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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Naples, FL
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
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English
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Periodicals -- Naples (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Collier County -- Naples

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 2-8, 2008)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038797485 ( OCLC )
2018226752 ( LCCN )
on1038797485
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AN1.F6 N37 F56 ( lcc )

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RESCUEME BILL CORNWELL A2 OPINION A4 NEWS OF THE WEIRD A12 GET MOVING A18 HEALTHY LIVING A22 MOTLEY FOOL B6 REAL ESTATE B11 EVENTS C6 FILM REVIEW C11 ANTIQUES C18 SOCIETY C24-25 VINO & CUISINE C26-27 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. III, No. 46 FREE WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. Shes hotMeet performance artist Marie Blaze Barnett. C3 Collecting collectionsArtists assortment of collectibles leads to a blog and a book. C1 The rent is rightThe market is good for buyers and sellers where long-term rentals are concerned. B1 FLORIDA WEEKLY PHOTO Wetland mitigation methods may not protect enoughSouthwest Florida generally gets high marks for its efforts to protect its wetlands, but a recently completed study indicates that the long-term outlook might not be as favorable as we have been led to believe. The analysis, conducted by the Southwest Florida Regional Planning Council, concluded that (w)hile the total area of wetland acreage and functional decrease can appear relatively small it is important to understand that this permitted wetland elimination is gradually reducing the total extent of coastal wetlands. In essence, while it appears that wetland reduction is nonexistent, we actually are losing small chunks of this valuable ecological resource. Over time, this can lead to serious environmental consequences. Wetlands are vital. They act as buffers against flooding, wind and waves. They help to purify water that courses through them, and they provide sanctuary to a wide variety of reptiles, fish, mammals, birds and plant life. One of my favorite quotes comes from John Adams, says James Beever, a co-author of the study. He s aid, Facts are stub-SEE MITIGATION, A13 BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@ oridaweekly.com Local shelters are full of Local shelters are full of animals that need homes animals that need homesBY ELLA NAYORenayor@ oridaweekly.com IF OPIE COULD TALK, HE WOULD PROBably chat about the good old days he had at his previous home. You know, stuff like napping on the couch, watching birds flit by on the lanai and getting excited about his favorite snack. But hes a dog and hes not talking. However, we do know a thing or two about his life today. The Teddy bear-like Rottweiler mix is a guest at the Gulf Coast Humane SocietySEE RESCUE ME, A8 Open wideUF research hopes to help teens remember to take their meds. A22 T T a r O U h More friendly faces awaiting adoption.A9 >>inside: >> Florida Weekly photographer Vandy Major met Jasper as he cooled off in a kiddie pool at Collier County Domestic Animal Services.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 9101 STRADA PLACE NAPLES, FLORIDA 34108 239.552.5100www.wholefoodsmarket.com/naples SATURDAY AUGUST 20TH from 11:30am 3pmStorewide buy-one-get-one savings Safety fun with the Collier County Sheriffs Ofce and North Naples Fire Department Sampling in each department and outdoor cookout School supply drive benetting the Education Foundation The rst 50 people to arrive at 11:30 receive a free reusable shopping bag Anyone who watches the nightly news on any of the three non-cable networks can draw only one conclusion: We are a very sick nation. You see, the viewership of these shows skews toward those approaching what are euphemistically known as the golden years. Thus, the sponsors of these telecasts tend to be corporations whose principal pursuit is the manufacture of pharmaceuticals that are designed to extend these so-called golden years, no matter how debilitating and dreadful they may become. Tune in the newscasts of ABC, CBS or NBC and youll see what I mean. Youll find that we are a people who are beset with dry eyes, constipation, acid reflux, clotted legs, erectile dysfunction, soaring cholesterol and blood pressure, depression, anxiety, gout, bipolar disorder, weak bladders, diminished lungs and narrowed arteries. About half of the time of these commercials is devoted to the side effects that can result from the wonder drugs side effects that, ranging from excruciating erections lasting into the next millennium to bloody projectile vomiting to just plain old death, seem much more frightening than the maladies they were intended to alleviate. But the real question is why we are we subjected to these commercials at all? They are bunched most tightly during newscasts, but they play out across our screens throughout the day and night on all channels. Why do drug companies target laymen, who know nothing about medicine or medicines, for such intensive advertising? The answer is simple: Because it works. I have a friend who is a doctor and has been in practice for many years. He says he cannot recall a day in which at least one patient has not demanded a prescription for some drug he or she has seen advertised on television or in a magazine. This, my doctor friend say, presents a dilemma. Very often another, less-expensive drug will do just as well. And, sometimes, the demanded drug is inappropriate. If a less-expensive alternative will suffice, he tries to reason with the patient. That rarely works. Those commercials are really well done, he says. My patients strongly buy into what they see on television. I usually give in and write the script they want. If the drug is inappropriate, he simply refuses to prescribe it, and that often leads to lengthy arguments, ugly scenes and wasted time, he says. The television commercials are only the most visible aspect of how the big pharmaceutical companies manipulate and rip-off the consumers of American health care. My doctor friend, for example, is a man of utmost integrity and a superb physician. I would entrust my life and the lives of my children with him. Yet, he travels the world at the expense of drug companies promoting certain medications. He only touts drugs he regularly prescribes and believes to be highly beneficial, but I still find this practice to be highly distasteful and I have told him so. Drugs companies have flown him, first class, to places to like Hawaii and London and put him up in five-star hotels so he could praise their products in front of other physicians. I dont see anything wrong with that, he says. I do, but apparently I am a voice crying in the wilderness. Reuters reported last year that more than 17,000 doctors and health-care providers received cash payments from seven major drug companies to promote their products. Shockingly, more than 380 of the doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other providers who were compensated were paid more than $100,000 in 2009 and 2010. In exchange for payments, Reuters reported, doctors were sometimes urged to recommend off-label prescriptions of drugs, meaning using them for conditions they are not approved for. Such payments are not illegal, nor are they considered to be improper by current standards. It is important to note that these payments covered only seven companies; 70 other pharmaceutical companies refused to disclose their payments, although they will be required to do so by 2013 under President Obamas health reform act.During the Bush administration, the big pharmaceutical companies received their greatest windfall ever in the form of the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit plan. As part of this deficitbusting legislation, it was decided that the United States government would not be allowed to negotiate the price of prescription drugs for Medicare recipients. The Veterans Administration can negotiate, but, as a sop to the drug industry, negotiation was taken off the table for Medicare. This resulted in a $25 billion windfall for the pharmaceutical industry.So, you might ask, what are the drug companies doing with all this cash? Are they accelerating cancer research? Are they looking for new medications to treat horrific afflictions like Lou Gehrigs disease? Well, not exactly. What they are doing is producing more commercials and advertising aimed at inducing ignorant consumers to demand drugs and medications they may or may not need. According to one study, drug companies spend about 24 percent of their sales-driven revenue on marketing and advertising and about 13 percent on research. The net result of all of this promoting and hustling and the greasing the palms of doctors, nursing and pharmacists is that over the last decade, the average price of a prescription in the United States has risen from $30 to $68. Prescription drug prices in the United States are the highest in the world. Please forgive what is truly an unforgivable pun, but I find that to be an extremely bitter pill to swallow Side effects may include price gouging billCORNWELL bcornwell@floridaweekly.comCOMMENTARY

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 PublisherShelley Lundslund@floridaweekly.comManaging EditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsLois Bolin Bill Cornwell Karen Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Bernadette La Paglia Dennis Goodman Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald Bob RaymondCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comProduction ManagerKim Boone kboone@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersPaul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Hope Jason Nick BearCirculation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Masse nmasse@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Jeff Jerome jjerome@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantSandi HughesBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2011 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $29.95 in-county$49.95 in-state $54.95 out-of-state OPINION A few months ago, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner predicted with unshakable confidence that there was no risk of a downgrade of U.S. debt. In fact, he argued, things are better than theyve been if you want to think about the prospects for improving our long-term fiscal position. In his self-assured cluelessness, Geithner reflected the president he serves. Upon taking office, President Barack Obama gravely misread the historic moment. He has brought us to a dangerous pass where a few slips another sharp recession, a spike in interest rates could bring on another terrifying economic crisis. To borrow his own put-down of Congress during the debt-ceiling fight, hes an AA+ president of an AAA country. Financial crises like that of 2008 always create vast overhangs of debt, but Obama believed he should heedlessly add more. And hes never once pivoted to responsibility. In February, six months before the downgrade, Obama offered a budget that increased spending and the debt. After 10 years, the deficit still would have been more than $1 trillion. In April, four months before the downgrade, Obama delivered a gimmicky budget speech with no specifics. On April 11, just seven days before S&P assigned a negative outlook to our AAA rating, White House press secretary Jay Carney said the president wanted a debt-ceiling increase with no deficit reduction whatsoever. Now that the downgrade is upon us, the administration is lashing out. It reeks of desperation and blameshifting, but, hey, this is the way the game is played down at AA+. Geithner scolded S&P: Theyve handled themselves very poorly. And theyve shown a stunning lack of knowledge about the basic U.S. fiscal budget math. His huffiness is badly misplaced. Whatever S&Ps failings, its not under the misimpression that its OK to spend 40 percent more than you take in, which is the basic error in budget math of Geithners boss. S&P had barely acted before every Democratic henchman hilariously deemed it the tea party downgrade. S&P does complain about political brinksmanship in Washington. But what does it expect in a divided government? We had a blissfully united government for two years in 2009-10, and it gave us a historic spending blowout vastly more irresponsible than the debt-ceiling deal. The reason is fundamentally political elected officials remain wary of tackling the structural issues required to effectively address the rising U.S. debt burden. Tea-partying House Republicans dont suffer from this endemic deficiency. The Ryan budget undertook precisely the containment of entitlements that, S&P says, we and most other independent observers regard as key to long-term fiscal sustainability. To this point, Obama has put ideology and cute partisan games above the national interest in leadership worthy of AA+. He thought he could spend as much as possible in his first two years, and a favorable business cycle and rhetorical repositioning would bail him out before 2012. He didnt count on reality having different plans. Now, S&P has blown the whistle. Like all political malefactors, the administration isnt sorry for what it did; its sorry it got caught. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.The AA+ presidency richLOWRY Special to Florida Weekly What does the police killing of a homeless man in San Francisco have to do with the Arab Spring uprisings from Tunisia to Syria? The attempt to suppress the protests that followed. In our digitally networked world, the ability to communicate is increasingly viewed as a basic right. Open communication fuels revolutions it can take down dictators. When governments fear the power of their people, they repress, intimidate and try to silence them, whether in Tahrir Square or downtown San Francisco. Charles Blair Hill was shot and killed on the platform of the Bay Area Rapid Transit or BART systems Civic Center platform on July 3, by BART police officer James Crowell. BART police reportedly responded to calls about a man drinking on the underground subway platform. According to police, Hill threw a vodka bottle at the two officers and then threatened them with a knife, at which point Crowell shot him. Hill was pronounced dead at the hospital. Hills killing sparked immediate and vigorous protests against the BART police, similar to those that followed the BART police killing of Oscar Grant on New Years Day 2009. Grant was handcuffed, facedown on a subway platform, and restrained by one officer when another shot and killed him with a point-blank shot to the back. The execution was caught on at least two cellphone videos. The shooter, BART officer Johannes Mehserle, served just over seven months in jail for the killing. On July 11, major protests shut down the Civic Center BART station. As another planned protest neared on Aug. 11, BART officials took a measure unprecedented in U.S. history: They shut down cellphone towers in the subway system. Its the first known incident that weve heard of where the government has shut down a cellphone network in order to prevent people from engaging in political protest, Catherine Crump of the ACLU told me. Cellphone networks are something weve all come to rely on. People use them for all sorts of communication that have nothing to do with protest. And this is really a sweeping and overbroad reaction by the police. The cellular-service shutdown, which was defended by BART authorities who claimed it was done to protect public safety, immediately drew fire from free-speech activists around the globe. On Twitter, those opposed to BARTs censorship started using the hashtag #muBARTak to make the link to Egypt. When the embattled Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak shut down cell service and the Internet, those in Tahrir Square innovated workarounds to get the word out. An activist group called Telecomix, a volunteer organization that supports free speech and an open Internet, organized 300 dial-up phone accounts that allowed Egyptian activists and journalists to access the Internet to post tweets, photos and videos of the revolution in progress. We were very active Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria trying to keep the Internet running in these countries in the face of really almost overwhelming efforts by governments to shut them down, Telecomix activist Peter Fein told me. Telecomix believes that the best way to support free speech and free communication is by building, by building tools that we can use to provide ourselves with those rights, rather than relying on governments to respect them. Expect hacktivist groups to support revolutions abroad, but also to assist protest movements here at home. In retaliation for BARTs cellphone shutdown, a decentralized hacker collective called Anonymous shut down BARTs website. In a controversial move, Anonymous also released the information of more than 2,000 BART passengers, to expose the shoddy computer security standards maintained by BART. The BART police say the FBI is investigating Anonymous attack. I interviewed an Anonymous member who calls himself Commander X on the Democracy Now! news hour. His voice disguised to protect his anonymity, he told me over the phone: Were filled with indignation, when a little organization like BART ... kills innocent people, two or three of them in the last few years, and then has the nerve to also cut off the cellphone service and act exactly like a dictator in the Mideast. How dare they do this in the United States of America. Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 800 stations in North America. She is the author of Breaking the Sound Barrier, recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.San Francisco Bay Areas BART pulls a Mubarak amyGOODMAN Special to Florida Weekly

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 And so will the joy and optimistic outlook on life they represent when you consider the newest choice in retirement living in the Naples and Marco Island area The Arlington. Now you can look your best for the best years of your life in the easies t and most natural way possible. By appreciating each day for the wonder it brings. By giving up work and worry and gaining freedom and peace of mind. By taking control over decisions that affect your future. By being with others, having fun and laughing all the way. Its all part of The Arlingtons life nourishing, life ourishing and life af rming approach to retirement living. One that celebrates aging and every one of its many gifts. Laugh lines included. MODEL AND INFORMATION CENTER12276 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 501, Naples, Florida 34113 (239) 206-2646 or toll-free (866) 986-9690www.ArlingtonNaples.org The Arlington of Naples welcomes those of all faiths, beliefs and tradi ons.Located on Tamiami Trail East, across from the Freedom Horses Monument at Lely Resort. Open 8:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Sundays by appointment. Laugh lines never looked so good. The 30-by-56-foot Patriot Flag that is touring the country in memory of the victims of 9/11 and in honor of rescuers and those who continue to serve comes to Naples on Wednesday, Aug. 23. A brief ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. at IberiaBank, 2150 Goodlette Road N., across from Coastland Center. Everyone is welcome. The flag has been traveling across the country from San Diego, Cali., since Sept. 10, 2010, and has logged approximately 109,995 miles, according to www.thepatriotflag.us.In addition, the bank will present a free lecture, Scams: Awareness and Protection as part of its Iberia In the Round series at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, at the banks 775 AirportPulling Road location. The lecture is open to all, but seating is limited. Doors open at 6 p.m. Reserve a seat by calling 430-1639.For more information, call Keith Dameron at 393-2400 or e-mail keith.dameron@ iberiabank.com. Several meetings are on the calendar allowing the public to review proposed changes to district boundaries of the Collier County Board of Commissioners and the District School Board of Collier County. After a brief staff presentation, the audience will be encouraged to comment and ask questions. Everyone is welcome. The District 1 meeting (although anyone from any district can attend any meeting) has already taken place; subsequent meetings are set for 7-9 p.m. as follows: District 2: Thursday, Aug. 18, at Veterans Community Par k, 1895 Veterans Park Drive, Naples District 3: Tuesday, Aug. 23, at the Golden Gate Community Center, 4701 Golden Gate Parkway, Naples District 4: Tuesday, Aug. 30, at the countys Growth Management Division Planning & Regulation office, 2800 N. Horseshoe Drive, Naples District 5: Monday, Aug. 29, at Immokalee Community Park, 321 N. First St., ImmokaleeThe proposed redistricting maps can be viewed at www.colliergov.net/redistricting.For more information, call David Weeks at 252-2306 or e-mail DavidWeeks@colliergov.net. Patriot Flag making a stop in NaplesPublic meetings on the schedule about county, schools redistrictingWWW.THEPATRIOTFLAG.US / COURTESY PHOTO Get Florida Weekly for iPadTM on the App store and read your favorite newspaper just like the hard copy. FREE FOR ALL THE FUTURE OF NEWSPAPERS IS HERE Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comEnjoy a complete issue of Florida Weekly on your iPad. Get News, Arts & Entertainment, Business & Real Estate, everything that is in the print edition, now on the iPad.Download it FREE today!iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 in Fort Myers actually more of a long-term resident. Opie has been at the shelter for nearly three years. Thats 21 in dog years which makes Opie middle-aged. Opie is just another victim of the current economic downturn. His owner told Gulf Coast Humane Society staff that he could no longer afford to take care of Opie. The laid-back dog is one of many canine and feline casualties of a nationwide economic malaise. But to David Stroud, executive director of GCHS and other regional animal shelter directors, Opie is not just a number. Hes a homeless pet capable of feeling and in need of a loving family. He is just one of many dogs, cats, potbelly pigs, horses, goats, and even ducks that have wound up at shelters. Its one of the most heartbreaking things we see, Mr. Stroud said. Leaders at shelters in Lee, Charlotte and Collier counties find themselves working together unlike any other time in their histories in order to help pets find homes. Mr. Stroud and the other area shelter directors are not waiting for bluer skies to spread along the economic horizon. They, after all, are the stewards of helpless critters that cannot wait for people to have more money again or for unemployment figures to look rosier. There is too much at stake. Lives depend on it. Opie is a rarity since he has remained a happy dog despite living most of his time in a cage. Many other pets become depressed after being caged for too long. Once a pet breaks down mentally, he or she often must be euthanized to prevent further suffering. For reasons such as these, shelter officials are finding and using creative methods to get pets adopted and keep their facilities running well despite slashed funding, budget cuts, internal political conflicts and in many cases, greater intake numbers because of people losing their jobs and homes. For GCHS, resolving internal conflicts and reaching out to the community and working with other shelters and rescues has made a huge difference in finding homes for animals.Hard times, greater needIntake numbers from neighboring shelters have also increased. In 2009, GCHS took in only one animal from another shelter. In the last year and a half, the Fort Myers nonprofit has taken in nearly 900 pets from other shelters. Its adoptions are also up 28 percent a fact Mr. Stroud attributes to programs such as off-site adoption events. The shelter has also been fortunate with its raising and management of funds. A year ago, the shelter was struggling financially. Its coffers are now filling to the point where Mr. Stroud and the board are working to build an endowment that will keep the shelter operating indefinitely. With a series of successful fundraisers including a calendar showcasing the shelter pets, regular exposure at community events like Yappy Hour at the Bell Tower Shops and a race in March, the shelters finances are in good health. Partnering prevents deathsDonna Ward, the director of Lee County Domestic Animal Services, works with Mr. Stroud to ensure adoptable pets have a place to go. LCDAS is required, as the designated county facility, to take the injured, sick and aggressive pets brought in by animal control officers. That means Ms. Ward and her staff must use ingenuity and creativity to find space for everybody. Contrary to common belief, county shelters such as LCDAS do not look to euthanize for space. This is why working with area shelters is paramount to the lives of pets. She networks with GCHS, which takes owner-surrended pets. This lowers intake numbers for LCDAS, which helps balance out sometimes-flat adoption numbers. Were elated, Ms. Ward said. In the past couple of months, they have really stepped up to the plate. In light of the economy, LCDAS has created a number of other programs and services to help keep homeless pet numbers down. Some of these programs include an aggressive spay and neuter program, community pet pantry and low-cost veterinary services. They seem to be working. So far this year, more than 2,000 people have used the community pet pantry. Thats about 2,000 pets that didnt have to lose their homes because their owners couldnt afford to feed them. With the low-cost vet care, food pantry, low-cost spaying and neutering for needy families and trap, neuter and release program, the agency has created enough programs that Ms. Ward belives there are no excuses for people to allow animals to go homeless. Collier County Domestic Animal Services took in more than 8,000 pets in 2006. But in 2009, the agency counted a little more than 6,500. This occurred with a reduced operating budget and a 22 percent reduction in staff since 2007. Some of these numbers can be attributed to a decreased population in the county, but spay/ neuter programs and working with other shelters and rescues have also made a big difference in the lives of pets. Humane Society Naples has a caged area specifically for adoptable CCDAS pets, said Michael Simonik, executive director for HSN. County agency directors say that while nonprofit shelters open their doors for adoptable pets, it allows the government agencies to focus on other tasks, such as getting strays home and educating residents how to stay in compliance with laws. Our success is working in concert with other agencies, said Amanda Townsend, director of CCDAS. The area shelter staffs even formed a networking organization, the Southwest Florida Animal Welfare Professionals Networking Group. The group meets once a month to discuss ideas that work at their respective shelters and to brainstorm new ones. At The Animal Welfare League in Port Charlotte, staff works from two separate buildings on campus to meet homeless pets needs. Though the group has a state-of-the-art facility, it depends on area rescues, volunteers and neighboring shelters to help out when all the cages are full. Well do anything to get them a home, said Sharon Thomas, executive director of AWL. Dry and wet food are needed for the shelters pantry. The nonprofit shelters depend on donations and community support for help. Another bright spot that has seemingly spawned from the economic downturn is more people are adopting from shelters like the Humane Society Naples. Mr. Simonik said adoptions have increased over the last several years because more people would rather buy a pet at the shelter than shell out top dollar to a breeder. The shelter is preparing to open an adoption center in the Coastland Center mall this September inside a former pet shop. Its this evolution of local shelters from insular pounds to caring pet centers that network with other facilities that seems to be having an impact in the lives of creatures great and small. I believe in networking, Ms. Thomas said. Were all here for the same reason. RESCUE MEFrom page 1 VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYScenes from Collier County Domesticc Animal Services.ERIC RADDATZ / FLORIDA WEEKLY >> Lee County Domestic Animal Services Public Relations Officer Ria Brown holds Shonna, who is available for adoption.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEWS A9 wanteda good home for ...Brookes Legacy Animal Rescue, 434-7840, admin@brookeslegacyanimalrescue.org www.brookeslegacyanimalrescue.org Nina Salvator Ollie Sammy Shorty Ashley Gabby JesterCollier County Domestic Animal Services, 7610 Davis Blvd., 252-7387, www.colliergov.net/pets Bethany Coco Wrigley Female pygmy goat Toby Yanko Superman Female pygmy goat Shorty Tonka Capella Nina Princess Catherine Bolt Foxy JakeHumane Society Naples, 370 Airport Pulling Road, N., 643-1555, www.hsnaples.orgThese are just a few of the furry faces most recently available at two local shelters and from Brookes Legacy Animal Rescue, an organization that cares for animals in volunteer foster homes while searching for owners to adopt them. Both shelters and Brookes Legacy maintain websites with up-to-date information about available pets.

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FREESpecial Upgrades During August a style for every point of viewBlindsBudget Help us make sure that every child in our area has the basic school supplies they need to get the best education possible. Were proud to partner with education foundations in Tampa Bay and South Florida to collect school supplies for local students in need. To help, drop o your supplies at any Fifth Third location.August 8 26Thanks for helping to make education possible for every student in our area.Fifth Third Bank. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. Participating Education Foundations in the following counties: Collier, Lee, Charlotte, Sarasota, Manatee, West Palm Beach, Polk, Pasco, Hillsborough, Pinellas. Supporting students across Tampa Bay and South Florida! NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 When Gilad Shalit turns 25, it will be the sixth birthday he will spend without his family and friends; the sixth birthday he will spend as a captive of Hamas terrorists who kidnapped him in a cross-border raid near Gaza in June 2006. Two Naples synagogues, Temple Shalom and Beth Tikvah, in partnership with the Jewish Federation of Collier County, invite the Jewish community and friends of Israel to mark Mr. Shalits birthday by attending the screening of a documentary about his story. The showing of Family in Captivity will begin at 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 28, at Temple Shalom, 4630 Pine Ridge Road. The acclaimed, 59-minute documentary, produced with the full cooperation and participation of the Shalit family, intimately chronicles the human angle of Mr. Gilads kidnapping and the efforts and ordeal of his loved ones as they struggle to bring him home. Jewish communities throughout the world have shown this film over the summer, and the local Jewish community is proud to join the efforts to raise awareness about Mr. Shalit and his familys plight. Advance registration is required for this free event. Call the Temple Shalom office at 455-3030 to register. Temple Shalom S ist erhood will honor Seyla Cohen for 20 years of dedication and commitment to the temple preschool during a celebration beginning at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, in the social hall. Ms. Cohen, who grew up in Turkey and moved to America with her new husband in 1985, started working at the temple preschool when her son, Jeremy, was 2 years old. Days of spending hours of joyful teaching with her young charges carried her through the difficulties of a divorce and raising her child on her own. In 2007 she was promoted to director of Temple Shalom Preschool and has since established several new programs, including a parent involvement program, a computer lab, a kinder-prep program and Friday Shabbat celebrations with Rabbi Miller and Cantor Azu. For reservations and information about the celebration of Ms. Cohen, call 777-2889. Synagogues show documentary to raise awareness of captive Jew Temple Shalome will honor its preschool directorCOHEN

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The Time You Have Together is Precious.Dont let leg pain rob you of these special moments. One day soon, either you or she will get too old to enjoy fun times together. Dont let varicose veins make you the first to get there. Todays quick and virtually painless procedures will leave you wondering why you didnt take care of your varicose veins sooner. Laser therapy eliminates varicose veins right at the source. Youll be back to your normal activity the very next day.The Time is Now.Join us for a free vein screening to learn about your options. Its All A Matter of Time... CALL FOR YOURFREE VEIN SCREENINGAPPOINTMENT! Please wear shorts or a skirt to the screening239-344-7063311 9th Street N., Suite 301, Naples, FL 34102 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.comJames M. Scanlon, M.D. BEFORE AFTER

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 25%DISCOUNT ON EYE GLASSESSTUDENT EYE EXAMS $69 STUDENT SPECIAL 21 and underGood vision and healthy eyes are key in academic success. Rick Palmon, M.D. Richard M. Glasser, M.D. Penny J. Orr, O.D. Leonard Avril, O.D. Brian Marhue, O.D. Cannot be used in conjunction with any insurance or other promotions. Offers expire 10/31/2011NAPLES 594-0124 Cataracts LASIK Laser Vision Correction Cornea Treatment Glaucoma Dry Eyes Comprehensive Eye Exam Pediatric Eye Care Glasses & Contacts Milking itBerjuan Toys is already selling its Breast Milk Baby online ($70) and expects to have it in stores later this year. The doll works by the child-mother donning a halter top with flowers positioned as nipples, and when the baby comes into contact with the a flower, sensors mimic sucking sounds. Although dolls that demonstrate toileting functions are already on the market, breastfeeding activists are more enthusiastic about this one, hopeful that girls comfort with breastfeeding will result in decreased bottle-feeding later on. (Opponents have denounced the doll as forcing girls to grow up too soon and with choices too complicated for their age, which according to the manufacturer is as young as 3.) The continuing crisis Frances Ragusa, 75, was back in court in Brooklyn, N.Y., in June claiming child support she said was never paid by husband Philip Ragusa, 77, in their divorce settlement of 33 years ago. (The children, of course, long ago became adults, but the $14,000 judgment has grown, with interest, to about $100,000.) Ms. Ragusa told the New York Post in July that she called her ex-husband several months earlier to discuss the amount but that he merely began to cry. Dont let this case go to trial, she recalled telling him. (I)f you think Im going to forget it, Phil, youre stuck on stupid. Carole Green was fined $1,000 in July by a court in Leavenworth County, Kan., for littering the property of the same Bonner Springs resident most afternoons for the past two years. Ms. Green apologized and said the charge was a complete surprise. She said when she starts out in her SUV every day, and drinks a bottle of tea, it just happens that she finishes it at about the same spot on her journey in front of Gary Bukatys property and thats where she tosses the bottle. She promised to stop. Rules to assure correct, progressive behavior were recently proposed by the San Francisco Commission of Animal Control and Welfare and the Colorado Department of Human Services. The San Francisco agency would ban the sale of all pets in the city limits, from dogs to gerbils to goldfish. (Why fish? Why not fish? asked one exasperated commission member, bristling at criticism.) Animals sold as food for other animals would be included but not animals sold as food for humans. Day care centers in Colorado would be required, if it made dolls available at playtime, to have dolls of three different races. A Southampton (England) University researcher told an academic conference in Stockholm in July that his work, demonstrating that women who stop smoking even after becoming pregnant will have healthier babies, is important because he found that pregnant women rationalize continued smoking, in part to have smaller babies that will be less uncomfortable to deliver. The City Council of Gould, Ark. (pop. 1,100), voted in July to make it illegal for its citizens to form groups without written permission from the council. (The mayor and the city council are feuding over the budget, and the council, attempting to stifle lobbying by a group supporting the mayor, has taken down all groups except that the ordinance appears to blatantly violate the First Amendment.) The Pervo-American communityJerry Prieto, 38, pleaded guilty in July in Benton County, Wash. (possession of methamphetamine and malicious mischief with sexual motivation), and was sentenced to 45 days in jail. Mr. Prieto had been arrested with the drugs in October 2010 in a stall at a highway rest stop. According to the prosecutor, Mr. Prieto had written sexual notes on the floor with a felt-tipped pen and drawn an arrow pointing directly to his stall. (As a condition of his sentence, Mr. Prieto is allowed in rest-stop bathrooms only for traditional purposes. NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATEPlan BJonathan Schwartz called 911 in New York City in July to report that he had stabbed his mother to death. A few minutes later, but before police arrived, Mr. Schwartz called back 911 to report a correction: No, she committed suicide. (The mothers body was found with multiple stab wounds, and police, notwithstanding Mr. Schwartzs correction, charged him with murder.)

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEWS A13 born things. We are simply laying out facts. We want people to see what is happening. The loss of wetlands is subtle. It is hard to notice over time. At the heart of the matter is something called wetland mitigation. Simply put, mitigation takes place when a wetland area is destroyed or altered for development. Such development could involve dredging, new roads, home and business construction or any activity that adversely affects or destroys the wetland. By law, when such destruction takes place, a similar wetland in the general vicinity is either created, preserved, enhanced or restored. Ideally, the process of mitigation means that any wetland destruction is equally offset by mitigation elsewhere. The planning council examined the methods used to determine mitigation to see if one was actually superior in protecting these environmentally sensitive areas and keeping the delicate ecological balance in order. We wanted to make sure that the methods to determine mitigation are in fact resulting in no net loss of wetlands, says Whitney Gray, who along with Mr. Beever wrote the study. We were looking at the quality of mitigation. The study examined three methods commonly used and widely accepted in assessing wetlands in the field at 118 sites in Southwest Florida. The methods studied were Wetland Rapid Assessment Procedure, Uniform Mitigation Assessment Method and Hydrogeomorphic Method, or HGM. HGM was the most effective in identifying and quantifying wetland functions of coastal wetland ecosystems, the study concluded. The researchers found that the other two methods of wetland assessment deliver a mitigation ratio that results in a systemwide net loss of both wet function and wetland acreage. According to the Army Corps of Engineers, HGM is based on the position of the wetlands in the landscape, the water source and the flow and fluctuation of the water once in the wetland. By employing HGM as the standard for mitigation, Mr. Beever and Ms. Gray say the likelihood of truly replicating a destroyed or modified wetland at another location increases. The study has been passed along to the EPA for further review. According to Mr. Beever, the study is intended to be used as a guide for workers in the field. It does not require any governmental agency to adopt its recommendations. It is a guideline. This is not an anti-development approach, says Ms. Gray. It is rather an attempt to find ways for development and the environment to coexist. We dont set policy. In the end, the policy makers will do with it what they want. Mr. Beever says initial reaction from the field staff has been positive, which doesnt surprise Ms. Gray. We really arent recommending wholesale changes to the way we do things, she says. We are tweaking the system we already have. But even minor tweaking can reap big benefits, and Mr. Beever says the ultimate goal is to achieve a state of harmony in Southwest Floridas wetlands. We want to improve what already is going on, he says. We should live with the coast rather than against it. MITIGATIONFrom page 1

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA16 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 N26 20.315 W 081 49.677ALL BOATERS WELCOME ABOARD! Bonita BayMARINA DIRECT GULF ACCESS FULL SERVICE MARINA Boat storage & slip rentals from $264/month Dry storage for up to 32 & wet slips with lifts Fuel, ships store, boat launch & detail services COME BY BOAT AND DINE ON THE WATERat Backwater Jacks OPEN DAILYCall 239-495-3222 or visit BonitaBayMarina.net ALL BOATERS WELCOME ABOARD! DIRECT GULF ACCESS FULL SERVICE MARINA Boat storage & slip rentals from $264/month Dry storage for up to 32 & wet slips with lifts Fuel, ships store, boat launch & detail services OPEN DAILY Call 239-495-3222 or visit BonitaBayMarina.net Gourmet pastries Smoothies and coffees Gifts and specialties Weddings, events &corporate giftingFORT MYERS 11380 Lindbergh Blvd. 239.561.7215 HOURS Mon.Fri. 7:30 a.m.:30 p.m.; Sat. 7:30 a.m. p.m. NAPLES 3747 Tamiami Trail North 239.687.7215 HOURS Mon.Thurs. 8 a.m. p.m.; Fri. &Sat. 8 a.m. p.m.www.NormanLoveConfections.com NEW NAPLES LOCATION NOW OPEN.Personal Southwest Florida Delivery Service Available. WORLD-CLASS ARTISANcocoaeMADE WITHLOVE. 239-261-7157 www.WynnsOnline.com 141 Ninth Street North Naples For over 70 years offering Wholeseome fresh products to our customers. Wynns is now carrying a large selection of Natural, Organic, and Gluten-Free products. In the Bakery Store Made Quiche Assorted flavors $6.99Must have coupon at time of purchase Free with a $30 Grocery OrderTall Horse Pinotage Rose .750 ml.Must have coupon at time of purchase Take your career to the next level through the power of our Bachelors Degrees, Associates Degrees or professional certi cate programs. Challenge yourself and inspire your dreams with classes on campus or online. Forty-five churches and synagogues will set out donation boxes on Sunday, Aug. 21, to collect new socks and underwear for boys and girls sizes six through 12. Monetary donations also are welcome and will be used to purchase backpacks and school supplies. The collection drive benefits students at 34 Collier County public elementary schools, as well as young clients of Youth Haven and The Shelter for Abused Women & Children. Since the first Undy Sunday organized by John Fitzgerald in 1997, about 650,000 undergarments have been distributed. Those who cannot get to a collection site on Aug. 21 can drop off donations at Catholic Charities, 2210 Santa Barbara Blvd. between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday-Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. For more information, call 455-2655. Fifth Third Bank is holding a cash g r ab at select locations. Spend 30 seconds inside the money machine and stash as much cash as you can. For every dollar you grab, Fifth Third Bank will donate a dollar to the school supply drive. Heres the cash-grab schedule: Tuesday, Aug. 23 10 a.m. to noon: Marco Island South, 1818 San Marco Road, Marco Island 3-5 p.m.: Berkshire, 3775 Santa Barbara Blvd., Naples Wednesday, Aug. 24 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Carillon, 5076 Airport-Pulling Road N., Naples 3-5 p.m.: Greentree, 2470 Immokalee Road, North Naples In addition, all Fifth Third locations have bins for school supplies and will welcome donations through Aug. 26. Suggested items include No. 2 pencils, spiral notebooks, eightor 24-count boxes of crayons, washable glue or glue sticks, full-size boxes of tissue, antibacterial wipes or hand sanitizer and gallonor sandwich-size zip lock bags. Gift cards to office supply stores or retail vendors are also welcomed. In the first two years of the effort, the bank has collected more than 2,000 backpacks and filled them with pencils, pens, paper and more for deserving children throughout South Florida. Supplies are distributed with help from educations foundations throughout the area, including the Education Foundation of Collier County. To find the closest Fifth Third location, visit www.53.com. Take socks, underwear to church this Sunday Fifth Third Bank continues collecting school supplies

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Dr. Janette Gaw Colorectal Surgeon Vera Owens Colorectal Cancer Survivor .Regional Cancer Center is a unique partnership between Lee Memorial Health System and its private physician group partners. Working together, the health system and physicians now can oer cancer patients treatment for nearly every aspect of their cancer care under one roof. From the latest treatments and technology to workshops and design features intended to soothe the mind and body, cancer patients will know that they do not have to ght their cancer alone.When Vera Owens was diagnosed with colorectal cancer, the avid runners great overall health contributed to a speedy recovery after her tumor was removed. Within months, she was back to running half marathons and is cancer-free. To read Veras story, please visit www.LeeMemorial.org/caringwww.LeeMemorial.org

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Eyelid SurgeryAustin Wm. Coleman, D.O.239-597-2792 www.colemaneyecare.com 10661 Airport Pulling Rd., Suite 12, Naples 34119Why trust your eyes, your eyelids, and your vision to anyone else? Friday, August 26th, Botox $10/unit Collier County. and eyelids. NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL BY JULY 31, 2014**Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. Since 1982CALL TODAY! 239-597-9100 FREE ELECTRIC MOTOR & REMOTE CONTROL on your NEW retractable awning order! Hit the linksHere are some charity golf tournaments coming up in the area: A tournament to benefit Drug Free Collier takes place Saturday morning, Sept. 17, at Lely Resort. Registration is $80 per player. The event is a project of Gaining Associates In Naples, in conjunction with the Leadership Collier Foundation. For more information, visit www.gaingolf.com. The second annual Golfing for Charity to benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank is set for Friday morning, Oct. 7, at West Bay Club in Estero. The $100 registration includes cart and green fees, two beverages on the course and a posttournament party. Registration and payment may be made by sending checks, payable to SERVPRO of Collier County/Fort Myers South, 5605 Second St. W., Lehigh Acres, FL 33917. For more information, call Shannon ONeill at 430-9300. The 20th annual Florida Gulf Coast University Founders Cup to benefit the FGCU Foundation is set for Friday, Oct. 14, at Pelicans Nest Golf Club in Bonita Springs. Registration is $2,000 per foursome. A championship sponsor level for $2,500 includes a four-player team and logo on a sponsors golf towel. For more information or to register, call Michele Kroffke at 590-1074, e-mail mkroffke@fgcu.edu or visit www.fgcu. edu/foundation. The Mental Health Association of SWF hosts a tournament to benefit its Childrens Mental Wellness Program on GET MOVING Monday, Nov. 14, at TwinEagles Golf & Country Club. For more information, call 261-5405 or visit www.mhaswfl.org. First National Bank of the Gulf Coast hosts its third annual charity tournament Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Hideout Golf Club. Beneficiaries are Eden Autism Services Florida and Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida. Continental breakfast will precede the 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, and lunch will also be provided. For information about registration and sponsorship opportunities, call Heather Gessel at 325-3750 or e-mail heathergessel@fnbofgc.com. Help make strides against breast cancerThe American Cancer Society-Collier Countys Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk steps out Saturday morning, Oct. 29, from the Village on Venetian Bay. Participants in the noncompetitive walk follow Gulf Shore Boulevard from the Village north to the end and back. For information about starting a team, volunteering or becoming a sponsor, call Stacey Deffenbaugh at 839-0680 or e-mail stacey.deffenbaugh@nbc-2.com. A Put on Your Pink Bra kickoff party for the walk takes place from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23, at Bayside Seafood Grill at The Village on Venetian Bay. Team members who have already registered, as well as anyone interested in forming a team, are invited to enjoy appetizers and soft drinks, get fundraising ideas, meet fellow walkers and decorate a pink bra for the Making Strides walk. Pink bras have been donated by Olga and Warner; the American Cancer Society will provide decorating supplies. RSVP by Aug. 19 by calling Dawn Pallett at 261-0337 or e-mailing dawn.pallett@cancer.org. For more information about Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, contact Melissa Wolfe at the American Cancer Society-Collier County by calling 261-0337, ext. 3860, or e-mailing Melissa.wolf@cancer.org. 5K fun walk/run will benefit FGCU health education centerThe Kleist Health Education Center on the campus of Florida Gulf Coast University will host the Come Run With Us 5K fun walk/run Saturday morning, Sept. 17. Fees from registration will help the center continue its health education programs throughout the Southwest Florida community. Registration begins Aug. 20. Details are at www.fgcu.edu/khec/events.asp. For more information, call 590-7459. Captiva triathlon for kids and adultsThe inaugural Galloway Captiva Triathlon takes place Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17-18, at South Seas Island Resort on Captiva Island. The Saturday competition for ages 6-9 will consist of a 100-yard swim, 1.5-mile bike ride and -mile run. Ages 10-13 will compete in a 200-yard-swim, a 3-mile bike ride and a 1-mile run. The adult triathlon on Sunday will consists of a -mile swim, a 10-mile bike ride and a 5K run, all on Captiva Island. Registration is capped at 500. The Galloway Captiva Triathlon is the first event organized by Southwest Florida Events Inc., a nonprofit corporation dedicated to combining fun, fitness and support for local charities through multisport events. Community Cooperative Ministries Inc. will benefit from the Captiva event. For registration or more information, call Angie Ferguson at 246-2920, go to www.captivatri.org or find Captiva Tri on Facebook. How it works: Find a BuddyChoose a family member, friend or coworker Mark Your CalendarOn the 2nd of each month, mark your calendar as a reminder Call Your BuddyRemind each other to do breast self exams To Get A Free Packet Visit www.nbc-2.com/buddycheck2 Call (239)936-0382 or visit any 21st Century Oncology of ce Get your free Buddy Check tool kit as a simple reminder to do your breast self-exam every month. Rie Aihara, M.D. Amy Fox, M.D.

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GIVING YOU THE POWER TO SAVEGet the tools you need to budget your energy usage. 4980 Bayline Drive, North Fort Myers, FL 33917 239.656.2300 | www.LCEC.netOnline. On the phone. And yes, we even make house calls. Choose the option thats convenient for you! LCEC offers powerful information to help you save money and energy. ONLINE Monitor energy usage with kiloWATCH, improve energy efficiency with Calc-U-Saver, and learn about green energy tips BY PHONE Get answers to your questions from an energy consultant or an LCEC Virtual Advisor ON PREMISES A certified energy advisor will conduct a FREE on-site energy survey of your home or business FindusonDowntownNaplesGoldenGateBonitaSpringsSanCarlosMarcoIslandEastNaples www.SunshineAce.com Whygopaintshopping whereyourvoicewont beheard?AtaBenjamin Moorestore,wetreat youtoamorepersonal experience.Withan enticingrainbowof colorsforyoutoexplore. Analluringatmosphere foryoutorevelin.And colorspecialistswhowill lavishyouwithallthe adviceandattentionyou desire.Socomefind inspiration.Visityour localBenjaminMoorestoretoday. VisitoneofoursixlocationsinLeeandColliercounties. omas Quigley, M.D.Board Certi ed Eye Physician & Surgeoncomplete medical exam with one of our board certi ed eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to new patients 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 08/31/2011Naples Bonita Springs www.doctorquigley.comFREEEYE EXAMFOR NEW PATIENTSNo Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal.CODE: FW00 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 A19 Extend Your Outdoor Living Experiencewith an Acrylic Enclosure 239.206.2599www.LanaiEnclosures.com(Showroom Available By Appointment)From design to furnishing we can provide everything you need to make your new outdoor enclosure the perfect place to enjoy the outdoors year round! (Acrylic-Glass-Impact Glass) Af liated with Harbor Springs Building Company Lic#CGC1518248 END OF SUMMER SALE30% OFFEnds September 30thCOURTESY PHOTOCollier County has an extra $100,000 so spend on books and reading technology for its 10 branch libraries, thanks to a gift from Friends of the Library of Collier County Nick Linn, president of the Friends board, right, recently presented the check to Marilyn Matthes, Collier County library director For news about th e 2012 Nick Linn Lecture Series sponsored by the Friends organization, see page C1

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THE FIRST TO BRING YOU THE...Softec HD LensThe Softec HD is the newest cataract replacement lens available, from the most experienced ophthalmology team in S.W Florida.It is designed to be the World's Most Accurate Lens and is three times more precise, to more closely match your vision needs. And best of all, it is covered by Medicare and most insurance plans.Bonita Springs 26831 S. Tamiami Trl.239.992.1422 www.ecof.comDavid C. Brown, M.D., F.A.C.S.Founder and Medical Director Ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon Barrett R. Ginsberg, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmologist Cataract Surgeon Laser Vision Correction Naples 2352 Pine Ridge Rd.239.263.2700 North Naples 877 111th Ave., Unit 2239.591.2949 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 A21 The NCH Community Blood Center is teaming up with Beasley Broadcasting, Patrics Restaurant and the businesses at Mission Square West Plaza for the Tailgate for Life blood drive from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 23-24. Former Miami Dolphins defensive star Kim Bokamper will make celebrity guest appearances throughout both days, encouraging everyone to get on the ball, donate blood and pass life on to someone in need. All successful blood donors during Tailgate for Life will receive a $5 Patrics Restaurant gift card, a $10 gas card and gift cards from Sylvan Learning Center, Sugar Palm Caf Bakery and Sports Clips (while supplies last). Donors will also become eligible for drawings for prizes including Tampa Bay Rays game tickets, Fort Myers Miracle tickets, a 10-passenger cruise from Cruise Naples and gift cards from Lu Lu Belle Childrens Boutique. The summer grand prize drawing will be for four adult, twoday passes to Busch Gardens in Tampa with lodging at Wingate by Windham. For more information, call 436-5455 or visit www.givebloodcbc.org. The Boys & Girls Club of Collier C ount y is enrolling children for the new school year and expects a record attendance of more than 1,500 students for its after-school programs that include homework help, visual and performing arts programs, career education, music and art with certified teachers, and more. New this year, free dinner will be served to everyone enrolled. Children in grades one through 12 in the Collier County School District are eligible. Open enrollment applications are available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday at BGCCC headquarters, 7500 Davis Blvd. next to the Santa Barbra Boulevard intersection. For more information, call 325-17154 or visit www.bgccc.com. Parents of girls ages 10-15 can enroll their daught er s in the Teen Sisterhood program at the Greater Naples YMCA. Teen Sisterhood provides fun, structured and educational sessions that explore the various issues todays young women face and help them develop selfconfidence and character values that enable them to deal with those issues in a healthy way. The program consists of five sessions led by strong, positive, adult female role models. The first of five sessions takes place on Monday, Sept. 12, with ages 10-12 meeting from 6-7 p.m. and ages 13-15 meeting from 7-8 p.m.Cost for all five sessions of Teen Sisterhood is $35 for YMCA members and $70 for non-members. For registration or more information, call the Greater Naples YMCA at 597-3148 or visit www. ymcapalms.org. Tailgate for Life will replenish blood suppliesSchools in, and so is after-school programGirls invited to Teen Sisterhood at the Y

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA22 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 HEALTHY LIVINGThe message was chilling, but the tone was calm: Thirty minutes to live, neurosurgeon Mark Gerber said to Michele Thoman, our chief nursing officer, on a Saturday afternoon two weeks ago. He was talking about an infant with a head injury. With the babys life hanging in the balance, NCH teamwork would never be more important. I wont keep you in suspense. Now, two weeks later, the child is well and at home, doing what any normal 7-month-old does, except for the temporary physical and occupational therapy for the next few months at an NCH outpatient facility. Jill Zollar, R.N., and ER Coordinator at our North Naples hospital, picks up this miraculous story. Emergency Medical Services entered the waiting room with a mother who was cradling the vomiting infant. R.N. Jessica Walsh quickly called the mother into the triage room, where the mother pointed to a fist-sized hematoma (bruise) on the babys head. The baby was pale, lethargic and had a low heart rate. Ms. Walsh immediately involved Dr. John Lewis (who was on call and is also co-chairman of our ER physicians, chairman of the board quality committee and an NCH board member). R.N. Julie Stoner quickly executed Dr. Lewis orders for oxygen, an IV and a CT scan of the head, which showed a large blood clot on the brain (an epidural hematoma). Pediatric intensivist Debbie Lopez and registered respiratory therapist Beverly Ward then arrived and never left the babys side thereafter. Together, Drs. Lewis and Lopez called Dr. Mark Gerber, one of our five neurosurgeons on call all the time. Dr. Gerber, in his car that Saturday afternoon, pulled over, got out his iPad and viewed the CT results. (NCH is among the 200 top IT hospitals in the country; we can view radiology results anywhere with Internet access.) Dr. Gerbers instant conclusion: The baby would be too ill to transfer out of town. He had all the necessary neurosurgical instruments at the NCH downtown campus, where we do the majority of brain surgery, and arranged for the babys emergency transport there. Anesthesiologist Rob Statfeld had already finished his Saturday morning surgery schedule and had just arrived home. Earlier in the week, he graciously agreed to cover on Saturday afternoon for a colleague who had another engagement. Dr. Statfeld had extensive experience with pediatric trauma in his former practice, and as he drove back to the hospital, he considered plans for anesthesia and the equipment he would need for an infant. Fortunately, Dr. Lopez keeps a pediatric cart full of equipment in the downtown ER, just in case its needed. It was. Sarah Holton, assistant OR director in North Naples, who recently joined NCH after five years of pediatric surgical experience at Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, also headed in to assist OR staff Rose Echols, Lily Mangovski, Cheryl Marshall and Matt Roberts. The baby was resuscitated with blood, emergently cross-matched at NCH North Naples lab by Peter Kubetschek, and transported downtown, where Dr. Statfeld, with Dr. Lopez in the OR as well, administered the anesthetic and Dr. Gerber performed successful neurosurgery. All stayed for most of the afternoon, while the patient was cared for by R.N.s Linda Yerger and Kelly Whitfield. Finally, as the baby emerged from anesthesia and one of his pupils started to react to light, a second CT scan showed stabilization and the child was transferred to the McDonald Seacarium where R.N.s Brittany Cassan, Patty Devarenne and Jenna Randall continued the care. The baby was saved. A miracle? Certainly. But it was a miracle because of teamwork at its best among highly trained professionals. It is a privilege to work with such dedicated and talented caregivers. Teamwork at its best helps make a miracle happenTO YOUR HEALTH Th hillibh b allenWEISS allen.weiss@nchmd.org Beyond a spoonful of sugarResearchers look for new ways To get teens to take their medsSkipping doses of medicine or taking it at the wrong times can worsen a patients condition and lead to costly complications. A consortium of researchers in the United States and Canada, including at the University of Florida, has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to test techniques that might increase medication adherence in perhaps the most challenging population of patients: teenagers. Newer medicines and technologies have improved the lives of people with illness. But such improvements have much less of an effect if patients dont take their medicines on time or use the technologies appropriately, says Dr. Vikas Dharnidharka, division chief of nephrology in the UF College of Medicine department of pediatrics and one of the studys investigators. Teenagers who have chronic diseases really struggle with being adherent, Dr. Dharnidharka adds. As part of the fiveyear grant, researchers will study whether a menu of techniques, including a high-tech pillbox, will improve how well adolescent kidney transplant patients stick to their medication regimens. The pillbox, produced by MedMinder, is connected to a monitoring service that tracks when patients take their medicine. The device can also send reminders via text, e-mail or phone calls about when a dose is due, something the researchers hope will appeal to tech-savvy teens. Study participants will be able to choose what options on the pillbox will best work for them. They also will work with health professionals to discuss what hinders them from taking their medications and develop plans to tackle these obstacles, says Dr. Beth Foster, an associate professor of pediatrics at McGill University in Montreal and the grants primary investigator. Using MedMinders Maya device, patients can also pinpoint problem times and patterns, like always forgetting to take a dose on Saturday mornings. After an organ transplant, patients must take drugs that suppress the immune system so the body does not fight off the new organ. Not taking them or even just deviating from the medication schedule can have dire consequences, Dr. Foster says. (Non-adherence) is probably the single most important reason for graft losses and rejections, she says. If you look at the risk of graft failure related to the age of patients and plot it, you can see a hump during the adolescent years. It is definitely the highest-risk interval, and the reason is likely adherence. Adherence dips during this period. The researchers also will ex amine how outcomes differ from patients in the Canadian and U.S. health systems.Although their study focuses on kidney transplant patients, the researchers think the findings will translate to patients with other chronic diseases and conditions as well.It could be something that could be applied across all populations for all chronic conditions, Dr. Dharnidharka says. We often spend 20 years developing new drugs, but they will have a limited effect if patients dont take them. STRAIGHT TALK Physicians Regional has free lecturesPhysicians Regional Healthcare System presents the following hour-long programs at Physicians Regional-Pine Ridge, 6101 Pine Ridge Road: 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23: Robotic Arm Knee Surgery, presented by orthopedic surgeon Jon Dounchis. 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 24: Newest Advances in Shoulder Surgery, presented by orthopedic surgeon Steven Goldberg. 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25: Strategies to Help Cope with Abdominal Pain, presented by Dr. Anthony Vernava III. Attendance is free, but seating is limited. For reservations or more information, call 348-4180 or visit www.physiciansregional. com/events. Free screening for autism disorderThe Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, in partnership with the Ronald McDonald House Charities of of Southwest Florida, offers a free monthly autism spectrum disorder screening for toddlers 18 months to 5 years of age. The next screening will be from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, at the Bonita Springs Family Health Center, 26800 S. Tamiami Trail. It is estimated that one in every 150 children is diagnosed with some form of autism spectrum disorder, making it more common than childhood cancer, juvenile diabetes and pediatric AIDS combined. Early intensive behavioral intervention can make an immense difference not just in the development of the child, but in their families as well. The ASD screening is conducted by the neurosciences center at The Childrens Hospital, under the guidance of pediatric neurologist Jose Colon and administered by an advanced registered nurse practitioner. A physician referral is not required. To schedule a screening, call 343-6838. SEE HEALTH, A23 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY tion of patients: teenagers. Fl Do o r i m d h s l l a t t 68 c h u t i m a n t t h e n s r i c ed io 8 23 edi i m wi em a n ke u at ha r o l M d i a dy h y e p g Newer m e g ies have p eo p le w improv e less of do n t ta k time or appropri a Dharnid h of neph r l e g e o f of p e d s tu d l oro ni da d isto be t he 8 00 h i l i sm c d o3

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COLD LASER THERAPY LASER FOR FUNGAL NAILS DIFFICULT ACHILLES/HEEL PAIN INGROWN TOENAILS PEDIATRIC FOOT AND ANKLE CARE239.417.2256 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com DR. BRIAN TIMM, DPM VOTED: Top Podiatrist in America Double Board Certi ed: American Board of Lower Extremity Surgeons NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEWS A23 HEALTHFrom page 22Six-session class for caregiversRight at Home, a home-care service in Bonita Springs, presents a class to help family caregivers reduce stress, improve self-confidence, communicate feelings better, balance their lives, increase their ability to make tough decisions and locate helpful resources. The next session will meet from 1-4 p.m. Fridays, Sept. 2-Oct. 2. A donation of $25 to help defray the cost of a workbook is suggested, but is not required. Classes meet at Right at Home, 4061 Bonita Beach Road. Refreshments are served, and space is limited. Register by calling 343-2751. Geriatric psychiatrist on diagnosing dementiaThe Mental Health Association of Southwest Florida presents Naples psychiatrist Daniel Deutschman with a lecture about Delirium/Dementia Diagnosis and Treatment at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, at MHA headquarters at 2335 Tamiami Trail N. Mental health professionals can earn one CEU. Attendance is free. Registration is required and can be completed by calling Brian Follweiler at 261-5405 or e-mailing bfollweiler@mhaswfl.org. Dr. Javier Rosado came to Immokalee so he could work with CHS Healthcare patients as a postdoctoral Psychology Fellow from the Medical Humanities & Social Sciences Department at the Florida State University College of Medicine. He has been at the Isabel Collier Read Medical Campus working with our CHS staff in the area of health psychology since September 2008. This integrated pediatric psychology service is available at our pediatric practice in Immokalee and offered to all CHS pediatricians as a support service. The goal is to integrate pediatric psychology services into usual pediatric care in order to enhance patients and families health outcomes, psychological adjustment and functioning and disease management. This may include, but is not limited to, difficulties with medical treatment adherence, preparation for and adjustment to medical procedures/ hospitalization, helping increase patient self-management of chronic disease and support of treatments that require behavioral changes.Dr. Rosado received his Ph.D. in counseling psychology and human systems from FSU. He completed a predoctoral internship training program in clinical and community psychology at Yale University School of Medicine and received his bachelors degree in interdisciplinary social science at the University of South Florida. In 2009, he received a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to further his work with migrant children and families. Soon after, in November 2010, he passed his Florida psychologist licensing and accepted a fulltime faculty position with FSU to continue serving CHS patients in Immokalee.Dr. Rosado is one of only 20 researchers funded by the RWJF through Salud America, a national research network to prevent obesity among Latino Children. The $75,000 grant involves conducting a two-year study on how rural clinics and school health programs inform Latino parents about their childrens weight, specifically during well-child visits. Concern for obesity among Latino children escalated when, in 2006, a study by the Mathematica Policy Research Group found 25 percent of Latino children are considered obese by age 3. Through the use of structured interviews conducted by FSU staff after the childs office visit, CHS families will be asked to talk about the routine medical check-up. They will be asked to assess information given to them by the physician relating to their childs weight. The study will look at the familys awareness, post-visit, of weight-related facts and information. Several tools will be used to examine study outcomes, and how those outcomes will be shared with the service providers. Dr. Rosado will continue work on the RWJF grant through the end of this year. The Isabel Collier Read Medical Campus is a Federally Qualified Health Center with clinic management, including patient enrollment, run by CHS Healthcare staff. It also serves as a training site for FSU medical students and psychology postdoctoral fellows. The medical complex, which includes Marion E. Fether Medical Center, offers the community primary medical services in pediatrics, family medicine, adult care, dental, obstetrics /gynecology and behavior health services. CHS Healthcare has been delivering primary care to Collier County residents for 34 years as a private, not-forprofit, safety net health-care provider. The CHS network has 12 locations, including the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile, throughout Collier County. Connie Dillon is the executive director of the CHS Healthcare Foundation. For more information, visit www.Collier.org. CHS pediatric psychologist participates in research on obesity in Latino childrenBY CONNIE DILLON____________________Special to Florida WeeklyROSADO

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* See dealer for Details. **Free oil changes are for all new and preowned Acuras' purchased after 1/1/2011 at Scanlon Acura. For All New and Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles** 14270 South Tamiami Trail Fort Myers1/2 Mile South Of The Bell Tower On US 411-800-330-9155 1-239-481-9797www. ScanlonLexus .com ^ Lease for 36 months with $5,199 due at signing plus tax, tag and title. 10,000 miles per year. Security deposit waived with a pproved credit. Requires 720 + beacon score. #With approved credit. Requires 690+ Beacon Score. Through Lexus Financing Services *Prices plus tax, tag and title.**Free oi l changes are for all new and preowned Lexus' purchased after 1/1/2011 at Scanlon. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. SALE HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8:00AM 8:00PM SATURDAY 9:00AM 5:OOPM STK#1PL128, 6SPD 2008 LEXUSIS250 $24,127 STK#1Y140A 2007 LEXUSES350 $27,885 STK# 1Y133A, NAVIGATION 2008 LEXUSIS350 $29,990 STK#1R200A 2010 LEXUSRX350 $35,938 STK# 1L050A 2008 LEXUSLS460 $46,990 STK#1PL165 2007 LEXUSSC430 $42,990 www.ScanlonAcura.com15581 South Tamiami Trail Fort Myers1 Mile South Of The Super Wal-Mart On US 41 South SALE HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 9:00AM 8:00PM SATURDAY 9:00AM 5:OOPM1-800-226-6800 1-239-433-1661 #* STK#1Y108A 2008 LEXUSES350 $25,945* * STK#1PL068A, NAVIGATION 2004 LEXUSLS430 $18,488* STK#1H029A 2008 LEXUSGX470 $36,788* STK# 1C024A 2010 LEXUSIS250C CONV. $44,990* * STK#1KO49A 2008 LEXUSGX470 $35,777* FREE OIL CHANGESFOR LIFE!For All New & Pre-Owned Franchise VehiclesOn All Certified Pre-Owned Lexus **2 YEAR COMPLIMENTARYMAINTENENCEFor All New & Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles^2.9%APR# On All Certified Pre-Owned Lexus Over 100 Lexus Certified Vehicles in stock &Over 200 Pre-Owned vehicles in stock 2.9%APR# FREE OIL CHANGESFOR LIFE!For All New & Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles** STK#1R182A 2009 LEXUSRX350 $29,998* TL $299PER MONTH DRIVE FOR JUST 2012 ACURA ALL CURRENT ACURA OWNERS RECEIVE A $750 INCENTIVE WHEN YOU LEASE A NEW ACURA*** STK#1M015A 2000 LEXUSGS300 $12,990 STK#1PL134 2004 LEXUSES330 $14,960 STK#1R234C, 46K MILES 2002 LEXUSSC430 $23,688^ * MDX $399PER MONTH DRIVE FOR JUST 2011 ACURA Lease for 36 months with $2,999 down plus lease surcharge, tax, title and DDF (499) due at delivery. 10,000 miles/year. With approved credit (660+ beacon) through AFC. To qualify, customer must be a current owner/lessee of an Acura. Model # YD2H2BJNW. MSRP $43,440. Lease for 36 months with $2,999 down plus lease surcharge, tax, title and DDF (499) due at delivery. 10,000 miles/year. With approved credit (660+ beacon) through AFC. To qualify, customer must be a current owner/lessee of an Acura. Model # UA8F2CJW. MSRP $36,490. Lease for 36 months with $2,250 down plus lease surcharge, tax, title and DDf (499) due at delivery. 10,000 miles/year With approved credit (660+ beacon) through AFC. T o qualify, customer must be a current owner/lessee of an Acura. Model #CU2F6BJW. MSRP $ 30,495.Momentum Miles; Up to 15K Miles Rolled Over $1500 Wear and Tear Waiver at lease end No Disposition Fee Gap Insurance Included Half of excess miles forgiven, up to 7500 Miles ACURALEASE ADVANTAGES

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEWS A25 COMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACING DREAM KITCHENS | CUSTOM CLOSETS | LUXURIOUS BATHROOMS Dont MoveIMPROVE!Kitchen Refacing at Half the Cost of New Cabinets & More. We Do Complete Home Remodeling! NAPLESPELCIAN BAY BLVDVANDERBILT BEACH RD IMMOKALEE RD NS VD 41 www.cornerstonebuilderssw .com FORT MYERS SHOWROOM3150 Metro Parkway 239-332-3020Mon Fri 9:00am to 4:00pm Saturday 10:00am to 4:00pm Evenings available by appt. only NAPLES SHOWROOM7700 Trail Boulevard 239-593-1112Mon Sat 10:00am to 4:00pm Evenings available by appt. only VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS... Located in Fort Myers & NaplesYour complete satisfaction is my rst and foremost priority.Tony Leeber Sr.Owner/ContractorGive us an opportunity to wow you!Factory Direct Pricing... We are the Factory!Lifetime Warranty on any product we manufacture!Cornerstone stands behind every job... BEFORE. DURING. AFTER.Now Offering Mold Remediation COMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACING Youre invited to our ...OPEN HOUSEThinking of Moving? SOLID SURFACE COUNTER TOPSas low as$19per sq. ft. QUARTZ COUNTER TOPSas low as$29per sq. ft. 3CM GRANITE COUNTER TOPSas low as$39per sq. ft. PhysiciansRegionalMedicalGroup.com Now accepting new patients. Appointments: 239-348-4404 My dog gives me wonderful presents. It just doesnt seem like it at the time. When he turned 15 and was no longer able to fly, I dreaded the 4,000-mile drive to our summer hideout in Oregon. That journey soon evolved into a backroads transcontinental exploration, a highlight of our year. Wally turned 20 in July. His fragile health and triple-digit temperatures mid-country have postponed that trip this year. Every time it looked like he was rallying, or the national weather was settling into normal patterns, a flare-up kept us homebound. As July turned August, it became clear there would be no summer exit this year. My initial funk from being denied the mild climate of the Pacific Northwest has once again turned into appreciation of a gift from Wally: An opportunity to taste the rare wine of a Southwest Florida summer. I wasnt an instant convert. Getting up at daybreak to pull weeds started as an effort to avoid the direct summer sun. Sunrise, I found, happens quickly and beautifully. Goldshot and bleeding, those summer skies became a welcome precursor of another days birth. Sl owly I began to see growth patterns and flowering in the garden that had been missed during my usual absence. Instead of coming back to an overgrown mess, there came opportunity to shape and propagate plants during the rainy seasons abundance. This was the time of birth and growth in the subtropics. Tiny lizards scattering everywhere, the fecund viscosity of the air itself new life infused every space. The boil and gather of afternoon clouds also established a pattern: mid-days giant cumulus building to a crackling, windswept wall of rain surging across the river. Working outside as the storm approached was like being in the shadow of a great animal, its breathing and presence filling the world until all is released in a cataclysm of downpour and lightning. Watching the water run to low ground between flashes and the applause of thunder became a lesson in topography, a chance to see the subtle elevations of the Summer songEXCURSIONS property delineated by courses of runoff where all had appeared featureless before. Jalousies were rolled open to taste the change of temperature and force of the wind, an opportunity to connect with the way earlier generations lived with and appreciated the drama of a Southwest Florida monsoon. Living on this slender spine of stone between two oceans, temperatures rarely reach triple digits despite our proximity to the tropics. Stalled air is soon flushed by the exchange of pressure between Atlantic and Gulf. Summers spent in south Louisiana and east Texas were never as temperate, mid year in the high desert of New Mexico and Arizona dustchoked and near sparse by comparison. Fair weather residents, as I had been, miss the personal transformation experienced by year-round Floridians. The body and mind accept the heat and wet until sweating through outdoor work feels renewing. Roofers, landscapers and other outdoor workers become nearly invincible as they grow stronger and tougher with this season of extremes. The weakness and lack of purpose painted by pundits over whole generations dissolves in the presence of Floridians who get things done year round. There is a sense of solidarity in those who remain. Fewer cars, less crowds. More time for please, thank you, and offers of help. Summer brings juvenile snook to the creek outside my home, rolling under mangrove cover where freshwater meets the brackish Caloosahatchee. Porpoise pen mullet against the seawall in hunting displays equal to the choreography of a wolf pack. Manatees take the opposite approach, bobbing aimlessly up the creek for a drink. Not as often as in past years, an alligators knobby head glides by on a mission to the marsh up river. Traffic sounds are rare, but so is silence. The air is alive with buzzy chatter from ibis seeking grubs in the floratam; a Cuban tree frogs rusty hinge. The insistent hum of summer life. School has started, unnaturally soon. A harbinger of seasonal change, it wont be long before we see and feel the shift of nature and residents. Every day, the posted time for sunrise and sunset slips by a minute or so. Migrations will begin, bringing birds, fish and people back from their summer adventures. This year, mine began and continues in Southwest Florida. Thanks again, Wally. w.deanPULLEY wdeanpulley@yahoo.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA26 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEED TREE WORK?Be Prepared! You will save on damages when a storm hits!Garden Center Full Service Tree Care to 75 feet Hurricane Prep & Clean-Up Privacy Plantings Landscape Design Water Features Pavers Irrigation in your pets memory can help. Find supportive family and friends. Not everyone will be able to handle your grief. It is important to find people who are comfortable letting you cry, listening while you talk about your pet or just sitting quietly with you. Find a pet-loss hotline or support group. Many veterinary schools offer free pet-loss hotlines staffed with trained volunteers who will listen and offer compassionate support. Pet-loss support groups can also be found through pet cemeteries or crematories, shelters, and veterinary hospitals. Pet-loss groups are not the same as group therapy, says Tousley. Their purpose is to offer a safe, structured place where people bound by the experience of loss can come together. Numerous online support groups are available 24 hours a day. Both Nielsen and Tousley recommend that pet owners who feel unable to function normally or who feel that they are not progressing in their grief process seek professional help. D Allow yourself time to grieve. While its not healthy to get stuck in your grief, pretending that nothing is wrong is equally unhealthy. A persons grief is legitimate and real, regardless of anyone elses comments, behavior or opinions, says Tousley. Nielsen adds, You are not crazy what you are experiencing is normal. The old adage that time heals all wounds applies to pet loss as well. As you work through your grief, youll find that there will come a day when youll wake up in the morning and your first thought will not be about how much you miss your pet, but about a happy memory of the time you spent together. Lack of understanding makes grieving more dif cultsource of emotional support tend to have more difficulty recovering. Here are some tips to help you cope: Mark the pets passing with some sort of ritual. Rituals such as memorial services and burial ceremonies are an accepted part of human loss, and can be just as healing after losing a pet. Even something as simple as lighting a candle Those of us who consider a pet a member of the family will sooner or later experience the pain of loss, and it can be as devastating as the loss of any loved one. That doesnt mean youll get much sympathy from those who dont see pets the way you do. Much of society is not aware of the strength of the human-animal bond, so pet loss is often seen as disenfranchised loss, meaning it is not socially recognized, says Joelle Nielsen, a veterinary social worker at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine. For some, the insensitivity of others can be more painful than the grief from the actual loss, says Marty Tousley, a bereavement counselor at Hospice of the Valley in Phoenix. Most people dont tell someone to go get a new spouse or child within a month of one dying. Knowing that youre not alone in your grief is important, as is realizing that the loss of a pet is a unique experience for each individual. Factors that play into how the loss is handled include whether the death was sudden or followed a prolonged illness, whether the pet owner had to elect euthanasia, whether it was the first time the person experienced losing a pet, and the persons living situation. Single pet owners for whom the pet was a primary PET TALES Dealing with pet loss For people who live alone, the loss of an animal companion can be even more difficult to endure.BY INGRID KING _______________________________Special to Florida Weekly Humane Society Naples holds its annual Fur, Fun and Food open house from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. Visitors are invited to tour the shelter, meet the HSN cat whisperer, learn about dog agility and training and sample dishes from local restaurants, with a portion of food ticket sales benefitting the shelter. Non-food donations for the animal shelter bleach, new or clean used towels, hand-sanitizer, etc. are welcome. The NCH bloodmobile will be on-site for those who would like to give blood. Also coming up at the shelter is Downward Dog Yoga: Yoga with Your Dog, at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8. Bring your own four-legged best friend, or enjoy the company of a shelter dog during the yoga session. Cost is $15. Sign up by Sept. 5. The shelter is at 370 AirportPulling Road. For more information, call 643-1880 or visit www. hsnaples.org. Humane society open house set for Saturday

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NEWS A27 Due to the increasing need for specialized pediatric services in Collier, Lee, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties, we are responding. A new state-of-the-art facility will be constructed at HealthPark Medical Center in South Fort Myers. Our new Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida will house 150 beds and all of the ancillary specialty services to treat the most critically ill children and their families. Please join us as we embark on this amazing journey of hope and care for the children of Southwest Florida. For more information on how you can help save a childs life, please call 239-343-6950, or visit www.LeeMemorial.org/Foundation Keep Children Close to Home for Health Care W e are responding to the increasing need for specialized pediatric servic es in Southwest F lorida by building a new state-of-the-art Childrens Hospital Our new Childrens Hospital of Southwest F lorida will house 148 beds and many specialty servic es to treat the most critically-i ll childr en and their families.For more information on how you can hel p save a chil ds life, p l ease ca ll 239-343-6 950, or visit www.LeeMemorial .org/Foundation That accounts for the bleeding, you see. Now you understand the way things happen here. White Queen, Alices Adventures in Wonderland Deer-stalking would be a very fine sport if only the deer had guns. W. S. Gilbert As you see, my reflexes are as sharp as my mind! And my blade even sharper! Sherlock Holmes Trials of the Demon! in Batman: The Brave and the Bold If you know where you were going, that would not be a-Musing. Rx, note to self In the middle of the plains, in the middle of the games, who knew thered be a mountain? SwongSo here I am, not much of a pirate really. More a wraith. Barely adrift on a raft in an endless see. Not much of a raft really. More like a single log. Or really more like a bit of a stick. A splinter, really. Tired of a-musing me-self, of feeling the family jewels slipping between boney fingers. Neither hot nor cold. Not really both hot and cold. Remember the game: Youre getting warmer....warmer....hot....hotter....oh, cooler....cold. So Im a looking. Wondering. Searching the memory archives. Investigating. The word investigate comes from the Latin word meaning to track. To track by following in the vestigium or footprint. So it goes in the forest. By forest, we usually mean a large, tree covered expanse. But in medieval England, forest meant royal forest, tracts of land including heath, grassland and wetland that were owned by the king. These lands supported game, mostly deer, for the exclusive hunting by royalty. In late 12th and early 13th century, fully a third of southern England was royal forest. There, forest law applied. This law ensured that the venison, the animals of the chase, and the vert, the greenery that sustained them, were exclusively for the royal pleasure. Now, if buck or doe escaped the royal forest and caused damage outside, they could be killed by the aggrieved commoners. Exiting the royal forest meant entering the purlieu, the place just beyond the forest edge. John Manwood, in his 1598 Treatise of the Lawes of the Forest, defines purlieu as a certain territory of ground adjoining unto the forest which was once forest land and afterwards disafforested by the perambulation made for the severing of the new forests from the old. This perambulation, also called the beating of the bounds, was a walking on the land to mark a redefining of royal boundaries. And who better at bounding royal redefinition than Alices White Queen? For her, if its jam every other day, its never jam today. She claims that this is the giddy effect of living backwards, of having memory that remembers best what happened the week after next. The Wonderland White Queen bleeds first and pricks later. Is that the then when we hear the baying of the hunting hounds? Like Sherlock who is ever wearing his signature deer-stalker hat, I have been doing some investigating of my own. My own memory, that is. So, like in the beginning here, bemusing on the floating splinter, the investigating adrift seems to find its own inspirational and expiring Yeth Hound, the headless yet wailing beast never seen by mortal eyes, not even by the Baskervilles. Met em before? I looked for him. Had we passed in the forest? And I could find no sounds or sight or touch. No smell or taste. Not of him, nor of any forest creature. Just photos found, and story books. But no thing, not really. The past archive slipped, a way without a trace. No present; nothing to be given. No experience. Just like an old movie, someone is saying: Why dont you see me some time, and come? There may be purple mountain majesty, plain song fruit prints, and murmurs in the forest I know this is indecipherable. Remember: Non-sense. Rx is the FloridaWeekly muse who hopes to inspire profound mutiny in all those who care to read. Our Rx may be wearing a pirate cloak of invisibility, but emanating from within this shadow is hope that readers will feel free to respond. Who knows: You may even inspire the muse. Make contact if you dare.MUSINGS Rx rx@floridaweekly.com Purlieu

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BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES BUS INESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011Good morningThe chambers Wake Up Naples, and more networking events. B8-9 The Fools SchoolA lesson about stocks and return on equity. B6 Real EstateNABOR report encouraging; state stats, not so much. B11 INSIDE Preferred Travel of Naples has been selected to receive free technical assistance from the state-funded GrowFL program. The travel company was founded by Wilma Boyd in 1984 and belongs to the Signature Travel Network, a worldwide group that offers savings, amenities and privileged access experiences on luxury cruises, tours, hotels and adventures. Ms. Boyd says the GrowFL designation means growth and expansion for Preferred Travels 45 employees. The benefit of research provided by GrowFL experts will guide the local firm in making decisions and setting strategies that will help shape the company. As a second stage company, it is beneficial to have access, guidance and support from our peers. GrowFLs expertise and assistance in providing key information on market penetration, technology and core strategy will help in decision making and strategy, she says.Part of the Florida Economic Gardening Institute, GrowFL was created in 2009 by the Florida legislature and is based at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. When selecting businesses for the program, the institute looks for companies that have the potential for success, according to Tom ONeal, executive director of the Florida Economic Gardening Institute. Preferred Travel of Naples is ideal for the program as it has shown that it has the potential to succeed and it continues to grow, says Dr. ONeal, who also is associate vice president for UCFs office of research and commercialization. From its Naples headquarters, PreferredPreferred Travel has the ticket for GrowFL SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY SEE TRAVEL, B7 You know you want to you want to take the long-term vacation just once in a lifetime, or for the rest of your life, defining yourself as a true independent. Now might be a good time to plan and execute that glorious maneuver along the Southwest coast. At this unusual moment in economic time, brokers say, long-term vacation rentals range from surprisingly affordable to unambiguously opulent. The market will suit many, in other words not just a few. One thing, though: You cant define long-term as merely a couple of weeks. The minimum long-term stay up and down the coast is generally considered more than 28 days, part of a new trend in long-term vacation rentals, especially in upscale resort communities. Long-term vacation renters are typically from the Northeast and tend to be middle-age retired or semi-retired couples that will want a home large enough to accommodate visiting family members periodically during their stay, explains Randy Bacik, the CEO at Royal Shell Vacations based on Sanibel. Mr. Bacik spoke through Don DeLuca, a spokesman for Royal Shell. Remarkably, its both a buyers and a sellers market, when it comes to longterm vacation rentals, he suggests. The long-term rental activity is much better now as many more people are renting as opposed to buying, Mr. Bacik notes. Investors are still taking advantage of the low home prices and are much more successful at renting those investment homes. There are some areas where we have more demand for longterm rentals than inventory to fill the requests. Bottom line: how much and for what? Prices vary depending on the location, type of property, amenities, etc., Mr. Bacik says. Minimum pricing begins around $3,000 month and maximum pricing can reach up to $45,000 a month. If that top-end deal raises the specter of insolvency, dont flinch just yet. Best value on the island, 2 kayaks, Adult & Kid bikes, pvt. Beach, WiFi, reads an ad for vacation rentals at www. homeaway.com. You also get three bedSEE RENTALS, B7 Long-term rentals a resilient niche Taking it slow and easyBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIALISTS / COURTESY PHOTOSPremier Sothebys in Naples rents properties in Port Royal, Park Shore Resort and the Vasari Country Club.BOYD

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Specializing in Marital, Family & Appellate LawPROFESSIONAL COUNSEL... PERSONAL APPROACHFlorida Board Certi ed Marital & Family Law AttorneysAll aspects of complex marital and family law at both the trial and appellate levelSpecializing in pre-nuptials, post-nuptials and Collaborative Divorces MONEY & INVESTINGVolatility by the numbersOf particular importance last week to the investor with a traditional bond/ equity buy and hold portfolio was the volatility in the U.S. equity market. In daily terms, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 5.5 percent, up 4 percent, down 4.6 percent, up 3.9 percent and, finally, closed up 1.1 percent. After such a tumultuous week and tremendous news coverage of the same, what can be written of incremental value or insight?Its useful at this time to discuss volatility measures: what they mean, how theyre measured, whether equity volatility can be minimized and whether U.S. equity investors have been adequately rewarded for enduring the volatility of the past 11 years.This column covers two measures of volatility: Beta and VIX. Most investors understand Beta, which measures the degree with which an individual stock, portfolio or an asset class will move with the broad market. If the stock or portfolio moves in exact tandem (up or down) with the market, it would have a Beta of 1.0. A Beta of greater than 1.0 implies that the asset moves more (e.g. more up or more down) than the market; a Beta of negative 1.0 means the asset moves in the exact opposite direction of the market. In portfolio construction, investors want to reduce Beta without giving up return. Much has been written in this column about how to reduce the Beta of a portfolio. Sure, there can be a shift to nonpaying cash or painfully low-paying U.S. bonds. But for many, these are non-solutions. In simple terms, though my readers tire of hearing, they might soon be heeding some counsel to include alternative assets in a traditional portfolio for the very reason that they are an asset class which is uncorrelated to stocks and bonds as they have low or even zero correlation to equities. (Source: 1983 study by Dr. John Lintner, a Harvard professor, titled The Potential Role of Managed CommodityFinancial Futures Accounts in Portfolios of Stocks and Bonds; recently updated and confirmed by the CME Group.) Unlike cable news stars who might be inclined to promote what they already own (talking their book), I am talking a strategy a strategy rarely explained, promoted or included in individual investor portfolios. Mainstream media and many financial advisers continue to label alternative assets as too risky. Compared to what? To rockin rollin equities? In my opinion, the most prevalent market risk statistic is the Chicago Board Options Exchange Market Volatility Index, called by its ticker symbol, VIX.Some people call it a fear index but it really measures both fearful or exuberant expectations for the S&P over the next 30 days. It is quoted in percentage points and the percentage represents the expected annual change in the S&P. Suffice it to say, a 15 percent (annualized) VIX translates into an expected monthly change (up or down) in the market of some 4 percent. Per the calculation, this monthly volatility has a 68 percent or better (one standard deviation from the mean expectation) likelihood of happening.So what is a normal VIX reading? Well, equities have been very volatile since 2000. For most of 2011, the VIX was between 15 percent and 20 percent but, with the recent equity decline of the past three weeks, the VIX has reached 47 percent two times this past week and closed at 36 percent. Those figures, in effect, say that a lot more volatility is expected over the next 30 days and over the next year. (Source: Yahoo Finance VIX historical charts) The U.S. equity market has been volatile and expectations are for continued volatility. It is my opinion that the worlds problems are not going away for a long time and that if we couldnt jump start the economy with meaningful growth after the trillions already spent, another go-around of Fed Quantitative Easing, if such does happen, might well be just pushing on a string.You might want to revisit your risk/ reward expectations for equities and also reconsider your portfolios allocations so as to include assets not correlated to equities. You might want to consider inclusion of trading systems that take positions based on technicals and/or trading systems using money management rules or with capabilities to assets as well as go long. Always consult your advisers as to the suitability and if your advisers are not having these discussions with you, then consider expanding your circle of professionals. There is a substantial risk of loss in trading commodity futures, options and offexchange foreign currency products. Past performance is not indicative of future results. Jeannette Rohn Showalter, CFA, can be reached at 444-5633, ext. 1092, or jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com. Her office is at The Crexent Business Center, Bonita Springs. jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFA jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com Jan 07 Jan 08 Jan 09 Jan 10 Jan 111 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 7 0 8 0 9 0 Volatility Index S&P 500Aug 12, 2011

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Port Royal Rum RowMarvelous waterfront estate with over 9,500 square feet of living space. With architecture in the Bermudian tradition and breathtaking views over Buccaneers Bay, this immaculate estate oers the rare opportunity for elegant entertaining and luxurious family living. Quick access to the Gulf. Port Royal Club membership eligibility. Port Royal Nelsons WalkSensational vistas from this stunning residence situated on two Port Royal lots with expansive water frontage. Beautiful Southern exposure facing the conuence of Naples Bay and the picturesque inland waterways leading to Rookery Bay and the pristine coastal estuaries. Port Royal Club membership eligibility. $11,990,000

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 COMMODITIES AND MANAGED FUTURES Worldwide Futures Systems specializes in the development, monitoring and execution of alternative investment strategies using what we consider to be the worlds best Futures Trading Systems. We feel that it is our experience that has made us the benchmark in futures systems portfolio trading.Call now for a FREE consultation239-571-8896Jeannette Showalter, CFA & Licensed Commodities Broker of Worldwide Futures Systems, LLC.239-571-8896 showalter@wwfsystems.com www.wwfsystems.comAn investment in futures contracts is speculative, involves a high degree of risk and is suitable only for persons who can assume the risk of loss in excess of their margin deposits. You should carefully consider whether futures trading is appropriate for you in light of your investment experience, trading objectives, nancial resources, and other relevant circumstances. PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS. GED FUT U U U U U U U R R R R R R R E S Jeannette Showalter, CFA & LICENSED COMMODITIES BROKER your rst checking account. our rst chance to help you. capitalbank-us.com | 800.308.3971 Terms and conditions apply. Ask us for full details. Your rst checking account may be the most important nancial decision you will make. At Capital Bank we make sure you get the right product the rst time. With our CashBack Checking Account, you get easy savings and easy rewards. Use your debit card 10 times per month for point of sale purchases, have one direct deposit or ACH debit per statement cycle, and youll earn rewards that are credited to your CashBack Saver account. Visit your nearest Capital Bank branch or call 800-308-3971 for more information. Or visit us online at capitalbank-us.com. ON-SITE COMPUTER SERVICESFor Your Home or Busines 239-257-1601www.fastteks.com/capecoral We Come To You! New Clients Receive$25 OFFCall for Details AFFORDABLE RATES CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS Stephan to retire from Junior AchievementJunior Achievement of Southwest Florida has announced the retirement of Victoria Stephan, who has served as president of the organization for 11 years. During her tenure, student participation in JA programs designed to promote work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy have grown 425 percent and now serve 10,079 students in Collier, Lee and Charlotte counties. Today, JA programs are part of the mandated curriculum in both Collier and Lee counties. Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida also launched its CEO Academy summer camp program for high school students under Ms. Stephans leadership. The Southwest Florida office has received numerous honors from JA Worldwide in recognition of its program growth and operating surplus. JA Worldwide awarded the office with a Bronze Summit Award in 2004 and Silver Summit Awards in 2005, 2007 and 2008. In 2009, Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida received its first Gold Summit Award and a Peak Performance Award from JA Worldwide. Most recently, the organization earned the 2011 Gold Summit Award, which recognized program growth reaching an additional 1,500 students during the 2010-2011 school year. Ms. Stephans retirement is effective Dec. 2. A search committee is identifying candidates for the position in hopes that a a successor can be in place within approximately three months to allow for a brief overlap in service with Ms. Stephan and a smooth transition of leadership. Junior Achievement is the worlds largest organization dedicated to inspiring and preparing young people to succeed in a global economy. Junior Achievement of Southwest Florida Inc. provides in-school and after-school programs that focus on three key content areas: work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy. For more information, contact the Southwest Florida office at 225-2590 or visit www.JASWFL.org. Leonard named Zontas Woman of the YearTrish Leonard has been named 2011 Woman of the Year by the Zonta Club of Bonita Springs. A former president of the club and leader of numerous business groups and nonprofit fundraising efforts, Ms. Leonard will receive the award during the clubs third annual Glass Slipper Ball set for Friday, Nov. 18, at The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort. Ms. Leonard is the director of marketing for Florida Gulf Coast Universitys Small Business Development Center Office and president of TLC Marketing and Creative Services. She led the initial funding efforts for the Ronald McDonald House at The Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida and has been instrumental in the Love That Dress!, fundraising event for the PACE Center for Girls. She is the founder of the Commercial Sales Industry Professionals of Southwest Florida and is known to many for her years of service as the membership director for the Bonita Springs Chamber of Commerce. Ms. Leonard is the current president of the European American Network; vice chair of the board for the city of Bonita Springs Arts in Public Places; a board member of the Speakers Assembly of SW FL; committee member of the Boys & Girls Club of Collier County 2011 golf tournament; member of the Art League of Bonita Springs; and affiliate member of BEARBonita/Estero Association of Realtors. Summer interns gain experience at the chamberThe Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce has hosted four interns this summer who have made significant contributions to the nonprofit organization while complimenting their academic courses of study.The interns are: Nathalie Grajales, Merline Jacques, Nicholas Lynch and Lauren ONeal.A 2006 graduate of Barron Collier High School, Ms. Grajales is from Paris, France. She earned an associate paralegal degree from the Universite Pantheon SorbonneParis I and is a second year student in Modern Languages at the Universite Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III. During her internship, she has helped create systems to assist the chambers Council for Visitors in Collier County in applying for foreign visitors from the State Department. Ms. Jacques, a 2008 graduate of Golden Gate High School, will receive a bachelors degree in finance from Florida State University in 2012. Her internship work has also involved the Chambers CIVIC program to assist the chamber in applying for foreign visitors from the State Department. In addition, she is assisting the chambers finance department with W-9 compliance. Her community activities include volunteering with the Haitian Culture Club and SISTUHS Inc. Mr. Lynch will graduate from Lorenzo Technical High School, where his course of study focuses on architecture and engineering, in 2014. In 2006, he participated in the People to People Leadership Ambassadors sponsored by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Foundation to enhance leadership skills. This summer, he is working closely with the Leadership Collier Foundation to create an alumni database. A native Neapolitan, Ms. ONeal graduated from Johnson and Wales University in North Miami. She holds an associates degree in business administration and a bachelors in business management with a concentration in human resource management. During her chamber internship, she has worked closely with the programming and events department and helped coordinate the annual trade show for members. For information about interning with the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, contact Mike Reagen, president and CEO of the chamber, by calling 4032904 or e-mailing Lori Freiburg at lori@ napleschamber.org. BUSINESS BRIEFS STEPHAN LEONARD

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 THE MOTLEY FOOL If youre studying a stock, trying to figure out if it will serve your portfolio well, check out its return on equity (ROE), which reflects the productivity of the assets that management has at its disposal.When a company generates profits, there are many things it can do with them. For example, it can pay shareholders a dividend, pay down debt, buy back shares of the company stock or reinvest in operations.Return on equity reveals how effectively reinvested earnings and capital that shareholders originally invested in the company are used to generate additional earnings. For example, profits might be used to acquire a smaller company that has valuable technology. Or a new factory might be built, upping the firms output and sales. You can find ROEs online, such as at http://finance.yahoo.com (look up a companys info and then click on Key Statistics), but its good to know where the number comes from. Return on equity Return on Equity What Is This Thing Called The Motley Fool?Remember Shakespeare? Remember As You Like It? In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only people who could get away with telling the truth to the King or Queen. The Motley Fool tells the truth about investing, and hopes youll laugh all the way to the bank. Passive Can Beat Active Q What are actively managed mutual funds? C.R., St. Augustine, Fla.A Theyre funds run by professionals who try to maximize performance by hand-picking investments. A largecap equity mutual fund, for example, will be full of large-company stocks selected by the funds managers. Passively managed funds, meanwhile, commonly known as index funds, aim to mirror the components of an existing index. An index fund based on the Standard & Poors 500 will hold the 500 stocks in that index, in the same proportion as the index.The irony we love to point out is that the vast majority of actively managed stock funds underperform the overall stock market and the index funds that track it. Perhaps the biggest reason is costs, since, in order to mimic an index, passively managed funds dont need to employ lots of analysts. Most investors would do well to have at least some, if not much, of their assets in index investments.Learn more at www.fool.com/mutualfunds/mutualfunds.htm and www. indexfunds.com/learn.php. You can research funds at www.morningstar. com. For recommendations of exceptional, low-fee active and passive mutual funds, try our Rule Your Retirement newsletter for free at www. ruleyourretirement.com.Q Where online can I look up the rate of home value appreciation in a region? P.D., Brooklyn, N.Y.A One good resource is mortgage giant Freddie Mac. At www.freddiemac.com/finance/fmhpi, it provides its Freddie Mac House Price Index (FMHPI), measuring typical price inflation for houses nationally and within each state. Or look up data on 20 metropolitan regions via the S&P/Case-Shiller Indexes at www.standardandpoors.com. Realtor.com offers local market conditions, too, and you can also get lots of information from good real estate agents in your area. Got a question for the Fool? Send it in see Write to Us. Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest InvestmentTo Educate, Amuse & Enrichis calculated by dividing the past years worth of earnings (often referred to as net income) by the average shareholder equity for the period. Earnings are found on the companys income statement, and shareholder equity on the balance sheet. Consider Walmart. Its ROE was recently 26.3 percent. Its helpful to see whether a companys ROE is rising or falling, which you can look up at sites such as Morningstar.com. Walmarts ROE has been rising in recent years, from nearly 20 percent a decade ago. Another way to add context is to compare a company with its peers. Targets ROE was recently a solid 19.3, but Sears Holding, owner of Kmart, had no ROE since it most recently reported a net loss instead of net income. (The Fool owns shares of Walmart and has recommended it in its newsletters.) A final thing to keep in mind is that ROE can be inflated by high debt, so cast an eye on a companys balance sheet to see how debt-laden it is. Or look for a debt-toequity ratio under 1.0, or even 0.50. Be an informed investor. Here was the situation: Exodus Communications and Amazon.com were both trading for around $6 per share. I laughed at the idea of paying $6 for an online bookstore, so I went with the Internet service provider. I was left with a $6,000 sheet of wallpaper. D.B., onlineThe Fool Responds: If you were looking at Amazon at $6 per share, that must have been in 2001, when the shares were near an all-time low. It was around then that Exodus filed for bankruptcy protection, too. If youd parked $6,000 in Amazon then and held on, youd have more than $200,000 now. But Amazons future wasnt quite so clear a decade ago.In situations where youre not sure, you might divide your money between your candidates though you shouldnt spread yourself too thin or own more companies than you can keep up with. Better still, do more research and thinking until youre more confident in your decision. Despite Amazons success, its the kind of company Warren Buffett has avoided, as he isnt as certain about its future as he is about the soft-drink business, insurance or railroads. The Motley Fool TakeWell, what do you know? Maybe President Obamas choice of General Electrics CEO Jeff Immelt to chair the new Council on Jobs and Competitiveness wasnt such a bad idea after all. Exposure to the plight of the American worker seems to have helped Immelt see the light.Immelt recently confirmed that 60 percent of GEs forecasted $145 billion in revenue this year will come from outside U.S. borders. But nearly 46 percent of the companys employees are U.S.-based and Immelt plans to grow that number, capitalizing on tremendous demand for heavy machinery abroad. General Electric has reportedly streamlined its manufacturing processes so G.E. and Jobs Name That CompanyI trace my history to Bank of Americas 1958 launch of the BankAmericard, but I picked a simpler name in 1976. Im the worlds largest retail electronic payments network. You might think of me as a credit card company, but I issue no cards and extend no credit. I partner with financial institutions and receive fees from them based on transactions. About 70 percent of the payments I process Last weeks trivia answerI sold my first tickets to an Electric Light Orchestra concert in 1977. Based in Beverly Hills, today Im North Americas fourth-largest e-commerce site and the worlds leading live entertainment company. I produced 21,000 events in 2010 and manage more than 250 artists. I can sell 14,000 tickets per minute and I operate in 28 nations. My marketing solutions unit enables more than 800 advertisers to tap into the 200 million consumers I deliver annually through my live-event and digital platforms. I merged with Ticketmaster in 2010, and in 2010, Ticketmaster.com generated $6 billion in online sales. Who am I? ( Answer: Live Nation Entertainment )are from debit or prepaid cards. There are close to 2 billion cards out there with my name on them. My 2008 initial public offering (IPO) was Americas largest. Who am I? Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and youll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! much that labor now makes up only 10 percent to 20 percent of its cost of goods sold.The $14.2 billion that GE earned last year, but paid no taxes on, may have had a teensy bit to do with its hiring plans. Strong foreign demand for its products, coupled with a relatively weak U.S. dollar, helps make U.S. goods more cost-competitive abroad. But if GEs strong international profits are helping create jobs here, its hard to complain.American workers are starting to hold their own against foreign labor in the battle for jobs.Mesirow Financial chief economist Diane Swonk notes that America is enjoying a renaissance in the manufacturing sector. Its not across-the-board, but many heavy manufacturers are earning good money abroad and accelerating hiring in the U.S. Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Wrong Choice y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y h e s im r lds e nts e as ue i t. um 7 0 ss a c b m y ini t was a m I ? Kn ow with Fool youll be en a nifty prize! The Public Relations Society of AmericaGulf Coast Chapter meets at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 23, at the Hilton Naples. Guest speaker Joan Stewart will discuss How to Keep the Media Wolves at Bay. Cost is $24 for members and $29 for others. Sign up at www.gulfcoastprsa.org. The C ollier County Lodging & T ourism Alliance presents Marketing Your Business to Area Hotels at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 24, at Bellasera Hotel, 221 Ninth Street S. Attendance is free and limited to two individuals per organization. E-mail Pam Calore at pam.cclta@ gmail.com LeeCollier Business Women meets f or networking on Tuesday, Aug. 30, in Naples and on Marco Island. The Marco meeting is from 7:30-9 a.m. at ODonoughs; cost is $12. In Naples, the meeting is from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Roys restaurant in Bayfront Place; cost is $16 for members, $20 for others. RSVP for either meeting by e-mailing robin@leecollierbusinesswoman.com or visiting www. LeeCollierBusinessWomen.com. PR ACC, Public Relations, Advertising and Mar keting Professionals of Collier County, meets at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, at McCormick & Schmicks. Jennifer Edwards, Collier County supervisor of elections, will induct the new PRACC board of directors. Cost is $25 for members, $30 for others. Call 436-2105 or visit www.pracc.org. The next general membership luncheon meeting of the C ollier C ounty Bar Association is set for noon-1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9, at Carrabbas, 4320 N. Tamiami Trail. Members can make reservations at www.colliercountybar.org. Wake Up Naples with the Gr ea ter Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14, at the Hilton Naples. Cost is $20 in advance, $25 for non-members and members on the day of the event. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events. The C ollier Building Industry As sociation holds a members mixer from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at Ferguson Bath and Kitchen Gallery, 3406 Domestic Ave. Call 436-6100 or visit www.cbia.net to sign up. The next Business After 5 with the Gr ea ter Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at Real Seafood Company, 8960 Fontana Del Sol Way. Cost is $5 in advance, $10 at the door, $25 for non-members. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events. AM Blend, a new monthly networking meeting sponsor ed b y the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, meets at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Royal Palm Academy. Cost is $5. Attendance is limited to the first 25 who sign up at www. napleschamber.org/events. The Bonita Springs Chamber of C ommerce holds its annual meeting and awards luncheon Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the Bonita Bay Club. The members-only event costs $45 per person. Sponsorships are available starting at $250. Call 992-2943 or visit www.bonitaspringschamber.com. BUSINESS MEETINGS

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 BUSINESS B7 M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentals O er Good thru 08/31/11 WITH THIS AD $350.OFFNew Orders OnlyCoupon Must Be Presented At Time Of Order. Why Do More Home Owners ChooseComplete Line of Rolldowns Clear Pan ccordionsCall For FREE Estimate594-16161762 Trade Center Way, Naples Florida, 34109Hurricane IMPACT WINDOWS & DOORS!! QUALITT RVICErooms, two baths, a large screened porch, a 50-inch plasma television and a spacious kitchen, plus the use of a community pool. The ad is attractive, the photos are appealing, the place, located in the Dunes, is only minutes from either the Gulf Beach or the bay on Sanibel Island, and it sleeps 10. We just finished a complete home renovation in late September 2009 (with) fresh paint, new carpet, new tile and all-new furnishings, adds the owner, Michelle Hedden, a Georgia resident. What could be better, or a better deal? That depends on personal taste, time and budget. Although the temperamental and even bi-polar economy has created this new trend, in some areas its a not-sonew trend, suggests Lee Leatherwood, broker of the rental division for Premier Southebys International Realty, headquartered in Naples. Ive been doing rentals here for 15 years and Ive seen a culture developed for owners, with strict rules for rentals thats true from Naples to Lely to Bonita, she observes. Out of hundreds of condo associations or homeowners associations in Collier County, maybe only 10 or less offer weekly rentals. And theyre heavily policed. So this has always been a bit of a long-term vacationer spot. Thats by design the design of the code planners decades ago who sought a stable community without many transients, Ms. Leatherwood suggests. In contrast, Fort Myers Beach was designed and coded to rent to shortterm vacationers. To make the trend even more interesting from a business standpoint, brokers in Naples are looking for the longest rent contracts they can get for their clients, because the tight rental rules usually allow only two or three 30-day leases per year. If youve used up your 30-day options, you cant do a 30-day rental again until the following January, she says. So people who call us and want a 30-day lease get put on a waiting list. Each community has its own particular twist on the trend, however, as Deb Sestilio points out. A broker for Fishermens Village Realty in Punta Gorda, Ms. Sestilio sees a new strong trend in longer-term vacationing from clients in the Midwest or Northeast, where the devastating winter weather last year remains on their minds this year. Were seeing more people want to come and stay longer, maybe longer than six months, from places like Michigan or upstate New York, she explains. We consider seasonal contracts anything under six months, and longterm contracts anything over that. The seasonal folks tend to look for a finished unit, maybe a condo with amenities where they can go to the pool, or enjoy community barbecues or walk to Fishermens Village. The longer-term rentals dont always require all that. Certainly the longer trend in vacations requires more time of renters, whether long-term is defined as one month or more than six months. Such renters often tend to be either retired baby boomers, or people who dont mind devoting all four weeks of a vacation to a single beautiful spot. Families with kids generally dont get that much time, and if they do, they usually want to spend two weeks with grandma and two at Disney, or something, notes Ms. Leatherwood. They also have money, although people willing to vacation out of season or on the edges of a season wont necessarily break their banks, even in upscale communities. At Fishermens Village Reality, Ms. Sestilio offers long-term or seasonal rentals ranging from a high of about $3,500 a month in season, to about $1,800 a month at the low end. In Vivante at Punta Gorda, for example, the top-end money would get a three bedroom, 2 bathroom condo in a gated community with pools, spas, tennis courts and all of the other amenities, she explains. The less expensive rental might be a condo in an older neighborhood in Punta Gorda Isles, but it would have a pool or a boat dock or easy access to Fishermans village, the sprawling shopping and eating mall built on and over the water in downtown Punta Gorda. For the 3,800-square-foot Sanibel home owned by Michelle Hedden, meanwhile, prices for the next two months September and October are listed in the homeway.com ad as a mere $1,900 or $2,200, respectively. Wait until mid-December through March, though, and the price jumps to $5,200 per month. Oh, and pets? No problem at Ms. Heddens home, if theyre small. And thats almost always negotiable, owners say. Children, by the way, are not considered pets, generally. Travel works with independent contractors in other Florida locations, as well as Illinois, Ohio, North Carolina, Michigan and Pennsylv ania. For more information visit www.preferrednaples.com. The Florida Economic Gardening Institute was created by the 2009 Florida legislature to stimulate investment in Floridas economy by providing technical assistance for expanding businesses in the state. Qualified companies must be engaged in the following sectors to receive no-cost technical assistance: manufacturing; finance and insurance services; wholesale trade; information industries; professional, scientific and technical services; management services; and administrative and support services. For more information, visit www.GrowFL.com. RENTALSFrom page 1TRAVELFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTODemand for long-term rentals at Royal Shell Vacations often surpasses the amount of inventory. Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$2995*PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $29.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB8 BUSINESS WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce hosts Wake Up Naples at the Hilton Naples BOB RAYMOND / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1. Miriam Ross, MJ Scarpelli and Rita Allen-Elben 2. Kathy Curatolo, Corina Velasquez, Kamela Patton and Julie Sprague 3. Tim Durham with Kristi and Joe Foster 4. Kamela Patton, Collier County Schools Superintendent and Mike Reagen 5. Mike Riley, Russell Budd and Bill Hazzard 6. Christina Adams and Connie Dillon 7. Cyndee Woolley and Libby Anderson 8. Scott Koenig and Robert Metzger 9. Rosalie Rhodes and Jerry Sanford 10. Scott Gregory 11. Tom Stallmer, Pam Harwell and Seth Schiller 1 8 6 5 4 3 2 7 9 10 11

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 BUSINESS B9 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Bonita Springs-Estero Womens Council of RealtorsBERNADETTE LA PAGLIA FLORIDA WEEKLY1. Cindy Kruesi, Debi Chesebro, Heather Wightman, Rhonda Diner, Pamela Olsen, Terri Speech and Paula Angelopoulos Urbinati 2. Judi Geitzen, Debra McCalister Brown, Michael Jackson, Joanne Brenenstuhl and Ginny Nobbe 3. Cindy Krueis, Lackie Nary, Joe Harris, Heather Wightman and Jeanette Igoe 4. Nigel Fullick, Cathie Bartlett and Peter OFlynn 5. Todd Hansen, Heather Wightman and Scott Hannelis 6. Joni Pavich and Farah McCauley 7. Joe Harris and Pamela Olsen 8. Dawn Lutz and Donna DiMartino Collier Building Industry Association at Olde Cypress 1. Brad Stockham and Walter Crawford 2. Tom Martin, Norman Bloxham and John Nary 3. Chad Imig and Carrie Horner 4. Dave Dunnavant, Melissa Ahern and Nick Casalanguida 5. Tim Hancock, Alexis Crespo and Ron Waldrop 1 4 5 3 2 1 6 2 3 5 4 8 7 DAVID MICHAEL FLORIDA WEEKLY

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Key indicators such as pending sales, inventory and the median closed price show signs of real estate stability during challenging economic times, according to a report released by the Naples Area Board of Realtors, which tracks home listings and sales within Collier County (excluding Marco Island). Overall pending sales increased 2 percent, with 775 contracts in July 2011 compared to 760 contracts in July 2010. The median closed price for properties over $300,000 increased 2 percent to $550,000 for the 12 months ending July 2011 compared to $540,000 for the 12 months ending July 2010. The fact that we are not seeing volatility in the residential real estate market is positive. Home prices and sales are level but seem to be trending upward, inventory is declining, the average days on the market are declining all indicators of the stabilization process, says Tom Bringardner, president and CEO of Premier Commercial Inc. John Steinwand, president of Naples Realty Services, adds a decrease in the percentage of non-traditional sales, foreclosures and short sales is contributing to the stabilization. This is good news for the real estate industry, he adds.SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYLocal government officials and real estate experts will discuss Challenges and Strategies for Property Development Today during a seminar presented by the Real Estate Investment Society of Southwest Florida from 8 a.m. to noon Thursday, Sept. 22, at Pelican Preserve Town Center in Fort Myers. Topics include: How can government agencies assist with difficult properties? What constitutes due diligence? Where are the legal land mines? What are the options for re-positioning challenged properties? A question-and-answer session will follow each if severak segments. Registration is $25 for REIS members, $15 for college students and $45 for others. Reservations are required by Sept. 16. Sign up at www.reis-swfl.org. Larsen offers continuing education classesREIS hosts property development experts REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY B11WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Linda Haskins and Mary Kephart have been elected to serve as team leaders for the Bonita SpringsEstero Association of Realtors 2011 Leadership Academy. This years academy is made up of 13 candidates who were selected as potential leaders for the association in the years ahead. Ms. Haskins is originally from Washington, D.C., and has been an associate with Coldwell Banker for nine years, specializing in gated communities in Estero. Ms. Kephart is originally from Lynchburg, Va., and has been a mortgage broker with Fifth Third Mortgage for 25 years, specializing in residential home loans.Jo Ellen Nash was recognized as Julys top listing producer in the Naples office of Royal Shell Real Estate. Ashley Knie has joined LandQwest Commercial as the companys retail services coordinator responsible for assisting with marketing and leasing for the firms retail assignments as well as collateral development, sales material and business development. Ms. Knie previously served as marketing coordinator for the leasing team at Cushman & Wakefield in Atlanta, and prior to that was a project manager with Bovis Lend Lease Inc., working on the St. Regis Hotel and Residences project in Buckhead. She holds a bachelors degree from the University of Florida. Linda Roberts has joined the Old Naples office of Engel & Vlkers and will cater to British and European clients in the Pelican Bay area. Ms. Roberts spent her early adult life working in Europe, Spain, Tunisia and France and moved to the Naples/Bonita Springs area in 1998. She is a certified international property specialist as well as a certified residential specialist. Aldee Rosenberg, a sales associate in the Fifth Avenue South office of Coldwell Banker Previews International, represented the buyer in one of the highestpriced residential real estate transactions year-to-date in Naples Port Royal community. Listed by Gulf Coast International Properties, the 7,600 square-foot estate at 3520 Gin Lane closed on Aug. 9 for $8.25 million. NEWSMAKERS HASKINS KEPHART ROBERTS NABOR numbers indicate local inventory down 19 percentSEE STATS, B16 SOME SIGNS SHOW dt760ttiJl2010 tfthtbiliti TO F LO RI DA W EE KL Y NA BOR numbers in d icate local inventory d own 19 percent STABILITYLarson Educational Services presents several opportunities for licensed real estate professionals to complete 14 hours of continuing education credits to maintain their state licenses. The two-day course covers recent changes to Florida law and FREC rules, as well as new information on property tax bills, mortgage debt forgiveness, short sales and more. Dates and locations are: Aug. 27 and 28, 3073 Horseshoe Drive S., Naples Sept. 24 and 25, 1400 Colonial Blvd., Fort Myers Classes meet from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuition is $99. For registration or more information, call 344-7510 or visit www.LarsonEd.com.

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B12 CAPTIVA ISLANDFORT MYERS NAPLESSANIBEL Relax. Finding Your Next Home is Just a Click Away. elaxR inding F Fi elax ust a is J Ju e x t our N Ne Y Yo inding wayAust a Click ome tH Ho y y. SLAND I A CAPTIV VA T M F OR R R E T MYERS E A L E S T A T E V A C A T I O APLES N O N R E N T A L S APLES P R O P E R T Y M M A N A G E M E N T ANIBEL S NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES REDUCEDNEW LISTING CAPTIVA I SLAND FORT MYERSN APLES S ANIBEL

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B12 CAPTIVA ISLANDFORT MYERS NAPLESSANIBEL Relax. Finding Your Next Home is Just a Click Away. elaxR inding F Fi elax ust a is J Ju e x t our N Ne Y Yo inding wayAust a Click ome tH Ho y y. SLAND I A CAPTIV VA T M F OR R R E T MYERS E A L E S T A T E V A C A T I O APLES N O N R E N T A L S APLES P R O P E R T Y M M A N A G E M E N T ANIBEL S NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES REDUCED NEW LISTING CAPTIVA I SLAND FORT MYERSN APLES S ANIBEL

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DAVID WILLIAM AUSTON, PA AMERIVEST REALTY | NAPLES, FL | 239.273.1376www.DavidNaples.com Please visit my newly redesigned website! SW Gulf views. Over $300K in renovations. 2,076 sq ft. $1,329,000 in The Moorings Luxury Waterfront Brand new luxury beachfront condos from $2.4 million and up Moraya Bay Completely updated in 2009 with many unique features. 4+den/3bath. 3,146 sq ft. $1,249,000 The Moorings Built in 2007. 100 waterfront w/85 dock. Naples Bay view. SE exposure. 4,126 sq ft. $2,499,000 Royal Harbor Totally remodeled waterfront home. 4+den/4bath 3,400 sq ft. $3,079,000 in Aqualane Shores Aqualane Shoresnaples luxury real estate Luxury high rise beachfront condos. Priced from $2 million + Bay Colony Reduced $34K! Spectacular private long lake views. 1st Floor. 2,503 sq ft. 3+Den/3bath $525,000 at Mediterra Built in 2007. 3,925 living sq ft. Private lake views. $1,995,500 at Mediterra 3,786 sq ft. 4bed/4bath. Built in 2007. Private lake views. $1,999,999 at Mediterramediterra 1.27 acre lot. golf/lake views. New 5bed/6bath. 10,262 total sq ft. $3,995,000 at Mediterra Brand new. 7,316 total sq ft. 1 acre lot. 4bed/4bath. Offered at $2,750,000 at Mediterra SOLD 3,204 sq ft. 2nd 3/3 coach home. Lake and preserve view. $699,900 at Mediterra I want to help inspire and enable all young people, especially those from disadvantaged circumstances to reach their full poten al as produc ve, caring & responsible ci zens. To nd out how you can help our local children in need, please visit www.BGCCC.com.DAVID PROUDLY DONATES TO AND SUPPORTS REDUCED

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB16 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Jacki Strategos SRES, G.R.I., e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netwww.JackiStrategos.com Richard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.net Inland lot w/few left in Lely. Suitable for larger home on stunning street.Lely Homesite $125,000 Building costs down Rarely available, charming community. 2BR/2BA, eat-in kitchen, laundry in unit.St. Regis Club $99,900 Cheaper than renting Newer 3BR/3BA home, rarely used. No pet restrictions. Beautiful street.Lely Resort $490,000 Corner Lot In July 2011 the Naples area saw 87 foreclosed sales compared to 250 in July 2009. In addition, There were more closed sales recorded in the first seven months of 2011 (8,110) than there are available in the current inventory (7,010), which sends an encouraging message to consumers that our market is stabilizing, says Kathy Zorn, broker/owner of Florida Home Realty. Other highlights of the latest NABOR report: Overall pending sales for the 12 months ending July 2011 increased 3 percent, with 10,030 contracts compared to 9,785 contracts for the 12 months ending July 2010. Single-family home pending sales increased 3 percent in July 2011, with 447 contracts compared to 432 contracts in July 2010. Condo sales for the 12 months ending July 2011 increased 3 percent, with 4,108 sales compared to 3,995 sales for the 12 months ending July 2010. Brenda Fioretti, NABOR president and managing broker of Prudential Florida Realty, says current inventory 7,010 properties represents a drop at a rate of 19 percent for this period. This is the lowest we have seen since tracking the available inventory in April 2007, she says. Since April 2007, inventory has declined by 5,000 units, according to the report. Investors continue to purchase properties in the Naples area, which is helping in the reduction of available inventory, says Mike Hughes, vice president of Downing-Frye Realty. To view the entire report, visit www. NaplesArea.com STATSFrom page 11Economic worries and continued acrimony among lawmakers have claimed yet another casualty: The outlook for real estate markets in Florida declined slightly through the second quarter of 2011, according to a new University of Florida survey. The Survey of Emerging Market Conditions, conducted quarterly by the Kelley A. Bergstrom Center for Real Estate Studies at the Warrington College of Business Administration, concluded that economic and political worries were key components in the decline. Uncertainty in the direction of the economy and the political gridlock in Washington weigh on respondents minds, says Tim Becker, director of the Bergstrom Center. This prevents companies from investing in personnel. Consumers, uneasy about their own jobs and the slow economic growth, continue to limit spending, which drives a significant portion of gross domestic product, he adds. UFs Commercial Real Estate Sentiment Index declined for the first time since the third quarter of 2009, with high unemployment figures playing a role in that decline. Even though unemployment in Florida improved in many markets, the pace of change and the still-high levels are affecting the pace of improvements in the real estate markets, Mr. Becker says. One of the measures used to gauge the health of the residential real estate market is the absorption rate, which is the rate at which the inventory of homes for sale is being sold; the higher the rate, the more active the market. In the latest UF survey, the outlook for new single-family home absorption declined because of the struggling economy, but the outlook for condominium absorption increased for the third consecutive quarter to a new survey high. Mr. Becker says a large influx of foreign investment in Floridas condo sector is a reason for the improvement. The outlook for prices of new single-family homes and condominiums increased this quarter, as did expectations for occupancy for apartments and condo conversions. Respondents believe current occupancy levels warrant price increases in line with inflation despite a sharp drop in apartment investment, he says. The outlook for industrial occupancy declined for both warehouse and flex space, but the outlook for investment in warehouse space increased. The outlooks for occupancy in office and retail space also declined, but respondents believe occupancy levels will stabilize. Land investment and capital availability also declined. The apartment market continues to be the best performing asset class, Mr. Becker says, adding changing demographics and continued home foreclosures have increased growth both in supply and rental rates. The race is already on to find new development opportunities to address the coming shortage of quality units in major markets, he says. The hospitality sector also has been healthy, as an improving tourism market has improved hotel performance as seen by increasing occupancy and daily rates, Mr. Becker says. The number of visitors to Florida in the first quarter rose by 3.3 percent to more than 23 million, he adds. The dollars weakness against foreign currencies is driving more foreign tourism, which is leading to an increase in investment from foreign investors into Florida. Overall, the future remains uncertain and will continue to depend on policies from Washington that affect both spending and job growth over the coming quarters, he concludes. Positive steps in either or both of those areas with have a positive impact on real estate markets. The survey is the most extensive of Florida professional real estate analysts and investors conducted on an ongoing basis. The total number of participants in the current survey is 172, who represent 13 urban regions and up to 15 property types. The University of FloridaUF survey shows outlook in decline SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY THE FUTURE OF NEWSPAPERS IS HERE FREE FOR ALL Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comEnjoy a complete issue of Florida Weekly on your iPad. Get News, Arts & Entertainment, Business & Real Estate, everything that is in the print edition, now on the iPad.Download our FREE App today!

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$20,000 towards options and upgrades!Developer of the YearBroker participation welcomed. Oral representation cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. Black Bear Ridge Developed by Black Bear Ridge Naples, LLC member of the Stock Development family of Companies. The renderings, designs and other depictions may be of locations or activities not on the property however, are based on current development plans and are for the purpose of illustration only and subject to change without notice. Located on Vanderbilt Beach Road, east of I-75 and west of 951. Come see all 4 gorgeous model homes today. Open 10:00 AM 5:00 PM, 7 days a week.Nows the time to buy at Black Bear Ridge! For a limited time, were offering $20,000 towards options and upgrades on our exceptional single-family homes. Come see our collection of model homes and discover our tranquil North Naples enclave, tucked away from major roads yet convenient to everything. Its all youve come to expect from Stock Development: quality construction, exceptional value and an amenity-rich lifestyle with its own clubhouse, pool, playground, party room and tness facility.Call 239.514.2706 for a private tour. StockDevelopment.comLOCATION QUALITY VALUE and UNIQUE DESIGN from $339,990What buyers want

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Visit your new house today!www.OpenHouseSWFL.comThe rst stop to nding your new house!OpenHouse Southwest Florida lists the open houses for any given day in Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero. Customize your search by choosing location, living area, price range and more, quickly and easily.We make nding your new home easy!The Of cial Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero REALTORS Website INTEGRITY EXPERTISE DIRECTION FOR REAL ESTATE AMERIVEST Realty Dramatic 2677SF, elegant upgrades, beach/ Wiggins Pass views. $799,000 Walk into breathtaking views! Wood rs, Granite kit. 3/3. $889,000 Granite kit, wood/tile rs, direct Gulf of Mexico views, 3/3 2677SF. $874,900 Beautiful waterfront! New decor, 2677SF, 3/3. $799,000 Waterfront, amazing views, furnished, 4/3.5Ba., end unit. $1,125,000 Granite kit, new carpet, upgrades, spacious 2428SF, Views!. $779,000 3096 SF, lanais off living & Master suite, amazing views. $1,499,000. Marble rs, new granite kit, Gulf views, 3+Den/3.5Ba. $1,299,900 (W-10 $82,500) (W-31 $191,000) (N-25 $249,900) Pelican Isle II #602 Pelican Isle III #503 Pelican Isle III #906 Boat Slips Available Pelican Isle II #302 Pelican Isle II #303 Pelican Isle II #404 Pelican Isle II #402 Pelican Isle III #605www.GulfnGolfNaples.com www.WigginsPass.com www.Fosterteam.Listingbook.com www.youtube.com/fosterteamnaples thefosterteam@comcast.net GENE FOSTER 239.253.8002 BRIDGETTE FOSTER 239.253.8001 'Download AT&T code or = scanner on your 'Smart phone' and read our QR code' Residences of Pelican Isle, Open House Sunday, August 21st 1-4pm PENDING PENDING 550 5th Ave S., Naples, FL 34102 Oce 239-262-7131 800-741-7131 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. A n Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned And Operated By NRT LLC.4851 Tamiami Trail N., Naples, FL 34103 239-263-3300 800-562-0233 Two Loca ons to Serve You: Coldwell BankerFLORIDAMOVES.COM Martinique Club in Park Shore $619,000Awesome views of beach, Gulf & sunsets from this 2BR/2BA 1st oor co-op (no land lease). 2 Master suites, large kitchen, marble oors in living areas & Berber carpet in bedrooms. High impact sliders & electric hurricane shutters. Beautiful grounds & community pool.GARRY MOORE 239-404-1770 Country Club of Naples $282,000Many upgrades in this 2BR/2BA 2nd oor condo meticulously maintained by its Swedish owner and overlooking the pool. This delightful complex, renovated in 2002, is located in Olde Naples just blocks from the Gulf beaches, golf, tennis, ne dining & shopping. Turnkey.GARRY MOORE 239-404-1770 Crown Pointe $390,000Spacious 3BR/2.5BA pool home with enjoyable lake views. Vaulted & tray ceilings, granite countertops, formal dining room, French doors & more. Community pool, clubhouse & tennis courts. Located minutes from downtown dining & shopping.GARRY MOORE 239-404-1770 Claridge in Pelican Bay $1,160,000Panoramic views of Gulf & golf course from this updated 3BR/3BA condo on the 21st oor. The Claridge offers a casual but elegant lifestyle with pool/spa, guest rooms, library & more. Steps to tram to private beach pavilion plus all the fabulous Pelican Bay amenities.LARRY BRESNAHAN 239-250-4452

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Put Your Investment Property To WorkWe have qualied tenants lined up and ready to rent! VacationRentals |Seasonal Rentals | Annual Rentals Theres no reason for your investment properties to be sitting idle and under performing. From Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero to Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers, we have quality, prospective tenants ready to rent your home now. Whats especially helpful for you is that our professional management team takes care of 100% of the details so you dont have to. Whether your property is available for rental for a week, a winter season, or a year from housekeeping to keeping it rented, were here for you. So, youre happy and your tenants are happy. Thats The Royal Treatment.Naples, Bonita and Estero | 601 5th Avenue South 239-213-3311 | 855-213-3311 | RoyalShellRentals.com Sanibel | 1547 Periwinkle | Captiva | 15050 Captiva Drive 239-472-9111 | 800-656-9111 | RoyalShell.com Fort Myers | 1870 Clayton Court 239-689-7653 | 800-805-0168 | RoyalShellRealEstate.comThis is not intended to solicit property that is already listed.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB22 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Blvd. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Marco Island Florida Weeklys Open Houses Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise marked>$2,000,00013 PARK SHORE ESPLANADE CLUB 4551 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #703 $2,095,000 Premier SIR Susan Barton 860-1412 14 VANDERBILT BEACH MORAYA BAY 11125 Gulfshore Drive From $2,500,000 Premier SIR Call 239-5145050 M-Sat: 10-5 & Sun: 12-5>$3,000,00015 OLD NAPLES 175 3rd Street South $3,450,000 Premier SIR Celine Van Arsdale 404-9917 16 OLD NAPLES 155 20th Avenue South $3,995,000 Premier SIR Jan Martindale 896-0360 >$6,000,00017 PORT ROYAL 3999 Rum Row $6,950,000 Premier SIR V.K. Melhado 216-6400 >$11,000,00018 PORT ROYAL 3045 Fort Charles Drive $11,950,000 Premier SIR Michael Lawler 571-3939>$400,0001 WYNDEMERE VILLA FLORESTA 100 Via Napoli $425,000 Premier Sothebys International Realty Susan R. Payne 7777209 2 THE STRADA AT MERCATO Located just North of Vanderbilt Beach Rd on US 41 From $400s Premier SIR Call 239-5949400 M-Sat: 10-8 & Sun: 12-8 3 LEMURIA 7172 Lemuria Circle #1602 Prices from the mid $400s Premier SIR Tom Gasbarro 404-4883 Open Mon-Fri: 11-4 & Sat/Sun: 1-4>$500,0004 BONITA BAY ESPERIA & TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive New construction from the mid $500s Premier SIR Call 239-495-1105 M-Sat: 10-5 & Sun: 12-5>$700,0005 THE DUNES GRANDE PRESERVE 280 Grande Way Starting in the $700s Premier SIR Call 239-594-1700 M-Sat: 10-4 & Sun: 12-4 6 Pelican Isle Yacht Club Condos 435 Dockside Drive $779,000-$1,499,000 Amerivest Realty Bridgette Foster 239-2538001 >$1,000,000 7 Livingston Woods 6480 Sandlewood Lane $1,290,000 Keating Assoicates Peggy Sue Garrity 239-207-1008 8 ESTUARY at GREY OAKS 1485 Anhinga Pointe From $1,499,000 Premier SIR Call 239-261-3148 M-Sat: 9-5 & Sun: 12-5 9 OLD NAPLES 877 7th Street South $1,699,000 Premier SIR Marty/Debbi McDermott 564-4231 10 GREY OAKS ESTUARY MARSH WREN 1535 Marsh Wren Lane $1,750,000 Premier SIR Call 239-261-3148 11 OLD NAPLES 663 11th Avenue South $1,795,000 Premier SIR Carol Steeves 240-7809 12 OLD NAPLES 383 2nd Avenue North $1,995,000 Premier SIR Marty/Debbi McDermott 564-4231 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 17 13 14 11 7 8 9 12 18 1

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE CSECTIONWEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: INSIDEThe High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Old Naples 434-2424 North Naples 594-9494 The Promenade 948-4000 Fifth Avenue 434-8770 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 Chatting with the chefKaren Feldman catches up with M Waterfront Grilles Brian Roland. C27 Here, there, ElsewhereTheatre Conspiracy at its best with latest production. C8 The Spirit of A USO-style party at Pinchers, and more summer fun. C24-25 HANDS UPFOR LISA CONGDONS COLLECTION OF COLLECTIONSTHE DISEMBODIED HANDS RANGE IN COLOR from albino white to pink and beige to a warm mocha brown. Some grasp baby bottles, while others are curled into defiant fists. Some hands lie open, expectantly, palms up, while others seem to be flashing gang signs. Theyre Lisa Congdons collection of baby doll hands, just one of the hundreds of collections shes amassed. A couple of years ago, the San Francisco-based artist and illustrator was searching for something to revitalize herself artistically. It was BY NANCY STETSONnstetson@ oridaweekly.com COURTESY PHOTOAbove: Day 260 consists of a collection of doll hands. Artist Lisa Congdon challenged herself to photograph one of her collections every day for one year. Left: Ms. Congdon shops at an antique mall. SEE COLLECTION, C4 Four best-selling authors have been engaged for the 2012 Nick Linn Lecture Series sponsored by the Friends of the Library of Collier County. Limited tickets remain available for the programs that take place at the Naples Grande on: Monday, Feb. 13: Brad Meltzer Monday, Feb. 20: James Rollins Tuesday, March 13: Andrew Gross Monday, March 26: Lisa See Mr. Meltzers newest thriller, The Inner Circle, is in bookstores now. He is the No. 1 New York Times bestselling author of The Tenth Justice as well as the Book of Fate, Dead Even, The First Counsel, The Millionaires, The Zero Game and The Book of Lies. In addition, he is the Eisner Award-winning author of the critically acclaimed comic book Justice League of America, the co-creator of the TV show Jack & Bobby and the host of Brad Meltzers Decoded on The History Channel. Mr. Grosss The Dark Tide was nominated for the Best Thriller of the Year Award by the International Thriller Writers. In addition to several bestsellers penned on his own, he coauthored with James Patterson five No. 1 international bestselling novels, including Judge & Jury and Lifeguard.Also with Mr. Patterson, he co-wrote six novels that became The Womens Murder Club Series. Mr. Grosss latest novel, a standalone titled Eyes Wide Open, is described by Kirkus Reviews as an emotional, frightening study of evil with believable characters and a relentless pace. A co-founder of International Thriller Writers Inc., Mr. Rollins is the bestselling author of seven thrillers in the Sigma Force series. He wrote the blockbuster movie novelization, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull alongFriends of Library announces lecture series authors SEE AUTHORS, C3

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 The online humor site The Oatmeal is one of my favorite time wasters. Apparently a lot of other work-at-homers love it too, hence The Oatmeals hilarious strip, Why working at home is both awesome and horrible. In the awesome section: No more waking up unnaturally early, less time spent in the car and a flexible schedule. In the last panel of the comic strip, a man phones his office-bound friend. Hey man, Im driving a dump truck full of lingerie models to the park for a game of nude laser tag. Wanna go? I cant, the friend says. Work etiquette requires that I sit in a gray office under dull fluorescent lights in the same eight-hour timeframe as a bunch of other pale, sallow people. At least he has equity. But working from home is not all nude laser tag. Sure you can phone in to conference calls in your underwear, but as The Oatmeal lays, out the experience can also be horrible. Hey man, where ya been? a guy asks a friend who is six months into the working-from-home-adventure. Havent seen you around. Unshaven and unkempt, the friend stammers out a response. Home work Why working at home is romantically compromising SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTS artisHENDERSON sandydays@floridaweekly.com Work etiquette requires that I sit in a gray office under dull fluorescent lights in the same eight-hour timeframe as a bunch of other pale, sallow people...at. Not go out much. Daylight not see. English is speak becoming hardness. The two bump into each other again six months later. All the house-ridden man can manage is Hooba porkrind! before he pees on the floor. When I spend too much time at home, my romantic barometer goes on the fritz. Ill call a 1-800 number for some small item and the next thing I know Im chatting up the customer service rep. When they try to shuttle me off the phone Well, thanks for calling I know its time to get out of the house. Last week I phoned my bank and the young man on the line asked me to spell my last name. H-E-N-D T? Like tango? No, no, I said. D. Henderson. Like, Harry and the Hendersons. The mans voice brightened. I remember that movie. I was a kid when I saw it. He paused, as if he were searching for something. I bet you were, too. It looks like were about the same age. Apparently, he was searching my account information. Did you hear theyre remaking Howard the Duck? Youre kidding. Can you believe it? I started to ease into the conversation, the way I would with a suitor, before I caught myself. Customer service reps are not substitutes for dating, even if we do have similar movie tastes. I thanked him for his time and forced myself to hang up. I took a quick shower, dressed and climbed into my car. I needed some reallife romance. As I cruised down the road, I checked out a guy on a bicycle. Not bad, I thought. Traffic slowed down as I neared, and he stopped to talk to another man on the sidewalk. I had time to get a good look at my mans smile missing his two front teeth and watch him bum a cigarette off the other guy. Hooba porkrind, indeed. www.RiverchaseDermatology.com Same week appointments available. SWFLs Most Comprehensive Skin Center Three Fellowship-trained Mohs Surgeons Dermabeam Non-surgical Radiation Therapy Camisa Psoriasis Center Cosmetic and Laser Dermatology Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery Spa Blue MD Medical Spa A Melanoma InitiativeThei on P ass Proud supporter of the Passion Foundation. North Naples 239-596-90751015 Crosspointe Dr.Downtown Naples 239-216-4337261 9th St. S. Marco Island 239-642-3337950 N. Collier Blvd., #303Ft. Myers 239-437-88107331 Gladiolous Dr.Cape Coral 239-443-15001425 Viscaya Pkwy., #102See Spot. See Spot Change. See Riverchase Dermatology.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C3 www.janesnaples.comNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH & WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING 15% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 201115% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 2011Sunday Brunch! 8am-3pmNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH & WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING oldenaplesvet349 14th Ave. South Naples, Florida 34102 239.331.3345 Mobile Pet Club: Text ONV to: 97063 www.OldeNaplesVet.com 20% OFFALL SERVICESWITH THIS AD. NEW CLIENTS ONLYEXPIRES 8/31/11. Full Service Boutique Style Veterinary Hospital in the heart of Historic Olde Naples.Anne Lozynski, D.V.M with six standalone adventure thrillers, and is also the author of the Jake Ransom Series for kids and adults. Ms. See is the author of the critically acclaimed international bestseller, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, which was released in 2005. The film adaptation is in theaters now. Other titles by Ms. See include Flower Net, The Interior, Dragon Bones, Peony in Love and Shanghai Girls. Her latest novel, Dreams of Joy, continues the story of Pearl and May from Shanghai Girls. Ms. See served as the west coast correspondent for Publishers Weekly for 13 years and wrote the libretto for the opera based on her nonfiction book On Gold Mountain, which premiered in June 2000 at the Los Angeles Opera. For information about tickets to the 2012 Nick Linn Lecture Series, call Friends of the Library at 262-8135 or visit www.collierfriends.org. AUTHORSFrom page 1ARTISTS AMONG US >> Describe your art form. I am a flow artist and I dance with different props. For the performance art of fire dancing, the prop is soaked in white gas and then lit. I use fire poi (two balls on metal chains), fire hula hoops, fire fans and a fire hoop skirt. There are different moves that you learn and then choreograph. Its a very physical art form that demands grace, skill and physical fitness. >> Where can we see you perform? I like to perform at fundraising events and milestone birthday parties. My fire-dancing troupe performs mostly at private events. >> Where did you grow up? Raleigh, N.C. >> What did you want to be when you were growing up? An actress or a veterinarian. >> How long have you been a performer? Since I was about 22. >> How has living in Naples inspired you? Since I started fire dancing, I have met the most wonderful people drummers, dancers, singers. Naples residents inspire and lift me up. The beach inspires me. >> Are you a full-time entertainer? If not, what is your other job? When Im not fire dancing, I am an environmental architect. >> How does your art contributes to our community? I believe that flow arts are a moving meditation and an emerging art form. Fire dancing is cutting-edge and exciting. >> How do you use technology in your work? I connect through Facebook, and I have a website. >> Outside of your art, what are you passionate about? Green architecture. >> What are you reading now? The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida. >> What would you want to be if you werent a performance artist? I cant imagine not being an artist. >> Which entertainer would you most like to meet, and what would you ask them? Madonna. I would ask her about her early days. >> What is your favorite quotation? While I dance, I cannot judge, I cannot hate, I cannot separate myself from life. I can only be joyful and whole. That is why I dance. Hans Bos >> Any guilty pleasures? Chocolate martinis! >> Website: www.blazenaples.com. Artists Among Us is provided by the United Arts Council of Collier County. The council promotes all the arts in Collier County and provides education in the arts for at-risk students. For more information and a calendar of arts and cultural events, call 263-8242 or visit www. CollierArts.com.Marie Blaze Barnett, performance artist COURTESY PHOTO

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 toward the end of 2009, and I felt like I needed to be recharged creatively, she recalls. I wanted to start a project that would challenge me creatively in a different way than what I do every day, which is draw and paint. She also planned to document it on the Internet, so shed be held accountable. She entertained a few ideas, but the one that appealed the most was taking a photograph every day of one of her collections and posting it online. On occasion, shed draw or paint an imaginary collection. So Ms. Congdon began Collectionaday. com, posting a different photograph or drawing daily, throughout 2010. She went from Day 1 (20 vintage erasers) to Day 365 (seven New Years party favors.) In between, 362 other odd assortments include the plastic baby arms and vintage pool cue chalks, golf tees, bread bag ties, shoelaces, bobbins, napkin rings, wooden and plastic clothespins, sales receipts, bingo cards, thread, twigs, feathers, river stones, old signage, sepia photographs, cookie cutters, paint brushes, matchboxes, hat pins and mid-century kitchenware. The website drew thousands and, a few months into the project, garnered national press. Ms. Congdon was on an NPR photo blog, quoted in a New York Times article about the lure of objects and featured in the February 2011 issue of Martha Stewart Living magazine, which flew her and her Scandinavian kitchenware to New York City to be photographed. (Martha Stewart collects old brass plates or platters, Ms. Congdon says. Other collectors featured in the article amassed vintage metal dollhouses, sewing patterns and travel books.) Midway through the year, she signed a book deal, though that hadnt been her goal in starting the blog. A Collection a Day was released by the Canadian publisher Uppercase earlier this year. In 400-plus pages, the book contains all 365 collections, as well as some introductory essays. It comes in its own collectible tin. Its the size of a brick, Ms. Congdon says. Small and thick. Signed copies can be purchased for $35 at collectionaday.bigcartel.com.Evoking nostalgiaThe images are visually intriguing, the subject matter unexpected. Ms. Congdons work reminds you of what it was like to be a kid, when the world was new and everything was infinitely fascinating. She plays with color and pattern, grouping her collections in various ways: by color, by shape, by size, by purpose. For the most part, I was grouping by the thing it was, she says. Many of the objects are vintage. I think old things are appealing because they evoke some kind of nostalgia, or they remind people of things that we dont do anymore, like letter writing by hand, she says. Or maybe people are just attracted to things that people used to use a lot: school supplies or sewing supplies I think everyones come into contact with them, at some point. Younger generations, people in their 20s or early 30s, probably dont have a relationship to a lot of things in the book, she says. But if youre over 30 or 35, either you used something I photographed, or you knew someone who did: Oh, I remember my grandmother used to have those needle packs in her sewing basket. Or, I remember I used those crayons in school.Grouping is keyThe other reason people are drawn to these collections is because of how theyre arranged, she theorizes. (Some are) ordinary things that by themselves wouldnt be that interesting, but put them together in a group and arrange them in an interesting way, and all of a sudden youve got a work of art, she says. A collection of plastic leaves recalls Matisse cutouts. Twine wrapped around cardboard look like a fiber art piece. Two rows of pink and red vintage golf tees look like an exhibit of alien teeth from some futuristic nature museum. And four plastic wishbones in a row could pass for a minimalist sculpture. Other common items among Ms. Congdons collections: twigs, river stones, rolls of colored tape, paintbrushes. She has a keen eye for composition and color; the way she groups her items makes viewers pay new attention to old objects. As a child, she had a couple of collections. Her first was Madame Alexander dolls, gifts from her mother and then her grandmother. I never had more than six or seven of them, she says. She also collected plastic horses. I was really into collecting and arranging things in my room. My mother always used to nag me to clean my room, and by that, she meant: Take things off the floor, make my bed, vacuum. But my favorite part was to take everything off the shelf, dust them, and put them back. That was the only part I enjoyed. I think that stuck with me throughout my life. Of all her collections, Ms. Congdons mid-century Scandinavian kitchenware is her favorite.A guiding principleFor her blog, she had a rule: All the photographed collections had to be hers. She wouldnt borrow a collection from anyone. My friends would say, I have a collection of such-and-such. Why dont you borrow it and photograph it? and I would say, Not unless you want to give it to me. I have to own everything. A few people did give her collections, including an array of light bulbs. Ms. Congdon photographed them and also drew a picture of them for her book. I loved how they came out in the photograph, she says, adding shed collect more light bulbs if she had a place to display them. Theyre hard to find, she says. Its sculpture theyre really beautiful: very thin glass, and they have beautiful wire inside.Collecting and creatingAs an artist and illustrator, Ms. Congdon, is in good company; many artists collect images and objects, keeping them in their studios. I think theres a connection, whether its physical, or photographing them, or visually memorizing them, between collecting and the creative process, she says. Its where we get our inspiration from looking at things. Its what evokes memories or emotions for us. Music and smell do that, too. She counts among her clients Poketo for Target, Urban Outfitters, American Greetings, Harper Collins, Random House, Chronicle Books and Trader Joes. She did 150 illustrations for The Dictionary of Extraordinary Ordinary Animals, scheduled for release Sept. 27 by Running Press. But doing the blog and the Collection a Day book was a really interesting ride, she says. Shes thinking about doing another year-of project in 2012 and posting it on the Web, but it wont be related to collections. I feel that this particular project is done, she explains. I did enjoy what I set out to do. I didnt set out to publish a book or make a blog people would enjoy visiting. For me, it was a personal creative challenge. Even though all these other things happened, I still feel like in the end, the personal creative challenge was valuable, and one of the best things to come out of it. COLLECTIONFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTOSAbove: Lisa Congdons home Left: Day 187 Below: The cover of Ms. Congdons book

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2380 Vanderbilt Beach ROAD, Naplestequila inspired. real wood FIred.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Hours: Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30-4 Dinner Sun-Thurs 5-10 Fri & Sat 4-11 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples 239-592-0050 www.noodlescafe.com $ 15 00 OFFWITH PURCHASE OF $50 OR MOREGratuity added before discounts. One coupon per table. Valid Sun-Wed 4-7 pm. Not valid holidays. Not valid with special offers.EXPIRES 8-31-11Sunday Summer SpecialAll You Can EatSpaghetti & Meatballs $ 9 955-9 PMNot valid with any other offer or discount.Independently Owned & Operated The OriginalSince 1991 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Weekend Best Bets Aug. 19: Kids Free Fridays. Rookery Bay. 417-6310 or www.rookerybay.org. Aug. 19-21: Sharkabet art exhibition. Rookery Bay. 417-6310 or www. rookerybay.org. Aug. 19-21: Photography of Clyde Butcher. Marco Island Historical Museum. 642-1440 or www.colliermuseums. com. Aug. 19-21: Historic Palm Cottage tours. Naples Historical Society. 261-8164 or www.napleshistoricalsociety.org. Aug. 19-21: Everglades City students: Emerging Art of the Everglades. Museum of the Everglades. 695-0008 or www.colliermuseums.com. Aug. 20: African honey badgers premiere. The Naples Zoo. 262-5409 or www.napleszoo.org. Aug. 20: Museum matinee: The Littlest Rebel. Collier County Museum. 252-8476 or www.colliermuseums.com. Theater Elsewhere By Theatre Conspiracy, Fort Myers, through Aug. 27. 936-3239 or www.theatreconspiracy.org. See review on page C8. Run For Your Wife By the Off Broadway Palm Theatre, Fort Myers, through Aug. 28. 278-4422, by www.BroadwayPalm.com. Thursday, Aug. 18 High Style Find out about the latest fashions during a Style Session at Marissa Collections, 1167 Third Street S. 687-1148, TinaFarnsworth@MarissaCollections.com or www.MarissaCollections.com. Just for Laughs Comedian Corey Holcomb performs tonight through Sunday at the Off The Hook Comedy Club, 599 S. Collier Blvd., Marco Island. 389-6900. Friday, Aug. 19 Live Tunes Hear the Bug Tussle Ramblers at 7 p.m. at Freds Food, Fun & Spirits, 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928. Saturday, Aug. 20 Fur, Fun and Food Humane Society Naples holds an open house from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring the family and enjoy samples from area restaurants. 370 Airport-Pulling Road. 643-1555. Grrrrr Golden Retriever Rescue of Southwest Florida is on hand from noon-3 p.m. for Bass Pro Shops Next Generation Weekend. Meet rescue volunteers and get acquainted with adoptable goldens at Gulf Coast Town Center. 369-0415, info@ grrswf.org or www.grrswf.org. All That Jazz The Naples Jazz Masters perform from 1-3 p.m. at The Norris Center. $15 per person $25 for two. 2133049. Hot Cars Florida Hot Rods & Hogs hosts a free Corvette Show from 4-7 p.m. at Seminole Casino Immokalee, complete with music by Tommy Tunes. 997-0047 or www.flhrh.com. Music Walk The monthly Music Walk starts at 7 p.m. in the Fort Myers River District. 332-0161. Sunday, Aug. 21 Sweet! Marco Presbyterian Church holds its annual Sundae Sunday starting at 4:30 p.m. Kids can enjoy a 30-foot long sundae in the courtyard at 875 West Elkcam Circle. 394-8186 or www. marcochurch.com. Funny Guy Comedian Brian Regan takes the stage at 7 p.m. at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall, Fort Myers. 481-4849 or www.bbmannpah.com. Monday, Aug. 22 Film Night The Fort Myers Film Festival Summer Independent Film Series begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, Fort Myers. Showing tonight: Beat Boxing: The Fifth Element of Hip Hop. 810-6323. Tuesday, Aug. 23 In the Pink The Put on Your Pink Bra kick-off party for the American Cancer Societys upcoming Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk takes place from 6-8 p.m. at Bayside Seafood Grill & Bar at the Village on Venetian Bay. Meet fellow walkers and decorate a pink bra for display at the walk. RSVP to 261-0337 or Dawn.Pallett@cancer.org. Diamond Jubilee Robert Nunes brings An Evening with Neil Diamond to the Pewter Mug from 8-10:30 p.m. Dinner and show, $35; show only, $15. Reservations required. 12300 Tamiami Trail N. 596-6844. Face Time Enjoy a complimentary Ultimate Glow facial at Marissa Collections. By appointment only. 1167 Third Street S. 687-1148, TinaFarnsworth@ MarissaCollections.com or www.MarissaCollections.com. Coming up Art in Bonita The Center for the Arts of Bonita Spring presents Art Walk at the Center for the Arts Studios at the Promenade at Bonita Bay from 4-7 p.m. Aug. 25. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. SummerJazz The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club presents Monique and NuVite on Aug. 27 and Blue Dice on Sept. 24. Concerts are from 7-10 p.m. on the lawn overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. 2612222 or www .naplesbeachhotel.com. Sunday Art The Kathleen Bradford Studio/Gallery hosts Summer Sundays from 1-4 p.m. Aug. 28. Meet the gallery artists, enjoy refreshments and register to win artwork. 4259 B onita Beach Road. 776-6844 or www.artistkb.com. Love That Dress! PACE Center for Girls-Immokalee holds its first Love That Dress! sale and party from 6-9 p.m. Aug. 31 at the Naples Grande. $25 per person. 657-2400 or www.pacecenter.org/ collier-at-immokalee. Celebration of Courage A ceremony honoring and remembering the rescuers and victims of 9/11 takes place from noon to 2 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Marriott Beach Resort & Spa on Marco Island. $30 for adults, $12 for children. 331-0908 or 642-9122. Remembering 9/11 The Naples Philharmonic Orchestra presents In Remembrance: A Concert to Honor the Victims of the 9/11 Attacks at 8 p.m. Sept. 11 at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. $30 for adults, $15 for students. 5971900 or www.thephil.org. Submit calendar listings and photos to events@floridaweekly.com. E-mail text, jpegs or Word documents are accepted. No pdfs or photos of flyers.COURTESY PHOTOSweet! Marco Presbyterian Church holds its annual Sundae Sunday starting at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 21. Kids can enjoy a 30-foot long sundae in the courtyard at 875 West Elkcam Circle. 3948186 or www.marcochurch.com. COU RTE S Y PH O T O

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C7 The Naples Jazz Masters performing Dixieland Jazz Group discounts available. For Tickets or more information call the box of ce at 239-213-3049.PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM PERFORMANCE DATE.Every Saturday through the Summer 1pm 3pm Tickets: $15 per person or $25 for two Presents... 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 K K K K K K W W W W W W E E E E E E 7 7 7 7 7 7 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 9 9 9 9 9 9 ww ww w w. se se k ak ak ey ey we we t st st ex ex pr pr es es s s. co co m m facebook.com/KeyWestExpress twitter.com/KeyWestExpress youtube.com/KeyWestExpress Reasons to VISIT KEY WEST August 18th TROPICAL HEATAugust 27th 2ND ANNUAL SUMMER JAMFeaturing Howard Livingston and the MM 24 Band at the Key West Harbour Yacht ClubSeptember 2nd 2ND ANNUAL KEY WEST BREWFESTSeptember 6th KEY WEST WOMANFESTSemtember 9th ROBERT JAMES S.L.A.M. CELEBRITY TOURNAMENTSeptember 16th POKER RUN $ 5 OFFFull Fare Roundtrip AdultCannot be combined with other offers Get Ready for the PRIME of your Life Classical voices needed for Bach EnsembleThe Bach Ensemble of Naples is holding auditions for classical singers to be part of its 10th anniversary performance of J.S. Bachs Mass in B Minor. Auditions will take place by appointment from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 27, and also from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1, at Grace Lutheran Church in Naples. The ensemble will perform the Bach piece on Friday, March 9, at the church. Those who would like to try out should prepare a song of their choice. To schedule an audition, call 732-1055. For more information about the group, visit www.thebachensemble.org. Marco center seeks Fins, Fur and FeathersArt League, Marco Islands Center for the Arts, is opening its doors to wildlife for the month of September. Fins, Fur and Feathers is a juried art exhibit showcasing the diverse denizens of the great outdoors. Artists working in all media are encouraged to deliver up to two submissions to the art center at 1010 Winterberry Drive, Marco Island, between 10 a.m. and noon Thursday, Sept. 1. Judging will take place Friday, Sept. 2. An opening reception is set for 5:30-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. For more information, call 394-4221 or visit www.marcoislandart.org. Philharmonic Youth Chorale welcomes new voices Singers between the ages of 7 and 17 are invited to audition for the new season with the Philharmonic Youth Chorale on Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. The chorale performs with the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra. Audition selections should be no more than two minutes long, and a copy of the song must be provided for the Philharmonics accompanist. All auditions must be with piano accompaniment, not to recorded music or a cappella. Applicants will be asked to match pitch and, depending on their musical background, might be asked to sight-read. Under the direction of James Cochran, the Youth Chorale rehearses weekly on Saturday mornings with breaks that coincide with public school vacation schedules. Annual tuition is $125. The one-time music fee is $25. Some scholarships are available. For more information or to schedule an audition, call 254-2642 or e-mail jlawfer@thephil.org. Naples Players has parts for Final AdventureThe Naples Players will hold auditions for Sherlock Holmes, The Final Adventure beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, at the Sugden Community Theatre. From the 1889 play by Arthur Conan Coyle and William Gillette, the play has been adapted for modern staging by contemporary playwright Stephen Dietz. At the end of his career, the worlds greatest detective finds a case too tempting to ignore. Sherlock Holmes is surrounded by elements his fans expect: danger, intrigue, humor and suspense. Joined by Dr. Watson, he matches wits with arch-enemy Professor Moriarity and meets Irene Adler once again. Sherlock Homes, The Final Adventure will be directed by Dallas Dunnagan. The cast of 12 includes roles for six to 10 men ages 20-mid to 60s and two women, ages 25-45. Rehearsals will begin Oct. 10, and the show will run Nov. 22-Dec. 17 on the main stage. Perusal scripts are available for 72 hours, with a $20 deposit, at the box office. For more information, call 434-7340, ext. 10. CALLING ALL ARTISTS

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 NAPLES bucadibeppo.com Also try our traditional Italian dishesfeaturing CHICKEN PARMIGIANA, SPAGHETTI WITH MEATBALLS, CHEESE MANICOTTI, MOZZARELLA CAPRESE and many more! LOBSTER SPECIALS Summer Lobster Ravioli come!) Shes a non-stop talker, while Teddy is stingy with his words and emotions, almost Heminwayesque. While we dont experience them as stereotypes, they certainly embody those associated with men and women: Celia likes to talk about her feelings and thoughts and is complex, while Teddy is very simple and non-reflective. Jordan Wilson, who plays Teddy, is a master at playing these Keanu Reeves not-a-thought-in-my-head roles. To borrow Gertrude Steins line, theres not much there there with this character. Celia likes to ponder things and is very inquisitive; Teddy likes to eat and sleep. He says hes always wanted to paint, but he never has the time for it. (Mr. Szymkowicz is probably commenting here on artist wannabes those who want to have painted or written or filmed, but dont really have the passion for it. They just want to say theyre a painter or writer or filmmaker.) Its Celia who pushes for the relationship to go further; Teddy allows himself to be pushed. With Amandas arrival on the doorstep, Mr. Szymkowicz takes sibling rivalry to a whole new level. Denise Scott plays Celias sister like a femme fatale, glamorous and breezy and flirtatious. Her every line drips with suggestiveness. Shes obviously the prettier, more popular sister who enjoyed the bulk of the male attention even in high school. Its a Christina Hendricks kind of role, and Ms. Scott sinks her teeth into it and delivers flawlessly. Director and Theatre Conspiracy founder Bill Taylor has done an excellent job of directing and staging here. The sets are minimal (no walls only a window hanging in space, and one or two doors.) Yet somehow, it manages to have a surreal, Pee Wees Playhouse feel to it. And Celias bedroom scenes are done a la Hairspray, giving us an aerial view of Celia and moonlight shining through venetian blinds. This is one of the best-staged plays Ive seen at Theatre Conspiracy; even the scene changes with minimal but bulky props (dining room table, bed) are executed swiftly, to the music of The Art of Noise.ARTS COMMENTARY Celia lives in her childhood home by herself. Shes desperately lonely, but her agoraphobia prevents her from going out. Her only contact is Teddy, the deliveryman who brings her packages to her door daily. She used to have a fiance, but, she explains, He died. (Pause.) It happens. It happens quite a lot. As Celia says, people around you keep dying, and then you die, too. Ravenous for company, she asks the deliveryman in for a meal. Teddy, a lackadaisical kind of guy who seems to just let life happen to him, says yes. And when she then asks insists, actually that he stay with her permanently, he agrees to that, too. Shes just persuaded him to share her bed when her sister Amanda shows up. And the dynamics instantly change. So begins Elsewhere, a quirky and thoroughly entertaining dark comedy playing at Theatre Conspiracy through Aug. 27. Written by Adam Szymkowicz, Elsewhere was the second-place winner in last years New Play Contest. (Cynthias Lament, the first place winner, already played at Theatre Conspiracy last season.) After seeing this full-fledged production of Elsewhere, Im thinking it should have been the first-place winner instead. Its a well-written play, deceptively simple, with situations that keep bringing surprises and lines that keep bringing laughs. Mr. Szymkowicz knows what hes doing. His work contains layers and, like a good comic, he knows how to slip in moments of truth and hit you with a punch to the gut while youre laughing. His characters are longing for human connection, to not feel so isolated. He comments not only on sibling rivalry and human insecurities, but on death and life and love and the nature of male-female relationships. Jenny Smith plays Celia at full-tilt, almost manic at times. She doesnt seem to possess that internal censor that keeps people from blurting out everything theyre thinking. (At one point, she tells her sister, Youve outlived your welc T e s t w nancySTETSON nstetson@floridaweekly.com Twos company, threes a crowd in quirky ElsewhereThis is Theatre Conspiracy at its best, putting on a top-notch production and introducing its audience to a new play.You should go and see it and not because theres not much else happening in the area culturally right now, but because its funny and smart and entertaining. And itd be a shame to miss it. >>Elsewhere>>When: Through Aug. 27 >>Where: Theatre Conspiracy at the Foulds Theatre, the Alliance of the Arts, 10091 McGregor Blvd., Fort Myers >>Cost: $18 >>Info: 936-3239 or www.theatreconspiracy.org in the know le nd a s d y d e r md y u d s e d o s s d o r e s w r s r er e d e n no tt r s cy an a gno in Y et ur o it COURTESY PHOTOSJenny Smith and Jordan Wilson star in Elsewhere at Theatre Conspiracy.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C9 PUZZLE ANSWERS The reasons for volunteering at The von Liebig are as varied as the 900 volunteers themselves. Some have a passion for the arts, others a desire to give back to the community, and many simply want to meet interesting people and have some fun. Whatever the reason, volunteers are the heart and soul of this Southwest Florida institution, and theres plenty of room for more. Every year, The von Liebigs art festivals attract more than 50,000 guests to downtown Naples and the Mercato shopping district. Their gallery exhibits, art studios and lecture series bring in another 15,000 visitors. With such an ctive program, The von Liebig relies on the time and talent of hundreds of local men, women and students willing to pitch in and pull it all together. Finding assignments to match volunteer interests is easy since theres so much to do. Some enjoy working at The von Liebigs downtown location setting out food and checking-in guests at gallery openings, leading docent tours, working on grant applications or helping with administrative tasks. Others like being outdoors at the festivals serving as gate attendants or information booth volunteers, or keeping watch over artists stations. Theres something for everyone who wants to participate. The volunteer with the greatest number of donated hours is Dianna Rehla. This retired heart and transplant nurse and hospital administrator stumbled upon the art center one day while enjoying downtown Naples. She has been a staple of the art center for more than three years working in The von Liebigs gift shop. What I like most about volunteering is the opportunity to meet people. From Europe to Alaska, to my home state of Connecticut, you never know who will walk through the shop, shares Dianna. Its opened up another world for me, says Linda Johnson, a volunteer who helps manage all the other volunteers for the festivals. I love art and being part of the Naples community... Plus, Ive made lots of friends. For high school and college students, theres another reason to consider giving a few hours to The von Liebig: It qualifies for community volunteer credits at school. Not only that, the staff is welcoming and eager to cultivate a new generation of supporters. Sarah Adams is a volunteer at The von Liebig Art Center. To learn more about opportunities at the center, call 262-6517, ext. 105, or e-mail Yvonne.Gibb@ naplesart.org to learn more.Volunteering with The von LiebigBY SARAH ADAMS____________________________Special to Florida WeeklyARTScool interns, standing: Xylia Horgan, Ashley McGowan, Nicole Graney, Gabby Donofrio, Ben Zuk, Veronica Rabanal, Evyn Graefe, Sarah Kusher and Chris French. Seated: Miriam Horgan, Isabella DiPasquale and Summer Horgan Katie Burgess and Linda Johnson volunteering at the New Years Art Festival.COURTESY PHOTOSDianna Rehla in the gift shop GIVING

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch 263-9940 263-2734 www.napleswaterfrontdining.com fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Limited time offer. Not good with any other offer. SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved.FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLES HOROSCOPES SPECTACLE By Linda Thistle LEO (July 23 to August 22) Romanc e comes to unattached Leos and Leonas who have been waiting for Cupid to target them for far too long. Domestic purr-fection is also enhanced for paired Felines. VIRGO (August 23 to September 2 2) You need to take a much-needed break from that demanding project before too much energy-draining tension sets in. And dont be ashamed to ask for help. LIBRA (September 23 to October 2 2) Change makes demands that you might find unwelcome at this time. But instead of concentrating on the short run, look toward potential benefits down the road. SCORPIO (October 23 to N o vember 2) You have a gift for reviving projects that seem beyond repair. Use that same ability to restore a relationship that seems to have turned from loving to lifeless. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 t o Dec ember 21) Expect to be asked to use your combined wisdom and humor to resolve a problem. After all, folks not only value your advice, they also like how you give it. CAPRICORN (December 22 t o J anuary 19) Most people consider you solid and steady. But you also can be quite capricious (which is a Latin word for describing the behavior of Goats) when it suits your needs. AQUARIUS (January 20 to F e bruary 18) People treat you as you wish to be treated. So if you want a change in your relationship, make it happen. Also expect someone to reveal some long-held secrets. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) S t ay with the decision you made, despite a sudden torrent of advice to the contrary from well-meaning people. Remember: You know your needs better than anyone. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The t ypically tidy Ram or Ewe might want to butt out until things are settled on the home front. But get involved and let your Ovine sense of order help restore domestic tranquility. TAURUS (April 30 to May 20) The B ovines flair for fine-tuning complicated fiscal dealings comes in handy when an unexpected financial problem arises. Stay with it until its resolved to your satisfaction. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) F amil y aspects remain strong. There might be some unresolved difficulties, but continued attempts to smooth things over eventually prove to be successful. A major purchase looms. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A pr omise that w as made but never kept suddenly re-emerges in your life. You now have to decide if youre still interested in what it offers or if youve moved past it. BORN THIS WEEK: Y ou lik e things tidy, with no loose ends. You also enjoy research and would make an excellent investigative reporter or scientist.Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Sponsored By: Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week:

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C11 Shop Gulf Coast Town Center for all your back to school needs.Visit Belk, Marshalls, Ross and JCPenneyfor school uniforms. For school shoes, accessories and more visitClaires, Journeys, Forema, Rack Room Shoes, Zumiez and Justice.For a new look visit Salon Adrian or Great Clips. A Joint Venture of The Richard E. Jacobs Group and CBL & Associates Properties, Inc. facebook.com/GulfCoastTownCenterIn Jackson, Miss., in the early s, Confederate flags waved high. Men were manly, women were feminine, and African-Americans were second-class citizens. Separate but equal was both a rallying cry for white people and an egregious mistruth, as racial equality was an impossibility in the bigoted Jim Crow south. Like many civil rights polemics, The Help is rife with heartache and hatred, but it also carries a sense of hope for both its white and African-American heroines. It is also, as it was at the core of Kathryn Stocketts best-selling novel, a story about female empowerment and finding personal justice in an unjust world. At the center of the story is Eugenia Skeeter Phelan (Emma Stone), who returns home from Ole Miss to learn that the maid who raised her, Constantine (Cicely Tyson), is no longer with her family. Skeeter takes a job writing a housekeeping column for the Jackson Journal newspaper, but dreams bigger. Good for her. When an editor (Mary Steenburgen) in New York tells Skeeter to come up with an original book idea, Skeeter fancies telling the stories of Jacksons African-American maids. Its a fine idea but a dangerous one: Medgar Evers murder happens in the middle of the film, and all forms of law and order are pasty white. But Skeeter perseveres and soon has the help of Aibileen (Viola Davis), who works for Skeeters friend Elizabeth (Ahna OReilly), and Minny (Octavia Spencer), who used to work for Skeeters friend Hilly (Bryce Dallas Howard) and her mother (Sissy Spacek) but is now employed by social pariah Celia (Jessica Chastain). Its all very secret, but not melodramatic. In fact, director Tate Taylor is careful not to overdo the bursting racism and instead offers a story focused on women trying to make a better life for themselves. Because he gets such strong performances from Ms. Stone, who proves drama is not beyond her scope, and Ms. Davis, who can do anything, the film is effective and moving in all the right ways. At one point, Aibileen makes note of an interesting irony: That African-America maids raise white children for mothers who either dont know how or dont care to on their own. The maids change diapers, prepare food and regularly hug and kiss the children. This is expected of them. But at the same time, the maids arent allowed to use white bathrooms, libraries, etc. It would be laughably dumb if it werent so painfully true. To his credit, Mr. Taylor points out this white idiocy but doesnt dwell on it, simply because we must accept that this is part of life in Jackson and move on. Skeeter, however, doesnt accept it and because she doesnt, the story moves forward briskly and with purpose. Is The Help good enough for awards consideration?Its the type of socially important picture that Hollywood enjoys feeling good about itself for liking (Crash), but it lacks the hard-hitting punch needed to make it great. Still, its a solid drama with strong performances, and it deserves to be seen by those who have and have not read the book. Dan Hudak is the chairman of the Florida Film Critics Circle and a nationally syndicated film critic. You can e-mail him at dan@hudakonhollywood.com and read more of his work at www.hudakonhollywood.com.Tabloid (Joyce McKinney, Jackson Shaw, Kent Gavin) Academy Award-winner Errol Morris documentary follows a former beauty queen (Ms. McKinney) whose devotion to the man of her dreams leads to gunpoint abduction, manacled Mormons, oddball accomplices, bondage modeling, magic underwear and more. Its certainly crazy, but there are times Mr. Morris moves too fast; after 88 quick minutes, youll wish the film slowed down and told you more. Rated R.The Change-Up (Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman, Olivia Wilde) Best friends Mitch (Mr. Reynolds) and Dave (Mr. Bateman) switch bodies and assume the others life, and they couldnt be more different. This is a funny comedy with a story that grows naturally and makes sense, meaning you dont mind its predictability. Rated R.Rise of the Planet of the Apes (James Franco, Andy Serkis, John Lithgow) In this prequel to the Apes franchise set in modern-day San Francisco, an Alzheimers cure is tested on apes until one of them (Mr. Serkis) gets sick of being mistreated and starts a rebellion. The motion capture animation and visual effects are stunning, but the story never gets going. Rated PG-13. LATEST FILMS CAPSULES The Help REVIEWED BY DAN HUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com ............Is it worth $10? Yes >> Director Tate Taylor and author Kathryn Stockett grew up together in Jackson, Miss., and have been best friends since they were 5 years old. in the know danHUDAK www.hudakonhollywood.com

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC12 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 FREE CONSULTATION (239) 594-9075 www.drlipnik.comLipnik Dermatology and Laser CenterCant make up your mind which area to have Laser Hair Removal?SUMMER SPECIALTWO areas for the price of ONE Colby Red Wine $ 9.99 HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6domestic draft beer wells (one shot only) $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 priceEveryday Fish Taco Lunch Special $ 7.99Black Angus Prime Rib Special $ 12.95while it lasts Its Finally Open! Freshest Seafood Take-OutBONITA SPRINGS25010 Bernwood Ave. | (239) 949-6001 Randy's paradise Shrimp Co.www.randys shmarketrestaurant.com10% OFF YOUR NEXT PURCHASE at Either Randys Location! (with this ad, cannot be combined with any other offer.)NAPLES10395 Tamiami Trail | (239) 593.5555 Full Rack Danish Baby Back Ribs $ 9.95Randys Famous Fish n Chips $ 9.95Come Visit the Fishtine Chapel of Fish Murals! HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6bottle domestic beer and select wines $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 priceOpen Monday thru Sunday 7:00am to 9:00pm www.paradiseshrimponline.com Unconquered Spirits, a 3-D sculpture by Naples artist Tim Parker that depicts the eight clans within the Seminole Tribe of Florida, was recently unveiled and will hang permanently from the ceiling in the new Paradise Room at the Seminole Casino Immokalee. This sculpture serves as a significant symbol of the Tribes heritage for our guests, the casinos James Gibson said at the unveiling ceremony, which was attended by members of the Seminole Tribe of Florida board of directors, among others.Mr. Parkers semiabstract painting showcases the clans of the Seminole Tribe of Florida: Wind, Bird, Panther, Otter, Bear, Snake, Deer and Big Town. It was an honor to create artwork depicting the unconquered spirit of the Seminole Tribe clans that continue to thrive in the modern world, he said.As an artist, Mr. Parker added, A unique installation piece is a dream job and for me, the larger the better. This has 16 different sections, is more than 30 feet wide when all hung together, and two-sided. I am quite pleased with the final results and would like to thank the folks at the casino for giving me the creative freedom and opportunity. Mr. Parker earned a degree in art from Parsons School of Design in New York City and an MFA from Adelphi University. His work has been featured at several galleries across South Florida and can be found in many private collections. For more information about the artist, visit www.art2d.com. For information about Seminole Casino Immokalee, call 658-1313 or visit www. seminoleimmokaleecasion.com. Immokalee casino sculpture celebrates Unconquered Spirits of the Seminoles RALPH NOTARO / COURTESY PHOTOSTop: Tim Parkers sculpture is more than 30 feet wide. Above: Tony Sanchez, Dorothy Scheffler and Joe Frank at the unveiling at the casino.

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CLUB CARD REWARDSFREE ENROLLMENT for a limited time, when you sign up on-line at gr8food.net (click on JOIN THE CLUB). $25 enrollment fee will be waived until September 23rd, 2011!RECEIVE 20% off all summer long on our regular dinner menu including all wine by the bottle, wine by the glass, all alcoholic drinks and beverages. As an example, Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon is regularly $89.00 (At Chops City Grill in Naples and Bonita), Club Card members pay $71.20!!!! While chain restaurants normally charge over $100.00!Bud Light is regularly $4.50, Club Card members pay $3.60! Svedka Martinis are just $6.30!!! Everything no matter what the price is 20% off, if you are a Club Card member!RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 5% RETURN! in reward points every time you dine. 500 points = $25.00 reward automatically added to your Club Card. Thats a total of 25% off every time you dine at a Culinary Concepts restaurant.DINE AT ANY OF OUR 5 AWARD WINNING RESTAURANTS whether is it Italian, Seafood or Steak, dine or drink at the bar or in the dining room and receive points on your entire bill! No restrictions.VIEW ALL 5 MENUS, wine lists and concepts at GR8FOOD.NETENJOY SPECIAL YEAR ROUND PROMOTIONS, advantages & discounts ... Culinary Concepts offers one of the best loyalty programs in America! COME JOIN THE FUN! GR8FOOD.NET JOIN THE CLUB!With over 10,000 members and counting ... it pays to be a local! Culinary Concepts CLUB CARD offers you an exclusive opportunity to receive 20% off all alcohol, beverages and food ... 7 days a week, all summer long! Plus receive a 5% return in reward points every time you dine!Nobody in SW Florida compares with the quality, creativity and style of Culinary Concepts .... the chains just dont compete! TURN PAGE TO VIEW THE CHOPS NAPLES & BLUE WATER BISTRO MENUS

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C14

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C14 FINALLY ... IT P AY S TO BE A LOCAL!JOIN NOW AND START SAVING! Culinary Concepts Club Card members receive 20% off all summer long at each of our 5 different restaurants ... that includes all alcohol and beverages too!NOT A MEMBER? 1.) Log on to gr8food.net 2.) Click on Join the Club 3.) View all 5 menus and join now!Blue Water Bistro menu (below) shows the menu with the 20% discount. Free membership for a limited time only. SIDES 3.9 SAUCES 1.5Steamed Broccoli Wild Mushroom Risotto add 1.2 Roasted Sweet Potato Sea Salt Baked Potato Loaded Baked Potato add .60 French Fries Coconut Sticky Rice Ugly Tomato EXVO Onion Rings Fresh Zucchini Pomodoro Roasted Butternut Squash Roasted Corn and Parmesan Cous Cous 3 Cheese Au Gratin Potatoes Cheesy Lobster Baked Potato add 1.2 Wasabi Citrus Soy Mango Sweet and Sour Lemon Butter Sauce Mango Habanero Fresh Tomato, Garlic and Wine Coconut Green Curry Tomato Salsa, Cilantro and LimeAPPETIZERSSugar Shack Shrimp, black beans and rice 7.1Big Stack of homemade onion rings, chipotle BBQ 5.5 Chicken Caesar Spring Roll 7.1Tequila Roasted OystersNectar Island Hot Wings 6.3 Tuna 3 Way: Tataki, Poke, Sushi 11.63 Crab Lobster CakeCrunchy CalamariMorning After Mussels, bloody mary broth, Coconut Shrimp in a Basket 7.1Homemade Tortilla Chips, fresh tomato salsa 3.7SUSHISpicy Tuna Roll 7.1California Roll 7.6Tempura Hamachi Roll, with Tuna Volcano COCKTAILSGulf Shrimp 21 each 51-60ct (count to a pound) 7.5Panama WhitesClassic Combo 2 oysters, 2 clams, King Crab CocktailLittle Neck Clams (6), lemon, cocktail sauce 7.1 additional clams add 1.5Ultimate king crab, snow crab, shrimp cocktail, oysters, clams and mussels (min. 2 people) each 14.5OYSTERSMoonstone (Rhode Island) 2.2Onset Inlet (Washington State) 2.0 Penobscot Bay (Maine) 1.8Deer Creek (Washington State) 1.8Leavins Oyster Box (Florida) 1.2Kumamoto (Humbolt Bay, CA) 2.3Blue Point (Connecticut) 1.4SOUPSSoup of the Day Crab and Corn Chowder cup 4.4 bowl 5.1Key West Conch SALADSBig Green Summer Salad choice of dressing 4.7Apple, Walnut, Romaine, blue cheese dressing black pepper and prosciutto 5.5Bistro Salad, mixed greens, watermelon, pecans, dressing as entree 13.4 6.3 Classic Caesar, grana padana cheese, homemade croutons 4.7The Big Ugly iceberg, heirloom tomatoes, bacon, carrots, blue cheese dressing, berry balsamic 5.5Blackened Salmon mixed greens, arugula, cucumber, bacon, tomato, maple miso dressing 12.7PASTASChicken Shanghai pulled chicken, spicy peanut infused soy, noodles, Thai basil, broccoli 13.5Shrimp Vodka Penne crispy prosciutto, hearts of artichoke, vodka tomato sauce, basil, pesto 14.0Spaghetti and Crab pasta with jalapeo, blue and king crab, red pepper, parmesan 14.3King Crab Alfredo cracked crab legs, fettucine, black pepper parmesan cream 15.6COMBOSFried hand breaded shrimp, scallops, calamari, fresh haddock, slaw 15.6Broiled 16.3Grilled Shrimp hand breaded shrimp, shrimp scampi, Gulf shrimp cocktail, slaw 14.8Paradise Maine lobster tail, snow crab, shrimp scampi, fried shrimp 20.7SURF AND TURFSteak and ShrimpSteak and Lobster sea salt baked potato 23.6 Steak, Shrimp and Lobster shrimp scampi, sea salt baked potato 26.0 SPECIALTIESFresh Grouper Scampi Seared Tuna No. 1 quality coconut pineapple rice, togarashi butter sauce, ponzu, wasabi, ginger 21.8The Great Fish Sandwich beer battered, lettuce, tomato, onion, on brioche bun, Bistro slaw and fries 12.7 Chipotle Baby Back Ribs with bistro slaw and choice of fries, sea salt baked or roasted sweet potato 18.0Mahi Mac macadamian encrusted mahi mahi, grilled pineapple togarashi sauce, island rice 18.2Captains Cut miso glazed sea bass, wasabi crumb, carrot miso-soy, Asian stir fry 23.1Classic Snow Crab dinner with bistro slaw and choice of fries, sea salt baked or roasted sweet potato 14.3Blackened Salmon bourbon brown sugar glaze, jalapeo pecan butter, spinach,Bistro Veg Plate pick 7 sides FRESH CATCHBroiled, Grilled or Blackened. Served with your choice of 1 sauce and 1 side!Flounder, Broiled Atlantic 12.7 Tilapia, Broiled Atlantic Salmon Canada 14.8Barramundi Australia 15.6Fried Shrimp (12) Gulf of Mexico 13.2Mahi Mahi Gulf of Mexico 20.7 Costa Rica 17.4Black Grouper Gulf of Mexico 22.0Ahi Tuna Hawaii 20.3Fish & Chips New England 13.3SeaBass, Broiled Chile 23.1Haddock Massachusetts 12.6Rainbow Trout, Broiled Idaho 15.6Shrimp & Scallops STEAKS AND CHOPSServed with your choice of 2 sidesNY Strip Steak (12oz.) Filet of Beef (7oz.) 20.3Chicken Chop (12oz.) 12.7 Chipotle BBQ on requestBURGERSClassic lb bistro burger, lettuce, tomato and onion 8.7Black & Blue black peppercorn seared, Triple Cheese & Bacon American, jack and cheddar cheese with peppered bacon Black Jack black Angus burger, jack cheese, jalapeos, red tomato salsa, guacamole, Cowboy chipotle BBQ, applewood smoked bacon, BEERSBud Light 3.6 Miller Light 3.6 Napa Smith Amber 4.4Samuel Smith Taddy Porter 4.4 Flying Dog In Heat Wheat 4.1 Harpoon Ale 4.1 Stone Levitation 5.2 Terrapin Hopsecutioner 6.0 Cigar City Jai-Alai 4.4 Holy Mackeral Golden 5.2 Barney Oatmeal Stout 6.8 Rastafa Rye 22oz 7.2 Tommyknocker Butthead 4.4 Victory Golden Monkey 5.2 Brooklyn Local 1 22oz 10.0 Skull Splitter 6.0 Rouge Dead Guy Ale 5.2 BLUE WATER BISTRO EAT FISH ... LIVE LONG!

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC16 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Text CBAKE to 97063 to receive more special offers & promos! ITALIAN MEATBALL MELT NAPLES Airport Rd., (239) 596-8840 Coastland Mall, (239) 352-8642 FT. MYERS Gulf Coast Town Center, (239) 466-8642 CHEF SALAD WHAT ARE YOU HAVING FOR LUNCH TODAY? TURKEY ARTICHOKE PRESSATA Interactive Friendly Pirate Fun for the Whole Family 1-800-776-3735 www.PiecesOfEight.com 2500 Main Street Ft Myers Beach Located at Salty Sams Waterfront Adventures Arrive 30-40 minutes prior to departure. Call For Times and Reservations 1-800-776-3735 2 2 2 2 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W I CONTRACT BRIDGE BY STEVE BECKERGood card-reading is an art unto itself. Declarer does not actually see the defenders hands as each card is played, but many times he can visualize their holdings just as if they were in open view.Take this case where South was not sufficiently alert to a situation he could have deduced without much effort. He ducked the spade lead, East winning with the queen and returning a spade to dummys ace. Declarer could count eight sure tricks and saw that the ninth might come from a finesse in either diamonds or hearts. He stewed mightily while deciding which one to take and finally settled on the diamond finesse. West won with the king and cashed his spades, and South went down one. The simple fact is that declarers cogitations were basically misplaced. Rather than trying to decide which finesse to take at trick three, he should have expended the bulk of his energy on determining the meaning of Wests opening lead. Wests five-of-spades lead was highly revealing. It was inconceivable that he would have led the five from a holding of, say, the K-Q-J-5-4, in which case he would have led the king. Declarer could therefore assume that East had the king, queen or jack, which in turn meant that the ace was the right play from dummy at trick one. Observe what happens in the actual case if declarer takes the first spade with the ace. Whatever East plays on the trick, the defenders cannot cash four spade tricks after declarer takes a losing diamond finesse at trick two. If West leads a spade to Easts queen, East has no spade to return, while if West cashes the K-J of spades, Souths ten becomes a stopper. If it turns out that Easts original holding is three spades headed by an honor, which certainly is possible, theres still nothing to fear. In that case, West started with only four spades, and nine tricks are assured. Thinking things through

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Whats a weasel? Its an animal, of course, but in some parts of Montana you might put weasels on your ice cream because some Montanans call M&Ms weasels. And in the 1700s, when the nursery rhyme Pop Goes the Weasel was composed, everyone knew the weasel of the title referred to a yarn winder. In the past, when women would spin and weave at home, they used special tools. After the wool was spun, it was wound by hand on a niddy-noddy or with the help of a yarn winder. The winder looked like a post on a footed platform. Attached to the posts side was a wheel of four or five arms. If the wheel turned once, it had wound a set amount of wool, usually a yard. Each time the wheel turned, a wooden counter would move a notch until it hit a final peg and made a loud pop. As the nursery rhyme said, Pop goes the weasel. Today, a weasel (wool winder) can cost anywhere from $30 to $500. Q: A tag on the inside of my piano says, Clarendon Piano Co., Serial No. 87434. Any information on age? A: Because you know the maker and serial number of your piano, you can find its approximate age by checking the well-known Pierce Piano Atlas. The 12th edition of the atlas was published in 2009. It lists piano makers alphabetically, with dates and serial numbers if available. Clarendon Piano Co. of Rockford, Ill., was in business from 1903 until 1930, when it was taken over by Haddorff Piano Co. Haddorff continued to make pianos using the Clarendon name until 1960. The serial number on your piano indicates that the piano was made in 1919. Q: My doll is at least 100 years old. On her back are the words, 09-15, Dep, Germany, Handwerck. She is 29 inches tall and has her original hair. What can you tell me about this doll? A: Your doll was made by the Heinrich Handwerck Doll Co., founded in Gotha, Germany, in 1876. The 09-15 is the mold number of the doll. Dep indicates that a trademark was registered at the local district court. A doll like yours in excellent condition could sell for close to $1,000. Q: My brother had a stringed instrument that looks like a zither but is called a Pianolin. It says Patent pending. Sold by our Advertisers only, Price $35, The Pianolin Co., New Troy, Mich. It has no date on it. Can you tell me anything about it? My brother died several years ago, and I dont know anything about the instrument. A: The Pianolin was invented in Why the weasel goes pop th T l i a n C f r terryKOVEL news@floridaweekly.com KOVELS: ANTIQUES & COLLECTING SEE KOVELS, C19 GOLDEN DOOR SPA AND THE BAR ARE LOCATED AT NAPLES GRANDE BEACH RESORTA Waldorf Astoria Resort 475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34103 (Spa) 239.594.6321 (Bar) 239.594.6000 THE BARVEUVE CLICQUOT HAPPY HOUR AT THE BAR $109* SUMMER SPA SPECIALChoose any of the following services for only $109* each:To reserve your service or for more information please call. 50 Minute Swedish Massage 50 Minute Restorative Facial 75 Minute Classic Manicure & Pedicure Bha!Bha!A Persian Bistro BELLY DANCERS NIGHTComplimentary while you dine.2-4-118% gratuity added before discount. Must present coupon. Dine-in only. Limit 2 persons per coupon. EVERY DAY ENJOY LUNCH WITH PRIX-FIXE 3-COURSE MENU Not valid on holidays.EVERY NIGHT ENJOY DINNER WITH PRIX-FIXE 3-COURSE MENU Not valid on holidays.

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24041 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL, BONITA SPRINGS 239.390.3187 | WWW.ANGELINASOFBONITASPRINGS.COM Follow me on Twitter AngelinasBonitaReal. Italian. Summer Hours: Open Tuesday through Saturday-AngelinaExperience award winning, romantic dining at Southwest Floridas most elegant restaurant. rough August 31stFour Course Dinner for Two, $65*Trip Advisor Food, atmosphere, and service at its nest! joannb1989, Bonita Springs July 28, 2011 Amazing food and service Sherrill, New York July 11, 2011 e Best Dining Experience in my Lifetime HANDS DOWN. Naples, June 15, 2011 NATURAL & ORGANIC LUNCH & DINNER EMPIRE FUSION Complimentary Champagne Bloody Mary Specials Delicious Breakfast Disheswww.thejollycricket.com720 5th Avenue S. (239) 304-946010:30am-3pm 15% OFF WITH THIS COUPON. VALID UNTIL AUGUST 25, 2011. Sunday Brunch NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C19 about 1930 by Henry C. Marx. The name is a combination of piano and violin. The instrument has two sets of strings, one thats played with a bow and a smaller set thats strummed. The pianolike keyboard indicates the melody notes. Marx, a concert violinist and music teacher, sold musical instruments door to door before founding the Marxochime Colony in New Troy in 1927. He and his son, Charles, invented several unusual instruments, including the Pianolin, Pianoette, Banjolin, Hawaii-Phone, Mandolin-Uke, Marx Piano Harp, Violin Uke and a guitar with only one string. Pianolas can be found marked either Pianolin Co. or Marxochime Colony and with the location New Tory, Mich., or Mount Pleasant, Iowa. There are very few people who buy these unusual instruments, so prices are low, under $100. Q: I have four teaspoons from the 1933 Worlds Fair in Chicago. Each spoon pictures a building on the fairgrounds. The four I have are the General Exhibits Group, the Administration Building, East View of Administration Building and Fort Dearborn. Are these of any value?A: The 1933 Chicago Worlds Fair was called the Century of Progress International Exposition. It celebrated the centennial of the city of Chicago and the advances in technology made during that century. The motto of the fair was Science Finds, Industry Applies, Man Adapts. It opened in May 1933 and closed the following November. It was so successful that it reopened in May 1934 and closed at the end of October that year. Worlds Fair souvenirs from all fairs are collected. Souvenir spoons sell for $30-$40 each. Tip: Dont store foods or beverages in crystal bowls or bottles for long periods of time. Acidic juice, vinegar and alcoholic beverages will leach out the lead in the glass. It is unhealthy to drink the liquid. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. WEEKLY WE EK K K K K K K K K K K K O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O F AUGUST 18 y violin. The t wo s et s of p l aye d wit h a e r se t th at s pianolike c ates t h e M arx, a con m usic teac h er rum e nt s d oo r founding the o ny in 7. He r les ve r al n t s, n o Ba n in g, East View o B uilding and F o t hese o f any val u A: T h e 1933 n ational E b rated the ce n o f Chica g o a i n techn o in g t mot t Sci e t r y App l ies, Man A da May 1933 and clos e N o v e m be r. It wa s s it reopene d in May 1 the end o f October F air so uv e ni r c ollected. S sell for $ 30 T ip : Do n beverages in b ottles for long Ac id ic j ui ce vi ne COURTESY PHOTOThis wool winder, made in Pennsylvania in the 19th century, was refinished, so it sold for only $34 at Conestoga Auction Co. in Manheim, Pa.KOVELSFrom page 18

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC20 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Located inside the Pavilion Shopping Center. Call for reservations. 239.566.2371. www.kcamericanbistro.com885 Vanderbilt Beach Road. Naples, FL 34108Welcomes the Summer! $20 OFF WITH THE PURCHASE OF TWO ENTREESMust present the coupon to redeem the offer. Only one coupon per table. Not redeemable with other offers. Valid thru August 25, 2011 SUMMER SAVINGS With the purchase of 2 Dinner Menu Entres. Not valid with any other discounts. Not valid for wine dinner. One coupon per table. Expires August 28th, 2011 Must present coupon in advance.WINE DOWN WEDNESDAY 6pm-9pmLive Jazz Reduced Prices Complimentary Wine TastingsHAPPY HOUR 1/2 OFF All Drinks in the M Lounge Every Day 4pm-6pm SUNDAY BRUNCH Serving 10:30am-3pm August 29 Sept 19 Oct 17 River Bar River Bar OPEN Join Jack s Club Great food!Cold drinks!Good times! never Best 1/2 PRICED WINE LISTbottles up to $100expires 8/25/11 BUY ONE GET ONEpurchase one dish, get the second freegood for lunch or dinner = or lesser value +18% gratuity before discountexpires 8/25/11must present coupon at time of purchase. cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer2455 vanerbilt beach road naples 34109 239.254.0050 BEST HAPPY HOUR IN TOWNALL drinks 1/2 price 4-8 NIGHTLY 10th annual tasting coming up for CANWomen Supporting Women holds its 10th annual wine tasting to benefit the Cancer Alliance of Naples from 5:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at Handsome Harrys. Alice Carlson, a founding member of Women Supporting Women and chair of the event, has chosen Audrey Hepburns quote, I believe in pink I believe in miracles, as the evenings theme. Tickets are $75 in advance, $85 at the door. To purchase a ticket or donate an auction items, e-mail Ms. Carlson at womensupportingwomen.naples@gmail. com. For more information about CAN, call 436-4763 or visit www.cancerallianceofnaples.com. Place your bets on library casino nightThe Friends of the Library of Collier County will hold the third annual Red, White & Roule tte casino night Friday, Nov. 4, at the Naples Beach Hotel and Golf Club. Last years casino night earned the Florida Library Associations Outstanding Program of the Year Award. For 2011, the Friends of the Library have upped the ante and promise a Las Vegas-style night of dancing to The Blue Tones and taking a chance with full casino gaming and professional croupiers. Tickets are $75 per person. A cash bar will be available.For tickets or more information, call 2628135 or visit www.collier-friends.org. Cmon to museums inaugural Dream GalaThe Golisano Childrens Museum of Naples will hold its inaugural Dream Gala beginning at 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 23, at Cmon in North Collier Regional Park. Gala chair Shelia Davis and her committee are hard at work planning an evening of adventure and discovery that will benefit Collier Countys first learning environment devoted exclusively to the serious business of childrens play. The 30,000-square-foot museum is set to open in early 2012. For information about gala sponsorship opportunities, call Cmon at 514-0084 or visit www.cmon.org. 13 is lucky number for tea and fashionsHumane Society Naples holds its 13th annual Afternoon Tea & Fashion Show on Friday, Nov. 11, at the Naples Yacht Club. Sponsorships and auction items are being solicited now. For more information, call Ali OConnor at 6431880, ext. 18, or e-mail events@hsnaples.org. SAVE THE DATE

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AVON PRODUCTSBy Linda Jones IN-STORE DISCOUNTStore 239.331.7491 Fax 239.331.7492 mayihelpu2day@comcast.net www.youravon.com/ljones6508 BARBECUE IS WHAT WE DO LET US DO IT FOR YOU!In Lee & Collier Counties Call Our Catering Manager at (239) 209-0940 Catering Services from 25 5,000 www.ribcity.com Catering! Our Award Winning Baby Back Ribs, Chicken, Pork and Beef accompanied by our homemade Cole Slaw and Baked Beans can be brought to your event by our mobile char-grill. www.RiverchaseDermatology.com W.G. Eshbaugh, Jr., MD FACS, Board Certi ed Plastic SurgeonUPPER EYELID LIFTIN OFFICE PROCEDURE LITTLE DOWN TIME Call for Special Event Pricing.Fort Myers and North Naples Spa Blue MD locations Call today. Appointments are Limited.239.313.2553Dr. Eshbaughs specialties include: Rejuvalift/In of ce Mini F ace Lift Liposuction Arm Lift Body Lift Tummy Tuck Breast Augmentation Cosmetic Breast Revision ASPS Member Surgeon Eyes Wide Open... Summer Event Introduces... THE PERSONAL SOMMELIER(239) 430-4999 Located at The Hilton Naples 5111 Tamiami Trail North www.donshula.comWeve Put Our Sommelier Recommendations and Award Winning Wine List on the iPad.Sit at your table with an iPad Mobile Digital Device, browse our menu items and your Personal Sommelier will give you professional assistance in choosing the best wine pairings. Text to 97063 to receive special offers Naples Best Kept Secret 4221 Tamiami Trail East NaplesLocated on US 41 opposite Sugden Park Open Mon-Sat & Nicks PlaceQuality Food. Exceptional Service.Call 239.793.2644 or visit www.mongellos.com Our outdoor patio is PET-FRIENDLY anytime, any day! ......... Summer Specials .........Choice of 2 Dinners & Bottle of House Wine $26.95 Lunches from $4.95. Dinners from $12.95 Daily Early Bird 5-7: Buy 1 full-priced Entree, Get the 2nd for 1/2 price Frank n Stein: $4.95 for Hot Dog and Stein of Beer Entertainment Nightly: Tuesday through SaturdayThursday, Aug. 18th Wounded Warriors Bene t Fundraiserfeaturing music from Michael Angelo from 6 10pmSaturday, Aug. 27th Latin Night 10pm 2am featuring Js DJSAVE THE DATE NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C21 Guys will set sail for Make-A-WishA manly afternoon of cigars, beer, Shulas steaks and steel drums aboard the Naples Princess will benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17. Tickets are $125. RSVP to Lesley Colantonio at 992-9474 or lcolantonio@ sflawish.org. An Evening in Old HavanaGuests will be transported to vintage Cuba for An Evening in Old Havana at the David Lawrence Foundations signature destination-drive gala on Friday, Jan. 20, at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples. From the dcor to the cocktails and music, everything will be reminiscent of Havanas opulent social clubs of the 1930s. In keeping with the theme, women are encouraged to wear summery cocktail dresses, while the bestdressed men can don linen guayaberas or tropical print shirts and smart fedoras. Tickets are $500 per person, $1,200 per VIP patron and $5,000 per table of 10. A variety of sponsorship opportunities and levels are also available. For more information, call the David Lawrence Foundation at 354-1416. Hispanic business council plans galaThe Council for Hispanic Business Professionals will hold its third annual gala on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Kensington Golf & Country Club. School on Wheels, an outreach of Guadalupe Society Services/Catholic Charities, has been chosen as the beneficiary of this years event. School on Wheels helps migrant women in Immokalee learn basic English skills. All are invited to enjoy the evening of Hispanic-style food and entertainment. For information about tickets and sponsorships, e-mail events@ CHBPnaples.org or visit www.CHBPnaples.org.

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239-263-45811100 Tamiami Trail N., Naples 6 blocks South of the Coastland Mall, next to the Ramada HAPPY HOUR 4:30-7pm ENTERTAINMENTBeatlemanias Peter McGann Saturday 6-9Serving the Evening Meal Since 1947 The Best Deal In TownOpen 7 Days Dinner 5:00pm-10pm Filet Mignon! Prime Rib! N.Y. Sirloin! Broiled Salmon! And much more... Wow!King sh Cabernet Sauvignon or ChardonnayTwo Dinners & a Bottle of WineWine & DineAll Entres Include Wine, Salad & Potato$1795per person 550 Port-O-Call Way | Naples, FL 34102Call (239) 649-2275 for reservations. www.NaplesPrincess Cruises.comwww.NaplesPrincessCruises.com Naples Bay Port Royal The Gulf of Mexico BUY 1, GET 1 1/2 PRICE, valid on... Wednesday Sunset Dinner Cruise Saturday Seabreeze Lunch Cruise Sunday Sunset More Than Hors doeuvres Cruise Valid on adult tickets. Subject to change without notice. SUMMERSPECIAL SAVINGS Naples Princess Naples P rin cess We cruise rain or shine! Enjoy air conditioned comfort! August 23: Sounds of Sinatra with Tony Avalon SAVE THE DATE NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 On your mark, get set, sprint!The second annual Stiletto Sprint to benefit the Garden of Hope and Courage and Susan G. Komen for the CureSouthwest Florida takes off at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21, along 500 yards of Fifth Avenue South. Runners, walkers and all styles of footwear are welcome, but only those in heels at least 2 inches high will qualify for the first-place prize. Registration is $25 for adults and $10 for kids younger than 15. Participants who raise $50 for the cause will receive a Stiletto Sprint T-shirt, and those who raise $250 will be invited to the VIP cool-down party at Caf & Bar Lurcat. Sign up in advance at www.komenswfl.org or beginning at 5 p.m. on the day of sprint. For more information, call 498-0016 or 434-6697. Mental health association plans Halloween cruiseThe Mental Health Association of SWF presents Bone Voyage, a Halloween-inspired high-seas adventure aboard the Naples Princess, on Friday, Oct. 28. The ships sets sail at 5 p.m. and returns to the dock at 7:30 p.m. Costumes are encouraged but not required. Cost is $50 per person. Guests will enjoy a welcome glass of champagne, hors doeuvres and live entertainment. A cash bar will also be available. For reservations or more information, contact Brian Follweiler at 261-5405 or bfollweiler@mhaswf.org. Have a ball at The Ritz for NCHThe patients, staff, volunteers, donors and friends of NCH Healthcare System inspired the theme for the NCH Hospital Ball 2011: This Is My Hospital. The black-tie evening begins at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples. Tickets are $475 per person. Proceeds will help create 64 Smart Rooms at the NCH North Naples hospital. For tickets or more information, call Cynthia Bennett at the NCH Healthcare Foundation, 436-4511, or e-mail foundation@nchmd.org. Step out and dance for Sunlight HomeSunlight Home for expectant women and teens invites everyone to put on their dancing shoes for an evening with Cahlua & Cream on Friday, Nov. 4, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Tickets are $60 per person. Proceeds will benefit mothers and babies at Sunlight Home, where they are empowered to overcome poverty, abuse and homelessness through education, training and spiritual growth. For more information, call Linda Hale at 352-0251 or e-mail Linda_lee_hale@ yahoocom.

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Hurley Travel Experts Expands and Opens Office in Naples Welcome Betsy Patton! www.travelexperts.com Betsy Patton 1-800-874-1743 Betsy@travelexperts.com We are excited about the opportunities here in the Naples area. William (Mitch) N. Mitchell Friday, August 26th: 10am-6pmPirates Ball at Captains Table-7pm-11pm Featuring an adult costume contest at 10 pm. August 26th 28th Come dressed as a Swashbuckler, Buccaneer or Tavern Wench! Admission to the three day Pirate Fest is free! Full Details Available @ FishermensVillagePirateFest.com Fishermens Village Waterfront Mall, Resort and Marina is located off Marion Avenue, Punta Gorda. From I-75, take exit 164, turn left and proceed 3 miles to Fishermens Village. Call 941-575-3067 for more information Pirate Fest 2011 Saturday, August 27th: 10am-8pmBreakfast with Pirates at Bella Luna, 9:00 a.m. Pirate Parade, 10:15 a.m. King Fisher Pirate Invasion Cruise 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Childrens Costume Contest, 4:30 p.m. Twilight Fire Show in Center Court at 8pm Sunday, August 28th: 11am-6pmBreakfast with Pirates at Bella Luna, 10:00 a.m. Dancing Under The Star VVER INAG Fred Astaire Dance Studio The party will end with a special dance by professionals from Fred Astaire Dance Studios.$ Next Dance Night Wednesday, August 31! SAVE THE DATE NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 C23 Getting in step for literacyLiteracy Volunteers of Collier County will hold the fifth annual Dancing with the Stars for Literacy on Friday, Nov. 11, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. LVCC teaches illiterate and non-English speaking adults to read, write and speak English.A number of prominent Neapolitans are paired with professional dancers to perform. Prizes are awarded based on dancing ability as well as the amount of money dancers raise for LVCC. For tickets or more information, call LVCC at 262-4448 or visit www.collierliteracy.org. Saddle up for Bootstrap BoogieNaples Equestrian Challenge holds its sixth annual Bootstrap Boogie barn dance Saturday evening, Nov. 12, at NEC headquarters off Goodlette-Frank Road north of Pine Ridge Road. Live country-western music, a mechanical bull, line dancers and Pony Pie Bingo are all part of the fun. NEC provides therapeutic riding and other equine-related programs for Collier County children and adults with disabilities. For more information, call 596-2988 or visit www.naplesequestrianchallenge.org. Be a goddess for an eveningGoddess Night 2012, an evening of pampering and enlightenment sponsored by the Naples Art Association, takes place Thursday, March 29, at The von Liebig Art Center. A champagne reception gets thing going, and guests enjoy a seated dinner and keynote speaker as well as their choice of informative breakout sessions. For more information, call Aimee Schlehr at 262-6517, ext. 120, or e-mail aimee.schlehr@naplesart.org. Wishmakers Ball is in Black and WhiteThe sixth annual Wishmakers Ball to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation is set for Friday, Jan. 20, at the Hilton Naples. The evenings theme is Black and White. Individual tickets are $200 and sponsorships start at $3,000. Premium tables are also available starting at $5,000. For tickets or sponsorship information, contact Lesley Colantonio at 992-9474 or lcolantonio@sflawish.org. Send Save the Date information about galas and other fundraising parties to cpierce@floridaweekly.com.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC24 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 Gentle, Caring Dentistry Since 2003 Initial Comprehensive Exam Full set of X-Rays Healthy Mouth Cleaning $95 regular $338239.261.7291 | www.naplesdentalcenter.com201 8th St South, Suite 106, Naples | Downtown at the Baker Center A night of fashion at Merle Norman Cosmetics for Footsteps to the FutureFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1. Hayley Carroll and Christine Clark 2. Anna Randazzo and Joni Dickens 3. Christine Clark, Sue Campaella, Maurisa Carroll, Dawn Lutz and Kori Gowan 4. Carrie Neville and Donna Scudder 5. Mike Lapidus, Mallie Logan and Beckie LapidusCOURTESY PHOTOS Hot Nights... Cool Sights at DeBruyne Fine Art Gallery 1 5 3 2 4MARLA OTTENSTEIN / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 5 4 3 21. Mike Galati, Suzanne Saltzman and Helen Noble 2. Jerry Goldberg and Ann Moran 3. Tom Smith and Joe Cox 4. Carol Pier and Suzanne DeBruyne 5. Tom Ray and Roxanne Galatti

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C25 A USO-style party at Bayfront to Keep the Spirit of AliveFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1 2 6 5 4 3 71. Gina Russen and Michael Soulard 2. Pierre Andrews, Gregory Garcia and Christine Andrews3. Lois Bolin 4. Lois Bolin and Dorie Anderson 5. Dorie Anderson and John Lobiano 6. Preston Pratley 7. John Gardi, Lynda Scalise, Eileen Miner and Linda HayesHELEN CATLIN / FLORDA WEEKLY

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC26 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 *Rates are in US dollars, per person, based on double occupancy and subject to availability Government taxes and fees are additional. A non-refundable and non-transferable deposit is required at the time of booking. No name changes are allowed. Restrictions apply. Request Early Saver. Ships Registry: The Bahamas and Panama. Carnival reserves the right to re-instate the fuel supplement for all guests at up to $9 per person per day if the NYMEX oil price exceeds $70 per barrel.4 Convenient Locations to Serve You!www.cinaples.comPelican Bay 597-6700 Get-Away Club 597-2961 Village Walk 514-2047 Verona Walk 430-1254 Enjoy a lively Fun Filled Cruise. Or, just take it Breezy. Experience Carnival and dont be surprised if your vocabulary is reduced to OOHS and AAHS. 6 Day Caribbean SailingsRoundtrip from Miami to Key West, Grand Cayman & Ochos Rios Rates from $399*8 Day Caribbean Sailings Roundtrip from Miami to Nassau, Grand Turk, Falmouth & Grand Cayman Rates from $579*Europe Carnivals newest Fun Ship, Carnival BreezeSM will debut in June of 2012 and o er various 12 Day Mediterranean Cruises thru October 25, 2012. Roundtrip from Barcelona ~ Rates from $1049* Livorno (Florence/Pisa), Civitavecchia (Rome), Naples, Dubrovnik, Venice & Messina AVacation sure to please the whole family! Summer is a great time to discover new wines (OK, well, there really isnt a bad time to discover new wines, but why wait?). During the slower summer season, lots of restaurants and retailers host tastings that afford you the opportunity to try some of these (see the food and wine calendar on the following page for upcoming events), but Im also including some you might not stumble upon elsewhere. Following are some wines that are new on the market and some that are new to our market. Either way, they are interesting offerings worth sampling. Nick Nemec, co-owner of Big Crush Distributing in Punta Gorda, continues to expand his companys line of boutique offerings, making interesting wines available for the first time in the region. Olabisi Wines is a boutique Napa winery that features vineyard designated, small production lots under 500 cases, he says. With wild yeasts and minimal handling, the varietal character of the wine is more pronounced. Tolosa Estate Wines are dry farmed (no irrigation) in the Paso Robles area, which concentrates the flavor because the vines have to struggle. Jason Adams, owner of Real Wine in Fort Myers, specializes in unusual offerings as well as helping clients find special lots and selections to build their collections. Among his new offerings: The Francis Tannahill Pinot Noir is a very small production from a private label from the husband and wife team (Cheryl Francis and Sam Tannahill) that part owns and makes all the wine at A to Z and Rex Hill, he says.Here are some noteworthy offerings I like, as well as some that appealed to Mr. Nemec and Mr. Adams. Not only that, they are lowto moderately priced. Nick Nemecs picks: Olabisi Mendocino Chardonnay Double Top Secret Vineyard 2008 ($30): Big spicy citrus and white flowers aroma with a rich palate of melon and lemon, followed by a long drawn out finish. Olabisi Suisun Valley Syrah King Vineyard 2006 ($30): Opens with a complex aroma of boysenberry and spices well integrated into the palate with red and black fruits and herbs. Tolosa Cabernet Sauvignon Paso Robles 2007 ($17): Concentrated aromas and of black cherry, currant and toasty oak, and a touch of spice ending in a lingering finish. Tolosa Chardonnay 2008 ($25): Pear and apple aromas with a touch of citrus follow through to the medium-bodied palate with hints of nutty oak and spice, ending with a long finish. Tolosa No Oak Chardonnay 2009 ($20): Made from estate fruit from the Edna Ranch in Edna Valley. Light golden color with aroma and flavors of fresh tropical fruits and pear and a crisp lingering finish. Tolosa Edna Ranch Pinot Noir 2008 ($25): Medium body and color with plum, cherry and cedar aromas and concentrated flavors and a generous finish. Jason Adams picks: Andre et Michel Quenard Vin de Savoie Chignin-Bergeron 2008 ($15): Bergeron is the name for Roussanne in the Savoie region (of France). Because this area is very mountainous and cooler, this version is a little lighter and lower in alcohol than the Rhone counterparts. This wine is a fullbodied white with no oak, and a deep dark golden color. Francis Tannahill The Hermit Pinot Noir 2006 ($36): This wine is dark and brooding in style with serious minerality and organic earthiness in the nose, and elegant Oregon berry and cherry flavors and long finish. WillaKenzie Estate Pinot Gris 2010 ($20): Clean and minerally with good acidity. Very much in the Alsace style, drier and less floral. Another big white with no malo(lactic fermentation) or oak. Mr. Vinos picks: Dr. HeidemannsBergweiler Graacher Doktorberg Spatlese 2009 ($40): A classic German Moselle with a rich yellow color and ripe fruits aromas, this late harvest Riesling has rich intense flavors of ripe pineapple, peach and apricot and a balanced lively finish. Long Boat Sauvignon Blanc 2009 ($15): A light, floral New Zealand wine, it has pineapple and stone fruits and a green apple nose, followed with peach and lemon lime and tropical fruit flavors, ending in a crisp clean finish. Lungarottis Torre di Giano 2010 ($15): Italys Umbria district is the home of this fresh white wine, strawcolored with a fruity bouquet of citrus fruit, orange blossoms and fresh fruit salad. It finishes dry and has good structure, with a delicate acidity and a long finish. Murphy-Goode All In Claret 2005 ($25): Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot combine their aromas of dark and red cherry with flavors of blackberry and spice, smoothed with barrel aging. An intense dark color and good fruit, ending with a long finish with a touch of tannin. Murphy-Goode Liars Dice Zinfandel 2008 ($21): A jammy bouquet with juicy flavors of black raspberry, black cherry, and blackberry, with soft round tannins and a lingering finish. Vesevo Falanghina 2010 ($16): This refreshing white wine from Italys Campania district has a white flower and pear aroma, mingling with crisp citrus flavors and a tangy mineral finish. jimMcCRACKEN vino@florida-weekly.com Summer is perfect time to find some new wines VINOCOURTESY PHOTOWillaKenzie Estate Pinot Gris 2010 ($ ) t a l o f t d w i t, a la r u o n g ur ($2 t ar w it h c e n i n u i t w i t D A f l b w l i 2 w p f m fl fi C W u s ig Rh a an H n a a e rr ot d s and g hter h one f ul ln d a He r ng in a nd a nd r y t ($ 15 ): It h ome o c olore d r us f r ui f ruit sa g ood s tr a nd a lo Mu 2 005 ( M e rl ot their r y w sp ic An f r u w

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 18-24, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C27 Brian Roland has packed a lot of experience into the dozen years since he graduated from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. Hes backpacked and eaten his way through Europe, worked with top chefs in the New York City area and presented a dinner at the James Beard House in New York City, among other things. Area food lovers have likely sampled his cuisine at Chops City Grill (Naples and Bonita Springs), Cru (Fort Myers) or M Waterfront Grille in Naples, where hes been the executive chef since 2008. Its at the Village on Venetian Bay, 4300 Gulf Shore Blvd. Call 263-4421. Q: Tell us how about your culinary ex p erience outside of M Grille? A: I was sous chef for macrobiotic Chef Patrick Verre at The TPC at Jasna Polana in Princeton, N.J., working seasonally at Maxwells before landing a job at Chops in Naples. I was also fortunate enough to work for Chef Daniel Boulud at Restaurant Daniel and Caf Boulud. He taught me to care for ingredients in a way that has stuck with me ever since. I moved to Cru after Chops, returning to Naples when owners Chris and Peter Sereno renovated Maxwells and turned it into M Waterfront Grille. Q: How old were you when you r e alized you wanted to be a chef? A: I was about 15. I worked at a small Italian restaurant called Teresas Caf in New Brunswick, N.J., throughout high school, working my way up from dishwashing to food prep. Coming into the dining room at age 15 or 16, I realized I loved working in the restaurant and decided I wanted to go to culinary school. Q: How did you find your way to Na p les? A: My grandparents lived in Naples and I thought it would be a great place to do my externship. Q; How would you describe your culin ar y style? A: I call what I serve at M cutting edge continental cuisine, which I define as an innovative approach to regional cooking using the highest quality ingredients including organic, natural and sustainable products as much as possible. I try to think outside the box and bring my guests dining experiences to the next level through complementary flavors, daring presentations and sophisticated wine pairings. Recently, Ive explored molecular cooking, which has allowed me to challenge my diners senses and palates in ways I was never able to achieve before. Q: Can you talk about a coupl e of high points in your career so far?A: Working for Chef Boulud and preparing a meal at the James Beard House (while at Cru) were both very special experiences. It was really rewarding to create dinners at the last three Southwest Florida Food and Wine Fests, too. Earlier this month, my dad and I took our first trip to Napa, where we ate at places like French Laundry, Bouchon, Bottega, Ubuntu, Mustards, Dry Creek Kitchen and CIA Greystone and toured some great wineries. I can see this experience helping me grow professionally for years to come. Q: Who do you admire most and wh y ? A: I admire my mother and father for guiding me and molding me into the man I am today. Professionally, Im inspired by Chef Verre and Chef Grant Achatz. I dined at Chef Achatzs Alinea in Chicago before his (successful) battle with tongue cancer. I just finished reading his book, Life on the Line, and its been a great inspiration. Q: You do a lot of collaboratin g with other chefs (such as the Summer Chef Series you are hosting this summer). What is it about teaming up with other chefs that appeals to you?A: I love having the opportunity to continue my education through working with other talented chefs. I think chefs are more willing to share ideas and experiences now than they were years ago. This form of communication has been a lot of fun for me. The Summer Chef Series has helped build great relationships with local chefs and resulted in creative dining experiences for our guests. Q: What ingredients could you simpl y not cook without? A: Fresh seafood, sea salt (all different types), seasonal produce and love Q: What are you likely to eat on a ni gh t off? A: Normally, I eat out and try different restaurants any chance I get. I will order the most creative dishes I can find and try new flavors. Im a huge fan of artisanal cheeses, truffles, foie gras, lobster, gnocchi, fall flavors and, I have to admit, I have a big sweet tooth. Q: What are your hobbies? A: I en jo y riding my BMW K 1200 RS motorcycle, playing golf and basketball, dining, of course, and investing in the real estate and stock markets. Q: Whats your favorite meal? A: A g l ass of pinot noir or a good sherry paired with a perfectly balanced paella containing all sorts of shellfish, chorizo, saffron, olives, tomato, garlic and spices Q: How do you view the relati o nship of food and wine? A: I believe they truly need each other. I enjoy exploring the synergies and contrasts in all the possibilities that food and wine have to offer. I believe that one can enhance the other in so many ways. Wine brings a certain dynamic to a dish that would not be achievable without it. karenFELDMAN cuisine@floridaweekly.com food & wine CALENDAR Thursday, Aug. 18, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Bethan y Taits cottage: Holistic health coach Bethany Tait hosts a birthday raw food potluck party and demonstrates how to make raw strawberry pie; bring a raw food dish to share; 864 106th Ave. N.; 216-3468. Reservations required. Friday, Aug. 19, 6-8 p.m., Whole F oods: T ake part in the first of whats planned to be monthly beer tastings with beverage specialist Joe Pais; $5, Mercato; 552-5100. Saturday, Aug. 20, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., T he Good Life of Naples: Shelly Connors demonstrates how to make Chinese dim sum; $25, 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road; 514-4663. Reservations required. Thursday, Aug. 18, 6-8 p .m., Cru Lounge: 15 beers youve never tasted, plus hors douevres to match; $15, Bell Tower Shops; 466-3663. Wednesday, Aug. 24, 11 a.m.-1 p .m., Fleming s: Take part in a cooking class and three-course meal hosted by Chef David Gosset. This months theme: fresh and healthy dishes; $35, 8985 Tamiami Trail N.; 598-2424. Reservations required. Wednesday, Aug. 24, 6-8 p.m., T he Good Lif e of Naples: Shelly Connors demonstrates how to make dishes that keep you cool in the kitchen; $50, 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road; 514-4663. Reservations required. Thursday, Aug. 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m., ABC Fine W ine & Spirits: 5Join fellow wine lovers to taste up to 50 varieties along with hors doeuvres. Receive a complimentary wine glass, chat with the stores wine experts and sample a cigar (outdoors); $10, 1000 Crosspoint Drive; 596-5434. Saturday, Aug. 27, 9-11 a.m., Ridgwa y Bar & Grill: Chef/owner Tony Ridgway helps students move beyond the four tastes sweet, salty, bitter and sour to the fifth taste, umami, a savory flavor found in a wealth of food. Students will participate in a blind tasting of several foods to test flavor identification skills and will cook a variety of entrees; $75, 1300 Third St. S.; 262-5500 or visit www. ridgwaynaples.com.Farmers markets Friday, 11 a.m.-2 p .m., the Government Complex farmers market, 3335 U.S. 41 E. Saturday, 7:30-11:30 a.m., T hird Street South, behind Tommy Bahamas between Third Street and Gordon Drive. Saturday, 8 a.m.-1 p .m., North Naples Green Market, in the Fright Factory at Olympic Plaza, 2320 Vanderbilt Beach Road behind Liberty Bank. Saturday, 7 a.m.-noon, the B onita Springs Lions Club farm market, The Promenade, 26851 South Bay Drive, Bonita Springs. Saturday, 8 a.m.-noon, Fr eedom Park farmers market, 151 Golden Gate Parkway. Send items to cuisine@floridaweekly.comFLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE M Waterfront Grilles chef views world as his culinary classroom o vernme nt U .S. 41 E VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYBrian Roland at M Waterfront Grille in Naples, where hes been the executive chef since 2008. p a n d c es e nn d n tng m y I u r d d y for guiding me and molding me into Q A t o a th be ot ce n o

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