OF WII.LISTON prayed from one to half-a-doen
If. D. Maehburn. Hampton probably the most interest- General IRevenue Fund Iteceipts, 2,21.02; Disbursements, 1005.30; Balances times during the season. Even then POINTED PINL
W. F Odevten, inr civil cases were continued for the 22 1,3.44. a wind, or a frost, or a rain. or a P
tanga: e Manhu.. term which were the cases of J. G. but may ge them PARAGRAPHS
Dsi u dtham. and 1. S. News.on and the VeKe~ ble BIANK OF CHIEFLAND It tkes longer to bring a pine .L LW rkhs
L W. Mut... Grower' Exchange v S. A. Ituil- IRoad and ridge Dist. No. 3---A, None; Dislurpment.s 107.5; Ialance!,5.-h. crop to the point of yielding prof- p.N. e
J a ln. roI Company. These were pretty 43,0.1). Its, but it also yields remre, and l m institute Amea tlu.
~ e Wilkere.n,M he, 'y ditamln;kire. suit and would mot -longer, and surer. As a matter of
C ( nal likelyv hav ,onsmed two or three The Nol;ary ;lai o.r S. E Wan, Jr., wih ,John It. Willis :and, A. (. amcurty, I'd ra there lon a ny other crop n vryone know at when there
S 1 *U.lan, day, in trying, tho. IJontp a urs sn-lie in h, ou m (of V10 each wa tan and ar I rowhen there




ownership was left in trust after his death in the low-grade oil at the rate of a few barrels a day. mid-1950's to his four daughters, Betty, Neva, This well was still active during the early thirties.
Anna Bea, and Royala. Child's brother-in-law, Second events were two major hurricanes-one
Elton Cobb, leased the newspaper from the in 1927 and the other in 1928. These hurricanes
trustees and served as editor for several years. did considerable damage to the county and
Cobb purchased the Journal in the early sixties. caused millions of dollars in damage and the
The Chiefland Citizen was started by Jack heavy loss of life in the Lake Okeechobee area.
Holland October 19, 1950. The paper was print- Roy Child was publishing The Glades County
ed in Bronson and published in Chiefland during Democrat at Moore Haven during the 1927 hurthe fifties. In the sixties the printing plant was ricane. moved to Chiefland. The Citizen began as a A third event was the crash of 1928 with the
tabloid size newspaper and later changed into the resulting financial losses. It was during this later full-size. It was the county's first of the old style period of the four years that one of the largest newspaper to make the change from setting type tax lists was published. It had to run in the
by linotype machines to the photo process. Hol- newspaper selected as the "official organ of the
land sold the Citizen to Walter Wilson in 1973. county commission." The last shift in the newsWilson brought the first roll-fed press into the paper names occurred shortly after the publicacounty when he installed a 2-unit Community tion of the tax list.
Goss. A few years later Wilson put in two more Many of the mastheads; of various newspapers
units. appear to be the same paper. Examine them
The Suwannee Valley News was first published closely, you will find other newspapers identified
in Chiefland in June of 1963. After three weeks as being a part of that particular paper. This was
the weekly moved its operation to Williston. The and still is a legal maneuver to preserve the legal
first owner-editor was Leonard Hayes, Jr. and status of a newspaper in order it could carry
his wife, Nelle, was the paper's editor. The public notices. If you look at the dates and the
Suwannee Valley News was the first totally offset names of the mastheads of the several newsnewspaper in the county. Hayes sold the paper to papers shown on pages appearing within this
Warren Torlay, Jr. in November of 1963. Other chapter you will see many of these piggy-back
owner-publishers were John Banks, Gordon changes.
Rhieker and his brother-in-law, Ken Smith, and Several editors, publishers, and contributors
Bess Williams. Williams bought out Smith se- were celebrities of sorts during their newspaper
veral months later. Williams purchased The careers. L. E. Vause served as president of the
Williston Sun from Louie Wadsworth in late Florida Press Association and was very active in
1970. the organization for many years. Roy Child
The youngest newspaper in Levy County his- served on the Board of Trustees of the Bronson
tory is also the oldest newspaper. That paper is High School. Ken Smith served as State Reprethe Suwannee Valley Sun-News. It is a descend- sentative from this district. Louie Wadsworth
and of The Levy County Times established in and Jack Holland produced award-winning
1879 in Williston. On the adjacent page is a table newspapers and served on the executive board of showing the lineage from the Times down to the the state press association. Wadsworth served as
Sun-News. It is interesting to note the same president of the association and was a National
publisher at one time or another owned the ma- Guard General. Holland served as mayorjority of the newspapers in this long chain. The commissioner of Chiefland and was an Army
publisher was L. E. Vause. Colonel. Elton Cobb served on the Bronson City
The four-year period, 1925 through 1929, saw Council. 0. J. Farmer and Warren Torlay were
newspaper merging with and emerging from each outstanding daily newspapermen. J. Ira Gore
other. It was not disclosed why the switching of was noted for his dedication in providing the
newspaper names from one to another and from area with newspapers in the early years. Walter
town to town occurred. Wilson served on Chiefland's Planning and ZonSeveral events occurred during this four-year ing Board. Bess Williams was the county's first
period which may provide clues for the numerous lady publisher.
shifts in the names of the newspapers. One was There have been several lay-persons who have
the boom of the mid-twenties that saw Levy made contributions in the newspaper field
County caught up in economic development with through their articles of historical nature. T. R.
the prospects of this area becoming an oil field. Hodges of Cedar Key, William Coulter of
There were several oil wells drilled around the Bronson, and Ruth Verrell of Chiefland enriched
county. A well near Cedar Key did produce a readers with articles about the culture, folklore,
9




Inside of an early printing and publishing plant.
Ruddy Janney is shown working an early model linotype machine.
Hand-feeding one of the old two-page flat bed presses is Jim Evans. 10




Gordon Reichart, editor of the Suwannee Valley News, during the Sixties.
Kay Langford setting type on an old Model 5 Linotype.
11




and governments of the times of which they Alma Clark won the Chrysler, Harriet Whiddon
wrote. There probably is not a family in the won one of the Fords and Mary West won the
county, whose roots go back at least three de- other.
cades or more, that has not had one of its mem- An oil drilling spree began in June of 1943
bers work as correspondent or columnist -for one led by Colonel Frank Thompson and William A.
of Levy County's newspapers. Other long-time Pollard. This was the second time in twenty years
newspaper people who wrote or printed for the the area was excited by the possibility of oil becounty papers include Macie Petersen, Emma ing discovered in the county. Several wells were
Lee Loften, Frank Weaver and Norwood Ishie. drilled in the sand hills west of the BronsonLevy County witnessed its newspapers progress Williston highway. No oil was found but the
from hand-set, hand-fed equipment, through the drillers did strike salt water. It was an artesian
hot metal stage of linotypes and casting boxes, to well and had to be capped to keep the salty water cold type and web-fed presses of the offset era. from killing the trees in the path of its stream.
The Levy County Journal, until early 1983, Montbrook Army Air Base, located near the
was one of two weekly newspapers in Florida still community of Montbrook, was very active durbeing produced by the hot metal process. When ing 1942-43. Victories in Europe and the South
the Journal went offset it left the Bristol news- Pacific brought an early closing of the camp in
paper in West Florida as the sole survivor of the late 1943. A skeleton crew remained at the base
old method of production. The first offset paper until the end of the war.
in the county was a small tabloid paper, The L. E. Vause, Jr., son of publisher Vause of
Suwannee Valley News. The Chiefland Citizen The Williston Sun, was killed in Europe during
quickly followed the trend to offset. When Wal- December of 1942. Young Vause was the naviter Wilson bought the Chiefland paper he en- gator for a bomber crew.
larged the capacity of the equipment by expand- Elections were always big news for the early
ing the computer typesetting system and install- newspaper. The tradition of gathering at the
ing the first web-fed press. The press was a newspaper offices to get the election returns were
Community Goss capable of printing eight pages looked forward to by young and old. This bion one press run. A few years later Wilson added annual event continued until the county went
two additional units and raised the capacity of from hand ballots to the use of voting machines.
the press to run 16 full-size pages. in the early The Williston and Cedar Key papers usually
eighties The Chiefland Citizen was printing all of put up make-shift tally boards for the local citithe weekly newspapers in the tri-county area. zens to keep count of the votes each candidate
One of the ways to tell the old newspapers and received by precinct. For years The Levy County
their offices was by the smell of printer's ink and Journal and The Chiefland Citizen sponsored a molten metal. The offices of today's newspapers tally board at the courthouse where final returns
smell more of chemicals, by precinct were officially reported.
It was learned during the research for this Television, computers and voting machines
chapter on the newspapers of Levy County that drew the curtain on the night-long wait on the
most happenings occur in cycles. The eighties counting of hand ballots and posting of results
saw a revitalization of local Chamber of Coin- of each race on the tally boards.
merces. History, or the newspaper records, revealed Cedar Key, Williston and Bronson each OLD-TIME DEFINITIONS OF THE
had their own chambers in the twenties and the NEWSPAPER TRADE
early 1900's. The economy has been the concern
each quarter century. Promoters appear period- Press Run: one run of the printing press that
ically promoting oil, specialty agriculture crops, produced two pages of a newspaper. An eightbarge ports and canal, railroads and highways, page paper required four press runs.
and even citrus production. The last grove of Quoins and Quoin Key: quoins came in pairs
commercial status disappeared after the big and were wedge-shaped; used with a quoin key to
freeze of 1898. lock type in printing frames.
Three cars were given away as prizes in one of Hell Box: a box that held last week's newsthe largest subscription drives ever held by week- paper type slugs to be remelted. ly newspapers. The contest was held during 1928 Kill Sheet: a marked copy of last week's- paper
by The Williston Sun, The Levy County News, showing what type to be thrown in the hell box.
and The Island City News. The cars were a 1928 Make-up Rule: a small two-inch steel scrape,
Chrysler, a Ford sedan, and a Ford Roadster, which is used to scrape the bottom of linotype
12




Still &u Bedt Invesmnt d Back Your Own Future
-1). S. Saving Bonds % By Putting Every Spare
Ki~p On Buying ThMWO- Dollar In Savings Bondis
loffuUUS 2. No. or 101111010201 FLORIDA. THURSDAY, AUGUST 25. 1,9" LN FI VIIAR. So A COP#.
Prominent Educators Work'Gov Warren Given I. fLevy Co. Health Unit Work on Road 55, Fannin to
SProof of No Now Tax nuojs Cheaper Makes Report on
GIng OnyGlcrs No AtChief land Atft r Tuberculosis Chief land Being Held Up For
In LevyGilchrs Woks op tm MAd t Tenton Mass Survey
WIV Ma a" &&is 44 don ait hir~s I TueSday I~o"9 ......... fit W ider Right of Way Lands
441IKIPLANDU Avg 1d let, R.d11 5. A._..._to _8"Ivi_____........_...._ Comi Clerh Jere 1. Moee5.
W d i% ath. Pit U. pwmw Kig a dday presented diret q4nteilom Ced ar K~ey ................. g1p lb Oka" hesidern all of Ike
ledetam Krt uh lorb lg Represent Chiefland "Idteine Wa'- m-de d". inle. sale I.wo 2 e.TCTI............SGN A Ifotumtiu ofd spilel s
@use 01the her-1kal 4l1040te At FFA Ferestry Camp oiehip Theseller:3 smld Ct$16 5i.6 Its with all grades We wish I. ibmuib thee" votes- flight a Nor the sidomi. rto.
Wo'4rbho tor Isoln Popmoma eln ha~~g ae love, tuoo their valstable ssstance, surfacing slid -Alhewgm lse igrult
Ams".a ?Z. fist They We. g~rabs Jodhw Klan am e ms there. lAhelae 14d9M. April It 1941 .,a eve a' tolw sal M& W r Andiem. Mrs Cow FOLKS WHO LIVIDII In stst Road Noua rom IVmssla 460.5mb,. algh S ltd groove I elsoo rompte5.elgd to& t'hlel.0.toff.@a adrs Wa m =d* O We3 wild4 seer Vtal of Tem r uale ollo. ros byMc. IAGO, A8N WHERT HEYI VID piecedr ho beeoseui. lt. at lte
wie even deainug wt teas n wm Former Chiagter Uooo Ie tol mes park klend. alonM oo olwy.Boon
peubisiss ~ ~ ~ ~ th orut@ ed~5It Peytm *i~h~meblOs Newberry "sell fae~trr alse. We 00.IItie.Mr il ANDMs 10,411 TRI Lace0 paied.M be oletstatera ate
&VuII *t5 eammd C a m peed e ie nel Wlts e then atpercaitaLwaf. this d etned ui4.t taes h 5 o se bs met sedMrsI =dosfl Msbias..C ean.. an f. *latHad eip hid rguse tu te om
Tosihlm i he114Utrede IVA Post y Vimg erd e &ebe .e aL.Reh 54 prprg 65 egt1et Aibl ~ ~ r ~ y h~ h r. 1 t j e end ho ewh Isn e r Maud Jiikft IV. '"S -so15
fluke Wie Nbh~ yfIMNN 'l"a & O4O a edr' u ya egs.b"t oW I w taysaw 1-.110n Mrut s. bais Wm adfr .O eoej wd"Gr adrqie a Osn
DP III81 efal frmeean fit3 &A Kilesl$ byl" voc etytebao a aiatnfrRm i" hsin.hdpa fThe ptr e 'It
ioe% will e Tb..lws 41 a uls n im t jk ~ t w pr LSW e~ ei d 517m NW Is8 Tepasers Tageth worise Annu t a d m em Mrs~ aloo Retire. tr.Mslh.teho ewihI ge mee In s 146 he I.Sl tie iht opsIn
M l oo n l ow Iea o ja t to fo5.Psry som aoleoa d. M mII of ng Rel el 3 t k ben h t io d s 1,1u a ake. A mat r i le ye ru gs f M u i W01 14 1 for iac oo 0W *~ ba an for e d e I. d n the 1 4 R o d $ P s -b
Mu. ebes a be elKhus lb.hop wAlabbamaW' M a I t?54 Iestlu T owiia s s lab.theeS ~llad 1101i- arruletna dtl waeema-9 strinana Meh- wibi iiithe peet
Thee Iseue. anbetow daio moe Lee set Obes of wos os t k tr l ark o the fighetltmc
mills bu0 ee6aruus :d theiti esmpl oele thes partn in l a bus4. ies" of h ea Mew V dit Ae. MetMitano' Hewsfr erYm mw wl o oyn h hr
beI ipf e s il.wt bre ga ms e mi $aahm MoAi L3e11d 164 t er ealml w iDkuO fae.u. om Mr JoJ Wl t ie win h min viewo it reamenr y
b te i s irhehop. IWmrml-ra'uith reptugettlr fa r h omosse stairwelals fr m ra aele@ ,t a e SiG th: -ad thist week b No frhsom Iisaalee. Minb e la st ite O diet seenmlod e a of cm an hev M r aMffic bmeral tha the
ageedeev aeg o the da sorn s.l ~it m m ct h e 're braa twimed I m ae eir film Lor 11141e K. 2 1.0 U mt Mra ('sa. h e m m b M rs t on e d thos Miamui I t1p0, H Jore m uch Lbostn tranopltIe a ll
Itm1e a li1. e d u t m e d D I.PoIrY ~ t hasgt~ lowe s th ousi Ie c e at oin e Wof thei d a hiss b em e e a e l s al e a L 1 s
I&* te.e eu*l boo wille. no legislatew W A P06M teia com ceys I'sg ace. IS: o. 1's 1 10 Pp ; M heavy Am I' s alw are eyio. ll. 61 M ut o~l s t i ami an lm isivee pru ctio f i d him mcv~ w%
Sat If the e.. heo s Teare em n is aee Waith b led goalw a 11114I pares ew ith W- -1.0 Dah -o II o o un I W uim r. x. r. t o s w e he to. fta a1, m k101s i Ia glliS b
ad~tIea lou iehdb" i Wilidrallomoege ralf e wit thfhetm avmte tremble W i 7wit P'usa" Chneckuplio "am pins ieAsndo Wa it. Rheml~ s i filed end9 sakd thattae1.14l e te T 1e00e y Ategue U W h of fialem e m th as o satus. Lb A 1. g 1 w nMs T. aps Y ke T homsonl Mrs ak o 41 =se mHosps italJe" e the p epl amw
era el t e la ltg ta fthe at fe te a r A ~Mri a ot ee is twice lise astuhoeto U h m o eospai
goptil brimaw Liegety we~i itselfe "meioe 4tm IX Mus FIR Child o rns iI;tes Arsk -m Fomauow M.al mamed Its wi er. d ae tuwod Is thi uad .
WPOIMPOR f KWGIU. lowelsesa r__me bein metf J-, it. Marsalin Amu. Misse~it Ir* -'w.Wllgs ut o~mNIsM Wt mwwmo o~m oadbaa
imr tohils alr~e b e -t 116 90-p -ae Nm l ~ bm re ..ss le or st s en prgf W* Hig mostnehe l~t W A oi ih as Istelgt
lb. NRA llemneem f utrm. asdeetp le bml e d oain ster lm e as teyiioheupsOkdheiA deut; *no withim fr o o lhove o w tiis be oncw ad eseptfu am posb e a N em1 tiou i
Flzaids-s flolembba WIt ervit so 'b the pReiste reaU Ug k..Iesise-~trelgYsetmai s Th. I cliesJmed. M ede the 14a%10 Rand most need ad
team"TeAmhesn AWsinin wo erald teutatemis Ik te onse1w "tN the Physica Checku a ~ buske tsrown-Moep Mrs. Liet. J. faeuut we"~ Whavtuoatndlgh
at lnivaoo meet"o the mume" hahve beneer.rkass
ediessd te Wcbuaqm Anuw ~, .~mw lesmva Ies ls ariainoS~u U a m t TinmN e.rd. Mu st said Children ee otr ohu.te b le d he Hare Heasew acfte ii teo r maiuht l o
Mury& Aiksum endo aao orle Entrin Scoo AHiigh Schoollm ThsTrHala a ernm.M.swa "tdy nso h oltpr
Oust.~ ro pl eed t f r s be ta m i OWc~ i sho isle famie s co elim wit. eaf is so emeodi c e5ti oibl eyl a e e d h r s e u e o lessla h i b 1 tlr O a ti h ero e pm mbn m m a h Teshee AceniliPORI=.etw OWlis grpu eIe.Sma lu otit m bs sptrne wh tame It fot emotegh gole tobr pottms m ofeve e e ilt "ben axmomal Levl bi o w;at
beg Mlm s to he A~ th that 10,0 rmm ~~w Ws Paer( einsy feet ttheOsemueb fin theo emsM b e foealdoin l dre eeee4ir a eacr In sai fio no w it. h Hild be oeseert to @w* amNI e ie Old we homl helpo G o@Wtie Wumibint h 1.11.n PA..it the letrmrisha I'msso year tthes meldl theein 44gin ?lice' rrs m M o a thre mClbr k 4ce r Ii* e4'00bl It" w ow- falres rteria highway s t
We als p Cusw mey. Pe814agm 401w the m ia f Oeased hof Sidel*mi go. a gref tahloaid oipdereett Iteet laoisim d IS akepI Abon itIitsme Whide N4119 f'5le IS I5I~ tm. m uh s o all s o twima
Mar Alistute a nd iMs becoal e. w oeh f emtlera mrste io ai l t eore wg nerohi priso Now h indre s le fu r ribslda toe h rsnald hc he aonened sa i t e e t' e rot m a Ise adp hf thesth fo r ral sI he s mewly ase rese nt aer.se thsee today tsme 4-aleys tie Aigetlmk ,*an ricle wi t dremeDr$t qeule a@moo a e traipt lvo oes. osd ave Ie lb gale the Homar e uiar oep hessel toe Mnepet to bin or glwPnb*anMNa Msml at tea ofbeel hoo fllsu m ap is fee. Ver.h m. mid90Wrts mefellow shoe ossine ne sl wbalk c ad" to hurrw vag sst i l trm meroleamureas sferarg l Ili ftrat' ~~ L wor o tael ess"ional
th%&t rml smae ad eish. 94 e. P=59 .,Mmar. Fmber Plieeat Wrvmn. wh stei ete to eye.cr.s" ls.tmgtpeerAetai b. Vmeawa 0ig 111410 else.W hebit e pres10hsie waySur n
of esiutd pEb e A* 1b eem sad M cal 45. po .sMg.mr nweate edeemte o C Ite Psmme e ad~v loiatrp toheA loses~ kalsl in s nt ill be IV k rmas to trMo Graduaeso wa slu.l of F bsa ie h smr t aods. farehero !ev x.eqsL ets line..b ft e tuectibs kn du at.. La helist. Coorodgs.enaR I The.4 dee Jstos treeeid ft by awfl ev 14*eib i fur Is pWs 1*01 al elv %s ueau 'eie that I b e w~ tom link, eG&Waude m ose or peeeplsdeems ill n dlmonlextfrvIpl fo the frii teueet liniland fl.im. mel A Wa e ebas live aMe eats% *isd Toe,.,. sSe t
bed 10 6t b em T m w.i r e ame l !:e t~ow a ma T Io 41 1 eT s vu ees e se q3 eM I e dll s o hu o se lat mereemt,-e c A ai ab a es us Noutle M r pi rsiod spah ile Me te.eslitm~ ed r e W WU. *lSS W011, w e N i t tr lam bee Lemom. a c ie Petsisrma mitnul rmembe r o n stt e a cthe inst wae s d thetat the homeI'l s o 0 Weme sd be le s tial OVAse ilee be tru d s a bout
m ore t W aleg Jam e aimd by h e Toga ~ d I ne ls rfimaa P I so aee e Sae don espe lch to &th ose a hei b hld ihsmp x e i bet i mad tlee sa ud Lbs miimau ld iay psp br ad thMrs .i Rus Mr h s ese i ur in c s .ies ,I e,. teMoo Werguall Ifso &asd lbnd The W'5'5UUC metrng I. rees V3 op iW Clu dee mis' ti s"a d he M l ai tI Tmplew ? he bule t Le y Su m rSeso now 9 "*haI amrk ist the Vrose N e w or R ats tole I= the 1~ad -ts: he p 5 h e ed ho l e eurd
amd moo edmaih N*mmea am "M. wmhe aren forec Plaoi*W "o rp otpakklbitIfS es"totrw rdae tU fF
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"Mo Ptat mdthe es-1ihlkldges qe fucin I iit*ri*A h Maedco o ti a rf y 0 g
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15




Jack Holland, editor and publisher of the Chiefland Citizen, 1950-1973.
16




slugs, remove and replace corrections, and gen- Proof: a single reproduction of a galley or
eral space out page forms in printing chases. page of type to be read for errors and used to
Leads and Slugs: type-high lead or brass ma- make identified corrections.
terial used to space between lines of type to fill Corrections: normally refers to linotype type
or tighten a page form, corrections made from a galley proof and to be
Type Lice: all of the unseen gremlins that inserted in place of the type with the error.
cause letters, words, and other mysterious events A Tail: a piece of cardboard attached to a mat
to occur with type. (paper mold) to keep metal from running behind
Casting Box: a box that you place a mold the mat when it is casted.
(mat) to form a casting of type, figure or an ad Scratch: means to remove a story or ad from
which has been pre-matted. an edition of the newspaper.
Mats and Matrixs: most common name for the Ad: where the money is made. Businesses adbrass molds of letters used by casting machines. vertising their goods and services in the newsTag Line: an identification line at the begin- paper.
ning of a news story to be able to locate it in the Obit: a short title for obituary or death galley bank, notices.
Heads: a short name for headlines. Sorts: odd combinations of letters; ie, ff's, ffi,
Printer's Devil: a novice or apprentice in the ff1, etc., cast on one body in order to save space.
composing department of a newspaper or print
shop.
Slug Cutter: a device used to cut slugs and
rules the appropriate length to fit type forms.
Type: individual letters, figures, or symbols ABOUT THE WRITER-JACK M.
casted in lead or brass either singularly or to- HOLLAND
gether.PaetweeJcan uyHolnimr
Linotype: a machine that sets type in metal Prses) wnerchands Ruby Hroln di timer
(lead) for newspaper and print shop composition. (crties and mtercatn.rno n h al
Cut: short name for an engraving used to print tHtes gaud frs.o HgSholi
pictures on paper. He41gaduatded from Bronesiyon Hloih. Schoolei
Rule: strips of various widths of metal used to 1941, attended the Universit ofeFlra Derafe produce printed solid line border. intonthearmyd Served wiH eunea Gorghe
Metal: a mixture of lead, tin, and zinc used in Pattonrsit 3trd U.S. ary Hed greturned wt th several type of casting machines to produce type. Univeryefer th149e artangaued it arm
Wood and Metal Furniture: large pre-sized BaJdegree n 199Hcotivrerisiinue tthis rarmyo
metal or wood spacing material to fill large voids Caroeeralnatv.eevst iigt h ako
Mnake-: thfptinrogterosaltye He started the newspaper, The Chiefland
h eadupcn tertils wigthaerintinglframe, Citizen, in 1950 and sold it 23 years later to the toeform apacig ofatherialswitpaprinigrm present owner, Walter Wilson.
tto f ed: whpaentesru of the lastpatwo Holland was with the Levy County School sysPut o Bd: henthelastrunof he asttwotem for four years where he developed the Adult pages have run through the press and everyone is and Community Education program which the
ready to go home.conyhstd.
Scoop: a news story of considerable impor- cont as retody.sriga he nls o h
tanc tht yo pulis befre ourcomptitrs.House of Representatives Committee on GovCorrespondent, Stringer: people who work ernmental Operations. He served four years as
parttime in the outlying areas of a paper's circu- the Staff Director of the House Agriculture lation area gathering news. Cmitebfr en se yteSekro
"Thirty" or Dingbat: a symbol used at the end Comte buefren a kd byneHde te Spaker ofe
of a news story to signal the end of the story. thes Hue anditRe.Gn ogstaeoe
Chase: a steel picture frame device used to His rrent psto. efrmrNvCido
place type to form a newspaper page. Bronson and they have one son, Jack Martin
Plane: a wooden block placed on a type form Holland, III. Holland has two daughters, Jeri
and struck by a mallet to insure that all type is and Joan, by a previous marriage. level.
Galy:lngmta raswhere completed type- In college he was a member of the Theta Chi
Gley lo ng mretale treayt epaenopo fraternity and was selected to be a member in
set stores-aesoe ed o epae nopo Sigma Delta Chi, honorary journalist fraternity.
17




81
a] ifSjU 11A j.1
12 a 2 1 1 11t1
. ~ CIhII I!*j sill ti-411 al l I *
~ Jii~ifii t Jil




= '10
Cb ap A" 001
'SERVING SUWANNEE ALLE % URROUNDING AREA"
VOL. I NO I* a InM. UMw QOum. P66. UMa. M 100 Ubt Pasg
Watermelon F*stivl!Narcotics Tw Inilured in
Directors Meet !Stolen From I
LocaiPharmacy Auto=Truck Mishap
ted smotim "trvNi~
md an estimated 510 north
-1 0 1 narcotics was take.
Lauer reeaahy aw lote
I oi, h lock VW broken a
the narcot ics osbipet end It
Th pnd back Winoa.
of W11l itD invsigate thS
incident.
Police Chef
@X a,:rarn e-lt .' ~e Resigns PO
rde nighe atis
br. tb icue u lef1:7t to it afre.btu!wtt. r reem trb
ow uC.1il t lmd ad biffiji 42__ o0whi Wp~i
Ors., wartba Martin. *Snf Club, President sad!6 On 0" ISO 'nop. we a
Plc 2~ri. bat he resiond
Mrs- Geiger hiefland Hols. I= f
Submerlber e d m gr j *;-.- =
The satim r~dng~ SWtEmdil
W~ Plrd Adibrary n b a sesam M a bog,. at the a1 id Lib- pIA O "Ipoeet
Predia Etherie. Pletwd Ohm Is the 'U Our-vd mis n acmcident at lot.
W I. r he ,,: Smae~ ea WaiFnd State Rad Depart- 239 ed Alt. 27 Bandar&a.
unmIr..O registeri fo Oe ii
-' -tbeclb OFin as~7 AD*I Goto-truck Ou1iemo-~le nigo a
vst k aft M. e- red at =~~ra Ion I ih-. w dmno s
miwa a p Dr Stu.a ~ 3Wvi~ted the Cod- il at losod IV ofese Itbi
-. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~A a odadclrb.tec-a L buya 1a.I o t. 27. resulting In Ony ~an wn lae
4 urat ~d ord ba thei to! la t1 bokoy ear %ItjU~O3U.~minao h a.W
meat 91 aid ar to~u binsvl -S.1dIrl.
b0cb amber kep hi am orn ThO ding 9-V Unit d. 00 investigated the ta to oginwrine mia m' fading record and lst orDed PI~d ft tklb. accident. mud the paint truck "!lco.Dds bic
librry eks eA itu the 9ar- 11ll Include a story was Ote oeeaof ub't~ ofrdl mer~arat the libray MCI WWd- I 5013 n1 Ut. sak OntOAt2 Vs. Wester sufed~ntm
I r a b u i a e i g r e t o r a l p b i l a n o s u m o r n g t hig d u i g e t a u t mo b i l e a t t m t ed b a k s d M r. lic e s t e r re c e iv e d
~ b~ff~i~ Beiger. ai. wg~1 'riety of tei r.bgnngat thgto POOs the truck. Th m~ t bruisesl and coinamn of the
w.J8 &tier.eloee ar 4ls Zllft VaaIII iblsa occurred in the moat-bound cheat. ~ oekp vr
Insurance ~t" incur tod U~ e recet mweren oep thovner-i ve
lSheflond, becee theANE gargesr ands sOt re 5 mwd o
,ubarriber to the MugiS wihar reading skill. Pidso&teLi- OPriozatelY 6 feet End Um. B's. ter listed
Ibe"o 10will be he.caiI.IZftU5 the canter 11s. The dri- AvT r drs *OisPect
-of aw t1=tin 0; throg. 24. eiwe th[cirot rver. of the truck gm duarged Sae sad .1
ivzwe 1list Your afto t",___________ gol dn o9 aie blf* v ru n
Pent ou will fine i- orm S pew bulletin, bOrd, two
Z! 9tia 64Waeaqjei 0 1#a~ fbrdljlg clirg chieldren ITransport v ru n
ore libral a branch of t t e AUTO RAMS H OUSE th aral Ond 5ogi~ at O trgr o
Wayfrthe me o owTRAILER; No INJURIES ed. ? added.
The wuows art planning a
Mdbooath fan ce Odar go.
an '.P~tIf wish to due
6Mmy leve theicIn
sorted odtebea woad N
ad to the ielvea. while dp
licalts will be sold for 10
and 25 s-ta each in froit of
TeMod r hneme librWy mdi Owturde am a.
will beeSONd o firtr b lur. 1-solme md math crdit
for the uccess d' the Osder
1:7 Thar Is dume to ore.
btherfard Tesa. a amter of
the LA", Sity Uibrary Bmni
md the amy frigods of Omar
g do ore Interested in the
- rgeso h congunity1
150 ~yautr. diwi ~ Te driwer 9f the car pull- iw librarian. Mra.
~tmII KndllWwdite ~uzL b. ett or Was Orville 1. klagse. mod her%,0.. me It h aca~so Omrster. Blatant 1rs On1. Sale, for JIMY 0 e a okn h ,tetnZ vr nd
of a~-.ae-zaier t te ta- er- were ne injuries Inin a subell Sue. rn iPOtOetre
ffc .te ot mi t the aV 7to(r 1. K. Or$ 010*0 Umiton Ioe wI be she..T c~ phtoben thAI te r a uries in the
Sn q lad, smoe at I.5 extizt Wigst bath we- the inmer librarian during aad transport began elidingj Tetaau smdh
p.. ~hiclas at 01750 the casnce ofIr. illings- sisa 15 i e11.bt -gdt ln emI is Olaes IV.
-4 19




..... i ........................
LWid




His army record shows that he served in secretary of the Bronson Club and later serving
Europe earning Meritorious Unit Citation, Good as President of the Chiefland Club. His memberConduct Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, two ship in the Chiefland Club extends nearly 30
Combat Stars, and Reserve Medal for his ser- years.
vices. He is both an artist and a writer. Many local
Holland served six years as Mayor-Com- people have pieces of his work in art. His most
missioner of the City of Chiefland. He was Levy recent book, "The Reception Station", is a story
County's initial appointee to the Suwannee River of many of the local men and women who had
Authority by Gov. Collins. He has served num- served in the area's oldest and largest U.S. Army
erous boards and councils of state government. Reserve unit. He has two new book releases out
He is a charter member of both the Bronson shortly.
and Chiefland Lions Clubs, serving as the first
21




Ken Smith, editor of the Suwannee Valley News during the early to mid-sixties.
n




Levy County Newspapers Published During Past 140 Years
Bronson
Bronson Artery --ot
Levy County Times
Levy County Advocate Levy Times-Democrat Levy County News
Levy County Journal Cedar Key
Telegraph s__Cedar Key Commercial Gulf Coaster
Cedar Key Hustler ___Cedar Key Breeze -_.
Island City News
Chlefland
Chiefland Citizen
Williston
Williston Progress t
Williston Sun (News) __1_III-Suwannee Valley News Suwannee Valley Valley
Sun-News
Other I
Florida Dispatch of INewnansville88 0
(Alachua County)
184 1860 11170 18M1 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 19410 1950 1960 I970 1980 1990




The Family Tree of the Oldest Newspaper in the County
Levy County Times 1879 Bronson
Levy Times-Democrat merger of LCT with new paper, Democrat Cedar Key Breeze Williston Sun
[1923 Cedar Key 1 -1921 Williston
Williston Sun successor to LTD-CKB 1925 Williston
5 19vy Timesr-Demscrat nliston Sun
Williston Sun successor to LTDI yCounty News 1926 Williston
11923 Bronson a
1927 Bronson
- Island City News 1927 CeaKy
Levy County News successor to WS-LTD-ICN 1928 Brson
-Levy Co. News disappears Williston Sun
successor to LTDC 1929 Williston SuwanneeIsland City News "disappears
Williston News successor to WS-LTD 1961 Williston 24illiston News "disappears Williston Sun successor to LTD Suwnnee Valley News 196 Wilso
1963Williston
Suwannee Valley Sun-News successor to LTD 1970 Williston
24




z I __0~l il jj
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a~ Vb
0 For
1z[~IP~l
i~~e~~Woo '.11F1 P 11ff or
F03~u _____0_________________Ir SEc4- W'
C -.-' ~fill t p
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- tit
RAMd




COUNTY'HAS.FOUR MAIN. SUMT HIGHWAYS -AND. FlVt -AL9D
MlL' FLORIDA. THURSDAY MARCH 25, Ins. Suslnog
~COMMIONERSLET ROA CONTR AS
tONIDERS NEED, m MW 1DmaC~f
~ UlDISN .'*ENS(m.eFC Several Important Road
flk o" IMIM
_________Moe I wo abeeks-- -J &
F6106. Isb do olb .~,. 4. a ad" bjp raft.. Adhe ~ ~ on the. I IbisI ie.. rb ~ Uae.~7W~~J
-THE~ EVY"NN COU-NTY NEWS~17-k 4
ONLY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED AND PRINTED IN BRONSON, THE COUNTY SEAT OF LEVY COUNTY, IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEART OF STATE FLORIE J%,E J. NUMBER 38. BRONSON. LEVY COUNTY. FLORIDA, APRIL.6th. 1926 $1.50 A YEA
~tinof Notes of Court FULL PROCEEDINGS OF
ComsioesProceedings COUNTY COMAMISSIONERS'$YATE ROAD 13 TO PARALLEL R. I
isgw. 1A. N. 4 tng If th lbs. l. At a regular merging of the 11oard of Cnulsty CunIisini,,nra. in and for
oil t..n,,.-ulws n nd at CiuitCortopeedMoida A ~ Leiy CountV,) hdel at the Churk*. Otfj-. in Wits.n Ia. Mnti~t. n 1t r W. R. Hodges. Chairman of the Roard of County Commxisalo
,unt). Stit. of Florida held at with Judge A. V. Long preeliding, with of April A. D). 1926, with the following mershers of the, Htoards lo...cnt to- after returning from Tallahaw*Pe where he wan in conference with the of Mk'. Office on this the 27th all other attaches of tile ur p-- wit: ili, of the State Hoad Dep'iatment, announced that State Roasd Number T
r M h. A 0. 9W2. with the ent W, R. HODGES. Chairman, teen han been .lepignated and will bo built directly beside the Seaboard
,ngW t.e- o hlor re .P lll Line Railway through Levy County, panning through the towns of MoMe
i-it-The ceut In gvng the bre to Mi. CLV ATT lrosen Lennon otter Creek. Ellay. Wylly. Rosewood. Sumner and or
V'. It. Hedges, Chairma, the Grand Jury was a very imatlruc- W.a tATCedar Key. Then; has been much discursilon as to the locationI Kimlet, andcJrge finshdo ter wortie h L C. PRICE~. sorRyn that it should leave the railroad at OtterCre
I. a V.-..
'NEED' FIRE PROTEMdONK CITY HALL., FIRE STATION,
_- TOURIST CAMP, PARK, WHITE WAY, BONDS WiL DO IT'
~AND SOIL I I
PUflUSHED IN 1M143 R OF TVE AGRICULTURAL SECTION FFLRD
-AND THE -LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT ___ t~
-IUONO FLORIDA. THURSDAY, APRIL 29, ISK NEW~SR On
i~iwnisClubGReceives arter>
Class Hi hReceives DinlomasLnARvn~if V H.
TELVY TIMES-DEORA
ItIAL PUBLICATION OF LRVY COUNTY URDICATED TO-21 THUlOGSU8SlVX ADVANCZMBNT OF Tus COU N y A
OFB SAE UAl NRFSGOVEN LEVY COUNTY WAS FOhIED I,
BY COMMSSONER KAYO IUIINN ROADS ON IX MONTH MORE FLRIA BILAE SRATE
49RA5 SA S el "Wha w. W. ot..ei SamOO PERIO &odo. Mamm F., Fieua U. S. Smtoe Hsr*--U
THlE STATE 6 t(FFxias fo lb 3Sd iSV0m Tnw.iwFw" 31dm
FTw W.bs a.e~ sebsab of~ softi so .~.
Cnp eu. "*~ F.. nm, ___ef. o~ J Nt 3
Jab.,RFurTor M s. s mn b lb e s or au ab A.UMin.1 Imi~ no"611 ~ b b ow U.Is. .wds A ye n--.
26




ISLAND.a CITY NEWS.
CEDAR KEY. FLA..' FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2.1927 NUMBER
AMSMM BOKS AccITBy com ONI $I
IL MEA77ON QVIN~TG~f UtaffALASSMfl Cedar Key School News
ond- o o "Ms an f I' Yea $61,060; Mad of Amount is Increase of lbo.m UYa t A b e:::m ~
WtEIA ORM<
a TO THl EL,, Y TiMLS.DfMOCRLATI HE WILLISTON SUN ANDE ISADCTY NEWS
ffciiL PUBLICATION *) LEVY COUNVY0DiAI TO THS PROGACSIVE ADV ANCENKNT OF THE COUYTj
WIWLSTON, FLORtIDA. THURSDAY DECEMBER Ith. 1928 NUMBER 17
rRn Mw STRWSTIlLS WEEK ARE TAKING ON REAL j ~J
.di Dashes by the Students DesRLSTNAS AftEARANC PasFSCOl ~.~ ~~ senlger Plane
Coa rk "so, NV tingeon Cl~istrae Ain Shop early camaie'nh ow,"_o are doing Abir bit "nd buyig is getting 4
*@ohm I :06 bm uw -,., W T
SUCoSO TO THMEYEIEMEMCOADTEISADCIYNW
Gwo. -no to. &igdW ~ .~, wno a e =@No" sob me. J. a U"_ waWY0 JAK or do Ib~
m. 5 __LIAT
y,..- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ N SOIL IN.~~~~I~ ss l a e
S I.memmm us..'' ~ m- uw'h S. bFLORIDAs
PUBLISHED-Iw THE HER OF. THE AGIULUA SETO FLRD SUCESSR O TE EVYTIMS-EMORA ANTE, 3AN CIT NES
MW0
AL~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ PCiy CL 'I t% FLVYC U TYD CAE O H O6CR f FAn-A CV N -T
WILITO. LOID. HUSDY ANAR 1a 92 --NMBF2
MUM ON GO~bin R M fAM -O FI
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"* P& 0%U OW b WM ... 011111" o o 09ro W o e&* s e ~ 7 11ot 60 o w ont2U7t




NOM- w WRUMM.OU 'LAOA 2M THUAT. .CT m s. Ws VOL a% NOM 5
Peanuts To Be Special New .ium~ Askew, Chilet, Shevin,)
Show At The County Dp e evis And Kmk Winners
Fair Next Month .bw In Tuesday's Election
Fair~~) Nexti Mot am" am," DO bawi a z = N".. 5.7. Law ra, Im Meet woutsom~e M 1 edDeibL MM_ ofw ise ka- at "b vr "IU &MM CM -=1 W~.. #a 014 h
am .. () ORi bwft *b do WMUM 16 a ft no=r a =On Red? rwi "NDr. ..-at &3 hIaarm (1) UM GP 16 min be ama m 44= oa n %A Sa., DOW Fadu 112ada..
__) G mast a ley ma ,. S- u anU a-lu By B~-eiga h-O bp ak aa.I).( Da (3) ia "Mowei~U~ph ~a A of W- ui Un .141 no~ t S
#LMAs s ., .R1 j ,14 60d '. "ma m ad &sag of I; W M Inm vn mor,~ ofp W ag
SINGLE Copy
P46MAa&. csawu. Flouida . 7116 Sam 01 do. Barsnum
?YUE N A NCWAM iMMM MMTI". INSLA
LevyI Ion Illn Williston High School
Are Signing Up Before ASOMIi! rd len$1,00 ar
The March 10 Deadline rV aaeLatTusa
new me 16MId So-.ag at hr
~t~bP~i .;BackYew Omn Fuhu
*UVG LN. FSON60S FLORIDA. THIJESOAV. LUG IL .9 aam van U S R o A, h pt
Prominent Educator* Work"'atts. CIHOISn Iepr'a~ okonRa 5Fnnt
proIn e o LevyGulcris Chor ms' ReotO hief land Being Held Up For
Going On Now At Chieflani '. af~t 1. II-t II ider Right-o Wayla&
9I1IUFLAIIA& A -0, K'i and1M hab46 I. Sok T esdy -- E.YCh m3 ai
IIIIaait 011"It Aft FIust, $011 big eat Ibe.. ail "MA 40 ~ IMPa. 0, Csui A Aaafswl a daia L.a OFs 8I111. r. owlo
"asa2. ISO ia., tea uSmo L-''dUA LA W. .111 WI 10-4 a *" aO a- C OLVII WHO Lives in 3..aihL~ u X' A it a-Iff Sat now MatA .esraa.o.....M.... Te
A Phlbs Ghr 1~dm
binint cob COMON A tilte Sum 0 au~a~ M gh mio b~t~
e agan __________ Pubibedi mad PrWWk In Riny County
OR 1HON" sul 1. 1- "Oft u* NawLTON Mve.01ft3M
,UanI e=r It. ft.1a
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Zaea em EI-iNG moNDA AW Offke hlidlg Om.11 ANI.wity. usk Meatta ong of fNoam amn aaim M. AND. dayr ata Delav Isa saw m
*.0ain a D *a Rom 4 Maea ON" Debta W5W5f -01O n 1 101n M t O sb G '
-ft" o at a. no&I*o.I" MotO ae oLD ee 2f mii
q.f edmiii Inn asia-. Or Tom a" *0 WIND
oh df 80 MO 411 "d a.b In. Me hoa ase adr a aNo M k c an
DRID to anon"" DO OMe pea 00 81ly160 h im f sma, ID e I"
some am wmUa6" o i .01 nO 4w VIM 3.bal to NNW. Mae. i DI
28




munow a we now- UMn Son, -- oppoonum go, own son Moor momw now a wum as 0.
-W bdm arbooft booor In ashm "a Duane P*W re-doodimo, me Mathew 1 0 hooogg. &'*,
am presoorv. Ig am l ft 11101 gloom" In emonq egoonladon meard moommore News law. 4.016 we Congo- "a dow" pru"M
010 hold ft arsum SO me look am 4* we rime d wamom. ad WON. 461 OMRSPMM- room so be "M M agbmd dftft = N"= am* Loa d Tuaw M. &Mel we lobor a. aw as amord.
as me Numb aft Ift Isom P Mown, bdwmd do"= somobw 8.
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e )1.
cuolls" cleftessary behool, oclur". Amondal Help Availloblus
softd a" Poor am. am". woon N*. froom kh. Mulas so" J"awdCM NUT". 61" sma loom"; Iftoon. ducers
mor" ww"ons. amooft ad a" SMFA"* lowdl. 'Wood'almh I"b" To Livestock Pro
we& andaw- mare ft Up" ftemillme. from MR. Dlom Mt.
i.-aug Tounty 30urn
IL"Yewift
vdww 8646L a FbrkII6 TkIroft. J* 14 no FIRM 01111111 "AsYser
Welfare Depi. To Give sixm spent on co. consinleolon Go"riumuse For City vs. County Rivalry
LM M To Moncl To Hftr Zonke Youth In Art Aro
Comawditin Mon.And Inspoodon -Foullog PAquests July 1911% in Planning give Renews For Marilyn L.
Tues. In Levy County solginge au have um ft wo, oppoefto" bod Julian Benefit Day Sat.
Tes levy coon" Wdbm Do. jo is --. mdg" ogn, Canal Counkmoners en Two. b& 60010111011 OR diffs"M we cvy we Ifty come"
Verse" ad MAO 0 dondbo- co"llow so gocage. am aggooftig 4100 LA" CGUMAY Vswh VMW -1g6copoologge-dobs
ftwol"up6% oil I TO gook onol, damming = log by b as coftaft"We"'s aging. Pam. Wig kby cum In Among. Men" For Slote salad wouroom" a" Sawgrant For An on, lospooda gog ad 'beam on u's on UoloMdkI$TG byl!6*101100101YOLDEPURUwin 4k. Som. pb. IAFW 1. mooing mown". dmwma. Pumift "d obm&
9ftoolka
WON OUWMU" =044
MUM M XUASER X 11"LL67M. FLORIDA MAY X, jm LGM MO M FIFTEEN CENTS
Face Beef DOWT WORRY FOLKS, THIS FIRE IS ONLY FOR PRACTICE
Two I arm exice. aw a *m&
budibm wm an
nololwoml dooft 69 pw 'Zirruz
TM am post some vown amonwin la
&orsoon am bmben Mft an W." X and
sompogont wakood go $156 WU "boa
A boa Monger Vabled go Sam twon sonim C
frown dw Ckw& d Choo in I 1 71 Zt
qw m ,.m I .." 04
29




THE BRYANT HARDEE
CONNECTION
By Eugenia Smith Rowe
Silvester Bryant, born 27th January 1800, in Having acquired a hotel in the Tallahassee,
Camden County, Georgia, (the son of Langley Leon County, Florida area in the early 1840's,
Bryant-one of the earliest settlers of St. Isaac did have a home to offer a bride, but not
Patrick's, Camden County, Georgia) grew up to such a life, as yet, to offer the darling of Silvesbe a prosperous farmer of that area. He met and ter and Elizabeth Bryant, as was offered by the
married Elizabeth Niblack, born 27th February older well-to-do widower, living in the Lake City
1807, daughter of a prominent neighbor, William area. Also, being a red-headed Irishman with a
Niblack, who was a member of the 1801 Georgia ready wit, its not hard to imagine that he would
Legislature from Camden County. also have a ready temper .. In any event, he
Silvester and Elizabeth married in 1826 in and Esther Ann quarreled and she was promised,
Camden County. Here their daughter, Esther by her Father and Mother, to wed the older n,
Ann Bryant was born on the 24th of April 1828. tieman, even though (it is said) she preferred the
it was shortly after the birth of Esther Ann that young Irishman. Silvester and Elizabeth decided to move their As the wedding day approached the young
small family to lands owned in Columbia Coun- lovers may or may not have communicated their
ty, Florida. And it was in that area, near Lake misery to each other. Tradition is unclear on that
City, that their son, Silvester Bryant, Jr., was point, but, I somehow believe that Isaac must
born on the 23rd of February 1830. A daughter, have been encouraged a little, at least. But tradiElizabeth Bryant, was born the 19th of Novem- tion (and History) is very clear that on the eve of
ber 183 1. She died soon after. the wedding day, Isaac, with the help of his
Silvester was a very prosperous farmer and he slaves, spirited, not only the willing Esther Ann,
and Elizabeth became "Pillars of Society" in the but also the massive amount of food prepared
Lake City area. Their daughter and son grew to for the wedding feast of his rival, out the winbe young adults amid wealth and plenty. dow of Silvester Bryant's home. And Isaac,
In due time the young swains (and by all Esther Ann, the slaves, the food and the wedding
accounts, one not so young) were courting the cake, stole away in the night and were married
petite, vivacious Esther Ann, among them a on the 30th of March 1844 in either Lake City or
dashing young man by the name of Isaac Pierson Tallahassee. The latter being where he took her,
Hardee, who was an emigree from the State of as his bride, to live, we presume, happily ever
South Carolina, by way of Georgia. Isaac was after.
born the 11Ith of October 1817 and had, at the Isaac and Esther Ann's first child, born the
age of 22, come down to Florida in 1839 as a 26th of June 1845, was a daughter and (ever an
soldier to help fight the Seminole Indians. As a Irishman and a politician) they named her Elizaresult of his military service, (he enlisted as a beth Niblack Hardee, for her maternal granddrummer and after serving for a year he was dis- mother. The second child, born the 6th of May
charged as a fifer) he was awarded land grants 1847, was a son, John Sylvester Hardee, named
and by the early 1840's he was back in Florida for the two grandfathers. They were still living in
looking around for a new plantation and for a Tallahassee at this time.
wife (not necessarily in that order), to found his Silvester Bryant and his wife, Elizabeth, had
own dynasty and help make his mark in the extensive real estate holdings on the Suwannee
world. River in Levy County, and after the marriage of
Now Isaac, son of John and Lucritia Hardee, Isaac and Esther Ann, he removed his family
was also from a proud and prosperous family from Lake City, Columbia County, Florida area,
from the Horry District of South Carolina. The to these remote acres in the Clay Landing viciidea that he would lose Esther Ann to an older, nity.
well-to-do swain, favored by Silvester and Eliza- Between May 1847 and January 1850, Isaac
beth, after a quarrel between the young couple, and Esther Ann and their two children left
didn't seem to set too well with this determined Tallahassee and removed to the same area of
red-headed descendant of an Irishman and he Levy County, near Clay Landing, on the Suwantherefore refused to be daunted. nee River. The Bryants had built a two story log
30




cabin and it was here that Isaac and Esther Lenora 300.00
Ann's third child, Issac Bryant Hardee, was born James 250.00
on 22 January 1950, named for his father and Henry 200.00
the Bryant family name. It has to be assumed by Thomas 75.00
this time that all had been forgiven the eloped Calvin 1,000.00
couple and they were one big happy family. $4,925.00
On the 20th of March 1853, the second child 2nd Group:
child of Silvester and Elizabeth Bryant, Silvester, Little Mary $750.00
Jr., was married to the Lovely Miss Susan Tyner, Margaret 450.00
born on the 6th of September 1834 in Effingham Florida 550.00
County, Georgia. (The daughter of Jackson and Hester 300.00
Sarah Ann Pace Tyner, then living in Marion Georgian 300.00
County, Florida). By 1858 Silvester and Susan Handy 300.00
Bryant were living at Ft. Fanning where he was Chany 75.00
Post Master, Ft. Fanning being the largest fort in Firby and child 1,100.00
the area to protect these pioneering inhabitants Jake 1,000.00
from the Indians. $4,825.00
---- Slaves were needed to grow and harvest cotJackson Tyner was born the 9th of July 1911 ton. This was the farmers money crop. Cotton
in Effingham County, Georgia. He met and later produced along the Suwannee River was shipped
married Sarah Ann Pace, born the 16th of July down river to Cedar Key and thence loaded on
1814, also of Effingham County, Georgia on the ships, until the completion of the railroad in
13th of December 1832. Jackson Tyner was a 1861, and then by rail to the northern and
farmer and also served for a time as the County European markets.
Coronor for Marion County, Florida. He died The Bryants and Hardees were known to enterafter 1880, as he is listed on the 1880 Census at tamn lavishly. To hold merry gatherings with muBronson, Levy County, Florida at that time. No sic and dancing and feasts prepared by slaves and
further record is found of him, served on tinkling china and crystal and shining
Sarah Ann Pace Tyner died the 24th October silver. Life was good for these families and on
1898 and is buried in the Old Bronson Cemetery. the 27th of February 1852, they celebrated the
Jackson and Sarah Ann had six children: birth of Joseph Owen Hardee, their fourth child,
1. Susan, 6th September 1834, Effingham named for Isaac's grandfather, Joseph Hardee of
County, Georgia. South Carolina and Isaac's brother, Joseph P.
2. Mozelle, 29th July 1836, Effingham Coun- Hardee, who later came to live with them.
ty, Georgia. The Hardee children appeared regularly.
3. Barnet Tryon, 1 st September 1838, Florida. Andrew Jackson Hardee was born the 16th of
September 1854 and named for that famous
4. Jane Verlilue, 27th September 1842, Florida. Indian Fighter of Tennessee who first led the Seminole Indian War soldiers and who in later
5. Isaac Bronson, 10th November 1846, years became President of the United States.
Florida. On the 20th of November 1856 sadness entered
6. William Badger, 2nd March 1850, Effing- their lives with the death of Silvester Bryant, Sr.
Florida. His estate passed to his wife and two living child---- ren, and their young families.
By about 1855, Silvester Bryant, Sr. held twen- Silas Langley Hardee, named for his greatty slaves. Their value was around ten thousand grandfather, Langley Bryant, was born the 22nd
dollars and they helped him maintain a planta- of February 1857, just three months after the
tion of 480 acres. Some of those slaves and their death of Silvester. value were: On the 23rd of October 1857, was born to
1 st Family-William $800.00 Sylvester Bryant, Jr. and his wife, Susan Tyner
Big Mary 500.00 Bryant, a son whom they named Sylvester BronTheir Children: son Bryant. This was to be their only child.
Sarah Phrna $700.00 In 1860 disaster struck in the form of typhoid
Marie 500.00 fever. An epidemic which before it was done had
Dianne 300.00 swept away the lives of several slaves and the unPhillis 300.00 named infant son, born 24th of February, died
Lenora 300.00 the 25th of February 1860. He lived just one day
31




and was buried with his mother, Esther Ann Isaac Pierson Hardee, aged 62, soldier and
Bryant Hardee, who died on the 1st of March planter, died on the 26th of November 1879 and
1860. They were buried in the Bryant-Hardee was buried in the Hardee Cemetery at Pine Hill
Family Cemetery, located near their home at. Plantation. Susan Tyner Bryant Hardee lived to
Clay Landing. They joined Silvester Bryant, Sr. be 74 years old, died on the 30th of August 1908
and several of their slaves in this burial ground and was buried beside Isaac. which is now lost on the banks of the Suwannee
River along with the site of that first log home. Sylvester Bronson Bryant, only child and heir
Three months after the deaths of Esther Ann of Sylvester Bryant, Jr. and Susan Tyner Bryant
and her son, on the I1st of June 1860, Sylvester Hardee, married on the 19th of August 1896,
Bryant, Jr. succumbed to the dreaded disease Miss Alice Wanamaker, born 31st July 1878. She
and was buried in what is now the Hardee Ceme- was sickly and died a year later on the 3rd of
tery, Hardeetown, Levy County, Florida. His September 1897 at the home of her parents in
was the first grave. Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. She was
Isaac Pierson Hardee, grieving widower, mar- buried in the Key Stone Churchyard Cemetery in
ried his former sister-in-law, Susan Tyner Tampa.
Bryant, grieving widow, in November of that About 1900 he was married to Miss Sarah
same fateful year of 1860. Isaac, left with six liv- Eleanor Worthington, of Levy County, Florida. ing children under the age of fifteen and Susan, She was born 25th December 1877, daughter of
left with her three year old son, Sylvester Bron- John Langley Worthington, and his wife, Susan son Bryant, and their aging (54 year old) mother- Taylor Worthington. They were blessed with six in-law, Elizabeth Niblack Bryant, had decided to children:
pool their families and their resources and make 1. Eulalee, 24th September 1901.
a home at Pine Hill Plantation for all of them. 2. Ida Mae, 12th March 1903.
Thus, first cousins became step-brothers and 3. Bronson Worthington, 16th August 1904.
step-sister, Aunt and Uncle became Step-Mother 4. Elenor, 5th October 1905.
and Step-Father. 5. Sylvester Langley, 22nd February 1907.
The arrangement was a successful one as on 6. Susan, 16th September 1908.
the 23rd of September 1861, Oscar Davis (Or On the 30th of May 1929, Eulalee was married
Daves) Hardee was born; followed by Eugene to J. Mauley Hudson. On the 5th of April 1930,
William Jackson, 3rd of August 1864; Dora Ann Bronson Worthington Bryant married Miss
Hardee, 23rd March 1866 (who died 4th of May Martha Esther Howell, and they have one son,
1866); and last but not least, Emmett Russel Bronson Howell Bryant, born 4th of December
Hardee, born on the 29th of October 1867. 1931.
32




Ellzey Methodist Church built in about 1865.




THE ELLZEY
METHODIST CHURCH
By Marie G. Meeks
Between the year 1850 and 1860, Robert Mar- Grove. This included practically all of what is
yin Elizey, a young Methodist preacher, felt a known as Levy County today except the Williscall to go to the frontier to help spread the Gos- ton area. pel. With his wife he started out from Barnwell A ledger containing a few remaining sheets of
County, South Carolina. They traveled down un- old church record dating 1871, at the time when
til they crossed the Georgia-Florida line and from Parson Elizey was admitted to conference, lists there on everywhere they stopped he preached. the names of eighty-seven persons on the church
He would pray and ask for Divine Guidance at roll in 1894. The sheets containing the roll before
every place he stopped, in order that he might that time were torn out.
know where to stop and establish a church. Mr. W. W. Ellzey states that his father walked
They traveled down through central Florida, to churches within eight miles and rode horsefinally arriving at Lake Butler. Here he stopped back to the others. He says his father was paid
and preached, supposedly for several months, mostly in produce from the farms and with the
While there his wife passed away. little money they received they bought clothes.
After the death of his wife, he moved on down The majority of the money went to buy the long
thirty-six miles west of Gainesville, to what was tailed parsons coat which his Father wore. He
called Eurika, but later changed to ElIzey. Upon says his Mother was a good manager and even
arriving there he said that this was the place he though his Father was away from home most of
felt that he had been looking for. He immediate- the time his Mother managed to keep things goly established a Homestead Grant and took up ing.
residence. At the twenty-seventh Conference held in TalSoon after getting a cabin fixed for himself lahassee in 1871, Robert Marvin Ellzey was adwith the help of a few settlers, they erected a one mitted to Conference. room log cabin to be used for a church. They Out of the eleven churches that Parson Ellzey
split the logs to make the floor and used wooden served in 1872, there are four still active today.
pegs for nails. They are: Ellzey, Bronson, Cedar Key and
By this time Parson Ellzey or Uncle Ellzey, as Archer.
he was more commonly known among his close In 1853 a railroad was built to Cedar Key from
friends in the surrounding communities, had Fernandina. The train burned cord wood so semarried Avarilla Williams, who was quite a help veral of the families found that they could make
mate for him. Along with raising four children, good by cutting cord wood for the train, others
she conducted Sunday School and made arrange- found that they could do well cutting the cross
ments to feed and lodge the many people who ties to build and then to repair the railroad
came from the surrounding communities to at- tracks.
tend services at the church. Around 1900 Ellzey went through a period of
Sometime during the years between 1860-1865 growth. A cedar mill was constructed and a little
the one room log cabin church burned. A Mr. later a turpentine still was put into operation.
Worthington agreed to cut the lumber, and by Many of the older families, some of which are
this time a number of families lived in Ellzey and still represented here today are as follows: all agreed to go to work and build a new church Phelps, Elizey, Meeks, Perryman, Hogans,
on the same sight. This is the church that is Pinner, Ishie, Williams, Tindales, Becks, Berrystanding today. The only difference to be found hill and Oglesbees. All were farmers.
in it is, the storm which passed through in 1889 During the period of growth the church prosblew the steeple off, new windows and several pered and many preachers came and went. A
new roofs have been added and also three Sun- Baptist church was added to the community durday School rooms have been added to the back. ing this period and was maintained until around
In 1872 Parson Ellzey's circuit included Bron- 1918 when the cedar was cut out and the cedar
son, Cedar Key, Ellzey, Archer, Shell Pond, mill moved. The turpentine still operated by
Blitch Schoolhouse, Hardee Schoolhouse, Clyatt West Brothers was closed down in 1952.
School, Levyville,- Rocky Hammock and Oak Sunday School and Church services have con34




tinued continuously from before the building of Due to the fortitude of Brother M. B. Cox,
the first log church when services were conducted Mr. Robbie Pinner, who was then Superintenin the homes up until the present time in Ellzey. dent of the Sunday School, Mr. W. W. Ellzey, They have been conducted on the same site ex- son of the late Parson Ellzey, and Mr. N. J.
cept for the times that calamities have befallen Meeks, with the combined help of the other the building. members of the church, the windows were reIn 1936 several people in Ellzey decided to placed and services were soon resumed in the
start raising goats. They overran the place and church.
due to neglect of the people they took the church On the first Sunday in June 1939, after church
so the people just moved out to the school build- services were resumed in the church, the first ing where services were conducted for about two "Homecoming" was held. This was the beginyears. A new preacher, Reverend Skelley came to ning of the annual "Ellzey Homecoming" which
us who had zeal and determination, so he started is attended by hundreds from near and far each a campaign to reclaim the church. Under his di- year, giving proof that the church has had a far
rection we were, in a few months, back in the old reaching effect and has a history behind it. church with a new roof on it, windows repaired The Ellzey Church has approximately twentyand a new door with a lock on it so that the five active members today. The old church is
goats could not enter. very much in need of repair. Due to the encourWe had been back in the church approximately agement brought to the church by the young stua year when one afternoon three boys of the dent pastors serving it, out of the University of
community sought refuge in the church from an Gainesville and due to the consecration, love and
electrical storm. While in there they had nothing devotion of the few remaining members, the else to do so they shot the windows out. Services church carries on today conducting Sunday were then forced to be conducted in the school- School and church each Sunday.
house again.
35




The old Curry homestead, 1904: Lem and Fannie Curry, Baby Alma, Blake, Gad, Lizzie, Belle, and Effie. The deer was a pet.




HENRY MIMS MATTAIR
(18 .19)
Transcribed by Eugenia Smith Rowe
I was born over there in an old log house her work. After awhile some whites captured her
which is now gone. My father built this house the back down around Stafford's Pond close to year I was born, and I have lived right here ever Montbrook which used to be Phoenix. They since. I have farmed all my life, raised cows, changed it to Montbrook because some families
hogs, just regular farming. named Brooks moved in. I guess they named the
My father was a farmer and a blacksmith. He place after Old Man Mont Brooks. Anyway, to
was raised about two miles from here in the di- get back to my story, the Negro woman told the
rection of Williston. My grandfather lived some- whites that when the Indians killed Old Man where around Lake City and then he moved to Stafford, they scalped him, took his stuff off
Jacksonville. After he married my grandmother, him, and went over to Micanopy and danced
they lived over in what is now the Ocala National around that scalp for two or three days. Forest. My father was born there. I believe it was Great Grandpa Tyner killed an Indian and a place called Long Swamp. That was about brought the scalp in and hung it on his back
1850. porch. Great Grandma Nancy Tyner made him
My wife is named Ima Vira Reeves Mattair. take it down. I don't know whatever became of
She was born in West Virginia. We have been it but I still have the tomahawk that the Indian
married fifty years and have four sons and one had at the time.
daughter. During the Indian War times, the people built
When I was a boy, there were more people liv- forts. There was one not far from Col. Smith's,
ing around this neighborhood than now. You right there where you turn to go to MacIntosh.
could say that our place is southwest of Waca- Some people today still have these here big old
hoota. musket balls; what the whites shot at the Indians
My Great Grandfather fought in the Indians when they tried to slip in. When the ground was
Wars. I don't know when he came to this coun- plowed up the people would find the musket
try, but it was before the Indians and whites got balls. I remember when Mr. Willard Smith lived mad at each other. I have heard my Grandmo- up here, he had a box full of them.
ther tell about the Indians coming to their house The Indians, before the war broke out, would
when she was about six or seven. She remember- come in here and trade huckleberries for milk.
ed one day when six Indians were setting on the There was not a regular trading post here.
porch with Old Man Tyner (that was my Great I never knew much about my Grandmother's
Grandfather). They had brought some brooms brothers and sisters because they either died or
and baskets to give to the older children, so my got killed during the Civil War. My daddy went Grandmother wanted to play around there so she off to the Civil War, also my uncle. The first
could see what was going on. The Indians were person ever buried at the Orange Hill Cemetery
sitting and lying on the floor. They had brought was William Tyner and some of his people live some knives along to show Old Man Tyner. One around Williston now. Mrs. Gilley is one of
of the Indians reached for a knife right at my them. Carl Gilley found two tomahawks in a
Grandmother's feet and she took off like a mound in Gulf Hammock during hunting season.
streak. The Indians all laughed at that. I heard that they are over at the University now.
My Great Grandmother was Nancy Tyner and I don't know exactly where the Indians lived
that was in the early 1800's. I don't recall hear- around here. I have heard that they used to drive ing what kind of Indians those were. My Great cattle from Stafford's Pond to the prairie over
Grandfather Tyner came here in 1832. Williston there where Whitehurst lived, the other side of
did not exist then. My wife, Ima, who was a his place. They must have lived, for one place,
Reeves, was born at a place called Balls in Mon- around Johnson Lake because so many arrowroe County, West Virginia. heads have been found there. After my GrandI have heard my Grandfather say that after the father and Grandmother separated, she married war started, the Indians captured a Negro wo- a man by the name of Tanner. Both of them had
man and took her over to Micanopy and made children to finish raising, so you might say Old
37




Man Tanner raised my daddy. The old Tanner In that Orange Hill Cemetery there's a big Oak
Cemetery is still down there, about two and a Tree and that's where William Tyner picked out
half miles from here. The Wacahoota Methodist the place for him to be buried. Some people since
Church, about two miles from here, is a lot older then have wanted to cut the tree down and there than the Orange Hill Cemetery. I think the first were some fusses about that. Some of Tyner settler around Wacahoota was a man named bunch objected, said their Grandpa owned the
Smith. land at the time he was buried and a whole row
My father left Florida and went off to the of Tyners are buried there.
Civil War. He was wounded five times. I heard My Grandmother never had bad experiences
him talk about Chickamauga, also some place with the Indians. This old Bible here, they gave
called Lookout Mountain. He got shot twice in it to her when she was a child. I remember her
the arm there and in his knee. saying that the white people had no business takThere was a log cabin down the road from ing Florida away from the Indians. When the
here that Mrs. Horne used to live in. I used to go Indians were chased out of here, Grandma said down there when I was a child and she would she wished she was back in Mississippi. Ethel
always give me something to eat, usually a bis- Gilley of Williston, that's Mrs. Waldo Gilley, is
cuit and sausage. also the great granddaughter of Old Man Tyner
My grandfather was named Johnathan J. Ty- and the granddaughter of William Tyner.
ner, he was born in September, 1824. My Grand- Grandma used to go there and they would get to
mother was named Frances and she was born in talking about the old times and Ben was still liv1826. They called her Fanny. Grandpa died when ing, that's Ben Tyner who was Ethel's father.
he was 76. Ethel might remember more than I do.
38




WHY RYE ..* KEY,
THAT IS?
Why should a small island at the north of Way John E. Johnson and Thomas H. Parsons reKey, on the Number Four Channel, have borne ceived title to their respective lands by patent
the name "Rye Key" ever since the first govern- from the General Land Office of the United
ment survey of the Cedar Keys in the 1850's? States. Then, exactly six months later, on
(The railroad route excepted.) The answer lies February 1, 1854, these two homesteaders sold
with a young homesteader named John E. their entire acreage to Major John Parsons. the
Johnson, who received a permit to enter and set- major, in turn, sold those lands to the Florida tle upon 160.5 acres on January 23, 1843. In ad- Railroad Company on September 22, 1855 and dition to the small island upon which he built his again, it appears from the deeds, on June 30, dwelling, Johnson's tract included much of the 1856. In the first transaction, David Levy Yulee
northern and central portions of Way Key, the was one of the grantors on the deed; in the seisland selected by David Levy (Yulee added later) cond, Major Parson's wife, Susan Decatur Parto become the Gulf terminus of his projected sons, was another grantor. In each transaction,
trans-peninsula railroad from Fernandina. the lands were identical, so many may conclude
About the same time, an acquaintance of that the Florida Railroad Company, creature of
Johnson, young Thomas H. Parsons, received a Yulee's tireless efforts, was well-possessed of
permit to homestead 164.31 acres on Way Key, those 324.81 acres so vital to its future.
more to the southeast, where most of the City of So what has all this to do with the name of
Cedar Key has developed. Both men's permits Rye Key? John E. Johnson's birthplace was Rye,
came through U.S. Government's land office in New Hampshire. And that is where the Parsons
Newnansville, which was managed for six years came from.
by Seminole War veteran, Major John Parsons. --Charles C. Fishburne, Jr.,
The major was an uncle of Thomas H. Parsons. April, 1984
On precisely the same date, August 1, 1853, Archivist, Cedar Key Historical
Society
39




THE CEDAR KEYS,
STEAMBOATS, AND
THE SUWANNEE RIVER
By Charles C. Fishburne, Jr.
Archivist, Cedar Key Historical Society
April 10, 1984
When steamboats began operating on Florida perform her trips regularly at all seasons of the
waters in the 1830s, some serving the U.S. Army year between Columbus and Cedar Keys, leaving
were ascending the lower Suwannee River by Columbus every TUESDAY morning at 7
1836. However, not until 1845, two years after O'clock, A.M. and Cedar Keys every FRIDAY
the U.S. Government declared the Second Semi- morning ... .As soon as practicable this boat
nole War over, did the first regular steamboat will extend her trips up the Suwannee River to
service on the Suwannee commence. On October the Upper Springs, and also up the Withlacoo25 of that year, the St. Augustine News reported chee River.
that the Orpheus was in operation between the ... .The Florida State Internal Improvement
Cedar Key and Santa Fe and Columbus. Steam- and Steam Navigation Company. .. .will soon
boat authority Edward A. Mueller (Florida complete their arrangements .. for purchase of
Historical Quarterly, January, 1967, pp. 27 1-88) cotton and other products of the country ..
adds that the Orpheus met an obscure and tragic As soon as practicable a line of suitable packets
end on the Suwannee in 1847. She was soon to will be established by the Company between
by followed by the Glasgow. The new service was Cedar Keys and New York and New Orleans for
announced in the Tallahassee Floridian on May the conveyance of freight and passengers ... .The
13, 1848 by the captain, himself, as follows: facilities offered to parties of pleasure and others
to visit the Keys, at all seasons of the year, one
STEAMER GLASGOW of the most healthy and desirable retreats for
James Tucker, Master invalids and others in the State, and the beautiful
THE undersigned avails himself of this mode and romantic scenery of the Suwannee will, it is
of informing the public that the new Steamer supposed, offer inducements to many to avail
Glasgow is now performing her regular trips on themselves of so pleasant an excursion.
the Suwannee River between Columbus and For further particulars, apply to Messrs. D. P.
Cedar Keys. This boat is strongly built of the SMITH & Co., Columbus, Messrs. SMITH &
best materials and propelled by two engines, and HARRIS, Madison, Messrs. PUTNAM &
capable of carrying one hundred tons burthen, or RICHARDS, Cedar Keys, or to the undersigned.
400 bales of cotton, with suitable accomodations Columbus, Florida, January 22, 1848
for forty passengers, of light draft, requiring but JAMES TUCKER
seventeen inches water, thereby enabling her to And others, Proprietors
40







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
11ll lili! I II 1111II!lilI 1111111111
3 1262 09770 9991
Gilchrist County Journal, Print




Full Text

PAGE 1

A History of Levy County, Florida & & & Chapter Fourteen & & & June -1985 Published By The Levy County Archives Committee Sponsored by the Levy County Board of Commissioners Bronson, Florida A Bicentennial Publication

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Digitized by the Internet Archive in 2018 with funding from University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries https://archive.org/details/searchforyesterd1419levy

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EARLY NEWSPAPERS By Jack Holland Newspapers are the daily journals of a com munity’s activities. It is history recorded on site. You will find the chronicals of events which have shaped, are shaping, and will shape the develop ment of the area and growth of its people by reading its newspapers. This chapter takes a look at those Levy County newspapers that recorded the daily events of the people they served from the middle of the 1800’s to the present. The Florida Dispatch of Newsnansville is the oldest weekly newspaper of record to serve Levy County. The paper’s service began before the county was created out of a portion of the west ern portion of Alachua County in 1845. Many subscribers continued to receive the paper even after the establishment of the first newspaper of record in new county. Legal notices appeared in Dispatch as well as the Florida Times-Union, a young daily published in Jacksonville in the early years. The practice of using out-of-county news papers following the establishment of the first newspaper within the county was because of the need to reach all of the county residents. Early small weeklies had localized subscription lists. Levy County’s first newspaper of record was The Telegraph. The first publication appeared during January of 1860 in Cedar Key. The paper was published each Saturday by owner, Charles W. Blanchard. E. M. Graham served as editor. A reproduction of a front page of the Telegraph appears within this chapter and illustrates the typical “tombstone” appearance of newspapers of that era. The paper was entirely hand-set in a small shop in the island community. No dates has been determined when this paper ceased pub lication nor are there any indications it merged with other publications appearing on the scene in the early 1860’s. The Bronson Artery, published at Bronson, was in publication on October 24, 1874 and car ried legal advertising for the county. A paper must be published for 52 consecutive weeks to be considered an eligible newspaper for a special second-class mailing permit from the United States Postal Service. This was and still held as a general qualification for papers seeking to carry official notices for government agencies. Owners of the paper were J. Ira Gore and another man named Burford (last name). Burford was listed as editor. This was another small hand-set week ly. Records have not been found to establish the life-span of this newspaper. The Levy County Times began publication in 1879 in Bronson. County record reflect its name over the next several years; the last report being in late 1888. Research did not produce the name of the paper’s owner or editor. The Times is mentioned in later years in the Levy-Times Democrat as being a merger of a new weekly, The Democrat, with the older paper, The Levy County Times. The Democrat began its publi cation in 1892 and the first edition carried in its masthead the name, The Levy-Times Democrat. Two brothers, J. Ira and F. S. Gore began the weekly newspaper, Florida State Journal in Cedar Key during January 1875. Ira Gore served as editor until around 1883. Records of news clippings show Dr. R. H. Mcllvane was serving as editor during 1877. This newspaper provided local news and news from around the nation and a few foreign countries brought in by the sailing ships. The paper was published on Saturdays. A year’s subscription was $2.00. This newspaper ceased publishing sometime in the middle or late 1880’s. From 1890 through 1905 there were frequent changes in ownership and number of newspapers serving the county. J. Ira Gore, one of the ori ginal owner-publishers of the Florida State Journal, Cedar Key, showed up in records of The Cedar Key Commercial, dated April 12, 1890 as editor. It could not be determined if Gore was the owner of this short-lived news paper. The Levy Times-Democrat, a combination of a new and an old newspaper, was first published in Bronson by O. J. Farmer. (See The Levy County Times above.) Farmer served as editor in the early years. P. B. Butler served as editor during 1915. Other editors were J. C. Sale, 1916; Lydia Bell, 1919; and, Farmer again as editor in 1920. He had moved to Jacksonville during the inter vening years and worked as a reporter for the Florida Times-Union. Farmer sold The Levy Times-Democrat to G. M. Sheppard and L. E. Vause in the early 1920’s. The Times-Democrat did job printing. This ex tra activity of printing billheads, stationary items, programs, etc., became a way-of-life for 1

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R. B. Child, editor and publisher of the Levy County Journal, 1928 to his death in the Fifties.

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Three county editors join the “Goldwater Team”, left to right are Jack Holland, Chiefland Citizen; Leonard Hayes, Suwannee Valley News; team leader, Herman Wellman; Elton Cobb, Levy County Journal; and, Frank Weaver, foreman of the Citizen plant. (Taken during the Sixties.) 4

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small rural newspapers to make needed money. Today you will find most small weeklies having commercial printing and stationary departmegts in with their publishing business. It was noted from the issues of The Levy Times Democrat that it did a good job covering the local scene, including local government. The Levy Times-Democrat merged several times. It merged with The Levy County News, The Williston Sun, The Williston News, and the Suwannee Valley Sun-News. Legal documents in the Levy County court house revealed a weekly newspaper, The Cedar Key Commercial, was in existence April 12, 1890. Its editor was J. Ira Gore according to the sig nature on the “Notice of Publication” attached to the documents. The clippings contained no paper date or volume number to assist in esta blishing how long the paper had been in publica tion. Records show that Gore was affiliated with three of the early newspapers of Cedar Key. The Gulf Coaster, another weekly newspaper, published in Cedar Key during 1893 was identi fied through courthouse records. The editor was listed “Editor” Corr. No other mention of the paper or Corr was found. Two more weeklies were found in the court house records. The Cedar Key Hustler was being published in 1902 in the island city. The Levy County Advocate was identified through the court records as being published in Bronson in 1904. These papers’ publishers and editors have not been unearthed. Records of the early 1900’s showed conditions stable among the county’s newspapers. The Levy Times-Democrat was the largest of the papers and the only paper that appears continuously during this era. The Williston Progress, publish ed in Williston, was identified as the only new paper during this period. The Progress editor was J. T. Lewis and the only issue available for veri fication was during 1918. The arrival of the 1920’s heralded a host of new newspapers, mergers, sales, and termina tions of existing papers. The Williston Sun began publication in 1921 at Williston. The first publishers were Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Miller. Mr. Miller was the first editor. L. E. Vause and G. M. Sheppard leased the newspaper from the Millers in 1925. A little later, Vause purchased The Williston Sun and ran it for many years. The first issue of the Sun after the lease carried “Successor to the Levy Times-Democrat—Cedar Key Breeze” in its masthead. R. J. Holly bought The Williston Sun from L. E. Vause and after a few months of publish ing the paper he changed the masthead to read, “The Williston News.” This masthead carried a subhead stating it was the successor to The Williston Sun and The Levy Times-Democrat. The Williston Sun was purchased by Jack Holland and he continued to print it as The Williston News. Several years later Holland sold the newspaper to Louie Wadsworth who changed the name back to The Williston Sun. Bess Williams bought the Sun in 1970 and merged it with her own paper. The Suwannee Valley News to form The Suwannee Valley Sun-News. Among the editors of the Williston paper be sides Miller were: Vause, Holly, Holland, Lamar Nash, Emma Rene Weaver, and Williams. I. B. Hilson began his publication, The Levy County News at Bronson in 1923. His brother, J. F. Hilson, served as the first editor and J. L. Santerfeit served as associate editor. On January 28, 1927 the newspaper sold to L. E. Vause who merged it with The Levy Times-Democrat. The new masthead showed the main line to be The Levy County News and a small secondary line read, “The Levy Times-Democrat.” The first editor of the merger was George Sheaff. He was followed by Henry Coulter. This paper was pub lished on Fridays. One of the unique facts about this particular paper was it had an oil editor, Robert L. Steffey. The Cedar Key Breeze was a weekly newspaper printed in Williston and published in Cedar Key. It was owned by G. M. Sheppard and L. E. Vause. They began publishing the paper in 1923. A few months after publishing the Breeze, Vause and Sheppard leased The Williston Sun (May 8, 1925). The Breeze appeared in the first leased issue of the Sun as a subhead, in the mast head along with The Levy Times-Democrat. Both papers were dropped temporarily from the Sun’s masthead on March 11, 1926. This was also the week The Levy Times-Democrat appeared as a Bronson paper. The Breeze did not appear in either of the two papers’ masthead. The Island City News appears a few months later in Cedar Key showing Vause as owner-publisher (Oct. 14, 1927). The Island City News was published for over two years before disappearing from the news paper scene. Vause served as the first editor and J. L. Taylor served as the second and final editor of the small newspaper. The first issue of The Levy County Journal appeared May 1, 1928 with Roy B. Child as pub lisher and editor. It was published in Bronson, the county site. Child was from Moore Haven where he published The Glades County Demo crat before coming to Bronson. The Journal’s 6

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THE LEVY COUNTY NEWS 8

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ownership was left in trust after his death in the mid-1950’s to his four daughters, Betty, Neva, Anna Bea, and Royala. Child’s brother-in-law, Elton Cobb, leased the newspaper from the trustees and served as editor for several years. Cobb purchased the Journal in the early sixties. The Chiefland Citizen was started by Jack Holland October 19, 1950. The paper was print ed in Bronson and published in Chiefland during the fifties. In the sixties the printing plant was moved to Chiefland. The Citizen began as a tabloid size newspaper and later changed into the full-size. It was the county’s first of the old style newspaper to make the change from setting type by linotype machines to the photo process. Hol land sold the Citizen to Walter Wilson in 1973. Wilson brought the first roll-fed press into the county when he installed a 2-unit Community Goss. A few years later Wilson put in two more units. The Suwannee Valley News was first published in Chiefland in June of 1963. After three weeks the weekly moved its operation to Williston. The first owner-editor was Leonard Hayes, Jr. and his wife, Nelle, was the paper’s editor. The Suwannee Valley News was the first totally offset newspaper in the county. Hayes sold the paper to Warren Torlay, Jr. in November of 1963. Other owner-publishers were John Banks, Gordon Rhieker and his brother-in-law, Ken Smith, and Bess Williams. Williams bought out Smith se veral months later. Williams purchased The Williston Sun from Louie Wadsworth in late 1970. The youngest newspaper in Levy County his tory is also the oldest newspaper. That paper is the Suwannee Valley Sun-News. It is a descendand of The Levy County Times established in 1879 in Williston. On the adjacent page is a table showing the lineage from the Times down to the Sun-News. It is interesting to note the same publisher at one time or another owned the ma jority of the newspapers in this long chain. The publisher was L. E. Vause. The four-year period, 1925 through 1929, saw newspaper merging with and emerging from each other. It was not disclosed why the switching of newspaper names from one to another and from town to town occurred. Several events occurred during this four-year period which may provide clues for the numerous shifts in the names of the newspapers. One was the boom of the mid-twenties that saw Levy County caught up in economic development with the prospects of this area becoming an oil field. There were several oil wells drilled around the county. A well near Cedar Key did produce a low-grade oil at the rate of a few barrels a day. This well was still active during the early thirties. Second events were two major hurricanes—one in 1927 and the other in 1928. These hurricanes did considerable damage to the county and caused millions of dollars in damage and the heavy loss of life in the Lake Okeechobee area. Roy Child was publishing The Glades County Democrat at Moore Haven during the 1927 hur ricane. A third event was the crash of 1928 with the resulting financial losses. It was during this later period of the four years that one of the largest tax lists was published. It had to run in the newspaper selected as the “official organ of the county commission.” The last shift in the news paper names occurred shortly after the publica tion o/ the tax list. Many of the mastheads of various newspapers appear to be the same paper. Examine them closely, you will find other newspapers identified as being a part of that particular paper. This was and still is a legal maneuver to preserve the legal status of a newspaper in order it could carry public notices. If you look at the dates and the names of the mastheads of the several news papers shown on pages appearing within this chapter you will see many of these piggy-back changes. Several editors, publishers, and contributors were celebrities of sorts during their newspaper careers. L. E. Vause served as president of the Florida Press Association and was very active in the organization for many years. Roy Child served on the Board of Trustees of the Bronson High School. Ken Smith served as State Repre sentative from this district. Louie Wadsworth and Jack Holland produced award-winning newspapers and served on the executive board of the state press association. Wadsworth served as president of the association and was a National Guard General. Holland served as mayorcommissioner of Chiefland and was an Army Colonel. Elton Cobb served on the Bronson City Council. O. J. Farmer and Warren Torlay were outstanding daily newspapermen. J. Ira Gore was noted for his dedication in providing the area with newspapers in the early years. Walter Wilson served on Chiefland’s Planning and Zon ing Board. Bess Williams was the county’s first lady publisher. There have been several lay-persons who have made contributions in the newspaper field through their articles of historical nature. T. R. Hodges of Cedar Key, William Coulter of Bronson, and Ruth Verrell of Chiefland enriched readers with articles about the culture, folklore, 9

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Inside of an early printing and publishing plant. Ruddy Janney is shown working an early model linotype machine. Hand-feeding one of the old two-page flat bed presses is Jim Evans. 10

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Kay Langford setting type on an old Model 5 Linotype. 11

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and governments of the times of which they wrote. There probably is not a family in the county, whose roots go back at least three de cades or more, that has not had one of its mem bers work as correspondent or columnist for one of Levy CountyÂ’s newspapers. Other long-time newspaper people who wrote or printed for the county papers include Macie Petersen, Emma Lee Loften, Frank Weaver and Norwood Ishie. Levy County witnessed its newspapers progress from hand-set, hand-fed equipment, through the hot metal stage of linotypes and casting boxes, to cold type and web-fed presses of the offset era. The Levy County Journal, until early 1983, was one of two weekly newspapers in Florida still being produced by the hot metal process. When the Journal went offset it left the Bristol news paper in West Florida as the sole survivor of the old method of production. The first offset paper in the county was a small tabloid paper, The Suwannee Valley News. The Chiefland Citizen quickly followed the trend to offset. When Wal ter Wilson bought the Chiefland paper he en larged the capacity of the equipment by expand ing the computer typesetting system and install ing the first web-fed press. The press was a Community Goss capable of printing eight pages on one press run. A few years later Wilson added two additional units and raised the capacity of the press to run 16 full-size pages. In the early eighties The Chiefland Citizen was printing all of the weekly newspapers in the tri-county area. One of the ways to tell the old newspapers and their offices was by the smell of printerÂ’s ink and molten metal. The offices of todayÂ’s newspapers smell more of chemicals. It was learned during the research for this chapter on the newspapers of Levy County that most happenings occur in cycles. The eighties saw a revitalization of local Chamber of Com merces. History, or the newspaper records, re vealed Cedar Key, Williston and Bronson each had their own chambers in the twenties and the early 1900Â’s. The economy has been the concern each quarter century. Promoters appear period ically promoting oil, specialty agriculture crops, barge ports and canal, railroads and highways, and even citrus production. The last grove of commercial status disappeared after the big freeze of 1898. Three cars were given away as prizes in one of the largest subscription drives ever held by week ly newspapers. The contest was held during 1928 by The Williston Sun, The Levy County News, and The Island City News. The cars were a 1928 Chrysler, a Ford sedan, and a Ford Roadster. Alma Clark won the Chrysler, Harriet Whiddon won one of the Fords and Mary West won the other. An oil drilling spree began in June of 1943 led by Colonel Frank Thompson and William A. Pollard. This was the second time in twenty years the area was excited by the possibility of oil be ing discovered in the county. Several wells were drilled in the sand hills west of the BronsonWilliston highway. No oil was found but the drillers did strike salt water. It was an artesian well and had to be capped to keep the salty water from killing the trees in the path of its stream. Montbrook Army Air Base, located near the community of Montbrook, was very active dur ing 1942-43. Victories in Europe and the South Pacific brought an early closing of the camp in late 1943. A skeleton crew remained at the base until the end of the war. L. E. Vause, Jr., son of publisher Vause of The Williston Sun, was killed in Europe during December of 1942. Young Vause was the navi gator for a bomber crew. Elections were always big news for the early newspaper. The tradition of gathering at the newspaper offices to get the election returns were looked forward to by young and old. This bi annual event continued until the county went from hand ballots to the use of voting machines. The Williston and Cedar Key papers usually put up make-shift tally boards for the local citi zens to keep count of the votes each candidate received by precinct. For years The Levy County Journal and The Chiefland Citizen sponsored a tally board at the courthouse where final returns by precinct were officially reported. Television, computers and voting machines drew the curtain on the night-long wait on the counting of hand ballots and posting of results of each race on the tally boards. OLD-TIME DEFINITIONS OF THE NEWSPAPER TRADE Press Run: one run of the printing press that produced two pages of a newspaper. An eightpage paper required four press runs. Quoins and Quoin Key: quoins came in pairs and were wedge-shaped; used with a quoin key to lock type in printing frames. Hell Box: a box that held last weekÂ’s news paper type slugs to be remelted. Kill Sheet: a marked copy of last weekÂ’s paper showing what type to be thrown in the hell box. Make-up Rule: a small two-inch steel scrape, which is used to scrape the bottom of linotype 12

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ISLAND CITY NEWS THfc OULF %  Tht htmd £*>' CEDAR KEY, FLA.,' FRIDAY. DECEMBER 2,1927 NUMBER l L MENTION i [Assessment books accepted by council I* GIVING CITY LARGEST TOTAL ASSESSMENT Mi kctDH Kim MtUm i r h TaMkri Mr Trm I T DtHob w M Jut i a a* m i lkMa.1 •r> MM M Hn f T DmoiT" %  Ml i a i MM CUy TWOac tlMBM. Ir and Mn Ta Mi l KM( KBt a Ms am M AtMr Mi ry Dana vbo to n \ toM and M id vnb tok faiaata. In P o M C Utoch aari Many *mm aauM M Ft VMM Mmtoj Mr CtoarMa a m cm— Cedar Key School News ---, haard t ac earner dew The total i ii 11 nr H J— wuhe %  noted to P1W with i for wtdowe to mm to v I Pu p to n fifth I I top. 1 Yte tott p* tor* ito to* i Mn Bath tore* and Bttlr eon'Bad daughter. to Bryevelllr —act ormral Man to too island City ton vast wttfi for eatchtof nuDrt to to P—nhrr l vts January to The (MeMdtof Thank-m— to M a d m and Mn LIm lotonil to Mto JaetoBBrOAc. w to ttv Itoaatf City aaturdsy and htoa; totottof reft* Club both bald their i fbbermen ham koeo maklaf war pood cateba the toot low Aaa toon wtth Ms permits. Mr mi J. Conway Mr J C Frtoetor toft Ten Bey for Lake Bottor to aoarpt a padtlan WP wtoh Mm sin— to Me now adoMr^TJl^ Wm m stored to < Mr Bam Bha. a —tr %  1 Mm. Mrs. J. Jlamtoe. Mr W F ABmd hm atarwed Imme tram Loaksruie Mia. where hr hae ~—... • Monday to totoltot ctooa tost* cradt wr atoto to wrttr hnprampcu para* frapba sc "What I Would Do With a May them food to oat ato m ‘ Mm %  to tt fiTthe" t ha—n't a toto and money a I would to to < tof with their a mr u gm Janet t.w a Mural Boddicfc to Thry haw neither has atom c tardy durlav thr month. Wo hope t i ahnnt an aoooaat to htom a enjoyed the Tbaakagm— %  toy touch and nme to to (to to %  By (to wtfo)—OWton i wtrr you not o hrtoc your mother with you? Wlfir—That* what tow wacu to am Hello, hallo, to thto 1 autos Taa urta Ta who to it? to minima owwakhi to tow aaall daofhtrr to thr bousr Too my your toner Baton to the oldat, and who and •* a 0ood < KOhaum too in attaadtot the Wo* emne Oanoft to Tins ha an. ant a >w day* wnb M Mr J • the dty 1 hn nt to e trip hero Mr I C Wadley a Nrona Wadley back to i itata* after apont the and Mn. W i to Tailour* ham already ham tht Itoaad City Mr Marched to | oral manager to HtB Basal dtoeaa %  Mr Carlton' Maonrv to WIBto •.KOI Ik 1 >d O H dtM jhto parents Mr and Mn Maaoa Mr and Mn Randolph Owe n of Mn I L. Thytar wa 1 had left 1 htott wtth ton mate X woil i a atoeet ar the other day a i and hto wtfo aw a aoct T oa ch I m ad I arm ae one. toM hto wife. Without w un d art at whae It to goto* Aoa Lou-I hope you are torrytoM tod) tor—DM pen i wtth the waar papi Ato I the toilet hop Wet thto aonaa oar and nv tkr etothae. with %  to thr aonoy 1 would help the poor j Um whMdmgtoa. to Mr and orphan chfldren. Thto the money Thn owk tot fit la a pit to oat. I lad left I would take prtpa ma the ^ oa ra a W tU don't oat It ihen. world and Ian aore about It than X mk Luca, to to-rf.—Wh: do you MVTBODIBT cmCP WOT** harm* to oohooL I warn by mount to ariao: with your Mto Mart Hak who to a ttondhn' ^ mndoy school Ft— ram was a M a nut l .lair to this dtoyrac-iM ccmd uon’ eehoc’ to Oair-rclDe open: Thanksftrjinny*; *c Last fc.mia* aortunc.' UVLUH GRADE Dert)—No eoc.fc ra-rv ^ tnr tr thr oty euittor reJauwe and j. ^ricr wwai -ry. r or Kn Man Ttw eemnth freer u flad to' ham Mjs> Lucs—Can; 70r r friends JJoyce. fupertotanAto .. wnb charye of \:*re Lanr'oo earr.r hrL 1 taibr* s ccrTt’ aaM; ~ m lrihtn and ,h dereticnal oemae a uaua* ther. The srwnih trade tTested the edit* Herv—N d hair. muir. B B tw-v returned Frida' arr-^jt^d that theiworn to he not cr-s for the room Friday Pot U Mr Carr.fv-So i* rrrjr •* al Mr Fadsir.—By frowLn? a: thr “ toe*ry. • were the rue'V of their %  ’ *^7*re:.M Mn Busw Bishop 8urJ.irrr. cf W’io were to thr Island C;ry Jrat week nataw ton Hoothbys 1rom 1 T ’ “ W frtrndB “.-leitrre free Poland At thh thw Thr fol’owrar were eiected *"* oetlle |Miss Alta Kirchhahe came to with Lorna Baker. Fretodent:hby a parents Mr and Mn haw Bern | iher cha of fhU. each betof droaed to Thetosa Fneel Bocrvtarr Mean Alex Kepote Arttofton 'tonI ** D “ ) M nj,
[r a t x heir wort all show 'barman edl fa damme wp We pair of women land City Iwhat e muslr-lortnt net ton Fotond Is e waned our wi n dows. Black boards aid : —__ and bow dorply rellfious Brr *080* aoas of the knys rakad the y ardlesa CBtOAt FmOGRAll AT MWOOL Mr and Mn B F OrtfT were Only their reheioAu machine has %  ype art eorry lhat Km wood Idh kas i ___ 14

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Jack Holland, editor and publisher of the Chiefland Citizen, 1950-1973. 16

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slugs, remove and replace corrections, and gen eral space out page forms in printing chases. Leads and Slugs: type-high lead or brass ma terial used to space between lines of type to fill or tighten a page form. Type Lice: all of the unseen gremlins that cause letters, words, and other mysterious events to occur with type. Casting Box: a box that you place a mold (mat) to form a casting of type, figure or an ad which has been pre-matted. Mats and Matrixs: most common name for the brass molds of letters used by casting machines. Tag Line: an identification line at the begin ning of a news story to be able to locate it in the galley bank. Heads: a short name for headlines. Printer’s Devil: a novice or apprentice in the composing department of a newspaper or print shop. Slug Cutter: a device used to cut slugs and rules the appropriate length to fit type forms. Type: individual letters, figures, or symbols casted in lead or brass either singularly or to gether. Linotype: a machine that sets type in metal (lead) for newspaper and print shop composition. Cut: short name for an engraving used to print pictures on paper. Rule: strips of various widths of metal used to produce printed solid line border. Metal: a mixture of lead, tin, and zinc used in several type of casting machines to produce type. Wood and Metal Furniture: large pre-sized metal or wood spacing material to fill large voids in page forms. Make-up: the putting together of all type, heads, spacing materials within a printing frame to form a page of the newspaper. Put to Bed: when the last run of the last two pages have run through the press and everyone is ready to go home. Scoop: a news story of considerable impor tance that you publish before your competitors. Correspondent, Stringer: people who work parttime in the outlying areas of a paper’s circu lation area gathering news. “Thirty” or Dingbat: a symbol used at the end of a news story to signal the end of the story. Chase: a steel picture frame device used to place type to form a newspaper page. Plane: a wooden block placed on a type form and struck by a mallet to insure that all type is level. Galley: long metal trays where completed type set stories are stored ready to be placed into pro per pages. Proof: a single reproduction of a galley or page of type to be read for errors and used to make identified corrections. Corrections: normally refers to linotype type corrections made from a galley proof and to be inserted in place of the type with the error. A Tail: a piece of cardboard attached to a mat (paper mold) to keep metal from running behind the mat when it is casted. Scratch: means to remove a story or ad from an edition of the newspaper. Ad: where the money is made. Businesses ad vertising their goods and services in the news paper. Obit: a short title for obituary or death notices. Sorts: odd combinations of letters; ie, ff’s, ffi, ffl, etc., cast on one body in order to save space. ABOUT THE WRITER—JACK M. HOLLAND Parents were Jack and Rubye Holland, timber (cross-ties) and merchants in Bronson in the early thirties and forties. He graduated from Bronson High School in 1941, attended the University of Florida. Drafted into the army and served with General George Patton’s 3rd U.S. Army. He returned to the University after the war and graduated with a BAJ degree in 1949. He continued his army career as an active reservist, rising to the rank of Colonel. He started the newspaper, The Chiefland Citizen, in 1950 and sold it 23 years later to the present owner, Walter Wilson. Holland was with the Levy County School sys tem for four years where he developed the Adult and Community Education program which the county has today. He is currently serving as Chief Analyst for the House of Representatives Committee on Gov ernmental Operations. He served four years as the Staff Director of the House Agriculture Committee before being asked by the Speaker of the House and Rep. Gene Hodges to take over his current position. He is married to the former Neva Child of Bronson and they have one son, Jack Martin Holland, III. Holland has two daughters, Jeri and Joan, by a previous marriage. In college he was a member of the Theta Chi fraternity and was selected to be a member in Sigma Delta Chi, honorary journalist fraternity. 17

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S>uuiantH$ ‘SERVING SUWANNEE VALLE 10 eeita PM NpUIB SURROUNDING AREA” anruM). um corn. pul %  moor, m s. m %  B*fct F* Watermelon Festival Narcotic* I t wo Directors Meet J Auto-Truck Sri ffln't ninu; eos aUnd on'ilne Goturdo? Diet! ad a Mttntid tioo eortb of aorcotics eos tokos. %  ollis Griffis, sroprletor of tbe phoraoc?. sold the is truder presunabl? cost isto the-store through • bock tond <* The lock eos brokes os tbo norcotlco cobipot ood it bod booo priod opos. The opened bock tondo. ooo discovered Sunday oorsist Depot? toorlff Pete Holth of tUlistai lsoestiiotod tbo incident §ar oimtv a Directors for ftieflood* s IOtb onnuol toter Sfl? •cJbCulod for Jtae IS. set Tuesday oiht ot at? toll in Oiieflad >th Uoc President HoltolllMy prosldic* Parpoof of tbo sorting ooo to ooke oeoi-flaol r' forth? fOrtbc'Oisd footiool ad porvde It tb • picture fn on OcTl etle?; Police Chief Resigns Post %  rs Hortso Mortis Horn t. left to right are: kit Crteett, Hort? %  oT (Prt tolffin. Hoi Hoilido? ^Hollow, arc war i to, boj mu an •nooso Club Preoldeot ood Jlso? Mrs. G>||er First Subscriber %  re. local a Golfer Mrs eifeolo Gel per. o? Life — --Icdeadent Life Insurosce uat f (hieflond. ho rat tbo 71; st -ubsrriber to the GDIANNEX; XL r teas Naos of oibocrlbers sill bo istod is mt edition of tbe %  ext seek’ You will find sttb< 110110 blako eloeaoro in biO lOBiO. Irfaleflaud Holds Reading Fgrm. tbo vocstltn rsodisf prorn. oponared by tbe Cen tral Florid, hagiaol Library bo cos ot tbo Chleflad Libror? Hondo?. Mra Predlo Etheridge lo ad llbrorla urges tin aildra to roclster for tbe pro(TV Children registering for tbo club during tookey Bear* o rlolt Mieedo? afternoon. re ceived o aoko Boor but ten. o rood ad color bob. tbe eatoerootia pledge ad o bookart. heb saber keeps his oa resdisi record tod list of libror? books rood arise tbo %  aoer. Ike caersl public is apeuraged to rood t oortet? of book, durisf tbo aimer Mrs Etheridge sold, to “increase their pleasure ad known die elts tbeir reeding skills Ike resihoc procra will oostisuo tbroucb Aug 24. Ot? QOacfi lob oifbt teetpo tot 11 %  ‘ fit tl on ot Pebct On* J. C. OtrUn Da Oven vu sprint id a o Mol bon. b? to. oaifil to 00 ilace corbie, tat be raiaod oftenocn. yittTPan as police dsttf for bessacji raMaas Ris rwafnatiac was %  C r eti n f iamcdlAte)7 Cu /Y£W$ AUTO RAMS HOUSE TRAILER; NO INJURIES _4 IBM Plvaoutb. drives hr %  run N. UdoJl ftevidence, L 1, crashed isto tbe back of t vxioe-tisiler ot tbe ermff'r .-ght os sooth tats Si is ^ 'loud. Tueutay ot 1:55 p.o Tbe driver pf tbo cor pull ing the trailer eos Orrille SC: is of Clooratrr. Tkorsere or lsjurles in tbo Hobos Trooper J I tode ootiat oo daosos tc b(XS ve hicles ot rso I j -i Smoker Bear To Vlsli Bake? Boor vloltod tbo Od or Ke? Libror? ot II o.a. led. to louocb the Baoko? Boor hading Club The reading rrogra spon sored to Friends c t the Lib rary. em include s otor? hour st tbe libror? each Bed sends? aornlng durisc durlsc tb* user, beginning ot tbe close pf Vocation Bible %  total. At s recat aeetlsc of tbe Prlads of tbe Libror?. Mrs Some Turner, choimnn. re pined tbe oehievaento oi tbe uundisi libror? to tbe addltia of a on book she]f s see bullet is board, teo folding choirs for children ad tso tons The libror? is o brooch of tbe Oatrol Florida declass] Libror? s?ota ad is o pub lic libror? for tbe use or ev eryone is tbo commit? Mrs. Turner added. Ike Prlads ore pi.noise s used book ale for Coder Kto. ad paople ao ns to dsote hooks ao? lave their c ala is tbe libror? These olll be artod ad tbe best ones add ed to tbe aelves. Mule top11 cotes eiTl be sold fcrlO and 2b oats each is front of tbe libror? oath toturday o a Tbe puteodi fra these sola toll be uted ftr future llbrVT Midl too. Turner sold such credit for tbe success ; lut. opproxlutoX? 6 feet I fna tbe oater line Tbe dri ver of tbe truck no charged volved in a accidat ot 1st. 33P ad Alt. 27 Hondo? o.a. with Inproper of lo_ ae Boleoter, ococants of tbe car. sere tnk a to (toineoville Medical cen ter to Bloor Dddscn totailace Service tow Boleoter suffered ioc-t eratlons tf tbe bead, neck ad back and to Bdester received bruises and conus ions of tbe chat. Bolt eere kept over night ad released to and Mrs Boleoter listed their address l£ 185 presoott Ave Staten Island. K T. Transport at Otter Overturns Creek I Jinv tone as Staking tbe %  transport off the truck is the above photo ebeo both truck ad trasport began sliding si dents. tone mated to loop clear a tbe transport overturned There eere Du injuria in the OKldat. Ike transporl is coned to —-Illinois Gloss Co. 19

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Louie Wadsworth, editor of the Williston Sun in the mid-sixties, shown at a dress-ball of the Florida Press Association. 20

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His army record shows that he served in Europe earning Meritorious Unit Citation, Good Conduct Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, two Combat Stars, and Reserve Medal for his ser vices. Holland served six years as Mayor-Com missioner of the City of Chiefland. He was Levy County’s initial appointee to the Suwannee River Authority by Gov. Collins. He has served num erous boards and councils of state government. He is a charter member of both the Bronson and Chiefland Lions Clubs, serving as the first secretary of the Bronson Club and later serving as President of the Chiefland Club. His member ship in the Chiefland Club extends nearly 30 years. He is both an artist and a writer. Many local people have pieces of his work in art. His most recent book, “The Reception Station”, is a story of many of the local men and women who had served in the area’s oldest and largest U.S. Army Reserve unit. He has two new book releases out shortly. 21

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Ken Smith, editor of the Suwannee Valley News during the early to mid-sixties. 22 n

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18S0 I860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 23 Levy County Newspapers Published During Past 140 Years

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The Family Tree of the Oldest Newspaper in the County 24

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\\ %  THE • WILLISTON • rirv *iun nru/wi vrv nrm ‘’I’ •. LEVY TIMES DEMOCRAT OIDAR KEY BREEZE PUBLISHED IN THE HEART OP THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION OP Up whjjron, ujvt ONE HUNDRED CARS CUCUMBERS SIPPED FIOH HERE Jblc£ CROP JtOMATOES AND WATERMELONS af Ml tnrraaMal util VilMi) Ik* BhMH m Imudlkt AC M (aak tar *m*t*4 PREVHCt STEM^t • END. ROT ) OP MELONS LOCAL IIEIS ^DSONAL ;> t WMttflj! ./ MM sSAisi 9 v’skwLS •kaa ktu t w Mi hr* Mia u TMfel hM UI Klin MM tk* n w rkW ala* larludw • Mmf Al-, MAT im FLORIDA. ’ ValanilM laaa u k*a Kt la* nu mm ruift tka IW Km Dr. 0 l‘ Uat f *kolactt N Ufteihartl III — b* wklek Mill in 4 m mmrm hmm Ik (mb Mm> ka aaaC Im WNm nTlIrkt Ul4 m iU fH* H Uka** kw MUM pa* Ml jjjff h MMtaa fm ** It 0| CUifcCi rmn at Jack •a* Vkk jr HUSTON REAL : • ESTATE NOW ON BOOH ’ aUKkifi^b i! LAND VALUES DOEASNC TWO SUBDIVISION# TO BE OPENED / WEEK OP MAY Bl .i .CHURCH NEWS MOTHERS DAY TO RE OBSERVED Tki 1. V> .. kfl *• M|knUA|Hc **THlhflNlF COWMat," aatoat a aaiaua %  • lioa at MMrrlam Tkundar araakij fctka wklrl af as*U* MM Dak I % % %  I — 1 -•*waiuua WOIua kkfali IM aabtlaMM. *a %  m tract aa Paatl ak aaU* *l Ckunh Am. la Mac rr*f*rn ..i Mill la. *m~ E NEED FIRE PROTECTION, CITY HALL, FIRE STATION, TOURIST CAMP, PARK, WHITE WAY, BONDS WILL DO if W ^ -L-i. PU BUSHED IN THE HEART OP THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION OF FLORIDA BEST CLIMATE AND SOIL IN FLORIDA WILUSTON, FLORIDA, APRIL BJWA NEWS SECTION ill j* %  i i .v.t CONSOLIDATION A FACT %  > 25

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COUNTY HAS FOUR MAIN STAIR HIGHWAYS AND FIVE RAILROADS hr mt SimrB-Srmnrrat LEV^COUNTY’S OLDEST NEWSPAPER “ BRONSON, FLORIDA. THURSDAY MARCH2S.il COMMISSIONERS LET ROAD CONTRACTS > m CONSIDERS NEED 'SJT^T r !" BRONSON C Of C SPECIAL SESSMM S0UM6. —I HOLDS MEETINC f h a Mfc nkN an n ‘^ *** %  %  M Ik. an • %  — %  U • k --*%  5 ” “ iad It Several Important Road Projects Contracted for. • Right of .Way fof 19 to be 'hi •)T. C Jl ** H > COUNTY NEWS THE LEVY ONLY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED AND PRINTED IN BRONSON, THE COUNTY SEAT OF LEVY COUNTY. IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEART OF STATE FLORID JV.C 1, NUMBER 38. BRONSON, LEVY COUNTY. FLORIDA. APRIL 8th. 1926 $1.50 A YE^ iting of I Notes of Court Commissioners 1 Proceedings > Sp* ijI M inly t omini ounl), SUiU*Mk> Office : March. A mg mi mberv a-wit — V. R. Hodge*, P. Kimble, I M Ojratt, i ling of the Uo:rl MoiM-rs in ami fur of Florida held at on this the 27th D. l'J2G, with the of the Uoard pres* Chairman, r • v---.. Cirruit Court opened Monday A. M. with Judge A. V. Long providing, with all other attaches of the court pres ent The court in giving the charge to the Grand Jury was a very instruc tive charge. As to their duties. The Grand Jury fininhed their wort MonFULL PROCEEDINGS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Al a rrgulnr marling of thr Itnarvi of County CunimositiniTK, in and for 1 0 y Cnunl), held at thr Cirri’.. Offitv in llron-on, Kl:i. ( on this the 2nd dny of April A. D. r.W., with Uir following month.-rs of thp Hoards proHont towit:— W K. HODC.tS, Chairman, J. P. KIMIII.K, U. M. CLVATT. W. 8 YKARTV, E. C. PRICE. STATE ROAD 13 TO PARALLEL R. Mr. W. R. Hodge*, Chairman of the Rourtl of County Comminaior after returning from TallahiKM*e where he was in confrrenre with the of ial* of the Stale Uoad Diiartim*nt, announce!I that State Kuad Number T teen has been designated and will be built directly beside the Seaboard Line Railway through Levy County, passing through the towns of Mered Itroiison, Lennon, Otter Creek, Kllsy, Wylly, Rosewood, Sumner and or Cellar Key. There has been much discussion as to the location n some saying that it should leave the railroad at Otter Croek a^B • NEED FIRE PROTECTION, CITY HALL, FIRE STATION, TOURIST CAMP, PARK, WHITE WAY, BONDS WILL DO IT BEST CLIMATE AND SOIL IN FLORIDA PUBLISHED IN THE HEART OF THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION OF FLORIDA A ND THE LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT W1UL1 jrrON. FLORIDA THURSDAyTaPRIL a. IS2S. NEWS SECTION alKiwanis Club Receives Charter Class High Receives Dmlomasilnp Rvmoc ftf lav THE LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT UIAL PUBLICATION or LEVY COUNTY DEDICATED TO THE PMOGEtBBlVl ADVAHCBMBNT OF TNI COD Nil FEBRUARY >1. 1,27 OF ENURE STATE BY COMMISSIONER MAYO NEBRASKA SAYS THE STATE OF FLORIDA IS SOU) __hpfaaTaM Apw %  Tima far Lawd CwH R i Nw Iha Iw It WIU. AID IN BUILDING ROADS •M BffiMl a Ctyiul llm i f w i b iM pUtN la IM Levy riw lf MU by O pa r Oatfl W. ft. WbMftaa. ytaad galfcy U bar* at rbtelalac wl la Mat a MnM ui (waived a *lw i at Ms amU a tbe aaaaty read. !• w> fc l Harad by Htttff L L ---* 1 1 ** ml laaiia FIGURES GIVEN ON SIX MONTHS SCHOOL PERIOD Ont Tkk Pkarida Ope ra n d That Ow U li an kutni MW*b #r Vlaride iHaai far a ptrM mt ala awlN or law dartaa IN ura of IMLM, wrdlag to flgum aMt pab lte by W. B. Caviboa. ruu ny LEVY COUNTY WAS FORMED BEFORE FLORIDA BECAME STATE ia c tiot Nomad For Firtt U. a Iwitiir Htrt Botmdod Bjr Water oo Thraa of Foot Sidaa %  Famowa for ite Mild Climate aad FortQa Soil d' COUNTY BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 26

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ISLAND CITY NEWS CEDAR KEY. VIA..' FRIDAY. DECEMBER 2.192? NUMBER -?| Assessment books accepted by council I* [L MENTION T GIVING CITY LARGEST TOTAL ASSESSMENT I Cedar Key School News lK, ii, — | IscreMt Id AiMMmesli TBit Yeer Ow Lul •>•—* Yeer 961,000; Most of Amount is Increase of m, m o I m*mru | ^.r***! Ten: Mills*. Not Fixed Yet "n. I UKIlAN ICKINTY YERS 3Eeta Cowiitg News OFrlCIAiORGAR Of LEVY COUNTY >R TO THE LE Y TiMES-DEMOCRATl HE W1LUSTON SUN AND THE ISLAND CITY NEWS Fmci a l Tubl'ic a tioJ %  >r''rr~vY~c 7 u'N Vv 'by. 5 if a tk to'thk pa oc a aaaTv 7 t a oVX~ l Nce int uror the c o u n t i WILLISTON. FLORIDA.THURSDAY DECEMBER 13th 1928 NUMBER 17 rSTBcraiWr^^l STORES THIS WEEK ARE taking on real undD ^br^^lu I CHRISTMAS APPEARANCE BUSINESS GOOD LT^^r CEDAR KEY CniAAl lirOfC' S r f<•i doeor.tiag awl putXDUUL ntffji ting on Christmas AinShop aarly campaigns ara doing thair bit and baying is getting Un *r t J r ^ — 1 %  DIES SUNDAY !:* %  *a* L laaaen u wu on loa anaw no! 1 ,fl *“• **' a |l "swkTAivw tuutmt ^^^odicatidg Florida Passanger Plano BEST CLIMATE AND SOIL IN I FLORIDA 1 PUBLISHED. IN THE HEART OF THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION OF FLORIDA SUCCESSOR TO THE LEVY TIMES-DEMOCRAT AND THE ISLAND CITY NEWS niAL n T u r \ r mvr county dedicated to the ttncnsmvr a n v a n c e m e n t o r, t %  r o i v t r WILLISTON. FLORIDA. THURSDAY JANUARY 17st 1929 NUMBER 22 WHUSTON SUN U ficYnjr ]Hf iTVTJhAr ” SIGHT YET MAKES APPEARENCE! Dots and Dashes by I ha Students MR s s.n s-^ no mm •* mm I m ssss* *•* %  tfs —w *rl HIM f t* tM* rw'ag r* *s a M Mr M *• s*d M m Bi —a •• N*t MlBi mt M Mtklr by Om Butii On* w *wt they tn a l f Ow ViWMn MmI I *i ‘.GOVERNORSTARTS COUNTY OFFICIALS BIG SUGAR MO! 0RGAN1ZETUESDAY n cwurroa Ja it o m D<*a Tn a —— %  Oisa us Ilms I S < s M Taa, m na la Os • am* u Mason, ua MOM U I no non n —T W a 1 aM Oioa MS a a i ^ Honor a Oanr Hot Oinil nat oanol ua o oin a ao ins m so. na na a St as a can ons J J %  1 %  R'i gnuuattup; 10 CPBlI p Nnus “SERVING SUWANNEE VALlEY^ANDySURROUNDING AREA” U I 1 odvuv. uvr ctum. rjl mmbms. jm j. A Bgbt Pages Watermelon Festival Narcotics I Two lidured In Directors Meet IStolan From I !" 27

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OTLUITOM. rUMUDA tkumdat, ocroacn i, iro tot Ml no. (I Peanuts To Be Special Show At The County Fair Next Month TmNew Business Askew, Chile;. Shewn, O^Here Be vis And Kiik Winners In Tuesday's Election MM-rtanfe tot tuto r %  It UMBOOf tMfftf liuru Own I I —in •• Lr*T r—r y Fair at in pet Ne*. J-7 la* yeamklk iu •) Vtw w Imd n an 4 Hm W pM din nil hi ha mi m hy *> pRtitn t *t Ini. OaWWn (l)USD^Cidi Thithleann n ( 2 ) Greet*.' ifpiimri ae • h* mmm n hat ymi tmry %  SieaMy aad h n^m ni el pui> p a mn %  eW n pn • heft. (Sj Mi fie' ^erakkry Un W U ho euM awto Owe d created In retry %  Os nn. HirSn !" ?.i Red Devils Lou nn ef r tanr a n i r enapnm 0 m = i SeCOfKl ClMf a^'ntiretinnii B\' Bif ScOFf %  Meat to tor W matter area J ^ ^ Wr Oni i Od • k 2J02 ned tfiH pen • W (Ml) id tUi ( •n’m lsee- m iSr ceaeiy nd thru eett um mm Id Fn Csm (hertit) IntelMh. 1412 eed 4 i-. 7*0 h h c A. Kith. 103. Lherd. 27 VoAoMM.N^ti he (Elrieflanh (Eitizen MtUM el CbUfi load, IbrUa fit Cm V **• l*MMM BCTACUUKD UN CanETUUI* PIXUIU IMM SINGLE COPY 10c nm.. Dual a. 1*71 l*vy County Farmers Are Signing Up Before The March 10 Deadline Cnh far Mini Bmkk CIM bar •m mw a* Willislon High School Suffers $15,000 Fire Damage Last Thursday / i StJ the Beat Investment -U. S. Savings Bonds • Kaep On Buying Them Back Your Own Future By Putting Every Spar* Dollar In Savings Bonds vki > i Going On Now At Chiefland EHBirrj; rJ'.V..•SmSLVtf-AZ a* latheredgei. | **VT r. At Trenton Sale Tuesday to tto seta ihia vane rtt too atoi tar lll.rs 7a wee ell *rmSw eeiUaa awa* ibaa at tarn acta W vlU aadt mat eata at Tree to ew ito f*o taa wrote at K ia Mt t t atoll taiMt aatu-e. \V< TOTAL Wa tlab la thaafe !*• (* ibr*r aaioaMa aaaiataar* Wider Rightof Way Lands BYCONI DAYS tw a c.i .. __Mra Cam FOLM WHO UVlO 1 M efo \+ Jrrrtae. Mra NaB* McKay. MONtON tieTV-SlVt VUM Mr lo*m Htotama* tooaaea |aOO. AMP WHIM TMKV LlVKO Mra N li MarB. 'toaa. Mra Mac taa C Mariam Or ato Mra A M Oeeet? Ctare iace 1* Mato a talB vtoaa toatoa aM to ito %  frriMUaa ato Mat to laa ra aeaaattoiMr to caauae riekt to var tor tto •taaaiar r*aarfactae ato oa tor a taa laiaroatap State Sato Na U trmm KauU Apriaca ta tatrlUto toe kaaa Btarai. toa beat aaMa tor to ItoM a orb lac aa topaletac tto aaremaary tato raai>to far (to stota JbtoaMbto A tint ler Chlafliil faau 'i dab 'cfhe Jlhlli^sloa ^Eiu^ r To Dm WllUotoo Smm Puhlishsd lu Ths Burt Of Ihs AgHmhmtl lutim Alee Ito toy Ouee Ommmmrn WWeh Itoreed PePOatotoM to t VO. PnMhhsd umd Prinlsd li Lsry Cmty wilhstom. tioum rausBiv, ocr. m. Newspaper Moves Ills New Pint AmI Office Buildisg Oa II AN. Willi Only Minor Delays lo Paper 1 SCHOOL URCED BY BRHX AT RAD MEKT 1 NC MONDAY Ito tatoitoy aaaeMas el toe Levy Catieir Mural Area Oev Spiatai OaeacM ru toto Ito toy ei ito nroaMOM mm tofi MS* Dec** Oto |NiHto Tto MAii tower i ta |ata VMS toe Levy Oawty Cta ta it ta M ito 4— toy etocauaa ta aatoeaertoi to loUaa i r ae nn ato w et toaal foata to toa iiwQ eeato tone to Ito atay aato prartoMtoy ato awtoatoto to Ito toWa art carry we era to toto to ito papat toto toaep. toM ee toae awaau toto aar maw to Ito tag m Twmc toto VFW Befol to Heel in *f %  m m mr 28

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mm taUMtal tolly t U tra Ik*H tm primary N will TO. nwM Fr %  Ml. ( Oil m Damsfiituy (Homily Jtomrtial VWmm m-m. S FtoriOa. Thunday, July 14 IMS SS. 0 S Ymt In CnuMy SS.OO Ytnr Ottnhtri Welfare Dept. To Give Commodities Mon. And Tues. In Levy County Tto Levy Cnualy VSbis Dt%  — — %  rrr Chioiisnd T# took Slat* Qrant Far $12,000 Spool On Lavy JaU To Mand Inapaction ‘Faulta’ Bagiikod lafnMMau luva Im akado M Um U*i Caaaly tad S iiaai—. MrlodMg a mm fc aarapa, Ara olaras aal a aaafta ImscOm syoooas la oa tasparuon at tht >aII by Imp Sara UtnWI’i nAn U Co. Commission To Hoar Zoning Roquosts July 10th TWn anil he a regular mast ing of Ida Levy County Board of r aunty CosmoKmosmto im Tassday. July 1$. l*J oi II 00 a s la Um Coshmimumct's in—. Branson. Florida, locunudnr *| flnBowina aosuna rcovctls Opportunitioa For city vs. County Rivalry Bnnnwt For Marilyn L. JZJSXZJZS Julian Benefit Day Sat. lag. arnnrdiag lo Um dkucsnr of Um Lavy County Youth ho groaa. Wriibhy Claaao la damoa. %  usi c aad thnotfa oa watt aa drawingpamtlng ^ ahaia%  nj IlM City wtl play Um County Uconso For Stata Motorcyclists To 4., hr Um Mud), U.|ua. J. SOo VftMott SuwamuMP ISfttO^ VOLUME MS NUMBER JJ WILUSTON. FLORIDA MAY M. ms USPS* SS0 S00 FIFTEEN CENTS % % % % % %  %  %  ———. '1 Mm ImI DON’T WORRY FOLKS, THIS FIR! IS ONLY FOR PRACTICE Two admit. • mam aHtca. and a church building watt at auhm burglar! tad or vandduad during tha paat Math In levy Counly Tha nar poai nriic. undat cenrtructlon In Statuon waa brekan Into on May V and aquipmanr vakaad at II&0 aw taken A lawn mown valued ai 11300 waa aloUn horn die Church ai ChrMi In Mnrrtaran 29

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THE BRYANT HARDEE CONNECTION By Eugenia Smith Rowe Silvester Bryant, born 27th January 1800, in Camden County, Georgia, (the son of Langley Bryant—one of the earliest settlers of St. Patrick’s, Camden County, Georgia) grew up to be a prosperous farmer of that area. He met and married Elizabeth Niblack, born 27th February 1807, daughter of a prominent neighbor, William Niblack, who was a member of the 1801 Georgia Legislature from Camden County. Silvester and Elizabeth married in 1826 in Camden County. Here their daughter, Esther Ann Bryant was born on the 24th of April 1828. It was shortly after the birth of Esther Ann that Silvester and Elizabeth decided to move their small family to lands owned in Columbia Coun ty, Florida. And it was in that area, near Lake City, that their son, Silvester Bryant, Jr., was born on the 23rd of February 1830. A daughter, Elizabeth Bryant, was born the 19th of Novem ber 1831. She died soon after. Silvester was a very prosperous farmer and he and Elizabeth became “Pillars of Society” in the Lake City area. Their daughter and son grew to be young adults amid wealth and plenty. In due time the young swains (and by all accounts, one not so young) were courting the petite, vivacious Esther Ann, among them a dashing young man by the name of Isaac Pierson Hardee, who was an emigree from the State of South Carolina, by way of Georgia. Isaac was born the 11th of October 1817 and had, at the age of 22, come down to Florida in 1839 as a soldier to help fight the Seminole Indians. As a result of his military service, (he enlisted as a drummer and after serving for a year he was dis charged as a fifer) he was awarded land grants and by the early 1840’s he was back in Florida looking around for a new plantation and for a wife (not necessarily in that order), to found his own dynasty and help make his mark in the world. Now Isaac, son of John and Lucritia Hardee, was also from a proud and prosperous family from the Horry District of South Carolina. The idea that he would lose Esther Ann to an older, well-to-do swain, favored by Silvester and Eliza beth, after a quarrel between the young couple, didn’t seem to set too well with this determined red-headed descendant of an Irishman and he therefore refused to be daunted. Having acquired a hotel in the Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida area in the early 1840’s, Isaac did have a home to offer a bride, but not such a life, as yet, to offer the darling of Silves ter and Elizabeth Bryant, as was offered by the older well-to-do widower, living in the Lake City area. Also, being a red-headed Irishman with a ready wit, its not hard to imagine that he would also have a ready temper .In any event, he and Esther Ann quarreled and she was promised, by her Father and Mother, to wed the older genr tleman, even though (it is said) she preferred the young Irishman. As the wedding day approached the young lovers may or may not have communicated their misery to each other. Tradition is unclear on that point, but, I somehow believe that Isaac must have been encouraged a little, at least. But tradi tion (and History) is very clear that on the eve of the wedding day, Isaac, with the help of his slaves, spirited, not only the willing Esther Ann, but also the massive amount of food prepared for the wedding feast of his rival, out the win dow of Silvester Bryant’s home. And Isaac, Esther Ann, the slaves, the food and the wedding cake, stole away in the night and were married on the 30th of March 1844 in either Lake City or Tallahassee. The latter being where he took her, as his bride, to live, we presume, happily ever after. Isaac and Esther Ann’s first child, born the 26th of June 1845, was a daughter and (ever an Irishman and a politician) they named her Eliza beth Niblack Hardee, for her maternal grand mother. The second child, born the 6th of May 1847, was a son, John Sylvester Hardee, named for the two grandfathers. They were still living in Tallahassee at this time. Silvester Bryant and his wife, Elizabeth, had extensive real estate holdings on the Suwannee River in Levy County, and after the marriage of Isaac and Esther Ann, he removed his family from Lake City, Columbia County, Florida area, to these remote acres in the Clay Landing vici nity. Between May 1847 and January 1850, Isaac and Esther Ann and their two children left Tallahassee and removed to the same area of Levy County, near Clay Landing, on the Suwan nee River. The Bryants had built a two story log 30

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cabin and it was here that Isaac and Esther Ann’s third child, Issac Bryant Hardee, was born on 22 January 1950, named for his father and the Bryant family name. It has to be assumed by this time that all had been forgiven the eloped couple and they were one big happy family. On the 20th of March 1853, the second child child of Silvester and Elizabeth Bryant, Silvester, Jr., was married to the Lovely Miss Susan Tyner, born on the 6th of September 1834 in Effingham County, Georgia. (The daughter of Jackson and Sarah Ann Pace Tyner, then living in Marion County, Florida). By 1858 Silvester and Susan Bryant were living at Ft. Fanning where he was Post Master, Ft. Fanning being the largest fort in the area to protect these pioneering inhabitants from the Indians. Jackson Tyner was born the 9th of July 1911 in Effingham County, Georgia. He met and later married Sarah Ann Pace, bom the 16th of July 1814, also of Effingham County, Georgia on the 13th of December 1832. Jackson Tyner was a farmer and also served for a time as the County Coronor for Marion County, Florida. He died after 1880, as he is listed on the 1880 Census at Bronson, Levy County, Florida at that time. No further record is found of him. Sarah Ann Pace Tyner died the 24th October 1898 and is buried in the Old Bronson Cemetery. Jackson and Sarah Ann had six children: 1. Susan, 6th September 1834, Effingham County, Georgia. 2. Mozelle, 29th July 1836, Effingham Coun ty, Georgia. 3. Barnet Tryon, 1st September 1838, Florida. 4. Jane Verlilue, 27th September 1842, Florida. 5. Isaac Bronson, 10th November 1846, Florida. 6. William Badger, 2nd March 1850, EffingFlorida. By about 1855, Silvester Bryant, Sr. held twen ty slaves. Their value was around ten thousand dollars and they helped him maintain a planta tion of 480 acres. Some of those slaves and their value were: 1st Family—William $800.00 Big Mary 500.00 Their Children: Sarah Phrna $700.00 Marie 500.00 Dianne 300.00 Phillis 300.00 Lenora 300.00 Lenora 300.00 James 250.00 Henry 200.00 Thomas 75.00 Calvin 1,000.00 $4,925.00 2nd Group: Little Mary $750.00 Margaret 450.00 Florida 550.00 Hester 300.00 Georgian 300.00 Handy 300.00 Chany 75.00 Firby and child 1,100.00 Jake 1,000.00 $4,825.00 Slaves were needed to grow and harvest cot ton. This was the farmers money crop. Cotton produced along the Suwannee River was shipped down river to Cedar Key and thence loaded on ships, until the completion of the railroad in 1861, and then by rail to the northern and European markets. The Bryants and Hardees were known to enter tain lavishly. To hold merry gatherings with mu sic and dancing and feasts prepared by slaves and served on tinkling china and crystal and shining silver. Life was good for these families and on the 27th of February 1852, they celebrated the birth of Joseph Owen Hardee, their fourth child, named for Isaac’s grandfather, Joseph Hardee of South Carolina and Isaac’s brother, Joseph P. Hardee, who later came to live with them. The Hardee children appeared regularly. Andrew Jackson Hardee was born the 16th of September 1854 and named for that famous Indian Fighter of Tennessee who first led the Seminole Indian War soldiers and who in later years became President of the United States. On the 20th of November 1856 sadness entered their lives with the death of Silvester Bryant, Sr. His estate passed to his wife and two living child ren, and their young families. Silas Langley Hardee, named for his great grandfather, Langley Bryant, was born the 22nd of February 1857, just three months after the death of Silvester. On the 23rd of October 1857, was born to Sylvester Bryant, Jr. and his wife, Susan Tyner Bryant, a son whom they named Sylvester Bron son Bryant. This was to be their only child. In 1860 disaster struck in the form of typhoid fever. An epidemic which before it was done had swept away the lives of several slaves and the un named infant son, born 24th of February, died the 25th of February 1860. He lived just one day 31

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and was buried with his mother, Esther Ann Bryant Hardee, who died on the 1st of March 1860. They were buried in the Bryant-Hardee Family Cemetery, located near their home at Clay Landing. They joined Silvester Bryant, Sr. and several of their slaves in this burial ground which is now lost on the banks of the Suwannee River along with the site of that first log home. Three months after the deaths of Esther Ann and her son, on the 1st of June 1860, Sylvester Bryant, Jr. succumbed to the dreaded disease and was buried in what is now the Hardee Ceme tery, Hardeetown, Levy County, Florida. His was the first grave. Isaac Pierson Hardee, grieving widower, mar ried his former sister-in-law, Susan Tyner Bryant, grieving widow, in November of that same fateful year of 1860. Isaac, left with six liv ing children under the age of fifteen and Susan, left with her three year old son, Sylvester Bron son Bryant, and their aging (54 year old) motherin-law, Elizabeth Niblack Bryant, had decided to pool their families and their resources and make a home at Pine Hill Plantation for all of them. Thus, first cousins became step-brothers and step-sister, Aunt and Uncle became Step-Mother and Step-Father. The arrangement was a successful one as on the 23rd of September 1861, Oscar Davis (Or Daves) Hardee was born; followed by Eugene William Jackson, 3rd of August 1864; Dora Ann Hardee, 23rd March 1866 (who died 4th of May 1866); and last but not least, Emmett Russel Hardee, born on the 29th of October 1867. Isaac Pierson Hardee, aged 62, soldier and planter, died on the 26th of November 1879 and was buried in the Hardee Cemetery at Pine Hill Plantation. Susan Tyner Bryant Hardee lived to be 74 years old, died on the 30th of August 1908 and was buried beside Isaac. Sylvester Bronson Bryant, only child and heir of Sylvester Bryant, Jr. and Susan Tyner Bryant Hardee, married on the 19th of August 1896, Miss Alice Wanamaker, born 31st July 1878. She was sickly and died a year later on the 3rd of September 1897 at the home of her parents in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida. She was buried in the Key Stone Churchyard Cemetery in Tampa. About 1900 he was married to Miss Sarah Eleanor Worthington, of Levy County, Florida. She was born 25th December 1877, daughter of John Langley Worthington, and his wife, Susan Taylor Worthington. They were blessed with six children: 1. Eulalee, 24th September 1901. 2. Ida Mae, 12th March 1903. 3. Bronson Worthington, 16th August 1904. 4. Elenor, 5th October 1905. 5. Sylvester Langley, 22nd February 1907. 6. Susan, 16th September 1908. On the 30th of May 1929, Eulalee was married to J. Mauley Hudson. On the 5th of April 1930, Bronson Worthington Bryant married Miss Martha Esther Howell, and they have one son, Bronson Howell Bryant, born 4th of December 1931. 32

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33 Ellzey Methodist Church built in about 1865.

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THE ELLZEY METHODIST CHURCH By Marie G. Meeks Between the year 1850 and 1860, Robert Mar vin Ellzey, a young Methodist preacher, felt a call to go to the frontier to help spread the Gos pel. With his wife he started out from Barnwell County, South Carolina. They traveled down un til they crossed the Georgia-Florida line and from there on everywhere they stopped he preached. He would pray and ask for Divine Guidance at every place he stopped, in order that he might know where to stop and establish a church. They traveled down through central Florida, finally arriving at Lake Butler. Here he stopped and preached, supposedly for several months. While there his wife passed away. After the death of his wife, he moved on down thirty-six miles west of Gainesville, to what was called Eurika, but later changed to Ellzey. Upon arriving there he said that this was the place he felt that he had been looking for. He immediate ly established a Homestead Grant and took up residence. Soon after getting a cabin fixed for himself with the help of a few settlers, they erected a one room log cabin to be used for a church. They split the logs to make the floor and used wooden pegs for nails. By this time Parson Ellzey or Uncle Ellzey, as he was more commonly known among his close friends in the surrounding communities, had married Avarilla Williams, who was quite a help mate for him. Along with raising four children, she conducted Sunday School and made arrange ments to feed and lodge the many people who came from the surrounding communities to at tend services at the church. Sometime during the years between 1860-1865 the one room log cabin church burned. A Mr. Worthington agreed to cut the lumber, and by this time a number of families lived in Ellzey and all agreed to go to work and build a new church on the same sight. This is the church that is standing today. The only difference to be found in it is, the storm which passed through in 1889 blew the steeple off, new windows and several new roofs have been added and also three Sun day School rooms have been added to the back. In 1872 Parson EllzeyÂ’s circuit included Bron son, Cedar Key, Ellzey, Archer, Shell Pond, Blitch Schoolhouse, Hardee Schoolhouse, Clyatt School, Levyville, Rocky Hammock and Oak Grove. This included practically all of what is known as Levy County today except the Williston area. A ledger containing a few remaining sheets of old church record dating 1871, at the time when Parson Ellzey was admitted to conference, lists the names of eighty-seven persons on the church roll in 1894. The sheets containing the roll before that time were torn out. Mr. W. W. Ellzey states that his father walked to churches within eight miles and rode horse back to the others. He says his father was paid mostly in produce from the farms and with the little money they received they bought clothes. The majority of the money went to buy the long tailed parsons coat which his Father wore. He says his Mother was a good manager and even though his Father was away from home most of the time his Mother managed to keep things go ing. At the twenty-seventh Conference held in Tal lahassee in 1871, Robert Marvin Ellzey was ad mitted to Conference. Out of the eleven churches that Parson Ellzey served in 1872, there are four still active today. They are: Ellzey, Bronson, Cedar Key and Archer. In 1853 a railroad was built to Cedar Key from Fernandina. The train burned cord wood so se veral of the families found that they could make good by cutting cord wood for the train, others found that they could do well cutting the cross ties to build and then to repair the railroad tracks. Around 1900 Ellzey went through a period of growth. A cedar mill was constructed and a little later a turpentine still was put into operation. Many of the older families, some of which are still represented here today are as follows: Phelps, Ellzey, Meeks, Perryman, Hogans, Pinner, Ishie, Williams, Tindales, Becks, Berryhill and Oglesbees. All were farmers. During the period of growth the church pros pered and many preachers came and went. A Baptist church was added to the community dur ing this period and was maintained until around 1918 when the cedar was cut out and the cedar mill moved. The turpentine still operated by West Brothers was closed down in 1952. Sunday School and Church services have con34

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tinued continuously from before the building of the first log church when services were conducted in the homes up until the present time in Ellzey. They have been conducted on the same site ex cept for the times that calamities have befallen the building. In 1936 several people in Ellzey decided to start raising goats. They overran the place and due to neglect of the people they took the church so the people just moved out to the school build ing where services were conducted for about two years. A new preacher, Reverend Skelley came to us who had zeal and determination, so he started a campaign to reclaim the church. Under his di rection we were, in a few months, back in the old church with a new roof on it, windows repaired and a new door with a lock on it so that the goats could not enter. We had been back in the church approximately a year when one afternoon three boys of the community sought refuge in the church from an electrical storm. While in there they had nothing else to do so they shot the windows out. Services were then forced to be conducted in the schoolhouse again. Due to the fortitude of Brother M. B. Cox, Mr. Robbie Pinner, who was then Superinten dent of the Sunday School, Mr. W. W. Ellzey, son of the late Parson Ellzey, and Mr. N. J. Meeks, with the combined help of the other members of the church, the windows were re placed and services were soon resumed in the church. On the first Sunday in June 1939, after church services were resumed in the church, the first “Homecoming” was held. This was the begin ning of the annual “Ellzey Homecoming” which is attended by hundreds from near and far each year, giving proof that the church has had a far reaching effect and has a history behind it. The Ellzey Church has approximately twentyfive active members today. The old church is very much in need of repair. Due to the encour agement brought to the church by the young stu dent pastors serving it, out of the University of Gainesville and due to the consecration, love and devotion of the few remaining members, the church carries on today conducting Sunday School and church each Sunday. 35

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The old Curry homestead, 1904: Lem and Fannie Curry, Baby Alma, Blake, Gad, Lizzie, Belle, and Effie. The deer was a pet. 36

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HENRY MIMS MATTAIR (18 -19 ) Transcribed by Eugenia Smith Rowe I was born over there in an old log house which is now gone. My father built this house the year I was born, and I have lived right here ever since. I have farmed all my life, raised cows, hogs, just regular farming. My father was a farmer and a blacksmith. He was raised about two miles from here in the di rection of Williston. My grandfather lived some where around Lake City and then he moved to Jacksonville. After he married my grandmother, they lived over in what is now the Ocala National Forest. My father was born there. I believe it was a place called Long Swamp. That was about 1850. My wife is named Ima Vira Reeves Mattair. She was born in West Virginia. We have been married fifty years and have four sons and one daughter. When I was a boy, there were more people liv ing around this neighborhood than now. You could say that our place is southwest of Wacahoota. My Great Grandfather fought in the Indians Wars. I donÂ’t know when he came to this coun try, but it was before the Indians and whites got mad at each other. I have heard my Grandmo ther tell about the Indians coming to their house when she was about six or seven. She remember ed one day when six Indians were setting on the porch with Old Man Tyner (that was my Great Grandfather). They had brought some brooms and baskets to give to the older children, so my Grandmother wanted to play around there so she could see what was going on. The Indians were sitting and lying on the floor. They had brought some knives along to show Old Man Tyner. One of the Indians reached for a knife right at my GrandmotherÂ’s feet and she took off like a streak. The Indians all laughed at that. My Great Grandmother was Nancy Tyner and that was in the early 1800Â’s. I donÂ’t recall hear ing what kind of Indians those were. My Great Grandfather Tyner came here in 1832. Williston did not exist then. My wife, Ima, who was a Reeves, was born at a place called Balls in Mon roe County, West Virginia. I have heard my Grandfather say that after the war started, the Indians captured a Negro wo man and took her over to Micanopy and made her work. After awhile some whites captured her back down around StaffordÂ’s Pond close to Montbrook which used to be Phoenix. They changed it to Montbrook because some families named Brooks moved in. I guess they named the place after Old Man Mont Brooks. Anyway, to get back to my story, the Negro woman told the whites that when the Indians killed Old Man Stafford, they scalped him, took his stuff off him, and went over to Micanopy and danced around that scalp for two or three days. Great Grandpa Tyner killed an Indian and brought the scalp in and hung it on his back porch. Great Grandma Nancy Tyner made him take it down. I donÂ’t know whatever became of it but I still have the tomahawk that the Indian had at the time. During the Indian War times, the people built forts. There was one not far from Col. SmithÂ’s, right there where you turn to go to Macintosh. Some people today still have these here big old musket balls; what the whites shot at the Indians when they tried to slip in. When the ground was plowed up the people would find the musket balls. I remember when Mr. Willard Smith lived up here, he had a box full of them. The Indians, before the war broke out, would come in here and trade huckleberries for milk. There was not a regular trading post here. I never knew much about my GrandmotherÂ’s brothers and sisters because they either died or got killed during the Civil War. My daddy went off to the Civil War, also my uncle. The first person ever buried at the Orange Hill Cemetery was William Tyner and some of his people live around Williston now. Mrs. Gilley is one of them. Carl Gilley found two tomahawks in a mound in Gulf Hammock during hunting season. I heard that they are over at the University now. I donÂ’t know exactly where the Indians lived around here. I have heard that they used to drive cattle from StaffordÂ’s Pond to the prairie over there where Whitehurst lived, the other side of his place. They must have lived, for one place, around Johnson Lake because so many arrow heads have been found there. After my Grand father and Grandmother separated, she married a man by the name of Tanner. Both of them had children to finish raising, so you might say Old 37

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Man Tanner raised my daddy. The old Tanner Cemetery is still down there, about two and a half miles from here. The Wacahoota Methodist Church, about two miles from here, is a lot older than the Orange Hill Cemetery. I think the first settler around Wacahoota was a man named Smith. My father left Florida and went off to the Civil War. He was wounded five times. I heard him talk about Chickamauga, also some place called Lookout Mountain. He got shot twice in the arm there and in his knee. There was a log cabin down the road from here that Mrs. Horne used to live in. I used to go down there when I was a child and she would always give me something to eat, usually a bis cuit and sausage. My grandfather was named Johnathan J. Ty ner, he was born in September, 1824. My Grand mother was named Frances and she was born in 1826. They called her Fanny. Grandpa died when he was 76. In that Orange Hill Cemetery thereÂ’s a big Oak Tree and thatÂ’s where William Tyner picked out the place for him to be buried. Some people since then have wanted to cut the tree down and there were some fusses about that. Some of Tyner bunch objected, said their Grandpa owned the land at the time he was buried and a whole row of Tyners are buried there. My Grandmother never had bad experiences with the Indians. This old Bible here, they gave it to her when she was a child. I remember her saying that the white people had no business tak ing Florida away from the Indians. When the Indians were chased out of here, Grandma said she wished she was back in Mississippi. Ethel Gilley of Williston, thatÂ’s Mrs. Waldo Gilley, is also the great granddaughter of Old Man Tyner and the granddaughter of William Tyner. Grandma used to go there and they would get to talking about the old times and Ben was still liv ing, thatÂ’s Ben Tyner who was EthelÂ’s father. Ethel might remember more than I do. 38

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WHY RYE KEY, THAT IS? Why should a small island at the north of Way Key, on the Number Four Channel, have borne the name “Rye Key” ever since the first govern ment survey of the Cedar Keys in the 1850’s? (The railroad route excepted.) The answer lies with a young homesteader named John E. Johnson, who received a permit to enter and set tle upon 160.5 acres on January 23, 1843. In ad dition to the small island upon which he built his dwelling, Johnson’s tract included much of the northern and central portions of Way Key, the island selected by David Levy (Yulee added later) to become the Gulf terminus of his projected trans-peninsula railroad from Fernandina. About the same time, an acquaintance of Johnson, young Thomas H. Parsons, received a permit to homestead 164.31 acres on Way Key, more to the southeast, where most of the City of Cedar Key has developed. Both men’s permits came through U.S. Government’s land office in Newnansville, which was managed for six years by Seminole War veteran, Major John Parsons. The major was an uncle of Thomas H. Parsons. On precisely the same date, August 1, 1853, John E. Johnson and Thomas H. Parsons re ceived title to their respective lands by patent from the General Land Office of the United States. Then, exactly six months later, on February 1, 1854, these two homesteaders sold their entire acreage to Major John Parsons. The major, in turn, sold those lands to the Florida Railroad Company on September 22, 1855 and again, it appears from the deeds, on June 30, 1856. In the first transaction, David Levy Yulee was one of the grantors on the deed; in the se cond, Major Parson’s wife, Susan Decatur Par sons, was another grantor. In each transaction, the lands were identical, so many may conclude that the Florida Railroad Company, creature of Yulee’s tireless efforts, was well-possessed of those 324.81 acres so vital to its future. So what has all this to do with the name of Rye Key? John E. Johnson’s birthplace was Rye, New Hampshire. And that is where the Parsons came from. --Charles C. Fishburne, Jr., April, 1984 Archivist, Cedar Key Historical Society 39

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THE CEDAR KEYS, STEAMBOATS, AND THE SUWANNEE RIVER By Charles C. Fishburne, Jr. Archivist, Cedar Key Historical Society April 10, 1984 When steamboats began operating on Florida waters in the 1830s, some serving the U.S. Army were ascending the lower Suwannee River by 1836. However, not until 1845, two years after the U.S. Government declared the Second Semi nole War over, did the first regular steamboat service on the Suwannee commence. On October 25 of that year, the St. Augustine News reported that the Orpheus was in operation between the Cedar Key and Santa Fe and Columbus. Steam boat authority Edward A. Mueller ( Florida Historical Quarterly, January, 1967, pp. 271-88) adds that the Orpheus met an obscure and tragic end on the Suwannee in 1847. She was soon to by followed by the Glasgow. The new service was announced in the Tallahassee Floridian on May 13, 1848 by the captain, himself, as follows: STEAMER GLASGOW James Tucker, Master THE undersigned avails himself of this mode of informing the public that the new Steamer Glasgow is now performing her regular trips on the Suwannee River between Columbus and Cedar Keys. This boat is strongly built of the best materials and propelled by two engines, and capable of carrying one hundred tons burthen, or 400 bales of cotton, with suitable accomodations for forty passengers, of light draft, requiring but seventeen inches water, thereby enabling her to perform her trips regularly at all seasons of the year between Columbus and Cedar Keys, leaving Columbus every TUESDAY morning at 7 oÂ’clock, A.M. and Cedar Keys every FRIDAY morning .As soon as practicable this boat will extend her trips up the Suwannee River to the Upper Springs, and also up the Withlacoochee River. .The Florida State Internal Improvement and Steam Navigation Company .will soon complete their arrangements .for purchase of cotton and other products of the country As soon as practicable a line of suitable packets will be established by the Company between Cedar Keys and New York and New Orleans for the conveyance of freight and passengers .The facilities offered to parties of pleasure and others to visit the Keys, at all seasons of the year, one of the most healthy and desirable retreats for invalids and others in the State, and the beautiful and romantic scenery of the Suwannee will, it is supposed, offer inducements to many to avail themselves of so pleasant an excursion. For further particulars, apply to Messrs. D. P. SMITH & Co., Columbus, Messrs. SMITH & HARRIS, Madison, Messrs. PUTNAM & RICHARDS, Cedar Keys, or to the undersigned. Columbus, Florida, January 22, 1848 JAMES TUCKER And others, Proprietors 40

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09770 9991 Gilchrist County Journal, Print