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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Naples, FL
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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regular
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English
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Periodicals -- Naples (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Collier County -- Naples

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 2-8, 2008)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038797485 ( OCLC )
2018226752 ( LCCN )
on1038797485
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AN1.F6 N37 F56 ( lcc )

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GLOBALSouthwest Floridas businesses goneBY EVAN WILLIAMS EWILLIAMS@FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM BY THE NUMBERS: 19.5A818 66.4 58,000percent increase in SWFL exports from 2010-2011 percent of all U.S. exports to Latin America and Caribbean from Florida exporters in Florida, second in the U.S. (behind California) billions of dollars in Florida-origin exports in 2012 SMALL TO medium-sized businesses drive Southwest Floridas export market. Local companies manufacture and ship electronics to Israel, jewelry labels to Italy, skin-care products to Tokyo, real estate services to the UK, a luxury bedding line to Shanghai, and organic pesticide to Ecuador. These are just a few of a growing list of cities and countries were doing business in. Its the tortoise, not the hare, but its getting there: the Gordon River Greenway, a partially realized trail of sidewalk and boardwalk winding sinuously through Naples both on and off the Gordon River. More than 20 years after the short, east end of the trail opened in 1992, connecting to a 1.5-mile loop around the Naples Municipal Airport, phase two kicked off with a groundbreaking last week. The work may be completed in a mere 14 months, finally offering potent witness to the benefits of a public-private partnership, its champions insist. I think its a gem, says Ellie Krier, widely recognized as one of the prime movers of a completed Greenway. Ms. Grier is executive director of the Southwest Florida Land Preservation Trust and owner of EK Consulting. And if the Greenway isnt a gem, then its the necklace that supports a gem. It will stretch, loop, twist and turn through dense native woods of red and white mangr ove, pine, oak, wild coffee, myrsine, white indig o berry, buttonw ood and liatris or blazing star, among other flora. Phase two, with its 12-foot-wide paved path and sections of 10-foot-wide elevated boardwalk, will extend for about two Making an old dream new and true Local companies speak the international language of businessBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com SEE DREAM, A17 www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. V, No. 32 FREE WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 OPINION A4 PROFILE IN PARADISE A6 HEALTHY LIVING A14 PETS A18 NETWORKING B6-7 REAL ESTATE B8 OPEN HOUSE MAP B26 NANCY STETSON C8 PUZZLES C10 FILM REVIEW C11 ANTIQUES C14 CUISINE C23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. INSIDE Networking Wake Up Naples with the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. B6 You missed itHighlights from the season that was. C1 Cyber securityProtect your business. B1 Illumination artCollectors look beyond Tiffany. C14

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Once, the word security probably meant comfort to many Americans. Ive saved for retirement, people might say, so I have some security. But now the first thing that comes to mind is safety. Security as a word suggests defense in its most literal sense protection from lifeor health-threatening assault. Security policies proliferate, along with security devices. Security details along with security teams abound. We have internal security, external security, perimeter security, homeland security, national security, personal security, and car, home and school security, to name a few. And somehow we still dont feel secure. The security question had been floating around in my mind for a long time until recently, like a lost boat without a harbor. Perhaps the same is true for you. I became aware of it first when I was about 5, and I noticed that walking across the cow pasture outside the fence was if not a guarantee of security at least a nod in its direction. Walking inside the fence, on the other hand, could get you chased by a creature about 30 times your weight. Since my sister had the temperament of Rocky Marciano and the speed of Wilma Rudolph (they were big back then), she liked to see how far inside the fence we could get before we became suddenly and literally insecure. Later, I thought that security meant a rifle or a pistol or a platoon of Marines (reinforced by a division), or a close airstrike, a long-range airstrike, an aircraft carrier, a nuclear submarine or a variety of other options based on the notion that the best defense is a good offense. I had, after all, practiced duck-and-cover drills when I was kid, so it all made sense. Once a month, youd hide under your desk when the teacher shouted, Duck and cover! That way, youd be secure when the Soviets started World War III on top of your elementary school with a nuclear missile that said HIYA, ROGER on it. And right through my comfortable late 20s and 30s and 40s and 50s, I figured, loosely because I didnt have to worry about it much, since others did that for me that security might include not only all those things Ive cited, but a good economy and some honey-tongued ambassadors and a good intelligence service, for example. Get it out there around you and youll be secure that was my idea. So was this: If you want security, quit whining and establish it. With force. With muscle. Because thats what it takes. But Ive since come to realize how far short of the mark my estimation of good security fell. My growing recognition that security begins with something else entirely probably started with the bombings, school shootings and subsequent gun control debates of the last decade or two. Its been 20 years since the first World Trade Center attack, 18 years since the Oklahoma City bombing (domestic terrorism), and 15 years since Columbine, after all.Then along came 9/11 (international terrorism), followed by a hunt for the perpetrators that turned into the misguided wars of the Bush-Cheney-Rumsfeld triumvirate, who heroically allowed less than 1 percent of Americans to soldier on to security for the rest of us, the other mostly uncomplaining 99 percent.Followed by more incidents that culminated recently in murders by wackos with assault weapons at a movie theater in my home state last July (Colorado), and an elementary school in Connecticut on Dec. 19. Since I have a child in elementary school and another still in high school, and since I have a friend who writes the best blog on gun control issues in the United States right now (called Gunsense, at www.readwrite. typepad.com/gunsense/), I began to think more deeply about security. Why? Because I realize now that real security in the foreseeable future is a concept that borders on the impossible, unless we change our thinking and our behavior toward each other as humans.Around my sons school stands a new, 8-foot-high iron security fence with an impressive gate that remains locked, usually. Like in many other school districts and at many other schools now, officials have established a single-point entry system supported by cameras that appear inside and outside the school on ceilings and in high corners.But that isnt security, even with a police officer always on duty in every school. True security wont be available to Americans for a few decades at a minimum, and it may not happen at all. The reason is not complicated. True security will require unlike, say, the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan that each one of us participate, and ultimately that humans everywhere participate.Otherwise, we become targets. Just as our new and unpredictable global interconnectedness by travel, trade and information sharing has made countless lives richer and fuller, it also makes us deeply vulnerable to those who remain angry, irrational and genocidal. The fence around my sons school will not keep them out, and in my opinion, his life will have to steer around catastrophes on the scale of any plague in history, either biological or nuclear. But there is one way around this, over time, and its not just to fence up and arm up. This singular strategy, never before attempted en masse, also requires that we compassion up, if you will. We must recognize that by avoiding superstition and pre-judgment, by insisting on a comparative level of health and public safety for all peoples, by requiring that every person be treated equally and fairly under the law here first, and someday elsewhere and by working a great deal harder than we have to share with others our abundant wealth, our opportunities for education, and our tough-minded tolerance of quirky differences in a quirky world, we can create the most formidable defense ever mounted against enemies foreign or domestic.Thats a lot harder than going to boot camp. Or buying assault rifles and pistols at the gun show. Or getting a concealed weapons permit. Itll take guts and smarts and a lot of cool, on an unprecedented level. Its also the only ultimate answer to the security question. COMMENTARYThe security question r ( s c o b rogerWILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 richLOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONPatriot games at the IRS It sounds like the plot from a dystopian libertarian novel. The word patriot and the phrase educating on the Constitution and Bill of Rights triggered heightened scrutiny from the most intrusive agency in the federal government. We now know that the Internal Revenue Service did indeed target conservative groups, as had long been rumored and oft-denied. The news is a perverse confirmation of the groups worldview, and a challenge to President Barack Obamas. He always harangues us about putting more trust in government, and then you find out that the IRS has been singling out his political enemies. This isnt an unaccustomed role for the IRS. It was notoriously used as a partisan bludgeon by Franklin D. Roosevelt and Richard Nixon, an abuse that was a Watergate impeachment count. In this case, the IRS gave special scrutiny to conservative groups filing for tax-exempt status as so-called 501(c)(4) organizations. Their applications would be flagged if an offending phrase or issue popped up, say, tea party, or statements criticizing how the country is being run, or concern about the federal debt. Then, the group might be hit with massive document requests and queries about the activities of family members of board members and key officers. No one defends the propriety of any of this. President Obama says it is outrageous, and even the IRS calls it, drawing on that elastic Washington word, inappropriate. So how did it happen? The IRS explanation is that it was an innocent mistake by the rubes out in the Cincinnati office, who apparently lack an appreciation for objectivity and the rule of law, not to mention common sense. We will learn soon enough how this holds up. But Ken Vogel, a reporter at Politico who has covered the IRS, says via twitter that the Cincinnati office has little autonomy and mostly just follows DCs instructions. Certainly, if the IRS had a rogue operation on its hands, it didnt act like it. An agency vigilant in defense of the rights of citizens and of its own reputation would have exposed and shut down the misconduct immediately. Reports say that the IRS targeting of conservatives began as early as 2010, and senior IRS officials learned of the practice two years ago. In March 2012 congressional testimony, then-IRS Commissioner Douglas Shulman repeatedly denied any targeting of conservatives. Evidently, no one who knew about it did his or her boss the favor of telling him he had misled Congress. There are two steps toward making it right. One is a thorough congressional investigation and the firing of anyone involved in the harassment or in looking the other way or covering it up. The other is, as much as possible, to remove political regulation from agencies like the IRS that can become the tool of one party and its partisan agenda. The Federal Election Commission has its faults, but it is designed to be bipartisan and is better-suited to making politically sensitive judgments. Needless to say, ours should be a country where you can start a group with the word patriot in the title and not incur the hostility of the American government. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. GUEST COLUMNWhatever you call it, ArtisNaples committed to communityNonprofit boards have three key responsibilities: ensure the institutions fiscal viability, set strategic direction and hire a CEO who will lead the organization in that direction. I and the undersigned board members of ArtisNaples, formerly the Philharmonic Center for the Arts, have 253 collective years of board service spanning 27 years, and we take the responsibilities entrusted to us very seriously. For more than a decade, we faced challenges similar to many arts institutions, including declining audiences resulting in lower revenue from ticket sales and contributions. The 2008 market crash dramatically lowered endowment returns. Combined, this led to annual operating losses of $23 million. In response, the organization began cutting expenses and jobs in 2007. We had not increased musicians pay for three years, even though contractually committed to do so; nor did the staff receive raises during that period. But our expense cuts were not sufficient to balance the budget. When orchestras around the country began filing for bankruptcy, we received a clarion call that we had to change! The boards primary goal in hiring Kathleen van Bergen as CEO in 2011 was to initiate cultural change and to balance the annual budget. A close second was to fill two critical artistic appointments, a director for The Baker Museum and a music director for the Naples Philharmonic. This season, we focused on developing a patron-centric culture that would meet the needs of our growing and increasingly diverse community. We analyzed programs, pricing and customer expectations, and made many changes. Initial results are promising. Paid attendance to our classical concerts is at its highest level since 2004, and 22 percent higher than two years ago. Annual fund contributions this year are the highest since 2002. Yet we have only begun to close the gap between operating revenue and expense. Frank Verpoorten was hired as director and chief curator of The Baker Museum in December, and is already making his mark. Most exciting is our recent announcement of Andrey Boreyko as music director of the Naples Philharmonic. Internationally renowned as a conductor of exceptional ability, his appointment signifies a new era for our wonderful orchestra. Arts organizations that expect not only to survive but to thrive must adapt to changing landscapes. The face of Southwest Florida has changed dramatically since the Phil was founded: not only has the population doubled since 1989; it is younger and more diverse. ArtisNaples must be a vibrant, relevant resource for our community as it exists today. We have already demonstrated our responsibility to be good corporate citizens by embracing partnerships with non-profits throughout Southwest Florida. In the past 21 months, our partners have included the Boys & Girls Club, Opera Naples, the Shelter for Abused Women and Children, Gulfshore Playhouse and many more. This is a good first step, but it is not enough. After months of careful review, it became clear the Philharmonic Center for the Arts was viewed as relevant largely to one segment of our community, and that others felt excluded or simply not motivated to visit. This led to the adoption of a new brand and a new name that embraces all our programmatic offerings for the entire community. ArtisNaples begins to define our broadened platform for the future. The board, orchestra and staff have enthusiastically embraced the new direction. We know not all the changes have been immediately popular, but everything we have done, including the adoption of ArtisNaples, has had great thought and deliberate purpose. Many support this direction. Myra Daniels grew this organization from a home for the orchestra to a multi-disciplinary arts center, and in the process made Naples a much bigger place than it would have been otherwise. We owe Myra a great debt of gratitude for enriching all our lives. Whether you call us the Phil, Artis Naples, or some combination of both, please know we are firmly committed to ensuring this wonderful organization is here for future generations to enjoy. Thank you for caring so deeply about us. Sincerely, Ned C. Lautenbach, chairman and board members: C. Michael Armstrong, Jay H. Baker, James R. Campbell, James C. Curvey, Michael E. Dougherty, David R. Drobis, Robert T. Edwards, Linda C. Flewelling, Eugene U. Frey, Lynne Haarlow, A. Scott Hansen, Lois Wertheimer Lipnik, James P. McCready, Gerri Moll, J. Leo Montgomery, Dave Neill, Lawrence R. Pugh, Kimberly K. Querrey, John J. Remondi, Sarah B. Rorer, Donald E. Ryks, William J. Schoen, Stephen L. Schwartz, Bruce S. Sherman, Adria D. Starkey, Shelly A. Stayer, William S. Stavropoulos, George W. Sypert, Kathleen van Bergen, ex officio, Artis Naples Lautenbach PublisherShelley Hobbsshobbs@floridaweekly.comEditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsKaren Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Athena Ponushis Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Maureen Sullivan-Hartung Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Tim Gibbons Bernadette La Paglia Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald Bob Raymond Stephen WrightCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Nick Bear Paul Heinrich Rebecca Robinson Natalie Zellers Circulation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Ryan nryan@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Aron Hubers ahubers@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing AssistantCarolyn AhoBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2013 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state

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Golden Gate City has been identified by the 2006 Naples Children and Education Foundation of the Naples Winter Wine Festival Study on Child Well-Being in Collier County as the pocket most in need in all of Collier, outside of Immokalee. This four-square-mile community is home to many of the poorest, most underserved children in our county. Language barriers, poverty, low parental education levels, hunger and overcrowded living conditions plague these childrens chances for development. In just nine years, Grace Place for Children and Families (www.graceplacenaples. org) has established itself as the heart of the neighborhood, helping residents of all ages overcome the barriers of poverty and language to become productive members of our community. The Rev. Stephanie Munz Campbell, founder and executive director of Grace Place, saw the need in Golden Gate City in 2004 and was led to fill it. She was born in Cincinnati, and her family moved to the Paradise Coast in 1970 when she was a child. Stephanie attended Gulfview Middle and Naples High schools when Naples was truly a small town. She remembers Naples as a place where she could walk barefoot everywhere and ride her bike with friends to get from one end of town to the other, from Old Naples to Pine Ridge (which was way out of town then). Her parents, Bob and Connie Munz, were lead educators in the public schools (her dad was Collier schools superintendent in the 1990s). Her first job was cashier at the Publix at Naples Shopping Center. Stephanie has a bachelor of science in business from the University of Florida, where she met her husband, John. When he was attending seminary at Emory, she ended up working in childrens ministry at a local church and took to it like a duck to water. John went from seminary to business, so it seems that they switched places, and she says, we have been living by Gods surprises ever since. Stephanie was ordained in 2004, the same year she founded Grace Place for Children and Families. This was another one of Gods surprises, she says, since I didnt intend to found an organization. During her graduate studies, she felt called to connect the church to the local service of neighbors in need. Golden Gate city was emerging as a pocket of need in Collier County, yet there were no charities there to provide support. In 2003, she borrowed a church building and bus, gathered together some friends and started a homework club after school. This grew in a few short years into Grace Place, which now teaches literacy, language and life skills to more than 800 clients each week, providing educational programs that help at-risk children and working-poor families break the barriers of poverty, suco P t w ( d bobHARDEN e-mail: bob@bobharden.com PROFILES IN PARADISEMinister behind Grace Place golden to community Talking points with Stephanie CampbellMentor(s): Too many to list, As I work with disadvantaged children, I am so aware that it takes a village and I am who I am because of a strong circle of mentors, including my family, teachers, ministers, colleagues, community leaders and friends. What would you be doing if you werent doing this: Probably another one of Gods surprises! Guilty pleasures: Chocolate and curling up with a good book. Next vacation destination: Camping and hiking in California in September with our son and his girlfriend. One thing on your bucket list: Walking The Way of St. James in France and Spain. Skill or talent you wish you had: Singing (I have to lip sync!). Advice for your kids: Be true to yourself. Best thing about kids: They live in the moment the now. Something thats been on your mind: Who is going to come forward to be the lead philanthropic visionary who sees the need and the future of investing in the amazing young people and families in Golden Gate City. What your mother was always right about: It will all come out in the wash. What makes you laugh: People we are fascinating creatures. Last book you read: Traveling with Pomegranates. Something youll never understand: People who dont see the blessings in every day. Pet peeve: Clutter. Something people would be surprised to nd out about you: I LOVE digging in the dirt (my organic garden). What are you most proud of? My children. What the Paradise Coast really needs: To become a community where we embrace diversity and actually know, are friends with, and work together with our neighbors across the cultural and economic differences. Favorite thing about the Paradise Coast: Generous philanthropy. What I miss about the Paradise Coast when Im away: Glorious sunsets. ceed in school and become self-sufficient, contributing members of our community. Add it all up, and you understand why those involved with Grace Place believe that true joy in life is found by serving others. Stephanie Campbell and her family understand such joyful living, and the citizens of Golden Gate City are the benefactors. Bob Harden is the producer and host of The Bob Harden Show, airing from 7-8 a.m. weekdays at www.bobharden.com. WOW!!!NEW PATIENT SPECIALPatient Consultation, Exam, Cleaning and Necessary X-Rays D0110, D0150, D0274PLUS FREE TEETH WHITENING$431 Value, You Save $338!ALL FOR $97.00 NOT VALID WITH THE PRESENCE OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE.MUST CALL BY 5/30/2013 www.gulfviewdentistry.com (239) 300-9693 501 Goodlette Road North, Suite B202, Naples Located in the French Quarter FREE CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE FORBRACES CROWNS DENTAL IMPLANTS WHITENING EXTRACTIONS BRIDGES VENEERSCall 239-300-9693 & set an appointment Enjoy these special offers from Gulfview Dental! Seeking to put Gods love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope. NEW LOCATION! www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 The next time you find yourself in the Fort Myers River District or wandering through Tokyo, for that matter stop by the fragrant Naples Soap Company. The bath and body retailer since last summer has opened seven smaller shops, nestled in department stores in the gleaming, complicated Japanese city. The effort has left owner Deanna Renda at times jet lagged, but also filled with a new appreciation for the challenges and rewards of doing business abroad. The Japanese are famously nationalistic, and the cosmetics and personal-care industry there is highly regulated, a very arduous process, Ms. Renda said. But in her experience at a Tokyo trade show last June, when she introduced her line of soap and skin-care products, people welcomed the business with a sense of diligence and professionalism shes rarely seen. I absolutely fell in love with it: so in love with Tokyo and the Japanese culture, she said. It was nice to see that kind of respect for the product we were putting out there. Many companies miss entering foreign markets, assuming it will be difficult to enter, said Peter Keating, a certified business analyst in the Port Charlotte offices of the Small Business Development Center at Florida Gulf Coast University. Thats true enough, he admits. Intentional trade is not the easiest thing, he said. You have to find and understand the market overseas. But he added, The impact (of International trade) on Southwest Florida could be a lot greater than it is. Its a growth pattern that companies really have to look at. Not everything is necessarily an international opportunity but a lot of what we do really is, and we dont take advantage of it. Customer service is a key to that, whether international or local. It just takes more time and research to get to.Business without bordersIncreasingly, Southwest Florida companies that sell everything from waterfront homes to high-tech computer chips have found second homes (as well as third, fourth and fifth ones) in countries abroad. Its a statewide trend. Florida exports two-thirds from small to medium sized companies with fewer than 500 employees totaled $66.4 billion in 2012, sixth in the United States. Florida exports have grown exponentially over the last decade, said Manuel A. Mencia, senior vice president of international trade and business development for Enterprise Florida, the states official economic development arm. As recent as 20 to 25 years ago, we were not really a major player in the international arena. Among other activities, Enterprise Florida has pushed for high-tech exports to the Middle East in recent years. Were working those markets very hard, Mr. Mencia said. We do three major trade shows for target sectors there. From 2003 to 2012, the value of Floridas high-tech exports increased by 102 percent while the U.S. growth rate was 36.7 percent; more than 25 percent of Florida-origin exports are high-tech products. Companies like Fort Myersbased Fox Electronics export electronic circuitry used in computers. World trade slowed in 2013 in part because of the European debt crisis; but Floridas top trade partner, Latin America, is poised for continued steady growth. Eighteen percent of all U.S. exports to Latin America and the Caribbean originated in Florida in 2012. The Southwest Florida Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is capitalizing on that relationship with yearly trade missions to Peru and other countries to facilitate trade both ways, said Veronica Montoya, international affairs director. Many other industry sectors have found foreign markets welcoming. United Seal & Tag Label Corp., an unassuming company based in Port Charlotte, has been printing labels, embossed seals and tags for more than 90 years. The third-generation business doesnt show signs of stopping. We have the fourth generation here now, said Vice President Kathy Freda. They export primarily jewelry labels to Italy and India, but also send products to Africa, Thailand and China. Unlike some other businesses, Ms. Freda said it doesnt require travel. The labels are printed here and she sends them out. The exports make up about one-third of the companys business. Good Florida companies with good products can do business anywhere, Mr. Mencia says. Sanibel-based VIP Realty Group, which offers properties throughout Southwest Florida, this year began using WorldPosting by Previsite. The website offers portals to top real estate sites in dozens of countries where Southwest Florida sunshine would be appreciated. Also, in 2009, VIP partnered with Mayfair International Realty, one of the UKs largest real estate firms. Clearly, Florida, California and New York are the targets for international buyers in the United States, said Allison Ashby, marketing director at Previsite. The sellers are really looking to VIP for that kind of exposure.Rose-colored businessThe next time you enjoy the taste of an avocado from the Dominican Republic or enjoy an aromatic feast of roses from Ecuador, consider that Marketing Arm Internationals line of organic, environmentally friendly pesticides or fertilizers may have helped bring them to fruition. The Charlotte County-based company does business exclusively overseas because, explained director Monica Luna, they cant compete with the big U.S. pesticide companies. Marketing Arm plans to expand in countries near our latitude, with Southwest Florida-like climates. That includes Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines. What works in this side of the world will also work in Southeast Asia, Ms. Luna said. Bringing the business there requires company representatives to travel hundreds of thousands of miles per year. The face-to-face business is key to gaining the trust of her customers, she explained, and working with local government agencies that monitor agriculture. Marketing Arm turned 20 this year. People ask, What are you most proud of? Ms. Luna said. The answer: Us connecting Charlotte County to the rest of the world.Japan Ms. Renda of Naples Soap Company, by comparison, is just beginning. She started in Naples in 2009, opening shops in Fort Myers, Punta Gorda and Sarasota before launching her line at a trade show in Tokyo last June. Since then, her distributor there, the old Japanese company Kameyama Candle House is becoming a trusted partner. I had to brush up on the business culture and proper etiquette in Japan, she said of that initial appearance. We actually had business cards printed specifically for this trip. The front side in English and the backside in Japanese. The fact that we made the effort went a long way at the trade show. You can visit Kameyamas website to see Naples Soap Company represented in Japanese (or just go to Tokyo). Kameyama also launched a local radio show there based on the one Ms. Renda has here called The Soap Dish on 92.5 Fox. For her part, Ms. Renda is pleased to be gathering Japanese followers on Facebook, but insists theres no substitute for face-to-face business both for her relationship with Kameyama and for customers abroad. A passport to profitBY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@ oridaweekly.com Local companies speak the international language of business COURTESY PHOTOLocal designer Kira Krmm has discovered an eager and affluent market in China. Florida exports have grown exponentially over the last decade. As recent as 20 to 25 years ago, we were not really a major player in the international arena. Manuel A. Mencia, senior vice president of international trade and business development for Enterprise Florida, the states official economic development arm

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 NEWS A9 When you can touch it, feel it, smell it and enjoy and appreciate the product first hand it definitely makes a difference, she said. We have a beautiful website and that certainly is helpful but we like to do business face to face. Next, Ms. Renda hopes to bring her line of products to what one Fort Myers veteran international business operator E.L. Fox Jr. of Fox Electronics calls the wild wild west of business: China. Guangzhou and beyondEstero-based Kira Krmm International Design has had success in the country. In March, it introduced a luxury bedding line, The Kira Krmm Kollection, at the huge China International Furniture Fair in Guangzhou. Our primary international focus is in China, and we recently expanded our team and opened a satellite office in Shanghai, owner Ms. Krmm explained in an e-mail. Over the past decade of doing business in China, the Chinese consumer demographic has become increasingly more affluent and eager to embrace western points of view. About half her business comes from overseas markets. Our interior design projects are ongoing here in Southwest Florida, where our studio headquarters are located, she wrote. And abroad, we are working on various creative projects, and focused on developing a product line for the Chinese luxury market.Fox ElectronicsE.L. Fox Jr. logged about 50,000 travel miles last year. His father, who traveled less, started Fox Electronics in Fort Myers in 1979. The headquarters remain here, but the electronic circuits called oscillators that they produce sell all over the world. Theyre used in cars, cell phones, laptops, copy machines and other electronics. Last year, Fox was acquired by public technology company Integrated Device Technology, but continues to operate with independence. The acquisition expanded the sales force from about six to 170 people, which Mr. Fox called way cool. Its also lengthened the companys reach to big brand-name companies like Intel, which is tapping Foxs products to use in cars. The companys expansion overseas has come largely in the last two decades; roughly half its business is exports to a growing list of countries: the UK, Germany, Italy, Israel, Sweden, France, Taiwan, China, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong and Canada. North America is the easiest area to do business in, in Mr. Foxs experience, while Japan and China can be a few of the toughest. China, its just a cultural thing, he said. Its incredibly competitive. Its like theres no rules, like the wild wild West. Japan, on the other hand, is extraordinarily nationalistic; they want to buy from Japanese suppliers unless they cant. They would rather pay a higher price from a Japanese guy than from somebody else. Imagine if we treated them like they treat us. We buy Japanese and Chinese stuff left and right. Our biggest concern (in China) would be the no rules culture and intellectual property can be stolen. Well spend millions and millions inventing a product. We ship it to China and then theres no rules or laws to stop them from copying or reproducing it. I know the Obama administration is pressuring China. But what can a government do? Point a finger at them and say, you better stop? Its a real big problem for everybody. But business abroad has also given him this perspective: Americans have no idea how good they have it. He added, We think our way is the best, and that is not always the case. Sometimes other countries have a different process or different way of doing things that I think is better.Selling drugs in foreign ports Peter Keating, the SBDC business analyst in Port Charlotte, started a pharmaceutical distribution company in 1995. It exported successfully until 2001, when new rules in the wake of terrorist attacks made it too expensive, he said. Having worked for major pharmaceutical companies before, he used connections overseas to find distributors for the drugs (ones typically used by anesthesiologists). Gaining traction in foreign countries required him to be something of an ambassador; he prided himself in learning the customs and the cultures abroad. Face-to-face is always what I did, said Mr. Keating, who lives in Punta Gorda. Never made appointments, never made deals over the phone. Everything was always in writing. Because he couldnt compete with the latest drugs by big American companies, he sold older-model but still viable, federally approved drugs. They were less in demand in the U.S., but very much wanted by foreign hospitals with low cash flow. Its a niche business. Regulatory arms of governments in places such as Egypt and Bangladesh, which directed medications to well funded hospitals, would leave out many that couldnt afford the latest medications, he explained. In some cases, he would go to a port where the containers of drugs arrived. His distributor in that country would check the product, take it away in a truck, and authorize his payment through Chase Manhattan, the bank he used at the time. Sometimes the truck would take the whole container sight-unseen, without breaking the seal, he said. Id say, take it as it is then, but you have the opportunity now to open it up and look at it. Because the medication was temperature-sensitive and could also break in rough oceans, distributors usually would check. Although his pharmaceutical distribution company is dormant, Mr. Keating kept old contacts to resume the business when he can. From an international point of view, its still a viable thing I maintain so I can move back in in a moments notice, he said. COURTESY PHOTOThe Naples Soap Company has had success in Japan by studying the culture and conducting many face-to-face meetings in Tokyo. COURTESY PHOTOPeter Keating has often talked business at the Great Wall of China a sign of cultural respect. A map shows the countries and websites where Sanibel-based VIP Realtors has a web presence thanks to its relationship with Previsite. Floridas exports, 2007-2012The Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area was the fth largest in the country, exporting $43.1 million, about twice the dollar amount of exports of all other Florida MSAs combined. It was behind MSAs that include Detroit, Los Angeles, Houston and New York (No.1) Naples-Marco Island MSA exports grew by 81 percent between 2007 and 2011, the third highest in the state Cape Coral-Fort Myers MSA grew 51 percent Punta Gorda MSA was down 12 percent Floridas 20 MSAs total growth was 53.7 percent By region, Southwest Florida exports were up 19.5 percent from 2010 to 2011 (fourth highest growth rate of seven regions), with exports totaling $798.9 million Total merchandise trade (exports plus imports) is $162.2 billion, an 8.7 percent increase over 2011 In 2012, international trade and investment accounted for about one-sixth (18 percent) of the states economic output. Enterprise Florida provides export marketing plans for new-to-export Florida manufacturers that include a matchmaking services in an overseas markets.

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WORLD-CLASS ARTISAN cocoates MADE JUST FOR YOU! www.NormanLoveConfections.com Stop in for a Scoop of Love!ARTISAN GELATO BY NORMAN LOVE 239. 288.4333 | FORT MYERS HOURS MONSAT 11:30AM:00 PM FORT MYERS 11380 LINDBERGH BLVD | 239.561.7215 | HOURS MONFRI 7:30 AM5:30 PM | SAT 7:30 AM5 PM NAPLES 3747 TAMIAMI TRAIL NORTH | 239.687.7215 | HOURS MONTHUR 8 AM8 PM | FRI & SAT 8 AM9 PMUltra-premium Chocolates Artisan Desserts Gifts and Specialties Handmade Gelato Fresh Crepes Smoothies and Coffees Weddings and Events Corporate Gifting & MORE! NEWS BRIEFSHodges, Community Foundation partners for trainingThe Community Foundation of Collier County and Hodges University announced that the Center for Nonprofit Excellence, established at the Community Foundation in 1997, is moving to Hodges University this summer. The Community Foundation has awarded a three-year grant to Hodges, totaling $150,000, to help establish the training program at the university. We are excited about this partnership with Hodges, said Eileen Connolly-Keesler, president and CEO of the Community Foundation of Collier County. The Center for Nonprofit Excellence has provided training for 7,000 participants from local nonprofit organizations over the past 15 years. Under Hodges management, the Center will be able to expand and offer additional services to nonprofits. The first event of the CNE at Hodges will be a June 26 full-day seminar on nonprofit finances presented by experts from CliftonLarsonAllen LLP, a nationally known CPA firm that works with many local nonprofits. Future programs will include a local funders panel addressing grants that will be available in the upcoming year and the Indiana School of Philanthropys Fundraising School. Free admission for vets on Memorial Day weekendConservancy of Southwest Florida Nature Center is offering free admission on Memorial Day Weekend to all active and retired military on May 23, 24, 25 and 27. A valid military ID is required. Regular admission prices apply to all guests. The recently completed $20 million renovation offers abundant learning opportunities for the entire family. The Conservancy Nature Center is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday Saturday. Adult admission is $12.95. Admission for children ages 3-12 is $8.95. Admission for Conservancy members and children under the age of three is free. More information is available at www.conservancy.org or at 262-0304. Naples Chamber welcomes 15 new members The Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce welcomed 15 new members who joined in April. The new members are: Aztec Plumbing Inc., 1460 Golden Gate Parkway, www.aztecplumbing.net California Closet Co., 5844 Enterprise Parkway, Fort Myers, www. californiaclosets.com/naples Cinnabon, 200 Glenridge Point Parkway, Atlanta, www.cinnabon.com Culvers, 3557 Airport Pulling Road North, www.culvers.com Dr. Finn Foot & Ankle Center, P.A., 11181 Health Park Blvd. #2240, www. finnfootandanklecenter.com InfiLaw, 1100 Fifth Ave. South, www. infilaw.com Luxury Home Solutions, 1045 Collier Way Unit #1, www.mhlhs.com Mitchs Cookies, 2212 Kings Lake Blvd., www.mitchscookies.com Nirvana Sleep, 2170 Tamiami Trail N, www.nirvanasleep.com Premier Sothebys International Realty Catherine Bordner, 4001 Tamiami Trail N., Suite 102, www.catherine. bordner.premiersothebysrealty.com Royal Palm Chocolates, 1084 Business Lane, www.royalpalmchocolates.com Sanibel Logic LLC, 2402 Palm Ridge Road, Unit 2 Suite 207, Sanibel, www. sanibellogic.com The Woodhouse Day Spa Naples, 2059 Ninth St. North, www.naples. woodhousespas.com Tri Corps Security, 1415 Dean St., Fort Myers, www.tricorpssecurity. com XLR8 Naples, 3619 Tamiami Trail N., Suite 4, www.powerplateflorida.com To learn more about joining the Chamber, visit www.napleschamber.org/Members/Join_the_Chamber.aspx. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 A11 FORT MYERS:13170 S. Cleveland Avenue, Fort Myers, FL 33907 Phone: (239) 415-2800NAPLES:355 9th Street South, Naples, FL 34102 Phone: (239) 732-2400 Store Hours: Mon Sat: 10am 6pm, Sun: Noon 5pmwww.RobbStuckyIntl.comPROFESSIONAL INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES LOW PRICE GUARANTEE CUSTOM WINDOW TREATMENTS & FLOOR COVERINGS WORLDWIDE DELIVERY AVAILABLE Memorial Day weekend only, save an additional $100 off any Royall & Borden mattress set at Robb & Stucky. Plus, enjoy FREE LOCAL DELIVERY on your entire purchase.*A GOOD NIGHTS SLEEP THE ULTIMATE LUXURY.Visit our showroom and discover over 15 luxury mattress styles, Queen sets starting at $1499, exclusively handcrafted by Royall & Borden. One look and youll see the exquisite design and detail that goes into every bed. One try and youll feel the exceptional comfort that comes only from the latest and most innovative sleep technology. Sweet dreams. *Purchase a Royall & Borden Mattress during our Memorial Day Sale weekend, and enjoy free delivery and set-up on your entire purchase when delivered within a 50 mile radius of the store. Free delivery is a $100 value. RSI is not responsible for typographical errors. MEMORIAL DAY SALE Bonita Chamber seeking 2013 Business Expo exhibitors and sponsors The Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce is seeking exhibitors and sponsors for its 2013 Business Expo June 13, from 4:30 to 7:00 p.m., at Vi at Bentley Village in North Naples. New this year, the Bonita Springs Chamber is offering free admittance to its 2013 Business Expo and the public is invited to attend. Our goal is to host an event that brings together the greater business community in one venue allowing them to make connections on multiple fronts, whether that is business to business or business to consumer, said Christine Ross, CEO of the chamber. For exhibitors, the 2013 Business Expo is an excellent low cost investment to showcase their products and services to hundreds of potential customers. This event will be heavily promoted and marketed to drive attendance and the Bonita Springs Chamber expects more than 300 attendees. Booth space to exhibit at this event is limited and reserved for members of the Bonita springs Area Chamber of commerce. To sign up, interested parties may contact Cindy Burgess at 992-2943 or Cindy@BontiaSpringsChamber.com. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. Got Download?Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comThe iPad AppSearch Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Call now to schedule an appointment: North, Central and East Naples: 239-430-3668 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com DR. LAM FACFAS, DABPS DR. LEE DPM DR. TIMM AACFAS, DABLES DR. ADARVE DPM ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS: If you said yes to 2 or more we realize you need to see us now! 1. Child ever had heel pain 2. Child stop running or walking due to foot pain 3. No arch noted on a wet foot print 4. Child always wanting to be carried / does not want to walk (239) 430-3668 Research says, if you dont treat your child with at foot, over 25% will need surgery or deal with chronic knee and heel pain. NEWS OF THE WEIRDBY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATEBackyard barnyardThe Department of Agriculture reported recently that in four of Americas largest cities New York, Miami, Los Angeles and Denver nearly one home out of 100 keeps chickens either for a fresh egg supply or as pets, giving rise to chicken services such as Backyard Poultry magazine, MyPetChicken. com and Julie Bakers Pampered Poultry store. Among the most popular products are strap-on cloth diapers for the occasions when owners bring their darlings indoors, i.e., cuddle their lap chickens. Also popular are saddles for roosters, to spare hens mating injuries owing to roosters brutal horniness, sometimes costing hens most or all of their back feathers from a single encounter. Government in action Consider all the ways were taxed, wrote Marylands community Gazette in April when were born, die, earn income, spend it, own property, sell it, attend entertainment venues, operate vehicles and pass wealth along after death, among others. Maryland has now added a tax on rain. To reduce stormwater runoff into the Chesapeake Bay, the Environmental Protection Agency assessed the state $14.8 billion, which the state will collect starting in July by taxing impervious surfaces any land area in its 10 largest counties that cannot directly absorb rainwater, such as roofs, driveways, patios and sidewalks. Its good to be the county administrator of Alameda County, Calif. (on San Francisco Bay, south of Oakland). The San Francisco Chronicle revealed in March that somehow, Susan Muranishi negotiated a contract that pays her $301,000 a year, plus equity pay of $24,000 a year so that she makes at least 10 percent more than the next highest paid official, plus longevity pay of $54,000 a year, plus a car allowance and that she will be paid that total amount per year as her pension for life (in addition to a private pension of $46,000 a year that the county purchased for her). Congress established a National Helium Reserve in 1925 in the era of zeppelin balloons, but most consider it no longer useful (most, that is, ranging from President Reagan to the Democratic congressman who in 1996 called it one program that, if we cannot undo it, we cannot undo anything). The House of Representatives recently voted 394-1 to continue funding it because of fears of a shortage that might affect MRI machines and, of course, party balloons. Great art! The Jewish Museum in Berlin is currently staging what has become popularly known as the Jew in the Box exhibit to teach visitors about Judaism simply featuring one knowledgeable Jewish person who sits in a chair in a glass box for two hours a day and answers questions from the curious. Both supporters (We Germans have many insecurities when it comes to Jews) and critics (Why dont they give him a banana and a glass of water (and) turn up the heat?) are plentiful. The weather in Hong Kong on April 25 wreaked havoc on American artist Paul McCarthys outdoor, 50-foottall piece of inflatable art in the West Kowloon Cultural District. Complex Pile (a model of an arrangement of excrement) got punctured, which mostly pleased Mr. McCarthys critics since his recent work, reported the South China Morning Post, has often centered around bodily functions. Police report News of the Weird has reported several times on the astonishing control that inmates have at certain prisons in Latin American countries, with drug cartel leaders often enjoying lives nearly as pleasurable as their lives on the outside. However, according to an April federal indictment, similar problems have plagued the City Detention Center in Baltimore, where members of the Black Guerrilla Family operated with impunity. Between 2010 and 2012, corruption was such that 13 female guards have now been charged, including four women who bore the children of the gangs imprisoned leader, Tavon White. Cellphones, drugs and Grey Goose vodka were among the smuggled-in contraband, and the indictment charges that murders were ordered from inside. (Baltimore City Paper had reported 14 stories in 2009 and 2010 on the gangrelated corruption at the center, but apparently state and federal officials had failed to be alarmed.) Chicago police have arrested Ms. Shermain Miles, 51, at least 396 times since 1978, under 83 different aliases, for crimes ranging from theft (92 times) to prostitution and robbery. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, she is a virtuoso at playing the system to delay her proceedings and avoid jail time. (2) Alvin Cote, 59, passed away in February of poor health in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, following a career of 843 publicintoxication arrests. Danielle Parker was hospitalized and awaiting DUI charges after a crash near Gaston, N.C., in March, even though she had been in the passenger seat of the car. She had handled the wheel momentarily because Brittany Reinhardt, 19, in the drivers seat, was busy texting. (Ms. Reinhardt, apparently sober, was charged with aiding and abetting a DUI.) Strange old worldMr. Datta Phuge perhaps overly personifies Indias national obsession with the beauty of gold. For special occasions, he outfits his knuckles, neck and wrists with golden signet rings, chunky bracelets and a medallion, wrote BBC News in April after Mr. Phuge had also purchased a crinkly gold tailored shirt made for him for about $250,000. The 7-pound shirt (from Rankar Jewellers in the city of Pune) has a velvet lining to keep it from irritating his skin, and he must, of course, always travel with a bodyguard. www.SunshineAce.com Memorial DaySalute-worthy Savings at Sunshine Ace Hardware$10Instant SavingsCutter Insect Repellent Spray 6 oz. Backwoods or 4 oz. Dry. 7097363, 7198781 Rubbermaid 48 Qt. Cooler Holds up to 56 cans plus ice. 86108. Limit 1 at this price. 17 Gal. Utility Tub. 6018220. Save up to $500for ACE Rewards members on gallons of Clark+Kensigton Paint & Primer in One. Gallons only. Limit 3 gallons total. MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND MAY 24 27 From paint supplies and lawn and garden tools to pool toys and outdoor lighting its on sale at Sunshine Ace. Sale $399 EA.You Pay99 with card -$3Sale $1999You Pay$999 with card -$10$499 Exclusively available at your neighborhood Sunshine ACE $499 $649to Value $999Value $3699ValueSave up to $27 after instant savings.The Sunshine Ace Memorial Day Event is here, and Ace has got your weekend covered on all fronts. Whether youll be completing those much-needed home maintenance projects, or taking some much deserved down-time, Sunshine Ace has what you need!

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omas Quigley, M.D.Board Certi ed Eye Physician & Surgeonwww.doctorquigley.comFREEEYE EXAMFOR NEW PATIENTSNo Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of reimburse within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal.CODE: FW00SP27823complete medical exam with one of our board certi ed eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to new patients 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 5/31/2013Naples Bonita Springs www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA14 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Aspirin not always best treatment for many individuals SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY An aspirin a day may not always keep heart disease away, say two University of Florida cardiologists. But a new algorithm they have developed outlines factors physicians should weigh as they assess whether a patient would benefit from a daily dose of the drug. Approximately 50 million people in the United States pop a daily aspirin pill to treat or prevent heart disease. Of these, at least half take more than 100 milligrams of the drug more than one baby aspirin a day. Although aspirin has been widely used in cardiovascular medicine over the past 20 to 30 years, a review of research papers suggests that the widely used over-the-counter medicine does not benefit everyone to the same degree, report Dr. Ki Park and Dr. Anthony A. Bavry in the May issue of Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine.Not all patients with coronary disease are the same, said Dr. Park, a physician in the department of medicines division of cardiovascular medicine.Dr. Park and Dr. Bavrys algorithm leads physicians through a series of questions that consider the patients age, gender and current health status. The answers help them determine whether the course of care should include aspirin. Its an evolving assessment that should be repeated every few years as conditions change, Dr. Park said. Most studies on the effects of aspirin therapy in patients who had previous heart attacks have focused on men. While examining the literature, Drs. Park and Bavry found that less is known about the effects of aspirin on women, people with diabetes, the elderly and even patients who are at risk of a heart attack but have never had one. In this paper we highlight gaps in knowledge where we dont fully know if aspirin should be used or not, said Dr. Bavry, an assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine. Theres still room to study its optimal use. While people may see aspirin as a harmless drug, taking a daily aspirin does carry some risk of side effects such as gastrointestinal bleeding. Drs. Park and Bavrys review contains an analysis to help physicians determine whether the risks outweigh the benefits. Their review showed that while aspirin therapy remains a good way to prevent further heart attacks, more is not better. A low-dose aspirin, such as an 81-milligram pill, gives the same amount of protection as a standard dose of 325 milligrams and lowers the risk of bleeding. But even at a lower dose, the current literature suggests certain patients may not benefit from aspirin therapy. In women, for instance, evidence shows aspirin can help prevent certain types of stroke, but does not appear to prevent heart attacks as effectively as it does in men. On the other hand, women appear to have a lower risk of gastrointestinal bleeding than men do. Risk factors also change with age and the estimated 10-year risk for heart disease. The rise in use of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins also can affect whether a patient should take aspirin. And aspirin therapy for patients with diabetes, who are automatically considered to be at high risk for cardiovascular disease, remains controversial. A lot goes in to estimating a patients risk, Dr. Bavry said. HEALTHY LIVINGNurses deserve our supportLast week was Nurses Week across the nation, and it gave us a chance to reflect on what a great year it has been for our wonderful NCH nurses. They mean so much to our reputation for competent and compassionate care. Heres a glimpse of what our nurses have helped accomplish over this past year: The ASPIRE (Achieving, Success, Professionalism, Integrity, Rewarding, Excellence) program aims to enhance the quality of care, improve patient outcomes, reward excellence, and promote nursing satisfaction. It had 320 participantsup nearly 50 percent from a year earlier. The number of certified nurses in their specialties has more than doubled in four years, from 60 to 140. The number of bachelor of science or higher degreed nurses has more than doubled in that timeframe. We continued down the Pathway to Excellence on the road toward becoming a Magnet Hospital. Our goals on this journey are three: improving patient care; providing a great place to work; and strengthening the ability of nurses to advance individually. Objective quality continued to improve this year. Falls, pressure ulcers, physical restraints, central line infections, catheter associated infections, global immunization, deep vein thrombosis prevention, and our own selfassessment are all the best we have ever been and compare favorably with the best national standards. More than 90 percent of our central lines are now inserted at the bedside by nurses, a process which is safer for patients. Board members spent time walking the floors with nurses. Board Chair Mariann McDonald summarized the feelings of all, Nursing is not an easy job, it changes moment to moment . these men and women are so dedicated to what they do. Nurses Week culminated with an award ceremony on the beautiful lawn of the Naples Beach Hotel. Scores of NCH nurses were recognized, including our newest category the Thelma Hodges Nurse Mentors of the Year with RNs Eileen Haely, ICU, and Jeri Petersen, Brookdale, winning. Other winners included Nurses of the Year Elizabeth Foster, 3S downtown, and Stephen Taylor, fifth floor North Naples; Rising Star (nurses new to the profession) Leonardo Ricardo, 3S downtown, and Kevin Turner, Brookdale; Nursing Technician Support Superstars Eleanor Johnson, Care Technician (CT) 3N, and Guillermo Castellanos, CT 4th floor; and Nursing Secretary Support Superstars Kim Witmer, 6S, and Gloria Corrales, Out Patient Infusion Service. You can support our nurses through a special NCH Friends of Nursing Fund. Simply visit www.nchmd.org/nursingfund to make a contribution. They all deserve the support. Dr. Allen Weiss is president and CEO of the NCH Healthcare System. allenWEISSallen.weiss@nchmd.org

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Periodontal FACTPeriodontal Disease may be a contributing factor to: gum periodontal disease periodontal diseaseDr. Bradley Piotrowski, D.D.S., M.S.D.BOARD CERTIFIED PERIODONTIST Hurry offer expires 6/7/13 Hodges Funeral Home at Naples Memorial Gardens 525 111th Ave North, Naples, Florida 34108 at Naples Memorial GardensMonday, May 27th 10:00 am9:45 am Prelude: P i n e Ridge Middle School Ban d d Hodges Funeral Home at Naples Memorial Gardens Keynote by historian, chaplain and U.S. Army (Ret.) Lt. Col. Robert Hartman The Korean War, The Rev. Emil Kapaun, and The Medal of Honor PICNIC Catered by Cook Brothers BBQin memory of their beloved father, US Navy veteran, Ronnal E. CookBring lawnchair! Music by Pine Ridge Middle School Band under the baton of Kelly Parker Dedication, Volunteerism and Sacri ce Come Celebrate... FREE NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 A15 Tour Edison States student housingLightHouse Commons at Edison State College will be offering several Information Sessions throughout the summer for those interested in learning more about student housing options.Available dates and times are: 5 p.m. Thursday, May 30 Noon Saturday, June 8 Noon Wednesday, June 19 5 p.m. Thursday, June 27 5 p.m. Monday, July 1 Noon Saturday, July 13 5 p.m. Thursday, July 18LightHouse Commons is Edison State Colleges first on-campus residence building. It is located on the Fort Myers campus at 13301 Edison Parkway. Guests will see the available floor plans and pricing sheets, while also learning about affordable student housing options. Tours of the building and model units will be also available. The information sessions will also cover the safety and security measures, meal plan options and the activities and amenities provided for resident students. For more information, or to make a reservation for one of the upcoming information sessions, contact LightHouse Commons at 985-8361 or e-mail housing@edison.edu.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA16 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 providing quality healthcare for all since 1977 four convenient family care locationseast 1755 Heritage Trail #604, Naples, 239.353.4101immokalee 1454 Madison Avenue, Immokalee, 239.658.3000itech 508 North Ninth Street #142, Immokalee, 239.657.6363 north 1284 Creekside Street #101, Naples, 239.596.3133 www.healthcareswfl.org FREE WITH A$35 Grocery OrderCentury Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon 750 ml.While supplies last. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 5/30/13 Serving Naples the finest products for over 70 years. FREE WITH A$29 Grocery Order Island Vinaigrette 12 oz.While supplies last. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 5/30/13 UNDERCOVER HISTORIANOchopee Post Office puts stamp on local historySixty Years Ago May 12, 1953, was quite a memorable day in local history. On that fateful day in Ochopee, a small farming community four miles east of Highway 29 from the crossroads at Carnestown, the original three-story building that housed a small caf, boarding house and general store was lost to fire. Gone was a place where citizens could buy clothes, shoes and yard goods along with various sundries and groceries and carcasses of beef and pork that were cut to order right in front of you along with the town post office, literally burned to the ground by a transient truck driver. Before any white settlers arrived, the Seminole Indians made their home in this area, including both the Osceola and Billie families. With the white settlers arrival, the Seminole lives would be forever changed. Ochopee, a Seminole word meaning big field, is located roughly seven miles from Everglades City, along the Tamiami Trail. Its name is indeed quite apropos, considering the location today is in a large field. Prior to being named Ochopee, the area was called Gaunts Place or Gaunts Farm, after tomato farmer James Gaunt, and it was a thriving community from 1928 through 1953. With the completion of the Tamiami Trail by county namesake Barron Gift Collier in 1928, this southernmost frontier was now open to development. And within two years, there was plenty of development. Ochopee boasted a general store, a packing house, a three-story boarding house, its own utility plant, a garage and a cafe, along with housing for the local residents as well as the workers and a barn for the mules. How interesting to learn that during the Great Depression, the Gaunt Company prospered. In its heyday, in the 1930s and s, Ochopee would swell to 1,200 people. Ochopee was considered the halfway point between Miami and Fort Myers, and once the road opened, travelers began stopping for gas, food and lodging. It was reported by local residents that waitresses in the caf served $2 T-bone steaks that were too big to fit on a dinner plate in addition to 15-cent hamburgers. The wrecker at the nearby garage was constantly kept busy pulling vehicles out of area canals. Business was indeed booming. That May 12 some 60 years ago, the blaze spread quickly from one building to the next despite the heroic efforts of the townspeople. The nearest fire department was in Everglades City, and even though crews came, there was a problem with their hoses. While many were scooping up water from the local canals, the fire was just too strong. Everyone just stood back and watched it all burn to the ground. The transient truck driver who was responsible died the following day from injuries. Many believe the fire marked the beginning of the end for Ochopee and it appears that way to me, too. The following day, while residents literally were picking up the pieces, the mail truck arrived, jolting everyone back to reality and to the realization of the need for another post office. Local farmer Mr. Gaunt offered the use of one of the irrigation sheds nearby until a new post office could be built, sharing with the late folklorist Maria Stone in her book Ochopee: The Story of the Smallest Post Office, that we can use one of those sheds out in the field that we store irrigation pipe, hoses and things in. And thus was born the Ochopee Post Office, measuring all of its 8 feet, 4 inches by 7 feet, 3 inches. There is room for only the postmaster behind the counter and one customer at the window.After the fire, the Gaunt family moved its farm and business to nearby Immokalee, and for a time, many of the workers were transported between the two towns. Sadly, the packing house along with the Ochopee Caf and Garage all historic buildings were demolished in the 1960s when the Tamiami Trail was widened. Another decade brought the establishment of the Big Cypress Preserve in the 1970s by the National Park Service, and other historic buildings were later sold, burned or moved. In addition to the Gaunt family, there were many other pioneer families that helped shape this community, including the Browns, Barretts, Cails, Griffins, Warrens and Wootens each one with his or her own story that should be told. At the post offices Feb. 25, 1995, dedication as a Collier County Historic Property, which was attended by numerous dignitaries along with a few local citizens, including author Stone, it was said that the post office had risen like a phoenix out of the flames. The location, marked by the highway sign Ochopee, shows no indication of the former caring and thriving community it once was. Who knew that this makeshift post office along the famed Tamiami Trail would stand the test of time, and several hurricanes, while becoming a national landmark and tourist attraction as one of the smallest post offices in the world? Maureen Sullivan-Hartung arrived in Naples in 1981. Following a years stint as a reporter for the former weekly Everglades Echo newspaper, she began freelancing. Her first book, Hidden History of Everglades City & Points Nearby, was published in 2010 by The History Press in South Carolina. Learn more at www.maureenwrites.com. The landmark Ochopee Post Office along the Tamiami Trail. This photo was taken in the mid-1990s. 1 f t w w m a maureenSULLIVAN-HARTUNGmshwrites@gmail.com $1Emergency Exam (D0140), X-Ray (D0220) and Photos (D0471)With Coupon Only. Expires 6/30/13$495Porcelain Crown (D2740),With Coupon Only. Expires 6/30/13 9960 Business Circle #14 Naples, FL 34112239-330-3666License Number DN14337Monday Saturday 7 am 7 pm Scan for more savings! The Patient Has The Right To Refuse To Pay, Cancel Payment Or Be Reimbursed For Any Other Service Or Treatment Which Is Performed As A Result Of, And Within 72 Hours Of Responding To The Advertisement For The Discounted Service. Same Day Crowns and Root Canals at Truly Affordable Prices *Starting At

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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Saturday, May 25, 4 to 7 p.m. & Sunday, May 26, 1 to 4 p.m. in the Restaurant Piazza KIDS DAY Saturday, May 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in MundoFox Playland NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 NEWS A17 miles as the prominent and crucial piece of the long-time dream. This creates a Naples central park, says Andrew McElwaine, president and CEO of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida. Together with the Naples Zoo of about 50 acres and the Conservancys 21 acres, roughly 100 acres of Greenway park will have direct access to and from both the Zoo and the Conservancy. It means you have a big chunk of real estate in the middle of Naples dedicated to preservation and to nature. People can park south of the Zoo, get out of their cars and leave them, then walk the Greenway, pay the Zoo a visit, and come see the Conservancy, he explains. People can spend all day devoted to studying wildlife conservation and the natural world. To do that in the heart of a city is nothing short of extraordinary, he suggests. And he isnt alone in the sentiment, nor in the conviction that getting to this point hasnt been easy. The master plan took a long time, with two different county advisory boards Parks and Recreation, and the Collier Conservation Land Acquisition Advisory Committee, explains Ms. Krier. You have an airport, a river (and wetlands), so you deal with the Coast Guard and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the South Florida Water Management District, and the DEP. The litany is long and glorious of permits required for this project. You have three governments involved: the city, the county and the Airport Authority. You have two NGOS (the Naples Zoo and the Conservancy), one commercial marina, and at a minimum five neighborhoods Bears Paw, River Reach, Coconut River Estates, Natures Preserve and Avion Park, all on top of the Greenway. Ms. Krier and the Land Preservation Trust proved to be firestarters, without which none of it might have happened or at least not now, other officials say. Thats because she and her organization wrote the grant proposal that won about $9.2 million from the Florida Communities Trust, part of the states Forever Florida program that has remained dormant for about three years, since Gov. Rick Scott took office, Mr. McElwaine says. The money will now pay for phase two, and help fund the last three things that have to be done after that, to complete the full plan. Those include buying a parcel south of the river; developing an easement on Airport Authority land; and building a bridge from Airport Authority property to the city, while the city completes a park on its bank at Central Avenue. Which raises a question: Why did it take 21 years to move from phase one to phase two of this project? Theres an answer, of course. Much of the land required to move forward on the project was privately owned by the Fleischmann family of Cincinnati, which ultimately sold the land to the county and the Conservancy for $62 million, through the Trust for Government Land that brokers such deals. The citizens of Collier stepped up and voted to save the Zoo by taxing themselves, as well, which made the deal possible. Most people think Save the Zoo just saved the Zoo, says Mr. McElwaine. It didnt just save it; it also bought the other 90 acres that will be the Gordon River Greenway. Ultimately the Greenway will include miles of walking, biking, running, inline skating, skateboarding, dog walking, baby-carriage-pushing, wheelchairriding opportunity for lovers of fitness, nature and Naples itself. On it, Neapolitans will weave through urban areas in a frequently close veil of nature, without getting their feet wet (unless it rains). The effort, which began with the late Al French and Mark Benedict, founding members of the Land Trust, includes such partners as the state Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Greenways and Trails; the city of Naples; Collier County; Conservation Collier; The Conservancy of Southwest Florida; the Naples Zoo at Caribbean Gardens; the Naples Municipal Airport; the Naples Pathways Coalition; and the Florida office of the Rails-ToTrails Conservancy. Among the creatures who owe their continuing existence along the Greenway to those organizations both public and private are the following: anhingas, cormorants, tricolored herons, great egrets, green herons, snowy egrets, brown pelicans, ospreys, red shouldered hawks, ospreys, eagles, great-horned owls and the prolific but exotic Muscovy ducks. The Gordon still includes alligators, banded water snakes, green anoles, red-bellied turtles diamondback terrapins, soft-shelled turtles and the invasive brown anole, and of course there are otters, raccoons, possums and the like. All of which come together with and for humans in for the relatively near future its months away now, not decades. Unfortunately, at the moment visitors still cant see any of it, old or new. The original section is closed while workers remove exotic plant species such as Brazilian peppers and Australian pines. But that wont last forever, and neither will the dormant dream. Its soon to awaken to a new Gordon River Greenways reality. DREAMFrom page 1

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www.MillenniumPhysician.comPRIMARY CARE o LAB SERVICES o RADIOLOGY o DIAGNOSTICS o MEDICAL AESTHETICS o URGENT CARE Primary Care OcesMARIA DEL RIOGILES, M.D. ALEJANDRO PEREZTREPICHIO, M.D. LUIS POZNIAK, M.D. MICHAEL Y. WANG, M.D. 1735 SW Health Parkway Naples, FL 34108239-249-7800 239-249-7830 JULIA HARRIS, M.D. JAMES FAREMOUTH, D.O. NANCY BARATTA, MSN, ARNP 8803 Tamiami Trail E Naples, FL 34112239-732-1050JOHN DIAZ, M.D. KAE FERBER, M.D. JULIE DIAZ, FNPBC 671 Goodlette Road, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34102239-263-8222 CHARLES KILO, M.D. 1495 Pine Ridge Rd. Suite 4 Naples, FL 34109239-594-5456 www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 PET TALESFree to a good homeMaddies Fund challenges adoption myths to get shelter pets placed BY GINA SPADAFORIUniversal UclickIf someone else pays the adoption fee when you adopt a pet, does it change how much you value the animal as a member of your family? How you answer that question may reveal how you feel about many of the changes currently under way in the shelter and rescue community. It has long been a core belief in the community that people who didnt pay for a pet were more likely to get rid of it for pretty much any reason at all or for no reason at all. In recent years, though, organizations such as Maddies Fund, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and the NoKill Advocacy Center have challenged those views and many others, working to increase the number of homeless animals placed in good homes by changing the way shelters do business. One of the first things they looked at: the idea that adoption fees help pets find better homes. After Maddies Fund experimented with paying the adoption fees for a relatively small adoption drive, the Maddies Shelter Medicine Program at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine tracked the people and the pets they adopted. They found that the overwhelming majority of the animals were still in their homes months later, most sleeping on the beds of the people who adopted them. This year, Maddies Fund has expanded its adoption drive. On June 1 and 2, more than 200 shelters and rescue groups from eight communities in five states will participate in the fourth annual Maddies Pet Adoption Days, with Maddies Fund ready with $4 million to provide the adoption fees that shelters and rescue groups are counting on. Adoption drive organizers hope to place 5,000 pets in new forever homes, adding to the nearly 7,000 pets placed in the three prior, more geographically limited events. (For locations and more information, go to Adopt.Maddiesfund.org.) A few years ago, I would have been in the people value what they pay for camp. I ran a breed rescue for a couple of years, taking in and rehoming about 200 dogs in that time. You definitely can get burned out and cynical when dealing with people who are giving up pets. But the relatively few bad eggs in the pet-owner population seem to get concentrated into the baskets of rescuers and shelter workers. Its easy to start thinking that pretty much everyone is a pet-dumping jerk, even those who dont want to give up pets but have to, such as when someone loses his or her home. There will always be some people who dont do right by their pets, but studies show that most people truly are doing the very best they can for the pets they consider family. Even if sometimes the best is finding another home. When you stop looking at everyone as an enemy, you can ask your communities for help and youll get it. Thats why this year I volunteered to help Maddies Fund spread the word of this years Pet Adoption Days. For weeks now, Ive been helping the group connect with people who will share the information and with some, I hope, wholl adopt a pet! We are pet-loving societies here in the United States and Canada, and Maddies is truly on to something here. In providing shelters and rescue groups with the resources to change how they work with their communities, theyre giving them room to change for the better. Its a pretty good bet that 5,000 pets will find new homes during Maddies Pet Adoption Days as planned, but its just as likely that more hearts will be changed forever by drives like these than can filled by shelters operating on their own. And thats great news for pets and the people who love them. A nonprofit foundation dedicated to getting more animals into good homes will pay adoption fees at more than 200 sites June 1-2. >> Sassy (A170948) is an approximately 10-month-old female Australian cattle dog mix. She is sweet, affectionate. She likes to play, is friendly and fun to be with. >> Willow (A169282) is an approximately 8-year-old female tabby domestic short hair. She is beautiful, fullgured and full of love. She has captivating bright yellow eyes. >> Beans (A148953) is an approximately 3-year-old male Treeing Walker coonhound mix. He is an A+ student who is good on his leash, sits and comes. Beans is friendly. >> Sylvester (A168596) is an approximately 2-year-old male domestic short hair. He is a handsome Manx with a cute stub of a tail.To adopt or foster a petThis weeks pets are from Collier County Domestic Animal Services. Adoption fees for cats are $60 and dogs are $85 and include sterilization surgery, vaccinations, pet license, ID microchip and a bag of food. Visit DAS at 7610 Davis Blvd. from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday. For more information, call 252-7387 or visit www.colliergov.net/pets. Pets of the Week

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 NEWS A19 The Springs Assisted Living is part of Shell Points Integrated Healthcare System. Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc. Shell Point. All rights reserved. SPG-128-13 13901 Shell Point Plaza Fort Myers, Florida 33908 www.shellpoint.org/springs MK Mb t Vn Cf Navigating the myriad decisions in determining if Assisted Living is right for you or your loved one is just plain difficult. Levels of care. Different facilities. Quality. Affordability. All factors in ensuring an optimized quality of life. If youve got a question or a whole list of them meet with our assisted living experts, McKenzie or Vivian, today. With the well being of the individual as their highest priority, theyll give you answers that can assist you in making the most informed decisions possible. When you do, we also invite you to tour Shell Points newest assisted living facility, The Springs. With beautiful surroundings and Shell Points proven reputation, The Springs offers an affordable option on a month-to-month basis. Meet with our experts and visit The Springs today! 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Three years ago I drove a CX-9 to Colorado and back, and that trip was a revealing experience. The vehicle was quiet and comfortable on the road, and it handled with carlike agility. The spacious interior was as well-appointed as a luxury sedan. Now, for 2013, some minor updates and a new front-end design enhance the package. The CX-9s chassis is derived from the Mazda6, and its basic architecture has a lot in common with the Ford Edge. This threeseat SUV is available with front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive in Sport, Touring and Grand Touring trim levels. Prices range from $29,785 to $36,375. I recently got reacquainted with the top all-wheel-drive Grand Touring model. The base price was $36,375 and the sticker price was $39,605. Some of its competitors include the Honda Pilot, Buick Enclave and GMC Acadia. One of the most obvious and welcome changes is the addition of a new nose with Mazdas KODO, or Soul of Motion, design. The smiling face from previous years is thankfully gone. The new front gives the CX-9 a more flowing, unified shape. The steeply sloping windshield and tapered roofline are perfect accents. The test cars 20-inch wheels and low-profile tires add a muscular touch and improve cornering. Low-profile tires often deliver a harsh ride, but that was not the case with the Mazda. The interior looks a little dated, but carefully executed styling details such as the tasteful integration of wood-grain trim and satin-finished accents make it attractive. The front seats were nicely contoured, and the second-row seat moves forward for easy access to the third seat. It also slides forward to enhance legroom for third-row passengers. The rear cargo area is substantial when the third seat is folded down. The Mazdas door panels have curved ribs that mimic those of the center stack, and power window switches are mounted on the ribs. The Grand Touring comes with a blindspot monitor, backup camera and heated front seats. Popular options include the navigation system, Bose stereo and a moonroof. The blind-spot monitor is an invaluable partner in freeway traffic. A small icon in the outside rearview mirror lights up when a vehicle is alongside, and it issues a warning beep if you use the turn signal. The 273-horsepower, 3.7-liter V-6 has very little vibration, and the six-speed transmissions shifts are nearly seamless. When coasting downhill, the transmission automatically downshifts at the slightest touch of the brakes, helping to hold the vehicles speed. Fuel economy is rated at 16 mpg in the city and 22 on the highway. Safety items include front, side and sidecurtain airbags, anti-lock brakes, traction control and vehicle stability control.PriceThe base price of the test vehicle was $36,375. Options included a power sunroof, Bose stereo and navigation system. The sticker price was $39,605.WarrantyThree years or 36,000 miles with a fiveyear, 60,000-mile powertrain warranty. The new front end gives the CX-9 a more contemporary look. The Specs2013 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring>> Engine: 3.7-liter, 273-horsepower V-6 >> Transmission: Six-speed automatic allwheel drive >> Wheelbase: 113.2 inches >> Curb weight: 4,552 pounds >> Base price: $36,375 >> As driven: $39,605 >> MPG rating: 16 city, 22 highway MOTORS

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2777 Tamiami Trail North, Naples, Florida 34103 239.261.home(4663) www.clivedaniel.com Shop Monday through Saturday 10am to 6pm Sunday 12 noon to 5pm Memorial Day.A Time to reflect. A time to remember all those who served and sacrificed. A time to sayThank You.From the women and men ofAmerican. Original. Exceptional.CLIVE DANIELHOME CD

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THEYRE OUT THERE. THEY COULD be around the corner or in another state or in some country with a name you cant spell or pronounce. But make no mistake, theyre out there, waiting to pounce on your business. Criminals are out to steal information or intellectual property or suck funds out of accounts. Carrie Kerskie knows that. Shes president of Marcone Investigations Inc. of Naples and its her business to know about cyberattacks. They are increasing, Ms. Kerskie said. The Department of Homeland Security recently issued a warning about a new wave of cyberttacks targeting American corporations. The focus of those particular attacks may be large corporations, but no business is immune, even in Southwest Florida. Lt. Keith Day of the Lee CountyCyber attacks against business on the riseBY GLENN MILLERFlorida Weekly Correspondent SEE PROTECT, B4 PROTECT YOUR DATA Simple tips to protect your business from online attacks.B4 >>inside: INSIDE Out and aboutThe Arts and Alzheimers series at ArtisNaples. B7 Real estateFinal phase released in Porto Romano at Miromar Lakes. B9 Ask the FoolShould you spend or save if you want to help the economy? B5 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE LOCAL BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Villalago at Mediterra Bua/Bua-Bell 866.884.8196 $1.375 Million Web#: N213005976 Barefoot Beach Bua/Bua-Bell 866.884.8196 $3.995 Million Web # N212024853

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239-434-0300 www.aemc.cc American Eagle has the Solution! www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 The who, what and why of the various CPIsSince last weeks Inflation or deflation column, there has been an abundance of questions by readers: What is the CPI? Is it a good measure of inflation? Why does the Federal Reserve Board look at core CPI? Arent changes in producer prices important? Does the CPI predict inflation or deflation? Here are the answers to your questions: The CPI is the Consumer Price Index. There are several CPIs and the one most often referenced is the all urban CPI index. It measures 144 consumer items (goods and services), which are categorized into groupings such as food, energy, schooling, medical, etc. Yes, it is absolutely an imperfect measurement, but it is probably the best measuring stick that we have. Since Fed is charged with keeping price stability in the U.S. economy (i.e., keeping prices from deflating but allowing mild inflation). The Fed looks at the CPI, but also keenly looks at what it calls Core CPI, thats the CPI excluding food and energy. Food and energy are considered to be the most volatile of the components and their price changes are not necessarily indicative of permanent change in inflation rates. However, Core CPI is not embraced by all academia as a superior inflation measurement. A recently published white paper (How Well Does Core Inflation Capture Permanent Price Changes? by Bradley, Jansen and Sinclair, April 23, 2013), found that the permanent component of core CPI is much more volatile and that core excludes volatile permanent shocks to the overall price level. The authors suggest we pay close attention to CPI measures that include food and energy. However, the CPI is not the only important measure of inflation. The Producer Price Index, or PPI, is a leading economic indicator and is thought to lead consumer inflation. The three PPI Indexes measure prices at the producer level: finished goods PPI is more important than than intermediate and crude materials. The idea that PPI leads CPI inflation is based on the premise that producers will ultimately pass along price increases to their buyers. There are 12 regional Reserve Banks (e.g., Atlanta, Chicago, New York, St. Louis, etc.) Each one seems to track an inflation index that it thinks more closely measures inflation or creates its own index. The Chicago Fed created an Income Based Economic Indexes, or IBEX, to capture the inflation experiences of specific socio-economic and demographic groups (as) inflation experiences of the socioeconomic and demographic groups are very similar, though the elderly experience somewhat higher inflation. The Cleveland Fed publishes its own estimates of inflation. The St Louis Fed president has been openly critical that the Feds preferred measure Core CPI leads us astray and that we have too little inflation. Why do some bloggers and analysts propose that inflation is much greater than what the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports as CPI inflation, beyond demographic differences? The bloggers propose that the CPI has undergone meaningful changes in definition/calculation in the past 30 years and the changes were primarily made to benefit the U.S. government by lessening increases on Social Security, which is indexed to the CPI. The changes in the CPI require their own, extensive debate. But for the purposes of last weeks column (which was addressing the inability of the Fed to create inflation post 2008, and the concern that we could slip into deflation), 30-year-old changes in the construction of the CPI are not relevant. What needs to be addressed is whether the CPI of the prior five years is signaling inflation or deflation. Right now, it is inconclusive but leans to deflation. Shadow stats is a most popular website that has some interesting white papers on the changes in the CPI. It has created its own CPI number and proves that consumer prices have escalated astronomically during the past 30 years. Columnist Rex Nutting wrote recently in Market Watch about problems with the runaway inflation arguments. But lets assume for a moment that the deniers are right that we should compare, as much as possible, prices of the same goods and services over time, he wrote. So why not look at some actual prices and see how much theyve risen over time? If prices were rising 6 percent at a year, then it would mean most things would cost almost six times as much as they did 30 years ago. Under this scenario, milk would cost $13 a gallon, a family car would cost $38,000, a first-class postage stamp would cost $1.15, and a gallon of gas would cost $7. (The column offers a table of price increases for 20 consumer items.) Further, the problem that the BLS and anyone else measuring price changes is faced with is that the object or service being measured had radically changed over time and mostly improved... (with the exception of quality of education, which most would agree per any international measurement has declined). For instance, consider the difference between cars in the 1980s and today (air bags, tire quality; sound systems; navigation features; seat comfort; gas mileage); the difference in apartment living then (no washer/dryer) and now. Possibly the most radical change has been the improvement in medical care between then and now, as we have medicines and treatments that are so much more extensive, technology driven and life-extending. So the task before the BLS (to measure the price change in a fixed basket of goods and services) is clearly not possible without all sorts of adjustments. Just which adjustments give rise to great debate. It is always good to hear from readers and something is learned from each letter or phone call. So, thank you. Jeannette Showalter, CFA is a commodities broker with Worldwide Futures Systems, 571-8896. For mid-week commentaries, write to showalter@ww fsyst ems.com. m p C B 2 n a jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFAshowalter@ww fsyst ems.com MONEY & INVESTING

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To Schedule a Private Showing of Our 6 Luxury Model Homes, call ( 239) 494-5398 or visit LifeAtMediterra.comMEMBER OWNED CLUB. FROM THE $700s TO OVER $7 MILLION A London Bay Homes Community Development Enterprise Visit us daily at The Mediterra Sales Center 15836 Savona Way, Naples, FL 34110 Located on Livingston Road, approximately 2 miles north of Immokalee Road between I-75 and US 41. HA V E IT AL L ISABELLA II at SERATA3,009 Total A/C By London Bay Homes $1,811,864 FEATURED MODEL HOME OF THE WEEK

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M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentals Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$3195*PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $31.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Sheriffs Office economic crimes unit investigates cybercrimes against local businesses. Seeing more each year, Lt. Day said. A favorite target, he said, are real estate companies, and e-mail is often the opening the bad guys use. Other times, identity theft may be the opening. We have other instances where people may take on the identity of someone who owns or operates a business, Lt. Day said. Finding and catching the people responsible is not easy because, he said, the cases cross jurisdictional boundaries. He cited the case of a Lee County medical office where somebody hacked into its computer system and pretended to be one of the doctors. In that case, Lt. Day said, an employee became suspicious because she had never seen a spending pattern like the one that was popping up. She did her due diligence, said Lt. Day, who declined to name the company. The doctors didnt lose any money. Ms. Kerskie knows about these sorts of things as the president of Marcone Investigations. The target doesnt have to be a multinational corporation. Theyre even going after small business, Ms. Keskie said. The bad guys are probing here, probing there, looking to insert spyware into a companys system or poke holes in firewalls. In April, Verizon released what is called its 013 Data Breach Investigations Report. It may not have a catchy title, but there is still some scary information in the report. Some highlights: Perpetrators fall into three categories activists, criminals and spies. How are targets selected? Attacks were opportunistic and not targeted at specific individuals or companies in 75 percent of breaches, according to the report. Methods: In 78 percent of the cases, techniques were used that required only basic skills. Less than 1 percent involved, the report said, techniques considered of high difficulty. Ms. Kerskie suggests regular security updates. If not? That leaves huge, gaping holes, Ms. Kerskie. Those holes are where the bad guys can steal intellectual property or employee or customer information that can be used to further infiltrate a system and do more damage. On the world stage, where superpowers, terrorist organizations and megacorporations battle, computer probes and worms are used constantly to either infect or protect. Small businesses are subject to the same dangers. You could afford Fort Knox level security but all it takes is one employee checking Facebook, Ms. Kerskie said. That could be the opening. The most important thing is employee training, Ms. Kerskie said. Ms. Keskie said the primary reason employees shouldnt be on Facebook or personal e-mail accounts on company computers isnt productivity, but security. Thats what she emphasizes in her role as a speaker, trainer and consultant who, according to the Marcone website, specializes in identity theft, healthcare fraud/medical identity theft data security, breach prevention and Internet safety. Its to scare the pants off employees, Ms. Kerskie said. She said Facebook or other social media sites can open holes for criminals to leap through and into a companys system. Ms. Kerskie and Debbie B owe, the Charlotte County Sheriffs Office public information officer, both emphasized how smart phones have made it easier for cyber criminals. Smart phones are now loaded with information that used to be stored in office computers. Ms. Bowe said she started the Charlotte County cyber crimes unit in late 1999 or early 2000, before nearly everybody bought a smart phone. Hand-held devices such as smart phones and e-readers and tablets are easier to misplace or have stolen but have the same information available as old-fashioned desktop computers. Thats the biggest evolution, Ms. Bowe said of the difference between when the Charlotte County Sheriffs Office cyber unit started and today. Both women urge people to use passwords on portable devices. State, local and federal agencies all have a hand in fighting cyber crime. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement created a cybercrimes task force in 2012. Local agencies such as the Collier County Sheriffs Office have Economic Crimes Units, which investigate cyber crime. The cases we investigate typically involve individuals, Collier County Sheriffs spokeswoman Karie Partington wrote in an e-mail to Florida Weekly. She added later that, Cyber crimes against corporations would typically be investigated by a federal agency such as the FBI or Secret Service, rather than a local agency like CCSO. Ms. Kerskie said older people are essentially cyber immigrants and have had to learn technology to function in our modern world. Younger professionals are, she said, cyber natives and have grown up with the technology. Whether an immigrant or a native, both need to protect an employers information and their own. Once information is posted online, even on a private Facebook page, somebody can find it, Ms. Kerskie said. It is out there forever, Ms. Kerskie said. PROTECTFrom page 1 >> 1. Train employees in security principles. Establish basic security practices and policies for employees, such as requiring strong passwords and establish appropriate Internet use guidelines. Establish rules of behavior describing how to handle and protect customer information and other vital data. >> 2. Protect information, computers, and networks from cyber attacks. Keep clean machines: antivirus software to run a scan after each update. Install other key software updates as soon as they are available. Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. >> 3. Provide rewall security for your Internet connection. A rewall is a set of related programs that prevent outsiders from accessing data on a private network. If employees work from home, ensure that their home system(s) are protected by a rewall. >> 4. Make backup copies of important business data and information. Regularly backup the data on all computers. Backup data automatically if possible, or at least weekly and store the copies either offsite or in the cloud. >> 5. Control physical access to your computers and create user accounts for each employee. Prevent access or use of business computers by unauthorized individuals. Make sure a separate user account is created for each employee and require strong passwords. >> 6. Secure your Wi-Fi networks. If you have a Wi-Fi network for your workplace, make sure it is secure, encrypted, and hidden. To hide your Wi-Fi network, set up your wireless access point or router so it does not broadcast the network name. Password protect access to the router. >> 7. Passwords and authentication. Require employees to use unique passwords and change passwords every three months. Consider implementing multifactor authentication that requires additional information beyond a password to gain entry. Check with your vendors that handle sensitive data, especially nancial institutions, to see if they offer multifactor authentication for your account. For more information, visit www.fcc.gov/cyberforsmallbizCybersecurity procedures DAY

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 BUSINESS B5 I was born in a one-bedroom apartment in Chicago in 1984, and today I have more than 3,000 employees and operations in 27 countries, providing independent investment research. The nations shift from pensions toward 401(k)s boosted interest in mutual funds, so I began providing data on them. In 1985, I introduced ratings for funds. I went public in 2005. I cover more than 400,000 investments, including stocks, and I even manage money now, with about $157 billion in assets under management recently. Ive bought companies such as Ibbotson Associates. I rake in more than $650 million annually. Who am I? THE MOTLEY FOOLTo Educate, Amuse & Enrich Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest Investment The Motley Fool Take Name That Company Last weeks trivia answerDo you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Understanding BondsOver the long run, stocks have usually outperformed bonds. Still, its good to balance your portfolio with some bonds, and to understand what they really are. Bonds are essentially long-term loans. If a company issues bonds, its borrowing cash and promising to pay it back at a certain rate of interest. There are many kinds of bonds. Ones sold by the U.S. governments Treasury Department are called Treasuries. State and local governments issue municipal bonds, while businesses issue corporate bonds (sometimes called corporate paper). Since companies on shaky ground have a great chance of defaulting, they have to offer high-interest-rate junk bonds to attract buyers. Bond investors receive regular interest payments at what is called the coupon rate. For example, if you buy a $1,000 bond with a coupon rate of 5 percent, youll receive payments of $50 per year. When the bond matures after perhaps five, 10 or 30 years youll get back your initial loan, called par value. Most corporate bonds have a par value of $1,000, while government bonds can run much higher. Sometimes a company will call its bond, paying back the principal early. All bonds specify whether and how soon they can be called. Federal government bonds are never called. Investors dont necessarily buy a bond at issue and hold to maturity. Bonds are often traded between investors, with their prices rising and falling in reaction to changing interest rates. For example, when rates fall, people bid up bond prices. If banks are offering 2 percent, a 5 percent bond starts looking good. According to Jeremy Siegels Stocks for the Long Run (McGraw-Hill, $35), from 1926 through 2006, long-term government bonds returned an average of 5.5 percent per year, compared with 10.1 percent for the stock market. At those rates over 30 years, $10,000 would have grown to about $50,000 invested in bonds and to nearly $180,000 in stocks quite a difference.Lessons From LossesOne of the first investment moves I made was buying AIG when it crashed. I knew nothing (relatively speaking) about AIG or the stock market, but thought this would be a good chance to profit from panic. I did not profit. Im thankful that it was a small amount of money lost in exchange for a very valuable lesson. That transaction forced me to become a more informed investor. Last year I shorted (bet against) shares of Alcoa and that investment is still on the books at a loss. Dumb m ove, but a smart lesson. Turns out I have neither the time nor knowledge to be a short-term trader. D.M.G., onlineThe Fool Responds: It sometimes takes a loss to teach us important lessons. Investors can profit by shorting, but it isnt easy, and you have the companys management and the global economy working against you. Companies that crash as AIG did can indeed be bargains, but sometimes they just keep falling and other times they require lots of patience. AIG remains well below its pre-crash levels, but it has risen in recent months. Butterfly in the MakingCaterpillar (NYSE: CAT), recently trading near its 52-week low, offers an opportunity to buy in at a good price and await the global economic recovery that will boost its stock price. The company sports an extensive national dealer network and a widespread reputation for high quality. Its service network has allowed its market share to expand and keep customers coming back. It also enjoys a huge name-brand advantage, along with the sheer size of its company in an industry where both play a large role in success. Caterpillars shortterm performance may be bumpy, but it will benefit from above-average long-term growth in regions such as China, India and Africa. With increased spending on industrialization and infrastructure building, there will be an increased demand for machinery and commodities. Meanwhile, Caterpillars 2011 acquisition of Bucyrus, a mining equipment manufacturer, means that almost half its operating profits are now from the mining end market, where demand is expected to grow. Another thing in Caterpillars favor is its ability, so far, to avoid pricing wars with competition. This is evident in its quickest growing market China where it battles rival Komatsu for the dominant position. With its dividend yield recently around 2.5 percent and its forward P/E ratio in the single digits, Caterpillar deserves some consideration for your portfolio. I began in 1843 as a small Connecticut shop making wrought-iron bolts, hinges and other hardware items. My name combines two major brands, but I also house brands such as DeWALT, Porter-Cable, Bostitch, Sonitrol, Proto, FACOM, Vidmar and Mac Tools under my roof. I specialize in security as well as tools, and my offerings go way beyond power drills and hammers, ranging from automatic doors at airports to storage solutions for the military. Im the product of a 2010 merger between two giants in my field. My ticker symbol is almost sealed with a kiss. Who am I? (Answer: Stanley Black & Decker) Marginal ThoughtsQAre companies with low profit margins bad investments? R.W., Escondido, Calif.AHigh margins are generally preferable, of course. They can reflect some competitive advantages, such as a strong brand that commands a higher price. Amid a price war, companies with higher margins have more wiggle room. Still, you shouldnt necessarily avoid lowermargin businesses.Imagine that Fred Co. (ticker: TAPTAP) has a whopping net profit margin of 25 percent, while Ginger Inc. (ticker: TWIRL) has just a 1 percent margin. If Fred sells only three top hats a year, while Ginger sells gobs of gowns each week, Ginger may well be the better buy, generating more cash in total than Fred. Some industries, such as software, typically have high profit margins. Discount stores and supermarkets typically have very low ones but if they turn over inventory fast enough, they might still be good investments. Walmarts margin, for example, is around 3.6 percent, while Targets is 4.1 percent. But Walmarts volume is much higher, generating far more profits. ***QI placed a buy order for a stock before the market opened. The stock had closed at $82 the previous day, so I bid that. But it opened at $84 and kept rising. Whats the deal? How can a stock open at more than its closing price? B.N., Pensacola, Fla.ADemand can build up for a stock overnight, due to a positive news report or some other reason. This will have buyers willing to pay more for it and sellers thus selling it for more.At any given moment, a stocks price reflects the last price at which someone was willing to buy it and someone was willing to sell it.Got a question for the Fool? Send it in see Write to Us a I v s u c c iat e $ 650 m am I ? Former FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair will deliver the keynote address at the Urban Land Institute Florida Summit on June 6 and 7 in Naples. The conference will also feature four Florida mayors discussing how the state is getting ready for change as the economy recovers. The summit provides an opportunity to connect with top Florida decisionmakers and real estate experts to learn about best practices and whats working as the industry moves to create and sustain thriving communities. ULIs recent publication, Whats Next: Getting Ready for Change, will provide the framework for the content of the program and will be featured in the opening general session. Fridays keynote luncheon speaker, The Honorable Sheila Bair, will share her experience as chairman of the FDIC and her projections for trends in continued economic recovery as it pertains to real estate. One of the summits general sessions will feature Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs with ULI global Chairman Peter Rummell as the moderator. Another general session will feature a presentation on Making Healthy Places by UCLAs Dr. Richard J. Jackson, who will discuss the impact of the built environment on public health. Dr. Jackson will be interviewed by Dr. Diane Trees of the University of Central Florida. More than 40 speakers and panelists will lead the discussion through a combination of mobile workshops, panels, special interest tours and networking events. The summit, the second statewide event hosted by the five ULI District Councils in Florida, will also feature eight breakout sessions. Topics include: 3 p.m. Thursday, June 6 Looking Ahead for Rental Housing Are Florida Ports up to the Challenge? Shrinking Into Showrooms Trends in Retail Shark Tank10:30 a.m. Friday, June 7 Keep Watch on Capital Markets Appealing to Tomorrows Households Insurance ChallengeAgain? Can Mixed Use Finally Work? The summit will take place at The Ritz-Carlton, 280 Vanderbilt Beach Road. For the full conference schedule, list of speakers and to register, visit www.ulifloridasummit.org. Former FDIC Chairman to speak at ULI Summit BAIR

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 NETWORKING Grand opening of Marketplace TitleWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.DAVID MICHAEL / FLORIDA WEEKLY Jenny Foegen, Cyndee Woolley and Taylor Marini Wake Up Naples with the Greater Naples Chamber of CommerceBOB RAYMOND / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 2 4 3 5 7 6 1 David Collins Oliver and Karla Kramer LaFreniere 2 Joe Harris, Heather Wightman and Joe Taylor 3 Jason, Jamie, Joni and Joe Pavich 4. Tom and Dianne Mannion 5. Melissa Morrison, Ginny Nobbe and Gisela Gonzalez 6. Tom Ryan, Dawn Zoellner, Chris Davis and Dixie Ryan 7. Kathy Zorn, Dorene Clark and Jill Miller Sen. Garrett Richter and Reps. Kathleen Passidomo and Matt Hudson Ted Soliday and Rep. Matt Hudson RaeAnn Enders and Brenda Smith Lesley Colantonio and Amy Sedlacek Lorin Nash and Jay Roth

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At Central Bank, we are proud to be a part of the Southwest Florida community. We offer innovative nancial products for all banking needs and even offer FREE nancial literacy courses for low to moderate income families and small businesses. Stop in to Central Bank to enjoy a higher level of service and convenience today! 1520 Royal Palm Square Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33919239.274.19004099 Tamiami Trl N, Suite 100 Naples, Florida 34103239.430.2500 Building Lasting Relationships Equal Housing Lender NETWORKING The Arts and Alzheimers series at ArtisNaplesWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY Bonnie Thayer, Bernadette La Paglia and Alexandra Carlson Eugene and Natasha Lidow Angel Duncan, Paul Arsenault and Julie Badour Barbara and Wayland Jensen with violinist Daniela Shtereva Amy Glassover and Angel Duncan Lou DeBonzo NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 BUSINESS B7

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Our Portfolio of Southwest Floridas Rental Properties RENTAL DIVISION239.262.4242 800.749.7368rentnaples.com premiersothebysrealty.comSothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each oce is independently owned and operated. Equal housing opportunity.Vanderbilt Pavilion ClubClose to beaches, shopping and theaters, this 2BR/2BA is located on 2nd oor. Furnished. $1,350Pelican Bay ChanteclairBeautiful, updated 2BR/2BA plus den. Furnished. $2,000Park Shore SolamarWater views from all rooms. 3BR/3BA condominium. Furnished. $3,200Royal HarborPool home on canal with 4BR/4BA and boat slip. Unfurnished. $4,300Marco IslandEstate home, 5BR/6+BA. Waterfront with Gulf views. Furnished. $21,500FT. MYERS, ESTERO BONITA SPRINGS AREA Coconut Point RapalloLake views from this 3BR/2BA condominium. Great amenities, 3rd oor. Unfurnished. $1,300Sabal Palm-GrandezzaUpscale gated community with 2BR/2BA and 1-car garage. Water and basic cable included. Furnished or Unfurnished. $1,400Bonita Bay TuckaweyeCourtyard villa, heated pool and waterfall, 3BR/3BA. Furnished. $3,500Pelican Landing PalermoLuxurious 3BR/3BA high-rise in The Colony. Private elevator and entry. Unfurnished. $3,500 Bonita Bay WaterfordPool home on the golf course with 3BR/2.5BA plus den. Wood oors throughout. Unfurnished. $5,000Bonita BayRemodeled estate home with 3BR plus den, pool and golf course views. Unfurnished. $5,000NAPLES MARCO ISLAND AREAA GUIDE TO THE LOCAL REAL ESTATE INDUSTRYREAL E S TATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY B8 WEEK OF MAY 23-1295, 2013 House Hunting:29161 Marcello Way Custom built by BCB Homes, this lakefront French country manor estate in Mediterra encompasses almost 7,500 square feet. Architectural details include wood-beamed ceilings, vintage wood and travertine flooring, a chefs kitchen with tinstamped ceiling and furniture-style cabinetry, and a winding staircase adorned with wrought iron balustrades. Mediterra is member-owned and has two Tom Fazio championship golf courses, a golf learning center, a 25,000-square-foot clubhouse and a beach club on the Gulf of Mexico. This property is offered at $2.995 million. For more information or to arrange a showing, contact Emily K. Bua or Tade Bua-Bell at Naples Estate Properties, 465-4645. COURTESY PHOTOS Southewest Floridas luxury real estate leader ranks No. 37 of top 500 in U.S. Premier Sothebys International Realty, a leading luxury residential brokerage in Southwest Florida, has been ranked by 2013 REAL Trends 500 as No. 37 of the top 500 brokerage companies in the U.S. by closed sales volume, jumping from No. 46 in 2012. With an average sales price of $748,737, it also ranked No. 13 among the top 50 firms by average home sales prices. The REAL Trends 500, now in its 26th year, is an annual research report that identifies the leading, most successful residential real estate firms in the United States. Due to requirement of independent verification, REAL Trends 500 is the trusted source for information about the performance of real estate firms. Under the leadership of Judy Green, president and CEO, Premier Sothebys International Realty achieved sales of more than $2.3 billion through the end of 2012, positioning the firm among the nations leading residential real estate brokerages featured in REAL Trends prestigious Billionaires Club. With a 35 percent increase in closed sales yearover-year, the firm also ranked as one of the Top Movers by Volume. With 19 offices along Floridas Gulf Coast and more than 450 associates, the firm also ranked No. 25 among the top firms nationwide in terms of closed sales volume per sales associate. Premier Sothebys International Realty holds the majority market share of properties sold for over $1 million in Southwest Florida. In the Naples region, the firm outpaced its closest competitor by 67 percent and 15 percent in the Sarasota region. We are honored to again be recognized as one of the nations top residential real estate firms and a leader in the luxury market. Premier Sothebys International Realty continues to achieve milestones thanks to our dedicated team of knowledgeable associates and our loyal clientele throughout Southwest Florida, Ms. Green said. We look forward to further growing our presence along the Gulf Coast as we expand in the Tampa region with the recent opening of our 19th office in South Tampa. Premier Sothebys ranked among top brokerages

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Miromar Lakes Beach & Golf Club has just released for sale the final phase in the Porto Romano neighborhood. A total of 22 detached villa homes will be built with golf and water views. The new homes are priced pre-construction starting in the low $500,000s. We expect this limited opportunity in Porto Romano to sell quickly, with our new homeowners beginning to move into their new residences next season, said Al DiNicola, Miromar Lakes vice president of sales. With the benefit of all of the amenities that Miromar Lakes has to offer to its residents, there is a strong demand for this size home, in this price range. Regional homebuilder WCI will build the homes. Construction began in April on a model home and two additional move-in ready residences. There are several three bedroom and three bath floorplans to choose from ranging in size from approximately 2,200 to more than 2,700 square feet of air-conditioned living space. The available home sites have wide water and golf course views. Miromar Lakes is the winner of the National Association of Home Builders Gold Award for Community of the Year. Miromar Lakes is the only Florida community to win the top honor in the 32 year history of the NAHB awards. Miromar Lakes offers a dynamic social scene with hundreds of social events for residents. The private resort-style community has a 700-acre aquamarine freshwater lake with endless opportunities for in-lake swimming, boating, sailing, water-skiing and fishing, three miles of private, white sandy beach, a full-service European Spa and Fitness Center, three restaurants, seven Har-Tru Tennis Courts and an Arthur Hills signature championship golf course all in one luxurious location. For more information, contact the sales center at Miromar Lakes Beach & Golf Club at 425-2340 or (877) 809-9444, or visit MiromarLakes.com. Final phase released in Porto Romano at Miromar Lakes COURTESY PHOTOAugusta model above. The View From Porto Romano is at right. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 REAL ESTATE B9

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You can always spot a new resident.11125 Gulf Shore Drive, Naples, FL 34108Our Gulf views tend to be somewhat distracting. Stunning views dominate each luxurious residence and every on-site amenity at Moraya Bay. From the beachside service, restaurant and grotto bar to resort-style pool, lap pool and fitness center, the views are quite distracting. Residences of 4,000-4,500 square feet. Prices from $2.5 million.239.514.5050 MorayaBay.com ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE.

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Serving North Naples and surrounding area.STOP BY OUR ON-SITE NORTH NAPLES VILLAGE WALK OFFICE MON-SAT.All homes now on re-sale market and priced from the low 200s-500s. Illustrated PropertiesJoanne Ciesielski | 239.287.6732 Brian Carey | 239.370.8687 OPPORTUNITY Village Walk & Island Walk of North NaplesThe community Town Center is the focus of the communitys unique lifestlylea lifestyle people dream about; meeting friends for a swim, a work out or a set of tennis.. then grabbing lunch or dinner at the on-site restaurant... relaxing to the soothing sounds of fountains or taking a relaxing stroll back home around the many lakes and footbridges! Enjoy all the community offers; a full array of activities, and full recreational facilities reserved exclusively for the residents use with no equity or membership fees! FEATURED PROPERTY ISLAND WALK NAPLES BARGAIN ALERT! 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 car garage, with peaceful canal views in Berkshire Village. Low condo fees and Furniture is available too. $148,000 BERKSHIRE NEW LISTING FEATURED PROPERTY EXTENDED 2 BR,2BA CAPRI, CLEAN AND BRIGHT, ORIGINAL OWNER SERIOUS SELLER. WATER VIEWS FROM SCREENED PATIO. $254,000 VILLAGE WALK NICELY UPGRADED 3BR,2.5 BA Oakmont featuring granite in kitchen and master bath, 3 year old a/c unit, jetted tub in master bath, side load garage, screened patio with lake view. Easy gate and amenities access. $356,900 VILLAGE WALK VILLAGE WALKPRISTINE 3BR,3BA plus den is ready to MOVE RIGHT IN! The original owners used the home on a part time basis, home has been lightly lived in! Features new GE appliance package, new toilets,seamless shower in master bath, custom built wall unit, newer A/C and hot water tank, full hurricane protection, and screen lanai with lake view! $359,000 PENDINGPRISTINE 4BR, 3.5BA, IS SURE TO PLEASE! From the engaging front porch you will fall in love with this gracious light and bright southern exposure home. The open oor plan offers an abundance of room to entertain, with separate formal dining ,living room, and spacious great room boasting many upgrades! The screened lanai with private pool and peaceful lake views is the prefect place to entertain, and the hurricane protection on entire home completes this prefect package! Ready to move right in! 1Yr. Home warranty included. $455,000 NEW PRICE!SPECTACULAR 2 BR, 2BA CAPRI OFFERS BUYERS THE WOW FACTOR! Features tile throughout entire home, granite, built -in entertainment center, plantation shutters, newer A/C, cabinets in garage, and premier nish on garage oor, screened lanai has a private oasis feel with electric retractable awning, heated pool and peaceful lake and bridge views, complete electric and roll down hurricane protection offers homeowner peace of mind and security while away! This is a must see home! $299,500 Visual tour available! PENDING PENDING

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Prices subject to change without notice. Copyright 2013 Lennar Corporation. Lennar, the Lennar logo and Everythings Included Homes are registered service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. CGC 1507191. 5/13 EVERYTHINGS INCLUDED H O ME S SM everything!For the Executive Who WantsEverythings Included Executive Homes from the mid $300s 600 MEMBERS FOR 36 HOLES OF GOLF!Whether youre actually an executive or simply share the same high expectations for luxury and true understanding of value, Twin Eagles was designed just for you! EVERYTHINGS INCLUDED IN YOUR HOME AT NO EXTRA CHARGE! Impact glass (no shutters necessary) Home technology package Glass frameless shower in master Upgraded kitchen Crown molding & tray ceilings And many more luxury upgrades included 12495 Fenhurst Way, Naples Open daily 9am 6pm, Sun. 10am 6pm Located 6 miles east of I-75 on Immokalee Rd.888-204-3475

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D.R.HORTON. *Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. **Square footage dimensions are approximate. FORT MYERSBanyan Bay1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1983 SqFt**/ 2-Car / Lot 50-$289,459*2 Story / 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Loft / 2587 SqFt**/ 2-Car / Lot 79-$312,035* SummerALMOST MEGA HOT SALE! SAVE Thousands on Magnolia Landing 1 Story / 2 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1342 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 178-$141,990*1 Story / 2 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1342 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 197-$146,990*1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Loft / 2260 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 135-$235,810*Moody River1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1983 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 85 $231,248*Verandah1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1983 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 28-$316,044*1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Den / 2260 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 30-$339,609*Veridian1 Story / 3 BR / 3 BA / Bonus Room / 3402 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 22-$487,190* ESTEROTerra Vista1 Story / 2 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1426 SqFt** / 1-Car / Lot 109-$165,805*1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1626 SqFt** / 1-Car / Lot 310$185,709* BONITA SPRINGSMirasol2 Story / 2 BR / 2 BA / 1244 SqFt** / 1-Car / Lot 13 $175,249*2 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / 1528 SqFt** / 1-Car / Lot 5-$193,715*Paloma 1 Story / 2 BR / 2 BA / Den / 1342 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 2 $233,759*1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / 1519 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 5-$244,924*1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / 1804 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 4-$301,859* NAPLESBucks Run2 Story / 4 BR / 2.5 BA / 2554 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 7 $355,608*Fiddlers Creek1 Story / 3 BR / 2 BA / 1840 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 15 $424,450*2 Story / 3 BR / 3.5 BA / Loft / 3522 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 6 $649,137*Summit Place2 Story / 3 BR / 2.5 BA / 1800 SqFt** / 2-Car / Lot 170-$210,204*

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B14 239.213.3311

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B14 239.213.3311

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ANNUAL & SEASONAL RENTALSDont wait call today!The Name You Can Trust: We take care of the rest.{DO YOU OWN A HOME OR CONDO? howWe have quali ed guests and tenants ready to move in, and well take care of everything so your property earns income for you all year. Contact us today! unpack. 800-346-0336 239-482-8040www.RoyalShellAnnuals.com}

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Buy a new home before its too late!2 & 3 BR condominiums with beautiful fairway views of the North Course $688,700. Now $430,000! Furnished.Elegant 2 & 3 BR coach homes plus den & 2-car garage$796,300. Now $549,000! Furnished. Avellino Isles Fully furnished estate home with large master bedroom, 2 guest suites, study & 3-car garage $1,454,000. Now $1,055,000! Furnished.The epitome of exquisite single-family estate homes can be yours from$2,400,000. Now $1,690,000! Banyan Bay Vista Pointe Venezia Grande Estates Spacious single-family detached villas with heated pool & spa$1,014,700. Now $575,000!Single-family homes with old-world detail & oor plans from 2,626 to 3,015 sq. ft. a/c$1,272,600. Now $775,000!Chestnut Grove Aspen PalmsEnduring. Luxury. Home. Values.Vineyards VineyardsNaples.com 239-353-1920 | 800-749-1501 75 Vineyards Boulevard, Naples, FL 34119 Ask about our new No Initiation Fee Introductory Membership 239-353-1500 | VineyardsCountryClub.net 15 New Designer Models. 4 New Neighborhoods. Prices from $400s to over $3 million.For over 25 years, Vineyards has offered a variety of new homes in a beautiful country club setting. But as in life, all good things must come to an end. Less than 40 homesites remain. These all-inclusive homes where everything is included many of them professionally furnished come with a free lifetime golf-membership and 3-year homeowner warranty*.*3-year homeowner warranty applies to existing new homes, not applicable on homes under construction or lot/construction purchases.End-of-Season Blowout Sale on All New Homes. Final Phase. Only 40 Homesites Remain! Taylor Morrisons West Florida Division recently celebrated the beginning of construction of its newest South Florida golf course with a ceremonial golf shot along a future fairway, as well as the more traditional shovel ceremony. Held on the grounds of Esplanade Golf and Country Club of Naples, the event was attended by members of Taylor Morrisons West Florida management team including Derek Andruss, Cammie Longencker and Tony Squitieri, as well as Collier County Commissioner Georgia Hiller, Chris Wilczynski of C.W. Golf Architecture, and Dennis Gilkey of G&M Naples, LLC. I am so pleased to be part of this groundbreaking ceremony, said Commissioner Hiller, who currently serves as chair of the board of county commissioners. Its companies such as Taylor Morrison that are improving our community on so many levels. With all the green building practices in place, Esplanade is an excellent example of how a company can be successful and environmentally sensitive at the same time. Commissioner Hiller estimated that a project the size of Esplanade would likely generate more than $40 million in additional tax revenue once completed, as well as more than $30 million in impact fees. This is exactly the type of development that we need to grow the area, she said. In addition to the revenue increases, Esplanade is expected to add more than 250 jobs annually over the next several years, and that will have a significant impact on decreasing unemployment. Esplanade Golf and Country Club of Naples is a gated resort-style community located on Immokalee Road, just three miles east of I-75. Its nearly 1,800 acres have been designed to include more than 1,000 acres of wetlands and preserve areas, as well as 170 acres of lakes. When complete, it is planned to feature approximately 1,121 single family homes and coach homes. The centerpiece of the community will be an 18-hole championship golf course, which is estimated to be ready for play next year. Future residents can expect to enjoy an unmatched, wellappointed lifestyle and to enhance their body and mind experiences with an abundance of luxurious amenities. To learn more about Esplanade Golf and Country Club of Naples or to receive the latest information about this resort community, contact Taylor Morrison at 866-495-6006 or visit taylormorrison.com. Taylor Morrison starts construction of Esplanade Golf and Country Club COURTESY PHOTOTaylor Morrison recently broke ground for its new Esplanade Golf and Country Club of Naples. Participating in the ceremony are: (from the left) Derek Andruss, Cammie Longencker, Collier County Commissioner Georgia Hiller, Tony Squitieri, Chris Wilczynski and Dennis Gilkey.www.JackiStrategos.comJacki Strategos GRI, CREN, SRES, e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netRichard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.net 633 Hernando Ct. $1,095,000 NEAR BEACHLarge 4 BR home on waterway. Stunning lanai, of ce/den, eat-in kitchen. Great location surrounded by million dollar homes. 3 BR/2 BA. Excellent condition. 1771 Piedmont Ct. $675,000 ON THE WATERPriced like a 1 BR but you get 2 BR/2 BA plus on the water with a view. Model Village $195,000 UPDATED KITCHEN NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 B17

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BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. NOT AN OFFERING WHERE PROHIBITED BY STATE LAW. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. PHOTOGRAPHY IN THIS AD MAY BE STOCK PHOTOGRAPHY USED TO DEPICT THE LIFESTYLE TO BE ACHIEVED RATHER ANY THAT MAY EXIST. *ON SELECT FLATS, TOWNHOMES AND CASITAS. TOP QUALITY, TOP VALUE... From the $160s to over $7 million. For our community locations and directions, please visit StockDevelopment.com For the best selection and best prices on our ready-to-move-in homes, come this weekend! SINGLE FAMILY HOME MAJORCA SCOTTSDALE II #6 | 3 bed/3 bath | 2,719 sq. ft. | $889,425 ISLA DEL SOL CHESTERFIELD #29 | 4 bed/5.5 bath | 4,224 sq. ft. $1,628,500 SINGLE FAMILY HOMES ESCALA MARLOWE #10 | 4 bed/4.5 bath | 3,050 sq. ft. | $1,135,725 Model Leaseback | Fully Furnished TAMWORTH PONTE VEDRA GRANDE #MM1 | 4 bed/4.5 bath 3,525 sq. ft. | $1,332,855 | Fully Furnished SINGLE FAMILY ESTATE HOMES LIPARI PONTE VEDRA II #2 | 4 bed/4.5 bath | 3,525 sq. ft. $1,311,215 | Fully Furnished LIPARI MUIRFIELD III #3 | 4 bed/3.5 bath | 3,255 sq. ft. $1,325,090 Fully Furnished SINGLE FAMILY HOMES BUONASERA PONTE VEDRA II #3| 4 bed/2 bath | 3,490 sq. ft. $1,221,045 CELLINI GRAND CALAIS #11 | 4 bed/4.5 bath | 3,597 sq. ft. $1,475,440 Includes up to $20,000 on Options/Upgrades on Select Units*From the $160s. 239.425.6777TWIN VILLA CORONADO VILLAS #113 | 2 bed/2 bath | 1,575 sq. ft. | $374,265 CASITAS CORDOVA #9604 | 2 bed/2.5 bath | 1,531 sq. ft. | $194,990 FLATS SAN CLEMENTE #5603 | 2 bed/2 bath | 1,404 sq. ft. | $189,990 TOWNHOMES SANTA ISABELLA #8403 | 2 bed/2.5 bath | 1,520 sq. ft. | $179,990 SINGLE FAMILY HOMES LAKOYA ORCHID II #77 | 4 bed/3.5 bath | 3,158 sq. ft. | $741,622 LAKOYA PINEHURST II #115 | 3 bed plus Cabana/3.5 bath 2,890 sq. ft. | $793,121 TWIN VILLA MOORGATE NAPOLI #33 | 2 bed/study/2 bath | 1,855 sq. ft. | $389,925 TOWNHOMES OLE SAN CLEMENTE #5004 | 2 bed/2 bath | 1,404 sq. ft. | $234,990 OLE SAN PABLO #5003 | 2 bed/2 bath | 1,770 sq. ft. | $249,990 From the $300s. Golf Membership Included. 239.687.2264 LANTANA SINGLE FAMILY HOMES MONTESSA II #66 | 3 bed/2 bath | 2,327 sq. ft. | $557,355 RUFFINO II #72 | 3 bed/2.5 bath | 2,585 sq. ft. | $618,470 From the $300s. 239.514.2706SINGLE FAMILY HOME TIVOLI III #77 | 3 bed/3 bath | 2,062 sq. ft. | $379,360 T T T From the $500s to over $2 million. 239.249.6210Its Not Just a Community, Its a Lifestyle. From the $200s. 239.793.2100From the $800s. 239.949.8989 I F F F F F F F From the $600s to over $7 million.239.592.1010 From the $700s to over $2 million. 239.249.6220 SI S S SI NG NG N LE LE F F AM A A AM IL IL Y Y ES ES S S ES T TA TA TA TA TE TE

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Patti Fortune 239.272.8494 850 5th Avenue South #C Naples, FL 34102www.OwnInNaples.com pattifortune@gmail.com CALL NOW to purchase on June 9thSo many questions come up during construction and the onsite salesperson works for the builder, not for you. Having Patti Fortune as you personal representative will be priceless! Camden Lakes By Pulte Homes Taking pre construction deposits! Call Immediately for more information. This north Naples community will only have 150 homesites. By contacting Patti, she can be your representative to help you through the builders contract, negotiations, follow-up, walk-throughs and closing. She can take pictures for you, help with any construction questions and make cost saving suggestions during the building period. This does not cost you anything and you gain the knowledge and experience from a veteran On-Site Sales Agent with 18 years of Builder experience. Builders do not negotiate more if you dont have a Realtor. In other words, skipping your right to Realtor representation may even cost you in mistakes or missed opportunities. Before going into a new community, PLEASE contact Patti to represent YOU. Builders require you to be with your Realtor upon your rst visit to their location, even if you are Just looking.

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41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Pkwy. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Marco Island Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise markedwww.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB26 REAL ESTATE MAY 23-MAY 29, 2013 >$200,0001 COCONUT SHORES 3301 S. Coconut Island Dr. #101 $228,500 Prudential Florida Realty Dena Wilcoxen 239.989.24362 BONITA BAY HARBOR LAKES 27091 Lake Harbor Court #102 $250,000 Premier Sothebys International Realty Cathy Lieberman/Cindy Reiff 239.777.2441>$300,0003 MARINERS COVE 305 Goodlette Road South #303 $310,000 PSIR Marilyn Moir 239.919.2400 4 FOREST GLEN 3748 Jungle Plum Drive East $379,000 PSIR Jesse Moreno 239.405.0065 5 FIDDLERS CREEK CASCADA 9053 Cascada Way #102 $382,000 PSIR Lura Jones 239.370.5340 6 MERCATO THE STRADA 9123 Strada Place From $390,000 PSIR Call 239.594.9400 Open Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm & Sunday 12-8pm >$400,0007 PARK SHORE BELAIR 3602 Belair Lane $429,000 PSIR Richard Culp 239.290.2200 8 NAVONA AT THE COLONY GOLF & BAY CLUB 23540 Via Veneto Blvd $435,000 Prudential Florida Realty Dena Wilcoxen 239.989.2436 9 COPPERLEAF AT THE BROOKS 23531 Copperleaf Blvd. $469,000 Engel & Voelkers Olde Naples Tom Ostrander 806.304.1037 Saturday 1-410 CHATEAUMERE ROYALE IN PELICAN BAY 6000 Pelican Bay Blvd, C-202 $489,900 Downing & Frye Realty Lyn Reddy 239.216.6506>$500,00011 THE BROOKS SHADOW WOOD TAMARIND TRACE 23227 Foxberry Lane $589,000 PSIR Cathy Lieberman/ Cindy Reiff 239.777.2441 >$600,00012 PELICAN LANDING THE COLONY NAVONA 23540 Via Veneto Blvd. #1005 $658,000 PSIR Mark Leone 239.784.5686 13 PELICAN MARSH OSPREY POINTE 9045 Whimbrel Watch Lane #201 $675,000 PSIR Roya Nouhi 239.290.911114 PELICAN LANDING SANCTUARY 23853 Sanctuary Lakes Ct. $675,000 Engel & Voelkers Olde Naples Tom Ostrander 806.304.1037 >$700,00015 PELICAN BAY VILLAGE 810 Pine Village Lane $795,000 PSIR Patricia Bucalo 239.248.069416 THE DUNES GRANDE PRESERVE 280 Grande Way From $799,000 PSIR Call 239.594.1700 Open Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm 17 FIDDLERS CREEK MULBERRY ROW 7698 Mulberry Lane $799,000 PSIR Lura Jones 239.370.5340 18 FIDDLERS CREEK MAHOGANY BEND 3860 Mahogany Bend Drive $799,900 PSIR Lura Jones 239.370.5340>$800,00019 THE COLONY AT PELICAN LANDING FLORENCIA 23850 Via Italia Cir. #1702 $859,000 Engel & Voelkers Olde Naples Dean Satrape 239.908.1121>$900,00020 VANDERBILT BEACH PHOENICIAN SANDS 9055 Gulf Shore Drive #502 $925,000 PSIR Catherine Bordner 239.560.2921 >$1,000,00021 COLLIERS RESERVE 1023 Barcarmil Way $1,250,000 Engel & Voelkers Olde Naples Elton Alikaj 239.821.7242 22 COQUINA SANDS CHARLESTON SQUARE 1400 Gulf Shore Blvd. North #302 $1,290,000 PSIR Lodge McKee 239.592.3358 23 OLD NAPLES VILLAS DEL MAR 425 2nd Avenue South $1,295,000 PSIR Paul Graffy 239.273.0403 24 MEDITERRA 29071 Amarone Ct. $1,299,900 Engel & Voelkers Olde Naples Tom Ostrander 806.304.103725 BONITA BAY TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive From $1,306,000 PSIR Call 239.495.1105 Open MondaySaturday 10am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm26 QUAIL WEST 6357 Highcroft Drive $1,490,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464527 PARK SHORE 4875 Whispering Pine Way $1,650,000 PSIR Christie McCorkle 239.963.7472 28 THE MOORINGS 619 Bowline Drive $1,795,000 PSIR Susan Barton 239.860.1412 29 PELICAN BAY COCO BAY 7905 Cocobay Drive $1,895,000 PSIR Linda Piatt 239.269.2322 30 AQUA 13675 Vanderbilt Drive #610 $1,925,000 PSIR John DAmelio 239.961.5996 Also Available: #605 $1,695,000; #607 $1 ,625,000>$2,000,00031 GREY OAKS ESTUARY 1220 Gordon River Trail From $2,049,000 PSIR Call 239.261.3148 Open Monday-Saturday 9am-5pm & Sunday 12-5pm32 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #1005 $2,395,000 PSIR Jean Tarkenton 239.595.0544 Additional Residences Available from $825,000 $1,795,00033 QUAIL WEST 4430 Wayside Drive $2,495,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464534 MEDITERRA 16045 Trebbio Way $2,498,888 PSIR Tom Gasbarro 239.404.488335 BAREFOOT BEACH 101 Dominica Lane $2,800,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464536 MEDITERRA 29161 Marcello Way $2,995,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464537 AQUALANE SHORES 533 15th Avenue South $2,995,000 PSIR Dana Marcum 239.404.220938 MARCO ISLAND 495 Thorpe Court $2,999,000 PSIR ML Meade 239.293.4851>$3,000,00039 OLD NAPLES 282 1st Avenue North $3,995,000 PSIR Celine Julie Godof 239.404.9917 >$4,000,00040 ESTUARY AT GREY OAKS 1392 Great Egret Trail $4,595,000 Naples Estate Properties Emily K. Bua & Tade Bua-Bell 239.465.464541 PORT ROYAL 3060 Green Dolphin Lane $4,695,000 PSIR Frank Sajtar 239.776.8382 42 PORT ROYAL AREA LITTLE HARBOUR 425 Little Harbour Lane $4,875,000 PSIR Tess McCarthy 239.207.0118 >$6,000,00043 PORT ROYAL 3605 Fort Charles Drive $6,700,000 PSIR Phil Collins 239.404.6800 Florida Weeklys Open Houses 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 17 13 14 11 7 19 8 9 12 18 1 20 22 23 25 28 24 27 26 29 30 31 32 33 34 21 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

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THE BEST SOURCE FOR EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTIESFORREST INTERNATIONAL REALTYwww.theforrestcompany.com ~ OFFICE (239) 434-7228 ~ EMAIL jimf@forrestco.comJAMES E. FORREST, REAL ESTATE CONSULTANT EXCELLENCE ISNEVERAN EXTRAVAGANCE EXCELLENCE ISNEVERAN EXTRAVAGANCE PORT ROYAL TO BAY COLONYELITE HAVENS FOR THE WORLDS MOST PRIVILEGED FAMILIES SOLD 2012Listed & Sold In 2012 By James E. Forrest: The Most Expensive Estate Ever To Sell In Southwest Florida: $47,250,000 Contact James E. Forrest To Set New Records For Your Prime Property. Call For Private Consultation. MOORINGS COUNTRY CLUB Southern Exposure, Golf Course ViewsWonderful Interior w/12-14 Ft. Cove Ceilings. All Main Rooms Have Direct Views. 3-Car Garage. Serious Seller. $1,995,000 4 Brs + Den. Great Room w/12 Ft. Ceiling. Hardwood Floors. A Move-In Condition Opportunity Close To Bistros & Beach. Pool + Deepwater Dockage. Cut-In Slip w/Covd Boat House. $2,895,000 Remarkable Naples Bay Estate Opulent Showcase Of Evocative Charm. Spectacularly Scenic Vistas! Huge 1 Sites. 5 Bedrooms, Library, Theatre. $11,495,000 Exquisite Deepwater Estate 9,000 Sq.Ft. Interior w/15 to 17 Ceilings. Richly Paneled Two-Story Library + Theatre Room. 5-Car Garage. 153 Ft. Waterfrontage. 86 Ft. Dockage. Master Suite w/ 200 Ft. Waterfrontage. Two 70-Ft. Docks. Exciting Residence w/Pizzazz. Views Overlooking Bay To Naples Yacht Club! Captivating & Vivacious! $6,500,000 $5,750,000 Cul-De-Sac Property w/Cut-In Slip (80 Ft. x 24 Ft.). 2 Docks (43 Ft. w/Lifts). 4 Bedrooms. 3-Car Garage. Incredible Views! $2,945,000 ~ West/Southwest Exposures ~ AQUALANE SHORESCharming Deepwater Home Recent Renovations. 32 Ft. Pool. 37 Ft. Covd Boat Slip + Dock. 3-Bedroom Residence on Low$1,995,000 AQUALANE SHORESYachting/Fishing Connoisseurs DelightROYAL HARBOR200+ Ft. Waterfrontage In Acquisition Mode? Discuss Insider Market Information With The #1 Track Record & Discern All Best Values That Suit Your Needs & Interests James E. Forrests 2012 Sales: $150 Million SOLD: When You Want Your Best Results... Call For Private Consultation (& Consider It Done!) 6-Br. Main House + 2-Br. Guest House AQUALANE SHORESDeepwater Estate ~ Western Exposure! 5 Brs + Study. 4-Car Garage. Exercise Room. Billiard Room. 12 Ft. Cove Ceilings. Picturesque Tropical Setting. 35 Ft. Pool & Spa. Covd Slip For 35 Ft. Boat + 70 Ft. Dock. 12 Houses To Beach. 2 Blocks To 3rd Street. $3,250,000 Downtown 590 Putter Point Place Elegant 2006 ConstructionResidence On Spectacular Naples Bay 311 Ft. Waterfrontage!!AQUALANE SHORESCasual Elegant Boaters Hideaway Sumptuous Elegance! Just Steps To Port Royal Beach Club. A Mint Move-In-Condition Opportunity. 6 Bedrooms, Study, 4-Car Garage. $9,850,000 Riveting Spectacular Views! Move-In Condition Opportunity

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INSIDE A GUIDE TO THE LOCAL ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTCSECTIONBROUGHT TO YOU BY:The High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Broad Avenue 434-2424 Vanderbilt 594-9494 The Promenade 948-4000 Fifth Avenue 434-8770 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 CHRISTIAN ALTORFER / COURTESY PHOTO C4 missed ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE GREATER FORT MYERS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE CSECTIONWEEK OF APRIL 3-9, 2013 I N S ID E Our Divas out this weekShell return next week. Beach ReadingThe Chronicles of Downton Abbey: A New Era. C5 VinoChardonnay remains popular by changing with the times. C40 Latest FilmsToo much story in G.I. Joe Retaliation proves rude. C11 ira IRA GLASS PAINTS PIC TURES FOR RADIO. Using words, music, humor, solid journalism, whimsy and unfettered imagination, he and his team of producers and writers weave stories you can see in your minds eye. The result: This American Life, a weekly one-hour show on public radio that consistently informs, entertains and surprises. Though radio is an aural medium, On a good day, its a visual medium, Mr. Glass says. When a story is working really well, you know what stuff looks like and theres a picture in your head. We try to be mindful of the pictures. He says theyll be working on a story and inevitably, one of the editors will ask, What am I looking at right now? It isnt that different than any other kind of nonfiction writing, he adds. I think any reporter tries to keep an eye on that, on what the audience is seeing in their head. Heard locally on WGCU-FM 90.1/91.7 at 1 p.m. Saturdays and rebroadcast at noon Sundays, This American Life is constantly re-creating itself and stretching the boundaries of Ira Glass comes to the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall Sunday, April 14. NANCY UPDIKE/ COURTESY PHOTO w hi m s h is t st o w t a M r really dh Behind the glasses, the TV show and Torey Malatia.C4 >>inside:Public radios Ira Glass on This American Life and the art of storytellingSEE IRA, C4 BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com Film festivals are so frustratingly wonderful. You peruse the schedules, reading the various descriptions, and you want to see everything.Which, of course, is impossible. The Sarasota Film Festival celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, or, as they like to put it, 1.5 decades. The festival opens on April 5 with Blackfish, a documentary film by Gabriela Cowperthwaite that looks at the lives of orca whales and what happens to them when they are forced to live in captivity. The closing night film on April 13 is Frances Ha, directed by Noah Baumbach, known for films such as The Squid and the Whale, The Fantastic Mr. Fox and Life Aquatic. Some of the festivals highlights include Pasadena, a family comedy starring Peter Bogdanovich; The Discoverers, starring Griffin Dunne and The Cold Lands starring Lili Taylor. (All three are being honored at the festival.) Unfortunately, advance screeners of films werent available before press time, but heres a quick look at four films that look interesting and deal A critics look at the Sarasota Film Festival lineupBY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com Film festivals are so frustratingly wonderful. You peruse the schedules, reading the various descriptions, and you want to see everything. Which, of course, isimpo TheSarasot i The festival opens on April 5 with Blackfish, a documentary film by Gabriela Cowperthwaite that looks at the lives of orca whales and what happens to them when they are forcedto live in capti vity. Theclosin include Pasadena, a family comedy starring Peter Bogdanovich ; TheD coverers, st arringGr TheCol ok at the Sarasota Film Festival lineup BY NANCY STET SON nstetson@ oridaweekly.com Catch South Florida actor in touring showSEE CATCH ME, C12 Stephen Anthony recently graduated from Florida State University, and hes already engaging in a life of crime. Well, at least onstage. Mr. Anthony stars as the main character, Frank Abagnale Jr., in the touring production of the musical Catch Me If You Can, which stops Jan. 1-6 at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall in Fort Myers. Mr. Anthony grew up in Miami and attended the New World School of the Arts. Theres a certain amount of confidence that Frank Jr. has, and the funny thing is that Im so goofy. Im such a goof and Frank Jr. is so charismatic, so Im definitely learning about the confidence. But really, if you listen to the real Frank COURTESYCOURTESY PHOTOCatch Me If You Can is coming to the Barbara B. Mann Hall Jan. 1-6. BY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@ oridaweekly.com A look at highlights from the season SEE CATCH ME, C12 from F already engaging in a life of crime. Well, at least onstage. Mr. Anthony stars as the main character, Frank Abagnale Jr., in the to uring productio n of the musical Catch Me If You Can, which stops Jan. 1-6 at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall thing is that Im sog and Frank Jr. is so charismatic, so Im definitely learning about the confid ence. But really, if you listen to the real Frank HOTO arMary Poppins plays this week at Mann Hall The long-awaited production of Mary Poppins will begin performances at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15, for a limited engagement of one week through Sunday, Jan. 20. Tickets are on sale. With four productions currently running on three continents, Mary Poppins is one of the biggest stage musical successes to emerge from London or New York in recent years. Worldwide to date, the show has grossed more than $644 million and welcomed 9.3 million guests. The musical is the winner of 44 major theater awards around the globe, including Tony, Olivier, Helpmann and Evening Standard awards. Tickets range in price from $45 to $80 and are available at the Barbara B. Mann box office and online at www. bbmannpah.com. To charge tickets, call 481-4849 or (800) 440-7469. Orders for groups of 20 or more may be placed by calling Lois Soscia at 489-3033, ext. 3122. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________led SEE !%#@, C4 COURTESY PHOTOChimney sweeps invade the Barbara B. Mann with Mary Poppins playing this week. Savion Glover gave a stellar performance at Artis Naples, paying tribute to those who had come before him. What youCalling all filmmakers! The fifth annual Naples International Film Festival is accepting submissions for the upcoming event in November. Categories include full-length features, documentaries, shorts and Florida films. Submissions for the 2013 Naples International Film Festival are open exclusively through the online submission platform, Withoutabox, at www.withoutabox.com/login/7363. Details on the categories and submission deadlines: Full-length features: Any original work of fiction at least 40 minutes. Documentaries: Any non-fiction film of at least 40 minutes. Shorts: Any narrative or documentary film 40 minutes or less. Florida films: This category is intended to celebrate, encourage and support the production of films in the state of Florida. Documentary feature, narrative feature or short films with principal photography in Florida can submit in the category. Submission deadlines: Early submission deadline is May 31; regular deadline is June 28; late deadline is July 5; extended deadline (members only) is July 12. Naples International Film Festival accepting submissions Whos the alpha? Tale of a two-legged dog and a four-legged canine. C2 Boldly goLatest Star Trek a solid action flick.C11 Beach readingThe Still Point of the Turning World. C3

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SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSThere can be only one top dogI am not a dog person. I say this truthfully but regretfully because I know that, socially, dog people rank higher than cat people. Were too solitary and our affection has a takeit-or-leave-it quality. We spook at loud noises and struggle in a crowd. We have none of the boundless energy that dogs and dog people possess, none of the eagerness to please or the willingness to play, none of the boundless slobbering that makes dogs so great. But sometimes, for the right dog, even my cat-fancying heart can be swayed. Im spending the summer in France in a remote mountain village and there is a dog here named Homer (for the Greek poet not the Simpsons character). Hes a Brittany Spaniel, fierce and lovable and loyal. Hes stubborn, too, and very bossy. But I dont mind. He greets me warmly after breakfast and we go on walks together in the afternoons. For this cat person, hes nearly made a dog lover out of me. There are seven of us staying in the village at an artists residency, a mix of writers and artists from all over the world. There is one man, an older Frenchman, who fancies himself a philosopher. On a recent afternoon when the spring sunshine warmed the hills, I set out with Homer for our usual walk. Before we had made it very far down the mountain path we crossed the philosopher also out for a stroll. May I join you? he said without really asking, already falling in beside us. Homer looked back cautiously before continuing on. You see, the philosopher said, nodding toward Homer. Hes checking to see where I will lead us. He knows Im the alpha in this group now. I glanced at the Frenchman with his small stature and pompous demeanor and had to stop myself from rolling my eyes. I may not know much about dogs, but I know enough to bet that Homer is a difficult alpha to top. The three of us walked for a time in silence and then the Frenchman picked up on a subject he had been lecturing me about earlier in the day. I watched Homer nose the path ahead as the philosopher prattled on. When Homer stopped suddenly, his canine gaze fixed on the grass at his feet, one paw raised and his nose trained on the earth, the Frenchman didnt even notice. He talked on and on, but I stopped short and finally he quieted. The brush rustled. Homer leapt forward, his snout in the grass. He reached with his teeth and tossed something in the air. I shrieked. A mouse scurried to the middle of the road and the Frenchman dashed into the fray. Homer, he shouted. No. Homer darted around him as the mouse ran between the Frenchmans feet. The Frenchman jumped to one side, turned, and nearly fell into the weeds. Homer deftly scooped the mouse in his jaws and set off down the road, the tail hanging from his teeth. The Frenchman called after, pleading this time, but Homer didnt even glance back. It was all I could do not to laugh. Alpha, indeed. Artis Henderson has joined the Twitterverse. Follow her @ArtisHenderson. a o a h a w H artisHENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com Transform your body without...diet, exercise or surgery! www.RiverchaseDermatology.com1-800-591-DERM (3376)Charles Camisa, MDBoard Certi ed Dermatology and Immunology Skin Conditions Appointments available in: Downtown Naples Fort Myers Cape CoralVoted One of Americas Top Doctors 12 Years in a Row Camisa Psoriasis Center Free Consultations 239-313-2553Fort Myers and Napleswww.riverchase-fatfreeze.com Treat-to-Complete with...Riverchase Dermatology now o ers guaranteed results with the Treat-to-Complete package featuring FDA-Cleared CoolSculpting *Guaranteed Results!Con dence in your treatment, Con dence in your clothes. North Naples 1015 Crosspointe Dr. Downtown Naples 261 9th St. S. Marco Island 950 N. Collier Blvd., Suite 303 Fort Myers 7331 Gladiolus Dr. Cape Coral 413 Del Prado Blvd. S., Suite 101 NOW OPEN North Port 14840 Tamiami Trail www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013

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agavenaples.com I 239-598-FIRE (3473)Corner of Airport & Vanderbilt Sunday & Monday 11:30 am 10 pm Tuesday -Saturday 11:30 am Midnight CONTEMPORARY SOUTHWEST CUISINE 2012 Cuestin Tequila DinnerWed., May 29 at 6 p.m. Join us for an extraordinary 4-course dinner paired with Cuestion Tequila, made from 100% all natural hand selected Blue Weber agave. $80/couple*Space is limited; reservations required *plus tax & gratuity Call (239) 649-2275 for Reservations www.NaplesPrincessCruises.com Naples Princess Naples P rin cess The Best Way to Experience Naples from the Water. Naples Princess...UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTSThursday, May 30th Wine Tasting with Decanted WINE BEER TASTINGS SUMMER SPECIALSSTARTING, SATURDAY JUNE 1STBUY ONE GET ONE1/2 PRICEWednesday Dinners Saturday 12:30 & 3pm Sightseeing Sunday Hors doeuvresBased on availability. Valid on adult tickets. No other coupons or discounts apply. BEACH READINGThe Still Point of the Turning World By Emily Rapp (Penguin Press, $25.95)REVIEWED BY ROSE M. CROKELife is challenging for everyone in different ways. In The Still Point of the Turning World, author Emily Rapp faces the unfathomable challenge of confronting her first and only childs diagnosis of TaySachs disease a rare and always-fatal illness when he was only 9 months old. As she and her husband helplessly witness the life-limiting disease take over their sons body, they are forced to re-evaluate everything they thought they knew about parenting. Ms. Rapp writes eloquently about trying to find meaning in her familys situation and accepting the fact that she must live and mother in the present, because thats all she and her young son have. She seeks solace wherever she can find it: in literature, in religion and with family and friends who literally hold her up during her darkest, most inconsolable days. Drawing inspiration from a broad range of thinkers, writers and poets, Ms. Rapp tries to embrace what wisdom she can gain from caring for a child whom she knows she will inevitably outlive. Her parenting mandate is simple and yet impossible: to go with him as far as I could along this journey we call life, to be with him as deeply as I could from moment to moment and then let him go. This is the story of Ms. Rapps ongoing journey through grief, from the panic and mania of her anticipatory grief to the deep sadness, emptiness and longing that her sons death will cause. It is not an easy memoir to read, but Ms. Rapp writes with such raw honesty and emotion that readers are compelled to stick with it. Ms. Rapp somehow manages to uplift readers with her indomitable spirit and the sheer power of a dragon mothers love. This is a mothers love story to her little boy, who will have been fully loved from his first breath to his last and long thereafter. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 C3

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Who wouldve thought that some of the best jazz music performed onstage this season would come from a tap dancer? Savion Glover, of Bring in da Noise, Bring in da Funk fame, gave a stellar performance at ArtisNaples (formerly the Philharmonic Center for the Arts). The performance, SoLe Sanctuary, was a tribute to those who had come before him. This was tap dancing evolved to the 21st century, light years away from the kind seen in old movies and TV variety shows. It was tap as jazz percussion, with Mr. Glovers feet and body as both instrument and musician. He, and fellow dancer Marshall Davis Jr., created intricate rhythms, with toes, heels, soles and even sides of their shoes. It was so creative, so innovative, so invigorating, that at the end I just wanted to leap up and yell, YEAH! Thats what Im talking about Unfortunately, the venue was maybe half-filled. The Phil was also host to Grammy Award-winner Esperanza Spalding, who plays bass and performs a kind of stream-of-consciousness jazz. The Hot Club of San Francisco returned to the Phil to play its Cool Yule concert holiday tunes performed a la Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli. It was one of the more off-beat Christmas offerings, creative and witty and delivered in that unique gypsy jazz style. Unfortunately, the band, originally scheduled to perform four concerts over two nights, had its performance schedule shortened and even the shows that remained were not well attended. Pink Martini, a hard-to-label musical ensemble from Portland, Ore., brought their sensuous world music to the Phil, and even got the audience to form a giant conga line at the end of their concert. BIG ARTS on Sanibel also brought some terrific jazz acts to the area. The Fred Hersch Trio was jaw-droppingly amazing with its adventurous musical forays. Youd be listening, and all of a sudden, youd think: How did we wind up here? And the unconventional Corky Siegel and Chamber Blues performed a hybrid of blues and chamber music a most unique style of music you have to hear to believe. Corky played piano and wailed on his harmonica while his talented quartet bowed their stringed instruments and a hand percussionist drummed. He interspersed the instrumentals with his loopy songs (with lyrics that sounded inspired by Ogden Nash). Singer/songwriter Matthew Santos, whos collaborated with hip hop artist Lupe Fiasco, was a guest artist. Talking pointsIra Glass, the host of public radios This American Life, was a definite season highlight, though his appearance at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall was not as well-attended as I wouldve hoped. For the first five or seven minutes of Mr. Glass performance, the audience sat in the dark, hearing only the sound of his voice an experience akin to hearing him on the radio. He played excerpts from an interview with a woman who had lived through a tornado; her entire house was lifted up in the air, she and her children floating in it like astronauts. He finally told the venue to turn up the lights, and peering at us from the stage declared, Wow, you dont look like how I thought you would either! It was intelligent, humorous, gripping. The Sanibel Island Writers Conferences evening lectures at BIG ARTS are always open and free to the public What you may have missed:A look at highlights from the past seasonWhat I missedIt happens. Though I see approximately 20 shows a month during season, I still miss things. Scheduling conflicts, suddenly sold-out shows and work deadlines all prevent me from seeing everything Id love to see. Here are some things I missed that I really wished Id seen: Mary Poppins: The Musical at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall I remember seeing the movie at Radio City Music Hall when I was a very, very young girl, and family members tried to get me to pronounce supercalifragilisticexpialidoscious. I was curious to see how this book-turned-into-a-movie had become a musical. And I wouldve loved to have seen the chimney sweeps dance number, with chimney sweeps dancing up the side of the stage and, I believe, upside down. Next to Normal at TheatreZone I saw Next to Normal, starring Alice Ripley, on Broadway. The two-story set was so spectacular, I wondered how it would ever become a national tour. When I learned TheatreZone was putting it on, I wondered how it would fare on such a small stage. I heard good things about this production, but couldnt get in to see it. The Importance of Being Earnest at Gulfshore Playhouse The Naples Players put on an excellent production of this a few years ago; it wouldve been interesting to see Gulfshore Playhouses version, especially because they usually excel when it comes to the classics. Plus, you cant beat Oscar Wildes witty dialogue. Diana Krall at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall Any time Ive seen jazz pianist/singer Diana Krall in concert, shes never failed to thrill. Its never a good idea to miss one of her shows when shes in the area. Fiddler on the Roof at the Broadway Palm I hear it was an excellent production, but unfortunately, it sold out before I could get tickets. Ive seen good productions and bad productions of Fiddler. Ive even seen a high school production where part of the set fell and the kid playing Tevye forgot his lyrics. But theres nothing like hearing the music performed live. BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com and always worth attending. New Yorker magazine staff writer Susan Orlean, author of bestsellers Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend and The Orchid Thief, among others, gave a humorous talk. Award-winning novelist Tim OBrien (The Things They Carried) claimed he wasnt much of a public speaker, but then proceeded to give a thoughtful and moving talk that just knocked my socks off. Abundance of theaterThere was such a crazy abundance of great theater this past season that its impossible to mention every show that was worthy of seeing. The Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota put on a top-notch production of the seldom-performed 776. The Tony Award-winning musical, which first hit Broadway in 1969, is about the events leading up to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. You may think: Maybe a stirring subject for a history class, but it doesnt hold promise for a good musical. But 776 possesses not only drama and conflict and romance, but comedy. And this was a first-class production, with excellent acting and singing. Im glad I finally got to see it. The Naples Players put on a rousing production of All Shook Up as their summer musical, tapping directly into the energy and sheer exuberance of rock n roll. Their summer musicals are usually excellent, but often overlooked, because they occur in that in-between time after one season ends and before the next begins. Florida Repertory Theatre had such a good season, its difficult to pick out highlights. But two two-person shows captured my heart. The tender Talleys Folly, near the beginning of season, had an older gentleman (Chris Clavelli) wooing a younger, Southern woman (Rachel Burttram), both of them broken, wounded people. And the seasons closer, Educating Rita, about a young woman who wants to know everything and further her education, introduced us to Jessica Wortham, making her Florida Rep debut (playing against the solid William McNulty as her professor.) The transformation of Ms. Worthams character, as she gains knowledge and self-awareness, was an incredible feat of acting. The Liar, at Theatre Conspiracy, was a definite season highlight. David Ivess modern translation of Pierre Corneilles 1643 French comedy tells the tale of a young man who cannot tell the truth, and his servant, who cannot tell a lie. Mr. Ivess version is a delightful mix of old and new, with word play galore. Miriam Margolyess one-woman show, Dickens Women, at the Herb Strauss Theatre was a marvelous feat of acting, a love letter to the writing of the man who created such marvelous characters as well as an examination of Dickens relationship with the women in his life. It was a Master Class in acting, as Ms. Margolyes would suddenly and completely transform from one character into another. And I enjoyed Catch Me If You Can at the BB Mann, a musical about con man Frank Abagnale Jr. With the book by Terrence McNally and music and lyrics by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray), the story of the real-life con man is told as a series of TV variety show numbers. Incredibly entertaining and fun. COURTESY PHOTOSSavion Glover, Ira Glass and Mary Poppins are just some of what you might have missed.

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LADIES NIGHTThursday, 6pm-10pm$4 feature wines by the glass $4 feature martinis $4 atbreads Live Entertainment!FEATURING David Cole 6:00-700 Blues Boys 7:00-8:00 Bill Colletti 8:00-10:00The Mercato of Naples: 9118 Strada Place 239.598.5601 www.thewineloftofnaples.com TELESCOPE CASUAL AND HANAMINT TRUCKLOAD SALE/NEW FLOOR SAMPLES UP TO 50% OFF MSRPinsideout furnituredirect SHOWROOM OPENMONDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-5PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY BY APPOINTMENTWWW.INSIDEOUTFURNITUREDIRECT.COM WWW.SINKVANITIESDIRECT.COM Kids can act up this summer at Gulfshore Playhouse campsThe Gulfshore Playhouse Theatre Education Project will host four summer camps for ages 5-18 at The Norris Center in June and July. June 10-28: STAR in a Play Acting Program (ages 7-12), a three-week introduction to the creative and technical side of theater In the process of rehearsing and performing The Emperors New Clothes, participants will be coaches by Gulfshore Playhouse teaching artist Selma Spies in the basics of blocking, movement, breathing, relaxation and bringing a character to life. Sessions will meet from 9 a.m. to noon, with a performance for the public at noon June 28. Cost is $350 (scholarships available). June 10-21: Summer Acting Intensive for Teens (ages 13-18), a deeper exploration of the creative and business side of theater Producing Artistic Director Kristen Coury will lead students in lessons on blocking, breathing, relaxation, breaking down a scene, proper audition techniques and bringing a character to life. Participants will also have an introduction to set design, lighting and sound equipment. Sessions will meet from 1-4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Students will perform a showcase of monologues and scenes at 5 p.m. June 21. Cost is $250 (scholarships available). July 8-12 and 22-26: Unmask the Power of the Theatre, one-week camps for ages 5-8 Children will explore fairy tales, storytelling, props-making and more. Sessions will meet from 1-4 p.m. Cost is $90 for each session. To register for any of the ab ove, call The Norris Center at 213-3058. For information about scholarships for the first two camps, visit www.gulfshoreplayhouse.org. Scenes from previous summer programs at Gulfshore Playhouse. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 C5 BAR WARS Beginning June 2 EVERY SUNDAY featuring NAPLES MOST ELITE BARTENDERS 4-10 PM Call for Competition DetailsRedeem this to the hostess on your next visit and receive a Complimentary Cocktail. Call for Competition Details: (239) 530-2225 489 Bayfront Place | Naples, FL 34102

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CATERING FOR ALL EVENTS Professional Chefs Exhibition Cooking Business and Residential CATERING Basic Omelette Party for 1st time Business Clients www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Theater A Closer Walk With Patsy Cline Tonight through June 22 at the Broadway Palm Theatre, Fort Myers. 278-4422 or www.broadwaypalm.com. The Rimers of Eldritch Through May 25 at Laboratory Theater of Florida, Fort Myers. 218-0481 or www. laboratorytheaterflorida.com. Thursday, May 23 Butcher Competition Whole Foods Market hosts a Best Butcher Competion and Fishmonger Face-Off from 11 a.m. to noon. First 50 customers receive a free Whole Foods Market hat or T-shirt. 9101 Strada Place. 552-5100 or www.wholefoodsmarket.com/wholefoods-market. Local History Naples Backyard History and Sea Salt restaurant present Maureen Sullivan-Hartung with Beer Worms, Square Grouper and Indians, Oh My! at 11 a.m. Lecture at the history museum followed by lunch at Sea Salt. $40. Reservations required. 774-2978 or www.naplesbackyardhistory.net. Trendy Windows Clive Daniel Home manager of cut goods valarie ahlers and interior designer C. Chad Elkins present chic window treatments, including the latest trends, at 2 p.m. Registration required. 213-7844 or www. clivedanielhome.com. Dogs in the Garden Naples Botanical Gardens opens its doors to dogs and their owners from 3-5 p.m. Free for Garden members, $12.95 for others and $7.95 for dogs. 643-7275 or www.naplesgarden.org. Wine Tasting Three60 Market hosts a wine and cheese pairing from 4-6 p.m. $10 includes a $10 voucher toward any purchase during the evening. 2891 Bayview Ave. 732-7331 or www.360-market.com. Village Nights The Village on Venetian Bay hosts live entertainment by the Dazzling Delrays and Sabrina from 5-8 p.m. 261-6100 or www.venetianvillage.com. Bubbles & Babbles Norris Home Furnishings hosts an evening with champagne and a trunk show by Tamra Designs to benefit The American Heart Association, from 5:30-7 p.m. Reservations required. 263-0580. Photography Presentation Journeyman Photography Gallery hosts an opening reception for Alaska! from 6-8 p.m. $10. Reservations required. 2220 J&C Blvd. 260-5771 or www.journeymangallery.org. Thursday on Third Radio Flyer, Flashback and Keith Atkins perform from 6:30-9:30 p.m. along Third Street South. Free. www.thirdstreetsouth.com. Spring Concert The Naples High School Band performs a composition written for the school by James Mobberley as part of the program for the bands final performance of the year beginning at 7 p.m. Free. 1100 Golden Gate Circle. 377-5448.Funny Guy Eddie Ifft takes the stage this evening through May 26 at Off the Hook Comedy Club, Marco Island. 389-6901 or www.offthehookcomedy.com. Friday, May 24 Fun Run Collier County Sheriffs Office hosts a 5K Fun Run and Safety Fair at 5:30 p.m. at Golden Gate Community Park. 530-9781 or www.collierparks. com. Rock Out Konnie & Kirk perform from 6-9 p.m. by the pool at Jacks River Bar. 475 North Road. 213-1441 or www. floridamarinaclubs.com. Live Piano Lynn Carol plays the baby grand piano today and May 25 from 6-9 p.m. in the lounge at Capers Kitchen & Bar. 2460 Vanderbilt Beach Rd. 431-7438. Musical Strings The Bean Pickers play from 7-10 p.m. at Freds Food, Fun and Spirits. 2700 Immokalee Rd. 431-7928 or www.fredsdiner.com.Patriotic Pops Conductor Stu Chafetz and the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra perform American classics at 8 p.m. at ArtisNaples. 5833 Pelican Bay Blvd. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org.Friday Jam Sweetclover performs at 9:30 p.m. at South Street City Oven. 1410 Pine Ridge Rd. 435-9333 or www. southstreetnaples.com. Saturday, May 25 Farmers Market The Third Street South Farmers Market takes place from 7:30-11:30 a.m. in the parking lot behind Tommy Bahama. www.thirdstreetsouth.com.Summer Cooking Sea Salt restaurant hosts a Healthy & Delicious: Eating Healthy Doesnt Need to be Bland cooking class beginning at 11:30 a.m. $65 for the class and lunch (including two glasses of wine). Reservations required. 434-7258.Magic Carpet Ride A small ensemble of woodwind musicians from the Naples Philharmonic demonstrate their instruments and answer questions at 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at ArtisNaples. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org. Two to Tango Alicia Repun leads a tango class from 7-8 p.m. followed by milongo for all levels until 11 p.m. $15. 1673 Pine Ridge Road. 738-4184 or www. pablorepuntango.com. Sunday, May 26 Tiara & Crown Day The Golisano Childrens Museum of Naples celebrates Tiara and Crown Day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Children can create their own crowns and crests in addition to dressing up. Free for Cmon members, $10 for others. 514-0084 or www.cmon.org.Live Rehearsal The Lost Rodeo Band has a live rehearsal open to the public from noon-2 p.m. at CJs on the Bay, 740 N. Collier Blvd., Marco Island. Free. 571-5567.Come for Karaoke Jacks River Bar hosts an evening of karaoke with Janice Diaz starting at 4:30 p.m. 475 North Road. 213-1441 or www.floridamarinaclubs.com.Family Ride & Dine Naples Pathways Coalition hosts a dinner ride around Olde Naples followed by dining at Barbatella, from 5:30-9 p.m. Barbatella will donate 10 percent of food and drink to NPC. Reservations required by May 24, saubona5@aol.com. Monday, May 27 Live Music Sara Hadeka takes the stage at 6 p.m. South Street City Oven & Grill. 1410 Pine Ridge Rd. 435-9333 or www.southstreetnaples.com. Tuesday, May 28 Book Talk South Regional Library hosts a discussion of The Queens Vow by C.W. Gortner at 2 p.m. Registration required. 8065 Lely Cultural Pkwy. 2527542 or www.colliergov.net/library. Marco Fundraiser The Marco Island Parks & Recreation Foundation hods a fundraiser for Camp Mackle from 6-8 p.m. at Stonewalls restaurant. 551 S. Collier Blvd., Marco Island. 642-3615. Now Youre Cooking Chef Brian Lewis leads a cooking class featuring Italian specialties from 6-8 p.m. at The Sauce Lady. $35 includes a three-course dinner. Reservations required. 9331 Tamiami Trail N. 592-5557 or www.saucelady.com. Wednesday, May 29 Scotch Dinner Shulas Americas Steak House hosts a Macallan Scotch Dinner at 6 p.m., with guest presenter Macallan Scotch Ambassador Randy Adams. $95, includes a four-course dinner and scotch pairing. 5111 Tamiami Trail N. 659-3716. Art After Hours ArtisNaples hosts Art After Hours, an evening of free admission, cocktails, live entertainment and more, from 6-9 p.m. 597-1900 or www.artisnaples.org. Dinner & Jazz Freds Food, Fun & Spirits presents The Stu Shelton Trio & Carla Valenti from 6-9 p.m. Reservations recommended. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928 or www.fredsdiner.com. Coming up Old Florida Style Interior Designer Susan Petril discusses how to achieve the look of Old Florida in your home at 2 p.m., May 30, at Clive Daniel Home. Registration required. 213-7844 or www.clivedanielhome.com. Dancing by the Fountain The Village on Venetian Bay hosts an evening of dancing demonstrations by professionals from Absolute Ballroom with music by Brandon Anthony and Mark Shapiro from 5-8 p.m. May 30. 261-6100 or www.venetianvillage.com. Stage 2 Improv By The Naples Players May 31 through June 22 at the Tobye Studio. 263-7990 or www.naplesplayers.org. Special Engagement John Pinette takes the stage May 31 through June 2 at the Off the Hook Comedy Club, Marco Island. 389-6901 or www. offthehookcomedy.com. Submit calendar listings and highresolution photos to events@floridaweekly.com. E-mail text, jpegs or Word documents are accepted. No pdfs or photos of fliers. The deadline for calendar submissions is noon Sunday. WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Patriotic Pops Conductor Stu Chafetz and the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra perform American classics at 8 p.m., Friday, May 24, at ArtisNaples. 5833 Pelican Bay Blvd. 5971900 or www.thephil.org.

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facebook.com/ KeyWestExpress twitter.com/ KeyWestExpress youtube.com/ TheKeyWestExpress www.keywestexpress.us 1-800-593-7259 $ 119ROUND TRIP!* FOR ONLY*Minimum 8 day advance purchase, non-refundable fare. Cannot be combined with other offers. Weekend fee applies to any travel Friday thru Sunday. Expires May 30, 2013. into www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 ARTS COMMENTARYThe Town Hall meeting that wasntWhat a waste of time! That was the thought that kept running though my brain Sunday afternoon as I sat in the Daniels Pavilion of the venue formerly known as the Phil. I was one of a small group of people attending a Town Hall meeting CEO Kathleen van Bergen held to answer questions about the organizations recent name change to ArtisNaples. It was part of their free Community Day. Only it wasnt really a Town Hall meeting. It was a carefully orchestrated PR event that was more infuriating than informative. In fact, it was insulting. Clay Miller and Krista Fogelsong, anchors of NBC-2s MorningNews, emceed the event. Its been exactly one month to the date since the Phils board of directors originally announced the name change to a handpicked audience. And if, somehow, you havent been following the news, what happened next was: all hell broke loose. The name has been almost universally rejected by Neapolitans, arts patrons and donors, many of who have also asked for their money back or have vowed not to give another penny to the Phil. A grassroots group, Save the Phil, started a petition protesting the new name and is gathering 10,000 names to present to the board. (People are beginning to talk of another petition this one requesting Ms. van Bergens resignation.) The local Naples paper prints five or six letters protesting the name daily, and Im receiving about the same number as well. Sundays event wasnt a genuine Town Hall meeting where anyone can stand up and ask a question. It was not a dialogue between the ArtisNaples staff and people who oppose the new name. It was a carefully scripted presentation to affirm the name choice. The event was not well attended. No surprise there, because it was barely advertised. But when asked about it onstage, Ms. van Bergen said it had been. The free Community Day was advertised, mentioning face painting for kids and museum tours and balloon animals but the actual meeting was not. It was listed on fliers handed to you as you entered, but thats the only place I recall seeing it. It wasnt even mentioned on the venues own website advertisement for the community day. Consequently, there were more empty seats than people, and of the approximately 70 people attending, many were staff or board members. Im sure if people who hate the name change had known about the meeting, they wouldve shown up. Im sure there wouldve been so many people that not even the bigger Hayes Hall wouldve been able to hold them all. But this was not really publicized. First, Ms. van Bergen showed the ArtisNaples promotional video, which is all typography, with different words after the long dash. And yes, it still says ArtisStreisand at one point, which I find tremendously misleading. Barbra Streisand is NOT going to be performing at the venue. Id like to make it clear that this is our organizational name, Ms. van Bergen said. She then showed a short photo montage of highlights from the first 25 years. Founder and original CEO/Chairman Myra Janco Daniels was pictured in exactly one photo the very first slide, which showed her cutting the red ribbon. Its interesting to note that while some of the highlights included the museum, the majority seemed to revolve around the orchestra, including its numerous conductors over the years. And thats the crux of the problem right there: they complain that people only think of the orchestra when the Phil is mentioned, and not of everything else they offer, yet their own emphasis is on the orchestra, almost to the exclusion of everything else. It seemed as if easily half the time Sunday was spent talking about the orchestras history, the youth orchestra, the upcoming expanded classical season, and Andrey Boreyko, the new conductor. (They also showed a video of him.) She talked about those infamous surveys. (Those are the surveys that no one seems to have received.) She said that 18,000 of them had been sent out via e-mail, and they received over 3,000 responses. They asked demographic questions, she said, not questions about a potential name change. She also showed a video of some of the man on the street surveys, which were conducted at sites such as Fifth Avenue South, the Mercato and Waterside Shops, asking them what they thought of when you said the Phil and whether they knew there was a museum as part of the center. The people interviewed were almost all very young (one was in grade school) and I wondered how many were visitors to the area. Without any irony evident at all, Ms. van Bergen said that part of their mission is to be transparent, inclusive and participatory. Yet, the name change, and how it was conducted, was none of those things. It was done secretly, without any participation or input from the community, patrons or donors. In fact, later on, when asked, Will you change the name back, Ms. van Bergen said: Thats been a popular question, adding, When we launched the name, we didnt launch it as a voting proposition. In other words: we made this name change, this is our decision, and you dont get to have a say in it. She also said, at another point, that shes disappointed she hasnt had the opportunity to sit down and talk with the Save the Phil organizers, adding, I have reached out to them. People werent allowed to stand up and ask questions Sunday; they had to submit questions before the meeting, giving staff the opportunity to sift through them ahead of time and plan their answers, or possibly even edit what questions would be asked. Some of the questions just seemed to be such obvious ringers. The first question wasnt even a question, but a statement: Love the name, its smart and new! She said that she receives letters, e-mails and phone calls all praising the new name. OK, maybe thats true. But Id sure love to know what that percentage is compared to the flood of letters, e-mails and phone calls shes receiving protesting the new name. And then there was this question soon after: I love the new name! How can I get involved with the organization? The entire community is in an uproar about the name change, and these are the questions theyre allegedly asking? It strained credulity. People began getting up and walking out. Another question: Tell us more about your new music director. Then there was this question: Is this a slap to Myra Daniels? Ms. van Bergen said no, This is really a story of her success. Were building on everything she has done. There were many images of Myra in the montage shown earlier, she said. But I saw only one. The name Philharmonic Center for the Arts did not cover everything that they offer, she continued to insist. We wanted Naples in the name, she said, and the old name does not celebrate Naples. We did choose an evocative name. At the end of the hour, when the two emcees said, Thank you for your candidness and openness, I almost fell out of my seat. A truly candid and open discussion wouldve been a totally different experience. First of all, it wouldve been widely advertised. Second, it wouldve involved spontaneous questions from the audience and unrehearsed, honest answers. Novelist Ernest Hemingway famously said that writers should possess a built-in bullshit detector. My meter was going off Sunday. Want to share your thoughts about ArtisNaples on the record? E-mail nstetson@floridaweekly.com. Include your first and last name and a phone number. nancySTETSONnstetson@floridaweekly.com ArtisNaples

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L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch Established 1976 263-9940 Established 1979 263-2734 fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Expires 6/2/2013 Not good with any other offer. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A sense of uncertainty could be a good reason to change your position on an important matter. Someone close might try to talk you out of it, but its your decision to make. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Being too zealous in pursuing your goal could create some resistance. Try to be more mindful of what you ask people to do, and theyll be more likely to do it. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Things change as you go from being ignored to being Lionized once again. This is a good time to reintroduce those previously rejected ideas to a more receptive audience. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone new in your life creates both anticipation as well as anxiety. Avoid the potential for misunderstandings by watching what you say and how you say it. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Watch your budget so that you dont overspend now and have less to invest when the time is right later on. Arrange to share your weekend with someone special. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) The temptation to involve yourself in a friends or family members personal problems is laudable. But get the facts before you make a firm commitment. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You might be upset by some of your critics. But most of your associates continue to keep the faith in your ability to get the job done, and done well. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Youve reached an important point in your ongoing pursuit of your goals. You might now want to consider letting someone you trust join you on your journey. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Youve been going through a spate of uncertainty involving people you care for. But it might be time to take a stand on a position you feel sure you can defend. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Treading water keeps you busy, but it wont get you where you need to go. Time to stop making excuses and to start moving ahead to ward your goals. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) An apparent act of injustice might turn out to be either an error in judgment or just plain stupidity. So calm down and cool off, and let the explanations roll out. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Its upsetting when someone you trusted might have failed you. But with new opportunities ahead, youll soon be too busy to feel even a wee bit sorry for yourself. BORN THIS WEEK: You see life as both creative and pragmatic. You would not only be a fine artist, but also a successful one. 013 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 013 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. PUZZLES HOROSCOPES LOVE IS ALL AROUND By Linda ThistlePlace a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Sponsored By: Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9

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475 SEAGATE DRIVE, NAPLES, FL 34103 RENEW. RELAX. REJUVENATE. Guests of Waldorf Astoria Spa will nd a place to renew mind, body and spirit in the sanctuary of an indoor-outdoor spa village in the Japanese tradition, amid exquisite gardens. Architecture, landscaping and water features are interwoven to create an atmosphere of harmony, beauty and tranquility. To reserve your service or for more information, please call 239.594.6321 or visit WaldorfAstoriaNaples.com. SPA NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 C11 ITALIAN STEAK FEAST ~DINNER FOR TWO $29.95TENDER SIRLOIN STEAK SEASONED, GRILLED & TOPPED WITH MUSHROOM MARSALA WINE SAUCE ONE BOTTLE OF CK MONDAVI WINE, YOUR CHOICE OF CABERNET OR CHARDONNAY(served with mashed potatoes and fresh vegetables ) All early bird orders must be placed by 6 PM in order to receive promotional pricing.For more information call Seth or Tom 239.592.0050 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples, FL 34109www.NoodlesCafe.com N ITALIAN STEAKFEASTDI N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N ERFORTWO$2995 ITALIA N N STEAKFEASTDI N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E RFORTWO$2995 Early Bird Special Oer expires May 31, 2013ITALIAN STEAK FEAST ~ 2 FOR $29.95 Is it worth $15 (3D)? YesStar Trek Into Darkness is a true film-going experience, and an awesome one at that. If you thought director J.J. Abrams 2009 reboot to the sci-fi franchise was a fluke, think again: Any movie that can have me genuinely laughing, then give me sweaty palms during tense moments and goose bumps during emotional high points, is a substantial accomplishment. This movie is fun. It starts on a remote red planet on which Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) and Bones (Karl Urban) are fleeing a group of primitive natives. On the starship Enterprise first officer Spock (Zachary Quinto), communications specialist Uhura (Zoe Saldana), pilot Sulu (John Cho), chief engineer Scotty (Simon Pegg) and young ensign Chekov (Anton Yelchin) keep a close eye on the proceedings. Once back at Star Fleet headquarters in San Francisco, in the year 2259, Captain Pike (Bruce Greenwood) chastises Kirk for not following orders. Meanwhile, a madman named John Harrison (Benedict Cumberbatch) is waging war against Star Fleet, prompting Admiral Marcus (Peter Weller) to send the Enterprise after him. Marcus daughter Carol (Alice Eve) is a science officer along for the ride. If the above summary reads a bit vague, its on purpose: The less you know going in, the better. The surprises are numerous, often shocking, sometimes fated by Star Trek mythology were already familiar with, sometimes not. Do yourself a favor and avoid all spoilers theres true joy to be gleaned from the riches this film offers, and being too eager in advance diminishes the novelty of surprise. Its hard to believe what Mr. Abrams is doing with the Star Trek franchise, let alone that hes doing it so well. This is a first-rate production from top to bottom: The visual effects are crisp and impressive, the costumes and production design are appropriately bold and futuristic, the script is smart and void of missteps, the rousing musical score punctuates intense moments, and the pacing/editing is brisk but never feels rushed. It runs 132 minutes, which is the right length. See it on as big a screen as you can it is showing in IMAX and in 3D if possible. As for the cast, Mr. Pine and Mr. Quinto have nicely settled into their lead roles, and Mr. Pegg once again gets the most laughs out of Scottys distinct Scottish brogue. Making a real impact, however, is Mr. Cumberbatch as the villain. His character, with his thick, dark voice and chilling eyes, is a haunting nemesis who is also extremely intelligent and manipulative. Smartly, as he interacts with the Enterprise crew no action that subsequently occurs is illogical, which spares us contrived moments of stupidity that we know are solely there to set up moments of heroism later. No, this movie is too good for that. This will read as hyperbole, but it cannot be overstated: What Mr. Abrams is doing in combining established Trek lore with his own vision is nothing short of brilliant. As a result, Star Trek Into Darkness is a great film in its own right and an especially awesome achievement for anyone familiar with the Trek universe. See this its one of the best films of the year. LATEST FILMSStar Trek Into Darkness danHUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com >> Tribbles make a delightful appearance! FILM CAPSULESThe Great Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan) Elusive millionaire Jay Gatsby (DiCaprio) uses the cousin (Maguire) of his former love (Mulligan) to get close to her once again. From director Baz Luhrmann (Moulin Rouge) its expectedly stylish and flashy, but its also too long and not engaging. Rated PG-13.Iron Man 3 (Robert Downey Jr., Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley) Iron Man (Downey Jr.) faces off against the Mandarin (Kingsley), a terrorist whos killing innocent American civilians. There are a few nice action sequences and Downey is charming, but on the whole its a bit of a let down. Rated PG-13.To The Wonder (Ben Affleck, Olga Kurylenko, Javier Bardem) American tourist Neil (Affleck) and the French Marina (Kurylenko) fall in love when he visits France, but things change when they move back to the states. Its hardly conventional storytelling from writer/director Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life); the film plays more like an elegiac poem that a narrative feature. Thats not a compliment, as its too dense for its own good. Rated R.

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C12 Give Today for Their Tomorrows Give Today for Their Tomorrows Give Today for Their Tomorrows Marie Ackord Betsy Allen Audrea Anderson Carl Barraco, Jr. Bette Batson Patricia Bell Lydia Black Virginia Booth Debi Braendle Roy Brodersen Denny Brown Tom Brown Peter Burkert Karen Cameron Greta Campbell Laura Chmielewski Carolyn Conant Joyce Dean Patricia Dobbins Kim Donahoe Francesca Donlan Anne Douglas Terry Eberle Bob da Frota Dave Fleming Marty Freling Frankie Lynn Gadson Greg Gardner Marie Glasgow Charlie Green Deborah Greenfield Suzan Harden Archie Hayward, Jr. Debra Hobbs Larry Hobbs Brenda Holloway Lee Howington Evelyn Jones Donna Kaye Bob Kleckner Peg Kleckner Luis Leon Nadja Lieberwirth Barbara Linstrom Joni Logan Donna Maul Steven Mills Mary Moore Melvin Morgan Frederick D. Morgan, II Charlotte Newton Murray Newton Timothy ONeill William Prather Chris Rahmings Robin Raineri Janet Remmel Teresa Riska-Hall David Robinson Carmen Salom M.J. Scarpelli Ellen Schneider Michael SchneiderChristians Verna SchneiderChristians Lowell Schoenfeld Louise Senneff John Sheppard Judith Sims John Steakley Vicki Stephan Vera Stephens Gay Thompson Randy Toscano George Traicoff Cathy Tucker Myra Walters Geraldine Ware Guy Whitesman Myra Walters, chair of Scholarship CommitteeTHANKtYOUtTOtOURt SCHOLARSHIPtREVIEWERS Layne Marshall Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Nicholas Wnukowski Bishop Verot High School Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship Bishop Verot High School Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship Kristen Duguay South Fort Myers High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce/Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship South Fort Myers High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Com merce/Ralph A. Rich ardson Scholarship Courtney Larkin Estero High School John and Ellen Shep pard Humane Student Scholarship Estero High School John and Ellen Shep pard Humane Student Scholarship Daniel Digby Ida S. Baker High School Judge William J. Nelson Scholarship Ida S. Baker High School Judge William J. Nelson Scholarship Kay Donovan Evangelical Christian School Sanibel Community Church Scholarship Evette TealRichardson Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship William Metcalf Florida Gulf Coast Uni versity Certified Public Accountants Scholarship Alexander Hernandez LaBelle High School Doc Keen Memorial Scholarship Crystal McCauley Lely High School Ruth Messmer Memorial Scholrship Amanda Brink University of Florida John I. and Madeleine Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship Kristin Current Florida State University John I. and Madeleine R. Taeni Scholarship Rafael Franklin Florida Memorial University Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Christopher Clarke Flagler College Robert A. Kleckner Scholarship Latisha FieldsUniversity of Florida Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship James Givens Payne Theological Seminary Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Meghan Ray Gulf Coast High School Chet and Jannett Perry Rotary Club of Fort Myers Scholarship Owen Berry Lemon Bay High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Katlin Corbitt Lemon Bay High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Johnathan Fischer University of Florida John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Shiakera Williams Dunbar High School Dunbar Heritage Scholarship Jorge Medrano Clewiston High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Tasha Baer Gulf Coast High School Southwest Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association Scholarship Cynthia Rodriguez Immokalee High School Frances H. Waldron Scholarship Sandralee Allen Nova Southeastern University Faye Lynn Roberts Edu cation Scholarship Joseph Coleman Barry University William L. Graddy Law School Scholarship Silvana Estrada Hodges University Certified Public Accountants Scholar ship Ashley Vernet Immokalee High School Carl E. Brooks Schol arship and Doris W. Frey Memorial Scholarship Kira Finan Cape Coral High School Carol Patti McLaughlin Scholarship Tatiana HughesStewart Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Dylan Mendez-Lynch Wheaton College Robert C. and Margaret A. Schikora Scholarship Stephanie Galo South Fort Myers High School Julie Willard Mikell Scholarship Lauren StrangBishop Verot High School Southwest Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association Scholarship Juliana Toyloy-Stanton Dunbar High School Francis Harris Gresham Scohlarship Michael Vardanyan Fort Myers High School James Bilder Scholar Childe Scholarship Fort Myers High School James Bilder Scholar James Bilder Scholar James Bilder Scholar Childe Scholarship Kasey Mayer Fort Myers High School D&A Florida Scholarship Fort Myers High School D&A Florida Scholarship Inaee Aidoo Ida S. Baker High School Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Chayana Burnside Dunbar High School Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Dunbar High School Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Ana AbarcaFlorida Gulf Coast University Anne M. Fassett Schol arship Florida Gulf Coast University Anne M. Fassett Schol arship Gian Hinkson Estero High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce/Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship Estero High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Com merce/Ralph A. Rich ardson Scholarship Alex Mendoza North Fort Myers High School Paul B. and Aline Flynn and Ellen Sheppard Humane Student Scholarship Kathryn Sprehn Bishop Verot High School Paul B. and Aline Flynn Scholarship Bishop Verot High School Paul B. and Aline Flynn Scholarship Christelle Ridore Nova Southeastern University Chip Johnson Memorial Scholarship Nova Southeastern University Chip Johnson Memorial Scholarship Leah Colucci Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Janilya BaizackSouth Fort Myers High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Emily Thorp Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Michaela Steakley Cape Coral High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Cape Coral High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Nicole CohenCape Coral High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Lauren Golom Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Henry Pellegrino Florida Gulf Coast University Chip Johnson Memorial Scholarship Alison RiceCypress Lake High School George E. Judd T. Gora Photography Scholarship Alexander Sell South Fort Myers High School James Bilder Scholarship Martha Gonzalez Mariner High School James Bilder Scholar Anderson, Jr. Scholar ship Seth Locker Riverdale High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Robert B. and Dorothy Pence Scholarship Olivia Finan Cape Coral High School George E. Judd David G. Robinson Arts Scholarship Shantyria Jacob Dunbar High School Isabel Mayer Kirkpatrick Scholarship Jenna DiazFlorida Gulf Coast University Anne M. Fassett Scholarship Marliss BrockingtonFlorida Gulf Coast University AAUW Sue Gottcent Memorial Scholarship Rose Cacicio Florida Gulf Coast University AUW Sue Gottcent Memorial Scholarship Daniella Sutherland Dunbar High School Dunbar Heritage Scholarship Samantha Dressel North Fort Myers High School Jordan Abdo Memorial Scholarship Joy Gemmer Naples High School Lewis B. Barber Memo rial Scholarship Naples High School Lewis B. Barber Memo rial Scholarship Michelle Saade Naples High School Carl E. Brooks Scholarship Cecelia Morales Estero High School Ellen Sheppard Scholarship Udaya Dash Scholar ship To start a scholarship fund or for more information on creative ways to give in your community, contact us at 239-274-5900 or visit us at www.FloridaCommunity.com 634 applications received 73 scholarships awarded $443,800 given in 2013 scholarships to local students Their Future. Your Fund. You can create scholarship funds within the Community Foundation for many reasons. Each scholarship fund can be customized to achieve your interest. It may be to memorialize a loved one, support a specific college or university or to support a student with special talents or academic achievements.Congratulations to Our 73 Scholarship Recipients More than $440,000 Awarded Through the Generosity of Our Donors Their Future. Your Fund. You can create scholarship funds within the Community Foundation for many reasons. Each scholarship fund can be customized to achieve your interest. It may be to memorialize a loved one, support a specific college or university or to support a student with special talents or academic achievements.

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C12 Marie Ackord Betsy Allen Audrea Anderson Carl Barraco, Jr. Bette Batson Patricia Bell Lydia Black Virginia Booth Debi Braendle Roy Brodersen Denny Brown Tom Brown Peter Burkert Karen Cameron Greta Campbell Laura Chmielewski Carolyn Conant Joyce Dean Patricia Dobbins Kim Donahoe Francesca Donlan Anne Douglas Terry Eberle Bob da Frota Dave Fleming Marty Freling Frankie Lynn Gadson Greg Gardner Marie Glasgow Charlie Green Deborah Greenfield Suzan Harden Archie Hayward, Jr. Debra Hobbs Larry Hobbs Brenda Holloway Lee Howington Evelyn Jones Donna Kaye Bob Kleckner Peg Kleckner Luis Leon Nadja Lieberwirth Barbara Linstrom Joni Logan Donna Maul Steven Mills Mary Moore Melvin Morgan Frederick D. Morgan, II Charlotte Newton Murray Newton Timothy ONeill William Prather Chris Rahmings Robin Raineri Janet Remmel Teresa Riska-Hall David Robinson Carmen Salom M.J. Scarpelli Ellen Schneider Michael SchneiderChristians Verna SchneiderChristians Lowell Schoenfeld Louise Senneff John Sheppard Judith Sims John Steakley Vicki Stephan Vera Stephens Gay Thompson Randy Toscano George Traicoff Cathy Tucker Myra Walters Geraldine Ware Guy Whitesman Myra Walters, chair of Scholarship CommitteeTHANKtYOUtTOtOURt SCHOLARSHIPtREVIEWERS Layne Marshall Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Nicholas Wnukowski Bishop Verot High School Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship Kristen Duguay South Fort Myers High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce/Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship Courtney Larkin Estero High School John and Ellen Shep pard Humane Student Scholarship Daniel Digby Ida S. Baker High School Judge William J. Nelson Scholarship Kay Donovan Evangelical Christian School Sanibel Community Church Scholarship Evangelical Christian School Sanibel Community Church Scholarship Evette TealRichardson Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship William Metcalf Florida Gulf Coast Uni versity Certified Public Accountants Scholarship Florida Gulf Coast Uni versity versity versity Certified Public Accoun tants Scholarship Alexander Hernandez LaBelle High School Doc Keen Memorial Scholarship LaBelle High School Doc Keen Memorial Scholarship Crystal McCauley Lely High School Ruth Messmer Memorial Scholrship Lely High School Ruth Messmer Memorial Scholrship Amanda Brink University of Florida John I. and Madeleine Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship University of Florida John I. and Madeleine Doris W. Frey Memo rial Scholarship Kristin Current Florida State University John I. and Madeleine R. Taeni Scholarship Florida State University John I. and Madeleine R. Taeni Scholarship Rafael Franklin Florida Memorial University Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Florida Memorial University Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Christopher Clarke Flagler College Robert A. Kleckner Scholarship Flagler College Robert A. Kleckner Scholarship Latisha FieldsUniversity of Florida Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship University of Florida Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship James Givens Payne Theological Seminary Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Payne Theological Seminary Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Meghan Ray Gulf Coast High School Chet and Jannett Perry Rotary Club of Fort Myers Scholarship Gulf Coast High School Chet and Jannett Perry Rotary Club of Fort Myers Scholarship Owen Berry Lemon Bay High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Lemon Bay High School School School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Katlin Corbitt Lemon Bay High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Lemon Bay High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Johnathan Fischer University of Florida John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship University of Florida John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Shiakera Williams Dunbar High School Dunbar Heritage Scholarship Dunbar High School Dunbar Heritage Scholarship Jorge Medrano Clewiston High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Clewiston High School John M. and Mary A. Shanley Scholarship Tasha Baer Gulf Coast High School Southwest Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association Scholarship Gulf Coast High School Southwest Florida Dep uty Sheriffs Association Scholarship Cynthia Rodriguez Immokalee High School Frances H. Waldron Scholarship Immokalee High School School School Frances H. Waldron Scholarship Sandralee Allen Nova Southeastern University Faye Lynn Roberts Edu cation Scholarship Nova Southeastern University Faye Lynn Roberts Edu cation Scholarship Joseph Coleman Barry University William L. Graddy Law School Scholarship Barry University William L. Graddy Law School Scholarship Silvana Estrada Hodges University Certified Public Accountants Scholar ship Hodges University Certified Public Accountants Scholar Accountants Scholar Accountants Scholar ship Ashley Vernet Immokalee High School Carl E. Brooks Schol arship and Doris W. Frey Memorial Scholarship Immokalee High School School School Carl E. Brooks Schol arship and Doris W. Frey Memorial Scholarship Kira Finan Cape Coral High School Carol Patti McLaughlin Scholarship Cape Coral High School School School Carol Patti McLaughlin Scholarship Tatiana HughesStewart Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Edison State College Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Dylan Mendez-Lynch Wheaton College Robert C. and Margaret A. Schikora Scholarship Wheaton College Robert C. and Margaret A. Schikora Scholarship Stephanie Galo South Fort Myers High School Julie Willard Mikell Scholarship South Fort Myers High School Julie Willard Mikell Scholarship Lauren StrangBishop Verot High School Southwest Florida Deputy Sheriffs Association Scholarship Bishop Verot High School Southwest Florida Dep uty Sheriffs Association Scholarship Juliana Toyloy-Stanton Dunbar High School Francis Harris Gresham Scohlarship Dunbar High School Francis Harris Gresham Scohlarship Michael Vardanyan Fort Myers High School James Bilder Scholar Childe Scholarship Kasey Mayer Fort Myers High School D&A Florida Scholarship Inaee Aidoo Ida S. Baker High School Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Chayana Burnside Dunbar High School Edna & Felix Swain Scholarship Ana AbarcaFlorida Gulf Coast University Anne M. Fassett Schol arship Gian Hinkson Estero High School Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce/Ralph A. Richardson Scholarship Alex Mendoza North Fort Myers High School Paul B. and Aline Flynn and Ellen Sheppard Humane Student Scholarship Kathryn Sprehn Bishop Verot High School Paul B. and Aline Flynn Scholarship Christelle Ridore Nova Southeastern University Chip Johnson Memorial Scholarship Leah Colucci Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Janilya BaizackSouth Fort Myers High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Emily Thorp Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Michaela Steakley Cape Coral High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Nicole CohenCape Coral High School Jane H. Berktold Scholarship Lauren Golom Fort Myers High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Scholarship Henry Pellegrino Florida Gulf Coast University Chip Johnson Memorial Scholarship Alison RiceCypress Lake High School George E. Judd T. Gora Photography Scholarship Alexander Sell South Fort Myers High School James Bilder Scholarship Martha Gonzalez Mariner High School James Bilder Scholar Anderson, Jr. Scholar ship Seth Locker Riverdale High School Richard and Marion Thompson Memorial Robert B. and Dorothy Pence Scholarship Olivia Finan Cape Coral High School George E. Judd David G. Robinson Arts Scholarship Shantyria Jacob Dunbar High School Isabel Mayer Kirkpatrick Scholarship Jenna DiazFlorida Gulf Coast University Anne M. Fassett Scholarship Marliss BrockingtonFlorida Gulf Coast University AAUW Sue Gottcent Memorial Scholarship Rose Cacicio Florida Gulf Coast University AUW Sue Gottcent Memorial Scholarship Daniella Sutherland Dunbar High School Dunbar Heritage Scholarship Samantha Dressel North Fort Myers High School Jordan Abdo Memorial Scholarship Joy Gemmer Naples High School Lewis B. Barber Memo rial Scholarship Michelle Saade Naples High School Carl E. Brooks Scholarship Cecelia Morales Estero High School Ellen Sheppard Scholarship Udaya Dash Scholar ship To start a scholarship fund or for more information on creative ways to give in your community, contact us at 239-274-5900 or visit us at www.FloridaCommunity.com 634 applications received 73 scholarships awarded $443,800 given in 2013 scholarships to local students Their Future. Your Fund. You can create scholarship funds within the Community Foundation for many reasons. Each scholarship fund can be customized to achieve your interest. It may be to memorialize a loved one, support a specific college or university or to support a student with special talents or academic achievements.Congratulations to Our 73 Scholarship Recipients More than $440,000 Awarded Through the Generosity of Our Donors

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btn, frBoard Certi ed Plastic Surgeon of the Face and Body Physicians-Regional Medical Center Pine Ridge Campus 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Suite 15 Naples, FL 34119 btn, b, ff fbr btnJune 20th, 4-7 PMJoin us to see how artistry meets technology at our open house event Space is limited RSVP required.239.348.4357www.naples-csc.com www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Shining a light on Art Nouveau designsElectric lights were first marketed to the public about 1880. It is said that Louis Comfort Tiffanys famous lily lamp with glass shades for light bulbs was the first lamp with a shade that projected light down, not up, like a candle flame. Other lamps of the early 1900s were adapted to accept bulbs by removing the older light source, like a candle, then wiring the lamp for electricity and adding a bulb and shade. Others were made in entirely new shapes. During the Art Nouveau period, sensuous women with curves were part of the designs used for glass, ceramics, bronze figurines and even furniture. So it is not surprising that a variety of lamps designed to feature women also were made. The Loetz glass factory (1840-1940), in what is now the Czech Republic, made art glass. At around the turn of the 20th century, workers there designed a figural lamp with a bronze base shaped like a woman holding an iridescent gold glass shade above her head. The glass resembled Tiffanys, but it was actually made at the Loetz factory. It was signed by Peter Tereszczuk (1875-1963), a well-known Ukrainian sculptor who made bronze figurines and other decorative bronzes. Bell collectors prize his bronze electric call buttons that look like a small child on a rocky base. The lamp sold for $3,750 at a Rago Arts and Auction sale in 2013. KOVEL: ANTIQUES terryKOVELnews@floridaweekly.com This lamp, created from a figure of a bronze woman and an iridescent gold glass shade made by Loetz, is 14 inches high. The signed lamp sold this spring for $3,750 at Rago Arts and Auction Center in Lambertville, N.J. It must be used with a low-wattage electric bulb because the glass lampshade would be damaged by too much heat.

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APPETIZER Blackened Sea Scallops with pineapple-mango salsa and agave nectar SCOTCH PAIRING: Macallan 12 SALAD Shulas Steak House Salad with romaine and mixed greens, cucumbers, hearts of palm, asparagus, cherry tomatoes, and Shulas vinaigrette SCOTCH PAIRING: Macallan 15 Fine Oak ENTRE SHULA CUT 12oz. Bone-in Filet Mignon with potato gratin, grilled asparagus and barnaise SCOTCH PAIRING: Macallan 18 DESSERT Seasonal Berries in an almond orentine basket with whipped cream and raspberry coulis SCOTCH PAIRING: Highland Park 18 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 C15 Dinner Daily at 5:00pm Open Sunday for Brunch 10:30-2:00pm Happy Hour 4-6pm Live Music in the Tavern~ THE CLAW BAR at TIERNEYS TAVERN ~OPEN ALL DAY239.591.3837 799 WALKERBILT RD., NAPLES Located off US 41, 1/4 mile North of Immokalee Rd.(239) 591-3837 WWW.BAYHOUSENAPLES.COM ON THE RIVER BEAUTIFUL UPPER NAPLES THIS WEEK ON WGCUTV THURSDAY, MAY 23, 9 P.M. Doc Martin Driving Mr. McLynn Aunt Joan is involved in a car crash with the McLynns. Martin reveals to Edith that he has applied for the surgeons job in London. Martin sees the McLynns behaving oddly, and makes an astonishing diagnosis. FRIDAY, MAY 24, 9 P.M. Live from Lincoln Center Audra McDonald: Go Back Home Join five-time Tony Award-winner and series host Audra McDonald as she takes a turn as the featured performer, singing songs from her new album and other favorites in a spring concert at Avery Fisher Hall. SATURDAY, MAY 25, 10:30 P.M. Yes Minister This classic British comedy follows Right Honorable James Hacker, minister for Administrative Affairs, and his attempts to make officialdom and administration make sense. He does this while pushing his own agenda, and keeping his head above any nasty political waters. SUNDAY, MAY 26, 8 P.M. National Memorial Day Concert Join Gary Sinise and Joe Mantegna for a night of remembrance featuring an allstar line-up performing with the National Symphony Orchestra. The 24th annual broadcast airs live from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol before a concert audience of hundreds of thousands, millions more at home, and to our troops around the world. MONDAY, MAY 27, 8 P.M. Antiques Roadshow Seattle Hour 3 Appraiser Ted Trotta discusses Northwest Coast Indian masks. Other notable finds include a moose, elk and buffalo hide chair; a 1880s Crazy Quilt; and a white Steiff clown bear worth $2,500$3,200. TUESDAY, MAY 28, 9 P.M. Constitution USA with Peter Sagal Built to Last Sagal considers why our own founding document has lasted more than 225 years. He looks at the systems that have kept the Constitution healthy and also at the political forces that threaten to undermine the framers vision: excessive partisanship leading to gridlock, money in politics and gerrymandering. WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 8 P.M. Nature The Himalayas The Himalayan mountain system is the planets highest and home to the worlds highest peaks. Explore the diversity of wildlife and habitats of this mountain chain starring the mysterious snow leopard.

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FLORIDA WEEKLYC16 WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 Bring this ad and receive 6 months FREE when you join! Hassle-Free. Your boat is clean, fueled up and waiting at the dock. All you have to do is show up, and start making memories! ~ Inshore and Offshore Fishing, Deck, Pontoons and Bowriders ~ ~ Access to over 65 locations nationwide ~ ~ No maintenance or cleaning... ever ~ Call today for an affordable, hassle-free, fun alternative to boat ownership. FreedomBoatClub.com877-804-0402 OPEN HOUSEVisit any one of our Open House locations for refreshments and a Boat Ride. BRING THE FAMILY!Sat., May 25th ~ 10am 4pmBONITA SPRINGS 26107 Hickory Blvd. FT. MYERS Salty Sams Marina 2500 Main St.Sun., May 26th ~ 10am 4pmNAPLES 495 Bayfront Place Redeemable at: Ritas of Naples Plaza 2045 Tamiami Trail North (On US 41 Across From Coastland Mall) Naples, FL 34102239-41-RITASwww.ritasnaples.comOnly place in Naples where you can get fresh Italian Ice made daily on premises! ZAGAT RATED #1 CUSTARD/ICE CREAM 2012 Now Offering: Unlimited Topping Sundaes Customizable Yogen Fruz Yogurt Milkshakes & much, much more!COME ON IN & SEE WHY WE'RE VOTED THE BEST! 25 % OFFyour orderNot to be combined with additional discounts. Exp. 6/6/13 Bulk sales excluded from discounts, such as quarts, party buckets and catering. The Naples Art Association recently recognized five member artists with top awards for their work in the new exhibition, Words, Signs and Symbols. The exhibition is on view through June 1 at The von Liebig Art Center. Admission is free, but donations are accepted to support the nonprofit services and programming of the Naples Art Association. Art Association members earn top awards Betsy Gandy, Road Kill, mixed media, 2012. Best of Show. Marie Kinnear, Hortus Meus, (diptych), mixed media, 2012. Jurors Choice Award. Mary Love, Eat Pray Love, digital photograph on aluminum, 2011. Jurors Choice Award. Pre-Owned Womens, Mens & ChildrensDesigner Fashions with Impeccable Style & Sophistication Resale! Consignment! Trade!Anne Taylor | BCBG | Chanel Tory Burch Gucci Jimmy Choo Louis Vuitton Michael Kors Theory | True Religionand many more!At the Shoppes at Vanderbilt2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road #178 | Naples(239) 596-5044www.truefashionistasresale.com $5.00OFFa Purchase of $50Coupon required at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per day per person. Not valid with any other offers or specials. Expires 5/31/13 FW $10.00OFFa Purchase of $100Coupon required at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per day per person. Not valid with any other offers or specials. Expires 5/31/13 FW We have EXPANDED... We now have more space to offer you extraordinary FABULOUSNESS!

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Contact us today to schedule your treatment!239-352-5554 or visit www.dr-pena.comAs seen on the Today Show with Kathie Lee! Skin tightening as wel l as targeted fat volume reduction Fast treatment no downtime Body and Face treatments Completely noninvasive and painless Excellent results in 4 sessions or lessMUFFIN TOP WEIGHING YOU DOWN? EXILISTargeted Fat Reduction and Facial Rejuvenation Warm Sculpting La Piel Spa 239.348.7362 6370 Pine Ridge Road | Suite 101 Naples, FL 34119www.dr-pena.comFRAXEL LASER RESURFACING NO DOWNTIME, LOOKS LIKE YOU SPENT THE DAY IN THE SUN! CAN BE USED TO TREAT GENERAL SKIN TONE, FINE LINES, ACNE & GENERAL SCARRING, HYPERPIGMENTA TION (BROWN SPOTS) MEDIAS # 1 SKIN REJUVENATION TREATMENTFREE CONSULTATION OFFERED TO LEARN MORE. Board Certi ed Plastic Surgeon my smile lines the least bit funny. As a way of saying thank you to all of our customers we want to make the following specials available. $5.00 OFF Your Market Purchase! (Minimum purchase of $25.00) Cannot be combined with any other offer. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 5/23/13 Buy One Market Sandwich GET ONE FREE! Cannot be combined with any other offer. Limit one per customer, must have coupon at the time of purchase. Good thru 5/23/13 A VERY UNIQUE MARKET, RESTAURANT, DELI, CATERING FOOD PLACE David Fuller, Bad Advice, acrylic on board, 2012. First Place. Tanya Trinkaus Glass, Chicken Feed, pastel on paper, 2013. Jurors Choice Award. 968 Second Avenue North in Naples MonSat, 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 239.434.7115 www.optionsnaples.org Owned & operated by:Condential 24-hour crisis line: www.naplesshelter.orgFREE Pick-Up of Furniture Donations.NEW ARRIVALS DAILY!Donation or PurchaseWE RELY ON YOUR GENEROSITY TO CHANGE LIVES.ESTATE SALE!Saturday, May 25th9:30 4:30 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 C17

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FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 I will take pictures of your...Business Family Gathering Holiday or Birthda y Party Gala Ball Auction and mor e!(c) PAPARAZI / www.fotosearch.comEvent Photography239-821-9774MediaNaples.com Stephen@medianaples.comin Naples BAR WARS Beginning June 2 EVERY SUNDAY featuring NAPLES MOST ELITE BARTENDERS 4-10 PM Call for Competition DetailsRedeem this to the hostess on your next visit and receive a Complimentary Cocktail. Call for Competition Details: (239) 530-2225 489 Bayfront Place | Naples, FL 34102 239.431.6341NaplesDesignerDivas.comThe Shoppes at Vanderbilt Suite 1362355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples naples designer divasNo Appt. Necessary Resale Cash on the Spot We Buy & Consign Items in Mint Condition 12-18 Months Young 20% OFF with this ad. Expires 5-30-13 now buying and selling all fashion trendy clothing DESIGNERS ANTHROPOLOGIE | BCBG | BURBERRY CACHE | CHANEL | CO ACH | FENDI FREE PEOPLE | GUCCI | JIMMY CHOO JUICY COUTURE | KATE SPADE LILY PULITZER | LOUIS VUITTON MICHAEL KORS | TIFFANY & CO. TORY BURCH | VERA BRADLEY WHITE HOUSE BLACK MARKETPlus High-End Brands for Women, Men and Juniors New Items Below Wholesale Prices! CONTRACT BRIDGEFamous handBY STEVE BECKERTheres a play in bridge you wont find in any of the textbooks. Its called the Alcatraz Coup, and the reason its omitted is that the play amounts to cheating. The Alcatraz Coup, as might be surmised, originated in Alcatraz. Who invented it is in dispute, but its many practitioners include some of the most distinguished members of the rogues gallery. The first use of the play occurred in this deal. West led the spade king and shifted to a heart, ruffed by East. East returned a club to partners ace and got another heart ruff, securing the fourth trick for the defense. East then led a spade, ruffed by South. Declarer played a diamond to the king and a diamond back, East following suit with the ten. South was now at the critical point of the play. Only one diamond, the queen, was missing, and the question was whether to finesse or play the ace. South analyzed the situation thoroughly. He reasoned that Easts original distribution was either 5-0-4-4 or 4-05-4. If East started with five diamonds, finessing the jack was essential; but if East began with only four diamonds, going up with the ace would be the winning play. South eventually came up with a unique solution. On Easts ten of diamonds he played the ace of hearts! West did not even look at Souths card and mechanically followed with the queen of diamonds. South thereupon corrected his deliberate revoke by substituting the diamond ace for the heart ace and so made the contract. Of course, players who practice such shenanigans eventually get ostracized, and it was no different for South, who was sentenced to a period of solitary confinement away from the bridge table by his peers. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. Got Download?Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comThe iPad AppSearch Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C19 SOCIETY ArtisNaples Community DayWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1 Musicians Polo Rubeo, Patricia Villegas and Abel Limones 2 Susie and Gracie Rosbottom studying sculpture 3 Cori Scheft and Zachary Paul 4. Daniel Sergui tests the trumpet 5. Joseph Martinez and balloon artist Michael Bey 6. Berkley Hill learns violin from Mitch Norgart 7. Bilingual storyteller Carrie Sue Ayvar 8. Emmilie Kaiser and Michele HellingsAlex and Ariana Russano flank Dezree MacDonough 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8STEPHEN WRIGHT / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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SOCIETY Community School of Naples hosts Savor the Flavor We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.TIM GIBBONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY p er. S g o to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we co d i d ki h l d h f i h i W e take more society and networkin g photos at area events than we can t in the newspa p 1 2 3 4 6 7 5 9 8 10 1 Howard and Judy Harper, Tom Elrod and Allyson MacLean 2 Mary Rowe, Angela Esperti, Madison McKenzie and Addy Brown 3 Tom Butz and Sandi Cossarini 4. Maria and William Nice 5. Toni Ann Singh 6. Katherine and Debbie Shipers 7. Bob Goldman and Melanie Solis 8. Cindy Gaye and Sara Storey 9. Shannon and Jon Pertchik 10. Cyndee and Bill VerhelleRobin Schiller and Andrea Lindemann www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC20 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013

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SOCIETY Diamond Volunteer reception honoring The Brody ProjectWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOS ArtsNaples Latin Film Night at Silverspot Cinema Shelly Baron, Bunny Kaufman, Diane Moserowitz and Phyliss Titlebaum Ellen Goldberg with Shannon and Zach Franklin Ann and Bill Hoffman MARLA OTTENSTEIN / FLORIDA WEEKLYTom and Carolyn Bruno with Cheryl Sturgeon Michael and Susanna Brennan Janet Rossano, Paula Brody, Karen Lasker and Kelly Capolino Carolyn Bruno and Frank Russen T TheBrodyProject The Brod y Pro j ect Adam and Rachel Keriek Florida Weekly is now FREE across all platforms.FREE FOR ALL Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Local content. When you want it. How you want it. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C21

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 PAST REPASTSHere are some capsule summaries of previous restaurant reviews:Agave Southwestern Grill, 2380 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples; 5983473: A blend of Northern Mexican and American Southwestern cuisines, the menu puts a sophisticated spin on humble, homespun food the likes of which hasnt previously been seen in Southwest Florida. Brought to us by the folks behind Angelinas Ristorante in Bonita Springs, Agave is a great concept executed with panache. The restaurant pays tribute to the agave plant with 200 varieties of tequila, which can be ordered in flights so you can compare; for those less inclined to take it straight there are delicious fruit-and-herb-infused margaritas. Sumptuous guacamole is turned out tableside with your choice of ingredients such as roasted garlic, queso fresco and bacon. From a quickly marinated seafood ceviche to a sl owly simmered poblano mole, dishes highlight flavorful ingredients and skillful cooking while never sacrificing authenticity. We only scratched the surface of the far-reaching menu and eagerly await a chance to return. Reservations are strongly recommended. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed October 2011Big Hickory Seafood Grille, 26107 Hickory Blvd., Bonita Springs; 9920991: For years, the restaurant has been known for pairing seafood with unlikely ingredients grouper and bananas, for example and thus showcasing the flavors of Florida and the Caribbean in innovative ways. Its location exploits the rustic charm of a marina that dates to 1969 and affords an impressive view of bay waters, mangrove islands and the finned and feathered inhabitants of each. The apple mango grouper is the restaurants latest fruit-and-fish combination and it upholds the tasty tradition. The fish was nicely bronzed and its thick flakes perfectly moist; the sweetness of the applemango salsa served on top was nicely contrasted by a tart passion fruit sauce. Some dishes seem overpriced, such as the better-than-average conch fritters at $14 for a half-dozen, but the generously portioned shrimp and lobster scampi is worth every penny at $29. Beer and wine served. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed June 2012Citrus, 457 Fifth Ave. S., Naples; 435-0408: Citrus has the potential to run with the big dogs on restaurantrich Fifth Avenue. The seafood-centric menu celebrates the bounty of the Gulf and the Atlantic with selections from locally harvested stone crab and hogfish to New England-style clam bakes. The dining room is appealing, with its beautifully stylized fruit trees rendered in delicate strokes on the walls. Although our entrees delivered what they promised, the appetizers were disappointingly middle of the road. Furthermore, the servers were dressed in shorts or jeans with shirts untucked, which creates a slovenly first impression on a starchy street where even linen shirts wouldnt dream of wrinkling. For starters, the Maine lobster purses lacked lobster flavor while the Florida fish cakes tasted too fishy. On the other hand, a simply seared lane snapper with tempura asparagus was very well executed and a roast duck had super-crisp skin and moist meat. It might be best to skip appetizers and go straight to the entrees. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed November 2012Maguro Sushi & Steak House, 895 Wiggins Pass Road, Naples; 5910003: Easily accessible but not so easy to find, Maguro is worth seeking out. Tucked into an outparcel at the corner of U.S. 41 and Wiggins Pass Road (sharing a parking lot with Beall's, Petco and other big-boxers), Maguro offers well-executed sushi and cooked entrees in one dining room and the full teppanyaki show and meal in another, both drenched in cool blue lights. The drink menu is inventive, too. I particularly liked the lychee martini. As for the food, everything we tasted, from the yellowtail nigiri to the Snow White roll (shrimp tempura and sliced cucumber, seaweed and rice topped with white tuna and unsweetened coconut, finished with spicy mayo and coconut sauce) to the miso soup, vegetable tempura and the shrimp and salmon hibachi combo, was carefully prepared and plated. The coconut bombe with layers of coconut cake, coconut custard and coconut icing proved an excellent finale for two. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed February 2013Texas Tonys BBQ Shack,4519 Tamiami Trail East, Naples; 732-8392: A side venture of the Phelan family, owners of the locally grown Pinchers Crab Shacks, Texas Tonys is plastered with Lone Star State flags, horseshoes and longhorn antlers. Aside from a few fixable flaws, Texas Tonys could serve as a successful new chain concept. The loaded chopped pork nachos did not showcase the meat as well as it should have, and the boom boom shrimp lost their batter in a sea of spicy cream sauce. But the spice-rubbed baby back ribs had a good, charry bark along the edges, while the meat remained incredibly tender and had the all-important pink smoke ring. A quarter chicken was super-moist, and the meat slipped easily off the bone. Its darkly varnished skin was visible evidence of the restaurants smoker, which uses orangewood a subtle alternative to the stronger hickory or oak. The star of the meal was the Texan, a huge sandwich of super-tender brisket, cole slaw, pickles, onions and barbecue sauce served on Texas toast. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed October 2012 Key to ratings Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor FISHRESTAURANT Located in Venetian Village STEAMED WITH BUTTER AND PARMESAN TRUFFLE FRIESLobster SundayFish: 4360 Gulf Shore Blvd. N., Naples Online Reservations Available The Show www.bobharden.comNews and commentary you can use to help you enjoy life on the Paradise Coast.Streamed live, Monday-Friday, 7-8 a.m. The show is archived for your listening convenience. Brought to you in part by w w w w w w News and c o N n use to hel ca n o n t h e P a r a M Th e B like us on facebook BARBECUE IS WHAT WE DO LET US DO IT FOR YOU!In Lee & Collier Counties Call Our Catering Manager at (239) 209-0940 Catering Services from 25 5,000 www.ribcity.com Catering! Our Award Winning Baby Back Ribs, Chicken, Pork and Beef accompanied by our homemade Cole Slaw and Baked Beans can be brought to your event by our mobile char-grill.

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EARLY DINNER2 Entres & a Bottle of Wine by Coastal Vines, CA $ 34.95Offered Daily 4pm-Closing 700 Fifth Ave. S., Naples, FL 34102 239.659.7008 | www.VerginaR estaurant.com | Live Entertainment Daily from 8:30pmFine Mediterranean Cuisine BAR SPECIALAny 2 Items from our AlFresco Menu & a Bottle of Wine $ 29.95Offered Daily 3:30-7pm In the Bar Lounge OnlyLUNCH SPECIALMain Course & Soda, Coffee or Iced Tea $ 12.95Offered Daily for Lunch NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 23-29, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C23 CUISINENew Naples restaurant showcases fresh, local ingredientsThe Local has opened in Naples, with a farmand sea-to-table menu featuring a wealth of locally sourced ingredients. Not only is the menu impressive, so are the credentials of the men running the show. Owner Jeff Mitchell is a graduate of both the Culinary Institute of America and the University of Wisconsin, with more than a decade of experience at The Ritz-Carlton, D'Amico & Partners and Cafe and Bar Lurcat in Naples. Chef de Cuisine Rich Demarse is also a CIA grad whose culinary repertoire features family recipes and favorites inspired by his travels through Europe, his Italian grandmother's cooking and Sunday suppers at his family home, where he learned to appreciate the way in which food brings people together. "The abundant seafood and long growing season in Florida inspire our menu and passion for our food," says Mr. Mitchell. "Although there are many great restaurants here in Naples, none of them focus on locally sourced ingredients. Our menu will change with the seasons." The restaurant uses organic produce from Worden, Inyoni and Wild Heritage farms, Winter Park Dairy cheese as well as locally harvested fish and seafood. The menu lists local products in bold print. Among the specialties are roasted pork ragu with house-made potato gnocchi, ricotta and rosemary; Pine Island clams with linguini, white wine, garlic and fresh herbs; braised lamb with house-made silk handkerchiefs, peas and mint pesto; and snapper ceviche tostada with citrus, Serrano peppers, avocado, red onion and cilantro. The wine and beer list features mostly artisanal selections, with 18 wines by the glass, 75 wines priced at less than $75, at least five beers on tap and 25 by the bottle. The Local is at 5323 Airport Pulling Road. It's open for lunch and dinner. For more information, visit www.thelocalnaples.com or call 596-FARM (3276). Summer wine specials at Agave and Angelina'sAgave Southwestern Grill and Tequila Bar in Naples and Angelina's Ristorante in Bonita Springs are offering year-round residents wines at half price throughout the summer. Through Sept. 30, Agave patrons receive a 50 percent discount on all bottles of wine valued up to $100 with the purchase of two entrees in the dining room. Winner of the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence 2012, Agave serves contemporary Southwestern cuisine emphasizing house-smoked meats and dish. In addition to wine, it offers 200 tequilas and mezcals. On Wednesday, May 29, Agave will hold a four-course tequila dinner featuring Cuestion Tequila paired with dishes created by Executive Chef Juan De la Rosa. It's $80 per couple. Reservations are required. The menu includes butter-poached lobster with roasted mushroom and Gulf shrimp crepe; pan-seared striped bass with tempurastyle sweet potatoes, chipotle-corn nage and avocado-tomatillo relish; braised beef short ribs; and margarita cheesecake. Agave is open 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday and Monday, 11:30 a.m.-midnight Tuesday through Saturday. It's at 2380 Vanderbilt Beach Road in North Naples. For details, visit www.agavenaples.com or call 598-3473. Through Sept. 28, Angelina's patrons may order any wine valued up to $175 and receive a 50 percent discount. The offer is good with the purchase of an entree. The only Lee County restaurant to win the Wine Spectator Best of Award of Excellence in 2012, Angelina's extensive wine list features many popular, affordable (53 percent are priced at less than $100), sought-after vintages and exclusive labels. The restaurant serves classic Italian cuisine and features a 30-foot wine tower with more than 4,000 bottles of wine. It's open 5-9 p.m. Sunday and 5-10 p.m. Monday through Saturday until July 1, when it will close on Mondays and open at 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Angelina's is at 24041 S. Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs. Call 390-3187 or visit www.angelinasofbonitasprings.com.Short subjects Noodles Italian Cafe & Sushi Bar offers an early bird dining special Italian steak feast through Friday, May 31. The $29.95 dinner for two features grilled sirloin steak with mushroom Marsala sauce, mashed potatoes and vegetables and a bottle of CK Mondavi cabernet or chardonnay. Orders must be placed by 6 p.m. Noodles is at 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples. Call 592-0050 or visit www.noodlescafe.com. Bleu Provence's newly redecorated Crayton Room has the feel of the French Caribbean. And on Sunday through Wednesday nights throughout the summer, it is now St. Bart's Cafe, with a new menu, tropical drinks, summer wines and live tropical music. It's at 1234 8th St. South in Naples. Call 261-8239 or visit www.bleuprovencenaples. com. Chez Boet now offers French Happy Hour 5-8 p.m. every Wednesday. Served in the restaurant's bar, it features two-for-one wine by the glass, well cocktails and beer, $5 small plates and French TV-5 Monde nightly news (at 6:30 p.m.) For details and reservations, call 643-6177 or visit www. chezboetnaples.com. AZN now offers its summer couples menu, which features a choice of two entrees and a bottle of Coastal Vines wine. it's available from 4 p.m. until closing Sunday through Thursday. Entrees are divided into two groups. For $30 per couple, choose from dishes such as pad Thai noodle, seven flavor basil beef, Wanchai walnut shrimp or three other entrees. For $50 per couple, try snapper Oscar, caramelized salmon, black and blue tuna, Korean beef short ribs or Cantonese roasted duck. AZN is at Mercato, 9118 Strada Place, Naples. Call 593-8818 or visit www.aznrestaurant.com. competition and a fishmonger faceoff 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday, May 23, featuring meat-cutters and fishmongers from stores around Florida competing in the regional semi-finals. Me at cutters start at 11 a.m. in the meat department. Fishmongers start at 11:45 a.m. in the seafood department. On Saturday, May 25, from noon-3 p.m., the summer barbecue takes place, featuring music and barbecue (chicken or pulled pork) for $7.99 a plate, which also includes baked beans and cole slaw. It's at Mercato, 9101 Strada Place, in Naples. S a B i o karenFELDMANcuisine@floridaweekly.com

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239 692-9449 www.evnaples.com837 Fifth Avenue South Naples, FL 34102 475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34108 Downtown Naples North Naples Your Local Guide to Worldwide Real Estate. Memorial Day and every day, we honor and remember. Memorial Day and every day, w e honor and r emember.