Citation
Rec Update

Material Information

Title:
Rec Update
Creator:
United States. Department of Defense. Environment, Safety and Occupational Health Network and Information Exchange. Regional Environment Coordinators.
Place of Publication:
Norfolk, VA
Publisher:
Navy Regional Environmental Coordination Office
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource

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Subjects / Keywords:
United States. Department of Defense. Environment, Safety and Occupational Health Network and Information Exchange. Regional Environment Coordinators. ( naf )
Genre:
periodicals ( fast )
serial ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
"Monthly environmental news for DoD facilities in EPA Regions 1, 2 & 3", later "Environmental News for DoD Facilities in Federal Regions 1-5".
General Note:
Description based on: Jan 2011; title from PDF caption, viewed August 6, 2018.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: February 2016, viewed August 6, 2018.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
1047730426 ( OCLC )

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Digital Military Collection

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REC Update September 2013 1 GENERAL INTEREST 2 FEDERAL NEWS 12 AIR 12 CHESAPEAKE BAY 13 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 14 REGION 1 15 CONNECTICUT 15 MAINE 16 MASSACHUSETTS 17 NEW HAMPSHIRE 18 RHODE ISLAND 19 VERMONT 20 REGION 2 22 NEW JERSEY 22 NEW YORK 23 REGION 3 24 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 24 DELAWARE 25 MARYLAND 25 PENNSYLVANIA 27 VIRGINIA 28 WEST VIRGINIA 33 REGION 4 34 NORTH CAROLINA 34 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOP MENT 36 CONFERENCES 36 TRAINING 38 MEET THE REC 43 STAFF 43 LINK HELP 44 SUBSCRIBE! 44 Monthly environmental news for DoD facilities in EPA Regio ns 1, 2 & 3

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REC Update September 2013 2 GENERAL INTEREST Septem ber is Suicide Prevention Month Suicide prevention goes beyond training people to recognize risk factors, warning signs or what to do in a crisis. You may not realize it but suicide prevention happens every day when you do something kind for someone who didn't expect it or just take the time to actually listen to someone when you ask how they're doing. It's hard to quantify exactly how many lives you're impacting or how you're impacting them but the one fact you can count on is that the little things you do mean something big to someone else. Often when we realize that we've helped others, we have a renewed sense of purpose and contribution even when we're experiencing our own challenges and setbacks. Hispanic American Heritage Month Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from 15 SEP to 15 OCT by celebrating the histories, cultures, and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. The observation started i n 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30day period starting on 15 SEP and ending on 15 OCT. The day of 15 SEP is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on 16 SEP and 18 SEP, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or D a de la Raza, which is 12 OCT, fal ls within this 30 day period. Prepare for Energy Action Month in October FEMP is providing templates and suggestions on how to promote energyand water saving practices in Federal facilities. This year's outreach materials call on Federal employees to t ake action and empower leadership, innovation, and excellence to realize a secure energy future. For more information, go to: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/services/energy_awar e.html The Navy Has Fuel Cell Generators; Will You Have Them Soon Too? By Raachel Feltman The Atlantic Fuel cells could break into mainstream use very soon, and that means big cuts in energy consumption. The US N avy is reportedly ready to deploy ge nerators powered by fuel cells. Meanwhile, a startup in Maryland claims it can offer a cheaper, longer lasting fuel cell than any on the market by next year. There are several kinds of fuel cells, which work a lot like batteries. Some have been used expe rimentally in passenger buses in London, Beijing and other cities since 2006, and certain types of fuel cells are already sold as generators. But solid oxide fuel cells, like the US military is now using, have the most potential for energy efficiency. U ntil recently, their greatest strength -the high temperatures they operate at allow them to produce more energy than other fuel cells had also made them expensive to produce. The materials needed to withstand over 1200 degrees Fahrenheit and proved cost ly and unreliable M ost models couldn't last long enough to return their initial investment in energy cost savings. But the short term benefits of using less fuel (reducing the number of convoys needed to carry fuel around the battlefield reduces the numb er of vulnerable soldiers in the field) motivated the US Department of Defense Energy and Power Community of Interest, a collaboration between branches of the US military, to improve fuel cell technology for battlefield use. In its press release, the US m ilitary said it may also use the technology to power naval war ships soon.

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REC Update September 2013 3 The resulting solidoxide fuel cell is the first to use high sulfur fuel like jet fuel instead of low emission options like hydrogen while remaining less pollutive and more efficient than a combustion engine. In tests, the US N avy's power unit decreased fuel consumption by 44% compared to similar sized combustion generators currently in use. Powered by jet fuel, the fuel cell generator runs nearly silently I nstead of the roar of a diesel engine, all you hear is the fuel cell's cooling fan, which hums like a refrigerator. You're probably not looking for a military grade, jet fuel packing generator, but the civilian options are getting better, too. MIT Technology Review reports th at Redox, a Maryland startup, is using new materials in its fuel cells that cut production costs by almost 90%, as well as increasing power output at lower temperatures. That means they'll be more efficient than versions on the market now -and hopefully t ake longer to wear out. By 2014, the company hopes to have a 25kilowatt generator which could produce enough electricity for a grocery store. Later, Redox will move on to models for residential use. If the company delivers and moves off grid-in other words, providing power in regions that lack reliable power infrastructure -solid oxide fuel cells will get cheaper, and using fossil fuel could get a lot less detrimental to the environment. US Navy, The Nature Conservancy Join Forces to Build Pamlico Sou nd Oyster Reef Oysters in the Pamlico Sound are getting a big boost from a new project that will create five acres of new oyster habitat. The Long Shoal Oyster Sanctuary is one of 12 oyster sanctuaries scattered around the Pamlico Sound. The Navy is funding the project in conjunction with The Nature Conservancy. The North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries is designing and building the reef. Many people dont realize the role that the military plays in conservation across North Carolina, said Aaron McCall, who is leading The Nature Conservancys work on the project. The military has helped to protect lands across the state most recently near the Dare County Bombing Range. This oyster reef project takes that collaboration offshore. Creating new reefs will increase the number of oysters in the sound. They will also improve water quality and provide valuable habitat for other fishes. Oysters were once plentiful in North Carolina waters. Native Americans relied on them for food. Archaeologists f ound mounds of shells, called middens, which were left behind by these early residents. Unsustainable harvesting, development and disease have reduced oysters to less than 10 percent of their historic range. The Navy shares the passion many Americans feel for our ocean environment, said Mr. Joseph W. Murphy, D eputy C hief of S taff for Fleet I nstallations and Environmental Readiness, U.S. Fleet Forces Command "The Navy has been operating and training off the eastern United States for more than two centuries taking great care to protect the environment. We have done so in order to maintain our readiness to conduct safe, effective and sustained operations at sea -operations that protect American citizens, the American homeland, and American commerce around the globe. The oyster reefs will be created from 800 concrete reef balls structures placed across the sound floor. Within a few months, young oysters (called spat) begin to colonize the balls. Navys Use of Biofuels Could Trigger Private Sector Adoption By Amy Harder Nextgov The Navy's use of advanced biofuels could help spur private sector investment, said Dennis McGinn, President Obama's newly confirmed A ssistant S ecretary of the Navy for E nergy, I nstallations, and E nvironment. "The private sector benefits are the military's ability to do some pretty good analysis, to manage risk, and to introduce innovative materials and innovative processes," said McGinn "It significantly lowers the barrier of entry to new industries and new technologies." From medical devices to space technology, the Pentagon has often been an incubator for the private sector. McGinn said he's going to work to make sure it's the same in the renewableenergy sphere, and especially for biofuels. "It can have a catalytic effect for large consumers of transportation," said McGinn, who stepped down

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REC Update September 2013 4 recently from his post as president of the American Council on Renewable Energy when the Obama A dministration courted him for this position. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, the Pentagon' s de facto advocate for the military's adoption of renewable energy over oil, has set a goal of getting half of the Navy's fuel from alternative sources by 2020 and sailing a "Green Fleet" that runs on nuclear power and biofuels. McGinn, a retired vice adm iral of 35 years, said he hopes to take the debate over this program beyond sound bites. "There have been a lot of sound bites attributed to various folks on both sides of the Defense Department's biofuels program," McGinn said. "I'm hoping to take it be yond that to really some objective cost benefit risk analysis." He said when doing that for the biofuels program, the cost will be competitive. "The Navy is on record saying that there are contracts out there to produce biofuels that are cost competitive with petroleum, and that is going to be the big task that I'll be working on with the team," McGinn said. McGinn said the driving force behind the Navy's greening effort is not climate change but military strategy. "Ultimately, it's to increase military e ffectiveness, combat effectiveness, and operational efficiency of military forces," McGinn said. "It's all about the mission. The other benefits, whether it's related to climate or what have you, are added benefits." Army Releases 2012 Net Zero Progress Report The Army has released the Net Zero Pilot Installation Initiative Progress Report for 2012, containing information useful to implementing Net Zero. The Army now plans to issue a policy this year that will expand the Net Zero Initiative to all perma nent Army installations. The report details the new Net Zero hierarchies and implementation strategies. It also contains information about installation collaboration, outreach and behavior and awareness campaigns that are being conducted. For more infor mation, go to: http://usarmy.vo.llnwd.net/e2/c/downloads/296777.pdf New LED Fixtures Brighten Base Gyms and Generate Savi ngs By Phillip Chitty The Dolphin (CT) New LED lighting inst alled at Naval Submarine Base New Londons (SUBASE) Morton Hall Gymnasium, Body Works Fitness Center, and the Lower Base Gym is giving patrons a brighter workout and the Navy a lower energy bill. "Im very pleased with our new LED lighting systems in the gyms," said Kevin Boedigheimer, SUBASE Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments A thletic D irector. "And I know our patrons are too." The recently installed overhead lighting fixtures are the result of a joint MWR and Public Works Department (PWD) initiative to not only provide a more aesthetically pleasing physical training environment, but to also do it a fraction of the cost. Some of the features available in the LEDs at Morton Hall Gymnasium and Body Works Fitness Center that immediately impres sed Boedigheimer were the motion sensors and auto dimmers. "Our old lights were either on or off and their burnout rate and costs were becoming excessive," said Boedigheimer. SUBASE PWD was only too happy to help make the difference. Kevin came to Publ ic Works and presented us with a great opportunity," said Bill Jankowski, SUBASE E nergy M anager. "We chose to use LEDs because they would enhance each gyms lighting and simultaneously reduce maintenance and energy costs for the Navy." With funding for the project coming from the bases Public Works sustainment budget, the lighting project is a purely SUBASE funded endeavor. T he upgrades to the bases gyms will save the Navy about $37,000 a year in energy costs alone and the project will pay for itself in four years, according to Jankowski.

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REC Update September 2013 5 For Boedigheimer the expected lifetime of the new LEDs will also be a great payback: the LEDs should last five to ten times longer than the original lighting. "This project is a great example of the collaboration between base commands and activities and the bases Public Works Department," said Jankowski. "And perhaps more importantly, it highlights how much energy and money the base can save when conservation is in mind." According to the Department of Energy LED lig hts are one of todays most energy efficient and rapidly developing lighting technologies. Quality LED light bulbs last longer, are more durable, and offer comparable or better light quality than other types of lighting. For more information about LEDs v isit http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/led lighting US Military Connects Microgrids for a Secure Cluster of Power Networks By Jeff St. John Green Tech Media Nobody is more inter ested in microgrids than the U S military. The idea of self sustaining energy islands that can stay on even during grid wide blackouts is of obvious value to military bases that cant let power outages keep them from performing their missions. But what if those military microgrids could also serve a broader set of purposes by linking themselves to one another or even to the grid at large? Thats a question that the U S Navy is now striving to answer, via a first ever project meant to tie three separate m icrogrids into a functioning whole. Power Analytics (formerly EDSA) is the San Diego based company that won the contract for the project under the Department of Defenses Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP). While weve seen ot her military microgrids start to connect themselves to the grid, this will be the first centrally managed cluster of multiple cyber secure military microgrids in the country, according to last weeks press release. Financial terms of the three year cont ract weren't disclosed, but Karen Cronin, Power Analytics vice president, told the San Diego Union Tribune that it was more than $2 million. Power Analytics is a longtime Navy partner US naval ships, which are in essence miniature cities running on self contained nuclear power plants or diesel powered generators, are designed using its Paladin software product. Its also the designer of the three Navy microgrids its now seeking to combine into a secure cluster of microgrids to help the Navy both impr ove energy supply security and reduce its overall energy consumption. Navy: No Significant Environmental Impact from Homeporting of Littoral Combat Ships By WAVY 10 (VA) The Navy found no significant environmental impacts that could result in homeporting Littoral Combat Ships in Norfolk or Florida. The Navy says the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required due to the fact that no significant impacts would occur. Right now, the Navy wants to homeport up to 14 ships at Naval Station Mayport in Florida, however, no final decision has been made at this time. The Navy conducted environmental testing at both locations. The stationing of up to 21 crews and 240 LCS support personnel was examined at either installation, which would result in about 1,700 personnel and 1,900 family members being added to either Mayport or Norfolk. Nuclear Wind By Mark Thompson Time The Obama Administration is building the nations biggest wind farm to generate electricity to help assemble the nations nuclear arsenal. Its boasting of the great environmental stewardship the project represents breezes for bombs? and has contracted with Siemens USA, the American subsidiary of a German company, for the wind turbines at the heart of the operation. The go vernment broke ground recently for the Pantex Renewable Energy Project. When finished in the summer of 2014, it will include five 2.3 MW wind turbines on 1,500 acres (607 hectares) of government owned property

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REC Update September 2013 6 east of the Pantex plant in the Texas panhand le. Pantex is charged with securing America by providing the nations nuclear deterrent, the fissile factory says, and is now the future home of the federal governments largest wind farm. The wind farm will be funded by the energy savings guaranteed by Siemens, Pantex says an estimated $50 million over 18 years. Supervising the financing is Hannon Armstrong, a specialty finance company that provides debt and equity financing for sustainable infrastructure projects. The Maryland based company focuses on profitable sustainableinfrastructure projects that increase energy efficiency, provide cleaner energy sources, positively impact the environment, or make more efficient use of natural resources. Positively impacts the environment? That kind of green talk is unusual for a nuclear bomb factory. Now shuttered sites like Colorados Rocky Flats plant and Washington States Hanford site, which have poisoned the ground surrounding them for years, have tended to be the rule. But its no different from what Pantex itself is saying about the deal The Pantex wind farm is projected to generate approximately 47 million kW h of clean energy annually, which is greater than 65% of Pantexs annual electricity needs. This is enough electricity to power nearly 3,500 homes and reduce CO2 emissions by more than 35,000 metric tons per year. This reduction is also equivalent to removing 7,200 cars from the road each year or planting more than 850,000 trees. So if youre discombobulated about the use of wind power for nuclear weapons, it might help to think of the Pantex project as an atomic arboretum. USS Theodore Roosevelt Successfully Completes RCOH By PEO Carriers Public Affairs The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) successfully completed its R efueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) on 29 AUG 13. The ship returned to the fleet after four days of sea trials which tested the ship's crew and systems. Roosevelt began its RCOH on 26 AUG 09. More than 24 million man hours of work were conducted onboard the ship, including refueling the reactors, upgrading ship's infrastructure, and modernizing combat systems and air wing capabilities to increase combat effectiveness. The revitalization enables the ship to carry out the remaining 23 years of its 50 year service life. "Each RCOH is a milestone in the history of the ship and the Navy," said Capt. John Markowicz, program manager for In Service Aircraft Carriers. "Our government and industry team is redelivering carriers their crews can be proud to serve aboard." Roosevelt is the fourth Nimitz class aircraft carrier to complete RCOH at Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding. Roosevelt is homeported at Norfolk Naval Station and will now conduct local operations and begin its flight deck cert ification. NAVSUP Announces 2013 Holiday Season Mailing Deadlines By NAVSUP Office of Corporate Communications T he Naval Supply Systems Command's (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division mail by dates for pre Dec. 25 delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages were released on 3 SEP 13. For mail addressed to: APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090 098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10

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REC Update September 2013 7 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 All classes of mail addressed to FPO/APO addresses must use the ninedigit ZIP code to ensure delivery. Mail not addressed correctly will be returned to the sender as undeliverable. Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/FPO address, check with your local pos t office to determine if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a spaceavailable basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first transported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth combined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is recommended that customers check with their local civilian or military post office for in formation on size restrictions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Customers are advised that certain mail restrictions apply and some items cannot be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, pornography, controlled substances, and explosiv e or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent through the mail, contact your local civilian or military post office. As a final note, customers are cautioned that packages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to a ny type of hazardous material, such as bleach, alcohol, or cleaning fluids. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. Navy Divers Recover US Bombs from Great Barrier Reef By Age nce France Presse A joint Australian U.S. Navy dive team recovered bombs dropped by American forces on the Great Barrier Reef during a training exercise in a delicate deep sea operation, officials said The divers attached balloons to pull the two unarmed GBU 12 laser guided bombs to the surface in a twoday deepwater operation involving strong tides, according to United States and Australian officials.

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REC Update September 2013 8 The United States and Royal Australian Navies should be congratulated on the successful recovery and di sposal of the ordnance, while ensuring that all environmental and safety requirements were met, said Lieutenant General Ash Power, Australian C hief of J oint O perations. Two other pieces of inert ordnance cement filled BDU 45 dummy bombs used for training with no explosive elements were left on the ocean floor due to the difficult diving conditions. All four bombs were jettisoned in the waters of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park by two U S AV 8B Harrier jets during bilateral war games with Austral ian forces after civilian boats strayed into the intended drop zone. They were found by minesweeper HMAS Gascoyne a fortnight ago using a remotecontrolled submersible equipped with sonar. After the unarmed bombs were brought to the surface they underwent a s afety inspection before being taken to a nearby official ordnance demolition beach and detonated. Russell Reichelt, head of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, said survey images had confirmed the bombs landed on a sandy bottom, well away f rom coral and any sensitive habitat. We supported the U S Navys decision to leave the inert rounds on the seafloor due to the challenging and potentially unsafe diving conditions these devices are not actual ordnance and pose no risk to people or the environment, said Reichelt. Our personnel will continue to monitor the area in the coming days for any potential impacts following the recovery and disposal part of the operation. The bombs were found 30 kilometers from the nearest coral reef and 50 ki lometers from the coastline well away from any sensitive habitat. Navy Saves Plants from Extinction By Aerotech News The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced they will be reclassifying two plants from endangered to threatened status under the Endang ered Species Act. The San Clemente Island (SCI) lotus and the SCI paintbrush are two names that you nearly never heard again, unless you were talking about dinosaurs and dodo birds. The lotus and paintbrush were placed on the endangered list in 1977 due t o ravenous goats that were left behind on the San Clemente Island by travelling ranchers the southernmost of the Channel Islands of California. Due to the tens of thousands of feral goats that ate and crushed the flora, 61 plants on the island are includ ed in the California Native Plant Society Inventory of Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Plants of California. In 1934 the U.S. Navy acquired the land and began removing the untamed animals. By the end, the Navy transferred more than 29,000 goats off the island. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that they will be reclassifying the two plants from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Both the lotus and the paintbrush have expanded their range on the island and ongoing manag ement by the Navy is reducing threats to the plants. Im very proud of the Navys commitment to the environment and especially our environmental team, said Capt. Gary Mayes, commanding officer of Naval Base Coronado. The fact that these two plant speci es were brought back from the edge of extinction demonstrates that a balance can be found between being good stewards of the environment and operational training. Being the sole steward for 15 plants that are only found on SCI, the Navy continues to condu ct rare plant surveys, genetic studies, revegetation of natives, weed eradication, and erosion control. I think it is very interesting that the Navy, whose mission is not to recover species, has done such a remarkable job at recovering these species, sa id Bryan Munson, NBC Botany Program Manager. The success story on SCI is better than just about any success story out there and the fact that the Navy is doing it is pretty remarkable.

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REC Update September 2013 9 Even though two plants and a night lizard that is indigenous to SCI are coming off the list at once, Brunson said that getting a plant downlisted is still very rare. Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Online Mapping Tool is Available The EPA has launched the EIS Mapper, an interactive web based tool that allows the publ ic to learn about Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) filed with EPA for major projects proposed on federal lands and other proposed federal actions. Users of the tool can click on any state for a list of Environmental Impact Statements, including info rmation about the potential environmental, social, and economic impacts of these projects. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires federal agencies to consider the impacts of proposed actions, as well as any reasonable alternatives, in their decision making process. For proposed projects with potentially significant impacts, federal agencies prepare a detailed Environmental Impact Statement which is filed with EPA and made available for public review and comment. EPA is required to review an d comment on Environmental Impact Statements prepared by other federal agencies. The EIS Mapper makes it easier for the public to be informed about the environment around them, said Cynthia Giles, A ssistant A dministrator for EPAs Office of Enforcement a nd Compliance Assurance Major projects and decisions have the potential to affect the environment where you work and live. I encourage everyone to check out the mapper, stay informed and lend your voice. The user can click on a state in the map and is provided with comment letters submitted by the EPA on Environmental Impact Statements within the last 60 days. The tool also provides users with the information they need to identify projects with open comment periods, including how to submit comments. T o use EPAs EIS Mapper, visit http://eismapper.epa.gov/ EPA Reaches Agreement with Safeway to Reduce Emissions of Ozone Depleting Substances Nationwide In a settlement agreement with the EPA, Safeway, the nation 's second largest grocery store chain, has agreed to pay a $600,000 civil penalty and implement a corporate wide plan to significantly reduce its emissions of ozonedepleting substances from refrigeration equipment at 659 of its stores nationwide. This is estimated to cost approximately $4.1 million, said the EPA and Department of Justice. The settlement involves the largest number of facilities ever under the Clean Air Act's regulations governing refrigeration equipment. The settlement resolves allegatio ns that Safeway violated the federal CAA by failing to promptly repair leaks of HCFC 22, a hydro chlorofluorocarbon that is a greenhouse gas and an ozone depleting substance used as a coolant in refrigerators. According to the settlement, Safeway also fai led to keep adequate records of the servicing of its refrigeration equipment. Safeway will now implement a corporate refrigerant compliance management system to comply with stratospheric ozone regulations. In addition, Safeway will reduce its corporate w ide average leak rate from 25 percent in 2012 to 18 percent or below in 2015. The company will also reduce the aggregate refrigerant emissions at its highest emission stores by 10 percent each year for three years. "Safeway's new corporate commitment to r educe air pollution and help protect the ozone layer is vital and significant," said Cynthia Giles, Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. "Fixing leaks, improving compliance and reducing emissions will make a re al difference in protecting us from the dangers of ozone depletion, while reducing the impact on climate change." "This first of its kind settlement will benefit all Americans by cutting emissions of ozone depleting substances across Safeway's national sup ermarket chain," said Robert G. Dreher, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "It can serve as a model for comprehensive solutions that improve industry compliance with the nation's Clea n Air Act."

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REC Update September 2013 10 EPA regulations issued under Title VI of the CAA require that owner or operators of commercial refrigeration equipment that contains over 50 pounds of ozone depleting refrigerants, and that has an annual leak rate greater than 35 percent repair such leaks within 30 days HCFC 22 is up to 1,800 times more potent than carbon dioxide in terms of global warming emissions. The measures that Safeway has committed to are expected to prevent over 100,000 pounds of future releases of ozone depleting refr igerants that destroy the ozone layer. HCFCs deplete the stratospheric ozone layer, which allows dangerous amounts of cancer causing ultraviolet rays from the sun to strike the earth, leading to adverse health effects that include skin cancers, cataracts, and suppressed immune systems. Pursuant to the Montreal Protocol, the United States is implementing strict reductions of ozone depleting refrigerants, including a production and importation ban by 2020 of HCFC 22, a common refrigerant used by supermarket s. The settlement is part of EPA's national enforcement initiative to control harmful air pollution from the largest sources of emissions, including large grocery stores. Corporate commitments to reduce emissions from refrigeration systems have been increasing in recent years. EPA's GreenChill Partnership Program works with food retailers to reduce refrigerant emissions and decrease their impact on the ozone layer and climate change by transitioning to environmentally friendlier refrigerants, using less r efrigerant / eliminating leaks, and adopting green refrigeration technologies and best environmental practices. Safeway, headquartered in Pleasanton, Calif., is the second largest grocery chain in North America with 1,412 stores in the United States and 2012 revenues of $44.2 billion. Safeway operates companies under the banner of Vons in southern California and Nevada, Randalls in Texas, and Carrs in Alaska. The settlement covers 659 Safeway stores all Safeway stores in the United States that have commer cial refrigeration equipment regulated by the CAA except for those stores in Safeway's Dominick's Division, which was the subject of a 2004 settlement with the United States. NPS Student Analysis Reveals Multi Million Dollar Savings for USNS Comfort By Ke nneth Stewart Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System A recent analysis of lighting life cycle costs aboard the USNS Comfort, conducted by students at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), revealed a lighting solution that could save taxpayers up to $ 6 million in as few as three years. The Comfort is one of two 1,000bed Military Sealift Command hospital ships The other is USNS Mercy and she is based in San Diego. The Comfort was originally built in 1977 as a commercial oil tanker and was converted by the Navy in 1986 for service with the Military Sealift Command. We have everything a 1,000 bed hospital would have, but additionally, we have a galley and the quarters that support a working staff of 2,200 people, said USNS Comfort Chief Engineer Jos eph Watts. The C omfort is basically a giant, floating building. The Comfort and its crew of doctors, nurses and sailors participate in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR) operations and exercises and they were pivotal in support efforts following Haitis devastating 2010 earthquake. Watts requested a life cycle lighting analysis of the Comfort in an attempt to reduce electrical, maintenance and disposal costs associated with shipboard lighting. Just keeping the lights on is quite a chore W e generate our own electricity at sea and plug into a public meter while in port. The bills are quite impressive. I was interested in reducing the cost and man hours necessary to keep the lights on, said Watts. NPS students explored the feasibilit y of replacing traditional fluorescent lighting aboard the Comfort with new LED lighting fixtures and bulbs. The Comfort uses approximately 14,000 24inch bulbs and another 14,000 48inch bulbs. According to Watts, fluorescent bulbs must be replaced annu ally. The materials and maintenance costs associated with replacing some 28,000 bulbs can be daunting.

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REC Update September 2013 11 If you wanted to change a few light bulbs in your own home, you wouldnt have to take out a second mortgage B ut what if the scope of the problem invol ved government purchases of tens of thousands of bulbs plus government employee maintenance staffing spread out over many years? asked NPS Professor of Operations Research retired Navy Capt. Steve Pilnick. In order to provide an accurate analysis, students compared a wide variety of lighting options that included both fluorescent and LED bulbs. In terms of looking at different lighting options, many venders did not provide very good information about how they determined bulb life and capabilities, so we had to be careful in our analysis to be sure that we were comparing apples to apples, said analysis team member Navy Reserve Lt. Cmdr. John Goering. But, students were not only concerned with finding a better bulb, they were tasked to find cost and ener gy efficient bulbs that could provide consistent lighting in the presence of radio frequency interference and harmonic distortion produced by the X ray and CAT scan machines employed aboard the ship. In addition to costs, students weighed the environmenta l impact of utilizing either fluorescent or LED lighting. Early analysis seemed to suggest that LED bulbs would provide a cost effective and more environmentally sound alternative. According to Watts, LED bulbs are safer for the environment and are cheap er over time because they do n ot contain hazardous materials, requir ing hazardous waste disposal. Pilnick is hopeful that lessons learned aboard the Comfort will lead to further improvements throughout the fleet. The Navy benefits from this study I t p rovides the detailed cost versusbenefit analysis necessary to meet mission requirements with tight budgets, said Pilnick. Military Sealift Command leadership was able to make an informed decision due to the work of government employees that understood the problem and were able to communicate a solution. The New Navy Transportation Tool By Jtozer Armed With Science With help from the forward looking Office of Naval Research (ONR), this new rather low tech energy saving breakthrough is called the Tran sportation Exploitation Tool or TET for short. Here's an example of how it works: Imagine a scenario where a U.S. Navy ship in a foreign port urgently needs a particular engine part to complete its mission. TET allows the user to simply enter what cargo n eeds to be shipped and where it s going, and then provides the planner with all available space on transports across military and commercial sectors, with recommendations for the most efficient routes. Previously, planners had to search multiple databa ses to access all civilian and military space availability, which could require hours or even days. In the worst cases, separate flights had to be chartered. You can read the full story at http://science.dodlive.mil/2013/08/19/movingexperiencenew navytransportationtool takesoff/

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REC Update September 2013 12 FEDERAL NEWS Notice: With regard to any regulation or legislation, installation staff is requested to cont act their respective component REC with information on mission or installation impacts, questions, or comments. AIR State and Regional Air Compliance Information The Construction Industry Compliance Assistance Center website contains s tate bystate infor mation on air permits. It also has links to regulatory agencies and rules covering topics such as open burning/smoke and dust. For more information, go to: http://www.cicacenter.org/airtool.cfm EPA Reconsideration for the RICE NESHAP and NSPS Rule The EPA received three petitions for administrative reconsideration of stationary reciprocating internal combustion engine (RICE) NESHAP and stationary internal combustion engine (ICE) NSPS after the rule w as amended in January 2013. In June, EPA informed the petitioners of the agency's intent to initiate a reconsideration process on three main issues. In this notice of reconsideration EPA is not proposing any specific revisions to the final RICE NESHAP or the ICE NSPS. EPA is only seeking comment on the following three issues and clearly stated that they will not respond to any comments addressing any other issues or any other provisions of the final rule or any other rule. Timing for compliance with the u ltra low sulfur diesel fuel requirement for emergency CI engines that operate or are contractually obligated to be available for more than 15 hours per calendar year for the purposes specified in 40 CFR 63.6640(f)(2)(ii) and (iii) and 40 CFR 64.6640(f)(4)( ii). The rule set a compliance date of 1 January 2015 for the fuel switch to allow operators to use up existing inventory of higher sulfur fuel. Petitioners want an earlier compliance date; Timing and required information reporting for emergency engines that operate or are contractually obligated to be available for more than 15 hours per calendar year for the purposes specified in 40 CFR 63.6640(f)(2)(ii) and (iii) or that operate for the purpose specified in 40 CFR 63.6640(f)(4)(ii), and the timing and required information for the analogous reporting requirement in the ICE NSPS. The rule set the first reporting date for 31 March 2016 for CY2015 operations. Petitioners want 2013 and 2014 data reported along with additional operating data; and Conditions in 40 CFR 60.4211(f)(3)(i), 60.4243(d)(3)(i) and 40 CFR 63.6649(f)(4)(ii) (local system reliability) for operation for up to 50 hours per year in nonemergency situations as part of a financial arrangement with another entity. EPA added these provisions to the final RICE NESHAP and ICE NSPS in response to public comments on situations where the local transmission and distribution system operator has determined that there are conditions that could lead to a blackout for the local area where the ready avail ability of emergency engines is critical to system reliability. Petitioners believe the EPA did not provide enough detail in specifying the discernible threats to the grid that would justify operation of the units.

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REC Update September 2013 13 The reconsideration notice was publishe d in Federal Register at 78 FR 54606 and can be found at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR 2013 09 05/pdf/201321626.pdf If you have any comments, please submit your comments t o dodrecreg3@navy.mil by 4 OCT 13. CHESAPEAKE BAY Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Launches Stormwater Website for Homeowners, Businesses The Alliance for the Chesa peake Bay launched an online resource dedicated to helping homeowners and businesses take charge of stormwater runoff The new website guides citizens to steps they can take to eliminate runoff and potential pollution from their property and improve their local stream and the Chesapeake Bay. The easy to use information is targeted to homeowners and includes helpful hints, technical specifications, illustrations, videos and other valuable resources. Homeowners play a crucial role in limiting water pollution and can take positive steps right in their own yards. The cumulative improvement on stormwater runoff and water quality can be quite substantial, says Al Todd, Executive Director of the Allianc e for the Chesapeake Bay I t can be hard to find the right information to get started. The Alliance has pulled this information together in an easy to use online reference. For more information, visit the Alliances Reduce Your Stormwater website Bald Eagles a re b ack in a Big Way And the Talons are Out By Elizabeth Shogren NPR Its a j ungle if youre an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at th e College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, VA. You have to watch your back. Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar but the notion that the y are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding. After nearly being wiped out inadvertently by strong insecticides that were in widespread use until the 1970s, bald eagles have come roaring back in places like the James River, south of Richmond, VA. Today, the raptors fly around together above the James River in big groups, hang out in communal roosts, and are fiercely competitive. Pesticides like Kepone and DDT helped put bald eagles on the endangered list. Eagles kept reproducing but their eggs were not viable and did not hatch. By the 1970s, there were no eagle nests at all on the James River and fewer than 500 nests in the Lower 48 states. Watts says the grim reality woke up Americans. The United States banned the pesticides an d the shooting of eagles. Wildlife officials started protecting the birds nesting territory and setting aside tracts of land for their recovery. In 2007, thanks to many recovery measures, the bald eagle came off the endangered species list. Today, more than 10,000 eagle pairs nest each year across the Lower 48 and many more in Alaska. And nowhere is their comeback more dramatic than along the James River, where they once again dominate the avian scene. The greatest thing is that it was our society tha t brought them back, Watts says. Interestingly, he says, it can still be tough to be a bald eagle along the James River these days but now for new reasons. As the population of the birds has rebounded, theres less habitat for all the eagles reaching m aturity as they try to find mates and claim territories. Only 1 in 5 finds a mate today, the evidence suggests, compared to nearly all a few decades ago.

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REC Update September 2013 14 For more information, go to: http://www.npr.org/2013/09/04/212641932/baldeaglesareback in a bigway andthe talons areout HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Electronic Reporting of Toxics Release Inventory Data Federal Register Citation: 78 FR 5286052868 The EPA has issued a final rule that requires facilities to report non trade secret Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) forms electronically to EPA using EPA's online reporting application, TRI MEweb. EPA will no longer accept nontrade secret TRI reports, revisions, or withdrawals on paper reporting forms, magnetic media, or CD ROMs. This final rule applies to facilities that submit annual reports under section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) and section 6607 of the Pollution Prevention Act (PPA). Potentially affected entities include facilities with certain North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) manufacturing codes and federal facilities. This final rule is effective 21 JAN 14. As currently impl emented, one or more representatives from each facility must establish an account with EPA's Central Data Exchange (CDX) https://cdx.epa.gov/ in order to prepare, transmit, certify, and submit TRI Forms. EPA also requir es facilities to submit electronically via the internet any revisions or withdrawals of previously submitted TRI reporting forms. Additionally, EPA will no longer accept submissions, revisions, or withdrawals of TRI reporting forms submitted for reporting years prior to 1991. Facilities that submit trade secret TRI information will continue to submit their trade secret reporting forms (sanitized and unsanitized) and substantiation forms in hard copy. EPA will still accept revisions or withdrawals of prev iously submitted trade secret information on paper forms for reporting years back to 1991. The full text of the rule is available at the following link: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/ pkg/FR 2013 08 27/html/201320744.htm EPA Web Tool ChemView Expands Access to Scientific, Regulatory Information on Chemicals The EPA has launched a web based tool called ChemView to significantly improve access to chemical specific regulatory informati on developed by EPA and data submitted under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The ChemView web tool displays key health and safety data in an online format that allows comparison of chemicals by use and by health or environmental effects. The sear ch tool combines available TSCA information and provides streamlined access to EPA assessments, hazard characterizations, and information on safer chemical ingredients. Additionally, the new web tool allows searches by chemical name or Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) number, use, hazard effect, or regulatory action. It has the flexibility to create tailored views of the information on individual chemicals or compare multiple chemicals sorted by use, hazard effect or other criteria. The new portal will a lso link to information on manufacturing, processing, use, and release data reported under the Chemical Data Reporting Rule, and the Toxics Release Inventory. In the months ahead, EPA will be continuously adding additional chemicals, functionality and links. When fully updated, the web tool will contain data for thousands of chemicals. EPA has incorporated stakeholder input into the design, and welcomes feedback on the current site. View and search ChemView: htt p://www.epa.gov/chemview

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REC Update September 2013 15 REGION 1 CONNECTICUT Note: The Connecticut General Assembly convenes on 9 JAN 13 and adjourned on 5 JUN 13. Legislation The Connecticut Gene ral Assembly is out of session. Proposed Rules Ambient Air Quality Standards The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) has proposed amendments to 22a 174 1; 22a 174 3a(k), 22a 174 24, and 22a 174 28(a)(5). Upon adoption, the amended and adopted regulations will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a revision to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for air quality. The purpose of these a mendments is to update DEEPs ambient air quality standards as required by EPA. The ambient air quality standards are set out in RCSA section 22a 174 24. Three other regulations are amended in this proposal as those three regulations refer to the ambient air quality standards of RCSA section 22a174 24. EPA has established ambient air quality standards for each of six criteria pollutants at levels necessary to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety. EPA reviews each standard on a fivey ear cycle and updates the standard if warranted by the latest science. As DEEP has not revisited the Connecticut air quality standards in a number of years, many standards in RCSA section 22a 174 24 require a change in the level of the standard. The amen dments also clarify in RCSA section 22a 174 24 that the ambient air quality standards are relevant to emissions from stationary sources regardless of whether the source is subject to an individual air quality permit or not. Well Drilling and Geothermal Exchange Systems The Department of Consumer Protection has proposed amendments to Sections 25 128 33 through to 25128 139, 25128 40 through to 25128 42, 25 128 48a, 2512849, 25128 51 through to 25128 55, the appendix following 25128 64, 25 129 1, and 251292; the addition of Sections 25128 39a through 25128 39c, 25128 41a, 25128 49a, 25 128 57a, 25128 62a, 25 128 62b, 251293 through to 2512911, and 25130 1; and the repeal of Sections 2512858a and 25128 64, concerning well drilling and geoexchange systems. The purpose of this regulation is to update the Connecticut Well Drilling Code to conform with current i ndustry practices, to incorporate standards related to geothermal bore hole drilling and system installation, including four new geothermal specific limited license categories, to make technical changes to existing language for clarity, to re number existi ng sections to more properly track the applicable underlying statutes, and to provide gender neutrality in the language employed. These regulations provide for updated definitions which conform to current industry practice, and also to incorporate specific definitions for geothermal bore hole drilling. Additional provisions are added to regulate geothermal systems to help assure that the water supply is not contaminated due to substandard drilling practices or component installation. The Department believ es these regulation changes will protect the public health and safety, and in particular, help to protect the water supply from contamination.

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REC Update September 2013 16 S tate of the Art Commissary to Improve the Quality of Life for Groton Sailors For the past 11 months, Sailors dr iving through Naval Submarine Base New London (SUBASE) have witnessed construction of a brandnew commissary along Tang Ave. "This commissary is going to be handsdown the best grocery store in the area," said Ronald Krumme Jr., site construction manager in charge of the quality assurance for Parsons, the prime contractor for the new building. "It will be a state of the art commissary." The $15 million project funded by the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) will result in a commissary that will be bigger a nd better than the current one, from offering a full delicatessen bar to energy saving light fixtures and refrigeration units throughout the building. The project began in October 2012 and is slated to finish in early 2014. Following the movement of goods from the old facility and the stocking of new items, the grand opening of the new commissary is planned for spring of 2014. "Although construction began last October, the planning that has gone into this new building began nearly five years ago," said Krum me. "The project is going really well. We are slightly ahead of schedule now, so we know we are going to finish on time." Boasting a spacious 57,000 square feet floor plan, and 33,000 square feet sales area, patrons will have plenty of space to explore, al ong with an increase in food selections. For more information, go to: http://www.dolphin news.com/articles/2013/08/29/news/doc521f5ab71ab8b818906888.txt?viewmode=fullstory MAINE Note: The Maine General Assembly convened on 5 DEC 12 and adjourned on 18 JUN 13. Legislation On 5 FEB 13, Senator Tuttle introduced ME LD 245 which specified that the funds provided by this bond issue, in the amount of $5,000,000, will be used to provide funds to repair and maintain armory property and facilities to remain in compliance with state and federal requirements. The Governor signed this bill on 30 AUG 13. Proposed Rules Proposed Routine Program Changes to the Maine Coastal Program The Department of Agriculture, Conservation and For estry has invited comment on proposed routine program changes to the Maine Coastal Program. Select state land use and environmental laws and related agency rules serve as the core laws and provide the enforceable policies of the Maine Coastal Program. Th e National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management ("OCRM") must approve changes to the Program and its enforceable policies. The Maine Coastal Program periodically submits for OCRM's approval proposed routi ne program changes made up of amendments or additions to the Program's core laws, and recently submitted such a routine program change request. The proposed changes are made up of amendments to the Natural Resources Protection Act, Shoreland

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REC Update September 2013 17 Zoning Act, S ite Location of Development Act, state air and water quality laws, and other Program core laws that were enacted during the most recent legislative session (First Regular Session, 126th Maine Legislature). In addition, this submission includes provision f or ongoing administration of the Program within the management framework for the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry ("DACF") established by P.L. 2013, ch. 405. Passed last session, this law confirms the merger of the State's D epartments of Conservation and Agriculture, Food, and Rural Resources to form DACF. These recently enacted public laws are available on line at: http://www.mainelegislature.org/ros/LOM/LOMDirec tory.htm This submission also contains the following previously enacted statutory provisions: Coastal Management Polices Act, 38 M.R.S. 8011802; Coastal Barrier Resources System Act, 38 M.R.S. 19011905; and 38 M.R.S. AA 480 FF (performance standards for quarries under the Site Location of Development Act), which OCRM has indicated were not formally approved previously for inclusion among the program's core laws and are being resubmitted. These statutes are available on line at: http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/ Navys Power Cable Plans for Cutler Concern Scallop Fishermen By Tom Cox Bangor Daily News The Navy's plan to run a power cable under Machias Bay to bring electricity to its communications station in Cutler ha s caused area scallop fishermen to be apprehensive. There is a possibility that fishermen may be restricted from dragging gear along the bottom of the bay in the vicinity of the cable in search of scallops or urchins. Such a determination would be made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in consultation with the Navy, and if a designated cable area by NOAA is marked accordingly on marine charts, dragging would be prohibited in the vicinity of the cable. The Navy may not seek such a designation since the cable will be buried 3 5 feet below the ocean floor. "We've been kind of talking about that," said Tom Kreidel, a spokesman for NAVFAC Mid Atlantic in Norfolk, VA. "Bottom lin e is, we're working to make the most minimal impact on fishing that we can," Kreidel said. For more information, go to: http://bangordailynews.com/2013/08/28/news/downeast/navyspower cableplans for cutler station concern scallop fishermen/ EPA Region 1 Stormwater Rain Garden Training for Federal Facilities Portsmouth Naval Shipyard EPA New England and the Por tsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, M E will be hosting a day and a half Stormwater Rain G arden training on 34 OCT 13. The speakers at this training will explain the Clean Water Act, s tormwater compliance requirements for Federal Facilities, provide inform ation on inexpensive green initiatives for managing stormwater, and provide details on designing and installing stormwater rain gardens at your facility. For more information, go to: ht tps://www.fedcenter.gov/Articles/index.cfm?id=24523 If you would like to register please contact Anne H. Fenn, Federal Facility Program Manager EPA Region I at Fenn.Anne@epa.gov by 27 SEP 13. MASSACHUSETT S Note: The Massachusetts General Court meets throughout the year.

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REC Update September 2013 18 Proposed Legislation No new environmental legislation of significant importance to DoD was identified during this reporting period. Regulations Adhesives and Sealants The Department of Environmental Protection has adopted amendments which add a new section 310 CMR 7.18(30), Adhesives and Sealants, that establishes volatile organic compound conte nt limits for industrial adhesives and sealants and associated cleaning and surface preparation operations; make minor associated changes to certain sections of 310 CMR 7.18 to make those sections consistent with the new Adhesives and Sealants regulations; and make minor technical clarifications to 310 CMR 7.19 and 310 CMR 7.00: Appendix B. This regulation passed and became effective on 30 AUG 13. NEW HAMPSHIRE Note: The NH General Court convenes on 2 JAN 13 and adjourn ed on 30 JUN 13. Legislation The New Hampshire General Court is out of session. Proposed Rules Septage Management The Department of Environmental Services has proposed the readoption with amendments of the Septage Management rules. The existing rules implement RSA 485A:4, XVI a by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for a permit system to manage the removal, transportation, and disposal of septage, including the processing and treatment thereof, in order to protect human health and the environment and to encourage beneficial reuse and recycling of septage with appropriate performance standards. The rules are scheduled to expire on 27 OCT 13, and so are proposed to be re adopted. The proposed changes to the rules are primarily editorial, with two exceptions. The first exception relates to the soil sampling protocol referenced in Env Wq 1608.12(d) and (f)(2), where the existing requirement to take soil samples in accordance with the protocol established by the UNH Cooperative Extension in its 2003 soil sampling form is proposed to be revised to require soil samples to be taken as specified by the accredited laboratory that will be doing the analyses. A reference to the UN H Cooperative Extensions protocol is included as an example. Since most people use the Cooperative Extensions service and since other accredited labs should have very similar sampling protocols, this revision is unlikely to result in any changes in prac tice. The second exception removes a reference to a specific septage sampling methodology in EnvWq 1613.05(b), as the current methodology required by EnvWq 1613.05(b) for batch sampling of septage does not apply to many situations. VOC Limits for Consumer Products The Department of Environmental Services has proposed the readoption with amendment of existing rules, Env A 4100, which reduce emissions of v olatile organic compounds (VOCs) by establishing caps on the VOC content of various consumer products. The rules are proposed to be readopted because they expired on 24 SEPT 13. As a result of filing this Notice prior to the expiration of the existing rules, the existing rules will continue in effect as provided in RSA 541A:14 a, subject to the conditions

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REC Update September 2013 19 specified therein. Revisions are proposed in accordance with revisions to the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC) Model Rules to add definitions, add con sumer product categories, change some existing VOC limits, add new VOC limits for some products, and add specific requirements for paint thinner and multipurpose solvents. (A description of the OTC is provided in 6(b), below.) Specifically, existing VOC l imits are proposed to be increased for construction, panel, and floor covering adhesives and for structural waterproof adhesives. E xisting VOC limits are proposed to be decreased for general purpose adhesives, carburetor or fuel injection air intake clean ers, aerosol engine degreasers, floor polishes / waxes (other than wood floor wax), aerosol general purpose cleaners, aerosol general purpose degreasers, and laundry starch / sizing / fabric finish products. Also, VOC limits are proposed to be added for a dhesive removers, dual purpose air freshener/disinfectants (aerosol), anti static products, automotive windshield cleaner, non aerosol bathroom and tile cleaner, brake cleaner, disinfectant (aerosol and non aerosol), electrical cleaner, electronic cleaner, fabric fresheners (aerosol and nonaerosol), footwear or leather care products, graffiti remover (aerosol and nonaerosol), hair styling products, multi purpose solvent, paint thinner; sanitizer (aerosol and nonaerosol), shaving gel, aerosol temporary hair color, toilet/urinal care products (aerosol and nonaerosol), and wood cleaner (aerosol and nonaerosol). A provision for sell through of products manufactured prior to the effective date is proposed to be added so that existing stock can be sold out. The proposed rules also would prohibit the sale or manufacture of any multi purpose solvent or paint thinner that contains any methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, or trichloroethylene, subject to allowances for sell through and for impurities in a combi ned amount equal to or less than 0.01 percent by weight. Regulation s Explosives Rules The Department of Safety has adopted rulemaking which readopts Saf C 1600 rules that are scheduled to expire on December 20, 2012, but subject to extension pursuant to RSA 541A:14 a. The rules establish the procedures for the handling, storage, sale, transportation and use of explosive materials. There are no changes to th e rules. This regulation passed and became effective on 15 AUG 13. NHDES Offering Workshops for Solid Waste Operators and Municipal Officials The NH Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) will hold 13 free workshops this fall for solid waste operat ors and municipal officials about Best Management Practices (BMPs). Attendees will receive a reference manual with BMPs and other pertinent information related to proper management of solid wastes and increasing recycling. This workshop counts as continu ing education for operators to renew certification. For a schedule of the workshops, go to http://m1e.net/c?808463058E6LXx8FTCsw.%4037254596ESEwFd76BH77w To register for a BMP workshop, contact Nelson Ordway at (603) 2712925 or nelson.ordway@des.nh.gov RHODE ISLAND Note: The RI General Assembly convenes on 1 JAN 13 and adjourn ed on 30 JUN 13. Legislation The Rhode Island General Assembly is out of session.

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REC Update September 2013 20 Proposed Rules Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Fee Structure for Licensing, Lab oratory and Administrative Services Provided by the Department of Health The Department of Health has proposed amendments to the Rules and Regulations Pertaining to the Fee Structure for Licensing, Laboratory and Administrative Services Provided by the Department of Health [R231 17 Fee] to address the reorganization of registration categories for xray devices. Regulation s Rules and Regulations for Wastewater Treatment Facility Operators The Department of Environmental Management has adopted amendments to "The Rules and Regulations for Wastewater Treatment Facility Operators". The regulations update is meant to clarify the language of some sections, expand opportunities for professional development, and provide more accurate explanations that reflect Board practices and expectations. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 29 SEP 13. VERMONT Note: The Vermont General Assembly convenes on 9 J AN 13 and adjourned on 10 MAY 13. Legislation The Vermont Legislature is out of session. Regulation s Act 250 Rules The Natural Resources Board has adopted amendments to the existing Act 250 rules to : 1. D efine or redefine terms; 2. A ddress the issuance of jurisdictional opinions; 3. C larify the time in which to file certain appeals ; 4. R equire the renoticing when a project application has changed; 5. A ddress fees for house construction; 6. A mend service requirements and electronic filing requirements; 7. R estrict successive applications; 8. C larify reconsideration review; 9. C larify that construction of a "material change" without a permit violates Act 250; 10. R elax certain filing requirements; 11. A ddre ss voluntary abandonment of permits; 12. C larify that appeals cannot be taken from motions to alter minor permits; 13. R equire utility lines proposed for lands subject to Act 250 permits to seeks amendments of such permits; and 14. A ddress jurisdictional issues rela ted to the construction of improvements for trails. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 1 OCT 13.

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REC Update September 2013 21 Updating the Vermont Stormwater Management Manual The Dep artment of Environmental Conservations Stormwater Program has announced a series of workshops to discuss a range of potential changes to the Vermont Stormwater Management Manual (VSMM), which was developed in 2002. The dates are as follows: Workshop sche duled for 11/1/2013 Workshop scheduled for 12/12/2013 Workshop scheduled for 1/17/2014 Workshop scheduled for 2/21/2014

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REC Update September 2013 22 REGION 2 NEW JERSEY The New Jersey Legislature meets throughout the year. Proposed Legislation On 9 SEP 13, Assemblywoman Angelini i ntroduced NJ AB 4357 which would provide information to the general public about how to ensure proper and safe disposal of unused prescription drugs. Specifically, the bill requires that each pharmacy practice site and each prescriber distribute, for every prescription drug dispensed, a copy of a notice prepared by the Division of Consumer Affairs i n the Department of Law and Public Safety and posted on its website, to advise patients about: the availability of drug takeBack programs sponsored by a local, State or federal government agency; and how to obtain information from those programs concerning where unused prescription drugs may be dropped off for safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal. Regulations No new environmental regulations of significant importance to DoD were identified during this reporting period. NJ Announce s Attainment of Federal Standard for Fine Particles The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has notified the state that New Jersey's metropolitan areas are in compliance with federal standards for fine particles, a type of pollutant that can cause seriou s health problems, especially in vulnerable populations. This action means all of New Jersey's counties for the first time meet federal health standards for this air pollutant. Specifically, the EPA has notified the state that counties that are part of th e state's two major metropolitan areas meet the daily and annual health standards for fine particles, also known as Particulate Matter (PM) 2.5. The attainment status became effective upon publication in the Federal Register. In the New York metropolitan region, those counties in attainment are Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Passaic, Somerset and Union. In the Philadelphia region, those counties are Burlington, Camden and Gloucester. The eight remaining New Jersey counties al ready meet the EPA's health standards for fine particles. Fine particles are two and one half microns or less in width, or approximately 1/30th the width of a human hair. According to EPA, fine particles may pose the greatest health risks of all air pollu tants because they can lodge deeply into the lungs. Exposure to fine particles can cause short term health effects such as eye, nose, throat, and lung irritation, coughing, sneezing, runny nose, and shortness of breath. Exposure to fine particles can als o affect lung function and worsen medical conditions such as asthma and heart disease.

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REC Update September 2013 23 NEW YORK The New York State Legislature meets throughout the year. Proposed Leg islation On 2 5 FEB 13, Assemblyman Oaks introduced NY AB 5363 which woul d repeal provisions relating to ultra low sulfur diesel fuel and best available technology by the state. On 15 JUL 13, Senator Young introduced NY SB 5917 which r elates to asbestos project notification fees per square foot for friable material. On 21 AUG 13, Senator Krueger introduced NY SB 5927 which would expand the provisions of the New York state plastic bag reduction, reuse and recycling law to require the collectio n and deposit of a five cent charge for each plastic bag provided by a retailer to its customers and a five cent charge on each piece of plastic film shipped to the state. R egulations Emerald Ash Borer Quarantine The Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has announced that it is expanding and consolidating its existing quarantine districts in eastern and western New York into one quarantine district in order to limit the potential introduction of the invasive Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to other areas of the state. NYSDECs EAB Quarantine Order rescinds and replaces the prior quarantine orders with one consolidated order. The Order prohibits the intrastate movement of EAB, and the movement of ash nursery stock, ash trees, and ash wood products, and firewood, wood chips and bark mulch from any tree species, beyond the quarantine district without certification or compliance agreements from the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM), or the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture, in addition to other provisions as defined in the Order. Revisions have also been made to the current regulations to reflect the same dates for the EAB flight season included in the NYSDAM and APHIS orders and to make minor changes for clarity. The final Quarantine Order will become effective 10 days after it is filed with the clerks of Albany, Allegany, Broome, Catt araugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chemung, Chenango, Columbia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Erie, Fulton, Genesee, Greene, Herkimer, Livingston, Madison, Monroe, Montgomery, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Orleans, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Rensselaer, Schen ectady, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Sullivan, Tioga, Tompkins, Ulster, Wayne, Wyoming, and Yates Counties.

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REC Update September 2013 24 REGION 3 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Note: The Council of the District of Columbia meets twice per month throughout the year. Proposed Legislation On 26 JUN 13, Councilmember McDuffie introduced DC B 368 which would establish a procedure for receiving, monitoring, and responding to air quality complaints; to inc rease the maximum penalties for emissions; and to set forth criteria for determining whether a particular emission interferes with the reasonable enjoyment of the quality of life and property. Proposed Rules No new environmental regulations of significant importance to DoD were identified during this reporting period. D DOE Issues New Lead Regulations The District Department of the Environment (DDOE) has issued new lead regulations that will fully implement the Lead Hazard Prevention and Elimination Act. The regulations were issued on 26 JUL 13 and became effective upon publication. Among the regulations key features are provisions that flesh out a new lead discipline in the District to be known as the Dust Sampling Technician. The Dust Sampling Technic ian is an entry level position that is anticipated to both create new jobs for District residents and provide property owners with a lower cost alternative to document lead safety in their properties. Technical changes to the regulations that implement th e Districts Lead Screening and Reporting Act have also been included. DDOE will soon release outreach materials that guide the regulated community on their new rights and obligations. Feds, Military, and Students can have Free Access to Washington Post Digital By Josh Hicks The Washington Post The Washington Post started an online paywall system in June, but the organization now offers free digital access for federal employees, military personnel and students in higher education. The new policy, which began in August 2013, is an extension of the companys original paywall plan, which provided access to people in government, the military, and education while at work or on campus. Now those readers can view the Web site anywhere at no cost by logging in with their .gov, .mil and .edu e mail addresses. Instructions for signing up are available on the Posts registration page

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REC Update September 2013 25 DELAWARE Note: The Delaware General Assembly convenes on 8 JAN 13 and adjourn ed on 30 JUN 13. Legislation The Delaware General Assembly is out of session. Regulation s Statewide Solid Waste Management Plan The Delaware Solid Waste Authority ("DSWA") has adopted an addendum to the Statewide Solid Waste Management Plan (the "Plan") to modify the Plan adopted 22 APR 10. The addendum to the SSWMP better and more completely describes the activities of the DSWA. The addendum also highlights the authority of the DSWA, whether through contractual arrangements or through regulation, to control and manage the collection of solid waste in Delaware to assure the usage of the facilities provided by DSWA. This assures proper solid waste disposal, waste volume reduction, use of recycling programs and the full capture of those recyclables in the future, and further provides the means of financially supporting the many and di verse activities conducted under the authority and dictates of DSWAs enabling legislation. This regulation passed and became effective on 11 SEP 13. MARYLAND Note: The Maryland General Assembly convenes on 9 JAN 13 and adjourned on 8 APR 13. Leg islation The Maryland General Assembly is out of session. Proposed Rules Baltimore Nonattainment Area PM2.5 Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan The Department of the Environment has announced a public hearing concerning the Baltimore Nonattainment Area PM2.5 Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan. The State of Maryland requests that the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) redesignate the Baltimore, MD 1997 fine particulate (PM2.5) nonattainment area to attainment for this standard pursuant to the provisions under 107 of the federal Clean Air Act (CAA). Since the designations for the National Ambien t Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for this pollutant were published (Federal Register, Vol. 70, No. 3, 1/5/2005), the areas PM2.5 air quality has improved due to permanent and enforceable emission reductions. Air quality in the area is significantly better than required by this standard. Due to the improvement in PM2.5 air quality, the USEPA finalized a clean data determination for the Baltimore area on 22 MAY 12 (Federal Register, Vol. 77, No. 99, 5/22/2012). The State of Maryland is also requesting that USEPA concurrently approve, as a revision to the state implementation plan (SIP) for each state,

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REC Update September 2013 26 the related 175A maintenance plan. This plan ensures that good PM2.5 air quality will be maintained through 2025. Bay Restoration Fund Implementation The Department of the Environment has proposed new Regulations .01.04 under a new chapter, COMAR 26.03.13 Bay Restoration Fund Implementation. The purpose of this action is to ado pt new regulations that specify the procedures for implementing the Bay Restoration Fund authorized under Environment Article, 1605.2, Annotated Code of Maryland. The Bay Restoration Fund is administered by the Maryland Water Quality Financing Administration, a unit of the Department, and is comprised of two subfunds: 1. Wastewater Fund: Bay Restoration Fund fees collected from customers or users of wastewater treatment facilities are deposited by the Comptroller into this Fund and are used to provide gra nts for the upgrade of wastewater treatment plants with enhanced nutrient removal technology, a portion of the operation and maintenance costs related to ENR, and other authorized uses. 2. Onsite Sewage Disposal System Fund: Bay Restoration Fund fees collect ed from users of onsite sewage disposal systems (such as septic systems or holding tanks) are deposited by the Comptroller into this Fund and are used to provide grants or loans for the upgrade of onsite sewage disposal systems with best available technolo gy for removal of nitrogen, and other authorized uses. Notice of Tentative Determination to Reissue State and National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Disch arge Permits The Department of Environment, Land Management Administration has made Tentative Determination to reissue the following State and National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Discharge Permits: General Permit for Discharg es of Storm Water and Hydrostatic Test Water from Oil Terminals (MDG34) This permit authorizes the discharge of storm water from storage tank diked and loading rack areas and hydrostatic test water to surface or ground waters of the State from petroleum terminals having less than 5,000,000 gallons storage of oil. This permit sets numerical limits on the concentration of the petroleum product contamination following treatment of the storm water or hydrostatic test water. General Permit for Discharges of T reated Ground Water from Oil Contaminated Ground Water Sources (MDG91) This permit authorizes the discharges of treated ground water previously contaminated by petroleum products as the result of leaks or spills. This permit sets numerical limits on the effluent concentration of the petroleum product contamination following treatment of the contaminated ground water. Regulations Permits, Approvals, and Registration The Depart ment of the Environment has adopted amendments to Regulations .17 and .19 under COMAR 26.11.02 Permits, Approvals, and Registration. The purpose of the amendments to COMAR 26.11.02.17 is to clarify how fees are applied to Air Quality Permit to Construct source categories; to establish a new fee for an additional source category that requires an Air Quality Permit to Construct; and to raise the existing minimum fee for securing a standard Air Quality Permit to Construct from $200 to $500, for most sources The proposed fee increases apply to sources requiring an individual Air Quality Permit to Construct. The fees will remain the same for small sources requiring an Air Quality General Permit to Construct. The purpose of the amendments to COMAR 26.11.02.19 is to raise the annual base fee for large air pollution sources in Maryland that are required to obtain a federal Title V Permit or State Permit to operate. The proposed amendments raise the annual base fee from $200 to $5,000 for sources requiring a fe deral Title V Permit and from $200 to $500$1,000 for sources requiring a State Permit to o perate. This regulation passed and became effective on 19 AUG 13.

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REC Update September 2013 27 Runway Repairs at NAS Patuxent River Communities surrounding Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent Riv er particularly the Cedar Cove neighborhood, the Lexington Park area south of the installation, Solomons Island, and California may notice changes in flight patterns and increased noise levels from September to November due to runway repairs at the air station. As with all operations, NAS Patuxent River takes precautions to lessen the impact of testing activities on the community. For more noise related information call 1 866 819 9028. PENNSYLVANIA Note: The Pennsylvania General Assembly meets throughout the year. Proposed L egislation On 24 JUN 13, Representative Pyle introduced PA HB 1576 w hich would provide a process for the designation of certain species. The bill provides guidance on how to get species or trout waters listed or delisted by Commonwealth agencies. It also provides guidance on how the Department shall manage the lists and how they will provide information to citizens On 2 9 AUG 13, Senator Tomlinson introduced PA SB 1084 referred to as the Underground Utility Line Protection Law, further providing for definitions, for duties of facility owners, for duties of the One Call System, for duties of excavators, for duties of designers, for duties of project owners and for penalties; providing for enforcement, for underground utility line protection fund and for compliance; and further providing for One Call System authority and for expiration. Proposed Rules No new environmental regulations of significant importance to DoD wer e identified during this reporting period. New DEP On Line Tool Speeds PreApplication Process for Permit Applicants As part of its continuing effort to create a more efficient permit application procedure, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Pro tection (DEP) has developed an online Permit Application Consultation Tool (PACT). Its designed to quickly and easily assist potential applicants in determining which types of environmental permits, authorizations, or notifications would be needed for s pecific projects. Based on the users responses to a series of simple questions, PACT provides information on permits and other information an applicant should consider. When the tools questionnaire is completed, PACT automatically submits the information and attachments to the Assistant Regional Director in the appropriate DEP regional office. This information serves as the basis for a PreApplication Conference. At the conference, DEP staff verifies the information and discusses the needed permits or authorizations with the applicant. Pre Application Conferences often result in a savings of time and resources, especially when multiple permits or authorizations are needed. This is another example of DEPs commitment to improving efficiency without sacrificing the quality or transparency of our reviews said Acting DEP Secretary E. Christopher Abruzzo. Since the original Permit Decision Guarantee was implemented last year, DEP has esolved 66 % of all backlogged applications. This

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REC Update September 2013 28 allows us to move mu ch more efficiently on new permit applications, ensuring that they meet their target timeframes. For more information, visit www.dep.state.pa.us and click on Permits, licensing, and Certifications. By clicking on the link, you can access the PreApplication Information Tool and the questionnaire. VIRGINIA The Virginia Legislature convenes on 9 JAN 13 and adjourned on 23 FEB 13. Proposed Legislation The Virginia Legislature is out of session. Propos ed Rules Regional Haze Mid course Review The Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has invited comments and announced a public hearing on a proposed five y ear progress report regarding visibility impairment in Federal Class I areas. Virginia is home to two such areas: Shenandoah National Park and James River Face Wilderness. The Commonwealth intends to submit the report as a revision to the Virginia State Implementation Plan (SIP) in accordance with the requirements of 110(a) and 169A of the federal Clean Air Act. The SIP is the plan developed by the Commonwealth in order to fulfill its responsibilities under the federal Clean Air Act to attain and maintain the ambient air quality standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Richmond Air Quality Plan, Stage II The Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has announced an opportunity for public comment on a proposed plan to attain and maintain the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for ozone in the RichmondPetersburg Ozone Attainment/Maintenance Area. The Commonwealth intends to submit the plan as a revision to the Commonwealth of Virginia State Implementation Plan (SIP) in accordance with the requirements of 110(a) of the federal Clean Air Act. The SIP is the plan developed by the Commonwealth in order to fulfill its responsibilities under the Act to attain and maintain the ambient air quality standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The proposed revision revises the Richmond Petersburg area's ozone maintenance plans such that Stage II vapor recovery systems on gasoline dispensing stations are no longer required beginning on 1 JAN 2017. The RichmondPetersburg area was originally designated as a moderate nonattainment area for the 1991 ozone NAAQS of 0.012 parts per million (ppm). The area s air quality improved and a redesignation request and maintenance plan were approved by EPA on 17 NOV 97. On 30 APR 04, EPA designated the area as a moderate nonattainment area for the 1997 ozone NAAQS of 0.08 ppm. Again the area qualified for attainmen t status and EPA approved a redesignation request and maintenance plan on 1 JUN 07. Both maintenance plans contained emission reductions from the implementation of Stage II vapor controls. Since the most recent maintenance plan was developed and approved the area has been attaining the current, more protective ozone NAAQS of 0.075 ppm. EPA has also determined that Stage II, which controls vapors emitted from gasoline pumps, is incompatible with and less effective in controlling vapors than onboard refue ling vapor recovery, which controls vapors in

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REC Update September 2013 29 individual vehicles. The Commonwealth has determined that Stage II is no longer needed in the area's maintenance plan, which is approved into the Virginia SIP at 40 CFR 52.2420(e). Removing this requirement does not interfere with maintenance of any ozone NAAQS. In addition to the incompatibility between Stage II controls and vehicles equipped with onboard refueling vapor recovery systems, volatile organic compound (VOC) reductions from other sources of emissi ons more than compensate for any emissions reductions that might be lost from the removal of Stage II requirements. Modeling studies also show that reductions in nitrogen oxides (NOX) are 10 to 1,000 times more effective than VOC reductions in lowering oz one concentrations in the RichmondPetersburg area. Therefore, this SIP revision satisfies EPA's requirements regarding the removal of Stage II vapor recovery requirements and 110(l) of the Clean Air Act. Regulations Transfer of Stormwater Management Program (VSMP) Regulations from the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board to the State Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt action fi nal regulation regarding 9VAC25 870 Virginia Stormwater Management Program (VSMP) Regulations. As of a result of actions by the 2013 General Assembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conserva tion and Recreation will now be administered by the Department of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, e rosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the Stormwater Management Regulations have been changed from Title 10.1 to 62.1 and section references have been changed from 4VAC5060 to 9VAC25 870 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13. Transfer of the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area Designation and Management Regulations from the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Stat e Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt action final regulation regarding 9VAC25830 Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area Designation and Management Regulations. As of a result of actions by the 2013 General As sembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will now be administered by the Department of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Wa ter Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, erosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the Chesapeake Bay Preservat ion Area Designation and Management Regulations have been changed from Title 10.1 to 62.1 and section references have been changed from 4VAC5090 to 9VAC25830 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and R ecreation and the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13. Transfer of the Erosion and Sediment Control and Stormwater Management Certification Regulations from the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board to the State Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt act ion final regulation regarding 9VAC25850 Erosion and Sediment Control and Stormwater Management Certification Regulations. As of a result of actions by the 2013 General Assembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will now be administered by the Department of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, erosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the Erosion and Sediment Control and Stormwater Management Certification Regulations have been changed from T itle 10.1 to 62.1 and

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REC Update September 2013 30 section references have been changed from 4VAC5050 to 9VAC25850 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13. Transfer of the Erosion and Sediment Control Regulations from the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the State Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt action final regulation regarding 9VAC25840 Erosion and Sediment Control Regulations. As of a result of actions by the 20 13 General Assembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will now be administered by the Department of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, erosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the Erosion and S ediment Control Regulations have been changed from Title 10.1 to 62.1 and section references have been changed from 4VAC5030 to 9VAC25840 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the So il and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13. Transfer of th e General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Construction Activities from the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board to the State Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt action final regulation regardi ng 9VAC25 880 General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Construction Activities. As of a result of actions by the 2013 General Assembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conservation an d Recreation will now be administered by the Department of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, erosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Construction Activities have been changed from Title 10.1 to 62.1 and section references hav e been changed from 4VAC5060 to 9VAC25880 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water C ontrol Board. This regulation passed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13. Transfer of the General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems from the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board to the State Water Control Board The Department of Environmental Quality has adopted an exempt action final regulation regarding 9VAC25890 General VPDES Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Smal l Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems. As of a result of actions by the 2013 General Assembly (HB2048 & SB 1279) certain water quality programs previously administered by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will now be administered by the Dep artment of Environmental Quality. The Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board will have oversight of water quality planning and laws dealing with stormwater management, erosion and sediment control and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Areas. In this regulatory action Code references for the General Permit for Discharges of Stormwater from Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems have been changed from Title 10.1 to 62.1 and section references have been changed from 4VAC5060 to 9VAC25 890 to reflect the change in administration of the program from the Department of Conservation and Recreation and the Soil and Water Conservation Board to the Department of Environmental Quality and the State Water Control Board. This regulation pa ssed and becomes effective on 23 OCT 13.

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REC Update September 2013 31 Navy Secures Funding for Conservation Easements on Disputed York Tracts By Gregory Connolly Williamsburg Yorktown Daily The U S Navy has secured funds from the Department of Defense (DoD) that would enable it to purchase conservation easements on two plots of land in York County near Cheatham Annex that played host to a battle in the Civil War. At a recent meeting of the York County Board of Supervisors, more than a dozen people spoke in opposition to development on the land, where perhaps more than 300 Confederate soldiers from the 5th North Carolina, an infantry regiment, were killed by Union troops on a rainy day during the Battle of Williamsburg in May 1862. The funding comes from DoDs Readiness and Environmen tal Protection Integration (REPI) Program, which allows the military to enter into partnerships with private groups and local or state governments to buy out land in the interest of preserving military testing and training while conserving land. While the REPI funds would enable the Navy to purchase the easement on the land, there is not funding to purchase the actual land. I n order for it to be preserved, it would require a preservation oriented group to come forward to buy the land. The Navy has spoken out in opposition to a mixeduse overlay on the two tracts of land, one of which already has one. As York County moves to update its comprehensive plan, the mixeduse overlay a designation that does not change the zoning of the land but rather identifie s it as a potential target for mixed residential and commercial development has also drawn criticism from preservationists who are concerned with how development would affect the land. The larger tract of land is known as the Egger tract. The family tha t owns the land wants to extract value from the land and they believe the land is most valuable with the mixed use overlay H owever, they are amenable to conservation if they are able to sell the land for that purpose at fair market value, according to Matt Egger, who spoke at the hearing. The other tract of land is owned by Anheuser Busch, which already has a contract in place with real estate development firm MidAtlantic Properties to develop the tract. Lamont Meyers, a manager at Mid Atlantic Proper ties, said the mixed use development is crucial to the planned development. He also said his company is sympathetic to preservation and that there is plenty of room to satisfy all parties. Drew Robins spoke on behalf of the Navy and mentioned a partnershi p between the Navy, the Civil War Trust and the Williamsburg Land Conservancy. While the Civil War Trust could not be reached for comment, Caren Schumacher, the E xecutive D irector of the Williamsburg Land Conservancy, said in a statement no action has be en taken by the conservancys board of directors to protect either tract of land. Protecting and preserving significant natural, scenic, agriculture and historic land in the lower James and York River watersheds is the long standing mission of the Williamsburg Land Conservancy, Schumacher said. As this regions local land trust, we are pleased to be part of the discussions that surround the preservation of the historic and hallowed Civil War lands located in York County. Preservation would be an accep table outcome to the Navy, which has expressed concern about residential development on the land. At past York County Planning Commission meetings, Capt. Lowell Crow, the C ommanding O fficer of Yorktown Naval Weapons Station, has said residential developme nt on the land would lead to potential encroachment scenarios, electromagnetic disruption of sensitive military equipment and other issues that would compromise the ability of the land to be used as a training ground. According to the REPI website, develo pment near military areas can cause problems for the military including: Residents near bases sometimes complain about noise, dust and smoke resulting in restrictions on the timing and frequency of training activities. C ommunication towers, wind turbines, highways and power lines near bases can hinder realistic training and testing.

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REC Update September 2013 32 Residential/Commercial d evelopment that affects the habitats of endangered species can push them onto military land, which results in restrictions on training and testing. Ligh t pollution could compromise the effectiveness of night vision equipment used by the military for training. The National Park Service has also expressed opposition to the residential development of the land. Dan Smith, the S uperintendent of Colonial Nati onal Historical Park, shared his concerns of residential development at the tracts leading to encroachment on federal lands. The Egger tract borders a stretch of the Colonial Parkway from where it intersects with Interstate 64 to where it passes Jones Mil l Pond. Dominion Resources Wins Auction for Wind Farm off Virginia Beach By Aaron Applegate The Virginian Pilot If wind turbines rise from the ocean off Virginia Beach, Dominion Virginia Power will likely build them. The company won the auction to leas e nearly 113,000 acres of federal waters for a wind energy project 24 miles off the coast. Dominion's provisional winning bid was $1.6 million about $14 an acre. Of the eight companies qualified to bid, one other took part in the auction. Politicians an d environmentalists hailed the auction as a step toward generating more clean energy and touted Hampton Roads as ripe to become a hub to support an offshore wind industry. "Today is another great step forward in ensuring Virginia is the 'Energy Capital of the East Coast,' Gov. Bob McDonnell said in a news release. Nothing is going to happen soon, though. Dominion said it will be 10 years before the first turbines would be installed, if the project moves forward. "It's still going to be a pretty lengthy time before this becomes a reality," said Bob Matthias, Virginia Beach's lobbyist and chairman of the Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority, a group created by the General Assembly to support the development of an offshore wind industry. "It's post 2020 before we'll see any real development." Dominion has five years to come up with a plan to build and operate a wind farm that officials say could generate power for 700,000 homes, using 200 or more turbines. The company's biggest challenge will be to bring the cost down, officials have said. They've estimated that wind energy is three times more expensive than energy from natural gas. One environmental group, the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, suggested that Dominion might not build a wind farm a nd instead hold on to the lease to prevent another company from building a project. Dominion spokesman Jim Norvelle said the company wants to develop it but has to make sure it's economically feasible. For more information, go to: http://hamptonroads.com/2013/09/dominionwins auctionwind farm va beach US Marine Companies to Relocate to Naval Weapons Station By Gregory Connolly Williamsburg Yorktown Daily The con struction of three buildings at Yorktown Naval Weapons Station will pave the way for an additional 800 to 1,000 Marines to be stationed at the base by early 2015. Three U.S. Marine Corps Marine Fleet Anti Terrorism companies are being consolidated at the Marine Corps Security Force Regiment stationed at Yorktown in a move Navy officials say will bolster mission capabilities. The FAST companies, currently stationed in Norfolk, are used globally in an antiterrorism and security role focused on protecting na val and national assets. For more information, go to: http://wydaily.com/2013/09/24/u s marine companiesto relocateto naval weapons station/

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REC Update September 2013 33 WEST VIRGINIA The West Virginia Legislature convenes on 9 JAN 13 and adjourned on 14 APR 13. Proposed Legislation The West Virginia Legislature is out of session. Proposed Rules No new environmental regulations of significant importance to DoD were i dentified during this reporting period.

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REC Update September 2013 34 REGION 4 NORTH CAROLINA Note: The NC General Assembly convenes on 9 JAN 13 and adjourn ed on 1 JUL 13. Legislation No new environmental legislation of significant importance to DoD was identified during this r eporting period. Proposed Rules Air Toxics Rules The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has proposed amendments to the rules cited as 15A NCAC 02D .1104; 02Q .0701.0704, .0706, .0709, .0711 and the repeal of the rules cited as 15A NCAC 02Q .0705 and .0704. Session Law 201291 provides an exemption from North Carolinas air toxics rules for certain sources of toxic air pollutants as long as the Division of Air Quality (DAQ) determines that the emissions from that facility will not pose an unacceptable risk to human health. Section 1 of the law exempts sources subject to federal maximum achievable control technology (MACT), generally availabl e control technology (GACT), or case by case emission limits for toxic air pollutants established under Section 112(j) of the Clean Air Act, and codifies the Directors Call provision of the state air toxics rules. Section 2 of the law requires rule amendm ents consistent with Section 1. Section 3 of the Session Law requires the DAQ to review the existing air toxics rules and make recommendations to the Environmental Review Commission (ERC) on whether further changes could be made that would reduce unnecessa ry regulatory burden and increase the efficient use of Division resources while maintaining public health protections. The proposed recommendations include: develop additional set of toxic emission permitting rates (TPER) for unobstructed vertical stacks; exempt natural gas and propane fired combustion sources less than 450 mm BTU/hr that are only source of benzene; exempt emergency engines less than 4843 hp that are only source of formaldehyde; repeal Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) call rule; cla rify the term actual rate of emissions; and remove the term unadulterated wood. Rules in Section 15A NCAC 02Q .0700 are proposed to be amended or repealed to incorporate the Section 1 statutory exemptions and the Section 3 report recommendations. In a ddition, Rule 15A NCAC 02Q .0714, Waste Water Treatment Systems a t Pulp a nd Paper Mills, is proposed to be repealed due to applicable requirements having expired. Existing rule numerical values for the asbestos ambient air level (AAL) in 15A NCAC 02D .1104 and the associated asbestos TPER in 15A NCAC 02Q .0711 are proposed to be revised due to a calculation error in their original development. Financial Relief to Applicants for Permits for Certain Beach Fill Projects The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has proposed rule amendments to provide financial relief to applicants for permits for certain beach fill projects. The CRC has identif ied a limited set of conditions under which applicants can avoid some permit related costs without violating the intent of the current rule or compromising environmental protection.

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REC Update September 2013 35 Regulations Executive Order No.22 To Protect the Public from Solid Waste The Office of the Governor has issued Executive Order No. 22 relating to vehicles and containers used for the collection and transportation of sol id waste. Under the Executive Order, t he State Highway Patrol and law enforcement officers of the Department of Public Safety shall continue to exercise their powers under Article 3 of Chapter 20 of the General Statutes to ensure no vehicle is driven or m oved in violation of N.C.G.S. section 20116(g)(1) and that leachate is not permitted to escape from containers or vehicles transporting solid waste on North Carolina highways. This Executive Order was issued on 16 SEP 13.

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REC Update September 2013 36 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Co nferences Energy Savings Performance Contracting Training (Web Based, On Demand) This 8 hour course is offered by the Defense Acquisition University/Federal Acquisition Institute (DAU/FAI) and is targeted at federal contracting and procurement officials, h owever, federal energy/facility managers would also benefit from understanding thirdparty financing options for energy and energy related building improvements. Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) is a contracting vehicle that allows federal agencies to accomplish energy projects for their facilities without depending on appropriations to pay for the improvements. An ESPC project is a partnership between the customer (a government organization) and an energy service company (ESCO). For more information, go to: http://icatalog.dau.mil/onlinecatalog/courses.aspx?crs_id=1945 Emergency Environmental Spill Response Training (Web Based, On Demand) Produced by NOAA s Office of Response and Restoration, this is an online training module for individuals looking to strengthen their knowledge of spills and their effect on the environment. The scenario describes and oil spill and directs you to the references and data that you can use to determine what natural resources are at risk. For more information, go to: http://ohshub.com/free online training emergency environmental spill response/ 30Meter Height High Resolution Wind map for Small and Distributed Projects (Web Based, On Demand) This webinar, originally presented 18 July 2012, provided an introduction to the new 30meter high resolution wind maps developed for the sma ll and distributed wind markets. Included in the discussion was the methodology behind the wind maps, how these maps leverage the learning that occurred in the development of the utility scale wind maps, and the appropriate use of the maps. For more infor mation, go to: http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3550 Climate Strategies Forum, 1417 OCT 13, Washington, DC Sponsored by the Association of Cli mate Change Officers, the Forum will feature prominent leaders from across sectors in a plenary format, and a series of half day bootcamps aligned with the core competencies. Plenary sessions will focus on climate and energy, and bootcamps will focus on t opics including adaptation planning, implementing change management schemes, implementing a GHG management structure, and building a public private partnership project. For more information, go to: htt p://www.climatestrategiesforum.org/ Scenario Planning to Support Decision Making 9 OCT 13, Web based Many utilities are thinking critically about how to best manage water resources and utility assets when future conditions are uncertain. This session will introduce scenario planning, a method that allows a flexible approach to strategic long term planning and highlight examples from utility representatives that have used scenario planning. This offering starts at 1300 and ends at 1400. For more infor mation, go to: http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/watersecurity/climate/index.cfm#splan 29th Annual Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy, 2124 OC T 13, Amherst, MA Examples of conference topics include: bioremediation, ecological risk assessment, innovative technologies, jet fuel contamination, regulatory programs and policies, remediation, renewable energy projects on closed landfills and contamina ted sites, carbon footprint and life cycle analysis, and recycling of demolition debris. For more information, go to: http://www.aehsfoundation.org/east coast conference.aspx

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REC Update September 2013 37 D efense Energy Summit, 11 13 NOV 13, Austin, TX This will be a 3 day conference and expo covering operational and installation energy issues. More information to come as it becomes available. Greenbuild Conference and Expo 2013, 2022 NOV 13, Philadelph ia, PA The Greenbuild C onference and E xpo is dedicated to green building. The schedule for Greenbuild includes multiple education sessions, LEED workshops, and a summit on Materials and Human Health. For more information, go to: http://greenbuildexpo.org/why/attend.aspx Robust Planning to Support Decision Making, 4 DEC 13, Web based This webinar will present another option for strategic long term planning, robust decision making, which assesse s the trade offs between different approaches and helps identify the most 'robust' solution. Utility representatives that have used robust decision making techniques will share their insights and experiences. This offering starts at 1300 and ends at 1400. For more information, go to: http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/watersecurity/climate/index.cfm 13th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference, 13 16 FEB 1 4, Denver, CO The theme of the conference is "Building Safe, Healthy, Equitable, and Prosperous Communities." Topics being addressed include: Communications and Engagement; Equitable Development and Environmental Justice; Implementing Smart Growth; Land P reservation; Planning Tools and Technologies; and Water and Coastal Areas. For more information go to: http://newpartners.org/ 2014 Climate Leadership Conference, 24 26 FEB 14, San Diego, CA At this conferenc e, forward thinking leaders from business, government, academia, and the nonprofit community gather to explore energy and climate related solutions, introduce new opportunities, and provide support for those addressing climate change in their operations. For more information, go to: http://www.climateleadershipconference.org/ Threshold Analysis to Support Decision Making, 19 MAR 14, Webbased This webinar will present a third option for making decisions under conditions of uncertainty: bottom up threshold analysis. This approach emphasizes the analysis of different thresholds of risk to inform and support decisions. Those that have developed and applied this method will provide their insights and experiences conducting threshold analyses for water utilities. This offering starts at 1300 and ends at 1400. For more information, go to: http://water.epa.gov/infr astructure/watersecurity/climate/index.cfm National Association of Environmental Professionals 2014 Conference, 710 APR 14, St. Petersburg, FL The theme of this conference is "Changing Tides and Shifting Sands." Subject matter ranges from cultural r esources to land management to overall sustainability. For more information, go to: http://www.naep.org/2014conference World Green Energy Symposium, 2224 APR 14, Niagara Falls, NY This symposium foc uses on green/renewable energy technology and innovations in existing technologies as the vantage point in the new economy creating and maintaining jobs, contract and exporting opportunities, and new policies leading to economic vitality and a healthier pl anet. For more information, go to: http://www.wges.us/home.html

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REC Update September 2013 38 TRAINING Only the CECOS courses offered within Regions 13 and North Carolina are listed here (with the exception of Natural Resources and Cultural Resources courses). For further information on the courses below, course offerings in other regions, and/or to register, visit the CECOS training website at: https://www .netc.navy.mil/centers/csfe/cecos/Default.aspx CECOS Classroom Courses Beginning Date End Date Course Location 21 OCT 13 23 OCT 13 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Norfolk, VA 24 OCT 13 24 OCT 13 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Norfolk, V A 4 NOV 13 7 NOV 13 Integrated EMS and Compliance Auditing Patuxent River, MD 5 NOV 13 7 NOV 13 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Portsmouth, NH 5 NOV 13 7 NOV 13 Munitions Response Site Management Norfolk, VA 12 NOV 13 13 NOV 13 Enviro nmental Background Analysis Norfolk, VA 12 NOV 13 15 NOV 13 Environmental Protection Norfolk, VA 19 NOV 13 22 NOV 13 Advanced Environmental Law Norfolk, VA (Compliance Offering) 2 DEC 13 6 DEC 13 Energy Management Course MIDLANT Region 28 JAN 14 30 JAN 14 Human Health Risk Assessment Norfolk, VA 4 MAR 14 4 MAR 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher (e) Washington, DC 5 MAR 14 5 MAR 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher (e) Washington, DC 6 MAR 14 6 MAR 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher (e) Norfolk, VA 7 MAR 14 7 MAR 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher (e) Norfolk, VA 10 MAR 14 14 MAR 14 ENV Sampling Design & Data Quali ty Assurance Norfolk, VA

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REC Update September 2013 39 Beginning Date End Date Course Location 11 MAR 14 12 MAR 14 Buying Green: A Multifunctional Approach to Pollution Prevention Norfolk, VA 25 MAR 14 27 MAR 14 Health & Environmental Risk Communication Workshop Norfolk, VA 7 APR 1 4 11 APR 14 Advanced Environmental Management Norfolk, VA 8 APR 14 10 APR 14 Basic Environmental Law Norfolk, VA 15 APR 14 16 APR 14 Uniform Federal Policy for Quality Assurance Project Plans Washington, DC 15 APR 14 18 APR 14 Natural Resources Complian ce Joint Base Bragg Pope, NC 22 APR 14 24 APR 14 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Quantico, VA 22 APR 14 24 APR 14 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Norfolk, VA 25 APR 14 25 APR 14 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Norfolk, VA 25 APR 14 25 APR 14 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Quantico, VA 29 APR 14 1 MAY 14 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Cherry Point, NC 29 APR 14 1 MAY 14 Ecological Risk Assessment Norfolk, VA 2 MAY 14 2 MAY 14 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Che rry Point, NC 12 MAY 14 15 MAY 14 Integrated EMS and Compliance Auditing Newport, RI 19 JUN 14 19 JUN 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher (e) Camp Lejeune, NC 20 JUN 14 20 JUN 14 HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Wast e Site Workers Refresher (e) Camp Lejeune, NC 25 JUN 14 27 JUN 14 Environmental Negotiation Workshop Norfolk, VA 14 JUL 14 14 JUL 14 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Camp Lejeune, NC 29 JUL 14 30 JUL 14 Optimizing Remedy Selection and the Site Closeout Pro cess Norfolk, VA

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REC Update September 2013 40 Beginning Date End Date Course Location 11 AUG 14 13 AUG 14 Intro to Hazardous Waste Generation and Handling Norfolk, VA 14 AUG 14 14 AUG 14 RCRA Hazardous Waste Review Norfolk, VA 19 AUG 14 21 AUG 14 Advanced Munitions Response Site M anagement Norfolk, VA 16 SEP 14 19 SEP 14 Environmental Protection Newport, RI CECOS Online Courses/Web Conferences Beginning Date End Date Course Location Various HAZWOPER for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Site Workers Refresher On Line 19 SEP 13 19 SEP 13 Sustainability in the Navy: LEED Web Conference 21 OCT 13 24 OCT 13 Advancing an Effective EMS Web Conference 18 NOV 13 21 NOV 13 Emergency Planning & Community Right to Know (EPCRA) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting Web Conference 3 DEC 13 5 DEC 13 Nat l Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Application Web Conference 9 DEC 13 12 DEC 13 Emergency Planning & Community Right to Know (EPCRA) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting Web Conference 9 JAN 14 9 JAN 14 Emergency Planning & Com munity Right to Know (EPCRA) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting Web Conference Section 311/312 Refresher 3 FEB 14 6 FEB 14 Advancing an Effective EMS Web Conference 4 MAR 14 5 MAR 14 Emergency Planning & Community Right to Know (EPCRA) and Tox ic Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting Web Conference Section 31 3 Refresher

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REC Update September 2013 41 Beginning Date End Date Course Location 31 MAR 14 3 APR 14 Advancing an Effective EMS Web Conference 8 APR 14 9 APR 14 Pollution Prevention Awareness Web Conference 10 APR 14 10 APR 14 Sustainability in the Navy: LEED Web Conference 9 SEP 14 10 SEP 14 Pollution Prevention Awareness Web Conference 11 SEP 14 11 SEP 14 Sustainability in the Navy: LEED Web Conference Air Quality Management Course is Open for Enrollment The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) is offering WENV 531 Air Quality Management Course from 28 OCT to 1 NOV 13. Registration is now open at http://www.afit.edu/cess/ You can find WENV 531 in the course listing under "Environmental Management." NPDES Permit Writers Training on the Web EPA has created a web based training series based on its popular National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Writer's Course. This will allow students, staff, stakeholders, and the public to access N PDES permit program training content online. The Course is a five day training session covering the key elements of NPDES permit development and is taught by experienced instructors. These recorded presentations enable one to review the material on deman d in a self paced environment to become familiar and comfortable with the concepts of the NPDES permit program. The NPDES web based training series can be found at http://www.epa.gov/npdes/training under Self Paced Web Training. CECOS EMS General Awareness: Computer Based Training (CBT) Module Available 24/7 at http://www.cecosweb.com/ under Training by Subject>EMS. A certificate is issued to all registered user s upon completion. This module is designed to provide an awareness level overview of EMS to satisfy the requirement that ALL personnel have basic EMS knowledge. It is also to be taken as a quick refresher for anyone that takes the Advancing an Effective EMS and/or Integrated EMS/Compliance trainings. NAVOSH & Environmental Training Center For further information on the courses and/or to register, visit NAVOSH & Environmental Training Center website at: http:// www.safetycenter.navy.mil/training/default.htm EPA Watershed Assessment Tools Training, Various Times & Locations More information is available at: http://www. epa.gov/waterscience/basins/training.htm USDA Forest Service Continuing Education Program, Various Times & Locations More information is available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/biology/education/ EPA Online EMS Training Course The course is available at: http://www.epa.gov/osw/inforesources/ems/ems101/

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REC Update September 2013 42 RCRA Training Modules An archive of training modules that provide s an overview of a specific regulatory topic. These modules will not be updated but are useful resources for people wishing to gain a general understanding of RCRA. They are not intended to serve as comprehensive sources of regulatory information. For more information, g o to: http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/inforesources/pubs/rmods.htm

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REC Update September 2013 43 MEET THE REC STAFF RADM D. R. Smith DoD Regional Environmental Coordinator (757) 3222800, DSN 2622800 Dire ctor, Regional Environmental Coordination (REC) Office (757) 3410363 REC Counsel (757) 3222938 DSN 2622938 or Deputy (757) 3222812 Cultural Resources (757) 3410372 Potable Water, Stormwater, Groundwater, Wastewater (757) 3410429 Air Quality, Asbe stos, Radon (757) 3410386 P2, EPCRA, RCRA HW/SW (757) 3410408 Navy On Scene Coordinator Representative (757) 3410449 POL/Tanks (757) 3410453 Regional NEPA, Natural Resources (757) 3410486 Land Use, Encroachment (757) 3410232 Environmental Restoration (757) 3410394 REC Support (757) 3410430 DoD Chesapeake Bay Coordinator (757) 3410455 DoD Chesapeake Bay State Liaison PA/VA/WV (757) 3410383 DoD Chesapeake Bay State Liaison DC/MD/NY (757) 3410450

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REC Update September 2013 44 LINK HELP SECURE SITES Lin ks beginning with https:// may give a security error. To get around this problem copy the link and paste it in your browser. DENIX Many of our links are to DENIX. To subscribe to DENIX, go to: https://www.denix.osd.mil/denix/register.html and register. If you find a dead link, please contact us at dodrecreg3@navy.mil and we will find the link for you. SUBSCRIBE! If you would lik e to receive notice when the REC Update is posted, please send an email to: dodrecreg3@navy.mil with your name, command, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and email address. If your email address or phone number changes, please send an email with the updated information. If you or your organization would like to submit an article, story, or picture for future newsletters, send it to: dodrecreg3@navy.mil Thanks