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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Naples, FL
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English
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Periodicals -- Naples (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Collier County -- Naples

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 2-8, 2008)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038797485 ( OCLC )
2018226752 ( LCCN )
on1038797485
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BILL CORNWELL A2 OPINION A4 NONPROFIT NEWS A20 HEALTHY LIVING A22 PETS A26 MOTLEY FOOL B6 REAL ESTATE B9 ARTISTS AMONG US C3 EVENTS C6 FILM REVIEW C11 SAVE THE DATE C16-18 CUISINE C22-23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. III, No. 51 FREE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. All or nothingWhen Twinkle sings, she gives up everything shes got. C1 A grand openingSee who celebrated at Agave Southwestern Grill, and more fun around town. C19, 21 Flights to CubaSWFL cleared for takeoff, but there are no takers. B1 New hostFarm City BBQ will set up at Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard this year. A13 BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@ oridaweekly.com Reserve Sept. 24 for National Estuaries DayBy land and by sea, the Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve offers numerous interactive ways for visitors to explore the environment as part of National Estuaries Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Start at the Environmental Learning Center, 300 Tower Road, and hop on a bus for a short ride down Shell Island Road to board the Good Fortune pontoon boat, courtesy of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida. Leading half-hour tours on the calm waters of the reserve, naturalists will discuss the areas flora and fauna from mangroves and palms to pelicans and bottlenose dolphins. If paddling floats your boat, guided kayak trips on Henderson Creek will give visitors a half-hour taste of the two-hour tours Rookery Bay conducts weekly through Hall Bay and Rookery Bay, including mangrove tunnels. Participants must be age 12 or older, and anyone under 18 must register and paddle with an adult. There is a weight limit of 250 pounds. And for those who want to try stand-up paddling, staff from the Old Naples Surf Shop will be on hand with 12-foot paddleboards for guests to try out on Henderson Creek. There arent any size or weight restrictions, but parents must sign waivers for youth under 18. Those who venture out in kayaks or on paddleboards should anticipate wet feet. National Estuaries Day also includes plenty of land-based activities. Enjoy a naturalist-led walk along the half-mile coquina shell Snail Trail, and then veer off to explore a mile or so of unpaved trail. Watch the waterbased activities from the pedestrian bridge that spans Henderson Creek or the observation platform along WAY BACK WHEN, LONGTIME residents of Naples may recall, there was a saying that went something like this: Life begins on U.S. 41 and life ends on U.S. 41. It might have been a bit hyperbolic, but it was an acknowledgement of the role the highway, which runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, has played in the history and growth of Naples. Anything that tinkers with such an iconic symbol is bound to raise eyebrows. And that was the case last May when city officials discussed and debated a plan that would drastically alter the configuration of U.S. 41. At the core of the proposal is a request by the city that the state redesignate a 2-mile section of the road. Basically, the city wants the state, which has control of the highway, to reroute U.S. 41 at Golden Gate Parkway eastward to the Coastland Center mall. The highway would then turn south at SEE ESTUARIES, A6 SEE REROUTE, A8 Officials agree: Rerouting is a long way off, if everCOURTESY PHOTONaturalists will tell visitors about the plants, animals and human history of the estuary as they walk along the Snail Trail.From what we have seen so far, the relocation of U.S. 41 does not appear to be viable. Johnny Limbaugh, DOTIMAGES FROM CITY OF NAPLES CRARenderings of the proposed U.S. 41 route change and pedestrian-friendly improvements 41FACE LIFT? CURRENT U.S. 41 PROPOSED REROUTESPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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Dr. Jamie E. Weaver, DPM Foot and Ankle Surgeon DR. JAMIE E. WEAVER, DPM the latest addition to the Joint Replacement Institute, will further the Institutes goal to provide comprehensive orthopedic care as a specialist in Foot and Ankle Surgery. She has distinguished herself as a podiatric physician who offers complete patient care with stateof-the-art treatment modalities and surgical techniques. Keeping patients pain free and active is both her passion and her mission. NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Privileges at BCHC | Most Insurances Accepted Specializing in FOOT & ANKLE SURGERYBunion and Hammertoe Surgery Diabetic Foot Care Laser Therapy for Toenail Fungus PodoPediatrics: Flat Feet and Toe Walkers Achilles Tendonitis Heel Pain/Plantar Fascitis Arthritis Management: Foot and Ankle Sports Medicine Neuropathy 239 676. 2663 (BONE) www.JointInstituteFL.com 3501 Health Center Boulevard, Suite # 2180 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 Monday Friday 8:30 AM 5 PM www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Death, which has faced severe public relations challenges for several millennia, now seems poised for an image makeover. At a recent debate among Republican presidential hopefuls, there were cries from the audience of yeah and yes (accompanied by a smattering of applause) when the moderator asked if a comatose 30-year-old man without health insurance should be left to die. But that was small potatoes compared to the bring-down-the-house ovation that erupted in another GOP debate when it was pointed out that Texas Gov. Rick Perry has presided over 234 executions. The death cheers were both unseemly and ghoulish. But setting aside those considerations, the cheering over Gov. Perrys record could prove useful in reigniting a national debate over the death penalty. There are two high-profile and hotly debated cases involving death row inmates in Georgia and Texas right now. In Georgia, a man awaits execution despite the recantations of most of the witnesses who testified against him at trial. In Texas, the United States Supreme Court has stayed an execution because the prosecution employed racially motivated arguments, which a jury never should have heard. I doubt that any of this will be enough to start a serious debate over the death penalty and how it is applied. That is a shame, but it is imminently understandable. When a nation is in the midst of the greatest economic downturn in 80 years, social issues like the death penalty are assigned seats in the back row. People are more concerned about finding jobs, saving their homes and putting food on the table. It would be a lost opportunity, however, if we didnt at least devote some thought to the subject. Before some tea partier dismisses me as just another bleeding heart, I should make something very clear. I favor the death penalty, in theory. Some crimes are so vicious and such an affront to a civilized society that death is the logical, and just, penalty. Revenge, in my view, can be cathartic. So, if the death penalty were applied equitably across the board and with an abundance of deliberation, Id be just fine with it. But I know, you know and I suspect even those dolts who cheered during the debate know there are two systems of justice in this country: one for the affluent and one for the indigent. The difference between those who cheered the killing of 234 people and me is that I care. They do not. For decades, especially in the Deep South, race was the determining factor in death penalty cases. A black person killing a white person would be a capital case. Reverse that scenario and youd be looking at a lesser charge that did not involve execution. While I do not dispute that race is still a factor, candidates for the death penalty nowadays seem to be selected more along the lines of how much money they have in the bank. Remember O.J. Simpson? The two murders in that case were horribly brutal and obviously carried out with premeditation, an essential element in murder in the first degree, which brings with it the death penalty. Prosecutors instead chose to charge Mr. Simpson with second-degree murder, a non-capital offense. Mr. Simpson is black. Mr. Simpson at that time was also rich, and he employed a Dream Team of defense attorneys. Not only did Mr. Simpson escape death row, he was acquitted. Another example of this two-tier system of justice is on display in Florida. Bob Ward, a wealthy developer in Orlando, stands trial for murdering his wife. He is accused of shooting her squarely between eyes at short range. Following the shooting, Mr. Ward telephoned 911 and said five times and in a voice colder than a gravediggers I just shot my wife. Mr. Ward contends it was an accident, but he had a strong motive for murder. His wife was soon to give a deposition in an investigation into Mr. Wards shadowy finances. Even with all that, prosecutors decided not to seek the death penalty against Mr. Ward, who was caught on a jailhouse security camera performing an impromptu strip tease for two female visitors, who just happened to be his dead wifes sister and his daughter.No millionaire has been executed in the United States. Some long-ago mobsters who amassed fortunes through illicit means have been put to death, but thats it. And, yes, quite a few defendants with a net worth of more than $1 million have been taken to trial with cases that could have carried the death penalty if the prosecution had chosen to do so.A study of Georgia capital cases revealed that prosecutors were almost twice as likely to seek the death penalty against defendants who could not afford to hire lawyers on their own. Sure, these people had lawyers appointed for them, but the quality of representation is wildly uneven. Some of these appointed attorneys are simply incompetent and indifferent, while the good ones are buried beneath obscenely heavy workloads. Returning to Texas, there was a case there in which a man was sentenced to death. It came to light that his elderly attorney had slept through most of the proceedings. The attorney even admitted to it, saying that at his age he had to have periodic snoozes throughout the day. A Texas judge reviewing the case had this to say: The Constitution says that everyones entitled to an attorney of their choice. But the Constitution does not say the lawyer has to be awake. This cavalier approach to the ultimate punishment invariably raises the specter of innocent people being put to death. We know that has happened, but it doesnt seem to register with people who hoot and holler at debates. A study by Northwestern University School of Laws Centre for Wrongful Convictions had, by 2009, documented 38 executions that were carried out despite compelling evidence the person was innocent or the presence of serious doubt about guilt. It is past time that we admit the process of sending people to their death is flawed. We have two choices: Either fix the system or take the death penalty off the table all together. Sadly, I see nothing to indicate that we, as a people, are inclined to do anything at all, other than cheer and bellow when demagogues use human lives as campaign props. COMMENTARYThree cheers for death! i i t p P j t billCORNWELL bcornwell@floridaweekly.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 A penny is 1 percent of a dollar, a dollar is 1 percent of a yard, and a yard a hundred bucks is 1 percent of ten grand. Its not much, 1 percent, but thats never the question. In poker or percentages, either one, the question is always this: Is it enough? Were a mere 300 Spartans enough against the invading Persians at the Battle of Thermopylae, in September of 480 B.C.? Were 300 members of the U.S. 7th Cavalry enough at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, in June of 1876? Was the first small wave of the Second Marine Division, which tried to wade ashore at low tide from about 500 yards out over sharp coral, enough at the battle of Tarawa, beginning Nov. 20, 1943? (One of my uncles was there, and he was not enough. But he managed to get to the beach and last about 30 minutes, Ive been told.) One percent. I began thinking about the numbers last week when I read the following sentence in a look back at the decade since 9/11. In the Sept. 12 issue of The New Yorker Magazine, George Packer wrote: Without a draft, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been fought by less than 1 percent of the (American) population. Not 1 percent. Less than 1 percent. Is it enough? Would a full 1 percent be enough or 2 percent or 10 percent? Shortly after I digested this uncomfortably compelling statistic, that pip-squeak percentage 1 percent started popping up like a jackrabbit in good grass, all over the place. And the more I thought about it, the more it demanded my attention. One in 100 American adults are behind bars. Roughly one in 100 lawyers lose their licenses to practice law by misbehaving (only one in 100? That cant be right). About one in 100 female adolescents suffer from the eating disorder anorexia, and one in 100 African Americans inherit a gallery of family forbears that includes at least 50 percent European ancestry. (Maybe for them, thats similar to having anorexia or skin cancer or something you just hope you can get over it.) And guess what? Only 1 percent of todays babies have the names Emma or Jacob, currently rated the most popular. Thats a lot more than merely 1 percent relief, at least to me. Sometimes one in 100 is just plain ugly Jane. One percent of American households, for example, hold about 43 percent of the financial wealth in the nation, defined as total net worth minus the value of ones home. One percent. Meanwhile, we all share the suffering together if not in war, then in dollars. But some of us share a little more suffering than others. The median household last year suffered a 36.1 percent plummet in wealth, defined as marketable assets (a term that too audibly suggests the primary economic strategy of practitioners of the worlds oldest profession). The top 1 percent, on the other hand, endured an 11.1 percent drop. That means if you had $100 million and you lost 11.1 percent of it, youd be down a whopping $11.1 million, which is a lot worse than having, say, $100,000 and losing a mere 36.1 percent. In that case youd only bleed out $36,100, which is no cause for whining. Two conclusions can be drawn (probably by the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans): One, clearly its much more difficult to be rich. And two, poor people or middle class people complain a lot. By the way, those percentages arent made up. You can find them and trace their reputable academic sources in a variety of ways, including by visiting www.sociology. ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth. html, where Prof. G. William Dumhoff summarizes the numbers. Or by checking the recent work of the economist Edward M. Wolff at New York University. Meanwhile, the academics point out that since the median workers pay these days is roughly $36,000, and the median remuneration for CEOs across the board last year was about $3.9 million, workers make less than 1 percent of what their top bosses earn. Of course, the CEOs of Standard & Poors 500 firms take in $10.6 million, or about 300 percent more than the median income of workers, and those heading Dow-Jones companies have median annual incomes of $19.8 million, or about 550 percent more. But whats a few million among friends and patriots? I have this in common with Dick Cheney, the former vice president of the country as well as a former Halliburton chairman who received a $33.7 million retirement package when he joined George W. Bush to run for public office: I, too, am fixated on 1 percent. Mr. Cheney established the 1 percent doctrine that helped lead us into Iraq in search of weapons of mass destruction. If a perceived threat had even a 1 percent chance of being real, he said, we have to treat it as a certainty in terms of our response. That attitude created the severing of fact-based analysis from forceful response, according to the Pulitzer-Prize winning writer Ron Suskind in his book, The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside Americas Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11. Its sadder than that, too. With no draft with only 1 percent of Americans actually fighting a war while the rest of us go to the mall there was little government effort for years to contract for, and buy, better weapons, according to The New Yorkers Mr. Packer. A better Humvee, for example, which several American companies stood ready to make. Such a vehicle could have withstood the increasingly sophisticated IEDs or Improvised Explosive Devices that have killed so many American in Humvees. The Florida dead number more than 260 men and women who once called the Sunshine State home, according to report in last year in the Fort Lauderdale SunSentinel, including 12 from Lee County, nine from Palm Beach County, four from Collier County, one from Charlotte County and one from Hendry County. There probably are more by now. And every one gave not 1 percent, like the nation like you and I have been asked to do but 100 percent. PublisherShelley Lundslund@floridaweekly.comEditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsLois Bolin Bill Cornwell Karen Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Bernadette La Paglia David Michael Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald Bob RaymondCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersPaul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Hope Jason Nick Bear Hannah ArnoneCirculation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Masse nmasse@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing AssistantSandi HughesBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2011 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $29.95 in-county$49.95 in-state $54.95 out-of-state OPINIONThe 1 percent solution o l 5 t s y rogerWILLIAMS rwilliams@floridaweekly.comThe paranoid interpretation of Barack Obamas presidency would be that hes a plant from the libertarian Cato Institute slyly wor king to discredit government. Could the tea party have devised a more diabolical scheme than a liberal president delivering a passionate speech plugging an enormous jobs program that wont work and doing it in grandiose terms that identify it with the historic liberal agenda? About half of the bold-seeming $447 billion President Obama jobs package is an extension and augmentation of an alreadyexisting temporary payroll tax cut. At best, preserving the cut avoids the pain of its lapse. It does put more money in the pockets of workers and, at the margins, reduces the cost of hiring for employers. But a lot of the money will be saved, not spent, by strapped workers, and employers will hire based on market conditions, not a tiny boost from government. President Obamas struggles with the economy are reinforcing the idea that government cant solve problems, and that it cant learn from its mistakes. Already dogged by the false promises of the first stimulus, President Obama has resorted to a second round of dubious assurances. Upon the passage of the first stimulus bill, he touted the shovel-ready infrastructure projects that would create immediate jobs. When few of these jobs materialized, even President Obama joked that theres no such thing as shovel-ready. But needing something, anything to call a jobs bill, hes back to misleadingly selling infrastructure as a short-term jobs measure. In a new twist, he wants $25 billion to refurbish schools. There is no serious evidence that the physical plant at schools in the United States correlates with student performance. John Maynard Keynes once said that even hiring people to dig up buried cash would help in a recession. President Obama wants to bury the cash in schoolyards and pretend its an educational initiative. He wrapped this all in a stirring defense of government. What kind of country would it be if we had no bridges or dams? he asked. This is a straw man a crow could identify from 200 feet away. No one doubts the necessity of infrastructure. But that doesnt mean it should be thought of as a fast-acting jobs program, or that it should trump all fiscal considerations. President Obama invoked Abraham Lincoln as a fellow believer in big, governmentsupported projects. He didnt mention the sweeping transportation scheme supported by President Lincoln as a state legislator in Illinois that collapsed in a heap. It left the state, in the words of a biographer, with an enormous debt and an empty treasury. President Obama could admit that this recession, driven by a financial crisis, isnt susceptible to quick Keynesian cures and focus on fundamental tax and entitlement reforms. Or he could once again put himself and his party behind an expensive measure poorly designed to meet the current crisis and speak of it as government activism at its finest. In choosing the latter, he risks feeding the skepticism of a public whose faith in government is scraping at 50-year lows. Consider it an in-kind contribution to the Rick Perry campaign, from our Manchurian President. Rich Lowry is editor of the National ReviewThe Manchurian president e e i d s s richLOWRY Special to Florida Weekly

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Museum celebrates role of animals in local historyCollier County Museums are highlighting the importance of wild animals in Southwest Floridas rich history with activities in observance of National Museums Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Visitors to the main Collier County Museum will learn about exotic and endangered species in the area and will get an up-close look at some of the animals from Kowiachobee Wildlife Preserve. The movie Dr. Doolittle will be shown, and Safari Sam will turn young visitors into the animals of their choosing with this face-painting expertise. Chic-Fil-A has donated its signature chicken sandwiches for free to all attendees, and the museum will hand out bottled water. The museum is in the Collier County government complex, 3331 Tamiami Trail E. Admission is free. For more information, call 252-8476. Snail Trail. Learn about the research done at Rookery Bay by touring the science labs, and peek through microscopes to see plankton. Kids will love the marine critter touch tank as well as aquariums filled with native fish. They can also make fish prints, watch nature films and have their faces painted. Russells Clambakes and Cookouts will sell lunch near the picnic area on the back lawn.USPS First Day of SaleThe U.S. Postal Service will conduct a First Day of Sale of the new Saving Vanishing Species stamp featuring an Amur tiger cub. The first-class stamp will sell for 55 cents, and net proceeds above the 44-cent cost of postage will go to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. USPS Go Green stamps, which show simple actions people can take to improve the environment, will also be for sale. All activities, including boat trips, are free with the days discounted admission ($3 for ages 13 and older, $2 for ages 6-12). Sign-up forms for the boat trips will be available at 10 a.m. National Estuaries Day event partners include the Conservancys Good Fortune pontoon boat, Cruise Naples, Costco and Old Naples Surf Shop. ESTUARIESFrom page 1 National Estuaries Day>> What: Boat rides, kayak trips, paddleboard demonstrations, nature walks, science lab tours, marine critter touch tank, nature lms, kids crafts, music and more >> Where: Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, 300 Tower Road (south of U.S. 41 on Collier Boulevard) >> When: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 >> Admission: $3 for ages 13 and older, $2 for ages 6-12; free for ages 5 and younger as well as for Friends of Rookery Bay members >> Info: 417-6310 or www.rookerybay.org in the know COURTESY PHOTOThe USPS new Saving Vanishing Species stamp will be available as a First Day of Sale purchase for collectors.COURTESY PHOTOGuided kayak tours on Henderson Creek give even novice paddlers a chance to explore the mangrove wilderness.

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ASL Assistance Available Sales Hours: Service Hours: All oers are mutually exclusive. See dealer for complete details. Special APR and Discount + Rebate oers are mutually exclusi ve. See dealer for complete details. $MPG based on EPA Fuel Consumption Estimates. Actual mileage may vary with driving conditi ons. ***Rotate/Balance Special plus Nitrogen ll: Nitrogen ll for only 4 tires. Coupon not valid with any other oer. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Limit one coupon per person. Coupon does not apply to prior purchases. Other Restrictions may apply. Void where prohibited. All oers are mutual ly exclusive and cannot be combined. Valid at Naples Nissan Only. See dealer for complete details. Coupon Expires 9/23/2011. ^Zero percent oered on select new Nissan models; Must have a 740 or higher credit score and approved credit. **Price and payment based on $3,000 cash down or trade equity; Maximum 72 month term depending on specic vehicle; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; With rates as low as 6.99% APR. Oers expire on date of publication. Not responsible for typographical errors. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. See dealer for details THIS TH THIS THIS HIS WEEKEND WE WEEK WEEK EEKEN EKEN KEND END ONLY! ON NL ONLY ONLY NLY! LY! 38MPG HWYPayment based on $2,995 out of pocket for 39-month lease; Lease is with 12,000 miles per year; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; Excludes taxes, title, license and non-refundable $595 Acquisition Fee. Oer valid only when nanced through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation. See dealer for complete details. 27MPG HWYPayment based on $2,995 out of pocket for 39-month lease; Lease is with 12,000 miles per year; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; Excludes taxes, title, license and non-refundable $595 Acquisition Fee. Oer valid only when nanced through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation. See dealer for complete details. 38MPG HWY All new car payments based on $3,000 cash down or trade equity; Special APR and Discount + Rebate oers are mutually exclusive; Must have 720 or higher credit score. Maximum 72 month term with rates as low as 2.9% APR. See Dealer for Complete details. Payment based on $2,995 out of pocket for 39-month lease; Lease is with 12,000 miles per year; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; Excludes taxes, title, license and non-refundable $595 Acquisition Fee. Oer valid only when nanced through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation. See dealer for complete details. 31MPG HWY 40MPG HWYPayment based on $2,995 out of pocket for 39-month lease; Lease is with 12,000 miles per year; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; Excludes taxes, title, license and non-refundable $595 Acquisition Fee. Oer valid only when nanced through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation. See dealer for complete details. 33MPG HWY Payment based on $2,995 out of pocket for 39-month lease; Lease is with 12,000 miles per year; Must have 730 or higher credit score with approved credit; Excludes taxes, title, license and non-refundable $595 Acquisition Fee. Oer valid only when nanced through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation. See dealer for complete details.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Goodlette-Frank Road before eventually rejoining the current highway. Included in the plan is a proposal that would allow the city to work with the state to reduce the lanes around present-day Ninth Street South from six to four. The state is scheduled to report back to the city next month, and although no official word has been delivered, a spokesman for the Florida Department of Transportation says the proposed redesignation appears to be dead in the water. We are currently evaluating the citys request, but we do not have the all of the data we need to make an official recommendation, says the DOTs Johnny Limbaugh. From what we have seen so far, the relocation of U.S. 41 does not appear to be viable. A preliminary review of the proposal, he adds, shows that it would require upgrading other roads and implementing additional standards that are simply not feasible. Still at play, however, is the lane-reduction proposal, Mr. Limbaugh says. Although the precise location the lane reduction would encompass is hazy, it would roughly extend from the intersection at Golden Gate Parkway to the Four Corners in downtown, where U.S. 41 takes a sharp turn eastward. This idea also faces an uphill battle for a number of reasons. Some 20 years ago, the City Council opposed the widening of U.S. 41 and passed a resolution denouncing it. The state ignored the citys protest and added the two additional lanes anyway. Its difficult to envision a scenario that has the state reversing itself, especially in these austere times. There are competing interests at work here. The city wants to redesignate U.S. 41 and reduce the number of lanes in order to improve parking and also make the road pedestrian friendly. If rerouting were to occur, it possibly would give the city control of the roadway from Golden Gate Parkway all the way through the Four Corners. The states interest, Mr. Limbaugh points out, is ensuring a smooth flow of traffic while also maintaining safety standards. It could be a tough sell to convince the state that reducing lanes is compatible with moving vehicles swiftly and efficiently through the city. Also lost in the hullabaloo is the fact that even if the stars align in the citys favor and the bureaucracy moves at warp speed and funding can be secured, any changes to U.S. 41 are years perhaps decades away. Mr. Limbaugh says the citys proposal is the mere beginning of what could prove to be a long and grueling process that would include Collier County, planning agencies and Lord knows how many more studies. Environmental and social-impact studies certainly would have to be conducted and reviewed, he says. In short, if the city can somehow secure approval, which is a dubious proposition at best, this will be a bureaucratic snarl of epic proportions. It will not be easily resolved. If anything happens at all, it will be many, many years in the future, Mr. Limbaugh says. Vice Mayor John Sorey concurs with Mr. Limbaughs assessment and predicts that if state approval is gained and everything else goes swimmingly, it could be 20 or so years before any real changes could be accomplished. I dont believe that everyone knows this a long-term situation, he says. Nothing is imminent. (The citys point man on the project, Assistant City Manager Roger Reinke, did not respond to several requests for an interview for this article.) Mr. Sorey says the state has yet to inform the city that proposal to redesignate U.S. 41 is not viable. He also notes that no one has any real idea how much redesignation and lane reduction would cost. We havent gotten to the point of putting a cost on it, he says. It would be several million dollars, at least, I would expect. And even if there were a solid estimate of the project cost, he adds, there is no state, federal or city money available to do the work. The prospects for funding in the foreseeable future are bleak. The proposal flies directly into headwinds that prevail in Washington and Tallahassee. Even dangerously deficient bridges and roads cannot secure funding for repairs, and Congress seems to be in no mood to increase infrastructure spending. When, and if, such spending resumes, the plan for U.S. 41 would have to leapfrog projects that involve public safety and other vital interests. Additionally, Naples is home to Gov. Rick Scott, who has instituted widespread and highly controversial budget cuts. The governor would have a hard time justifying politically the expenditure of funds to make a stretch of road pedestrian friendly in his hometown when he has jettisoned more pressing programs in other areas of the state. Mr. Sorey says the city went into this project fully aware of how long it would take to accomplish if it could be accomplished at all. Indeed, the enormous lead time is the reason they got the ball rolling now. Of course, he says, it is impossible to predict what conditions will be in 20 years; a future city council might have other priorities. But Mr. Sorey says the city thinks it is important to begin the process now, and he believes such a plan would be a boon to the city, if it ever could be accomplished. I believe it would reenergize Naples, he says. To be viable, we must, at some point, become pedestrian friendly. Right now were just babystepping our way through what would be a very, very long process if we get approval, which is not certain. Not everyone sees the situation through the same prism as Mr. Sorey. Nick Giannone, owner of the Downtown Naples Barber Shop, is perhaps the most vocal, visible and energetic of the plans critics. Mr. Giannone knows something about battling local government. He was the hero and ultimate victor in the Great Barbershop Pole War of 2007. In that episode, Mr. Giannone locked horns with Collier County, which was seeking to ban swirling poles outside of barbershops. The controversy got fierce, and Mr. Giannone became something of a celebrity. He recalls that a relative in New York emerged from the shower and saw him being interviewed on television. He says the relative stared at the screen and thought, Oh, I wonder what sort of trouble Nick is stirring up now. I really went after (Collier County) on that one, he says proudly. And weve still got the poles. Mr. Giannone maintains rerouting U.S. 41 would kill downtown businesses, and a narrowing of the lanes would be a safety hazard and increase traffic congestion. I predict that this area would start to look like Old U.S. 41, which is nothing but boarded-up and vacant businesses, he adds. I dont know what they are thinking, he says. Theyre trying to fix a problem that doesnt exist. As to the issue of lane reduction, Mr. Giannone says that doesnt make sense. Thats going backwards, he says. Why do we want to go back? We need to be looking ahead. Mr. Giannone says he wasnt aware of the long lead time. Twenty years? the 71-year-old barber asks. Whoa, I dont think Ill even be alive then. Id like to still be alive, but who knows? Not likely. The extended timeline and the Herculean obstacles the proposal faces ease his sense of urgency, he adds. I just didnt know about that. I was under the impression that this was something that might be done pretty soon. Mr. Sorey says anyone expecting quick action will be disappointed, or as in the case of Mr. Giannone greatly relieved. The economy has got to turn around before we can proceed, he says. Even then, it will be a tough task to get this approved and then secure funding. The vice mayor says the story has played out in dribs and drabs, which helps to explain the misunderstanding regarding the plans extended timeline. As with many things, the public got just enough information to be dangerous, he says with a laugh. REROUTEFrom page 1 IMAGES FROM CITY OF NAPLES CRAPedestrian-friendly improvements have little chance of coming to fruition anytime soon.I dont know what they are thinking. Theyre trying to fix a problem that doesnt exist. Nick Giannone, Downtown Naples Barber Shop

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 A9 Every day is cause for celebration when you consider the newest choice in retirement living in the Naples and Marco Island area The Arlington. Thats because this exceptional community is so much more than just a new address or residence. Its the start of a whole new phase of life. One in which growth and discovery become the norm. Where generosity and gratitude create the kinds of bonds that turn new neighbors into new friends. A place for individuals to thrive while knowing the kinship of others is always nearby. Its like opening the door to endless possibilities. And when the possibilities are endless, so are the reasons to live every day like never before. Whether its raising a toast or raising your hand for lifes next greatest adventure. MODEL AND INFORMATION CENTER12276 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 501, Naples, Florida 34113 (239) 206-2646 or toll-free (866) 986-9690www.ArlingtonNaples.org Located on Tamiami Trail East, across from the Freedom Horses Monument at Lely Resort. Open 8:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Sundays by appointment. The Arlington of Naples welcomes those of all faiths, beliefs and tradi ons.How about a toast to new possibilites? Edison State College-Collier Campus, in conjunction with Southwest Florida Works, hosts a career fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29. Free and open to all interested students and the public, the event has three major components: 1. A transfer component for those interested in pursuing new educational opportunities from colleges and universities statewide; 2. A job fair component with employers from several area companies looking for talented professionals; and 3. A mini-versity consisting of seminars throughout the day about things such as writing cover letters and resumes and helpful interview tips. ESC-Collier Campus is at 7007 Lely Cultural Parkway, off Collier Boulevard three miles north of Tamiami Trail East. For more information, call 732-3709 or e-mail grhine@edison.edu. The 2011 Campaign for Leadership, a nonp artis an program designed to encourage citizen leaders to serve on boards and commissions and/or run for elected office, is set for Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4-5, at the Naples Botanical Garden. Speakers and panelists will include U.S. senators from Florida Bill Nelson (confirmed) and Marco Rubio (invited) and more than 25 elected and appointed leaders, campaign consultants, party officials, the media and policy experts. Leadership Collier Foundation partners with the Collier Building Industry Association, Collier County Presidents Council, Economic Development Council of Collier County, Greater Naples Better Government Committee, the League of Women Voters of Collier County, the Naples Area Board of Realtors, the Naples Daily News and the Naples Mens Discussion Group to present the program. Participants will be charged with a vital task: to advocate and promote excellence at all levels of local government, says Michael Reagen, president and CEO of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce and the Leadership Collier Foundation. Registration is $75. To sign up or for more information, including a PDF brochure with agenda, visit tinyurl.com/ campaignforleadership2011 or contact Lori Freiburg at the chamber by calling 403-2904 or e-mailing lori@napleschamber.org. Career fair at Edison open to all Program promotes involvement in local government

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Mia Ferrao, who with mom Donna Ferrao pitched in as part of the team from Waste Management, drops off bags of litter collected at Vanderbilt Beach. COASTAL CLEANUP DAY IN COLLIERMore than 1,200 volunteers showed up at more than a dozen sites to help Keep Collier Beautiful as part of the 2011 International Coastal Cleanup effort on Sept. 17. Organizers are still tallying the results, but here are the numbers from just one site, Vanderbilt Beach, where volunteers bagged: 1,105 cigarette butts 144 cigar tips 65 drink lids 60 plastic bags 54 straws 45 food wrappers 20 glass bottles 5 fishing lures 2 ropesCOURTESY PHOTOSMembers of Brownie Troop 371 from Naples Park Elementary were among the estimated 275 volunteers who helped clean up Vanderbilt Beach. The Brownies are, left to right: Edith, Isabella, Sisi, Abby, Theresa, Ashley, Keanna, Emma, and Kaitlyn.The days most unusual debris was a 100-pound safe, pulled from Naples Bay by volunteers from the Naples Sailing and Yacht Club. Naples police were consulted but found no identifying marks on the safe.Avow Hospice plans blessing of the animalsWell-behaved pets and their owners are invited to a blessing of the animals at Avow Hospice at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 1. The traditional service is held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals. Attendance is free, and everyone is welcome. Avow Hospice is at 1095 Whippoorwill Lane. Cat coalition plans event at Freedom ParkThe Collier Community Cat Coalition is planning an event Saturday, Oct. 15, in recognition of National Feral Cat Day. Coalition volunteers, who advocate for Trap, Neuter, Return along with adoptable cats and kittens will be at Freedom Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Speakers will help educate visitors about controlling the feral cat population. Owners who bring their cats will be able to have them micro-chipped ($10 donation) or vaccinated for rabies ($15). Additional funds will be raised by a 50/50 raffle. Vendors will be on hand with food and pet products, as will representatives from local animal rescue groups. The cat coalition will welcome conations of wet or dry cat food. For more information, call Megan Sorbara at 431-0331, e-mail kittycat1368@ aol.com or find the Collier Community Cat Coalition on Facebook.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 A11 NEWS OF THE WEIRDBY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATEPlacenta pills Cant possibly be true Government in action Inexplicable Least-competent criminals Unclear on the conceptThe medical establishment generally regards placentas (afterbirth) as biohazardous waste, but to New York City placenta chef Jennifer Mayer, they are a nutrient-laden meat that can alleviate postpartum depression and aid in breast milk production (among other so-far-unverified benefits). Ms. Mayer typically sets up in clients own kitchens, she told New York magazine for an August story. Some placentas are really intense, with grief or sadness or uncertainty. Others might be joyful, big and round. Ms. Mayers method: Drain the blood, blot dry, cook for a half-hour (leaving something resembling brisket), chop into slivers, dehydrate overnight (rendering it jerky-like). For a popular touch, Ms. Mayer then grinds it in a blender and pours the powder into several dozen (one-a-day) capsules. The Learning Channels Toddlers & Tiaras series has pushed critics buttons enough with its general support of the competitive world of child beauty pageants, but a recent episode provoked unusually rabid complaints, according to a September New York Post report. Mother Lindsay Jackson had costumed her 4-year-old Maddy as Dolly Parton anatomically correct (chest and backside) Dolly Parton. The Post described Maddy as embarrass(ed) at her chest when another 4-year-old pointed at her and asked, What is that? (Ultimately, the judges liked Maddy for sweetest face.) Retired U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Rob Dickerson finally received his Purple Heart this summer, four years after he was seriously wounded in a rocket attack in Iraq and two years after he began a paperwork battle with the Army to prove his injury. Recently, the Army had apologized and mailed him the award, but it arrived C.O.D., leaving Mr. Dickerson to pay the $21 fee. (The Army subsequently reimbursed Mr. Dickerson the fee, but Dickerson said he hasnt been able to cash the check, in that it was erroneously made out to Roy Dirksen.) Madrids Getafe soccer club, struggling for customers, startled Spain this summer by commissioning a porn movie, with zombies, hoping to attract more fans. As if that were not quixotic enough, it then tied the movie to a campaign to solicit sperm-bank donations. Explained the films producer, Angel Torres, We have to move a mass of fans to seed the world with Getafe supporters. A promo for the film follows a Getafe fan, armed with a copy of the movie for his viewing pleasure, as he disappears into a clinics private cubicle to fulfill his donation. The man who approached tellers at the Eastern Bank in South Boston on Aug. 25 eventually fled empty-handed, but only after one teller had refused his order for all your money (she told him she was closed) and another had scolded him for breaking into the front of the adjacent line and for not removing his hoodie. In A ugust, 400-pound Eric Kenley, 48, w on a new trial for his two New York City robbery convictions after appeals court judges realized that the police lineup that identified him was unfair, in that he was apparently much fatter than the other men in his lineup. The police had attempted to compensate by using larger-than-average men and by presenting them all seated, to minimize the weight difference. Obviously intense about potential child-trafficking, the government of Quebec, Canada, requires strict proof of a live birth, certified by a doctor or licensed midwife. However, the waiting list to hire either one is long, and Heather Mattingsly went with an unlicensed midwife, whose word the Directeur de letat civil declined to accept. Four months after the birth, the agency ordered Ms. Mattingsly to submit to a vaginal examination. After calls from the media (according to a Montreal Gazette report) persuaded the agency that such an exam was useless, it finally agreed, on Aug. 26, to grant a birth certificate if Ms. Mattingsly submitted a doctor-certified copy of her pre-birth ultrasound. Jason Dean, 24, was arrested in Ringgold, Ga., in August and charged with false imprisonment after he waited in the parking lot of a Taco Bell, approached an 18-year-old woman and handcuffed her to himself. After her screams brought others to come help her, Mr. Dean explained that he had been trying for several months to get the woman to go out with him but that she had so far refused. A New York Times obituary for former lead singer Jani Lane of the heavy metal band Warrant revealed that Mr. Lanes birth name (he was born a year after Lee Harvey Oswald assassinated President John F. Kennedy) was John Kennedy Oswald. Rebellious musicians (Warrants debut album was Dirty Rotten Filthy Stinking Rich) often adopt provocative stage names to enhance their image, but Mr. Lane must be one of the very few to have abandoned a provocative birth name in favor of a bland one.

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SEPTEMBER 14 27BEAUTIFULLYBLENDED FRAPPSMALL$149FOR A LIMITED TIME Enjoy the rich, creamy coolness of a McDonalds McCaf Mocha or Caramel Frappe icy, blended treats featuring a hint of coffee topped with whipped cream and sweet drizzle.Offer good only at participating McDonalds in Miami-Dade, Broward, Monroe, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Okeechobee, Indian River, Collier, Hendry, Lee and Charlotte counties. Limit 5 per person per visit. Prices and participation may vary. Plus tax if applicable. McDonalds. Follow us for tasty tweets, news and special offers @McDonalds_SWFL @McD_PalmBeach @McD_ SouthFla

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 A13 Yacht ClubNorth StarAN UNRIVALED LIFESTYLE Nestled on 12 luscious acres of botanical splendor with a plethora of amenities including a 2 story clubhouse featuring a tness center, movie theatre, concierge and resort style pool, North Star Yacht Club provides you with the active lifestyle you desire. Spacious 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with Den from $239,900 Three Bedrooms and Penthouses Also Available. Directions from I-75 Exit 138 W to MLK Blvd. Right on Monroe St. then left on Main St. Merge onto 41 N and cross over bridge, then turn left on Hancock Bridge Parkway.*With the use of preferred lender. Prices subject to change without notice. See agent for details.Visit Our Sales Center Today!Only 3.5% Down Last Chance For Values This Good!FHA and Fannie Mae ApprovedCall 239.995.8200 or Visit NorthStarYachtClub.com3420 Hancock Bridge Parkway | North Fort Myers, Florida 33903 in Fort M y ers, F l ori d a I ncre dibl e Va l ue. Breat h ta ki ng V i ews.Follow us on See For Yourself Today F rom Only $ 239,900 The Farm City BBQ moves to a new location, Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard, for its 55th year in Collier County. A celebration of national Farm-City Week, the local tradition historically attracts upwards of 1,000 people for an old-fashioned barbecue feast the day before Thanksgiving. In the spirit of building relationships among business and agricultural leaders, steak from the grill, Floridagrown corn on the cob and Immokalee Salad will be dished up by local elected officials and civic and business leaders from 11:30a.m. to 2:30p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 24, in the parking lot at the hospital. Proceeds from the Farm City BBQ are donated to youth leadership development programs throughout the community. This years beneficiaries are Collier County 4H Foundation, Youth Leadership Collier and the Collier County Junior Deputy League. In addition to Physicians Regional Healthcare System as the host site, other sponsors are: Cattle Baron Sponsors: Waste Management of Collier County Farm Family Sponsors: Barron Collier Companies, Collier Enterprises, Gulfshore Business, Florida Weekly, PBS Construction, C2 Communications, Sunshine Ace Hardware, Naples Times, Alpha Media, Smith & Company and Atilus LLC Ranch Hand Sponsors: LCEC, Naples Lumber, Russells Clambakes and Cookouts, Ave Maria University, Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, Northside Naples Kiwanis, Business Dynamix Solutions, Reagan Rule Photography, Chapmans, Pacific Collier, Nobles Collier, 6Ls and Southern Corporate Packers. Purchase dinner tickets for $20 at www.farmcityBBQ.com. For more information, call Cyndee Woolley at 571-3174 or e-mail cyndee@c2-com.com. Pre-Thanksgiving crowd will feast at Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard Naples Princess Naples Princess Call (239) 649-2275 for reservations. www.NaplesPrincess Cruises.com Specialty cruise: September 27th: Sounds of Sinatra BUY 1, GET 1 1/2 PRICE, valid on... Wednesday Sunset Dinner Cruise Saturday Seabreeze Lunch Cruise Sunday Sunset More Than Hors doeuvres Cruise Valid on adult tickets. Subject to change without notice. SUMMERSPECIAL SAVINGS550 Port-O-Call Way | Naples, FL 34102

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A14 Presents THE VINEYARDS! Your Real HouseSeller at The Vineyards!MLS#:211506753 MUST SEE! Exceptional home and value, very well maintained. Long southern lake views to water feature, creates a peaceful setting for entertaining friends and family relaxation. Sliding doors in living room and zero corner family room opens this home that truly captures Florida living. Custom pool and expansive screened lanai creates very open to welcome your guests. The Cambridge model: upgraded with Italian tile flooring, volume ceilings with tray/coffer details, custom kitchen, granite counters/back splash, paver pool deck and driveway. Additional air conditioned storage space in garage. Award winning Vineyards community. This home is a MUST SEE! 912 GLEN LAKE CIR Naples, Florida 34119 $995,000 Scott Leiti Realtor Cell Phone: (239) 628-6181 Ofce Phone: (239) 594-5555 Email: scott.leiti@yahoo.com Call Scott Today for Seasonal or Annual Rentals in the Vineyards!

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A14 Presents THE VINEYARDS! Your Real HouseSeller at The Vineyards!MLS#:211506753 MLS#:211506753 MUST SEE! Exceptional home and value, very well maintained. Long southern lake views to water feature, creates a peaceful setting for entertaining friends and family relaxation. Sliding doors in living room and zero corner family room opens this home that truly captures Florida living. Custom pool and expansive screened lanai creates very open to welcome your guests. The Cambridge model: upgraded with Italian tile flooring, volume ceilings with tray/coffer details, custom kitchen, granite counters/back splash, paver pool deck and driveway. Additional air conditioned storage space in garage. Award winning Vineyards community. This home is a MUST SEE! 912 GLEN LAKE CIR Naples, Florida 34119 $995,000 Scott Leiti Realtor Cell Phone: (239) 628-6181 Ofce Phone: (239) 594-5555 Email: scott.leiti@yahoo.com Call Scott Today for Seasonal or Annual Rentals in the Vineyards!

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FORT MYERS 11380 LINDBERGH BLVD | 239.561.7215 | HOURS MON FRI 7:30 AM 5:30 PM | SAT 7:30 AM 5 PM NAPLES 3747 TAMIAMI TRAIL NORTH | 239.687.7215 | HOURS MON THUR 8 AM 6 PM | FRI & SAT 8 AM 8 PMNEW NAPLES LOCATION NOW OPEN. Personal Southwest Florida Delivery Service Available. www.NormanLoveConfections.comAbundant Love Pure Love Artisan Love Exotic Love Decadent Love www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA16 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Take your career to the next level through the power of our Bachelors Degrees, Associates Degrees or professional certi cate programs. Challenge yourself and inspire your dreams with classes on campus or online. Its a safe bet that Seminole Casino Immokalee will welcome poker champion Scotty Nguyen on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 24-25. Mr. Nguyen is set to host Saturdays Ante Up tournament and, on Sunday, a Poker Gives tournament that will benefit several local charities. Ante Up players must make a $230 buy in, and there is a $10,000 guarantee. The Poker Gives tournament requires a $75 buy in with a $75 charity re-buy. Proceeds will benefit Special Olympics, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Step by Step and Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund. Players who register for either tournament will have the opportunity to meet Mr. Nguyen, the 1998 World Series of Poker Main Event winner. The competition begins at 2 p.m. both days. The casino is at 506 South First St. in Immokalee. For more information, visit www.semi noleimmokalee casino.com. Poker champion set to host Seminole Casino tourneys COURTESY PHOTOScotty Nguyen The recreational harvest of gag grouper in all Gulf of Mexico waters off Florida, except Monroe County, reopened on Sept. 16 and will run for two months. This season will allow anglers in both federal and state gulf waters an opportunity to harvest gag grouper. The gag grouper season has been closed in state waters since June 1 and in federal waters since Jan. 1. During the open season, through Nov. 15, recreational anglers may keep two gag grouper within the four-grouper aggregate daily limit in all gulf waters off Florida except Monroe County state waters. The minimum size limit for gag grouper in these waters is 22 inches total length. These harvest dates for gag grouper apply in 2011 only. More information on grouper management is available online at MyFWC.com/Fishing. Season opens for gag grouper

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THIS SPECIAL HAS BEEN EXTENDED UNTIL OCT 15

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Some AC Repair Companies Seem To Think SOMETIME BETWEEN 9 AND 1 Is An Acceptable Appointment WindowCool Tonight or WE PAY For a Hotel Stay No kidding. Call us at 2:00pm with a broken AC and we will perform the entire estimate, order and pickup equipment, pull permit, and install before 9:00pm on average. If we dont, youll be cool in your hotel while we nish the job. On-Time or its FREE Our expert-trained technicians, who are not only 100% guaranteed to do the job right the rst time (or your money back), are also 100% guaranteed to be there on time, or your service call is free. No excuses. No ne print. Just FREE.Financing Available Lic. # CMC056884www.advanced-air.com(239) 321-5206 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Here are some charity golf tournaments coming up in the area: Young Professionals of Naples holds the second annual Coral Cay Miniature Golf Tournament beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 8. Sign up with a foursome, or be paired with other players on the day of the fun. Prizes include hotel packages, golf outings and golf equipment. Refreshments will be served during the competition; afterward, players will adjourn to South Street Bar and Grill for food and drinks specials. Tickets are $15 per person and must be purchased in advance at YP Naples events or by e-mailing Jason Print at jprint@hotmail.com. A tournament to benefit the Wounded Warriors Project tees off with a shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at La Playa Beach & Golf Club. Registration is $125 per person. Tournament sponsors are LaPlaya and Arthrex. WWP raises money and awareness for wounded warriors returning from the battlefield. Programs and services include combat stress recovery, transition training, Warriors to Work, physical rehabilitation and family support. Call Dale Mullin at 596-3019 or (203) 449-7742, or e-mail wwpoct22@aol.com. The inaugural FORE Wishes tournament to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Florida takes place Friday and Saturday, Oct. 20-21, at Quail West Country Club. Sponsors are BNY Mellon Wealth Management and Quail West. Registration is $200 per player and includes a Friday evening reception as well as breakfast, lunch and an awards ceremony on Saturday. Hole sponsorships are $500 each. To sign up or to sponsor a hole, contact Lesley Colantonio at 992-9474 or lcolantonio@sflawish.org. The 20th annual Florida Gulf Coast University Founders Cup to benefit the FGCU Foundation is set for Friday, Oct. 14, at Pelicans Nest in Bonita Springs. The day begins with lunch and ends with dinner and awards. Registration is $2,000 per foursome. Sponsorship opportunities are available. Contact Michele Kroffke at 590-1074 or mkroffke@fgcu.edu, or visit www.fgcu. edu/foundation. First National Bank of the Gulf Coast hosts its third annual charity tournament Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Hideout Golf Club. Beneficiaries are Eden Autism Services Florida and Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida. Continental breakfast will precede the 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, and lunch will also be provided. Contact Heather Gessel at 325-3750 or heathergessel@fnbofgc.com. The Collier Kids Can Read tournament takes place Saturday morning, Oct. 29, at The Strand. Registration is $125 per person and includes breakfast, lunch and two drinks. Proceeds will benefit the Toys for Tots literacy program. Sponsors are Usborne Books & More and Paradise Appraisals and Real Estate Services. Donations for a raffle, silent auction and gift-bags are being solicited, and hole sponsorships remain available. Call Natalie Moffitt at 293-2580 or Babara Manganaro at 293-8702. Swing for the Kids to benefit the Mental Health Association of Southwest Florida takes place Monday, Nov. 14, at The TwinEagles Club. For more information, call 2615405 or visit www. mhaswfl.org. HIT THE LINKS

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omas Quigley, M.D.Board Certi ed Eye Physician & Surgeoncomplete medical exam with one of our board certi ed eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to new patients 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 09/30/2011Naples Bonita Springs www.doctorquigley.comFREEEYE EXAMFOR NEW PATIENTSNo Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal.CODE: FW00 LASIK SPECIAL Cataracts LASIK Laser Vision Correction Cornea Treatment Glaucoma Dry Eyes Comprehensive Eye Exam Pediatric Eye Care Glasses & ContactsFULL SERVICE VISION CARE MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED LASIK FINANCING AVAILABLE www.sw eye.com Fort Myers 6850 International Center Blvd. 239-768-0006 Cape Coral 1109 Del Prado Blvd. 239-574-5406 Naples 11176 Tamiami Trail 239-594-0124 Rick Palmon, M.D. Richard Glasser, M.D. Leonard Avril, O.D. Brian Marhue, O.D. Penny J. Orr, O.D.Starting on Sept. 1st! $1,000 discount-$500 per eyeMust schedule surgery by Oct. 31, 2011. Call for your FREE CONSULTATION! www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA20 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 239-261-7157 www.WynnsOnline.com 141 Ninth Street North Naples For over 70 years offering Wholeseome fresh products to our customers. Wynns is now carrying a large selection of Natural, Organic, and Gluten-Free products. Free with a $15 Grocery OrderAssorted Flavors 12 oz. 12 pk. Polar Seltzer waterMust have coupon at time of purchase Free with a $30 Grocery OrderCovey Run Riesling 750 ml.Must have coupon at time of purchase Walk this way for United Way of CollierStep out for United Way of Collier County by participating in the sixth annual Walk for the Way on Saturday, Sept. 24, at North Collier Regional Park. This has become a flagship event in Collier, says John Brucato, Walk for the Way chairman and a volunteer board member for UWCC. Its a truly feelgood day, because you get to see the power of our communitys spirit at work. Were also making this event an opportunity for us to say thank you to those who support our campaign by giving away 1,000 commemorative T-shirts. Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the 2-mile walk around the parks nature preserve sets out at 9 a.m. The Marine Corps League color guard and the Golden Gate High School drum ensemble will mark the start of the walk. A shorter, 10to 15-minute route around the main lake is also available. The Miami Dolphins game bus will be in the parking lot, and Mercury Morris and Larry Little, alumni players from the 1972 undefeated team, Dolphins cheerleaders and members of the official Miami Dolphins Community Team will greet walk participants. Entry is $10 for adults, $5 for students and free for children 5 and younger. Businesses, community groups, youth sports and civic organizations and neighborhoods are encouraged to form walk teams and show up in force to help the United Way reach its campaign goal of $2.3 million. Walk for the Way is presented by Publix Super Markets and in partnership with Collier County Parks & Recreation. Major sponsors include Bond, Schoeneck & King; RWA Consulting; United Parcel Service; Fifth Third Bank; T-Shirt Express; IRMS; Cummings & Lockwood; Hilton Naples and Shulas. For more information, visit www.unitedwayofcolliercounty.org. See news about more walks for good causes throughout the community on page A24.Be a breakfast guest of Volunteer CollierVolunteer coordinators and executive directors of area nonprofit agencies are invited to join Volunteer Collier Inc. for continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 14, at the Hilton Naples. The mission of Volunteer Collier is to match volunteers with local charities and to maintain an online calendar where agencies and individuals add events or find things that interest them for volunteering purposes. Attendance at the breakfast is free, but reservations are required as seating is limited. Call Don Scott at 250-5000 by Oct. 5. For more information about Volunteer Collier, visit www.volunteercollier.org.Salvation Army pantry shelves need restockingAs its supplies dwindle and the requests for help increase due to this uncertain economic situation, the Collier County Salvation Army is seeking canned food donations to help the needy and destitute. Were concerned we wont be able to help people arriving at our doors through the year, says Naples Corps Officer Capt. Pierre Smith. The Salvation Army has always relied on the generosity of local residents to help us do our work, and we are making a special plea at this time for support. Donations of canned meats, vegetables and fruit and well as rice, beans, pasta, cereal and baby formula are especially needed to replenish the pantry shelves. Besides feeding hungry people, The Salvation Army provides clothing for the needy, utility assistance and emergency aid for struggling families. Lately, however, Capt. Smith says, Most local citizens have had their minds on the state of the economy. Theyre looking for relief themselves. Its hard to interest them in the plight of those truly needy people whove made their way to our doors, many for the very first time. For more information about donating food, call 775-9447 or visit www.salvationarmynaples.org.Have a slice, help Empty BowlsCalifornia Pizza Kitchen in Waterside Shops will donate 20 percent of its receipts on Thursday, Sept. 29, to the Naples Empty Bowls project for purchasing supplies to make pottery bowls for the annual soup sale coming up in January. Set for Jan. 28 in Cambier Park, the Naples Empty Bowls project raises money for the Harry Chapin Food Bank, which distributes food to Southwest Florida food pantries and through its mobile pantries. Last years event raised more than $30,000, which translated into $180,000 of food and services the food bank could provide. NONPROFIT NEWS COURTESY PHOTOSetting the pace for the 2009 Walk for the Way

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA22 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 TO YOUR HEALTH Free car seat safety checks setAs part of National Child Passenger Safety Week, the Childrens Advocacy Center of Collier County and The Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida will conduct free child car seat safety inspections from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 24, at Twinkle Twinkle Little Store. Families are welcome to come and enjoy a bounce house, play area, refreshments and giveaways for the kids while certified safety technicians assist parents at their vehicles. The store is in the Outback Steakhouse plaza at 4910 Tamiami Trail N., one block south of Pine Ridge Road. For more information, call 262-5904.Workshop planned for COPD caregiversThose caring for a loved one who suffers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease can learn patientand self-care techniques at a workshop from 1-3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, in the Ispiri community center at Avow Hospice. Sessions about reducing caregiver stress and increasing patient comfort will be presented by Avow Hospice staff members including Dr. Paul Mitchell; Mary Brodeur, RN; and Louise Kenny, LCSW. Attendance is free, but advance registration is requested. Trained Avow Hospice volunteers may be available to sit with patients while their caregivers attend the session. For more information or to register, call 649-3689. Pharmacy tech classes set for ESC-CollierA pharmacy technician training programs begins Oct. 6 at Edison State College-Collier Campus in partnership with the University of Florida. Meeting twice a week for 14 weeks, the course will provide students the skills needed to assist a pharmacist in packaging and mixing prescriptions, maintaining client records, purchasing and controlling inventory. The course also includes an 80-hour internship. Classes will meet on Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings, Oct. 6-Jan. 21. Enrollment is limited to 10 students. Tuition is $3,900. For more information, call 732-3128. Download the registration form at www. edison.edu/collier/ce. I never get tired of hearing about the selflessness, competence and compassion of the women and men who work at NCH. Here are three recent examples of how what we do makes such a difference. The first two are RN Daisy Award winners. Elizabeth Fitzsimons, RN-NN Intensive Care Unit, nominated by Kristine Andreasen, who wrote: Elizabeth cared for my sister Karen (also an NCH nurse) last August for two weeks in the NN ICU. She was her nurse almost the entire time. There is not enough room to express the gratitude of my family and myself. Her care was supportive and compassionate. She made us feel comfortable in the care Karen was getting. She remained professional while at the same time keeping the ability to hug, support, listen, offer those words of comfort and even shed a tear with us. I know it can be difficult taking care of a fellow nurse or nurses family, but Elizabeth requested to be Karens nurse through her final days. She put my friends and family at ease. Even with my critical care background, I took the situation as family, not as a nurse. Elizabeth was able to explain things to me when I needed it. Karen received safe and competent care as well as respect and dignity and privacy at all times. This meant more to me than anything. The loss of my sister was the worst thing that has ever happened to me. I was so grateful to have such a loving and caring nurse there for all of us. There is no way of expressing how fortunate Karen was to have Elizabeth as her nurse, and how fortunate NCH is to have her on staff. My friends and family will be forever grateful. As Karen looks down from heaven as an angel, she is looking at Elizabeth, an angel here on earth! Thank you, Elizabeth. Sue Zampell, RN-5 South Rehab, nominated by Josephine Marks, RN, who wrote: I have worked at this beautiful hospital for 21 years and in that time have experienced many touching, selfless and caring episodes. Sue epitomizes the caring-giving spirit that is ours at NCH. Several times I have seen her go to department stores and buy clothing to dress homeless patients on their discharge from the hospital. For one homeless patient, she bought underwear, shorts, socks, sneakers, jeans and shirts. The patient hugged her and cried. Sue cried, and all present cried. Whether this man lived in a mansion or had nowhere to live had no bearing on the compassionate care Sue delivered. Mitch Pierre, transporter in the cardiac catheterization lab holding area, nominated by Tammy Houchin, RN, who wrote: Patients post-cardiac cath are required to remain flat to avoid bleeding from the arterial puncture site. I had a patient with a movement disorder that greatly increased his risk for bleeding. He was unable to remain still, was becoming increasingly agitated and trying to get out of bed. As I stood at the bedside trying to prevent the patient from bleeding, Mitch came to assist. His presence helped quiet the patient and allowed me to negotiate his cooperation. Mitch sat at the bedside, and I got the needed medications from the pharmacy. The meds were administered, and the patient did well. Mitch did all this without being asked. He acted superbly and deserves a big thank you. All three of these exemplary coworkers deserve not only our thanks, but also our heartfelt gratitude for representing the very best in competent and compassionate care giving. Congratulations to Elizabeth, Sue and Mitch. Dr. Allen Weiss is the president and CEO of NCH Healthcare System. HEALTHY LIVINGRing finger proportions tied to sex hormonesFindings may offer health insightsSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYBiologists at the University of Florida have found a reason why mens ring fingers are generally longer than their index fingers and why the reverse usually holds true for women. The finding could help medical professionals understand the origin of behavior and disease, which may be useful for customizing treatments or assessing risks in context with specific medical conditions. Writing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, developmental biologists Martin Cohn and Zhengui Zheng of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the department of molecular genetics and microbiology at the UF College of Medicine, show that male and female digit proportions are determined by the balance of sex hormones during early embryonic development. Differences in how these hormones activate receptors in males and females affect the growth of specific digits. The discovery provides a genetic explanation for a raft of studies that link finger proportions with traits ranging from sperm counts, aggression, musical ability, sexual orientation and sports prowess, to health problems such as autism, depression, heart attack and breast cancer. It has long been suspected that the digit ratio is influenced by sex hormones, but until now direct experimental evidence was lacking. The discovery that growth of the developing digits is controlled directly by androgen and estrogen receptor activity confirms that finger proportions are a lifelong signature of our early hormonal milieu, Mr. Cohn said. In addition to understanding the basis of one of the more bizarre differences between the sexes, its exciting to think that our fingers can tell us something about the signals that we were exposed to during a short period of our time in the womb. There is growing evidence that a number of adult diseases have fetal origins. With the new data, weve shown that that the digit ratio reflects ones prenatal androgen and estrogen activity, and that could have some explanatory power. Messrs. Cohn and Zheng, also members of the UF Genetics Institute, found that the developing digits of male and female mouse embryos are packed with receptors for sex hormones. By following the prenatal development of the limb buds of mice, which have a digit length ratio similar to humans, the scientists controlled the gene signaling effects of androgen also known as testosterone and estrogen. Essentially, more androgen equated to a proportionally longer fourth digit. More estrogen resulted in a feminized appearance. The study uncovered how these hormonal signals govern the rate at which skeletal precursor cells divide, and showed that different finger bones have different levels of sensitivity to androgen and estrogen. Since Roman times, people have associated the hands fourth digit with the wearing of rings. In many cultures, a proportionally longer ring finger in men has been taken as a sign of fertility. Ive been struggling to understand this trait since 1998, said John T. Manning, a professor at Swansea University in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the current research. When I read this study, I thought, thank goodness, weve attracted the attention of a developmental biologist with all the sophisticated techniques of molecular genetics and biology. MARIA FARIAS / UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDAZhengui Zheng, Ph.D., and Martin Cohn, Ph.D., of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the department of molecular genetics and microbiology at the University of Florida College of Medicine, study the molecular genetics of limb development. Recently they have focused on what influences finger proportions. r. i d n e re n t u r u s h e r e a u r b w a sM ARIA FAR IAS / U NIVER SIT Y O F F LOR IDA I t tidfhib t t h t s r t a allenWEISS allen.weiss@nchmd.org STRAIGHT TALKCompassion and expertise make for exceptional care giving

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 NEWS A23 Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$2995PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $29.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. TO YOUR HEALTH Avow hosts son of hospice pioneerAvow Hospice welcomes Ken Ross, son of Hospice pioneer the late Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, for a program open to the public at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14. Dr. Kubler-Ross, a Swiss-born psychiatrist and author, shared a universal message that each moment of a patients life matters, especially when facing life-limiting illness. She transformed age-old taboos about end-oflife discussions and challenged the world to think about what it means to be alive. Mr. Ross will lecture about his mothers life and legacy; his presentation will be followed by a cocktail reception sponsored by Fuller Funeral Homes. Attendance is free. Reservations are required. Call 649-3683 by Oct. 12.Program will address mental health issues among childrenThe Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Government and College of Education hosts a conference about childrens mental health from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at FGCU. The program will address problems associated with mental health disorders in children and youth, and will provide insight about what the community can do to make a difference in their lives. Topics will include diagnosis and treatment in adolescent psychiatry, including bipolar disorder. Mental health professionals will be able to earn five contact hours. Registration is $25 ($40 with contact hours) and includes continental breakfast and a box lunch. To sign up or for more information, call Joanne Hartke, director of the FGCU Florida Institute of Government, at 425-3273.Free classes help blind, visually impairedLighthouse of Collier Center for Blindness and Vision Loss and the Florida Division of Blind Services offer programs to help blind and visually impaired be independent in Collier. A daily living skills class meets from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday from Nov. 8-Dec. 22. Classes focus on skills for independent navigation at home, work and in the community as well as money identification, cooking, grooming and the use of assistive technology. A class in coping with vision loss is offered by appointment. Classes take place at Lighthouse of Collier headquarters, 424 Bayfront Place. To register or for more information, call 430-3934 or visit www. lighthouseof collier.org. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYPhysicians Regional Healthcare System today has been named one of the nations top performers on key quality measures by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health-care organizations in America. The commission recognized PRHS based on data reported about evidence-based clinical procedures that are shown to improve care for certain conditions, including heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care and childrens asthma. Physicians Regional is one of only 405 U.S. hospitals and critical access hospitals earning the distinction of top performer on key quality measures for attaining and sustaining excellence in accountability measure performance. Inclusion on the list is based on an aggregation of accountability measure data reported to The Joint Commission during the previous calendar year. For example, this first recognition program is based on data reported for 2010. To be recognized as a top performer on key quality measures an organization must meet two 95 percent performance thresholds: First, it must achieve a composite performance of 95 percent or above after the results of all the accountability measures for which it reports data to The Joint Commission are factored into a single score, including measures that have fewer than 30 eligible cases or patients. Second, it must meet or exceed a 95 percent performance target for every single accountability measure for which it reports data, excluding any measures with fewer than 30 eligible cases or patients. PRHS was recognized for achieving these thresholds for heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia care and surgical care. We understand that what matters most to our patients is safe, effective care, says Todd Lupton, CEO at Physicians Regional Healthcare System. Thats why we have made a commitment to accreditation and to positive patient o utcomes through evidencebased care processes. In addition to being included in The Joint Commissions Improving Americas Hospitals annual report, PRHS will be recognized on The Joint Commissions Quality Check website, www. qualitycheck.org. Physicians Regional Healthcare System is comprised of two hospitals in Collier County, an affiliated multispecialty physician group and a medical staff of more than 300 physicians.Physicians Regional Medical Group lab earns accreditationPhysicians Regional Medical Group, a strategic affiliate of Physicians Regional Healthcare System, has earned accreditation by the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiography Laboratories. It is the first echocardiography lab in Collier County to be accredited in transthoracic and stree echo. ICAEL accreditation status signifies that PRMG has been reviewed by an independent agency that recognizes the laboratorys commitment to quality testing for the diagnosis of heart disease, Dr. Richard Prewitt, a cardiologist with the medical group, says. He adds participation in the accreditation process is voluntary. Noninvasive echocardiographic testing is one of the standard diagnostic tools in the detection and management of many types of heart disease. The accreditation earned by PRMD is in the areas of adult transthoracic and adult stress. The Joint Commission recognizes Physicians Regional Healthcare System Todd Lupton Dr. Richard Prewitt

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30% Federal Tax Credit** for most applications Extend Your Outdoor Living Experiencewith an Acrylic Enclosure 239.206.2599www.LanaiEnclosures.com(Showroom Available By Appointment)From design to furnishing we can provide everything you need to make your new outdoor enclosure the perfect place to enjoy the outdoors year round! (Acrylic-Glass-Impact Glass) Af liated with Harbor Springs Building Company Lic#CGC1518248 END OF SUMMER SALE30% OFFEnds September 30th NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA24 NEWS WEEK OF SEPT 22-28, 2011 COMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACING DREAM KITCHENS | CUSTOM CLOSETS | LUXURIOUS BATHROOMS NAPLESPELCIAN BAY BLVDVANDERBILT BEACH RD IMMOKALEE RD NS VD 41 www.cornerstonebuilderssw .com FORT MYERS SHOWROOM3150 Metro Parkway 239-332-3020Mon Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm Saturday 10:00am to 4:00pm Evenings available by appt. only NAPLES SHOWROOM7700 Trail Boulevard 239-593-1112Mon Sat 10:00am to 4:00pm Evenings available by appt. only VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS... Located in Fort Myers & NaplesFactory Direct Pricing... We are the Factory!Lifetime Warranty on any product we manufacture!Cornerstone stands behind every job... BEFORE. DURING. AFTER.Now Offering Mold Remediation Your complete satisfaction is my rst and foremost priority.Tony Leeber Sr.Owner/ContractorGive us an opportunity to wow you! COMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACING SOLID SURFACE COUNTER TOPSas low as$19per sq. ft. QUARTZ COUNTER TOPSas low as$29per sq. ft. 3CM GRANITE COUNTER TOPSas low as$39per sq. ft. Youre invited to our ...OPEN HOUSEWe make your home remodeling vision a...RealityCustom Cabinets and Countertops manufactured at our facility We also offer Refaced Cabinets at half the cost of New! 2 0 1 121STHere are some walks and runs coming up to raise awareness about and funds for various nonprofit organizations and causes: The Collier County Walk to End Alzheimers steps out at 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, from St. Ann School on Eighth Avenue South. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Sign up in advance at www. alz.org/flgulfcoast. Click on Walk and then on Choose a Walk Near You. There is also a registration link on Facebook at Collier County Walk to End Alzheimers 2011. The eighth annual Walk for Life to benefit the Pregnancy Resource Center takes place Saturday, Oct. 15, at North Collier Regional Park. The 2-mile walk begins at 9 a.m. The Pregnancy Resource Center helps meet the physical and emotional needs of women facing crisis pregnancies. To register as a walker or for more information, call 513-9775 or visit www. prcwalkforlife.org. The third annual Bulldog Dash 5K race and 1-mile fun run to benefit the American Cancer Society Relay for Life takes place Saturday, Oct. 22, at Oakridge Middle School and Indigo Lakes. The fun run begins at 7:15 a.m. and the 5K at 7:30 a.m. The event is sponsored by the Oakridge Middle School Builders Club and the Northside Naples Kiwanis Club. Advance registration for the fun run is free, and for the 5K is $15 for students and $20 for adults. Sign up at www.bulldogdash.com. Race-day registration is an additional $5. The American Cancer Societys Collier County Making Strides Against Breast Cancer noncompetitive 5K walk steps out Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Village on Venetian Bay. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the walk starts at 9 a.m. Title sponsor for this years event is 21st Century Oncology; Stacey Deffenbaugh of NBC-2 is chair of the event. To register, contact Ms. Deffenbaugh at 839-0680 or Stacey.deffenbaugh@nbc-2.com, or Melissa Wolf at the American Cancer Society, 261-0337, ext. 3860, or Melissa.wolf@cancer.org. Online registration is at www.putonyourpinkbra. com/naples. The second annual SWFL Walk the Talk for Epilepsy sets out at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at North Collier Regional Park. Registration begins at 8 a.m. The walk started as the dream of Dan Rosenfeld, a 26-year-old Naples man who is one of tens of thousands who live every day with the challenges of epilepsy. For more information, to sign up or to volunteer on the day of the walk, contact Mr. Rosenfeld at 254-7710 or DBRosenfeld08@gmail.com. WALK THE WALKS

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Look no further than for all of your eye care needs. exam is available to any person who does NOT have insurance to cover the cost of a complete eye exam.Bonita Springs 26831 S. Tamiami Trl.239.992.1422 Naples 2352 Pine Ridge Rd.239.263.2700 North Naples 877 111th Ave., Unit 2239.591.2949 www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA26 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 FREE CONSULTATIONNo Recovery No Fees or CostsOut of Area Call 1-800-852-65853515 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 101 Cape Coral 1629 K. Street NW, Suite 300 Washington D.C.www.lawinfo.cc239-540-3333 INJURED William M. PowellPracticing Law in Florida for over 28 years. Former President Cape Coral Bar Association Former Cape Coral City Attorney. Serious Bodily Injury Medical Malpractice Hospital/Physician Errors Wrongful Death Trucking Accidents Auto, Motorcycle & Plane Nursing Home Paralysis Slip & Fall Failure to Diagnose Drunk Drivers Brain Damage Birth Defects PET TALES Pets of the Week To adopt or foster a petCollier County Domestic Animal Services: Adoption fees for cats are $60 and dogs are $85. The fee includes sterilization surgery, vaccinations, pet license, ID microchip and a bag of food. To adopt this pet visit the Collier County Domestic Animal Services from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays at 7610 Davis Blvd., Naples. Information: 252-7387 or www.colliergov.net/pets.Lifes lessonsGuiding children through pet loss can help them for life BY DR. MARTY BECKER Universal UclickFrom the goldfish won at a school carnival who didnt make it home alive to the hamster who escaped from his cage and was never seen again to the cat or dog who has been in the family for years and is now taking a final trip to the veterinarians, the death of a pet can be a wrenching experience for a child. Though the death of a pet can be a sad and perhaps scary experience for a child, it is also a chance for parents to set a model for grief and death. For most children, this will be the first time they deal with death, and its an opportunity to teach them how to deal with painful experiences. Experts advise using activities to help children recognize and work through their emotions, such as having a child draw or paste a picture of the pet, or finish this sentence: Thinking about (my pets name) dying makes me feel ... Such exercises allow parents, grandparents, teachers and other important adults in the lives of children to open avenues for discussion, as well as to help set the tone for appropriate ways of grieving. Perhaps a little disconcerting to many parents, some experts even ask children to consider whats happened to their pets body. Such openness is important with children, even though it may run counter to parents own experience as a child. If you dont give children the answers to their questions, the answers they make up may be even worse than the truth. Its most important to be truthful and factual. Let the child know that its OK to talk about anything, and its OK to have the feelings they do. Some other suggestions for parents: Dont sugarcoat the facts. Parents need to remember not to use euphemisms. Telling a child a pet was put to sleep may leave the child afraid to fall asleep himself. Follow the childs lead. Children may even benefit from seeing the body of the departed pet. Ask the child, and prepare by explaining the pet wont meow or wont lick. Use more than words. Children are not as focused on words as we are. They may want to play the death scene over and over, which may be disturbing to adults, but its their way of working through it. Children also can express their feelings through painting and drawing, and cutting and pasting. Share you own grief, but dont burden your child. Its very important for a child to see your feelings and to know sadness is acceptable, but its too much to ask your child to be your support at such times. Turn to other adults for this need. Dont rush your child. Grief can be a long process. While it isnt going to be easy, when handled well, the death of a pet can leave children well-prepared for the losses we all face in our lives. A pets death, in other words, can be a final gift of love and learning to a child. Pets can help teach many of lifes lessons to children, including how to deal with loss. >> Dulche is a handsome domestic short hair Manx whos about 2 years old. He has lovely golden eyes and a sweet personality. >> Marco is a gentle, friendly beagle mix whos about 2 years old and 27 pounds. Hes very good on his leash and likes cats and other dogs as well as people. >> Shelly is about 4 months old. Shes beautiful and very friendly. >> Toto is a Cairn terrier mix whos about 1 years old and 15 pounds. Sweet and eager to please, shes good on her leash and OK with cats and other dogs.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 NEWS A27 Thursday September 29 10am-2pm Opportunity Knocks Three Times.Join us for a free Career Fair that does so much more for you.1. Pursue new educational opportunities 2. Meet with area employers 3. Attend Mini-Versities for great strategies and tipsEdison State College Collier Campus 7007 Lely Cultural Pkwy. (239) 732-3709 grhine@edison.eduMUSINGSToo long we have tarried....On the edge of the sand they danced by the light of the moon The Owl and the Pussycat, Edward Lear And in the hollow of a tree in Silas inmost maze, we made a happy home and there we pass our obvious days. The Children of the Owl and the Pussy Cat, Edward LearAnd this is certain, if so be You could just now my garden see, The aspic of my flowers so bright Would make you shudder with delight. And if you voz to see my rozziz As is a boon to all mens nozziz -Youd fall upon your back and scream -O Lawk! O Criky! Its a dream! His Garden, Edward LearA whole is what has beginning and middle and end. Poetics, Aristotle You know: I used to live in a car that was a cathedral with good gas mileage and a tent folded in the rear end. It was often parked in the good will lot of others lands and seas. And for that gift I gave stories. Even now they still just spill out, these stories, like the innards of kaleidoscopes: colliding, scoping, scooping, spinning. Always spinning. The pieces move from story to story, transforming story and teller and audi(oess)ence. The heart becomes the left pectoral muscle; the forest hunting horns become a gong; the whores become vestigial virgins. These virgins beecome versions. All stories are versions, virginal counterpart and countermand. Gyrating panegyric. Heavy metal pieces that once were the opposite of obvious albatrosses become, thankfully, heart signs sigh of love empty and merely chained together. Betrayal becomes entreaty. Entreaty becomes laughter. Laughter becomes bliss. Am I watching ? Is this sinetron or a telenovela? Or Masterpiece Theatre? Breaking all rules, does salacious climax follow denouement? Denouement is, after all, from Old French and Latin roots that mean to untie knots. Gustav Freytag would argue for the dramatic arc, a kind of pointed Bell curve, that simple model for this digestion of complex phenomena. Through this looking glass we first expose, then action rises. After the climax comes falling and denouement. The comedic protagonist is better off; the tragic protagonist, worse and off. All storytellers abide in me, biding time. They wait, remaining simple and sensate. I remember the time Scheherazade invited me over for dinner. (Or was it John Barth?) The exposition was a salad full of daffodils. Am I to eat the flowers? The denouement was seeing there the hanging plant I had not seen before. Amazing, it had adventitious roots hanging down on all sides. Its pot was a self-contained aerial forest. Entrancing. Enchanting. It is a spider plant, my host demured. So exotic, so transcendent. The perfect ending for a fairy tale. And as I walked down the main drag, I passed a flower shop window adorned with a never ending row of chlorophytum comosum. I approached to read the flyer taped on the inside of the shop window, facing out for the easy read of passers-by. The Spider Plant is an especially popular plant with beginners as it is easy to propagate and is very tolerant of neglect, being able to thrive in a wide range of conditions. Spider Plants have also been shown to reduce indoor air pollution. I was sold. Now: tomorrows story Rx is the FloridaWeekly muse who hopes to inspire profound mutiny in all those who care to read. Our Rx may be wearing a pirate cloak of invisibility, but emanating from within this shadow is hope that readers will feel free to respond. Who knows: You may even inspire the muse. Make contact if you dare. o e r ga st o l i Rx rx@floridaweekly.com Bide o l p y s e y y t u nter pa rt and cou npa ne gy ric. Hea vy thit m ax co m es f allin g a nd denouement. The comedic pr o titibttffthtit I p assed a f lower sho p w ith a r t u a p r e on s h in g r e a T an l ar ne r pro p tol e b ei n a w i d iti o hav e tdidi

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BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES BUS INESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011Excellence in IndustryThe EDCs annual awards, and more business events. B7, 8 & 14 INSIDEAsk the FoolDo bonds, CDs make good Investments for kids? B6 Agents of changeFabrics can make a world of difference when rooms need refreshing. B9 The Economic Development Council of Collier County will cease operations as of Sept. 30, the end of its current fiscal year. The announcement was made last week by the organizations board of directors. The EDC was established in 1976 to focus on the local economy and the corresponding infrastructure required to diversify the countys economic base. In 1997, the EDC and Collier County Board of Commissioners inaugurated a formal partnership to increase the resources available to assist the efforts of economic development within the community. Following the recent completion of a comprehensive strategic plan for regional and local economic development which, in part, recommended the county be responsible for business attraction and that a new economic development organization address business retention and expansion the EDC directors agreed it was in the best interest of the community to preserve the $400,000 allocated to the council for FY2012 for county advancement of the plan. Completed by KMK Consulting Group of Cincinnati, Ohio, the plan is the product of four months of intensive work and community input. Setting forth a vision for the creation of a regional and local economic delivery system, it contains 10 goals for a five-year period that are grounded in greater county government engagement, broader community education, sustained commitment of top tier business leaders and retired CEOs, and the reconstitution of the current EDC into a new economic development organization. Strategic changes recommended in order to accomplish the goals are: 1. Formalization and execution of a multi-county 501 (c)(6) economic development partnership for Southwest Florida, with participation by all county governments. The EDC created the groundwork for the partnership over the last few years. 2. A cooperative approach to privateFollowing consultants strategic plan, EDC will disbandFLYING DIRECTLY FROM FLORIDA TO CUBA has gotten easier for certain travelers the past few months, thanks to federal initiatives announced in January that loosen up some restrictions and expand to 15 the number of U.S. airports authorized to provide passenger service to the island nation. A dozen airports, including Southwest Florida International, were approved in June to provide direct charter flights to and from Cuba. But local residents wont benefit any time soon. No charter companies have applied with the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Customs and Border Patrol to offer Fort-Myers-to-Cuba flights, says Victoria Moreland, public affairs officer for the Lee County Port Authority, which operates Southwest Florida International. We have been approved by the government to have flights between RSW and Cuba under certain restrictions, says Ms. Moreland. We have carriers flying in here that could make the application, but we have not been approached by any. In applying to serve as a facility for Cuban travel, Ms. Moreland says the airport was merely positioning itself for the future: If and when commercial service to Cuba resumes for the first time since 1962. For now, Southwest Florida residents will have to drive to Miami, one of just three U.S. airports long approved for direct flights, or Tampa International, which offered its inaugural charter on Sept. 8. The airport will provide weekly charters; more flights are expected in the near future with the startup of other charter services. Fort Lauderdale-Holly-Flights directly to the island are now allowed from SWFLHello, CubaBY NANCI THEORETSpecial to Florida Weekly SEE CUBA, B4SEE EDC, B4FLORIDA WEEKLY ILLUSTRATION We have been approved by the government to have flights between RSW and Cuba under certain restrictions. We have carriers flying in here that could make the application, but we have not been approached by any. Victoria Moreland, public affairs officer, Lee County Port AuthoritySPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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ON-SITE COMPUTER SERVICESFor Your Home or Busines 239-257-1601www.fastteks.com/capecoral We Come To You! New Clients Receive$25 OFFCall for Details AFFORDABLE RATES CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS COMMODITIES AND MANAGED FUTURES Worldwide Futures Systems specializes in the development, monitoring and execution of alternative investment strategies using what we consider to be one of the best Futures Trading Systems. We feel that it is our experience that has made us a leader in futures systems portfolio trading.Call now for a FREE consultation239-571-8896Jeannette Showalter, CFA & Licensed Commodities Broker of Worldwide Futures Systems, LLC.239-571-8896showalter@wwfsystems.com www.wwfsystems.comAn investment in futures contracts is speculative, involves a high degree of risk and is suitable only for persons who can assume the risk of loss in excess of their margin deposits. You should carefully consider whether futures trading is appropriate for you in light of your investment experience, trading objectives, nancial resources, and other relevant circumstances. PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. Jeannette Showalter, CFA & LICENSED COMMODITIES BROKER www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 We are a direct lender offering the following loan products: Conventional | FHA | VA | USDA | Florida Bond | Homepath If you are looking to purchase or re nance a home give us a call! MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE $1000 OFF YOUR CLOSING COSTS. THE OFFICES AT MERCATO 9128 STRADA PLACE #10106 NAPLES FL 34108 239-434-0300www.aemc.cc NMLS ID 167191 OH: MBMB.850023.000 FL: MLB0700103 KY: MC24222 IN: 15191 WE CONTROL THE PROCESS FROM START TO FINISH! MONEY & INVESTINGThe other national defense: A call for consumer commitmentThe words defending the U.S.A. are reflexively associated with armament, military forces and bases, strategies and wars. But there is another form of defense, which is critical to the U.S. citizenry: protection of jobs; industries; unique talents and proprietary knowledge; and, ultimately, the American standard of living. Such is defended not through military might but through economic power, the cornerstones of which are found in: Management (leadership at all levels of the private and public sector) and Money (having large reserves and/or the ability to be financed through internal or external sources). These M&Ms, when brought together in the form of longterm strategic plans and well executed, are the elements that create a countrys economic power. In a very competitive world economy, happenstance and shortterm or fix-it planning will just not cut it. Its hard not to see the economic benefits to China as they create and execute, and then re-create and execute, their longterm strategic plans. While our competitive edge in the world decays daily, U.S. legislators argue about allocation of the pieces of the U.S. pie; there is little vision for making a much bigger pie. For many, the battle cry is Jobs! And the thought is to fix the problem. Make jobs. Incentivize people to hire. Yes, those are all well and good. But the problem is far beyond the 9.1 percent national unemployment figure; and far beyond the 16 percent combined unemployed and under-employed. From my perspective, these figures are manifestations of a much bigger underlying problem: the widespread loss of the U.S. industrial base in fact, the loss of many industries in their entirety; the loss of proprietary status for our scientific and technological knowledge bases; and the loss of unskilled and highly skilled industrial and service jobs. Even our training grounds for Americas greatness our colleges and universities have become international campuses and, for many foreigners, a cheap expense. A timeline of U.S. labor losses might look something like this: loss of the steel industry; much of the car industry; all of ball bearings; all of textile, etc. And loss of all of the small companies that fed into the larger companies industrial wheels. And where did they go? To emerging countries: initially Japan; then Korea, Vietnam, Taiwan; lastly (and especially) China, Mexico and India. But the U.S. citizenry got something in this trade a higher standard of living for the middle and lower income person who could now have a huge, flat screen TV and other consumption extras (that had previously only been awarded to the wealthy) because they were cheap imports. How was the labor force weighing in on this? It was complaining about loss of jobs but it was also buying this stuff, putting its dollars down on a deal (cheap imports) that was very bad for it in the long run. Outsourcing and loss of industry doesnt seem so bad until it is your job that is outsourced, until it is your industry that has moved to Asia. Those who lost their jobs followed the trail of new job availability; the road largely led into services. Yes, more than half of U.S. jobs are service. Have services been the panacea? No, they were just stopgap jobs along the road to more outsourcing. As fast as those jobs were being created, we were losing them, mostly to India. The advent of better technology in computers and telecommunications accelerated this shift of service jobs to overseas. If there were real cost savings to be realized in lower-level functions, why not outsource computer experts, consultants and programmers? Medical and lab technicians? Engineers? Online tutoring and teaching? Web designers? Office assistants? In the name of costcutting, we lost all these jobs. In the excitement of the 2003-2006 boom of the housing market; in the bust of 2007-2008; and in the groan of the Great Recession, the job loss to foreign competitors seemed to lose center stage attention. Who can defend the U.S. citizen from further loss of jobs? Sure the government can create the critically important long-term blueprint for resumption of our ascendancy. Sure, if given large incentives, the U.S. corporation will take back many outsourced jobs; just dont look for corporate compassion or character to right this particular issue. Instead of the consumer pointing to business or government, why not look inwardly? If you dont want your employer to continue to outsource jobs, then why dont you make the commitment to buy more U.S. products even if they are more expensive? Why dont you make a decision to make your preferences for U.S. products known? And, in services, you can protest. If you are on a telemarketing or customer support call routed to India, just affirm the foreign country and then ask to be rerouted to a U.S. call center. And when you finish the U.S. call, ask to speak to the U.S. supervisor and deliver the message that you are willing to pay more for services in order to have these jobs in the U.S. En masse, this would have a powerful effect. These are merely ideas for you to take back your tremendous power as the consumer. You might find them distasteful, smacking of protectionism. They happen to be woven into my everyday living and I embrace them in the absence of fair trade and the absence of a national plan to retain our dominant economic position. I cant point to Washington or big business if I, as a consumer, am at the root of the problem. Jeannette Rohn Showalter, CFA, can be reached at 444-5633, ext. 1092, or jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com. Her office is at The Crexent Business Center, Bonita Springs. th jo a is u th jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFA jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 wood International Airport launched its first flight last Saturday. Travel for leisure is still prohibited as part of the decades-long economic embargo against Fidel Castros communist regime. Under the policy changes announced by the Obama administration in January, purposeful travel to Cuba must be related to religious, education and humanitarian reasons or people-to-people exchanges, the latter a government proviso of goodwill to promote contact between Americans and the people of Cuba. The White House, in a statement, said the laxer restrictions will increase people-to-people contact; support civil society in Cuba; enhance the free flow of information to, from, and among the Cuban people; and help promote their independence from Cuban authorities. In easing the travel restrictions, the Obama administration also expanded the scope of international airports that could seek approval for travel to Cuba. The administrations action met strong resistance from the powerful Cuban-American lobby and some legislators. Instead of doing business with regimes that undermine Americas security and routinely violate the basic norms of human dignity, we should be bolstering our democratic allies through deeper economic ties, said Sen. Marco Rubio earlier this year as he railed against the new rules. The short flights to Cuba about 75 minutes from Tampa and 60 minutes from Miami arent cheap. Charter services charge around $400 in Tampa, $379 from Fort Lauderdale and around $420 from Miami. Smaller airports, however, generally mean less traffic and a shorter line through U.S. Customs, often an hourslong process at Miami International, where eight charter companies posted 7,616 departing and arriving flights from Cuba last year. A record number of 400,000 Americans, many of them Cuban-Americans, are expected to travel to Cuba this year, nearly double the number who made the trip in 2008, according to data from the National Statistics Office. Cuba claims more than 2.5 million international tourists visited the island nation in 2010. And Southwest Florida International Airport is poised to add to the number of American vacationers should the embargo be lifted. Were looking at the long-term possibilities, when Cuba travel is normalized, says Ms. Moreland. sector involvement in the delivery of economic development services to Collier County businesses; business retention and expansion; and measurable outcomes reflected in an annual report to the community. 3. Engagement of a full-time Collier County government economic development director to more effectively facilitate the permitting and incentives process associated with the attraction of new businesses. 4. Recruitment of top-tier regional business CEOs and retired CEOs as the economic and intellectual engine that guides the regional partnership and local economic development strategy and outc omes. The full plan is available on the EDC website at www.enaplesflorida.com. CUBAFrom page 1EDCFrom page 1COURTESY PHOTOSAmerican tourists are still prohibited from visiting Cubas beaches, the streets of Havana or the countrys cigar factories. Instead of doing business with regimes that undermine Americas security and routinely violate the basic norms of human dignity, we should be bolstering our democratic allies through deeper economic ties. Sen. Marco Rubio

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 A Job Search Support Group meets from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays at the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. Contact Karen Klukiewicz at kluk77@comcast.net or visit www. napleschamber.org. Young Professionals of Naples meets for socializing and networking from 5:30-8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, at Freds Food, Fun and Spirits, 2700 Immokalee Road. For more information, visit www.ypnaples.com. The Collier County Medical Society holds its next general membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, at Kensington Golf & Country Club. Guest speaker will be neurosurgeon Eric Eskioglu, medical director of the Neuro Vascular and Stroke Institute at Physicians Regional Medical Center. RSVP at www.ccmsonline.org. The Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce hosts a welcome reception for new members at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, at chamber headquarters, 25071 Chamber of Commerce Drive in Bonita. Sign up at www.bonitaspringschamber.com. The Public Relations Society of America-Gulf Coast Chapter presents Reaching Multicultural Audiences at its luncheon meeting beginning at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. Sept. 27, at the Hilton Naples. Cost is $24 for PRSA members, $29 for others. Reservations required by Sept. 23. Sign up at www.gulfcoastprsa. org. The American Business Womens Association-Neapolitan Chapter presents Avoiding the Six Business Killers at its meeting beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, at the Hilton Naples. Guest speaker will be Richard Lange. Cost is $26 for ABWA members, $30 for others. Register no later than Sept. 22 at www.abwaneapolitan.org. No walk-ins will be permitted. The American Marketing Association-Southwest Florida holds its next meeting from 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, at Naples Bay Resort. Guest speaker Karl Gibbons of Third Eye Management will discuss Want to Quit and Get Rich? Cost is $12 for AMA members, $18 for others. RSVP by Sept. 26 by calling Camden Smith at 682-0082 or e-mailing camden@dreamflymarketing.com. The Gulf Coast Venture Forum holds its season kick-off event from 5:30-8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, at the Naples Grande. Regular meetings take place December-May in the clubhouse at Tiburon Golf Course. GCVF promotes the success of Southwest Floridas new and emerging businesses by educating and bringing together the entrepreneurs and Angel Investors. For more information, call 262-6300 or visit www.gcvf.com. BUSINESS MEETINGS THE MOTLEY FOOL You can learn a lot about a company or industry by being nosy and asking questions. In his classic 1958 investment book Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits (Wiley, $22), Philip Fisher advocated just that, calling it scuttlebutt: Most people, particularly if they feel sure there is no danger of their being quoted, like to talk about the field of work in which they are engaged and will talk rather freely about their competitors. Go to five companies in an industry, ask each of them intelligent questions about the points of strength and weakness of the other four, and nine times out of 10 a surprisingly detailed and accurate picture of all five will emerge. Imagine youre considering investing in apparel retailer Urban Outfitters. It might look good on paper, but you should still check out the scuttlebutt. Give the companys investor relations department a jingle and ask some questions. Find out who its top competitors are by asking or just by observing, at malls and elsewhere. Then look into them.Scuttlebutt Pro ts What Is This Thing Called The Motley Fool?Remember Shakespeare? Remember As You Like It? In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only people who could get away with telling the truth to the King or Queen. The Motley Fool tells the truth about investing, and hopes youll laugh all the way to the bank. Are Bonds or CDs Good for Kids? Q Are savings bonds or CDs good investments for kids? C.G., Bloomington, Ind.A It depends. Less volatile investments such as savings bonds or CDs can seem safer, offering a modest return. But with many CDs and bonds yielding close to nothing, money in them will likely lose purchasing power over time just due to inflation. In the long run, stocks have generally outperformed bonds and CDs. We cant know how the stock market will fare in the next months or years, but the longer you leave your money in healthy and growing companies, the more likely youll be to do well. With stocks, its best to invest only money you wont need for at least five years (or 10, to be more conservative). If your child is 15, you might not want to put college money in stocks. But if shes 6, think about it. Perhaps start with an index fund, such as one based on the S&P 500. You might also invest in the stock of a few companies that your children know and like, and then follow them together. Learn more at www.treasurydirect. gov, www.sec.gov/answers/indexf.htm, and www.fool.com.Q Should I pay off my college loans as soon as possible, or stick to the long-term repayment schedule and start investing in stocks a little? J.S., Lake Charles, La.A It all boils down to interest rates. If youre paying 6 percent on your loans, but you expect to earn 9 percent annually on your investments, then youll likely earn more than you pay out, if you pay on schedule. If your debt is costing you much more than you expect to earn, pay it off pronto. Got a question for the Fool? Send it in see Write to Us. Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest InvestmentTo Educate, Amuse & EnrichHang out near some Urban Outfitter stores and gather data. See how many customers they have, how many people buy things, and how much they seem to be spending. Compare this with competitors. Which stores are busiest? Consider interviewing some customers to see what they like and dislike about various retailers. Talk to employees to find out how the business is doing and what they have to say about the company and its prospects. Search the Web, and youll likely find valuable industry information, such as from retailer trade associations. At websites such as http://boards.fool. com, youll find individual message boards for thousands of companies. There you can share intelligence with other scuttlebutters. Your local store might be doing good business, for example, but perhaps stores elsewhere are not. By mixing a careful reading of financial statements and scuttlebutt gathered from a variety of sources, youll have a much better chance of beating the market. Keep up with scuttlebutt even after you buy and own shares of a company. In 1998 we sold our house and moved overseas. We invested our equity with a broker-friend who worked for a big-name, full-service brokerage. When Cisco started to tank, our friend got out but didnt get us out. At the time we didnt have satellite or cable, so we had no idea how the market was reacting. Got in at $64 per share, got out at $28. Goodbye, nice house! D., onlineThe Fool Responds: Ouch. It sounds like you might have had too much of your money invested in that one stock. Its always best to diversify over, say, at least a dozen holdings. Its also good to diversify across different industries. While many Internetand computer-related companies imploded in 2001, other kinds of enterprises fared much better. Cisco dropped 47 percent, but General Electric sank only 18 percent, and Colgate-Palmolive less than 4 percent. Its always best to keep an eye on your holdings regularly, as professional money managers can sometimes let you down. And consider selling if any stocks ever seem very overvalued, as many did in 2000. The Motley Fool TakeSurprising some people, media metrics rater ComScore recently ranked Facebook as the third-largest online video provider. Google (Nasdaq: GOOG), of course, remains top dog with its YouTube subsidiary. But according to StreetInsider.com, Facebook is getting dangerously close to Google in terms of total unique viewers of online video within the U.S. But that overstates the case quite a bit. Google continues to top the rankings in oh-so-many ways. ComScore clocked it at 149.3 million unique views in July nearly three times as many as Facebook. Google also leads the pack in the amount of time viewers Facebook Is No Google Name That CompanyHeadquartered in Illinois, I trace my history to 1831 and Cyrus McCormick, who built the first mechanical reaper with the help of Jo Anderson, a slave and his friend. For many years you knew me as International Harvester. Today I make International trucks, MaxxForce diesel engines, IC school and commercial buses, Workhorse chassis, and RVs under the brands Monaco, Holiday Rambler, Safari, Beaver, McKLast weeks trivia answerHeadquartered in Illinois, Im the worlds second-largest food company, with annual revenue totaling roughly $50 billion, more than half of which is generated outside North America. My offerings include biscuits, cookies, confectioneries, beverages, cheese, grocery products and convenience meals. More than 50 percent of my revenue comes from categories where my market share is twice the size of the nearest competitors share. Twelve of my brands, including Oreo, Oscar Meyer, Philadelphia, Trident, Tang, Maxwell House, Cadbury and Nabisco, generate more than $1 billion annually, apiece. Youll find my products in some 170 countries. Who am I? ( Answer: Kraft Foods )enzie and R-Vision. I make military vehicles and offer financing services, as well. Ive been recognized for my commitment to clean air, and I rake in about $12 billion annually. Who am I? Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and youll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! camp out on its video real estate, with an average of nearly six hours per month, 72 percent more time than even Hulu clocks.Thats impressive when you consider that Hulu specializes in getting people to click on full-length television episodes, rather than the short clips that predominate on YouTube. It takes an awful lot of Monkey Washing a Cat videos to equal one rerun of Rock on Hulu, but all those mini-clips add up.Many are drooling over Facebooks impending initial public offering (IPO). For the time being, though, Google remains the biggest game in town, the most profitable, and arguably the best value on offer today. (The Motley Fool owns shares of Google and our newsletter services have recommended it.) Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Big Drops, Small Drops y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y u s f irst o f Jo For r nae r el i a l V s i K e m fi I ve co m I ra ke all y Wh Know with Foo l yo ull be en nifty prize!

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Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$2995*PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $29.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentals O er Good thru 09/30/11 WITH THIS AD $350.OFFNew Orders OnlyCoupon Must Be Presented At Time Of Order. Why Do More Home Owners ChooseComplete Line of Rolldowns Clear Pan ccordionsCall For FREE Estimate594-16161762 Trade Center Way, Naples Florida, 34109Hurricane IMPACT WINDOWS & DOORS!! QUALITT RVICE NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 BUSINESS B7 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING The EDCs 2011 Excellence in Industry Awards 6 5 4 3 2BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 1. Gail Neuharth, Joel Kessler and Colleen Murphy 2. Jeanne Seewald with John and Kristina Schmieding 3. Patrick Renda and Deanna Kelly 4. Lois Thome and Earl Hodges 5. Kathleen Passidomo and Sheriff Kevin Rambosk 6. Thelma Hodges and Donna Fiala

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB8 BUSINESS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Real Seafood Company hosts chambers Business After 5 1. Alina Roe, Trista Hines and Stephanie Robertson 2. Brian Psota and Bill Grauel 3. Rosalinda Gamez and Myara Rodriguez 4. Front row Brenda Smith, Dylan Sanders and Andy Colon. Back row Michel LaRose, Tom Graney and Kevin Dolan 5. Rosie Hatwell, Kathleen Fleming, Aliette Pettay and Holly Burghardt Wake Up with the Greater Naples Chamber of CommerceBOB RAYMOND / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 3 2 4 1. Jim Towey, Ursula Pfahl and Mike Reagen 2. Tony Marino, Bruce Gilbert, Reg Buxton and Kenneth Shaw 3. Vito Depalma, Keith Walker and Jeff Zanella 4. Susan Maurer, Cheryl McDonnell and Karl Williams 5. Karen Klukiewicz and Ashley Schult 6. Colleen Kvetko, Jennifer Edwards and Gail Schwartz 1 4 3 2 6 5 BOB RAYMOND / FLORIDA WEEKLY 5

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Our Portfolio of Southwest Floridas Rental Properties RENTAL DIVISION239.262.4242 800.749.7368PremierSothebysRealty.com Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Oce Is Independently Owned And Operated.RENTNAPLES.COMNAPLES AREAFURNISHED RESIDENCESPelican Marsh/Clermont ......................$1,500 NW lake views, 3BR/2BAs Pelican Bay/Avalon ................................$1,500 Great lake views, 2BR/2BAs Pelican Bay/Pebble Creek ...................$2,400 3BR/2BAs Pelican Marsh/Island Cove..................$3,000 2BR+den/2BAs Park Shore/Horizon House .................$2,500 Spectacular gulf views, 2den/2BAs Pelican Bay/Avalon ...............................$4,000 2BR/2BAs Park Shore/Park Plaza ..........................$4,000 2BR/2.5BAs Pelican Bay/Grosvenor ........................$4,500 PH with private beach tram, 2+BR/3BAs Royal Harbor ..........................................$8,500 Many upgrades w/ boat dock, 4+den/5BAs Port Royal ............................................$15,000 3+den/4BAs. located on Galleon DriveBONITA SPRINGS & ESTERO AREA ANNUAL RESIDENCESPalmira Country Club ...........................$1,750 Private pool, 2+den/2BAs Mediterra .................................................$3300 3+den/3BR, superbly furnished, lake viewsUNFURNISHED RESIDENCESAviano .....................................................$2,400 4BR/3BAs single family home, pets considered Stonebridge ............................................$1,300 2BR/2BAs WITH EXPERT ADVICE AND SMALL CHANGES, YOU CAN update any room in your home for the coming season. You dont have to live with the same-old, same-old, says interior designer Candice Sebring-Kelber. Without getting rid of anything you have, you can update and create a new look for any room using fabrics. Ms. Sebring-Kelber will get into design details to demonstrate just how easy it is to revive and refresh your living space when she presents a free seminar at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, at Miromar Design Center, where designer showrooms offer up thousands of materials, from canvas and chintz to velvet and fine silk, for every style, taste and budget. The presentation will outline four easy ways to use fabrics to transform any room in the house: Reupholstering a favorite chair or sofa can create a new look in the living room. Window treatments lighten, brighten and turn drab to dramatic in the dining room or breakfast nook. A colorful throw on an ottoman in the den adds a splash of personality. And updated bedding and pillows can alter the feel of the entire room. A complimentary wine and cheese reception with the designer at Angela Fine Furnishings in the designer center will follow the seminar. Seating is limited, and online registration is required. Visit www.MiromarDesignCenter.com no later than Friday, Sept. 30. Miromar Designer Center is across from Miromar Outlets in Estero. For more information, call 390-5111. Materials of changeSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ Fun fabrics can revive, refresh any room in the houseCOURTESY PHOTOLilly Pulitzer for Lee Jofa fabrics create a vibrant, playful room.REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY B9WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011Chris Adkins was named Salesperson of the Month for August at Manchester Square. A long-time Naples resident with more than 22 years experience in the Southwest Florida real estate market, Mr. Adkins was named National Builder Salesperson of the Year for 11 years and Salesperson of the Year by the Collier Building Industry Association for five years. Debra McAlister-Brown of ProTrend Residential Realty in Bonita Springs has earned the Certified International Property Specialist designation, signifying expertise in working with international clients as well as serving the growing multicultural population in the United States. Mary Manganiello was named Salesperson of the Month for August at Tiburn. Ms. Manganiello has held new homes sales positions in various WCI Communities over the past 12 years and rejoins the Tiburn sales team from her most recent position with Prudential Florida Realty in Naples. A University of Florida graduate and licensed real estate professional since 1986, she has achieved several top sales awards throughout her career. Tom Walsh has joined the Olde Naples franchise of Engel & Vlkers. An Ohio senator from 1978-1985, Mr. Walsh has been in real estate for more than 24 years, 12 of which he owned and operated Walsh Real Estate Services Inc. He has been a member of the Naples Area Board of Realtors since 1985. Heather Wightman of John R. Wood Realtors has earned the Performance Management Network designation from the Womens Council of Realtors. The PMN curriculum is driven by the following topics: negotiating strategies and tactics, networking and referrals, business planning and systems, personal performance management and cultural differences in buying and selling. REAL ESTATE NEWSMAKERS ADKINS MANGANIELLO WALSH WIGHTMAN

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BONITA SPRINGSBEACH FRONT CONTEMPORARY DESIGN 3 Bedrooms, 3.5-Baths, 5,500 S.F. of Living Space Direct Gulf Views From 4-Levels Ultimate Rooftop Decl w/360 Degree Views Pool & Spa w/Fiber Optic Lighting $4,995,000 MLS 211010024 Michael & Lauren Taranto 239.572.0066 NAPLESA TROPICAL PARADISE AWAITS 5 Bedrooms, +Den, 5.5-Baths Courtyard Lanai w/Pool & Spa 4,517 S.F. of Living 2-Story Guest House $2,200,000 MLS 210027446 Kristin Cavella-Whorrall 239.821.6330 NAPLESESTATE HOME IN PARK SHORE 4 Bedrooms,+Den, 5-Full, 2-Half Baths Theater Room & Private Elevator Stunning Pool and Open Lanai Meticulous Appointments Throughout $2,199,000 MLS 211013163 Jordan Delaney & Steve Suddeth 239.404.3070 NAPLESQUAIL WEST GROTTO ESTATE 4 Bedrooms, + Study, 5.5-Baths Separate Guest House Private Lanai w/Grotto & Waterfalls Situated on Private 1 Acre $1,999,000 MLS 211506978 Michael & Lauren Taranto 239.572.3078 NAPLESSAVOY AT PARK SHORE 2 Bedrooms, + Den, 3-Baths Direct Beachfront Condo His and Her Offices Private Beachfront Walkway $949,000 MLS 211013940 Michael & Lauren Taranto 239.572.0066 NAPLESSOLAMAR AT PARK SHORE 3 Bedrooms, 3-Baths, 2 Balconies Over $200k in Recent Remodeling Gulf, Bay & Cityscape Views Private Beach Access $829,900 MLS 211507508 Liz Appling 239.272.7201 NAPLESCUSTOM BUILT IN OLDE CYPRESS 3 Bedrooms, +Den, 3-Baths 2,948 S.F. of Living Golf & Preserve Views Large Pool and Spa $799,000 MLS 210030666 Martinovich & Nulf 239.398.3929 NAPLESTERRA VERDE AT GREY OAKS 3 Bedrooms, 3-Baths Beautiful Lake & Golf Views Over 2,600 S.F. of Luxury Living Private Elevator & 2-Car Garage $699,000 MLS 211012267 Jordan Delaney & Steve Suddeth 239.404.3070 NAPLESBEAUTIFULLY REMODELED VILLA 3 Bedrooms, 3.5-Baths Vaulted Ceilings, Open Floor Plan Courtyard Home, Lanai Overlooks Preserve Beautiful Tiled Floors, Granite Counters $399,500 MLS 211013742 Jo Ellen Nash 239.537.4785 BONITA SPRINGSHUNTERS RIDGE 3 Bedrooms, + Den, 2-Baths Over 1,800 S.F. of Living Space Screened Lanai & Pool Exceptional Community Amenities $169,000 MLS 211510177 Jackie Sweet 239.298.9000 NAPLESBERKSHIRE VILLAGE 2 Bedrooms, 2-Baths Recently Renovated Crown Molding Throughout New Cabinets & Granite $99,900 MLS 211507163 Frank Dekevich 239.877.4193 NAPLESSOUTH NAPLES CONDO 1 Bedroom, 1-Bath Totally Remodeled New Appliances, Tile & Carpet Turnkey Furnished $44,900 MLS 211510430 Liz Appling 239.272.7201 NAPLESWELL APPOINTED COACH HOME 3 Bedrooms, + Den, 3-Baths Over 2,800 S.F. of Living Space Private Elevator Extensive Upgrades Throughout $625,000 MLS 211510499 Milton Collins 239.565.2139 NAPLESVISTAS AT BONITA BAY 3 Bedrooms, + Den 3-Baths Luxury High Rise Residence Endless Views & Beautiful Sunsets Over 2,500 S.F. of Living $585,000 MLS 211509711 Martinovich & Nulf 239.564.1266 BONITA SPRINGSCUSTOM RIVERFRONT HOME 3 Bedrooms, 3-Baths Situated on Imperial River 260' of Direct River Frontage Screened Pool & Lanai $495,000 MLS 211507118 Michael & Lauren Taranto 239.572.0066 NAPLESCOUNTRY CLUB COMMUNITY Premier Homesite Fantastic Lake & Preserve Views Private Beach Club 2 Championship Golf Courses $495,000 MLS 211003991 Martinovich & Nulf 239.564.1266 NAPLESBEAUTIFUL LONG LAKE VIEWS 4 Bedrooms, +Den, 4.5-Baths Island Gourmet Kitchen Family Room w/Bar Almost 4,000 S.F. of Living $1,590,000 MLS 210035895 Martonovich & Nulf 239.564.1266 NAPLESUNOBSTRUCTED GULF VIEWS 3 Bedrooms, +Den, 3-Baths Totally Renovated Direct Gulf Views Intimate Low-Density Building $1,299,000 MLS 211010896 Steve Suddeth & Jordan Delaney 239.784.0693 NAPLESBUILDER CLOSEOUT 4 Bedrooms, +Den, 4.5-Baths 3,700 S.F. of Living Space Lake View w/Pool & Spa Gorgeous Stone Floors $1,299,000 MLS 210027454 Kristin Cavella-Whorrall 239.821.6330 NAPLESELEGANT DETACHED VILLA 3 Bedrooms, +Den, 3.5-Baths Beautiful Chef's Kitchen Private Pool w/Spillover Spa Wonderful Country Club Amenities $1,299,000 MLS 211505028 Martinovich & Nulf 239.564.5717 REDUCED

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Put Your Investment Property To WorkWe have qualied tenants lined up and ready to rent! VacationRentals |Seasonal Rentals | Annual Rentals Theres no reason for your investment properties to be sitting idle and under performing. From Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero to Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers, we have quality, prospective tenants ready to rent your home now. Whats especially helpful for you is that our professional management team takes care of 100% of the details so you dont have to. Whether your property is available for rental for a week, a winter season, or a year from housekeeping to keeping it rented, were here for you. So, youre happy and your tenants are happy. Thats The Royal Treatment.Naples, Bonita and Estero | 601 5th Avenue South 239-213-3311 | 855-213-3311 | RoyalShellRentals.com Sanibel | 1547 Periwinkle | Captiva | 15050 Captiva Drive 239-472-9111 | 800-656-9111 | RoyalShell.com Fort Myers | 1870 Clayton Court 239-689-7653 | 800-805-0168 | RoyalShellRealEstate.comThis is not intended to solicit property that is already listed.

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NOWMORE THAN EVER With three exceptional private neighborhoods in which to choose from Torino, Miramonte and Traditions the time to buy at Grey Oaks could not be more perfect. NAPLES PREMIER CLUB COMMUNITY Grey Oaks remains the right club in the right place: Naples number-one-rated private club, with 54 holes of championship golf, eight Har-Tru tennis courts and a 5,550-square-foot tness center. UNPRECEDENTED VALUE New prices offer unprecedented value on the home you have long desired a home to be enjoyed by you and your family for generations to come. Here, you enjoy the privilege of holding the keys to your future. Visit our sales of ce to take advantage of this unprecedented opportunity.VILLAS AT MIRAMONTE AND TORINO PRICED FROM JUST OVER $1 Million THE BOUGAINVILLEA at Torino he Right Time, the Right Place, the Right Price.T239.262.5557 800.294.2426 www.greyoaks.comAirport Pulling Road, north of Golden Gate Parkway in the heart of Naples. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECT STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS BY THE DEVELOPER, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTE, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE.Grey Oaks is offered by Grey Oaks Realty, Inc., a licensed real estate broker. Prices, features and availability subject to change without notice.THE HIBISCUS at Miramonte

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We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Collier Building Industry Association members network at Ferguson Enterprises 1 2 4 3 5 6 7 8 9 1. Kathy Curatolo, Carter Grant, Stephanie Gray and Tom Wegwert 2. Matt Golden, Jason Cieloha and Steve Wilkerson 3. Rosemarie DArpa, Bill Ryan and Caryn Murphy 4. Peggy Grant and Lorraine Carlone 5. Michael Brunoli and Mike Orfield 6. Mont Williams and Jeff Campbell 7. Brad Stockham and Jacqueline Glasgow 8. Scott Horner and Barbie Kellam 9. Kena Yoke and Mark Slack CHARLIE MCDONALD / FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB14 BUSINESS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011

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Visit your new house today!www.OpenHouseSWFL.comThe rst stop to nding your new house!OpenHouse Southwest Florida lists the open houses for any given day in Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero. Customize your search by choosing location, living area, price range and more, quickly and easily.We make nding your new home easy!The Of cial Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero REALTORS Website NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 B15 Jacki Strategos SRES, G.R.I., e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netwww.JackiStrategos.com Richard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.netSpacious 3 BR villa, upgraded kitchen. ++interior features. 2 car garage, great view. Rialto at Hammock Bay $328,000 EXCELLENT COMMUNITYCoach home w/3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Garage, major upgrades, generous sq. ft. Ascot at Lely Resort $320,000 BEAUTIFUL UNIT Rarely available in this charming community. 2BR/2BA, eat-in kitchen, ground level.St. Regis Club $99,900 CHEAPER THAN RENTING The Bonita SpringsEstero Board of Realtors Conference Center will host a four-day 25-module training Academy for New Brokers on Thursday and Friday, Nov. 3-4, and Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 7-8. The academy welcomes those who may be considering opening an office in the future, entrepreneurs, college students, and current managing brokers. Some of the topics that will be covered are: site selection, tax and company structure, ethical operations, office image, to franchise or not, interviews and hiring, telephone systems, office manuals and budget building. The instructors consist of adjunct professionals from technical services, experienced brokers, accountants, attorneys, college professors, authors, and corporate sales specialist. The academy director is Bill Barnes, CEO of the Bonita Springs-Estero Association of Realtors. Mr. Barnes has won more than 20 awards for mortgage, title, recruiting acquisitions, marketing and exceptional community service. The tuition for the class is $249. For more information and registration, call Gisela Gonzalez at 992-6771. Academy size is limited to the first 30 candidates. Real estate pro leads four-day academy btnbfrtbfrtbbfrtbfr btnfrttf !"#$% !"#" $%&'%()$)*(!!+)

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41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Blvd. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Florida Weeklys Open Houses Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise marked>$1,000,00016 OLD NAPLES PARKSIDE OFF FIFTH 601 7th Avenue South #202 $1,299,000 Premier SIR Richard Culp 239-290-2200 17 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #401 $1,399,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 239-5950544 18 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #501 $1,425,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 239-5950544 19 GREY OAKS ESTUARY 1220 Gordon River Trail $1,500,000 Premier SIR Call 239-261-3148 M-Sat: 9-5 & Sun 12-5 20 OLD NAPLES GARDEN TERRACE 378 6th Street South #1 $1,595,000 Premier SIR Marilyn Moir 239-919-240021 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #901 $1,595,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 239-595-054422 OLD NAPLES 877 7th Street South $1,699,000 Premier SIR Marty McDermott 239-564-4231 23 GREY OAKS ESTUARY MARSH WREN 1535 Marsh Wren Lane $1,750,000 Premier SIR 239-261-3148 24 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #1105 $1,895,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 239-595-0544>$2,000,00025 VANDERBILT BEACH MORAYA BAY 11125 Gulfshore Drive From $2,500,000 Premier SIR Call 239-5145050 M-Sat 10-5; Sun 12-5>$3,000,00026 OLD NAPLES 175 3rd Street South $3,450,000 Premier SIR Celine Godof 239404-9917 27 OLD NAPLES 155 20th Avenue South $3,995,000 Premier SIR Frank Sajtar 239-776-8382>$4,000,00028 OLD NAPLES 150 Gulf Shore Blvd. South $4,500,000 Premier SIR Philip N. Collins 239-404-6800>$6,000,00029 PORT ROYAL 3999 Rum Row $6,950,000 Premier SIR Scott Pearson 612-282-3000>$11,000,00030 PORT ROYAL 3045 Fort Charles Drive $11,950,000 Premier SIR Michael G. Lawler 239-571-3939>$100,0001 NAPLES BATH AND TENNIS CLUB 103 Bob O Link Way #3B $115,000 Premier Sothebys International Realty Sue Garner 239-438-2846 2 NAPLES BATH AND TENNIS CLUB 102 Bob O Link Way #2A $139,900 Premier SIR Sue Garner 239-438-2846>$200,0003 STONEBRIDGE ASHTON OAKS 2264 Ashton Oaks Lane #102 $289,000 Premier SIR Gordie Lazich 239-777-2033>$300,0004 PELICAN MARSH ARIELLE 2205 Arielle Drive #1301 $310,000 Premier SIR Sharon Kaltenborn 239-248-1964 5 MOORINGS COMMODORE CLUB 222 Harbour Drive #208 $349,000 Premier SIR Susie Culp 239-290-9000>$400,0006 THE STRADA AT MERCATO Located just north of Vanderbilt Beach Rd on US From $400s Premier SIR Call 239-5949400 M-Sat: 10-8; Sun 12 -8 7 FIDDLERS CREEK CASCADA 9050 Cascada Way #201 $449,000 Premier SIR Michalle Thomas 239-860-7176.8 LEMURIA 7172 Lemuria Circle #1602 Prices from mid $400s Premier SIR Tom Gasbarro 404-4883 Open M-F 11-4; Sat/Sun 1-4>$500,0009 BONITA BAY ESPERIA & TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive New construction from mid $500,000s Premier SIR Call 239-495-1105 M-Sat: 10-5 & Sun 12-5 10 PELICAN MARSH ISLAND COVE 2276 Island Cove Circle $575,000 Premier SIR Teri Moellers 239-404-7887>$700,00011 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #608 $765,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 239-595-0544>$900,00012 PARK SHORE PARK SHORE TOWER 4251 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #7B $949,000 Premier SIR Susan Barton 239-860-1412 13 PARK SHORE PARK SHORE TOWER 4251 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #3-A $949,000 Premier SIR Angela Allen 239-825-8494 14 OLD NAPLES CATELENA ON 3RD 317 7th Avenue South $995,000 Premier SIR Marty McDermott 239-564-4231 15 PARK SHORE PARK SHORE TOWER 4251 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #9B $995,000 Premier SIR Angela Allen 239825-8494 Marco Island 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 17 13 14 11 7 19 8 9 12 18 1 20 22 23 25 28 24 27 26 29 30 21www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB18 REAL ESTATE SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE CSECTIONWEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: INSIDEThe High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Old Naples 434-2424 North Naples 594-9494 The Promenade 948-4000 Fifth Avenue 434-8770 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 In the drivers seatFilm critic Dan Hudak says Ryan Gosling fearlessly steers a standard story line. C11 A new challengeLet this photo inspire your creative writing muse. C7 Artists Among UsA conversation with Tom Cardamone. C3 Melinda Roy, former principal dancer with the New York City Ballet and current artistic director of Gulfshore Ballet in Fort Myers, will be presented with the prestigious Jerome Robbins Award on Sept. 30 at Lincoln Center in New York City. This prestigious award, named after world-renowned Broadway producer, director and choreographer Jerome Robbins, will be awarded to 26 former and current New York City Ballet ballerinas who worked with Mr. Robbins during their careers. The award will be presented by Chita Rivera, star of the movie West Side Story, one of Mr. Robbins most famous works, and will be followed by a performance of his ballet West Side Story Suite. Ms. Roy joined the corps of the New York City Ballet in 1978. She was promoted to the role of soloist in 1984, and then to the rank of principal dancer in 1989. Among her favorite leading roles were her performances in George Balanchines Apollo, BrahmsSchoenberg Quartet, Divertimento No. 15, The Nutcracker, and in Jerome Robbins The Concert, Fancy Free, The Four Seasons, Gershwin Concerto, Goldberg Variations and Interplay. Ms. Roy also originated roles in Peter Martins Waltz Project, William Forseyths Behind the China Dogs, and Miriam Mahdavianis The Newcomers. She performed in China in 1980 with Jerome Robbins, as part of the governments first cultural exchange program. She has also toured worldwide with Stars of American Ballet. Ms. Roy retired from New York City Ballet in 1996. She moved to Sanibel in 2000 to found Gulfshore Ballet. In addition to her teaching responsibilities for Gulfshore Ballet, she has turned her choreographic skills to Broadway. Ms. Roy was choreographer for the Broadway version of the movie Urban Cowboy, for which she was nominated for a Tony in April 2003. Her other choreographic credits include the Broadway hit show Master Harold and the Boys, starring Danny Glover, Paparazzi with Tommy Tune, and an Encores Series production of Can Can for New Yorks City Center starring Patti LuPone. As the artistic leader of Gulfshore Ballet, Ms. Roy has made it possible for audiences in the Fort Myers region to see stars of the Sanibels Melinda Roy to be honored at Lincoln CenterSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ ROYSEE HONORED, C4 IF YOUVE NEVER HEARD TWINKLE sing, you could be forgiven for making some incorrect assumptions. You might think she performs childrens songs. Or, because she has a s-sounding name think Moonbeam, Rainbow you might expect psychedelic music or folk. But youd be wrong. Twinkles no lightweight musically. Shes a belter. A soulful singer who holds nothing back, she can wail with the best of them. Gregg Baker, writing in The New York Times, said she possesses a voice so hot she can sing the ice off a polar cap. The late record producer Jerry Wexler, who co-founded Atlantic Records and worked closely with Aretha Franklin, saw Twinkle perform and declared her the greatest soul singer I have heard in a long time, and believe me, Ive seen my share of imitators. People always compare me to Aretha Franklin and Janis Joplin, Twinkle says. Initially, she couldnt understand the Janis comparisons, because When Twinkle sings, she gives up everthing shes got A r A c Tom COURTESY IMAGESTwinkles first major-label album, Haunted by Real Life, was released nearly 20 years ago. BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com COURTESYIM SEE TWINKLE, C4 nothingAll or

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 www.RiverchaseDermatology.com Same week appointments available. SWFLs Most Comprehensive Skin Center Three Fellowship-trained Mohs Surgeons Dermabeam Non-surgical Radiation Therapy Camisa Psoriasis Center Cosmetic and Laser Dermatology Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery Spa Blue MD Medical Spa A Melanoma InitiativeThei on P ass Proud supporter of the Passion Foundation. North Naples 239-596-90751015 Crosspointe Dr.Downtown Naples 239-216-4337261 9th St. S. Marco Island 239-642-3337950 N. Collier Blvd., #303Ft. Myers 239-437-88107331 Gladiolous Dr.Cape Coral 239-443-15001425 Viscaya Pkwy., #102See Spot. See Spot Change. See Riverchase Dermatology. I met a man at a writing conference. Jake and I were introduced midway through the week, after the first wave of nervous self-presentations had already passed. Worn out on the polite Where-you-from?s and What-do-youdo?s, we skipped the formalities and went straight to the real stuff: What he thought of contemporary poets, the best essays Id recently read. That night we bumped into each other at a bonfire where we listened to a friend tell ghost stories in the dark. We laughed so hard our stomachs ached. I noticed how Jake adjusted his glasses as he spoke, lifting the frame and settling them back on the bridge of his nose. Sometimes he ran a hand through his dark hair. He talked about living in New York and his apartment on the Upper East Side. When he mentioned his cat, I thought, Jackpot. At breakfast the next morning I sat with another friend, Michelle. The muscles in my stomach still hurt from the previous nights laughing. I poured milk over my oatmeal while Michelle talked to the woman next to her. Then she turned to me. Ive figured out your life, she said. I took a sip of orange juice. My life? I asked. I think you should marry Jake. I laughed and nearly choked as I swallowed. Jake? Hes perfect, she said. Funny, smart. Hes a really nice guy. All true, but I shook my head. Jake and I were firmly in the friend category. As if to prove it, we exchanged friendly e-mails after the conference. Jake talked about his travels and once compared a spot hed visited along the Mediterranean to a Da Vinci painting. He used the word sfumato, which I had to look up. I learned the term many years before, in an art history class I loved, but in the decade since I have not spent much time with people who talk reverentially about those sorts of things. Which must have weighed on my mind, because I found myself talking about Renaissance art with another man in my life, someone who is decidedly more than a friend. We were curled up together, physically close although my mind worked elsewhere. I said something about a piece I once saw in a museum. The man lying next to me thought for a few moments. Have you ever seen a woman in an old painting with a full bush? he said. I gasped. The things men talk about. Im just saying, he said. Its interesting to consider. The way fashions change. I mean, down there. I mulled it over. But did they even have razors back then? Men shaved their faces, didnt they? He had me there. And it was interesting to consider, really. Id always thought the beauty tortures women put ourselves through bikini waxes high among them were products of the modern era. Antiquated paintings prove otherwise. Thats the thing about art: It has an amazing capacity to reveal details about the world around us. And the way we discuss art has the incredible ability to reveal details about ourselves. The trick is figuring out what sort of discussion we want to have. SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSTalking art with the men in my life lo H I artisHENDERSON sandydays@floridaweekly.com

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C3 September 24, 20115pm 8pm at the band shell at Cambier Park6th Ave. S. & 8th St. S., Naples, Fl.34102Show casing their new CD, "Side Man Stepping Out" Some of the best song writing, lead vocals and harmony youll ever hear with a very powerful band. A new band but seasoned pros you've heard with bands like Lonesome River Band & Lou Reid & Carolina. Bring a lawn chair or a blanket and get set for quite an evening of family friendly, p owerfully good music!County Clare Band featuringHeather & Shannon Slaughtera Bluewater Acoustic & Bluegrass Music Series concertwww.countyclareband.com For more info email bluewaterbg@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/russ.frontline1 Tom Cardamone, painter What is your medium of choice? My preferred medium is acrylic on canvas, but I also paint with gouache and watercolor. How do you describe your art form and style? My art form is representational and trompe loeil (French for to trick the eye). My style is to be as realistic as possible, whether I am painting still life, landscape or seascape. Where can we see your work? In my studio at 6240 Shirley St. and at www. tomcardamoneart.com. Where did you grow up? I was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. When I was 12 years old, my family moved to Mastic Beach, Long Island. When did you discover your creative talents? When I was around 10 years old, I realized that I enjoyed drawing, and did a lot of it. Thats when I decided to become an artist. Where did you study? Brooklyn College and the School of Visual Arts in New York City. What inspires you? Natural scenery is usually a spur-of-the-moment observation that might present a challenge to paint. My trompe loeil paintings are inspired by still life subjects that challenge my ability to create them with such dimension that the viewer is fooled by what they see. Are you a full-time artist? If not, what is your other job? I am a graphic designer and illustrator. My wife and I own a business called TCA Graphics. I find time to paint whenever I can, and I also teach painting and drawing in my studio. What would you want to be if you werent an artist? I never wanted to be anything other than an artist, but I would have enjoyed being a professional photographer. Outside of your art, what are you passionate about? I am passionate about teaching art. I also enjoy writing. I have two novels that I am trying to get published, and Ive written five how-to books related to the commercial art field. What are you reading now? Several art magazines, including American Art Collector, which often gives me direction and inspiration for my work. Tell us about awards youve won. Since moving to Florida 13 years ago, Ive won more than 25 awards for my work. I am most proud of my three Best in Show awards, won at The von Liebig Art Center, the Art League of Bonita Springs and the Florida Chapter of the International Society of Acrylic Painters in Tampa. What artists would you like most to meet? The three generations of Wyeths: N.C., Andrew and Jamie. Any guilty pleasures? It used to be cigarettes and beer, but now its peanut butter! Artists Among Us is provided by the United Arts Council of Collier County. The council promotes all the arts in Collier County and provides education in the arts for at-risk students. For more information and a calendar of arts and cultural events, call 263-8242 or visit www.CollierArts.com.ARTISTS AMONG US CARDAMONE www.janesnaples.comNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH & WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING 15% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 201115% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 2011Sunday Brunch! 8am-3pmNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH & WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING ALL DENTAL SERVICESWith This Ad. Expires 9/30/11 20% OFF COURTESY PHOTOGenerations

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 their voices are nothing alike. But then she realized it was about that total abandonment, that emotional sacrifice. Everything, its all out right now, she says. This is me, everything Ive got, right now. She recalls when she was in 10th grade performing at a dance. One of her band mates told her, Twink, you have to pace yourself. And another responded, She cant pace herself. She sacrifices herself to the audience every time. The comment pleased Twinkle. Thats the way it is with me, she says.Grab it and pull it out!Shes like her generations Bonnie Bramlett, of the s-s duo Delaney and Bonnie, who toured as Delaney and Bonnie and Friends (the friends included Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Duane Allman, Dave Mason and Billy Preston). Ms. Bramlett sang with a gritty soulfulness. We dont sound the same, but we come from the same place when were singing, Twinkle says. Reach in there, grab it and pull it out! Its all or nothing. When Twinkle sang for a benefit for her father, Buddy Yochim, this spring (also a musician, he was fighting cancer at the time; he died in July), Ms. Bramlett came onstage as a surprise guest and sang Knockin on Heavens Door with her. A long-time family friend, Ms. Bramlett has known Twinkle since she was a little girl. Twinkles style is difficult to pin down. On her website, she lists blues, rock and soul, but shes also performed Southern rock, jammed to Middle Eastern grooves and rocked out with heavy metal musicians. A Sarasota native, shes well known in the area, having performed at clubs and festivals all over Southwest Florida. In Fort Myers, she performed at the now defunct downtown Liquid Caf, and opened once for David Crosby and twice for The Bacon Brothers at the now-shuttered Neptunes on U.S. 41. On Saturday, Sept. 24, the singer/ songwriter returns to the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota to celebrate the 20th anniversary of her first album, Haunted By Real Life. The evenings opening act, Ambrosia, is known for the hits Biggest Part of Me, Youre the Only Woman and How Much I Feel. Twinkle plans to perform all the songs from her album from start to finish, starting with Cant Get Love With Money and ending with You Are Not Yourself Anymore.Two decades laterShe signed with Warner Brothers in 1990; Haunted By Real Life, on Reprise, was produced by Patrick Leonard, who also worked with Madonna, Roger Waters, Pink Floyd, Michael Jackson and Elton John. He took me under his wing, Twinkle says about Mr. Leonard. Hes a wonderful musician and just an incredible genius person. He did this intricate production. Twinkle and her musicians have all been absorbing it, she says about revisiting the two-decades-old album. Every time, you hear something else, she says. Its a layer-upon-layer album. Randy Jackson plays bass on the album, as do musicians from the Madonna tour. It was her tour where she had those cones for breasts, Twinkle recalls. They had to play note-for-note the same every night. But for this album, they just let loose. It seemed like they were all really happy to be there. Twinkle, who was in her 20s back then, was thrilled to sign with such a prestigious label. Its the golden ring, she says about signing with a label. Her record deal, she adds, was the largest deal that Warner ever signed with an unsigned artist. They advertised her on the back cover of Billboard magazine, and she was flown to New York to guest-VJ on VH1s Top 21 Count Down. She performed at the Montreaux Jazz Festival, accompanied by Eric Claptons band under the direction of Quincy Jones. But the powers at Warner Brothers didnt like her nickname, Twinkle, and so they promoted her by her given name, Schascle (rhymes with gazelle.) They thought Twinkle sounded too teeny-bopper, she says. (Shes been known as Twinkle ever since her parents brought her home from the hospital as a newborn. They were showing me off at a party and one guy says, She smiles so much, you have to call her Twinkle. And thats all anybody ever called me.) She signed a deal for six albums, with an option to record two more. The new beginningHer musical history since then is a microcosm of the history of the music industry itself. The industry switched to instant gratification, she says. The bean counters took over, and suddenly it was all about quick hits and being the biggest performer. The bottom line counted more than developing artists. It happened overnight, she says, adding it was disappointing, because artist development is what made Warner great in the first place. I was so young. I wanted to sing and write. Released from her record contract in the late 1990s, she raised her two daughters, Ursula and Monique, while continuing to perform and record. She recorded 16 albums, most of them independent, such as Live at the 5 0, Gemini and LA Sessions. She also made one record on the EMI label (they changed her name to Twinkle Shazelle). From 2005 to 2007, Twinkle toured with Dickey Betts and the Great Southern Band. In 2008 she opened for Aerosmith at the St. Pete Times Forum. Shes done everything from singing God Bless America before a crowd of 75,000 at a Miami Dolphins game in Tampa to performing Little Wing with Paul Rodgers and Bad Company in Tacoma, Wash. She sang on Last Call With Carson Daly, causing him to exclaim, Wow! Twinkle! My God in heaven! when she was done. Many of the small clubs where she used to perform no longer exist, but Twinkle can be heard on YouTube and on her website, www.schascle.com, and her songs can be purchased on iTunes. Its a different musical landscape compared to 20 years ago. Im 47, my kids are out of the house, and this is now the new beginning, she declares. She sees her upcoming concert at the Van Wezel as the starting point for the rest of my life. The performance will be recorded, and a documentary about the history of Haunted By Real Life will be made. This is probably going to be the best show Ive ever done in my life, she says, adding she wants to take it to Europe, Japan and Australia. She has new management supporting her, and it just might happen. I want to tour a little bit at a time, nothing too extravagant, she says. Do the festivals, great theaters and concert halls. She also plans to go back into the recording studio and make another album. Writing, to me, has saved my life, she says. Its the best thing in the world anyone can do, making something out of nothing, expressing yourself. Completely uninhibited on stage, its as though shes a conduit for the song, with the music flowing through her veins and every molecule of her being. She holds nothing back. I am definitely a live performer, she says. I connect with people. I love people. I love music Its like church. Its magnificent to me. I devote everything I am to it. It is, she says, the one thing Im really, really good at and what Im obviously supposed to do. And the more I do it, the happier I am. For Twinkle, thats the ultimate freedom. TWINKLEFrom page 1 >> Haunted By Real Life 20th Anniversary Concert >> When: 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 >> Where: Van Wezel Performing Arts Center, 777 N. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota >> Cost: $100, $45, $35 and $25 >> Info: (941) 953-3368 in the know One reviewer said Twinkle has a voice so hot she can sing the ice off a polar ice cap.COURTESY PHOTOS Twinkle plans to return to the studio to record another album.New York City Ballet perform in a yearly fundraiser called Bravo Ballet. Ms. Roy and husband Roberto Muoz are the founders and directors of Saratoga Summer Dance Intensive, a ballet program that takes place in the month of June and July in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. In 1970, Jerome Robbins, a preeminent figure in the dance and theater world, established The Jerome Robbins Foundation with the intent to support dance, theater and their associative arts. Before his death in 1998, Mr. Robbins expressed his wish that the foundation again extend its resources to the performing arts dance and theater especially, but not exclusively including what developed into The Jerome Robbins Award. I would like there to be established a prize to some really outstanding person or art institution, explained Mr. Robbins in 1995. Past recipients of the award are Jennifer Tipton, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Twyla Tharp, Robert Wilson, New York City Ballet, Brooklyn Academy of Music and San Francisco Ballet. Jerome Robbins was the winner of five Tony awards, Two Academy awards, and was a Kennedy Center honoree. His best known works include Gypsy, Fiddler on the Roof, The King and I, The Pajama Game, Peter Pan and West Side Story, among many others. HONOREDFrom page 1 MARTHA SWOPE / THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTSMelinda Roy in rehearsal with Jerome Robbins, left

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Southwest Floridas largest tequila selection. over 200 ways to get inspired. www.agavenaples.com 239-598-FIRE (3473)2380 Vanderbilt Beach ROAD, Naplestequila inspired. real wood FIred. Authentic southwestern cuisine. best burgers in town.

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PENNE ALA VODKA BUCATINI ALA ENZO SPAGHETTI ALA NORMA JOIN OUR ECLUB FOR VALUABLE OFFERS AT BUCADIBEPPO.COM ALSO TRY OUR NEW LOBSTER SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLIS FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!One coupon per visit per table. Minimum purchase of $20 required. Must be presented at time of purchase. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Unauthorized internet distribution, replication or resale is strictly prohibited. Not refundable or redeemable for cash. Excludes banquet and group menus, tax, alcohol, gratuity and purchase of gift cards. Valid for dine in or Buca To Go. Expires 11/30/11. LMP$10offNAPLES DI BEPPO brand new pastas for a limited time only. DINE IN ONLYANY PURCHASE OF $20 OR MORE$10off www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Weekend Best Bets Sept. 23-25: Bonny Hawley: Spread Your Wings & Fly. West Wing Gallery/Naples Library. 649-1389 or www.bhawley.com. Sept. 23-25: Hope of Peace: 9/11 Remembrance Exhibit. Sophies Art Factory. 596-0606 or www.wallsculpt.com. Sept. 24: Film: Ann Echols Winn & Mae Janelle Echols Storter. Naples Historical Society at Palm Cottage. 261-8164 or www.napleshistoricalsociety.org Theater S Wonderful At the Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Fort Myers, through Oct. 1. 278-4422 or www.BroadwayPalm.com. A Bad Year for Tomatoes By The Island Players Sept. 30-Oct. 15 in the Rose History Auditorium at the Marco Island Historical Museum, 180 S. Heathwood Drive. 394-0080 or www. theateronmarco.com. Always Patsy Cline By The Naples Players Oct. 5-29 at the Sugden Community Theatre. 263-7990 or www. naplesplayers.org. Thursday, Sept. 22 Book Talk A discussion of Dreams of Joy by Lisa See starts at 2 p.m. at Headquarters Regional Library, 2385 Orange Blossom Drive. www.colliergov.net/library. Novel Discussion A discussion of The Paris Wife by Paula McClain starts at 2 p.m. at South Regional Library, 8065 Lely Cultural Blvd. www.colliergov. net/library. Just a Sec Freds Food, Fun & Spirits hosts Naples first-ever Minute to Win It Tournament at 8 and 10 p.m. $10 per two-person team with $100 going to the winner. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928. Friday, Sept. 23 NFL Legends Meet celebrity bartenders Mercury Morris and Larry Little from the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins team from 5-8 p.m. in the Lobby Bar at the Hilton Naples. Enjoy drink specials, complimentary hors doeuvres and have your photo taken with the duo. 430-4999. Bluegrass Tunes Sweet Clover performs from 8-11 p.m. at Freds Food, Fun & Spirits. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928. Saturday, Sept. 24 Trunk Show Petunias of Naples hosts a trunk show of womens fashion by Elana Kattan from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 852 Fifth Ave. S. 403-3550. Hispanic Culture Fifth Third Bank presents a family event from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the banks Mission Hills location on Vanderbilt Beach Road. Enjoy food, music and more in celebration of the histories and cultures of Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. Bluegrass in the Park Shannon and Heather Slaughter, with Country Clare Band, perform from 5-8 p.m. in the band shell at Cambier Park. Bring a chair or blanket. $12. 213-3058. All Classics, All the Time The Naples Philharmonic Orchestra presents All-Time Top 10 Classics at 8 p.m. at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. 597-1900 or www.ThePhil.org. Monday, Sept. 26 Foreign Film The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs presents Good Bye Lenin! at 7 p.m. at the Promenade at Bonita Bay, 26811 S. Bay Dr. $8. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. More Movies Its TGIM for the Fort Myers Film Festival at 6:30 p.m. at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in downtown Fort Myers. Learn how films are selected for the festival and hob-nob with the indie film community, assorted guests and host Eric Raddatz. 810-6323. Tuesday, Sept. 27 Cuban Culture History of Cuba Through Music and Photography starts at 2 p.m. at Headquarters Regional Library, 2385 Orange Blossom Drive. Enjoy a tour of Havana via the recorded singing of the chamber choir Entrevoces, with narrative by Dr. Marian Dolan. www.colliergov.net/library or 593-0177. Wild Time The Natural Cafe for kids ages 4-6 starts at 3:30 p.m. at the Vanderbilt Beach Branch Library, 788 Vanderbilt Beach Road. Kids can have fun with Conservancy puppets and learn what wild animals eat and how their diets compare with our own diets. Register at www.colliergov.net/library. Making Magic Magic, Magic, Magic! starts at 6 p.m. at the South Regional Library, 8065 Lely Cultural Pkwy. Cesar Domico presents his family show in English and Spanish. Register at www.colliergov.net/library. Wednesday, Sept. 28 Space Tales A program about Comets: Strange Visitors from Outer Space starts at 10 a.m. at Naples Regional Library, 650 Central Ave. 263-7768 or www.colliergov.net/library. Marco Art Wednesday ArtWalk runs from 5-8 p.m. at the Artist Colony at the Esplanade, 760 N. Collier Ave. on Marco Island. Get a sneak peek at the Bras for Life creations by participating Colony artists. Wine & Dancing Enjoy a threecourse dinner and glass of wine, plus demonstration from the Fred Astaire dancers followed by open dancing from 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Vergina. $30 per person, with proceeds benefiting Bosom Buddies Breast Cancer Support. Reservations: 659-7008. Coming up Art Night The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs Art Studios presents Art Walk from 4-7 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Promenade at Bonita Bay, 26811 S. Bay Drive. 495-8989 or www. artcenterbonita.org Rib Cook-off The Marco Island Brewery sponsors a rib cook-off beginning at 3 p.m. Oct. 1. $25 donatoins, with proceeds to benefit the Marco Island Police Foundation Scholarship and Emergency Fund. 9700461. Submit calendar listings and photos to events@floridaweekly.com. E-mail text, jpegs or Word documents are accepted. No pdfs or photos of flyers.COURTESY PHOTOOver Clouds Series: Big Guy (Bird) is one of the works by Richard Rosen on display at Rosen Gallery & Studios. Visitors are invited to see works by two painters, two ceramic artists and two sculptors. Free. 2172 J&C Blvd. 821-1061 for reservations. COURTESY PHOTOBig Splash by Tara ONeill is part of the artists exhibit of original oils on display at the Marco Island Library through September. Library hours are 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday and Thursday, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday. 201 S. Heathwood Drive. 394-3272.COURTESY PHOTOThe Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club presents Blue Dice in the final concert of the 2011 SummerJazz on the Gulf series from 7-10 p.m. Free. 261-2222 or www.naplesbeachhotel.com.

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Seating is limited. RSVP by Thursday, September 29. Register online ONLY at www.MiromarDesignCenter.com. Call (239) 390-8207 for more information.Mon Fri: 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. First oor stores open on Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; second and third oor hours vary. Located at 10800 Corkscrew Road, I-75, Exit 123 in Estero, between Naples and Fort Myers across from Miromar Outlets (239) 390-5111tuesday seminar series2012 is almost here! With expert advice and small changes you can update any room in your home for the New Year. Interior Designer Candice Sebring-Kelber will demonstrate just how easy it is to enhance your living space with these four ideas:REUPHOLSTER: Changing upholstery can create a new look. REVITALIZE: Window treatments to lighten, brighten and enhance. REVIVE: New pillows and throws add color and personality. RENEW: Bedding can completely alter the feel of the entire room. Following the seminar you are invited to Angela Fine Furnishings in Suite 210 for a complimentary wine & cheese reception. Refresh and Revive Discover four easy ways to transform your home for the New Year.TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 at 11:00 a.m.FREE SEMINAR AND WINE & CHEESE RECEPTION Candice Sebring-Kelber Interior Designer NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C7 NOW OPEN2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, Naples, FL (Located in the Galleria at NW corner of Airport-Pulling & Vanderbilt Beach Road) Email your name and a photo to events@shopvanderbilt.com or call 239-594-5000 NOW LEASING SPACE FARMERS MARKET DOGGIE DAYSaturday, October 8th3-5pm Food & Fun with your four-legged friends!Register your pet for our Canine Costume Fashion Show by September 20th!Outdoor Farmers Market beginning Saturday, October 1st Shoppes at Vanderbilt would like to welcome... leasing@shopvanderbilt.com239-594-5000 N OW D l beginni ng WRITING CHALLENGE One winner of the Florida Weekly Writing Challenge will attend the Sanibel Writers Conference taking place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 3-6, at BIG ARTS and the Sanibel Island Public Library. We hope our photo prompts over the next few weeks continue to inspire writers to pen prose and poems for consideration. Well print our favorites from week to week right here. A panel of editors will choose one winner from all the entries that have been printed. Well print the winning entry on Nov. 2 (well notify the winner the week before so conference plans can be made). For more information about the conference, visit www. fgcu.edu/siwc/. Below are the last three winners of round three of the Writing Challenge, who used the photo of the boy and the dog as the starting point for their creative process. The rooster-and-cat photo is our prompt for round four of the challenge. Use it as your cue for a piece of fictional prose or a poem of no more than 1,000 words. Send the result to us in Word format or pasted into the body of an e-mail to writing@floridaweekly.com Be sure to include your name, address and contact information. Feel free to include a photo of yourself as well. The rooster crows for the round four deadline on Saturday, Oct. 8. Round three wraps up, rooster launches round fourAmerican DogmaBY JOHN PELOTYes... an offer with open palm containing a mystery my keen nose will help answer. And they use a boy to coax me because they know my kind cant resist man as innocent. This boy looks at me with chocolate eyes hand dipping from a shiny silver bowl bright like their machines: the howler they keep in the closet. Ive been baited by fake bacon, fooled with dried food of questionable origin, just a Family Guys pet of a girl named Megan. Why was the boy in red, white and blue chosen? They placed a noose around my neck and called it a scarf. Now they offer a hand with what I am due, or a poison.Loyal is...BY LISA FLEMINGOh brother! And I dont mean your twin brother, who tried to sugarcoat my pill yesterday with a rolled up ball of liverwurst. Yuck. I am a dog, but Im no dummy. I hear the half-nervous, half-annoyed tone of your moms voice when she trys to sugarcoat a spoonful of your cough medicine. OK, here it comes, its so good for you, wont taste a thing. Blah, blah, blah...or rather, woof, woof, woof. She knows she cannot get away with these charades. I can take one look at her, and she gives it away with a flash of her dimple that shes up to something. Something, I usually dont want. Who do you people think youre kidding?! I usually see this small tiny hand, hidden nightly, under the kitchen table. I know the sign like a page from a football playbook: Hand drop. Wiggle hand around. Wet nose takes a whiff and accepts. Hand opens. Bingo! Down the hatch. Tail wag. Off to take a nap or over to your twin who is not as good at this game as you. He will eat just about everything. But you! How could you be the one, after all those dinners you didnt like were cleaned up with the tip of my tongue? You even got dessert for all those empty plates, thanks to me, your faithful friend. I know your mom and dad are worried about my heart and those darn worms. I heard every word of what the veterinarian had to say about keeping me, your loyal and loving companion, healthy. So as I ponder this pill, and all your cleverly disguised ways of coaxing me to take it, I will. But the next time your favorite meal of meatloaf is on the menu, you owe me, big time, and the dessert too!No-Thank You BiteBY CAROL PHILLIPS I know you can do this all by yourself; But I wanted to be here, I wanted to help. I dont eat alone and why should you? I know what Im doing, I was spoon fed, til two. It tastes so much better from a hand that is kind. You can start when youre ready, I really dont mind. Once you get going Youll see its all right; But you wont know, less you try with a no-thank you bite. Announcing NFL Tailgate Parties at The Bayfront Inn COLLEGE TICKET! COL OL LEG LE C CO O CO L L L L L L LEG LE G G G EG G EG E E E NFL SUNDAY TICKET! N N N N F F F F L L L FL FL FL 1221 5th Ave South Call (239) 649-5800 for more info TIC KET T TI C KE ET KE T o o Direct TV College ticket and Direct TV NFL Sunday ticket Food and drink specials Best view in town Family friendly All the games Widescreen HD TV Tailgate specials beginning at 12:00 pm

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L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch 263-9940 263-2734 www.napleswaterfrontdining.com fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Limited time offer. Not good with any other offer. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 I dont have children of my own, but sometimes Im able to borrow some of my friends. In this way Ive been able to pass along the joy of reading and teach pre-schoolers that blue isnt just blue, but comes in many varieties, including baby blue and navy. My brothers two of whom were in college and high school when I was a preschooler myself took great pride in teaching me how to read and making sure I knew about spheres and cubes when I was learning about circles and squares. I remember the spark of excitement in a little friend a few years ago when I informed him there were more words in the world than listed in his childrens dictionary. His eyes grew bigger when I showed him his parents dictionary, 3 inches thick and filled with tiny print. Hed make me randomly read words to him. He didnt know what they all meant (I didnt either), but he liked the way they sounded. I think he also liked the idea that there were so many words in the world. Kids are just naturally curious about everything, from dinosaurs to ants to the universe. Nurturing a love of the arts is a great way to continue that sense of wonderment and curiosity about the world. Get kids involved early enough, and theres a good chance their appreciation of the arts will last forever. Itll make their lives infinitely richer. I was pleased to learn recently that two young friends of mine were trying out for their schools drama club. Hannah is in first grade, and Sams in third. They auditioned for roles in Snow White and a Whole Lot of Dwarfs. (I guess when youre dealing with four grades kindergarten through third grade youre going to have a lot more than seven dwarfs.) Their mom asked me if Id practice their lines with them. (Technically, its not running lines, because as far as I can tell, each of them has just one speaking part. The kindergarteners, who play animals, say a single sentence, short and worthy of Raymond Carver: What are you wishing for? Its also a very existential question, if you think about it.) Wanting to pass along tips to such young kids has really given me pause. Ive had to stop and think about it on the most elemental levels. Heres what I think is important for my little friends to know about theater and acting: Have fun. Figure out what the emotions are in the lines youre supposed to say. (For example, Sam, vying for the role of huntsman, has to say: Yes, my queen. Her heart? But your majesty!) Youre that character from the second you step on stage all the way to the second you step off. Even when youre not speaking. Realize too, that people can see you whenever youre on stage. So dont scratch your head or stare at your sneakers or fiddle with whatevers in your pockets. Listen to what the other characters are saying. Thats especially important when theyre saying something to your character. (Hannah: How will I know when its my turn? Sam: You have to also memorize the line before yours, so youll know theyre talking to you.) Its live theater, so sometimes things might go wrong. Something might get dropped or fall over. Dont freak out if that happens. (Hannah: What do you do if theres a fire? I told her that that was extremely unlikely. But I had to admit that in over 20 years of reviewing shows, yes, Id once seen a fire onstage. An actor had a magic wand that shot sparks, and one of the sparks ignited some confetti on the stage floor. Hannah: So what happened? Did everyone run out of the theater? I told her that the show continued on, while an adult from the wings quickly walked onstage and stomped out the fire. Hannah: But what if the entire theater is on fire?) Be clear. Be loud. No one will know what youre saying if you mumble mumble mumble. Dont rush your lines. This is your moment to shine. No one will understand you if you rush through them too quickly. Theater is a collaborative effort. That means that its many different people, on stage and off, all working together as a team to put on the show. And again, above all, have fun. My friends are leaning from this experience already. Theyve learned the importance of preparation, and of having self-confidence. (Or going on and trying something regardless, even if youre scared.) Theyve also learned that, like the Rolling Stones sang, you cant always get what you want. Hannah had her heart set on being a dwarf. But she was cast as a princess. Her mother tried to convince her that that was a good thing, but Hannah really wanted to be a dwarf. (This from a girl who has six images of Tinkerbelle over her bed and is stereotypically girly.) I want to be a dwarf! she said. But only the boys get to be dwarfs. Thats not fair! The injustice of it was very clear to her. Wait til you find out that women still get paid less than men, I thought, but held my tongue. Theres plenty of time for her to learn that ugly truth. So at a tender age, Hannah learned that you cant always get what you want and that sometimes directors make strange choices in casting (especially if you dont get cast for the role you really, really wanted.) But a day or so later, a compromise was offered: Hannah could be one of the three witches. It wasnt a dwarf, but it made her happy. If you knew Hannah, youd realize just how much this is casting against type. (She has a sunny personality and up until recently, her favorite color was pink. Ive never seen a pink, frilly witch.) Who knows what Sam and Hannah will take away from participating in their school drama club.They tell me the play will be performed in the spring. I plan on being in the audience.Maybe someone will wave to her parents right in the middle. Maybe someone will forget his lines. Maybe someone will knock over a prop. But whatever happens, itll be exciting. Its live theater. A whole lotta dwarfs: Theater 101 lit a c in nancySTETSON nstetson@floridaweekly.com f t he role o f huntsman, ha s to s ay : Y es my q ue en He r he ar t? B ut t he sta g e f loor. Han na h: So w ha t ha pp en ed ? Hanna h h a d h er h e a a w ce tr he a H wa d w a i m b e a n d c a l dw B u g et T h a T i t w h er. W o ut g et m e n b ut h The r fo r h u gl y S o H an n you c w hat th at s t ors choic e ( espe c ge t ca s

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C9 Our Sensational 6th Season! CORPORATE PARTNER CORPORATE EXECUTIVE PRODUCER EXECUTIVE PRODUCERSBob & Linda Harden Christine Paddockwww.gulfshoreplayhouse.org Call for Tickets: 1-866-811-4111 Single Tickets Start at $35 Season Packages Available All shows exclusively at THE NORRIS CENTER 755 8th Ave NAPLES, FL OCT 28 NOV 20, 2011 1 JAN 27 FEB 12, 2012 2 MAR 2 23, 2012 APR 6 22, 2012 Retired NYPD Officer Daniel Rodriguez, the tenor who rose to fame as the Singing Policeman following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, will perform a free concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at Covenant Church of Naples/PCA. After 9/11, Officer Rodriquez studied with Placido Domingo for 18 months and then performed at the 2002 Winter Olympics, the PBS Memorial Day concert in Washington, D.C., the Tournament of Roses Parade and the 2004 Republican National Convention, as well as during numerous television appearances. He has also recorded three albums. He retired from the NYPD in 2004. Officer Rodriguez inspired and comforted the nation in the weeks following 9/11 with his magnificent voice, said Bob Petterson, pastor of Covenant Church. We are so pleased to bring him to Naples, shortly after he performs during a 10th anniversary service at the Postcards Memorial on Staten Island. The program will include sacred hymns, classical pieces and patriotic songs. Covenant Church of Naples/PCA is at 6926 Trail Blvd., on the east side of U.S. 41 in North Naples. Reservations for the concert are required and can be made by calling 597-3464. 9/11 Singing Policeman to perform in NaplesRODRIGUEZ PUZZLE ANSWERS

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Hours: Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30-4 Dinner Sun-Thurs 5-10 Fri & Sat 4-11 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples 239-592-0050 www.noodlescafe.com $ 15 00 OFFWITH PURCHASE OF $50 OR MOREGratuity added before discounts. One coupon per table. Valid Sun-Thurs 4-7 pm. Not valid holidays. Not valid with special offers. EXPIRES 10-31-11Live Entertainment & DancingWednesday Saturday 5-9FeaturingManhattan Connection, Don Barber, Taylor Stokes, Rudy Vale & Barry NewmanIndependently Owned & Operated The OriginalSince 1991 S ATURDAYSFREE CALAMARI APPETIZERwith the purchase of 2 drinks*not valid with any other offer, or discountEXPIRES 10-31-11 VIRGO (Aug ust 23 to September 22) Venus offers encouragement to romance-seeking Virgos who are ready to get up, get out and meet more people, one of whom could be that long-sought soul mate. LIBRA (Sept ember 23 t o October 22) An ongoing problem with a coworker might need to be sent to arbitration. Get all your facts together so that you have a solid base from which to make your argument. SCORPIO (Oct ober 23 t o November 21) You are usually decisive about most matters. But you might want to defer your decision-making this week until you get more facts. Someone is holding out on you. SAGITTARIUS (N o vember 22 to December 21) That quiet period is ending, and a new burst of activity creates some problems at the workplace. But things are soon resolved, and everything goes back to normal. CAPRICORN (Dec ember 2 2 to January 19) Relationships could be either helpful or hurtful as you pursue your career goals. You might have to make some difficult choices depending on what your priorities are. AQUARIUS (J anuary 2 0 to February 18) You might still have some doubts about a career move that could involve a lot of travel. If so, continue to check things out until you feel secure about making a decision. PISCES (F ebruary 1 9 to March 20) Love rules, as Venus continues to exercise her cosmic influence on both single and attached Pisces. New developments might cause you to change your travel plans. ARIES (Mar ch 21 t o April 19) Cosmic changes create a potential for disruptions in your travel plans. In the meantime, you might want to consider shifting your focus to another area of your life that needs attention. TAURUS (April 2 0 t o May 20) Its a good time for beauty-loving Bovines to enjoy something special for the senses. It will restore your spirit and return you to the workaday world ready for the next challenge. GEMINI (Ma y 21 t o June 20) With your planetary ruler, Mercury, going retrograde, you might want to slow down the pace in pursuing some of your projects. Rushing things could be counterproductive. CANCER (J une 21 t o July 22) Tensions begin to ease in those once-testy relationships. This helps create a more positive aspect all around. Expect to hear news that could lead you to rethink a recent decision. LEO (J uly 23 to August 22) The p ace of activity that had slowed last week now begins to pick up. This is good news for Leos and Leonas who have career-building plans that need to be put into operation. BORN THIS WEEK: Y ou oft en think of others before you consider your own needs. You enjoy helping people and would make a fine teacher or caregiver. SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved.PUZZLES HOROSCOPES TITLED TITLES By Linda Thistle Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: Sponsored By:

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C11 Is it worth $10? YesDrive dares to be different, and it succeeds in every way. Its quiet, subtle and subversive, yet brusque and abrasive when it needs to be. It also features a fearless performance by Ryan Gosling that keeps viewers captivated even as it moves through a rather standard storyline. Mr. Gosling plays a man known only as Driver. He works as a mechanic and stunt car driver but moonlights as a heist-getaway wheelman for hire provided the henchmen adhere to his strict set of rules. He keeps to himself and speaks to few, and doesnt even get excited when his mechanic boss (Bryan Cranston) secures funding from a shady former film producer (Albert Brooks) to starting a racing team. Driver does, however, become smitten with his neighbor Irene (Carey Mulligan), whose husband, Standard (Oscar Isaac), is in prison. They run errands together, he helps watch her son Benicio (Kaden Leos), and a genuine bond emerges. The fact that the infatuation happens so easily is trite, but not more so than in any other film with a similar situation. Eventually, Standard gets out of prison and is forced to do one more job. When Driver decides to help, massive complications ensue. OK, so the plot points in screenwriter Hossen Aminis script (based on the book by James Sallis) arent going to win points for originality. But Im telling you it doesnt matter, because the driving force of director Nicolas Winding Refns film is Mr. Goslings performance. Theres a calm, eerie quiet in Drivers eyes, the likes of which are so unassuming youd take him for the nicest, most innocent guy in the world. And Driver certainly is nice until its time not to be nice. Although you rarely see Driver yell or lose his cool, when he does have to do bad things, it comes with such an exclamation point that you cant believe your eyes. Helping Mr. Gosling is the fact that Mr. Refn, a Danish filmmaker who helped put Tom Hardy on the map in 2008 with Bronson, is a true visionary. Watch the way the slow motion, camera angles, lighting, framing and character placement hold on certain scenes and keep our focus. We dont have to wait while Driver slowly b acks out of a room after an exciting scene, but Mr. Refn has the patience and artistry to make us think its cool to watch Driver do just that. This is a very easy thing to do wrong, and Mr. Refn hits every note just right. Like it or not, when Drive is over, you wont know what hit you. Hopefully, (like me) youll appreciate the creativity Mr. Refn brings to the film and the chilling performance Mr. Gosling delivers. The $13 million movie isnt getting a huge marketing push by its distributor, FilmDistrict, but its a must-see for all movie lovers. Dan Hudak is the chairman of the Florida Film Critics Circle and a nationally syndicated film critic. You can e-mail him at dan@hudakonhollywood.com and read more of his work at www.hudakonhollywood.com. LATEST FILMSDrive danHUDAK www.hudakonhollywood.com >> Hugh Jackman was originally cast as Driver. in the know VODKA TASTINGFEATURINGRUSSIAN STANDARDWednesday, September 28th5:30 PM to 7:30PM Sample vodkas by Russian Standard paired with complimentary hor doeuvres by Chef Cesar Try their signature drink Moscow Mule 5111 Tamiami Trail North | Naples, FL 34103 Register Today at shulasvodkatastin g.even tbrite.com or Call Je at 239-659-3176 $20 In Advance $25 At The Door

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Av alon D rL a kewo od Blvd 41 Sugde n R egiona l ParkT a mi a mi Tr i EL o cate d acr o ss from Walgr ee n s i n Su gd en Pa r k Pl a za 4270 Tamiami Trail East Naples (239) 692-9294 WWW.BOSTONS.COM BP International Rights Holdings Inc. 2011 (BPIRH). All Bostons the Gourmet Pizza trademarks are owned by BPIRH and are duly licensed by Boston Pizza Restaurants, LP in the United States. Game Day Headquarters Food & Drink Specials in the Sports Lounge Happy Hour 3-7 Daily Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC12 WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Fraxel Laser Resurfacing Reduces Fine Lines, Evens Skin To ne, Reduces Dark Spots Exilis Body &Face Treatments Shrinks Targeted Fat and Tightens S agging Skin Botox and Juvederm Relaxes Wrinkles, Adds Volume to smooth away linesCertied by the American Board of Plastic Surgery Manuel M. Pea M.D. (239) 348-7362 or visit www.dr-pena.com Look younger, Feel better, Without surgery.Dr. Pea Performs state-of-the art Aesthetics on the Face and Body By Rosamund Lupton (Crown Publishing, $24)REVIEWED BY ROSE M. CROKESpecial to Florida WeeklyOlder sister Bee is living an ideal life with her fiance and a great career abroad in New York. One evening, Bee gets a call from her mother in England, who informs her that Tess, her free-spirited 21-year-old sister, is missing. Without hesitation, Bee buys a plane ticket home to search for Tess, who is pregnant and due to give birth any day. Shortly after Bee arrives, Tesss body is found. The police investigation concludes that Tess took her own life after giving birth to a stillborn child. Bee is certain that the police are wrong, and she launches her own investigation. Bees determination to find out what really happened to her sister drives the plot and sets the tone of the story, all the while beautifully conveying the powerful bond between sisters. Bees palpable grief and relentless dedication to finding out what happened during Tesss final days are heartbreaking. Framed as a letter to her deceased sister, Bee deconstructs the events leading up to Tesss death and lays out the facts as she herself uncovers them. Part psychological thriller and part medical drama, Sister is the work of first-time novelist and former scriptwriter Rosamund Lupton. Written in an unusual narrative style, Ms. Lupton weaves together a compelling story about family, relationships, grief and loss, with an interesting angle involving genetic testing. Sister is a haunting love story with twists and turns, false leads, plentiful red herrings and a gasp-inducing surprise ending. Its the kind of enthralling story that, when read on a stormy night, may cause readers to jump in fright at a sudden clap of thunder. Books reviewed in this column are available online or at your local bookstore. BEACH READINGSister 239-263-18502048 Tamiami Trail N., NaplesAcross from the Cheesecake Factory houseofprimerib@centurylink.net Get Ready... For e Prime Of Your Life!Coming Early October

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C13 Text CBAKE to 97063 to receive more special offers & promos! ITALIAN MEATBALL MELT NAPLES FT. MYERS CHEF SALAD WHAT ARE YOU HAVING FOR LUNCH TODAY? TURKEY ARTICHOKE PRESSATA Coast into Happy Hour 1901 Gulf Shore Boulevard North, Naples, Florida 34102 | 239.403.2000 Enjoy internationally inspired cuisine in a casually elegant atmosphere while overlooking stunning views of the Gulf of Mexico.Serving Dinner Nightly from 5:30PM Thursday Happy Hour 6:30PM-8PM THURSDAY, SEPT. 22, 9 P.M. Me xico: The Royal Tour Hes traveled with the King of Jordan, the president of Peru, the prime ministers of New Zealand and Jamaica. Now, Peter Greenberg joins Felipe Caldern, one of the most dynamic leaders of Latin America, for a history-making television special. This groundbreaking program showcases Mexico in a way no visitor has ever seen the country before through the eyes of its leader who guides this personal tour. FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, 9 P.M. Gr ea t Performances Placido Domingo: My Favorite Roles The great Spanish tenor looks back on his illustrious career one bountifully preserved on film. SATURDAY, SEPT. 24, 10:30 P.M. Ar e Y ou Being Served? Set in the antiquated Grace Brothers department store, this innuendo-laden comedy with a penchant for slapstick has been a BBC classic since the 1970s. SUNDAY, SEPT. 25, 9 P.M. Mast erpiec e Mystery! Inspector Lewis: The Mind Has Mountains When a student is found dead during a clinical drug trial, the motives of an enigmatic professor are questioned.10:30 P.M. FGCU Perspectives Find out whats happening on the campus of Florida Gulf Coast University. MONDAY, SEPT. 26, 8 P.M. Antiques R oa dshow Raleigh Hour 1 A 1920 Arts & Crafts desk and lamp; a rare, circa-1960 Gibson Double 12 Electric Guitar; and a set of four Chinese carved jade objects that garner the highest-value appraisal in Roadshow history. TUESDAY, SEPT. 27, 10 P.M. P O.V. Last Train Home This award-winning film travels with a Chinese couple, part of the 130 million migrant workers who journey to their home villages every spring for the New Year. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28, 10 P.M. NO V A Surviving the Tsunami: A NOVA Special Watch amateur and professional video of the tsunami that struck Japan, as survivors tell the stories of their life-saving decisions. This week on WGCU TV

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4 Convenient Locations to Serve You!www.cinaples.comPelican Bay 597-6700 Get-Away Club 597-2961 Village Walk 514-2047 Verona Walk 430-1254 SAMPLE FUNRAISER CRUISES: Do you know a family in need or is your church, civic or non-pro t organization looking for a simple way to raise much needed funds? Let CI Travel show you how easy and fun it is for your group to Sail to Success! What are you waiting for...gather your pals, join the fun and support your favorite cause! Call Patti at 597-2961 (or your favorite CI Travel Agent) FUN-Raiser Cruises Majesty of the Seas4 Night Bahamas CruiseRoundtrip from Miami to Nassau, Key West & CoCo Cay PP/DBLAllure of the Seas 7 Night Western Caribbean Cruise Falmouth, Jamaica & Cozumel, Mexico PP/DBLRadiance of the Seas7 Night Alaska Cruise Vancouver to Ketchikan, Icy Strait Point, Juneau, Skagway, Hubbard Glacier & Seward PP/DBL Royal Caribbean International reserves the right to impose a fuel supplement on all guests if the price of West Texas Intermediate fuel exceeds $65.00 per barrel. The fuel supplement for 1st and 2nd guests would be no more than $10 per guest per day, to a maximum of $140 per cruise; and for additional guests would be no more than $5 per person per day, to a maximum of $70 per cruise. *Any pricing or special offers included on this ad, if any, are being included by CI Travel and are not the responsibility of Royal Caribbean International or its parent company or af liates. Contact your travel agency for more information. To the extent any itineraries are included on this ad, the same are subject to change without notice. All itineraries and prices are subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions apply. Government taxes and fees are additional. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. Ships registered in the Bahamas. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC14 WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Antique collectors who do research know that important companies grow from small companies with very talented founders who solved both personal and business problems. It is well known that Josiah Wedgwood, the 18th-century potter, was refused a job in the family business because he was disabled. But he worked hard, developed special glazes and shapes, and eventually went into the business and made it famous and financially successful. Richard and Betty James spent $500 to start making Slinky toys in the 1940s. Betty had six children and little business experience when her husband left her in 1960 to join a religious group in Bolivia. She ran the business, became CEO of the company, developed new products and made Slinky one of the most successful toys of the 20th century. Appolonia Margarete Steiff, born in 1847 and crippled by polio as a child, used a wheelchair for the rest of her life. She went to school, took sewing classes and learned to operate a sewing machine backwards with her stronger arm. She made some elephant-shaped pincushions as a gift for friends and then to sell to others. She realized they were being used as toys, so she started making large toy elephants. The company grew with her ideas and designs, and by 1893 she was issuing a catalog. Many relatives joined the company and helped it become the huge Steiff toy company still working today. Margarete made hundreds of different animal toys, even some based on the imaginary characters of comics and movies. Felix the Cat was a cartoon character in a 1919 short film called Feline Follies. He soon became the star of a King Features comic strip and a TV cartoon series, and was made into toys. A Steiff Felix toy was made in 1927. He had a white face, not a black one, and did not sell well. Today, as a very rare Steiff toy, he is worth more than $4,000. Q: I have several Dunbar furniture pieces made by Edward Wormley. They were originally done in a blond finish called bleached mahogany. My parents had two of the pieces refinished in a dark shade using Dunbar stains. I am debating restaining the other pieces. I have seen redone Wormley in high-end shops. The old finish has a brittle yellow quality caused by nitrocellulose lacquer. Is it OK to remove the lacquer? Will it destroy the value? A: If the refinishing is well done and closely resembles the dark finish used by Dunbar, it probably will not be a problem. Fifties furniture like yours was made in quantity and is bought today for its decorative value. If the lacquer is discolored, it would be a plus a e i i t h t terryKOVEL news@floridaweekly.com KOVELS: ANTIQUES Antiques that are results of triumphs over tragedies

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BONITA SPRINGS25010 Bernwood Dr. (239) 949-6001 Randy's paradise Shrimp Co.www.randys shmarketrestaurant.com Closed for September www.paradiseshrimponline.com SORRY FOR ANY INCONVIENENCE WE WILL BE RE-OPENING IN OCTOBERNAPLES10395 Tamiami Trail (239) 593.5555 10% OFF your next purchase Fish Market Only! (with this ad, cannot be combined with any other offer.)Month of September 8th Anniversary Special HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6domestic draft beer wells (one shot only) $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 price Lunch & Dinner Randys Famous Fish & Chips $ 9.95 w/purchase of a drink Full Rack Danish Baby Back Ribs $ 9.95 w/purchase of a drink DINNER ONLYColby Red Wine $ 12.99Tomatoes $ .79 lb Naples Award-Winning 2011 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP STUDIOIn support of breast cancer awareness month! Presents DINNER AND DANCING UNDER THE STARWednesday, September 28th 6:30-9:30pm Prix Fixe Menu starts with Cocktail Hour Professional Dance followed by open dancing with Live Music Ticket inclusive three course dinner and glass wine for only $30 per personCALL 659-7008 ASAP TO RSVP! SPACE IS LIMITED! Pro ts of this special event to bene t: CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS!www.VerginaRestaurant.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C15 This Felix the Cat figure was made by Steiff, the famous German toy company. It sold for $4,250 at a 2010 Fairfield auction in Monroe, Conn. He is 9 inches tall and, of course, has the trademark Steiff button in his ear. to remove it. Dont sand it, because you will remove some of the wood, and this would lower the value. Fifty years from now, Wormleys designs may not be as easy to find, and your refinishing may be questioned. But are you treating the furniture as something to enjoy, not as museum pieces. Q: I have several of my mothers silk scarves marked Vera. They are decorated with bright flowers in a flowing informal style. Any history or price information? A: Vera Neumann made colorful scarves, tablecloths, bedsheets, towels, fabrics, dresses, blouses and sleepware. She was born in Connecticut in 1907, graduated from Cooper Unions art school in New York and painted watercolors that she turned into fabric designs. She and her husband, George, started making silkscreened placemats in their apartment in the mid-1940s. But she is best known for her scarves. She signed each one Vera. The earliest had a small signature, but the signature grew bigger each year as her designs became more famous. She added a copyright symbol, then a ladybug, probably in the 1950s and 1960s. Some think she continued using the ladybug until the 1980s. Her flower designs are best-known, but she also did geometrics. After World War II, she bought surplus parachutes and used that fabric for scarves. Most of her work was made in the United States, but later pieces were made in Japan and China. Her name and designs are being made again. Scarves sell for $15 to $150. Q: I have a 2-gallon stoneware jug with a handle that reads Hamilton & Jones, Greensboro, Greene Co., PA on it. Its gray with blue writing. Id like to know more about the maker. A: Hamilton & Jones was in business from 1866 to 1898. The company was founded by John Jones and William Leet (or Lute) Hamilton. They made stoneware with hand-painted and stenciled blue designs. The pottery used several different marks, including some that said Star Pottery and some that said Union Works. Tip: To clean an old coffee grinder, grind white rice through the mill. When the rice appears to be clean, the grinder is clean enough to use. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. Write to Kovels (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

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facebook.com/ KeyWestExpress twitter.com/ KeyWestExpress youtube.com/ KeyWestExpress *Minimum 8 day advance pre-purchase tickets, non-refundable, cannot be combined with any other offers. Excludes weekend fee (Fri., Sat., Sun.). Offer valid through Sept. 30, 2011. www.seakeywestexpress.com 1-800-KWE-7259 FANTASYFEST 2011DONT MISS THE PARTY! SPECIAL PARADE CRUISE!OCTOBER 21ST-30THGETTING THERE IS SEPT. 17TH-24TH CHOOSE YOUR FANTASY! HALF THE FUN! BIKE WEEK $119ROUND TRIP* ROBERTO OF ITALYFeather Locks Feather Hair ExtensionsHair Designers862 Neapolitan Way, Naples, FL 34103 | 239-261-8812Award-Winning ColoristPaul Mitchell | Indola | WellaThe New Fashion Statement NEW AND EXCLUSIVEThe Ultimate Hair Ornament NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC16 WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 NATURAL & ORGANIC LUNCH & DINNER EMPIRE FUSION www.thejollycricket.com720 5th Avenue S. (239) 304-9460 Spend $50 and get a $10 Gift Voucher to spend laterWith this coupon. Valid until 9/29/11 Keys will unlock cancer society benefitThe Greater Marco Island American Cancer Society and Tiffany & Co. host Keys for a Cause, an evening of glamour and giving, from 5-8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, at Greystone Manor on Marco. With the $100 cost of admission, each guest will receive a key. At the party, they will find a locked glass box containing a Tiffany gift box. If their key opens the glass box, they will be invited to choose a Tiffany gift provided for the evening. Gifts will include crystal, silver and leather items from the current Tiffany collection. Additional keys will be available for purchase for $50. For more information, call 642-8800. United Arts Council plans patriotic saluteThe United Arts Council of Collier County hosts its annual fall fundraiser, A Patriotic Salute to the Arts, on Saturday evening, Nov. 12, at The von Liebig Art Center. The festivities help kick off Celebrate the Arts Month. Guests will enjoy an evening of visual and performing arts showcasing area artists and musical and theater groups. Trevor Earl will entertain, and gourmet food stations will be set up throughout the center. Peter and Stella Thomas are honorary chairs, and Mr. Thomas will do a patriotic reading as part of the program. Mayor Bill Barnett will serve as auctioneer. Cherry Smith is the event chair. For tickets or more information, call 2638242 or visit www.CelebrateTheArts.org. Make a date for clinic block partyThe Neighborhood Health Clinic hosts its ninth annual Neighborhood Block Party: The Party with a Purpose To Save Lives on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Guests will enjoy a cocktail reception, an elegant sit-down dinner and dancing to Cahlua and Cream. Relying on a volunteer professional staff, the clinic delivers care to lowincome, working but uninsured adults in Collier County. The block party generates approximately 25 percent of its annual operating budget. Kelly Richardson is chair of the 2012 event. Tickets are $250 per person. Invitations will be mailed in early January. For information about sponsorships or becoming involved with block party plans or clinic operations as a volunteer, contact Nikki Strong, director of development and communications, at 2602080 or nstrong@neighborhoodhealthclinic.org. SAVE THE DATE

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Make your FREE Consultation appointment now! (239) 594-9075 www.drlipnik.comLipnik Dermatology and Laser CenterSUMMER SPECIALon BOTOX Cosmetic$10/unit NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 C17 24041 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL, BONITA SPRINGS 239.390.3187 | WWW.ANGELINASOFBONITASPRINGS.COM Follow me on Twitter AngelinasBonitaReal. Italian. -AngelinaExperience award winning, romantic dining at Southwest Floridas most elegant restaurant. Four Course Dinner for Two, $65* rough October 15. e perfect meal. LibertyLives, Bonita Springs e BEST of Naples. dnj53, Naples FL Excellent; authentic; professional servers; upscale environment. Cape Coral, FL Delectable, authentic Italian food in a luxurious atmosphere. Travchef acting technique for the stage acting technique for the stage acting technique for the stage 2011 2011 2012 2012 Come play with us! Gulfshore Playhouses professional teaching artists will take students ages 7-14 on an exciting journey into the magical world of live theatre.These classes will include: Improvisation, theatre games and pantomime Scene and monologue study Movement and memorization Learning new ways to have fun and build confidence All experience levels are welcome to enroll and step into the spotlight! 2011Series 1: August 30, September 6, 13, 20, 27 October 4 Series 2: October 11, 18, 25 November 1, 8, 152012Series 3: January 10, 17, 24, 31 February 7, 14 Series 4: February 21, 28 March 6, 13, 20, 27 Series 5: April 10, 17, 24 May 1, 8, 15 TIME: 4:15-5:45 pm COST: $150 for single series $125 for each additional seriesAll classes held at THE NORRIS CENTER 755 8th Avenue South, Naples, FL 34102 TO REGISTER, CALL GULFSHORE PLAYHOUSE @ 239.261.PLAY (7529)www.gulfshoreplayhouse.org Its tea time for Make-A-WishAn afternoon of fine teas, lovely china, delicious treats and a silent auction at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples, from 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, will benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Florida. Organizes hope to raise enough money to fund one local childs wish. Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust is the sponsor. Make-A-Wish grants wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions. Tickets for Tea at The Ritz are $125 per person. To purchase tickets or to learn more about donating, volunteering or becoming a wish sponsor, call Lesley Colantonio at 992-9474 or e-mail lcolantonio@sflawish.org. Hope for Haiti plans garden galaHope for Haiti holds its 2012 gala, A Passport to the Secret Garden, from 6-11 p.m. Saturday, March 3, at the St. Ann Jubilee Center. The evening will include a cocktail reception, dinner, silent and live auctions, raffle drawing, entertainment and more. Tickets are $300 per person. Volunteer and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information, contact Elizabeth Davison at 434-7183 or Elizabeth@hopeforhaiti.com.10th annual tasting coming up for CANWomen Supporting Women holds its 10th annual wine tasting to benefit the Cancer Alliance of Naples from 5:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at Handsome Harrys. Alice Carlson, a founding member of Women Supporting Women and chair of the event, has chosen Audrey Hepburns quote, I believe in pink I believe in miracles, as the evenings theme. Tickets are $75 in advance, $85 at the door. To purchase a ticket or donate an auction items, e-mail Ms. Carlson at womensupportingwomen.naples@ gmail.com. For more information about CAN, call 436-4763 or visit www.cancerallianceofnaples.com.Place your bets on casino nightThe Friends of the Library of Collier County will hold the third annual Red, White & R oulette casino night Friday, Nov. 4, at the Naples Beach Hotel and Golf Club. Last years casino night earned the Florida Library Associations Outstanding Program of the Year Award. For 2011, the Friends of the Library have upped the ante and promise a Las Vegas-style night of dancing to The Blue Tones and taking a chance with full casino gaming and professional croupiers. Tickets are $75 per person. For tickets or more inf ormation, call 2628135 or visit www.c ollier-friends.org. SAVE THE DATE

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1/2 PRICED WINE LISTbottles up to $100expires 9/29/11 BUY ONE GET ONEpurchase one dish, get the second freegood for lunch or dinner = or lesser value +18% gratuity before discountexpires 9/29/11must present coupon at time of purchase. cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer2455 vanerbilt beach road naples 34109 239.254.0050 BEST HAPPY HOUR IN TOWNALL drinks 1/2 price 4-8 NIGHTLY Unisex styles, Slides and thongs, Brown, Black and White/Green AMAZING RELIEFfrom plantar fasciitis (Heel pain) plus many other symptoms Gulf Coast Town Center. . . . . . . . . .$10Must present coupon. Not valid on any other offers or discount. Exp. 9/30/11.Kenhoh Re exology/ Massage SandalClinically proven to: Decrease fatigue Increase blood ow Reduce swelling in feet & legs Provide an overall good feeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Open Sundays239-337-9810Gulf Coast Town Center I-75 exit 128 Call for DirectionsMore information at happyfeet.comOnly available at Happy Feet PlusOff NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 True Neapolitan Pizza and Authentic Italian Food www.rosedalepizza.com 239-325-96531427 Pine Ridge Road, #105, Naples Experience the Difference Good Taste Makes. Monday-Thursday 11:30 am-9:00pm Friday-Saturday 11:30am-10:00pm Sunday 12:00pm-9:00pm Naples Best Kept Secret 4221 Tamiami Trail East NaplesLocated on US 41 opposite Sugden Park Open Mon-Sat N N N N N N & Nicks PlaceQuality Food. Exceptional Service.Call 239.793.2644 or visit www.mongellos.com Our outdoor patio is PET-FRIENDLY anytime, any day! Pick up your Wine and Dine Club Card on your next visit!LIVE ENTERTAINMENT WED-SATWednesday through Saturday, visit www.mongellos.com for details Now Open Sundays NFL FootballFREE Snacks! Food and Drink Specials......... Summer Specials .........HAPPY HOUR 11-7 Daily Choice of 2 Dinners & Bottle of House Wine $26.95 Lunch Special: Lunch SpecialBuy 1 Full-Priced Lunch, Get a FREE Draft Beer or House Wine Latin Night! 10pm-2am SaturdayNO COVER! An Evening in Old HavanaGuests will be transported to vintage Cuba for An Evening in Old Havana at the David Lawrence Foundations signature destination-drive gala on Friday, Jan. 20, at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples. From the dcor to the cocktails and music, everything will be reminiscent of Havanas opulent social clubs of the 1930s. In keeping with the theme, women are encouraged to wear summery cocktail dresses, while the best-dressed men can don linen guayaberas or tropical print shirts and smart fedoras. Tickets are $500 per person, $1,200 per VIP patron and $5,000 per table of 10. A variety of sponsorship opportunities and levels are also available. For more information, call the David Lawrence Foundation at 354-1416. 13 is lucky for tea and fashionsHumane Society Naples holds its 13th annual Afternoon Tea & Fashion Show on Friday, Nov. 11, at the Naples Yacht Club. Sponsorships and auction items are being solicited now. For more information, call Ali OConnor at 6431880, ext. 18, or e-mail events@hsnaples.org. SAVE THE DATE

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$153* Naples To...*Call For Availability & Departure Dates. Restrictions Apply. www.gulfcoastairways.com 526 Terminal Drive | Naples, FL 34104 | (239) 403-3020 Your On Demand Charter Service!ONE WAY! Located inside the Pavilion Shopping Center. Call for reservations. 239.566.2371. www.kcamericanbistro.com885 Vanderbilt Beach Road. Naples, FL 34108Welcomes the Summer! $20 OFF WITH THE PURCHASE OF TWO ENTREESMust present the coupon to redeem the offer. Only one coupon per table. Not redeemable with other offers. Valid thru September 29, 2011NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C19 VIP ribbon-cutting at Agave Southwestern GrillSOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1. At your service, the Agave staff 2. Jacke McCurdy and Arden McCurdy 3. Jacqueline Fishburn and Thomas Rieman 4. John Sorey, Don and Angela Smith, Tom Rieman, Jacqueline Fishburn and Georgia Hiller 5. John Sorey, Georgia Hiller and Jacqueline Fishburn 6. Don and Angela Smith 1 2 3 6 5 4MARLA OTTENSTEIN / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C21 239.261.7291www.naplesdentalcenter.com201 8th St South, Suite 106, Naples | Downtown at the Baker Center One American dies every hour from oral cancer!As a thanks to our community... Please call for a complimentary painless oral cancer screening with VELscope. (D0431) Expires September 30th.Onboard the Naples Princess for the Make-A-Wish Foundation SOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1. Dr. and Mrs. Morris Lipnik 2. Craig and Kelly Chasnov 3. Linda and Bob Harden 4. Robert Colantonio and Susi Winchell 5. Leo Mediavilla with Wanda and Mark Trouba 6. J Robert 7. Howard Isaacson and Hank Parker 8. Brendan Duffy and Dr. Joseph Magnant 9. Reg and Sandra Buxton with Tony Marino 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 Tropical & Outdoor Dining Doc F ords.comDoc Fords Ft. Myers Beach708 Fishermans Wharf Dr. 239.765.9660Doc Fords Sanibel975 Rabbit Road239.472.8311 ZAGATZAGAT.COMRated by: Find Us On Sanibels Favorite @ 11AM Enjoy Outdoor DiningROOFTOP THE WHALE Voted Best Casual Dining Thursday Night is Ladies Night!Ladies Drink Free! 9pm-Midnight!Live Music Thurs.-Sun. Get the Free mobile app athttp://gettag.mobi Get the Free mobile app athttp://gettag.mobi Key to ratings Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor Here are some capsule summaries of previous reviews: Bokampers Sports Bar & Grill, 8990 Fontana Del Sol Way; 431-7611. With 70-plus flat-screen televisions, you wont miss out on your favorite teams game at this trendy sports bar, the brainchild of former Miami Dolphin Kim Bokamper. What makes this a great choice for sports lovers is an inventive menu that includes shrimp, calamari, tuna wontons and fish tacos in addition to the usual burgers, wings, sliders and chili. Bos banging shrimp, in a sweet and spicy sauce topped with sesame seeds, were tasty and cooked just right. Bos signature chicken wings were excellent, grilled then topped with a medium hot barbecue and garlic sauce accompanied by a bounty of celery and blue cheese dressing. The fish tacos, made with mahi, were terrific. Apple pie a la mode was a perfect finish to a winning meal. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed November 2010 Latitude Fusion Cuisine & Piano Bar, Naples Walk, 2500 Vanderbilt Beach Road; 596-5600. Stylish and comfortable, Latitude resembles a well-appointed supper club filled with dark woods, oversized booth and sleek Art Deco touches. The open kitchen adds a touch of theater. The menu is a mix of comfort food and fusion fare, the stuff for which Chef Ross Peterson is known. From a selection of flatbreads, I liked the one with topped with lots of Portobello, goat cheese and caramelized onions. The crisp, yeasty crust complemented the toppings nicely. An Old World charcuterie platter had an interesting array of wursts, although Id have preferred more firm varieties and fewer soft ones. The Better than Nanas Kobe beef Bolognese was terrific, with a soulful sauce containing lots of tomatoes, onions, carrots and herbs simmered for a long time with the ground beef and accompanied by garlic bread. Lovely and not overly loud live music and a well-chosen wine list enhanced the meal. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed June 2011Noodle Saigon, 13500 Tamiami Trail N., Naples; 598-9400. For an inexpensive but excellent Vietnamese feast, head straight to Noodle Saigon. The 12-page menu might seem intimidating at first, but the friendly servers are happy to help newcomers sort through it. Ive found its hard to go wrong here. On my most recent visit, I enjoyed savory asparagus crabmeat soup, shrimp paste on sugar cane, steamed rice crepe with grilled pork, shrimp summer rolls, clams with black bean sauce and the restaurants heavenly version of rare beef pho. For dessert, we followed our servers suggestion and sampled a tasty mix of mashed avocado, sweetened condensed milk, ice, lime, sugar and mint. The combination resembled Italian water ice and proved a refreshing end to a terrific meal. Beer and wine served. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed May 2011 Sea Salt, 1186 Third St. S.; 4347258. Chef Fabrizio Aielli was the darling of the Washington, D.C., political elite before he and his wife, Ingrid, decided to head south. And so was born Sea Salt. No expense has been spared in the chic, modern dcor, the voluminous wine list or the painstakingly prepared food. Curry coconut black mussels and a salad of red and gold beets with mache and pecan-crusted goat cheese were excellent starters, although those with a taste for carpaccio, raw oysters or meats and cheeses will find suitable options as well. The menu changes regularly, so some dishes arent always available, but the limoncello-marinated salmon with green lentil mustard sauce, as well as the wild halibut and veal osso buco ravioli were outstanding. Desserts include house-made gelato and a sushi-style menu of Norman Love chocolates. The pistachio gelato with tomato marmalade was rich and velvety; the tiny almond linzer torte three bites of bliss. Service was superb throughout the meal. Full bar. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed February 2009Sophias Ristorante Italiano, 3545 Pine Ridge Road, Naples; 597-0744 This classic and classy establishment serves ultra-fresh, well-executed Italian dishes along with house-made breads and desserts. From the warm bread with olive oil and tender-crisp broccoli rabe with spicy homemade sausage and crisp polenta to the vivid red tuna carpaccio with caper berries to the huge and delicious zuppe di pesce, to desserts of tiramisu and sfogliatelle, this was an exceptionally good meal. Service was also excellent, including table checks by owner Jay Cherr, one of which included a visit with his young daughter, Sophia, on whom he and wife/co-owner Camille clearly dote. The ambience is lovely as well, reminiscent of trattorias found in Italy. Beer and wine served. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed August 2010 PAST REPASTS

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C23 food & wine CALENDAR Friday, Sept. 23, 6-8 p.m., T he Good Life: Learn how to make tapas with Shelly Connors; $50, 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road, North Naples; 5144663. Reservations required. Saturday, Sept. 24, noon1:30 p .m., Whole Foods: Join in the block party with recipes to enjoy in each department and the opportunity to sample and vote for your favorites. From 3-5 p.m., sample a variety of wines from New Zealand at this informal tasting; free, Mercato, 9101 Strada Place; 552-5100. Saturday, Sept. 24, 1 5 p.m., World Market: Celebrate Oktoberfest with German sausage, spaetzle, sauerkraut and more; 2415 Tarpon Bay Blvd., North Naples; 566-1239. Thursday, Sept. 29, 5:307:30 p .m., ABC Wine & Spirits: Sample wines from all over the world along with appetizers; $10, 6425 Naples Blvd.; 514-2316. Thursday, Sept. 29, 6:307:30 p .m., Whole Foods: The Health Starts Here Supper Club features a fourcourse healthy Italian meal; $10, Mercato; 552-5100. Reservations required; call or register online at www.acteva. com/go/LifestyleCenter. Friday, Sept. 30, 6:30-8:30 p .m., Whole Foods: Join Health Starts Here specialist Julie Joiner for Forks Over Knives, a documentary about healthy eating that follows two people on their journey to good health after years of unhealthy diets. Refreshments provided; $5, Mercato; 552-5100. Reservations required. Register online at www. acteva.com/go/LifestyleCenter. Friday, Sept. 30, 7 p .m., N oodles: A benefit for The Alliance for the Advancement of Adult Stem Therapy and Research includes a four-course wine dinner, jazz piano, tableside magician, Latin entertainment and dancing; $125, 1585 Pine Ridge Road. Reservations required. Call Kelly Drouin at 961-1312.Farmers markets Friday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., the Go v ernment Complex farmers market, 3335 US 41 E. Saturday, 7:30-11:30 a.m., T hir d Street South, behind Tommy Bahamas between Third Street and Gordon Drive. Saturday, 7 a.m.-noon, the B onita Springs Lions C lub farm market, The Promenade, 26851 South Bay Drive, Bonita Springs. Sunday, 8 a.m.noon, F r eedom Park farmers market, 151 Golden Gate Parkway. Send events to Cuisine @floridaweekly.comCUISINE B ay D ri v e You can see the off-season slowdown more acutely in some locations than others. Summer really puts the squeeze on places like Fifth Avenue South and Third Street South in Naples, where theres currently plenty of sidewalk to roam and curbside parking to pull into. At Coconut Point in Estero, the lakeside location thats lively at night in season is a muted version of its former self. Theres an upside to that, of course, for diners. Its a lot easier for us fulltime residents to get a table. We stopped in at Coconut Point to celebrate a birthday quietly and were surprised to see the vast Pagellis Italiano serving only scattered groups of patrons. Its certainly no reflection on the quality of food or service, both of which are good. Perhaps the scale of the dining room high ceilings, open kitchen, piazza-sized seating sections accentuated the void. We settled into a booth that was not quite as generous in proportion. The bench was comfortable, but the table was a bit of a tight fit. (No waistline remarks, please.) Our eager waiter was quick to the table to offer drinks. Pagellis has a full bar with a half-dozen specialty martinis featuring fruit and chocolate flavors. We settled on a Manhattan and a glass of Candoni Chianti. My companion said her cocktail was on the strong side, but she didnt seem to mind. The wine had a beautiful purple-red color and ripe blackberry notes with soft tannins. A basket of crusty bread and herbed oil arrived promptly, which kept us from starving while we pored over the menu. Inspired by the Pagelli familys Sicilian roots, it covers a lot of territory, including hearth-baked pizza, grilled meats and seafood as well as the usual Italian pastas and baked dishes. For starters we selected a pair of small plates that turned out be anything but. The flatbread and the sausage plate were ample enough to serve as entrees, and both were delicious. The cracker-thin bread was smothered in prosciutto, arugula and shards of Parmesan cheese. Im guessing that the last two were put on top after the bread was baked, because the greens hadnt wilted and the cheese hadnt melted. Both had a tendency to fall off when we picked up the bread; it worked easier if you folded it like New Yorkers do with pizza. Regardless, we liked the combination of toppings, especially when spritzed with the wedge of lemon provided. The salsiccia rustica needed no tweaking it was perfect as served. As the name suggests, the peasant-style dish combines Italian sausage, roasted sliced potatoes and red peppers, cannellini beans and sauteed spinach. Hearty stuff for an appetizer, but its really well conceived and balanced. If theyd used hot Italian sausage instead of a milder one, then the heat would have overpowered everything else on the plate. The beans were creamy, and the potatoes nicely browned. At this point, I could have moved on to dessert. Instead, I set aside the sausage dish to take home. One service criticism here: A diner shouldnt have to finish a meal with a to-go box sitting on the table; cant restaurants keep track of them in the kitchen? That could be a personal issue. Service at Pagellis was good overall, and our waiter came across as knowledgeable about the menu. For entrees we went with one of Pagellis favorites and a surf-and-turf combo. Veal and scallop rosemary with cappelini was the former and a most unexpected pairing. Veal medallions and sea scallops were sauteed to perfect tenderness and topped with a tomato sauce infused with rosemary, one of my favorite herbs. It added a woodsy counterpoint to what otherwise might have been an overly sweet dish. The only fault with the dish with both entrees, actually was the grilled asparagus served on the side. The stem ends werent trimmed far enough up the stalk before cooking, so we got some woody sections that were impossible to cut through with a knife. Otherwise, they were well grilled. As were the steak and shrimp. The beef was medium-rare as ordered, and the shrimp were slightly browned on the outside but not overcooked within. Although a peppercorn sauce didnt bring a lot to the steak presentation, the lemon-butter added a flavorful but light finishing touch to the shrimp. They were accompanied by a generous mound of garlic mashed potatoes and the aforementioned asparagus. The dessert menu at Pagellis offers the usual Italian sweets along with creme brulee. The birthday girl had the fluffy espresso-infused tiramisu, a textbook-good example of the creamy treat. The creme brulee was well executed. The Pagelli family has a strong concept going with this restaurant and another in Tampa. I find the food and atmosphere much better conceived, more focused and fully realized than the companys other restaurant, East Side Firepit City Grill in Gulf Coast Town Center. That place seems like a restaurant in search of a concept. Theres such no confusion at Pagellis. The food clearly is Italian classics with a twist, and the dining room evokes an outdoor plaza with textured plaster and lots of metal work. It will be nice for them when that room starts filling up again. Pagellis Italiano: Inspired by Sicily, with a twist Pagellis Italiano, >> Hours: 4-10 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 4-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 4-10 p.m. Sunday. >> Reservations: Accepted. >> Credit cards: Major cards accepted. >> Price range: Appetizers, $9-$14; entrees, $10-$26. >> Beverages: Full bar. >> Seating: Indoor and outdoor. >> Specialties of the house: Hearth-baked pizzas and atbreads, pasta, grilled meat and seafood. >> Volume: Low (at least during offseason). >> Parking: Mall parking. Ratings: Food: Service: Atmosphere: Coconut Point, 8017 Plaza Del Lago, Estero; 226-4242 Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor If you go DREW STERWALD / FLORIDA WEEKLYAbove: Salsiccia rustica combines mild Italian sausage, roasted potatoes, cannellini beans and spinach. Middle: Both steak and shrimp are perfectly grilled. Right: A textbook example of tiramisu layers of coffeesoaked cookies and sweetened mascarpone cheese. drewSTERWALD pgnews@floridaweekly.com