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The Moblie

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The Moblie
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United States -- Army. -- Corps of Engineers. -- Mobile District ( issuing body )
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

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"Building Strong".

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on10476 ( NOTIS )
1047612168 ( OCLC )
2018226780 ( LCCN )
on1047612168

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THE MOBILE April 2014 Vol. 6, Issue 1 Architect nationally recognized at BEYA-STEM Conference

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COVER STORY Click Here! Commander Col. Jon Chytka Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Thomas Nelson Public Affairs Of cer E. Patrick Robbins Deputy PAO Lisa Parker Public Affairs Specialist Lorraine Evans Writer-Editor Lance Davis THE MOBILE is an unof cial, bi-monthly publication authorized under AR 360-1; designed via desktop publishing; and distributed electronically the rst Friday of every other month by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District Public Affairs Of ce. Story ideas, news tips and letters to the editor are welcomed. Editorial views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the U.S. Department of the Army or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Please contact the Public Affairs Of ce: PHONE: 251-690-2505 FAX: 251-690-2185 EMAIL: editor@usace.army.mil Address mail to: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District Public Affairs Of ce Attention: Editor P.O. Box 2288 Mobile, AL 36628-0001 Inside this issue... Vol. Vol. 6, 6, Issue Issue 1 1 April 04, 2014 COVER STORY PHOTO CUTLINE: Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Commanding General and Chief of Engineers, presented Tymon Wallace, an architect in Mobile Districts Engineering Division, with a Special Recognition Award for his successful work in the eld of Science, Technology, Engineering & Math at the 28th Annual BEYA-STEM Conference held Feb. 8 in Washington. Photo courtesy of Career Communications Group, Inc. THE MOBILE

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SOCSOUTH opens new headquarters facility built to withstand hurricanesStory by Joseph Armstrong, Construction Division & Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce The Special Operations Command South (SOCSOUTH) held a ribbon cutting ceremony Feb. 21 to open its new headquarters building constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District. SOCSOUTH is a sub-uni ed command located at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla. and assigned to Commander, U.S. Southern Command. It is a joint military Special Operations headquarters that plans and executes special operations in Central and South America and the Caribbean, principally employing Special Operations Forces provided by U.S. Special Operations Command and the Services Special Operations Forces component commands. The ribbon cutting ceremony culminated a long journey for SOCSOUTH that began with the conceptual idea for a new headquarters by Lt. Gen. Charles Cleveland previous SOCSOUTH commander from 2005-2008 who was then Maj. Gen. Cleveland. Lt. Gen Cleveland is now the Commanding General of Special Operations at Fort Bragg, N.C. It was deemed appropriate to have Lt. Gen Cleveland come back as the guest speaker and do the honors of cutting the ribbon. He was joined by Senior Executive Service Dr. Larry McCallister of USACE South Atlantic Division and Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka. This signi ed the completion of nearly 29 months of construction. SOCSOUTH now has a three-story, 124,000 square foot, state-of-the -art facility consisting of general purpose administrative areas and a Secure Compartmentalized Information Facility. SOCSOUTH Headquarters is Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Silver certi ed structure. What you see before you is a great looking headquarters facility for the Special Operations Command South, Col. Chytka said during the ceremony. This headquarters was a unique design build challenge for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The project was designed to withstand a Category 5 Hurricane, like Hurricane Andrew in 1992. THE MOBILE As the National Anthem played during a ribbon cutting ceremony to open the new Special Operations Command South Headquarters at Homestead Air Reserve Base, Fla., several attendees pledged allegiance to the American Flag as it was raised. Simultaneously, the American Flag was lowered at the old headquarters building. Photo courtesy of SOCSOUTH. Lt. Gen. Charles Cleveland previous Commander of Special Operations Command South and current Commander of Special Operations at Fort Bragg, N.C. cut the ribbon, culminating a long journey for SOCSOUTH that began with his vision for a new headquarters. Photo courtesy of SOCSOUTH.

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SOCSOUTH continued...Story by Joseph Armstrong, Construction Division & Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce It was built with a structural steel skeleton and tilt-up concrete exterior veneer panels designed to withstand winds up to 192 mph, which exceeds Category 5 hurricane winds. The building is designed to maintain continuous operations on the 2nd and 3rd oors in the event a hurricane causes a surge of ooding on the 1st oor. The structure has a separate utility building with two 1.5 mega-watt generators and a 150,000 gallon diesel fuel tank that will support continuous operations in the event of a power outage. A $40,368,280 design-build contract was awarded to Carothers Construction, Inc of Oxford, Miss. was unique because it included early completion dates for joint occupancy room and a phased moving plan for occupancy. The intent was to give SOCSOUTH the capability of maintaining continuous operations during the construction and moving of the headquarters. Joint occupancy rooms included data, telecommunications, and conference rooms to allow early installation of servers to begin data migration and installation of audio visual/video teleconferencing equipment. These joint occupancy rooms were synchronized with an overall plan that successfully moved SOCSO staff sections over a two-month period beginning in January and nishing in March. This unique timeline required three separate contracts to operate in the same space at the same time under three separate contract authorities. This required a collaborative effort and partnering amongst the government organizations responsible and their contractors to synchronize efforts. USACE Mobile District had the Military Construction contract to build the structure; the U.S. Army Information Systems Engineering Command (USAISEC) had the contract to install the data center equipment; and the U.S. Navys Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) had the contract to install video teleconferencing/audio visual equipment. Normally these contracts are executed in sequence one after the other, but this enabled the customer to save time and accomplish the phased moving plan. The districts Homestead ARB Project Of ce Team worked effectively with SOCSOUTH, USAISEC, and NAVAIR to successfully execute the construction and installation of equipment in accordance with the customers phased timeline. Currently under the leadership of Brig. Gen. Sean Mulholland, the headquarters staff of military, Department of Defense civilian employees and contractors is comprised of more than 200 personnel.THE MOBILE The newly constructed Special Operations Command South Headquarters pictured the night before the ribbon cutting ceremony. Photo courtesy of SOCSOUTH.

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Local news anchor takes unconventional approach at Black History ObservanceStory by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce A large, record-breaking crowd of employees attended Mobile District s Black History Observance Feb. 20 at the Athelstan Club in downtown Mobile to hear keynote speaker Eric Reynolds a local morning news anchor from Mobiles FOX 10 News. The observance was sponsored by the Equal Employment Opportunity Of ces Special Emphasis Leadership Forum. With a program theme of Civil Rights in America, Reynolds told the audience it was the medias coverage of the Civil Rights Movement that motivated him to become a journalist. He saw the power of the images and believed it helped make a difference in the success of the movement and that he wanted a career where he too could help make a difference as a journalist. Reynolds focused his message on Alabama during the 1960s and shared three civil rights activists stories. I want to share with you all brie y today the stories of some people who in 1960s Alabama made the ultimate sacri ce for us all, he said. 1. The Postal Worker Reynolds told the audience about a postal worker from Baltimore who was a member of Congress of Racial Equality and one-man marcher, protesting against racial segregation. The postal worker also delivered letters in support of equality by foot to the Maryland Capitol in Annapolis, and even a letter to the White House for U.S. President John Kennedy. His third protest was a walk from Chattanooga, Tenn. to Jackson, Miss. to deliver a letter to then Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett at his mansion, urging him to implement equal rights for all. During his journey, the brave post man was wearing sandwich board signs that said Equal Rights for All and Mississippi or Bust. On April 23, 1963, about 70 miles into his march along a rural stretch highway near Attalla, Ala., a passing motorist found him dead on the side of the road. He had been shot in the head twice at close range with a .22 caliber ri e. The guns ownership was traced to a man named Floyd Simpson who had been seen arguing with the postal worker earlier in the day, but no chargers against Simpson were ever made. The young man died just a week short of his 36th birthday. His letter was found and it read: The white man cannot truly be free until all men have their rights. He asked the governor to be gracious and give more than is immediately demanded of you.THE MOBILE Eric Reynolds addresses an audience of Mobile District employees during their Black History Observance Feb. 20 at the Athelstan Club in downtown Mobile. Reynolds is local morning news anchor from Mobiles FOX 10 News with more than 30 years of experience in broadcast journalism. He is also a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO.

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Black History Observance continued...Story by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce 2. The Clergyman Reynolds referred to his earlier comments about the power of media coverage, citing the national attention received for the Selma Marches to Montgomery The rst march also known as Bloody Sunday included 600 marchers protesting against the fatal shooting of activist Jimmie Lee Jackson by an Alabama state trooper and for equal voting rights. The marchers were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas. A pastor from Washington was watching the coverage and decided to answer Civil Rights Movement Leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther Kings call for clergy and students to join the Selma marchers in their protests for black voting rights. He traveled to Selma and became an active member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference a civil rights organization. One evening after leaving a restaurant, this clergyman and two other ministers were attacked and beaten by a group of white men armed with clubs. It took several hours before he was allowed to go to a hospital in Birmingham. While he was on the way, Dr. King asked America to pray for him. The doctors performed brain surgery but were unsuccessful. He died as a result of the beatings to his head. The men involved were acquitted of all charges. 3. The Seminary Student Reynolds last story was of an Episcopal seminary student from the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Mass. who answered Dr. Kings call as well, coming to Selma to help with black voter registration The seminary student participated in a demonstration, picketing whites-only stores in a small town of Lowndes County, Ala. He and the other demonstrators were arrested. Upon their release, the student and three others went down the road for a cold soft drink. They were approached by Tom Coleman an unpaid special deputy sheriff. Coleman attempted to shoot a young girl among the group. She was saved when the seminary student pushed her down to the ground, catching the full blast of the shot. He was killed instantly. The shooter was acquitted.THE MOBILE Eleanor and Eric Reynolds sing Lift Every Voice the African American National Hymn. The Reynolds co-anchored and co-produced the FOX10 Morning News program in Mobile for ve years. They were one of the rare husband and wife television news co-anchor/producer teams in the nation and are reportedly the rst African American husband and wife team to do so in the world. Photo by James Hathorn, Engineering Division. Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka presented Eric Reynolds, with wife Eleanor standing at his side, a certi cate of appreciation along with two commanders coins for his participation in the districts Black History Observance. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO.

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Black History Observance continued...Story by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce Reynolds said he chose these three young mens stories because they were young white men who laid their lives on the line for the Civil Rights Movement. He explained that the Civil Rights Movement wasnt just about African Americans, comparing it to the Underground Railroad a movement to help slaves escape to freedom that involved the efforts of both black slaves and white abolitionists. Reynolds went on to provide the names of the men for each story: the postal worker ~ William Lewis Moore; the clergyman ~ James Reeb; and the seminary student ~ Jonathan Daniels. It took these men and their unsel sh actions to bring attention to the plight of our forefathers here in the Deep South, Reynolds said. It took these men who made the ultimate sacri ce. It took all of us to make America what it is today. The observance concluded with re ections by Operations Division Chief, Wynne Fuller; presentations by Col. Jon Chytka, Mobile District Commander; remarks by Equal Employment Of ce Chief, Catherine Cummings; and the singing of the African American National Hymn Lift Every Voice.THE MOBILE The Postal Worker. William Lewis Moore was a postal worker from Baltimore who walked one-man marches to protest segregation in the 1960s. About 70 miles into his third march along a rural stretch highway near Attala, Ala., Moore was found shot in the head twice at close range with a .22 caliber ri e. Photo source: ladaryl.com The Clergyman. James Reeb was a pastor from Washington who responded to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.s call for the clergy to support the cause of black voting rights in Selma, Ala. Reeb traveled to Selma and joined the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He was beaten in the head by three white men and died as a result of head injuries. Photo source: wikipedia.org. The Seminary Student. Jonathan Daniels was a seminary student at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Mass. who responded to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.s call for the students to support black voter registration in Selma, Ala. Daniels pushed a young girl down, Ruby Sales, as a shot was red towards her by a deputy sherriff in Lowndes County, Ala. He died instantly. Note: The young girl above is unknown and not Ruby Sales. Photo source: www.vmi.edu.

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ANA: Brazils national water agency partners with Mobile DistrictStory by Lisa Parker, Public Affairs Of ce The Agencia Nacional de Aguas, or ANA, a national water agency from Brazil has partnered with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District under the authority of the U.S. Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, section 607. The Letter of Offer and Acceptance was signed on Nov. 5, 2013 and provides the technical expertise of USACE in the area of water resource management. ANA is a government agency created in 2000 with administrative and nancial autonomy under the Ministry of Environment. The agency is led by a board of directors comprised of ve members; a chief executive of cer; and four directors, all appointed by the President of Brazil. The term of each member is four years, on a staggered rotation. ANA was founded to compliment Brazilian national water resources policy, as an institutional response to bring balance to the complexity and dif culties inherent within a geographically large and diverse country. In a country where hydropower generation has become king, ANA has the challenge and responsibility to bring balance to all water resources needs including navigation, irrigation, water supply and environmental impacts. ANAs mission is to implement the National System of Water Resources Management in Brazil. Within this mission, ANA plays a signi cant role in regulation; support to water resources management; monitoring rivers and reservoirs; planning of water resources; development of programs and projects; and communicating hydrologic information throughout the country to encourage the proper management and sustainable use of water resources in Brazil. Five ANA delegates were of cially hosted by Mobile District Headquarters on February 5, 2014. The delegation communicated the role of ANA, discussed goals of the three-year agreement, and exchanged ideas for strengthening the partnership with USACE. During the visit, ANA delegates had the opportunity to observe USACE technical centers of expertise, visit newly constructed ood damage reduction projects in New Orleans, and meet with senior Mobile District leaders, said Wade A. Ross, Chief, Coastal Hydrology and Hydraulic Design Section. ANA, in simpler terms, executes the combined mission of four U.S. agencies; reservoir regulation ood control, modeling and ood prevention/mitigation similar to USACE; management of the national hydrologic network and ood forecasting similar to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); regulatory permitting like the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and ood inundation mapping for peak ood events similar to Federal Emergency Management Agency, said Ross.THE MOBILE Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka welcomes Aline Machado da Matta from Agencia Nacional de Aguas to Mobile District. Photo by Lisa Parker, PAO. Wade Ross, Chief of the Coastal Hydrology and Hydraulic Design Section in the Engineering Division, with members of Agencia Nacional de Aguas toured the Gulf Intercoastal WaterWest Closure Complex (WCC) Pump Station in New Orleans. The WCC consists of 11 ower pot pumps and boast a pumping capacity of 19,140 cubic feet per second making it one of the largest pump stations of its kind in the world. Photo by Lisa Parker, PAO.

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ANA: Brazils national water agency partners with Mobile DistrictStory by Lisa Parker, Public Affairs Of ce ANA was also recently charged with implementing a national dam safety program for reservoir systems with multiple use authorities. Through a cooperative agreement with USACE and the USGS, ANA is implementing a series of in-country training sessions for knowledge transfer and capacity building for the National System of Dam Safety. Water management is a huge challenge for a country the size of Brazil. The country has the worlds largest river discharge at an average 7,381,000 cubic feet per second (cfs), (Mississippi 600,000 cfs at New Orleans), the worlds largest drainage area of 2,720,000 square miles, and the largest fresh water basin in the world. The country has over 15,735 km (9,777 miles) of boundaries with 10 out of the 12 South American countries. ANA must bring together an extremely diverse group of stakeholders including 27 state governors, over 5000 locally elected of cials, and other Brazilian federal agencies to agree and implement water management practices and policies, said Ross. Mobile District will oversee delivery of tasks, services and products with more than 20 different subject matter experts within the USACE, USGS, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and other U.S. agencies to Brazil for three years. The scope of work will encompass: Flood Control (Flood Risk Management), Reservoir Operations and Management, and Regulation and Operation of National Hydrologic Networks. Mobile District looks forward to working with ANA and providing sustainable water management practices for the country of Brazil, said Col. Jon Chytka, Mobile District Commander.THE MOBILE Aline Machado da Matta from ANA and New Orleans Districts Tim Connell, project manager for the Gulf Intercoastal Waterway-West Closure Complex discuss the capabilities of preventing interior ooding in New Orleans. Picture by Lisa Parker Members from ANA toured the 17th Street Outfall Canal. Construction and installations of the interim closure structures and pump stations at the three outfall canals was performed before the start of hurricane season in 2006. These interim structures provide 100-year level risk reduction and will remain in place until the new, permanent structures are built. Photo by Lisa Parker, PAO.

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THE MOBILE New AFTAC replaces 1950s era building with modern facility Story by Lisa Parker, Public Affairs Of ce A ribbon cutting ceremony was held March 11 for the new Air Force Technical Applications Center constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. AFTAC performs nuclear treaty monitoring and nuclear event detection. AFTAC also provides national authorities quality technical measurements to monitor nuclear treaty compliance and develops advanced proliferation monitoring technologies to preserve Americas security. Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka attended the event along with other special guests that included: the Honorable James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence; Col. Christopher Worley, AFTAC Commander; and Kirk Hazen, Southeast District Manager and Vice President of Hensel Phelps Construction Company. It is my honor to be with you today to celebrate the delivery of an outstanding project to house the Air Force Technical Applications Center, Col. Chytka said during his remarks at the ceremony. This facility is built to last. Thus, it is great Col. Worley and his team will continue their mission out of this facility complex to do their part to defend America. The new AFTAC facility replaces a 1950s era building and is composed of a headquarters command and control building of 276,000 square feet; a radiological testing laboratory of 38,000 square feet; a 23,000 square foot central utility plant; and a ve-story parking garage for nearly 600 vehicles. This facility was built under a budget of $155 million. It was completed eight months ahead of schedule. The new AFTAC can withstand 140 mph winds and a 12-foot tidal surge. It has a scour wall to protect the foundation from erosion. The utility plant has three two-megawatt generators. In the event of a surge, the rst oor is constructed to be sacri cial while the oors above will remain intact allowing AFTAC to remain operational. Joan Singlevich, left center, and Terry Ciambrone, right center, cut the symbolic ribbon, of cially marking the opening of the Walter Singlevich Headquarters Building and the Ciambrone Radiochemistry Laboratory both part of the Air Force Technical Applications Center at Patrick AFB, Fla. The new headquarters building and laboratory are named after their late husbands two iconic members of AFTAC Walter Singlevich who was a senior scientist for AFTAC and Col. Thomas Ciambrone a chemical engineer who spent 20 of his 30 active duty years with AFTAC. U.S. Air Force by Susan Romano. Col. Jon Chytka, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District Commander, presents Col. Chris Worley, Air Force Technical Applications Center Commander, with a collage of photos, capturing the phases of construction for the new AFTAC at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. during the ribbon cutting ceremony. Pictured in the center with Colonels Chytka and Worley is Dennis Newell, resident engineer for the Patrick AFB Resident Of ce. U.S. Air Force by Susan Romano.

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THE MOBILE New AFTAC continued...Story by Lisa Parker, Public Affairs Of ce According to Mobile District Project Manager Claude Leake, Hensel Phelps Construction used Building Information Modeling (BIM) to design the facility The standard use of BIM is to allow the contractor, the designers and subcontractors to independently prepare their portions of the design, coordinate their work and eliminate con icts. Leake said. As an innovative technique, the contractor used the BIM process to ef ciently phase the construction of the large buildings on the small site. This process is able to graphically show a movie of the construction from pouring the foundations to nishing the roof caps. Through the use if BIM, Hensel Phelps was able to improve safety, eliminate overlap and save time. The Air Force has asked to use the BIM les to study Hensel Phelps technique for future projects. Aerial view of a nearly constructed new facility for the Air Force Technical Applications Center at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. The new AFTAC was recently opened with a formal ribbon cutting ceremony held March 11. U.S. Air Force photo by Susan Romano. A ribbon cutting ceremony was held March 11 for the new Air Force Technical Applications Center Headquarters constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. The new AFTAC facility replaces a 1950s era building and is composed of a headquarters command and control building of 276,000 square feet; a radiological testing laboratory of 38,000 square feet; a 23,000 square foot central utility plant; and a ve-story parking garage for nearly 600 vehicles. U.S. Air Force photo by Susan Romano.

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THE MOBILE Mobile District takes on community water, sewer system improvement projectStory by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce For 20 plus years, residents of the Big Hill Acres Community in Jackson County Miss. near Vancleve have had challenges with septic tanks. These individually owned treatment units have failed and leaked constantly because the surrounding land area is so wet, resulting in environmental issues and potential health risks for the people in the community. After several years of joint efforts with Jackson County; U.S. Department of Agriculture; and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District to respond the communitys call for help, 800 plus homes will enjoy the bene ts of a water and sewer system improvement project, which will be municipally operated and maintained. Last November, USACE Mobile District began construction of a water and sewer system for the Big Hill Acres Community. A $15.7 million contract was awarded to Necaise Brothers Construction, Inc. of Gulfport, Miss. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is proud to be a part of this moment, the opportunity to provide quality of life improvements to the residents of Big Hill Acres, Lt. Col Thomas Nelson said during a groundbreaking ceremony held last fall at the Jackson County Utility Authoritys Seaman Road Wastewater Treatment Plant. To our partners, thank you for your diligence, persistence and creativity in working with us over the past years to make this project a reality. It has been an honor to work with you, and together, we have crafted a project that will uniquely bene t the Big Hill Acres Community, the Gulf Coast and the state of Mississippi. The project includes distribution piping and stub outs for more than 800 residential services; a deep-water well with chlorination treatment; an elevated storage tank; four sewage lift stations; and repair of treatment ponds at the treatment plant. Project completion is expected for December. Mobile District Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Thomas Nelson gives remarks during a groundbreaking ceremony at the Jackson County Utility Authoriy Seaman Road Wastewater Treatment Plant in Mississippi. The district is constructing a water and sewer system for the Big Hills Acres Community near Vancleve. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO. Tom Smith, project manager for the districts Big Hill Acres Project; Lt. Col. Thomas Nelson, Mobile District Deputy Commander; Tommy Fair eld, Director of the Jackson County Utility Authority; and Russ Guess, a loan of cer for Bancorp South are pictured at the projects groundbreaking ceremony. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO. Representatives from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Jackson County; and Bancorp South break ground for the Big Hill Acres Project in a ceremony held at the Jackson County (Miss.) Utility Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO.

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THE MOBILE USACE Army Of cer receives promotionStory by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce U.S. Army Captain Jeffrey Van Dyke, a project manager for Programs & Project Management s OCONUS, Interagency Branch, was promoted to the rank of Major earlier this year. The ceremony was held in Mobile Districts Of ce of Counsel Conference Room and began with remarks from Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka. Several of Maj. Van Dykes family members, friends and colleagues were in attendance. I, Maj. Jeffrey Van Dyke, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the of cers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God, Maj. Van Dyke said to Mobile District Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Nelson as he took the Oath of Of ce. Maj. Jeffrey Van Dyke was commissioned as an Engineer Second Lieutenant from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio May 8, 2004. Completing his college experience, He was recognized as a Distinguished Military Graduate. After the Engineer Of cer Basic Course, Van Dyke was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Ft. Campbell, Kentucky, in the following assignments: Assistant S3/Air, 2-101 Brigade Special Troops Battalion; 2 Brigade Combat Team; Platoon Leader, A Co 2-101 BSTB, 2 BCT; Battalion Maintenance Of cer, 2 BSTB, 2 BCT; Battalion S4, 2 BSTB, 2 BCT; HHC Commander, 2 BSTB, 2BCT. He deployed twice to Iraq in his seven years in 2nd Brigade. After completing the Engineer Career Course, he returned to Ft. Campbell, Ky. to serve on the Division Staff and later Combined Joint Task Force-101, Regional CommandEast during Operation Enduring Freedom XI. Following deployment to Afghanistan, he was reassigned to be a project engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District in 2012. His duties focus on project management in Central and South America in support of the Southern Command. MAJ Van Dyke holds several military awards and decorations, including the Bronze Star Medal; Defense Meritorious Service Medal (1st Oak Leaf Cluster); and the Joint Service Commendation Medal. He also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in business from Bowling Green State University. He is a graduate of the Engineer Of cer Basic & Advance Courses, the Air Assault School and the Sapper Leader Course. He married the former Molly C. Parsons of Columbus, Ohio, in June 2007; they have a daughter, Isabelle, and are expecting a son in June. Maj. Jeffrey Van Dyke received his promotion Jan. 31 during a ceremony held in the districts Of ce of Counsel Conference Room. Van Dyke, center, is pictured with his immediate family and (right of him) fellow Army Of cers. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO. Maj. Jeffrey Van Dyke takes the Oath of Of ce with Mobile District Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Thomas Nelson. Photo by Lance Davis, P AO.

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THE MOBILE Cover story: Architect nationally recognized at BEYA-STEM ConferenceStory by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce Tymon Wallace, an architect in the Engineering Division, was nationally recognized in W ashington Feb. 8 during the 2014 Black Engineer of the Year Awards for his exceptional work in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math at the Historically Black Colleges & Universities Engineering Deans Power Breakfast for the 28th Annual BEYA-STEM Conference held in the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel. The BEYA-STEM Conference is a talent-rich environment for recruitment; networking and professional development sponsored by Career Communications Group, Inc. a media company whose mission is to promote signi cant achievement in STEM-professional careers. College representatives and thousands of professionals and students from across the country are in attendance, representing STEM disciplines and careers. Since 1986, BEYA has been one of the several leading employee recognition programs of Career Communications Group, serving as a tool for employers to recognize high-performing minorities and women. CCG employee recognition programs honor innovators who demonstrate excellence in STEM elds; leadership in their workplaces and communities; exemplary work as role models and mentors; and a commitment to recruiting and retaining minorities and women in the nations science and technology enterprises. Hundreds of government and Fortune 500 employers across America have used CCG programs to recognize their employees, enhancing their retention and recruitment efforts. Among the 20 professionals selected to receive awards from BEYA, Wallace was one of two recipients from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Lt. Col. Antoinette Grant, Albuquerque District Commander, was the other USACE recipient. USACE Commanding General and Chief of Engineers, Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick attended the program to present them with their Special Recognition Awards from BEYA-STEM. Tymon Wallaces ability to quickly grasp and translate concepts into computer renderings of building designs has made his contributions invaluable, Gen. Bostick said before presenting Wallace with his award. According to BEYA-STEM Conference Chairman Tyrone Taborn, Wallaces award comes at a time particularly critical for the United States. Statistics show that STEM enrollments are declining in the U.S. while the global economy is driving up demand for STEM professionals. Taborn told Wallace the future of America rests in your narrative being shared with our nations youth. Ive always been involved with the arts, and with xing things. From elementary school through high school, I won many art competitions. I started working at my fathers auto body shop in eighth grade, xing cars. Wallace said as he shared his story during his award acceptance speech. In high school, I was named one of the nations best artists and was accepted into Tuskegees Freshmen Accelerated Program. I majored in mechanical engineering but changed to architecture because its linked to art and what I was put on this earth to do. Tymon Wallace, an architect in the Engineering Division, speaks at the Black Engineer of the Year Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Conference after receiving his Special Recognition Award. The event was held Feb. 8 in Washington. Photo courtesy of Career Communications Group.

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THE MOBILE Cover story continued...Story by Lance Davis, Public Affairs Of ce Wallace also received a letter from USACE South Atlantic Division Commander Brig. Gen. Donald Jackson, Jr congratulating him. Congratulations on winning the 2014 Black Engineer off the Year STEM Recognition Award, Brig. Gen. Jackson said in the letter. To be singled out as the winner from so many highly quali ed candidates is a great re ection on your accomplishments and professionalism. The STEM program is vital to the expansion of the capacity and diversity of the workforce pipeline and thus closely linked with our nations future economic prosperity. You should feel justi ably proud of this accomplishment. Thanks for a job very well done. Wallace is a key member of the architectural, structural, and civil engineering section of the Design Branch. Arriving to the Mobile District in 2004, he quickly grasped an ability to translate concepts into reality in the form of computer renderings of facility designs and provided on the job training of this unique skill set to senior architects. In 2006, he was promoted to a full performance architect and has since been involved in a number of award winning in-house designs. Wallace has worked on designs, bringing accomplishments and accolades to Mobile District. He helped design in Microstation 3-D an Unmanned Aerial Systems Maintenance and Training Facility for the 7th Special Forces Group at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. This was the rst, full three-dimensional project using a system called Building Information Modeling, or BIM, completed in the district. The intent of BIM is to permit design team members to assemble all the pieces and parts of a facility from structure to furniture on the computer in collaboration; determine if there are con icts between components of the design; and produce construction contract documents for actual construction. BIM also gives the customer a clearer understanding of the end product. In addition, Wallace was solely responsible for the renderings of the Columbus Air Force Base Child Development Center for which Mobile District received a Concept Design Award from the Air Education and Training Command. He has also participated on a team that directly impacted the design and construction of Afghanistan facilities for U.S. military forces. More recently, he has been instrumental in the design and rendering development of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Complex at Fort Hood, Texas and the Combat Readiness Center at Fort Rucker, Ala. Tymon is a bright, young architect that really sets the standard for his generation, Design Branch Chief Gary Whigham said. He is a great example of what can be attained through perseverance and hard work, a true model for others to follow. A native of Mobile, Wallace attended Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Ala. where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in architecture in 2004. Since graduation, Wallace continues to assist his alma mater by participating in recruitment events that focus on future engineers. He supports his local community by creating and teaching a specialized 3-Dimensional course at Virginia Community College in Mobile. Additionally, he is involved in several philanthropic efforts throughout the area and active in the local chapters of Jack and Jill of America, Inc. and Strikers Club, Inc. Tymon Wallace, an architect in the Engineering Division, received a Special Recognition Award at the Black Engineer of the Year Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Conference. Mobile District Commander Col. Jon Chytka congratulated him before district employees in front of the district of ces awards display. Photo by Lance Davis, PAO.

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