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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Naples, FL
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Naples (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Collier County -- Naples

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 2-8, 2008)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038797485 ( OCLC )
2018226752 ( LCCN )
on1038797485
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AN1.F6 N37 F56 ( lcc )

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ROGER WILLIAMS A2 OPINION A4 NEWS OF THE WEIRD A11 HEALTHY LIVING A22 PETS A25 MOTLEY FOOL B6 REAL ESTATE B11 EVENTS C6-7 FILM REVIEW C11 ANTIQUES C12 SAVE THE DATE C18-19 VINO & CUISINE C22-23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. III, No. 42 FREE WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. Whatll it be?A celebrity bartender at Shulas, and more fun around town. C20-21 Marking a milestoneBusinesses that launched during tough times. B1 Nonprofit newsFrom health clinic to art center, theres a lot to report. A16 The write stuffWordsmiths respond in writing to Florida Weeklys newest challenge. C15 The Naples Airport Authority has voted unanimously to provide space at Naples Municipal Airport for the Museum of Military Memorabilia. The museum is constructing display cases for photos, medals, flight jackets, uniforms, newspaper clippings and as many as 500 of the museums 10,000 artifacts. Aircraft models also will be showcased in the 900-square-foot space in the airports commercial service terminal along North Road. We plan to have a small display set up for the month of August to coincide with Keep the Spirit of 5 Alive observances, and we are planning the museums grand opening for Veterans Day, Nov. 11, says Robert McDonald, who has served asAirport will house Museum of Military MemorabiliaSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYSEE AIRPORT, A20 w w w w w w ww w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w.FloridaWeekl y 1 27 20 11 L SING IT!BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com Lets chew the fat (but not literally). These days more than ever were sitting fat and happy. Or more likely, fat and unhappy. Almost two out of three people living in the Sunshine State are fat cats, defined by our very own state Department of Health either as obese or overweight. Obese: 30 pounds or more above the prescribed healthy weight for a given height, which describes about 26.1 percent of Floridas population of 19 million, or roughly 4.95 million citizens. Overweight: as much as 29 pounds over the prescribed healthy weight for a given height. A rough gauge of healthy weight in adults might be about 2.5 pounds per inch, or 180 pounds for a 6-foot-tall guy, according to generally accepted medical guidelines. By that standard, 38 percent, or about 7.22 million people in Florida, arise every morning resigned to carry excess baggage through the day. And why? Because weve been COURTESY PHOTOSChristina Heweker shed pounds with the four-stage Nuviva Medical Weight Loss program. 52 52 LOST LOST LBS. LBS. r a s 29 m i g h t i n c 6g 7 F i n b a g A n d Strategies for losing weight and keeping it offA8&9 >>inside:Stories from the front lines of the fight against fat COURTESY PHOTO Naples Municipal AirportSEE LOSING IT, A8

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Here it is, the third week in July. Lets pretend that the events of any one time and place are separated from the events of another neither by history, clocks or calendars, nor even by a shapeshift of eternal matter (our bodies into earth, wind, water and fire), but merely by a breath or two. In that case, for me, branding season is upon us. Every year about this time on the cattle ranch where my mother grew up, men and some women who could ride any horse over any terrain herded cows and calves off their spring ranges into corrals built with good pens and chutes. The work folded each late-July dawn into days end like cream into milk, with one break: At noon, my Aunt Louise and her daughters (those who werent riding or branding with the men) would arrive to serve dinner, with roasts and potatoes, green beans and corn, pies and bread and cold tea, all laid out in the back of a pickup truck.Suddenly, work would stop. In a near rush, cowhands would abandon the corrals and pine-board cattle chutes and barrel fires with their branding irons. First, theyd water and tether their hard-working horses. Then a line would form at the hand pump to wash up, one man jacking the handle and another splashing the icy torrent on hands, face, head and neck.Soon they were eating quietly, I think in deference to my laconic uncle, B.F. Nash, who ran the operation and cared nothing for noise or frivolous talk. That meant the mountain silence resumed its near-deafening symphony, inaudible all morning. Then, the music had been lost to the nervous bawling of calves and their protective mothers skittish and mean after months on the range or to the short, sharp shouts, whistles and whoops of cowhands that rose in a spray of verbal punctuation above the corrals. At noon, the buzz of flies or passing bees serenaded us like tightly bowed fiddles, and even the faintest breeze caressing pines or aspens a thousand yards away rendered a whispering chorus that might have carried both the breath and the dreams of the Ute Indians who once hunted across those summer mountains. But that was before we got there with our busy-ness and beef. When I was young we regularly found Ute arrowheads or the flint grinders they used to chip them, and occasionally their small spear tips, which turned up after any summer rain.Now the Utes are gone but so are the cowhands of my youth, at least up there at 9,000 feet west of Pikes Peak, Colo. Once, it took about 40 acres to support a single cow. Now, it takes a rich person with a second house to support about 40 acres.Where have the cows all gone? Somewhere, thats for sure, since beef is still the bomb in supermarkets. Theyve gone to feed lots or ranches where no range is required the kind that you smell miles before you see. And to Mexico or Argentina, which sell us their meat.And to Southwest Florida, which sells somebody else our meat.All over our wet summer fields here I cant see cows and their new calves without feeling ambivalent. On the one hand, I take strong pleasure from the sight of a little calf head-butting its mothers sack to draw down the milk, and then sucking greedily.On the other hand, Im frustrated when I see cows in another form butchered, cleaned and shrink-wrapped to swell the meat freezers of Publix or Winn-Dixie in a juicy salute to American opulence. Thats because we arent eating our local animals ourselves, which is patently absurd. In any given year, Charlotte County beefers (let me call them that) raise and sell about 19,000 head of cattle, Lee County beefers account for about 14,000 head, and Collier County beefers maintain roughly 9,000 head, according to the state Department of Agriculture. Instead of feeding us, those cows will become beef in a market somewhere faraway, after saving often wealthy landowners here a big bite of property taxes by securing agricultural tax exemptions for them. Mostly the problem comes down to this: The beef culture has gotten way out of hand. We like fat beef nowadays, the fatter the better, but the unwieldy and destructive system established to create fat beef is untenable. Start with this fact: It takes roughly five pounds of grain to put a pound of weight on a cow in a feedlot. To sell fat beef, you have to perform the following ceremony of the ridiculous: A) Grow all that extra grain somewhere (not Florida, where the soil is poor) using huge farm machines and gasoline produced mostly in Saudi Arabia. B) Ship the cows to the grain region for their final fattening, since the grainweight to cow-weight ratio makes it cheaper to do so. That requires lots of gasoline, huge possum-belly trucks and expensive, well-maintained highways. C) Butcher the cows, package the meat and ship it out to faraway stores, since most people in the nation dont live near feedlots. That requires even more gasoline, lots of refrigerated trucks and wellmaintained highways. And finally: D) Sell the beef at a price that supports that absurd system. Among the unnecessary consequences of such a system are overweight citizens and a continuing reliance on gasoline. Why do we do this to ourselves? We could save money, get healthier and enjoy a leaner, grass-fed beef all at the same time, simply by killing this system with good business. A few here in Florida already have the right idea. Go to www.eatwild.com and youll find a handful of farms or little ranches that sell local, grass-fed beef. They arent close enough to us, however (most are in central or north Florida), and its not enough. Local beef stands should be as prominent here as farm stands. We should never again have to buy fatty meat produced who-knows-where and butchered off some Midwestern feedlot.Then we could celebrate a culinary ceremony of the reasonable, not remain enslaved to a ceremony of the ridiculous. COMMENTARY Ceremony of the ridiculous rogerWILLIAMS rwilliams@floridaweekly.com COMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACING DREAM KITCHENS | CUSTOM CLOSETS | LUXURIOUS BATHROOMS Dont MoveIMPROVE!Kitchen Refacing at Half the Cost of New Cabinets & More. 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The use of birdcages, books and plants adds life to your room, and gives the room a lived in feeling. Domnick MinellaLicensed Interior Designer Chairman National Interior Design Society License ID 0004346Design Tip: T T a liv a liv g g. Designed to t your life.www.NorrisHomeFurnishings.com(239) 690-9844 14125 South Tamiami Trail Fort Myers (239) 579-0412 1025 Periwinkle Way Sanibel COMING SOON 5015 Tamiami Trail North Naples SALE of SummerLarry Norris

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 PublisherShelley Lundslund@floridaweekly.comManaging EditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsLois Bolin Bill Cornwell Karen Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Bernadette La Paglia Dennis Goodman Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald Bob RaymondCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comProduction ManagerKim Boone kboone@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersPaul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Hope Jason Nick BearCirculation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Masse nmasse@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Jeff Jerome jjerome@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantSandi HughesBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2011 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $29.95 in-county$49.95 in-state $54.95 out-of-state OPINION President Barack Obama just announced a reversal of a long-standing policy that denied presidential condolence letters to the family members of soldiers who commit suicide. Relatives of soldiers killed in action receive letters from the president. Official silence, however, has long stigmatized those who die of self-inflicted wounds. The change marks a long-overdue shift in the recognition of the epidemic of soldier and veteran suicides in this country and the toll of the hidden wounds of war. The denial of condolence letters was brought to national prominence when Gregg and Jannett Keesling spoke about the suicide of their son, Chancellor Keesling. Chance Keesling joined the Army in 2003. After active duty in Iraq, he moved to the Army Reserves, and was called back for a second deployment in April 2009. The years of war had taken a toll on the 25-year-old. As his father, Gregg, told me: He was trained for the rebuilding of Iraq. He was a combat engineer. He operated big equipment and loved to run the big equipment. Finally, he was retrained as a tactical gunner sitting on top of a Humvee. Because there was really very little rebuilding going on. When Chance came home, he sought mental-health treatment from Veterans Affairs. His marriage had failed, and he knew he needed to heal. He turned down the Armys offer of a $27,000 bonus to redeploy. Ultimately, he was sent back to Iraq anyway. Two months after being redeployed there, Chance took his gun into a latrine and shot himself. The Pentagon reported his death due to a non-combat related incident. Adding insult to the injury, the VA, five months after his death, sent Chance a letter that his parents received, asking him to complete his Post Deployment Adjustment. Kevin and Joyce Lucey understand. Their son, Jeffrey, participated in the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Afterward, back home in Massachusetts, he showed signs of post-traumatic stress disorder. He and his family found it next to impossible to get needed services from the VA. Jeffrey turned to self-medication with alcohol. He would dress in camouflage and walk the neighborhood, gun in hand. He totaled the family car. One night following his 23rd birthday, Jeffrey curled up in his fathers lap, distraught. As Kevin recalled to me this week: That night he asked if he could sit in my lap, and we rocked for about 45 minutes and then he went to his room. The following day on June 22, he once again was in my lap as I was cutting him down from the beams. Jeffrey hanged himself in the Luceys basement. On his bed were the dog tags taken from Iraqi soldiers whom he said he had killed. Since Jeffrey was technically a veteran and not active duty, his suicide is among the suspected thousands. Kevin Lucey summarized, in frustration: The formal count of suicides that you hear is tremendously underestimated. ... Jeffs suicide is among the uncounted, the unknown, the unacknowledged. We have heard of presidential study commissions being established almost every year. How often do you have to study a suicide epidemic? There is no system for keeping track of veteran suicides. Some epidemiological studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others suggest that the suicide rate among veterans is seven to eight times higher than in the general population. One report, from 2005 and limited to 16 states, found that veteran suicides comprised 20 percent of the total, an extraordinary finding, given that veterans make up less than 1 percent of the population. PTSD is now thought to afflict up to 30 percent of close to 2 million active-duty soldiers and veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Unemployment among young male veterans is now over 22 percent. Take one base: Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Nidal Hasan faces the death penalty for allegedly murdering 13 people there in November 2009, a horrific attack heavily spotlighted by the media. Less well known is the epidemic of suicides at the base. Twenty-two people took their own lives there in 2010 alone. Neither the Luceys nor the Keeslings will get a presidential condolence letter, despite the policy change. The Keeslings wont get it because the decision is not retroactive. The Luceys wouldnt anyway because it narrowly app lies only to those suicides by active-duty soldiers deployed in what is considered an active combat zone. Sadly, those with PTSD can leave the war zone, but the war zone never leaves them. Some see suicide as their only escape. They, too, are casualties of war. Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 800 stations in North America. She is the author of Breaking the Sound Barrier, recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.Soldier suicides and the politics of presidential condolencesThe White House made House Speaker John Boehner an offer he could refuse: to become the tax collector for President Barack Obamas entitlement state. The so-called grand bargain that Boehner eschewed wasnt so grand. It would have raised taxes by $1 trillion while leaving untouched the federal governments newest unsustainable entitlement program, ObamaCare, and preserving the bankrupting structure of the legacy entitlement programs. It was a formula for more revenue chasing ever-higher levels of government expenditure. The health-care bill already raised taxes by more than $400 billion over the next 10 years, although thats still not enough to truly cover ObamaCare. The president wanted another round of new taxes layered on top without giving up fundamental ground on entitlement reform. This wasnt a balanced approach. It was a proposed continuation of President Obamas fiscal policy under bipartisan auspices. Yes, the White House was willing to endorse cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. In all likelihood, they would have ended up as the dubious cuts that are the typical stuff of Beltway budgetary legerdemain. Reductions in payment rates and the like may produce savings on paper, but they rarely materialize. To sign off on such a deal, Boehner would have put his imprimatur on a substantive fizzle while signaling his own political death wish. The tea party would have been after him like a Redcoat after the Boston Massacre; hed be fortunate that tarring and feathering is out of style. The two parties have a conflict of visions. Republicans view the current levels of spending an astonishing 24 percent of GDP as a bizarre exception to peacetime norms in America. Democrats view it as the new normal. For them, any reduction in the inexorable growth of the entitlement state is a cruel betrayal. The press loves the idea of men of good will working behind closed doors to hammer out their differences. Yet some differences are too great for resolution in a few negotiating sessions. The election of 2012 is the necessary and proper forum for deciding the nations fiscal direction. After his historic spending bender in league with Nancy Pelosi and Co., President Obama wants a less spendthrift and less partisan image. He needs a deficit deal with the biggest headline number possible, and he needs to be seen to be working with Republicans. The grand bargain or, failing that, any bargain is in his political interest. By stating categorically a deal will get done by the administrations deadline of Aug. 2, hes put his credibility on the line. Hes ceded important rhetorical ground by aping the Republican argument that the deficit is harming the economy. Altogether, he appears ripe to be rolled. All the more reason for Republicans to insist on a deal on their terms no new taxes, and spending cuts to match the dollar amount of the increase in the debt limit. Ultimately, this is just a small patch on the red ink created by the recession and President Obamas profligacy. If the president wants massive new taxes to address it, he can make the case for them without John Boehners complicity. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.The not-so-grand bargain amyGOODMAN Special to Florida Weekly richLOWRY Special to Florida Weekly

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 THE FIRST TO BRING YOU THE...Softec HD LensThe Softec HD is the newest cataract replacement lens available, from the most experienced ophthalmology team in S.W Florida.It is designed to be the World's Most Accurate Lens and is three times more precise, to more closely match your vision needs. And best of all, it is covered by Medicare and most insurance plans.Bonita Springs 26831 S. Tamiami Trl.239.992.1422 www.ecof.comDavid C. Brown, M.D., F.A.C.S.Founder and Medical Director Ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon Barrett R. Ginsberg, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmologist Cataract Surgeon Laser Vision Correction Naples 2352 Pine Ridge Rd.239.263.2700 North Naples 877 111th Ave., Unit 2239.591.2949 INTEGRATED PHYSICAL THERAPY COLD LASER THERAPY CUSTOM NAIL LASER FOR FUNGAL NAILS SHOCKWAVE THERAPY FOR DIFFICULT ACHILLES/HEEL PAIN INGROWN TOENAILSNew York School of Podiatric Medicine Golden Key Honors SocietyUniversity of FloridaShands Department of Orthopedics / PodiatryUniversity of Florida Orthopedics : Education Award Outstanding Chief ResidentNEW PATIENTS WELCOMEwww.NaplesPodiatrist.comEmergencies and Same-Day Appointment Available Of ce Hours: Monday through Friday WELCOME DR. SADIA ALI, DPM! OUR RESULTS WALK FOR THEMSELVESDowntown Naples239.430.FOOT {3668}Goodlette Medical Park 661 Goodlette Road, Suite 103 15 MINUTES Protecting South Floridas water and freedom for allSome people have names that seem poetically matched to their jobs. Such is the case with Clarence Tears, who has had two long careers, one protecting South Floridas water and the other serving national security interests. The name is the polar opposite of his personality, which is not the least bit weepy its professional, and helpful in an unassuming way. But tears could suggest hard work, which he does, or be a metaphor for water in our region, so affected as it has been by development. Mr. Tears has been director of the Big Cypress Basin Service Center, a leader of massive, long-term projects such as the Picayune Strand Restoration, since 1996. Tears could also suggest the perils of defending a free country. During missions to the Middle East, including in the 1990s, Mr. Tears lived on military bases that sometimes came under attack. Mortar attacks were the most common. Its something he learned to live with, an acceptance of a dangerous situation. There is a point where it becomes like the luck of the draw, he says. Theres a fine line between life and death, and theres a point where you just become relaxed in the environment youre in. Some of those missions took place during his tenure as Command Master Sgt. Tears at Homestead Air Reserve Base near Miami, a position he assumed in 2007 after first becoming an Air Force reservist in 1984. Upon his retirement from Homestead this year, he left behind a military career that spanned 33 years. Holding the top enlisted spot at the base meant overseeing more than 1,300 personnel and a squadron of fighter jets. Technically, its a part-time position, but the hours Mr. Tears put in nights, evenings, weekends and on trips overseas made it closer to a full-time job.His responsibilities included organizing military and humanitarian efforts toward supporting the U.S. governments War on Terror, responding to the earthquake in Haiti and building schools and hospitals in third world countries. Mr. Tears grew up in a working class neighborhood in Greece, N.Y., a suburb of Rochester. His father left home before he was old enough to start school. He always had a part-time job shoveling snow, cutting grass, delivering papers.When he was 15, he moved out in order to ease the burden on his mother, who was struggling to support three children. After high school, he joined the Marine Corps for three years, 1976 to 9, and was sent to the Marine base in Honolulu. Later he studied business and engineering on the G.I. Bill.Not wanting to go back north after Hawaii and remembering that people who had money vacationed in Florida when he was growing up he moved to Port Charlotte and met his wife, Jean. Shes a nurse, and they have two daughters. When they moved to Miami for better opportunities in nursing, Mr. Tears played Mr. Mom for a while. Near the time he began as an Air Force reservist, he also went to work developing operational programs at the South Florida Water Management District, for which he commuted to an office in Naples. The Tears family moved back across the state, to Naples, in 1996, after he landed the position as director of the Big Cypress Basin Service Center. His work has included the Picayune Strand Restoration, a project that began in the 1980s. The installation of pump systems that will reduce flooding started a few years ago, and the first pump station should be finished by the end of this year. This office and all the staff here was instrumental in making that project move forward, Mr. Tears says. Another project entailed moving 6 million cubic yards (about 365,000 semi-truck loads) of muck or organic material out of Lake Trafford, a 14-year project that was completed last year. It impacts the aquatic life and all the migratory birds, Mr. Tears says. My grandkids and your grandkids will really enjoy that restoration. I think theres just great opportunities to protect what we have. Such work costs millions to complete and requires garnering public support. There were a lot of barbecues to get the public involved, he says about the Lake Trafford project. Mr. Tears turns 53 in August. Although hes been at his job for years, the complexity of the water system running through the Everglades still surprises him at times. Im still learning, he says. He plays tennis to stay in shape (and looks it), and enjoys dining out with his wife whenever they have the chance especially in the slow summer season, he says, when full-time Floridians have more space to themselves. He doesnt even mind the sauna-like weather. Meanwhile, he keeps a close eye on the basin and its surrounding waterways, maintaining and protecting them wherever possible. Mr. Tears looks at water in South Florida holistically: Every piece affects another piece. I probably see things differently, he admits. If I drive around and see vegetation in the canals, I know the impacts. Its satisfying to think were trying to protect the things other people and I enjoy. EVAN WILLIAMS / FLORIDA WEEKLYClarence Tears at the Big Cypress Basin Service Center, where he has been director since 1996. BY EVAN WILLIAMS ____________________ewilliams@ oridaweekly.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 living off the fat of the land, or such standins for the milk-and-honey life as fast food restaurants, for example. (Maybe we should just dispense with the s in fast and call them fat food restaurants.) In any case, we eat too much too much in the way of high-energy foods loaded with sugars and fats. While thats not news to anybody, this might be: A fat lot of good it will do us to worry about it now. It really will. Thats because all of it can be changed, and now is preferable to later, given the bleak health prognoses for those who dont. After all, the opera aint over til the fat lady sings. And these days the proverbial fat lady can become the much more slender lady before she reaches the final note, as Florida Weekly discovered last week by talking to people who were once obese, or who work with the overweight or obese. For them, food has been more than a source of sustenance and pleasure. Its also been a dangerous and powerful addiction. You can stop drinking, you can stop doing drugs and you can stop smoking, points out Jamie Carmichael, an actor whos appeared at Gulfshore Playhouse in Naples, at Florida Repertory Theatre and Theatre Conspiracy in Fort Myers, as well as in other regional theaters. With every other vice, you can cut it off and live your life. But you cant not eat again. Next month, Aug. 16 to be exact, will mark the end of the second year that the 6-foot, 1-inch Mr. Carmichael, now 32, has managed to remain at least 100 pounds under his maximum weight, he says. Currently he weighs 160 pounds less than the 367-pound weight he had reached by the beginning of 2009.Setting the stageHis story and countless others are set against a backdrop of bad news. In an annual study released two weeks ago, F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens Americas Future 2011, by the Trust for Americas Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Florida ranked 29th among the 50 United States and the District of Columbia for obesity. First on the list is Mississippi, with 34.4 percent of the population ranked not just overweight, but obese. Of the nine most obese states, seven are considered Southern and the other two are close (Arkansas and Oklahoma). The District of Columbia and Colorado rank as the least obese, with Colorado coming in last on the list at a 19.8 percent obesity rate. Which is no reason to celebrate, even in Colorado. To show how much things have changed quickly, the study notes that a mere 16 years ago, in 1995, contemporary Colorado would have ranked at the top of the list of states for obesity. In Southwest Florida, meanwhile, we reflect both state and national trends in our numbers, which appear county by county at www.FloridaCHARTS.com (click on county and state profiles). CHARTS is an acronym for Community Health Assessment Resource Toolset. In both Collier and Charlotte counties, 59.6 percent of the population is overweight, up about 3 percent since 2002. In Lee, the figure is 63.7 percent. Many strategies designed to slow or halt this behemoth American problem one universally accepted by politicians and health experts of every stripe and discipline as among the most costly and dangerous weve ever faced are regularly kicked around at federal, state and local levels by both public and private organizations. Change is in the wind, while calories remain on the ground. Changing policies is an important way to provide children and families with vital resources and opportunities to make healthier choices easier in their day-to-day lives, says Dr. Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nonprofit that devotes itself to American health. Creating healthy environments is key to reversing the obesity epidemic, particularly for children, Dr. Lavizzo-Mourey adds. When children have safe places to walk, bike and play in their communities, theyre more likely to be active and less likely to be obese. Its the same with healthy food: When communities have access to healthy affordable foods, families eat better. With or without those resources, however, the choice about weight always comes down to the decision of one person, a single soul fed up with the problem who chooses, alone or with help, to solve it. Some go it alone and succeed. Many others seek support from such public programs as the 12-week Biggest Losers competition (for cash prizes) at the Charlotte County Cultural Centers Fitness Salon, or franchise programs supervised by medical doctors and a variety of staff. A growing medical trend has local doctors buying weight-loss clinics to boost sinking revenue and more properly treat overweight patients, according to Frank Graff, a marketer for Medi-Weightloss Clinics. Americans spend $150 billion on weight-loss products and services every year, and local physicians, many who are seeing revenue steadily decline, want a piece of the pie in the right portion of course. Weight loss American-style might be an exercise in big business, but its also an exercise in big thought. Thinking the mere act of thinking about food could be as important as reducing consumption of poor food or exercising. I had one client coming in regularly on the program and one day she arrived with her child, recalls Alex Joseph, a co-founder and co-owner of Nuviva Medical Weight Loss, with two offices in Naples and one each in Fort Myers, Sarasota, Orlando and Boca Raton. She had her child carrying a McDonalds Happy Meal. I thought, What are you doing giving your kid that stuff when youre trying to change the way food affects your life? She wasnt thinking. But many are thinking. Here is a glimpse of what and how.The lone rangerBig, red-haired, freckled, chubby, the son of a cop and an educator who grew up middle-class and comfortable. Thats how Jamie Carmichael characterizes himself. I had an average upbringing. We never went hungry. We ate at home. My parents werent like granola health nuts, but we didnt eat Twinkies every day, either. I was always a tall kid. In my family, everybody is broad-shouldered. Were big guys, were not small-boned people. Which was OK until middle school, when he started to put on weight. Blessed with a quick wit, he sharpened it even more and became a comedian of sorts, making a joke of his size. His journey was rugged. At times, he tried to take control of his problem by following such programs as WeightWatchers or the Atkins diet, which became hugely popular more than a decade ago, even before the South Beach diet. On Atkins, he says, he lost 80 pounds but eventually gained it all back, and more. Although he loves character acting, he became typecast only for roles that required a funny fat man. And he suffered humiliating personal moments. He lost a job, and he also lost his respect at the county fair one day, when he climbed on a ride he couldnt get out of. They had to break me out of the seat it was one of the most embarrassing things that ever happened to me, he recalls. So things had to change. I decided I would lose 100 pounds by my 30th birthday. I did my own thing. First of all, I knew I had to change the way I thought about food. When I write my book and put out my instructional videos someday, this will be the key concept. People always joke that when youre heavy, you think about food and eating all the time. But its the polar opposite. I never thought about it. Id skip breakfast, grab a lunch from wherever and however, whatever was cheap, fast and flexible, and go from there. I put no thought into it. Now that hes much thinner, however, he thinks about food all the time. I think, If Im here or there I need to bring this or that, to eat. If Im going to a family barbecue, I have to bring the chicken I can eat, and I have to think about it ahead of time. I gave up fast food, for the most part. I stopped basically eating a lot of the complex carbs. As disciplined and thoughtful as he is about food, Mr. Carmichael is the opposite when it comes to formal exercise. I only worked out for three months steadily, he says, adding this note of wry self-awareness to that revelation: The doctors are going to kill me for saying that. Instead of exercise, which he considers work, he plays. I like to be active. I like to go swimming with my niece and nephews. I play kickball with my friends. I walk or ride a bike. I play like a kid would play in golf or on a beach. But I will not walk on an endless machine to nowhere. He still goes to Dairy Queen occasionally. He still goes to the Chinese restaurant. And he still eats chicken wings but not 25 or 30, along with a basket of fries. Now he might eat six. I dont deprive myself. I dont control myself, he says. Those arent the right words. Trainer to the braveTed Robedee is the fitness salon manager at the Cultural Center of Charlotte County, which means he inherits the brave and the publicly committed just the kind he likes. After all, suggests this high-energy 50-year-old with the endless optimism of a kid, it takes a kind of courage and commitment to do two things: admit you have a weight problem, possibly a big one, and admit it in public. You can look in a mirror and know you have a weight problem every day, but to go out in public and say, I need help, this has to change that takes real courage. Right now hes working with about 76 such people ranging in age from 28 to 68 or older, and every one of them a Big Loser. Divided into teams of three, nine of those people, each representing their three-person team, will win the proud title of the Biggest Losers come September in the 12-week competition sponsored by area businesses. The three winning teams will take home cash. Clearly, high ambition is not a weakness for Mr. Robedee. Im trying to get these people to commit to a lifelong weight control system, he explains. Lifelong, perhaps, but a system each person must take a day at a time or more accurately, four or five days a week, at a time. Along with staff and volunteers, including a nutritionist who helps sponsor the program, Mr. Robedee designs a pattern of exercise and diet for each person. This is a commitment, he says. Thats the only way to be successful, to really change your lifestyle. You have to get out and do something, and you have to be committed. Its a commitment, however, that does not require anyone to move too quickly or try too hard, at first. But haste and eagerness often become the problem with those who have hit bottom and want results. I tell them to start off sl owly, Mr. Robedee says. So many people will just jump into this thing and go from doing nothing to doing everything all at once, and they dont develop good habits, and finally they quit. You have to modify this, you have to start off slowly. When it comes to weight loss, the most important thing is cardiovascular, with a proper diet. I can work with you all day but if you go home and have two pizzas, I cant help you. We see some people come back again and again. Theyll come in for a 12-week period, lose 20 or 30 or 40 pounds, and then go back to their lifestyle.Triumphant veteranAt 59, former competitive swimmer ad now a celebrated educator and principal of Cypress Lake Middle School in Fort Myers, Jeananne Folaros is a realist. And like most or perhaps all who finally succeed at controlling their weight after its controlled them, shes careful not to exaggerate, and not to claim her own path as the way to success for anyone else. At the same time, she has a lot to share, and will. Not only has she dropped 100 pounds, but shes kept it off and discovered a lifestyle that works for her. Ms. Folaros started, this time, with a program that provides both medical and nutritional support, as well as an exercise plan. That helped her light the fuse. After six months she quit that program (Nuviva) to take up her own march at a gym (Omni) with the help of a trainer. Before she lost the weight, she was flirting with diabetes and other physical problems that can lead to early mortality. It started young and inexplicably. Ms. Folaros grew up in Fort Myers in what she describes as a typical 1950s-era house. We had three meals a day, and we never had a weight problem. There was activity and exercise all the time. In those days, she says, Your mother kicked you out of the house about 9 a.m. to ride your bike. Kids didnt sit around watching television. COURTESY PHOTOSJamie Carmichael before, left, and after he lost 160 pounds.LOSING ITFrom page 1

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 NEWS A9 Offer ends 9/30/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers in se lect areas only. The $35.99 monthly rate applies to Prism TV package for the rst six (6) months of service with a minimum ser vice commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. The stated monthly rate of under $90 applies to Local Calling service and High-Speed Internet, up to 1.5 Mbps speed, bundled with Prism T V package and applies for the rst six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism TV package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees and surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approv al and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rate s. Call 866.960.7089 for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. High-Speed Internet (HSI) As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recur ring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. 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Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial in stallation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. True Grit: 2011 PARAMOUNT PICTURES. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Test-drive all of our features at seeprismtv.com. Whole Home DVR Find-It-Fast Navigation Picture-In-Picture Navigation Video Caller IDFeatures that outshine cable and satellite. T T T T e e e e s s s s t t t t t d d d d d r r r i i i i v v v e e e e 2 2 2 2 w w w a a a a y y y y y s s s s in store: 6438 Naples Blvd., Naples online: seeprismtv.comCall 866.366.7935 Edge-of-your-seat TV has arrived. And with TV packages starting at $35.99 a month for six months or bundle TV, High-Speed Internet and Voice for under $90 a month for six months its time to give your TV and family what they really want. Prism. HD HD & & W W ho ho le le Ho Ho Ho me me me D D D VR VR VR fo fo r r 6 6 mo mo nt nt hs hs ! This is TV worth switching for.Introducing CenturyLinkTM PrismTM c tureI n-P ictu r Nav iga tion In her adult life, she gained weight rapidly. But on at least two earlier occasions, she lost many pounds. Ive had long runs of time, years under control. I might fall off the wagon, but I was able to get back on the next day. But during one eight-year period, she spiraled steadily downward, as she puts it. The worse shape youre in, the more you suffer lethargy, chronic depression and the physical problems. Theyre all connected. So now shes a wary but determined veteran of the hard ride. When she started this time, she feared the success shed had at an earlier age wouldnt come to her again. I was afraid to begin. What if I couldnt succeed? She cut out her habitual restaurant dinners after long days at work. She began to buy and prepare food at home. She wrote down and tracked what she was eating. She always had been able to put on weight and take it off. Now, she sought balance. I started 13 months ago and Im in a great place right now. At the end of six months, I left Nuviva and went into the gym. I was financially able to go to a medical weight loss place and to work with a trainer in the gym, and those are luxuries I didnt have before. Both have been accelerators for me. In a normal day, Ill take in about 1,400 calories. I cant buy into breakfast, so Ill drink a pot of coffee. Then about 11 a.m. I have soup theres a lot of soup and salad. Ive probably eaten Mt. Rushmore in pretzels. But like she varies her forms of exercise, she also changes the food she eats to keep it interesting. Part of her satisfaction these days lies in the fulfillment of her obligations as both mother and teacher, too. Shes setting a splendid example for a generation of young people prone to being overweight or obese. You want to be a good model for them, she says. And for others, as well. If youre 59 and you think its too late... well, it might not be.The program manWhen Alex Joseph and Dr. Brian Acrement, a vascular cardiologist, opened the Human Longevity Performance Center in 2006 to help men and women suffering from menopausal or testosterone deficiencies and other age-related problems, they thought they had discovered their niche. But they thought wrong. By 2008, theyd started Nuvivia Medical Weight Loss in Fort Myers, before franchising the business and the model with stores in Naples and points north and east. Weight loss became the primary focus, and aging issues the secondary focus. They based the model on Medi-Weightloss, another franchise company that offers doctor-patient consultations and individually designed real food diets, along with vitamin injections, supplements and sometimes appetite suppressants. What makes us different is that every patient has to see a physician and get blood work we look at patients from their thyroid to their metabolic profile, says Mr. Joseph. The company uses six principles in four phases. The principles, or tools: medications, supplements, education, support, diet and exercise. The phases: Well, they start slowly and carefully with a one-week detoxification. They have a week to go home and start the program, start cleansing eating clean healthy fruits and vegetables, proteins, and getting rid of pent-up sugars from carbohydrate intake. Youre not on the toilet for a week, I dont mean that. Youre just cleaning yourself out. Then you come back and see a doctor and take a physical exam. Once participants are given the good-to-go, the program begins seriously with phase two, which can last from one to six weeks. Patients pay $150 to start, which includes a visit with the doctor, an EKG and supplements, and then $100 a week thereafter ($85 for teachers, firefighters, police officers or military servicemen and women). During phase two, we add four supplements, Mr. Joseph says. Those include multivitamins, potassium, glucose support, which Nuviva created to help control insulin secretions from the pancreas as patients cut sugar intake, and a weekly injection of vitamin B12 and an amino acid complex. That helps the body burn fat, Mr. Joseph says. There is also an appetite suppressant that can be used in phase two. With phase three comes another fatburning supplement called HCG, produced naturally in the female placenta during pregnancy to enable the mother to provide body fat as an energy source for the fetus, Mr. Joseph says. Since it hasnt been studied long-term by the FDA, it doesnt come with that agencys approval, he adds. During this phase, the food choices are completely open. But heres the catch: Patients are limited to 600 calories a day, and no more than 200 at any one meal. Finally, in phase four, Nuviva identifies the level of nutrition and calories the body can sustain without gaining or losing any more weight, Mr. Joseph explains. Phase four defines us as something different, at least in our minds. Exercise, of course, is a key to living with a healthy diet, but Nuviva is not an exercise salon. It works for many, says Mr. Joseph, in part because theyre paying good money, theyre coming in and they feel obligated to make it work. Ive seen stories you wouldnt believe if youre not morbidly obese people who couldnt fly on an airplane, or sit next to their child on a ride in Disney World, or who couldnt watch a school recital because they couldnt fit in the chairs. And then, one fine day, they can. VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLY Left: Jeananne Folaros dropped 100 pounds. Right: Madeleine Fayman receives personal attention from Ted Robedee.

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By KEN MCINTOSH STAFF WRITERICCA will be placing ads in newspapers, radio and running television spots this week asking people to bring in any old silver and gold coins made before 1965. Those that bring in their coins will be able to speak with collectors one on one and have their coins looked at by a specialist. With the help of these ICCA members, offers will be made to those that have coins made before 1965. Offers will be made based on silver or gold content and the rarity of the coins. All coins made before 1965 will be examined and purchased including gold coins, silver coins, silver dollars, all types of nickels and pennies. Those that decide to sell their coins will be paid on the spot. If you are like a lot of people you might have a few old coins or even a coffee can full lying around. If you have ever wondered what they are worth now might be your chance to find out and even sell them if you choose. They could be worth a lot according to the International Coin Collectors Association also known as ICCA. Collectors will pay a fortune for some coins and currency for their collections. If it is rare enough, one coin could be worth over $100,000 according to Eric Helms, coin collector and ICCA member. One ultra rare dime, an 1894S Barber, sold for a record $1.9 million to a collector in July of 2007. While that is an extreme example, many rare and valuable coins are stashed away in dresser drawers or lock boxes around the country. The ICCA and its collector members have organized a traveling event in search of all types of coins and currency. Even common coins can be worth a significant amount due to the high price of silver and gold, says Helms, Washington quarters and Roosevelt dimes can be worth many times their face value. Recent silver markets have driven the price up on common coins made of silver. Helms explains that all half dollars, quarter and dimes made before 1965 contain 90% silver and are sought after any time silver prices rise. Right now its a sellers market he said. The rarest coins these collectors are looking for include $20, $10, $5 and $2 1/2 gold coins and any coin made before 1850. These coins always bring big premiums according to the ICCA. Silver dollars are also very sought after nowadays. Other types of items the ICCA will be purchasing during this event include U.S. currency, gold bullion, investment gold, silver bars, silver rounds, proof sets, etc. Even foreign coins are sought after and will be purchased. Also at this event anyone can sell their gold jewelry, dental gold or anything made of gold on the spot. Gold is currently trading at over $1,400.00 per ounce near an all time high. Bring anything you think might be gold and the collectors will examine, test and price it for free. If you decide to sell you, will be paid on the spot it has been an unknown fact that coin dealers have always paid more for jewelry and scrap gold than other jewelers and pawn brokers. So whether you have one coin you think might be valuable or a large collection you recently inherited, you can talk to these collectors for free. If youre lucky you may have a rarity worth thousands. Either way there is nothing to lose and it sounds like fun! For more information on this event visit the ICCA website at WWW.INTERNATIONALCOINCOLLECTORS.COM What We Buy:COINS Any and all coins made before 1965, rare coins, entire collections, Silver Dollars, Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes, Nickels, Three Cent Pieces, Two Cent Pieces, Cents, Large Cents, Half Cents and all others.PAPER MONEYAll denominations made before 1934.GOLD COINSIncluding $20, $10, $5, $4, $3, $2.5, $1, Private Gold, Gold Bars, etc.INVESTMENT GOLDKruggerands, Canadian Maple Leafs, Pandas, Gold Bars, U.S. Eagles and Buffalos, etc.SCRAP GOLD Broken and unused jewelry, dental gold.JEWELRYDiamond rings, bracelets, earrings, loose diamonds, all gem stones, etc.PLATINUMAnything made of platinum.SILVERFlatware, tea sets, goblets, jewelry, etc. and anything marked sterling. Heres How It Works: FREEADMISSIONCONTINUES IN NAPLES EVERY DAYTHROUGH SATURDAYJULY 18TH 23RDMF 9AMPM SAT 9AM-4PMHAWTHORNE SUITES3557 PINE RIDGE ROAD NAPLES, FL 34109DIRECTIONS: (239) 593-1300 SHOW INFO: (217) 787-7767 Recent Finds: MILLIONS SPENT!1000 NATIONAL EVENTS! 1893 Morgan PAID $1,800 1916 Mercury DIme PAID $2,800 1849 Gold Dollar P AID $8,500 1932 Washington Quarter P AID $250 1803 $10 Gold PAID $14,000 SCRAPGOLD GOLDIS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN! WE BUY SCRAP GOLD & GOLD JEWELRYInternational Coin Collectors Association is a Hit in Naples, Dont Miss Your Chance to Cash In! ONLY 3 DAYS LEFT!! PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 A11 Yacht ClubNorth StarAN UNRIVALED LIFESTYLE Nestled on 12 luscious acres of botanical splendor with a plethora of amenities including a 2 story clubhouse featuring a tness center, movie theatre, concierge and resort style pool, North Star Yacht Club provides you with the active lifestyle you desire. Spacious 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath with Den from $239,900 Three Bedrooms and Penthouses Also Available. Directions from I-75 Exit 138 W to MLK Blvd. Right on Monroe St. then left on Main St. Merge onto 41 N and cross over bridge, then turn left on Hancock Bridge Parkway.*With the use of preferred lender. Prices subject to change without notice. See agent for details.Visit Our Sales Center Today!Only 3.5% Down Last Chance For Values This Good!FHA and Fannie Mae ApprovedCall 239.995.8200 or Visit NorthStarYachtClub.com3420 Hancock Bridge Parkway | North Fort Myers, Florida 33903 in Fort M y ers, F l ori d a I ncre dibl e Va l ue. Breat h ta ki ng V i ews.Follow us on See For Yourself Today F rom Only $ 239,900 Cashing inThe New York Yankees Derek Jeter achieved his milestone 3,000th major league hit in July, and Steiner Sports Marketing of New Rochelle, N.Y., was ready (in partnership with the Yankees and Major League Baseball). Dozens of items from the game were offered to collectors, including the bases ($7,500 each), 30 balls used during the game ($2,000 each, unsigned), and even Jeters sweaty socks ($1,000). Steiner had also collected five gallons of dirt (under supervision, to assure authenticity), and uberfans can buy half-ounce containers of clay walked upon by Jeter during the game (from the shortstop area and the right-hand batters box) for a notdirt-cheap $250 each. Shouldve kept their mouths shut According to a bailiff, convicted car thief Thomas Done, 33, spent almost a half-hour at his June sentencing shucking and jiving Ogden, Utah, Judge Michael Lyon before finally finagling probation (instead of 15 years in prison) by expressing parental love for his young daughter and blaming his recidivist criminality on his girlfriends infidelity. However, literally seconds after Judge Lyon announced probation, Mr. Done, noticing his girlfriend in the courtroom, made a guntriggering motion with his thumb and fingers and said, Boom, bitch. A bailiff reported the gesture to the judge, who declared Mr. Done in violation of his brand-new probation and ordered him re-sentenced. Initially, all Jay Rodgers wanted was for the fellow Atlanta gas station customer to say thank you when Rodgers held the door for him, but the man remained silent, and Mr. Rodgers pressed the issue, confronting him and even following the man out to his car where the man pulled a gun and shot Mr. Rodgers in the abdomen, sending him to the hospital for nine days. (Interviewed on WSB-TV in May, Mr. Rodgers resumed nagging the man, urging him to do the right thing by turning himself in.) Easily offended Norris Sydnor IIIs $200,000 lawsuit against Richs Nail Salon of Landover, Md., for humiliate(ing) him last December is scheduled for trial as News of the Weird goes to press. Mr. Sydnor was upset that males have to pay $10 for a manicure but females only pay $9. John Luckett filed lawsuits on 11 different complaints earlier this year against the Las Vegas arcade Pinball Hall of Fame, claiming that he was wrongfully barred from the premises for obnoxiously complaining about out-of-service machines, especially Xenon, which he says he has mastered so well that he can play almost indefinitely on an initial 50 cents. Among the damages requested, Mr. Luckett is demanding $300 for each therapy session he might have to undergo to overcome the trauma of being ejected. Mr. Luckett has filed more than 40 lawsuits in his role of, as he put it, avenging peoples attempts to screw him. Ironies Budget cuts forced the closure of two of the three firehouses in Chillicothe, Ohio (pop. 22,000), and even that station failed a state fire marshals inspection in March. Because the stations own alarm system was broken, the chief was required, until the new system is installed, to assign one firefighter per shift to be on full-time patrol at the station, walking around the grounds constantly, upstairs, downstairs, looking for fires. In July, the city of Daytona Beach Shores, Fla., agreed to pay $195,000 to settle a lawsuit in which six people claim they were strip-searched unlawfully by police. Four of the six were strip-searched during a raid at the Biggins Gentlemans Club, where they work as strippers. NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATEDemocracy in actionEmerging democracies typically exhibit growing pains as they develop stability. For example, in July in Afghanistans parliament, one female legislator attacked another with her shoe (and then dodged the second ladys flying water bottle before colleagues separated them). Older democracies, however, act more maturely except perhaps in California, where in June, an Italian-American legislator got into a shoving match with a colleague whom he thought had made a Sopranostype slur about recent legislation. And in the mature democracy of Wisconsin in June, one state Supreme Court justice was accused of roughing up another (though who started it is in dispute) as the justices privately discussed a case. Compelling explanations Military veteran Joshua Price, 26, was arrested in March after police in a Chicago suburb found child pornography and 1,700 photos of dismembered women on his computer, but at a court hearing in May, Mr. Price explained that his photographs were a necessary escape from war-related trauma. In fact, Mr. Price told prosecutors that were it not for the distracting photos, his stress disorder would surely have caused him to kill his wife and two daughters. (Prosecutors accepted that Mr. Prices crime was a cry for help, but the judge, less impressed, quadrupled Mr. Prices bail, to $1 million.) The initial explanation by Melvin Jackson, 48, upon his arrest in June for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman in Kansas City, Mo., was to deny that he would ever do such a thing. Rather, he said, I thought the lady was dead. The initial explanation by Thomas ONeil, 47, upon his arrest in Wausau, Wis., in June for criminal damage to property (breaking into a neighbors garage and defecating on the floor) was to claim that he thought he was in his own garage.

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Let us orchestrate your dream.For the perfect products for your kitchen or bath, stop by a Ferguson showroom. Its where youll nd the largest range of quality brands, a symphony of ideas, and trained consultants to help orchestrate your dream. With showrooms from coast to coast, come see why Ferguson is recommended by professional contractors and designers everywhere. Fort Myers: 12085 Metro Parkway (239) 332-3072 Naples: 3406 Domestic Avenue (239) 643-0070FERGUSON.COM011 Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 COMMUNITY COLLECTION DRIVES The Guadalupe Center has started its annual Back-to-School Shoe Drive that will outfit more than 350 of the most impoverished children in Immokalee in new shoes for the first day of school. For many of the recipients ages 5 to 14, it will be the first pair of new shoes they have ever owned. Donations of new shoes or money to help purchase them are welcome and should be made by Friday, Aug. 12. Shoes can be dropped off at the Guadalupe Center Resale Shop at 8100 Trail Blvd., corner of U.S. 41 and Vanderbilt Beach Road, in North Naples. Monetary donations can be made online at www. guadalupecenter.org. A gift of $25 will fund a trip to Snyderman Shoes, where staff will fit each youngster for a new pair of sneakers. Laces of Love provides new socks for each child, and the shoe store adds lunch to make the back-to-school shopping trip complete. The Seminole Casino and Guadalupe Centers corporate coaches provide transportation to and from Immokalee. The mission of the Guadalupe Center is to break the cycle of poverty by providing education, social and other support programs for at-risk children and families of Immokalee. For more information, call 657-7711 or visit www.guadalupecenter. org. The Marco Island Area Chamber of Commerce is collecting back-to-school supplies so area children can return to the classroom with everything they need to get the new academic year off to a good start. In addition to supplies, monetary donations are welcome. Appropriate supplies include: composition notebooks and spiral notebooks, 5-inch blunt scissors, 3x5 index cards, Kleenex, three-ring binders (1, 1.5 or 2 inches), crayons, colored pencils and glue or glue sticks. Supplies or checks can be dropped off at the chamber, 1102 N. Collier Blvd., anytime between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 394-7549. New shoes will send Immokalee kids back to school on the right footMarco chamber wants back-to-school suppliesThe Shelter for Abused Women & Children has launched its Give Back: Stuff a Pack drive to help make sure children who receive services from the shelter have the supplies they need when they head back to the classroom this fall. In addition to the standard pencils and pens, notebooks and paper, items on the list include: gift cards to store such as Target, Wal-Mart and Payless Shoes; school clothes/uniforms and shoes; backpacks, pencil boxes, lunchboxes and thermoses; Kleenex; glue sticks; highlighters and washable markers; watercolors and primary paints; pocket folders with prongs, 2-inch binders and dividers; construction paper; calculators and protractors.Back-to-school donations can be dropped between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the Shelters Options Thrift Shoppe, 968 Second Ave. N.Always neededRebecca Grabau, the Shelters volunteer and resource coordinator, says donations of food and toiletries for residents of the emergency shelter are always appreciated and can be dropped off at the thrift shop during the hours listed above. New and used cell phones donated to the Shelter help ensure that women and children fleeing violence have access to emergency police and ambulance services 24 hours a day. In addition to Options Thrift Shoppe, cell phones and chargers can be dropped off at numerous places throughout the community, including all Collier County Sheriffs Office substations as well as most Starbucks locations. For more information about donating to or organizing a collection drive, call Rebecca Grabau at 775-3862, ext. 235, or e-mail rgrabau@naplesshelter.org. The food pantry of St. Vincent de Paul Societ y in N aples is in need of non-perishable donations. The society provides food to 125-150 families each week, an increase of 15 percent overall from 2010 and an increase of 25 percent in the number of children served. The following items are needed: dry cereal, canned vegetables and fruit, peanut butte r, jelly, canned meats, soups, canned or dried beans, rice, boxed potatoes, pasta and sauce, canned chili, macaroni and cheese. Personal hygiene items are also welcome. If you cannot donate pantry items, monetary gifts are also gratefully appreciated and can be mailed or delivered to the St. Vincent de Paul Society, 2874 Davis Blvd., Naples FL 34104. Please indicate food pantry on the check. St. Vincent de Paul Society also provides personal assistance for rent and utilities as well as the Meals on Wheels program for the homebound. For more information, call 775-1667 or visit www. stvincentdepaulonline.org. Shelter hopes donors will Give Back: Stuff a Pack St. Vincent de Paul pantry needs replenishing

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How it works: Find a BuddyChoose a family member, friend or coworker Mark Your CalendarOn the 2nd of each month, mark your calendar as a reminder Call Your BuddyRemind each other to do breast self exams To Get A Free Packet Visit www.nbc-2.com/buddycheck2 Call 1-800-936-0382 or visit any 21st Century Oncology of ce Get your free Buddy Check tool kit as a simple reminder to do your breast self-exam every month. Rie Aihara, M.D. Amy Fox, M.D.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA16 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Gourmetpastries Smoothiesandcoffees Giftsandspecialties Weddings,events&corporategiftingFORTMYERS 11380LindberghBlvd. 239.561.7215 HOURS Mon.Fri.7:30a.m.:30p.m.;Sat.7:30a.m.p.m. NAPLES 3747TamiamiTrailNorth 239.687.7215 HOURS Mon.Sat.8:00a.m.:00p.m.www.NormanLoveConfections.com NEWNAPLESLOCATIONNOWOPEN.PersonalSouthwestFloridaDeliveryServiceAvailable. WORLD-CLASSARTISANcocoaeMADEWITHLOVE.NONPROFIT NEWS Youngsters from Grace Place for Children & Families discovered just how exciting art can be when they visited The von Liebig Art Center as part of their Celebrate the Arts summer camp adventure. The children reveled in the Camera USA photography exhibit and were captivated by each artists subject matter, choice of lighting and camera angles used on each piece. Favorites included a spiral stained glass window and two wild horses rearing. The children were amazed to see all the unique photographs and asked lots of good questions, says Callie Spilane, education director at The von Liebig. I think everyone had a great experience. We certainly enjoyed having such an observant, well-behaved group.The tours were arranged by Ms. Spilane and von Liebig curator Jack OBrien and executive director Joel Kessler in in cooperation with Stephanie Munz Campbell, executive director of Grace Place. Thanks to a grant from the Community Foundation of Collier County, Grace Place and The von Liebig are working in collaboration with Naples artist JAMA, who was recently featured in the Cuba On My Mind exhibit at the center. JAMA will teach painting to Grace Place campers in August. Grace Place for Children & Families is a faith-based, nonprofit neighborhood center teaching literacy, language and life skills to at-risk children and impoverished families in Golden Gate city. Founded in 2004, Grace Place serves over 500 children and adults weekly. For more information, call 455-2707 or visit www.graceplacenaplesorg.The Neighborhood Health Clinic medication room dispensed 451 non-narcotic prescriptions in just six hours on Thursday, July 7, breaking the previous record of 330. Currently, the medication room dispenses approximately $246,000 (retail value) of medications per month. The estimated retail value of medication dispensed on the record-breaking day earlier this month was $43,357. A team of clinic volunteers work daily to secure donated medications from pharmaceutical companies compassionate medication programs. The majority of the clinics medications come from this source. When unable to secure necessary medications from the pharmaceutical companies or donations from medical offices, NHC buys prescription items at a bulk purchasing rate. There are no controlled substances/ narcotics at the clinic.We are seeing and treating an increasing number of patients each year with diagnoses far more complex than colds and influenza, says Nina Gray, CEO of the clinic. She adds the clinics patient population does not reflect seasonal fluctuations that are so common in Collier County.NHC provides quality health care for low-income, working but uninsured Collier county adults. Medical professionals who work at the clinic provide their time and services as volunteers. The clinic is funded solely by the financial kindness of individuals, foundations, churches and civic organizations, with 91 cents of every dollar raised going directly to patient care. No government funding is accepted. Nikki Strong is director of development and communications for the Neighborhood Health Clinic. The clinic is at 121 Goodlette Road N. For more information about programs and services, call 261-6600 or visit www.neighborhoodhealthclinic.org.Twenty-eight students from various programs of The Immokalee Foundation recently participated in a leadership/ team-building training with Adventure Training Concepts in Naples. Participants conquered several obstacle courses, team-building exercises and physical challenges designed to help them explore ther inner strengths.The group was placed into two teams that competed against each other in Operation Out Play, a Survivor-themed adventure that tested their ability to work together to complete a mission. The obstacles were designed so that they couldnt be completed by someone acting alone. Students were determined to give it their all, as not to let their teammates down.Elda Hernandez, vocational success program manager at TIF, says the event gave the students the opportunity to build friendships and teamwork. It not only allowed them to get to know one other, but to get to know themselves; to build self-confidence and know they can accomplish anything.She adds that although many of the young men and women were intimidated because it was their first time scaling walls and climbing ropes, they fought their fears and tackled the course with enthusiasm.Each team was assigned a team leader, but soon discovered that listening to one anothers input was the key to overcoming the challenges. If I had to take one thing away from the day, it would be to take everyones opinion into consideration before making a final decision, says Marcos Diaz, a student in TIFs Vocational and Career Success program. Hernandez Luis Parra, a student in the foundations Take Stock in Children program, focused on doing his best. His philosophy: You can only control your actions and pray the others keep up. Ms. Hernandez applauds all of the participants for an outstanding job gaining confidence and leadership and communication skills. Most importantly, she adds, everyone learned they dont have to face challenges alone. Since 1991, The Immokalee Foundation has been building pathways to success for many of the children in Immokalee through a variety of programs that focus on mentorship, after-school activities, college scholarships, the development of vocational skills and incentives for educational growth. In 2009, the foundation served 2,700 children through its core programs. For information about volunteering as a mentor or about TIF in general, call 430-9122 or visit www. immokaleefoundation.org. Grace Place campers Celebrate the Arts Neighborhood Health Clinic sets new dispensing record Immokalee students get a workout in team building COURTESY PHOTOEveryone takes a seat outside the art center.BY NIKKI STRONG____________________Special to Florida WeeklyCOURTESY PHOTOJerry Pinto, Gloria Mongue and Adriana Seczon in the medication room at the Neighborhood Health Clinic. COURTESY PHOTOThe Immokalee Foundation group with their ATC leadership training instructors.

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Dr. Adam Heller Neurologist Nola Theiss Former Mayor, City of Sanibel Stroke Survivor When patient Nola Theiss had a stroke, the quick actions of her husband and her medical team saved her life. Local EMS arrived at Nolas home on Sanibel within moments of receiving the call. Her trip to Gulf Coast Medical Center was quick, allowing medical personnel to stabilize her condition and start her on the road to recovery. Today, Nola works full-time with a charity that she launched several years ago, with no visible eects of the stroke. To read more of Nolas story, please visit: www.LeeMemorial.org/caring ., .www.LeeMemorial.org Gulf Coast Medical Center has earned the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association Get With the Guidelines Stroke Silver Plus Award

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 N26 20.315 W 081 49.677ALL BOATERS WELCOME ABOARD! Bonita BayMARINA DIRECT GULF ACCESS FULL SERVICE MARINA Boat storage & slip rentals from $264/month Dry storage for up to 32 & wet slips with lifts Fuel, ships store, boat launch & detail services COME BY BOAT AND DINE ON THE WATERat Backwater Jacks OPEN DAILYCall 239-495-3222 or visit BonitaBayMarina.net ALL BOATERS WELCOME ABOARD! DIRECT GULF ACCESS FULL SERVICE MARINA Boat storage & slip rentals from $264/month Dry storage for up to 32 & wet slips with lifts Fuel, ships store, boat launch & detail services OPEN DAILY Call 239-495-3222 or visit BonitaBayMarina.netGET MOVING 5K walk will make strides against breast cancerThe American Cancer Society-Collier Countys Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk steps out Saturday morning, Oct. 29, from the Village on Venetian Bay. 21st Century Oncology is the title sponsor, and NBC-2s Stacey Deffenbaugh is chair of the 2011 event. Making Strides brings together people of all ages with a common goal to fight breast cancer and save lives. Participants in the noncompetitive walk follow Gulf Shore Boulevard from the Village north to the end and back. Numerous businesses already have signed on as sponsors or entered teams, and many individuals who have been touched by breast cancer have registered teams as well, Ms. Deffenbaugh says. For information about starting a team, volunteering or becoming a sponsor, contact Ms. Deffenbaugh by calling 8390680 or e-mailing stacey.deffenbaugh@ nbc-2.com. For more information about the event, visit www.putonyourpinkbra.com/naples, or contact Melissa Wolf at the American Cancer Society-Collier County by calling 261-0337, ext. 3860, or e-mailing Melissa. wolf@cancer.org. Captiva triathlon events designed kids and adultsThe inaugural Galloway Captiva Triathlon is set for Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17-18, at South Seas Island Resort on Captiva Island. The weekend of fun and fitness holds something for everyone in the family, starting on Saturday with two childrens triathlons and continuing Sunday with an adult sprint-length event. The Saturday competition for ages 6-9 will consist of a 100-yard swim, 1.5-mile bike ride and -mile run. Ages 10-13 will compete in a 200-yard-swim, a 3-mile bike ride and a 1-mile run. The swim course will take place in waist-deep water, the bike course will be closed to all traffic, and the run course will be along the golf course overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. The adult triathlon on Sunday will consists of a -mile swim, a 10-mile bike ride and a 5K run, all on Captiva Island. Registration is capped at 500. Community Cooperative Ministries Inc. has been selected as the benefitting nonprofit. Made up of social service entrepreneurs fighting to end homelessness and hunger, CCMI provides more than 14,000 meals each month through its Everyday Cafe and Marketplace and home-delivered meals. CCMI also educates 40 children in its Community Montessori, offers homeless and comprehensive case management services through the United Way Resource House, oversees an emergency mobile food pantry and supplies weekend backpacks full of food to more than 2,500 children each school year. The Galloway Captiva Triathlon is the first event organized by Southwest Florida Events Inc., a nonprofit corporation dedicated to combining fun, fitness and support for local charities through multisport events. Race directors are Angie Ferguson, a well-known Elite Level 2 triathlon coach and 15-time Ironman, and Kate and Ken Gooderham. For registration or more information, call Ms. Ferguson at 246-2920, go to www.captivatri.org or find Captiva Tri on Facebook. Fun walk/run set for FGCU campusThe Kleist Health Education Center on the campus of Florida Gulf Coast University will host the Come Run With Us 5K fun walk/run on Saturday morning, Sept. 17. Fees from registration will help the center continue its health education programs throughout the Southwest Florida community. Registration begins Aug. 20. Details are at www.fgcu.edu/khec/events.asp. For more information, call 590-7459. 5K race in memory of Causeway cyclistThe first-ever Race for Trace 5K and KiddieK on the mainland near Sanibel Island is dedicated to the memory of 46-year-old Tracey Kleinpell, a veteran cyclist and triathlete who was killed by a driver while cycling across the Sanibel Causeway last April. The event on Saturday, Aug. 6, will also include a health fair and stage show. Proceeds will benefit Florida Diabetes Camp, which provides a fun, safe and educational camp environment for children with type-1 diabetes and their families. The race will begin at 7 a.m. in the parking lot at Sanibel Beach Place, across from Tanger Outlet on Summerlin Road. Runners will go east to John Morris Road and Bunche Beach before returning to the shopping center parking lot. The course does not include any beach or sand running. The KiddieK will take place after the adult run, and a group Zumba class will be offered after the competition. For registration and more information, call Mike Swanson at 896-6938 or visit www.racefortrace.org. Hit the linksHere are some charity tournaments coming up in the area: The annual summer tournament hosted by Collier Building Industry Association and Insurance and Risk Management Services tees off Friday, July 29, at Tiburon and includes a putting contest, long drive contest and a 50/50 raffle. For registration or more information, call 436-6100 or visit www.cbia.net. A tournament to benefit Drug Free Collier is being organized for Saturday, Sept. 17, at Lely Resort. For more information, call Drug Free Collier at 377-0535. Servpro, a fire and water cleanup and restoration company, presents the second annual Golfing for Charity to benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank on Friday, Oct. 7, at West Bay Club in Estero. The $100 registration includes cart and green fees, two beverages on the course and a post-tournament party. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the shotgun start is set for 9 a.m. Donations of nonperishable food items are welcome. In addition to Servpro, sponsors include Spectrum Contracting, Aquatic Systems and Sherwin Williams. Other sponsorships are available. Registration and payment may be made by sending checks, payable to SERVPRO of Collier County/Fort Myers South, 5605 Second St. W., Lehigh Acres, FL 33917. For more information, call Shannon ONeill at 4309300. The 20th annual Florida Gulf Coast University Founders Cup to benefit the FGCU Foundation is set for Friday, Oct. 14, at Pelicans Nest Golf Club in Bonita Springs. The day begins with lunch and ends with dinner and awards. Registration is $2,000 per foursome. A championship sponsor level for $2,500 includes a four-player team and logo on a sponsors golf towel. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information or to register, call Michele Kroffke at 590-1074, e-mail mkroffke@fgcu.edu or visit www.fgcu. edu/foundation. First National Bank of the Gulf Coast will host its third annual charity tournament Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Hideout Golf Club to benefit Eden Autism Services Florida and Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida. Continental breakfast will precede the 8:30 a.m. shotgun start, and lunch will also be provided. For information about registration and sponsorship opportunities, call Heather Gessel at 325-3750 or e-mail heathergessel@fnbofgc.com. Bonita Bay East has the summer ticketThe Summer Passport Program at Bonita Bay East gives golfers unlimited play on the North Naples clubs two courses through Oct. 31. For $600 per person, players also have access to the clubhouse, dining room, grill and bar. For more information, call 405-9002 or visit www.BonitaBayEast.com. Give to food bank and get a golf outingDonors who give $150 to the Harry Chapin Food Bank through the WCI Communities website www. WCIGolf.com will enjoy a golfing foursome at one of five WCI courses. Gift certificates are valid through Sept. 30 with tee times available two days in advance at: In Naples: Tiburn and Hammock Bay Golf & Country Club; In Bonita Springs: Raptor Bay Golf Club and The Colony Golf and Country Club; and In Fort Myers: Pelican Preserve Golf Club. For more information or to donate, visit www.WCIGolf. com and select the Harry Chapin Food Bank icon. s are avail payme nt sen d i ng S ERVPRO ort Myers n d St. W., 3 3917. For n, call t 43 0 n u al s t t Donors w C hapin F oo Co m WC I in g WC I c valid thro u avai l a bl e P d c C Since 1982CALL TODAY! 239-597-9100 FREE ELECTRIC MOTOR & REMOTE CONTROL on your NEW retractable awning order!

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NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL BY JULY 31, 2014**Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA20 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 museum president since 2008. Lois Bolin of Naples Backyard History is coordinating the Keep the Spirit of 5 Alive effort in Collier County and spoke to the airport authority in support of airport space for the museum. This is an extraordinary opportunity to create another historical touchstone in Naples, Dr. Bolin says. NAA board member Linda Flewelling sees the museum as an opportunity for students to experience history. I hope schools will bring students for tours, she says. The visibility of the museum may also encourage people to donate their military memorabilia. Naples Municipal Airports central location, convenient parking and accessible space make the terminal an excellent site for the museum. The Museum of Military Memorabilia was founded in 2006 and has accumulated more than 10,000 artifacts available for public viewing. The museums goals are to honor the veterans who have and are protecting the cause of freedom, to preserve artifacts associated with military history and to create a greater understanding of military conflicts among present and future generations. Keep the Spirit of 5 Alive is a national effort to remind America of the values and accomplishments of the generation that endured the hard times of the Great Depression, fought to defeat the greatest tyranny in history and then launched an unprecedented effort to assure a better future for both friends and former foes alike. For information about local observances, call Naples Backyard History at 594-2978. Naples Municipal Airport is home to flight schools, air charter operators and corporate aviation and non-aviation businesses as well as fire/rescue services, mosquito control, car rental agencies and the Collier County Sheriffs Aviation Unit. All funds used for the airports operation, maintenance and improvements are generated from activities at the airport or from federal and state grants. During the 2009-2010 fiscal year, the airport accommodated 86,000 takeoffs and landings. For more information, visit www.FlyNaples.com. AIRPORTFrom page 1 Get Florida Weekly for iPadTM on the App store and read your favorite newspaper just like the hard copy. FREE FOR ALL THE FUTURE OF NEWSPAPERS IS HERE Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comEnjoy a complete issue of Florida Weekly on your iPad. Get News, Arts & Entertainment, Business & Real Estate, everything that is in the print edition, now on the iPad.Download it FREE today!iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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IMPORTANT NOTICEIf you or your loved one is or was a resident at one of these facilities, they have been cited for multiple deficiencies including:FAILURE to provide care in a way that keeps or builds each resident's dignity and self respect.[9/18/2009]FAILURE to make sure that residents who take drugs are not given too many doses or for too long; make sure that the use of drugs is carefully watched; or stop or change drugs that cause unwanted effects.[8/12/2010, 2/26/2010]FAILURE to keep the rate of medication errors (wrong drug, wrong dose, wrong time) to less than 5%.[8/12/2010, 2/26/2010]FAILURE to give each resident care and services to get or keep the highest quality of life possible.[9/18/2009]FAILURE to have a program to keep infection from spreading.[8/12/2010, 2/26/2010]FAILURE to give professional services that follow each resident's written care plan.[2/26/2010]FAILURE to provide activities to meet the needs of each resident.[2/26/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who cannot care for themselves receive help with eating/drinking, grooming and hygiene.[9/18/2009]FAILURE to try to resolve each resident's complaints quickly.[12/4/2008]FAILURE to develop a complete care plan that meets all of a resident's needs, with timetables and actions that can be measured.[7/1/2009]FAILURE to immediately tell the resident, doctor, and a family member if: the resident is injured, there is a major change in resident's physical/mental health, there is a need to alter treatment significantly, or the resident must be transferred or discharged.[9/18/2009]*Deficiencies were obtained from past federal inspection results available on Medicare.gov.MANORCARE AT LELY PALMS LAKESIDE PAVILLION CARE AND REHABILITATIONFAILURE to give professional services that follow each resident's written care plan.[12/3/2010]FAILURE to give each resident care and services to get or keep the highest quality of life possible.[1/15/2010]FAILURE to store, cook, and give out food in a safe and clean way.[12/3/2010]FAILURE to provide needed housekeeping and maintenance.[12/3/2010]FAILURE to develop/implement required procedures for the administration of immunizations.[1/15/2010]FAILURE to check and update (if needed) each resident's assessment every 3 months.[1/15/2010]FAILURE to let the resident refuse treatment or refuse to take part in an experiment.[1/15/2010]FAILURE to make sure that residents who take drugs are not given too many doses or for too long; make sure that the use of drugs is carefully watched; or stop or change drugs that cause unwanted effects.[1/15/2010]FAILURE to protect residents from mistreatment, neglect, and/or theft of personal property.[3/12/2008]FAILURE to immediately tell the resident, doctor, and a family member if: the resident is injured, there is a major change in resident's physical/mental health, there is a need to alter treatment significantly, or the resident must be transferred or discharged.[8/7/2009]FAILURE to make sure all assessments are accurate, coordinated by an RN, done by the right professional, and are signed by the person completing them.[3/12/2008] If you or someone you love is or has been in the past a resident of ManorCare at Lely Palms or Lakeside Pavillion Care and Rehabilitation, call the law firm of Wilkes & McHugh, P.A. for a free consultation.800.255.5070www.wilkesmchugh.comPOOR CARE CAN LEAD TOBEDSORES, BROKEN BONES...EVEN DEATH. THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA22 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 HEALTHY LIVINGOur passionate nurses who deliver such compassionate care are among the reasons so many area residents proudly proclaim about NCH: This is my hospital. We are the first hospital in Southwest Florida to adopt a new way to recognize these caregivers. The DAISY Awards program for extraordinary nurses is in 900 hospitals around the world. Last month here at HCH, we celebrated our first DAISY Awards winners. Jeannie Kellogg, R.N. administrative coordinator, shared this idea last year with the Retention and Recognition Shared Governance Council, which then adopted it with the volunteer help of Peggy Munson, R.N. (our North Naples Nurse of the Year). And now, the envelopes please, for the June 2011 DAISY Awards nominees and winners. Downtown winner Markita Gorman, R.N., 4S nights, along with nominee Sherry Nigro, R.N., 4S, were surprised and initially speechless. An acutely ill patient in Ms. Gormans care described the extraordinary impression she left: She was right there assessing my needs and addressing my pain without me having to call for pain medicine. In my sleep, I must have been shivering and woke to find Markita gently laying a warmed blanket on me. They were small tasks, but they were great deeds. Jane Buza, R.N., North Naples ER, was recognized for her coaching of colleagues. R.N.s Jill Zollar and Kristine Jordan, also from the ER, were other worthy nominees. A colleague lauded Ms. Buzas extremely infectious positive attitude and noted that she regularly prepares snacks for her co-workers because she knows it lightens the load and renews the spirit. With patients, Ms. Buza was described as a caring, kind, highly skilled nurse, and an absolute fanatic about patient comfort. R.N. Misty Dudley from the Bonita Wound Healing Center was also praised by a colleague as an excellent team player with a delightful personality who goes out of her way to help patients and make each one feel special. Other colleagues said Misty has gone above and beyond the call of duty by delivering items to patients homes that they inadvertently left behind after their hospital stay. She has even offered to stop by a patients home each morning to help them put on their compression hose, one wrote.Theres one more noteworthy award about which Im proud to share the news.This is my hospital, our television campaign featuring grateful patients, physicians and staff, was honored with a national Telly Award for TV, video and film production, in the category of Overall Campaign. NCH was competing against every nonprofit hospital in the nation, regardless of size, as well as major national organizations, foundations and corporations. Director of Marketing Debbie Curry and her team were the creative wizards behind this campaign that captures the essence of our can-do, caring culture. Deserving nurses reap bouquets of DAISY Awards J allenWEISS allen.weiss@nchmd.org TO YOUR HEALTH Be a local heroHelp the American Heart Association assist young patients and their familiesEach year, an estimated 36,000 American families learn that their newborn has a heart defect. American Heart Heroes, a program of the American Heart Association, helps ensure that these families dont have to travel this daunting road alone. American Heart Heroes helps kids and their families connect and navigate the challenges of living with congenital heart defects. While research finds options for their futures, this special program offers opportunities for parents to learn and for kids to just be kids. In Florida alone, the program needs $400,000 a year to operate the following key components: Regional family conferences These annual conferences take place throughout the state and consist of a free, all-day educational program for parents and activities for the entire family. Hosted at kid-friendly locations such as childrens museums and science centers, parents attend to networks and learn the latest information from health-care professionals. Family resource guidebook The American Heart Heroes Family Guidebook is a lifelong tool filled with information and resource that can prepare patients and their families for surgeries, emergencies and stress. Local and regional activities These provide various opportunities for American Heart Heroes members to come together with other kids in their community going through similar challenges so they can have fun and just be kids together. Summer camp This program is for American Heart Heroes members ages 7-16. The AHA sends 155 pediatric heart patients on a weeklong adventure to Camp Boggy Creek, where they take part in boating, fishing, theatre, swimming, campfires and numerous activities in a medically safe environment. The AHA-Southwest Florida Division is raising funds for American Heart Heroes. For more information, call the local office at 498-9288. STRAIGHT TALK Juniper Village hosts Alzheimers support groupJuniper Village invites family members and others caring for persons with Alzheimers disease to a support group meeting from 10-11 a.m. Wednesday, July 27. Dr. Catherine Cruikshank, director of education for the Florida Gulf Coast chapter of the Alzheimers Association, will discuss managing challenging behaviors. Caregivers will be onsite. Juniper Village is at 1155 Encore Way, Naples. Attendance at the support group is free, but RSVPs are requested. Call 598-1368. Physicians Regional has free seminarsPhysicians Regional Healthcare System presents the following free programs: Incisionless Surgery for Severe Heartburn, presented by Dr. Thomas Bass at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 26, at Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard, 8300 Collier Blvd. Dr. Bass will discuss the new EsophyX TIF procedure to relieve chronic acid reflux and heartburn. Weight-Loss Surgery Options, presented by Dr. Thomas Bass at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 26, at Physicians Regional-Collier Boulevard Dr. Bass will discuss the newest techniques in weightloss surgery, including adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass. Innovation in the Treatment of Knee Pain, presented by Dr. Frederick Buechel at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 27, at Physicians Regional-Pine Ridge, 6101 Pine Ridge Road Dr. Buechel will discuss diagnosis and treatment advances, including MAKOplasty joint resurfacing. Attendance at all of the above is free, but seating is limited. For reservations or more information, call 348-4180 or visit www.physiciansregional. com/events. Daily living skills for visually impairedLighthouse of Collier Center for Blindness and Vision Loss and Florida Division of Blind Services offer free classes in daily living skills to help the blind and visually impaired live more independently. Classes meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday through Aug. 25 at the center at 424 Bayfront Place. Call 430-3934 to sign up. Staff from the American Heart AssociationSouthwest Florida Division recently visited Camp Boggy Creek. Left to right: Leslie Amick, Regan Goldberg, American Heart Heroes member Jacob Brockhoff, Jen Campbell and Monica Seif. Jacob, 14, was born with a congenital heart defect and has had a bypass and two openheart surgeries.SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY ks and learn the latest information from mation, call the local office at 4989288. the a rt onda tl y ogto ck, rg, art er ff, nd arn al d s ns. COURTESY PHOTO

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA24 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 ITS TIMETO MAKE THECHANGE TO BUSEYAt Busey, we partner with you to nd nancial solutions that meet your unique needs. We oer a wide array of personal and business banking solutions, including a complete Financial Management Hub of online services as well as comprehensive wealth management strategies*. Whats more, we promise to provide the highest quality of service to our valued customers.OUR PARTNERSHIP BEGINS WITH A PROMISE, AND ENDS WITH A CHANGE THAT LASTS A LIFETIME. Making the switch to Busey is easy with our complete Switch Kit ask any associate or call us today!Member FDIC*Strategies recommended may not be FDIC insured. 2524 Del Prado Blvd. 239.573.6488 2815 Tamiami Trl. 941.205.8111 2735 Santa Barbara Blvd. 239.772.5000 7980 Summerlin Lakes Dr. 941.429.8111Visit us at busey.com omas Quigley, M.D.Board Certied Eye Physician & Surgeoncomplete medical exam with one of our board certied eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and tests for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to new patients 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 07/31/2011Naples Bonita Springs www.doctorquigley.comFREEEYE EXAMFOR NEW PATIENTSNo Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of reimburse within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal.CODE: FW00SP27823 Caxambas Republican Club formedThe newly formed Caxambas Republican Club includes Marco Island, the Isle of Capri, Goodland, Everglades City and the Collier Boulevard/951 corridor. Programs will feature Republican candidates and discussions about various political issues. Socializing and networking will be part of every meeting as well. opportunities. All are welcome. For information about meeting dates and locations, contact Litha Berger, club president, at 594-4990 or lithasberger@gmail. com. Get acquainted with newcomersThe Naples Newcomers Club welcomes women who have been permanent residents of Naples for no more than five years and who want to meet others who are new to the area.The club meets for luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on the second Thursday of every month at country clubs throughout the area. In addition, groups within the club plan outings and dates to share varied interests, such as mah-jongg and duplicate bridge, gourmet cooking and discussions about philosophy. Prospective members are invited to coffee at 10 a.m. on the first Thursday of each month. For meeting locations and more information, call 2984083 or visit www.naplesnewcomers.com. The Bonita Springs Newcomers Club welcomes women who have lived in Bonita for less than three years. Luncheons are held at area country clubs on the third Thursday of every month (December meeting is on the second Thursday). Members must attend five luncheons a year and pay annual dues of $40. For more information, e-mail bonitanewcomers@gmail.com or visit www.bonitaspringsnewcomersclub.com. CLUB NOTES The Economic Development Council of Collier County invites the public to discuss ways to diversify the economy, create highwage jobs, expand the tax base, maintain quality of life and secure the economic future of Collier County. Dr. Mary Key, the president of CEO Florida Forums, will facilitate a free workshop beginning at 6 p.m. Monday, July 25, at North Collier Regional Park. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m. Dr. Key was part of the team that built Inc. Magazines Eagles CEO program that brought together CEOs of fast-growing companies to focus on one anothers strategic business issues. As the president of CEO Florida Forums, she provide key leaders in technology-driven companies with peer forums and resources to advance their growth at all levels. She also partners with Grow Florida and Floridas Economic Gardening program. For more information, visit www.colliereconomicplan.org. EDC invites public input on Colliers future Members of the Naples High School Class of 1971 are gearing up for their 40th reunion. Yo Ho Ho! A Pirate Looks at 40 will take place Aug. 12-14 at The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. The swashbuckling fun begins from 6-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 12, at the sunset bar and continues Saturday morning with golf followed by dinner, dancing and karaoke on the terrace. For more information, contact Cathy Orban (Johnson) at 597-8571 or 2500553; Emily Hobby (Creason) at (352) 495-3638 or (352) 427-4247; or e-mail paknflyguy@aol.com or catcon4333@ aol.com. On Facebook, look for A Pirate Looks at 40 Class of 1 Class Reunion. Naples High Class of set for swashbuckling reunion

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 NEWS A25 www.swfleye.com 25%DISCOUNT ON EYE GLASSESSTUDENT EYE EXAMS $69 STUDENT SPECIAL 21 and underGood vision and healthy eyes are key in academic success. Rick Palmon, M.D. Richard M. Glasser, M.D. Penny J. Orr, O.D. Leonard Avril, O.D. Brian Marhue, O.D. Cannot be used in conjunction with any insurance or other promotions. Offers expire 10/31/2011NAPLES 594-0124 Cataracts LASIK Laser Vision Correction Cornea Treatment Glaucoma Dry Eyes Comprehensive Eye Exam Pediatric Eye Care Glasses & Contacts naturally because the reproductive taps have been turned off for good. Trap, neuter and release programs for feral cats seem counterintuitive to many people. If you dont want cats around, wouldnt it make sense just to remove them permanently? But when you remove cats, TNR advocates say, other animals take their place. Thats because the food sources that attracted the cats will still be there, which means more cats (or rats, coyotes or raccoons) will eventually show up. They point to studies showing that TNR policies really do reduce feral cat populations. Neutering reduces the fighting, yowling and spraying behaviors, many of which are associated with fighting over mates. The neutered cats defend their territory, too, and prevent other animals from moving in including unneutered cats who could breed. The colony caretakers are quick to remove and find homes for any abandoned pets who turn up, as well as any kittens. While such programs arent perfect and arent considered appropriate for ecologically sensitive locations or areas where the protection of small-prey species is necessary trap, neuter and release is an option that must be considered where feral cats are a problem. TNR is a strategy thats both humane and sensible, and it should be allowed to become the new common knowledge when it comes to feral cats. Want more information? Visit the website of Alley Cat Allies (alleycat.org). BY GINA SPADAFORI _______________________________Special to Florida WeeklyFeral-cat management offers alternative to killingferal cat colonies by trapping all the cats and killing those who could not be tamed for adoption. However, TNR advocates argue that just feeding feral cats makes the problem worse (because the animals keep breeding), but that trapping and killing the cats doesnt solve the problem in the long run, either. Instead, TNR volunteers trap the cats, place the ones they can in caring homes, and return the truly untamable to their original territory after theyve been neutered and vaccinated. These colonies can then be fed and cared for in a hands-off but humane way, while their numbers dwindle The very reason our ancestors first decided they wanted cats around is used today to argue against allowing any cats to roam freely: They hunt, efficiently. The predatory skill that cats brought to eliminating rodents in grain storage is now labeled a danger to endangered species and prized songbirds. Thats another good reason for keeping pet cats inside, but what to do with the ferals pets gone wild and their unsocialized offspring? Advocates of TNR trap, neuter and release say maintaining healthy, neutered feral cat colonies is the best way to reduce feline numbers and problems. And, they argue, its both a kinder and more effective way than trapping and killing untamable cats. There have always been kind-hearted people who feed homeless cats, even if its just sharing a tuna sandwich from a park bench. There have also always been people who find colonies of feral cats to be annoying: The cats make noise, they mess and spray, and they multiply like, well, cats. Cities, colleges and military bases and other institutions with large pieces of land to manage used to routinely handle PET TALES Wild things Keeping feral cats in managed colonies eliminates many of the problems associated with the animals. Pets of the WeekTo adopt a petThis weeks adoptable pets are from Brookes Legacy Animal Rescue, an all-volunteer foster home rescue organization. For more information, call 434-7480, e-mail brookeslegacy@ brookeslegacyanimalrescue.org or visit www. BrookesLegacyAnimalRescue.com. >> Major is a 3-monthold German shepherd mix. Hes sweet, outgoing and ready for a permanent home.>> Alexander is a neutered, 1-year-old, 12-pound smooth fox terrier mix. Hes a great little guy. >> Cutilicious is a spayed, 2-year-old Chihuahua mix who weighs about 10 pounds and loves everyone. >> Georgianna is a spayed, 2-year-old tortoiseshell. Quiet and loving, she needs a forever someone. 239-261-7157 www.WynnsOnline.com 141 Ninth Street North Naples For over 70 years offering Wholeseome fresh products to our customers. Wynns is now carrying a large selection of Natural, Organic, and Gluten-Free products. Free with a $30 Grocery OrderClos Du Bois ChardonnayMust have coupon at time of purchase Free with a $15 Grocery Order4.4oz Skinny Pop PopcornMust have coupon at time of purchase

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^Lease for 36 months with $2,999 due at signing plus tax, tag, $499 dealer delivery charge and lease surcharge. 10,000 miles pe r year. Security deposit waived with approved credit. Requires preferred credit approval through AFC (660+ beacon). MDX (model#YD2H2BJNW) TL (model#UA8F2CJW) TSX(mo del#CU2F6BJW). See dealer for Details. **Free oil changes are for all new and preowned Acuras' purchased after 1/1/2011 at Scanlon Acura. For All New and Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles** 14270 South Tamiami Trail Fort Myers1/2 Mile South Of The Bell Tower On US 411-800-330-9155 1-239-481-9797www. ScanlonLexus .com ^ Lease for 36 months with $5,199 due at signing plus tax, tag and title. 10,000 miles per year. Security deposit waived with a pproved credit. Requires 720 + beacon score. #With approved credit. Requires 690+ Beacon Score. Through Lexus Financing Services *Prices plus tax, tag and title.**Free oil changes are for all new and preowned Lexus' purchased after 1/1/2011 at Scanlon. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. SALE HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8:00AM 8:00PM SATURDAY 9:00AM 5:OOPM STK#1R206A 2006 LEXUSRX350 $26,733 STK#1PL128, 6SPD 2008 LEXUSIS250 $25,988 STK#1Y140A 2007 LEXUSES350 $27,885 STK# 1Y133A, NAVIGATION 2008 LEXUSIS350 $29,990 STK#1R200A 2010 LEXUSRX350 $36,938 STK# 1K041A 2007 LEXUSLS460 $42,990 STK#1KO49A 2008 LEXUSGX470 $39,990 www.ScanlonAcura.com15581 South Tamiami Trail Fort Myers1 Mile South Of The Super Wal-Mart On US 41 South SALE HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 9:00AM 8:00PM SATURDAY 9:00AM 5:OOPM1-800-226-6800 1-239-433-1661 #* * * STK#1Y108A 2008 LEXUSES350 $25,945* * STK#1R201A 2005 LEXUSGX470 $27,230* STK# 1R271A 2005 LEXUSLS430 $28,990* * FREE OIL CHANGESFOR LIFE!For All New & Pre-Owned Franchise VehiclesOn All Certified Pre-Owned Lexus **2 YEAR COMPLIMENTARYMAINTENENCEFor All New & Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles^2.9%APR# On All Certified Pre-Owned Lexus Over 100 Lexus Certified Vehicles in stock &Over 200 Pre-Owned vehicles in stock 1.9%APR# FREE OIL CHANGESFOR LIFE!For All New & Pre-Owned Franchise Vehicles** STK#1R182A 2009 LEXUSRX350 $29,998 STK#1Y114B 2002 LEXUSES300 $10,873* * MDX $429PER MONTH DRIVE FOR JUST TL $329PER MONTH DRIVE FOR JUST 2011 ACURA 2012 ACURA ALL CURRENT ACURA OWNERS RECEIVE A $750 INCENTIVE WHEN YOU LEASE A NEW ACURA*** ^ ^ ^ STK#1M015A 2000 LEXUSGS300 $12,990 STK#1R190B 2004 LEXUSRX330 $16,955 STK#1R234C, 46K MILES 2002 LEXUSSC430 $26,990^ * *

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 NEWS A27 A team of wild horses couldnt keep you away.(239) 206-2646 or toll-free (866) 986-9690www.ArlingtonNaples.org At The Arlington, an all-new continuing care retirement community coming to Naples acclaimed Lely Resort, our new life spirit and new life style of retirement living is a perfect complement to the dynamic and abundant way of life Lely is known for. As thriving and vibrant as the magni cent monument of charging horses at Lelys entrance, the new life spirit and new life style of The Arlington will compel you to learn more. And speaking of nothing keeping you away a visit to The Arlington Model and Information Center is designed exclusively around your interests, preferences and schedule. Its a friendly, informative, pressure-free way to learn more about this impressive community lifestyle. Conveniently located and convenient to your schedule, simply call The Model and Information Center at (239) 206-2646, or toll-free (866) 986-9690 and let us know when youd like to visit Or, simply stop by whenever youre in the area ; were here to serve you. Model and Information CenterLocated on Tamiami Trail, across from the Lely Freedom Horses Monument.12276 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 501, Naples, Florida 34113Open 8:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Sundays by appointment. Lay down, Sally, and rest you in my arms....No need to leave so soon. Ive been trying all night long just to talk to you. Eric Clapton Youre walking meadows in my mind. Making waves across my time....Oh, what a strange magic. Oh, its a strange magic. Electric Light Orchestra Anyway, here I am, bouncing around in time, putting things right that once went wrong. Dr. Sam Beckett, Quantum Leap (television series) There are no quantum leaps, nor are there particles. H. D. Zeh, Physics Letters Love is the way messengers from the mystery tell us things. RumiA sally is an outburst of an attack, a rushing forth to defend against a besieging enemy. Or it is a witty, imaginative saying. Or a womans name. Or a mans nickname. Whatever the meaning intention, the word comes from the Latin salire, meaning to leap. And all these meanings have in themselves the leaping quality, the abrupt passing from one state to another. We make leaps of faith. We grow by leaps, unbounded. We live and we die, named and un-named, in continuous flux. Not even time is exempt. The atomic clock was invented in the 1950s. And since 1972, leap seconds have been periodically added to recalibrate these atomic clocks. This recalibration is necessitated by the happy wobbles and wiggles of the Earth. But the Earth is slowing down. Days have become about 0.002 seconds longer every century. The Earth loses energy to friction caused by tides, space dust, solar winds, geo-magnetic storms. What are from the Earths side minor adjustments to all these forces have formed mountains and erupted volcanoes. Some say that the last Southeast Asian tsunami was one such minor adjustment of the Earth mother. The IERS, International Rotation and Reference System Service, decides two times each year if the addition of a leap second is required to make UTC Coordinated Universal Time agree with astronomical time within 0.9 seconds. If it is needed, a leap second is added at the end of June or December. No leap second was added in June 2011. No leap second has ever been subtracted. Many have argued that time should be decoupled from Earths rotation. There are many pro and con arguments. The last debate occurred in Torino, Italy, in 2003. There were concerns on both sides about computer synchronization, air traffic control, the insignificance of exact astronomical time in the lives of mere mortals, and the eventual effect on sundials. The phrase quantum leap is used to indicate an abrupt change or a very small change. Or perhaps a very small abrupt change. It is a tiny discontinuity. In quantum physics, this leap is smaller than the diameter of an atoms nucleus. Cartoon characters and sub-atomic particles do it, going from point A to point B without passing through any of the points in between. We dont see this in real life. We dont apprehend the slowness of evolution or the quick revolution. Yet the truncated quiddity we observe seems appropriate and timely. Even if we think about Zenos paradoxes, we dont see them in real time. We can watch re-runs of Quantum Leap, the television series in which Dr. Sam Becketts time-travel experimentation goes, in his words, a little caca. And we can marvel at leaping celluloid lizards. Sometimes I say I love it. But mostly there is simply loving what we take a leap at naming. Oh, boy. Rx is the FloridaWeekly muse who hopes to inspire profound mutiny in all those who care to read. Our Rx may be wearing a pirate cloak of invisibility, but emanating from within this shadow is hope that readers will feel free to respond. Who knows: You may even inspire the muse. Make contact if you dare.MUSINGS Rx rx@floridaweekly.com Sojourn

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BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES BUS INESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011NetworkingWelcoming Wells Fargo, and more business affairs. B8-9 By the numbersNABOR report says home inventory in decline. B11 INSIDEThe Fool knowsWho introduced the postage meter and now employs 30,000 people? B6 Leadership Collier announces its 2012 class Forty-two professionals from the Collier County business community have been selected for the 2012 Leadership Collier class. Over the course year, they will learn from a broad-based network of community leaders who will enhance their leadership skills through continuing education, shared perspectives and community involvement. Leadership Colliers primary objective is to educate local business leaders on societal and economic challenges facing the community today so that they are equipped to become engaged in working toward solutions in the public interest. The class of 2012 will be the 23rd graduating class. Its members are: Trish Biebricher, Moorings Park; Brandon Box, IberiaBank; Mike Brennan, Office of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio; Judy Bricker, The Northern Trust Company; Amy Cooper, Larson Allen LLP; David Cuddihy, Naples Daily News; Rachel Decker, Ave Maria University; Sonia Diaz, Coleman, Hazzard & Taylor; Jennifer Foegen, Naples Princess LLC; Anne Frazier, Drug Free Collier; James French, Collier County Government; Lois Gomez, The Immokalee FoundationCheryl Hastings, Grant, Fridkin, Pearson, Athan & Crown, PA; Trish Hilbrands, Arthrex Inc.; Clark Hill, Hilton Naples; James Ray, Fifth Third Bank-South Florida; Robert Lancaster, Cummings & Lockwood LLC; Joan Larson, Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce; Andrea Marsh, Collier County Sheriffs Office; Jim Martin, NCH Healthcare System; Libby McHugh, Wasmer, Schroeder & Company Inc. James Molenaar, State Attorneys Office; Sean Morton, Morton Wasmer Abraham Construction Mgrs LLCSEE LEADERSHIP, B7 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYFive, alive BUSINESSES THAT TURN FIVE YEARS OLD, A nice milestone, can feel proud about a solid accomplishment that signals making it over a certain hump. But those that celebrate that birthday this year also passed an especially rigorous test. If navigating a weak economy may be considered a final college exam, this was something like Harvards version: home prices crash, unemployment spikes and two years into your fledgling business venture, a plunging stock market annihilates the holiday shopping season. People spend less on luxury goods and services, one of Southwest Floridas top economic engines. And even after its over, its not over. Jobs remain too scarce during a gradual recovery. Here are three local businesses that turned five in 2010 or 2011. Each passed the hard parts with flying colors, and their owners here offer some perspective on succeeding under less-than-ideal business conditions. Cone Communications Company, Naples One thing Clay W. Cone has going for his company is no payroll, other than himself, of course. As president of Naples-based Cone Communications Company, he provides marketing and advertising strategies for small to midsize businesses, and nonprofits. Hitting a milestone despite tough times We took some risks and they ended up paying off. Dan Schuyler, co-owner of Lily & Co. Jewelers on SanibelBY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@ oridaweekly.com VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYKaren Bell and Dan Schuyler launched their business just as the economy was starting to head south. SEE MILESTONE, B7 CONE

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 First Class Clothing For A First Class Lifestyle.www.tomjames.com F Cbt Annfr M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentals O er Good thru 07/31/11 WITH THIS AD $350.OFFNew Orders OnlyCoupon Must Be Presented At Time Of Order. Why Do More Home Owners ChooseComplete Line of Rolldowns Clear Pan ccordionsCall For FREE Estimate594-16161762 Trade Center Way, Naples Florida, 34109Hurricane IMPACT WINDOWS & DOORS!! QUALITT RVICE MONEY & INVESTINGA broad look at our economic situationThe U.S. is two years and some four months into recovery if March 2009 is considered a low for the economy. So, with an economic broad brush, how does the U.S. look? In employment terms, we have hardly made any recovery since unemployment hovers at approximately 9 percent. Accordingly, earned income has suffered from a shrunken employment base and, in some sectors, reduced compensation for intact jobs. As to asset prices, there has been recovery in equities and corporate bonds, stabilization in the commercial property markets but, by and large through mid-2011, a continued decline in residential real estate. There has been a meaningful decline in consumer debt (through strategic default, negotiated debt relief, bankruptcy, and/ or, the repayment of principal, which is becoming increasingly less traditional). Also, corporate debt levels are down. As to balance sheet liquidity, there is much media coverage that corporations have astronomically high levels of cash as if to suggest these entities are hoarding cash. Now a look at the public sector. As of the most recent (Junes) monthly employment report, government job losses are big. Municipal, state and federal balance sheets have not improved, particularly at the federal level.There was a positive to the federal ballooning of debt as the trillions spent on Federal Reserve interventions and U.S. fiscal programs : 1) prevented a collapse of the international banking system; 2) allowed successful recapitalization of several mega firms in banking, insurance, automotive, etc.; 3) kept the housing market alive through the continuation of Fannie and Freddie (though such quasi private/public entities remain troubled, mismanaged and possibly foundationally flawed). Not that the fiscal and monetary actions are to be embraced as the greatest, the most efficient, the best for producing jobs or having a meaningful multiplier effect, nor properly rewarding the responsible and punishing those who were causative of the demise, but these programs averted an economic crisis of depression proportions. But even after all the trillions have been spent, we are still left between an economic rock and a hard place, unable to solve the problems of unwinding of credit excesses, and quite possibly have created a tipping point now that the curative spending has caused federal debt to reach $14 trillion, around 100 percent of our GDP. Trailing closely behind is Greece at 140 percent, Italy at 120 percent and others. The tipping point is not that we cannot reduce our debt or get a debt extension, as currently under negotiation. Rather, it refers to the work of two economists, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff, who found that, when governments are excessively debt burdened (and, as defined by them, the U.S. is in the excessive category), incremental deficit spending has little effect and the gain to GDP is offset by the drag of additional debt. In the end, there is no improved standard of living as GDP growth has to be used to service debt. In short, the economic alchemy of the 1970s through the 1990s cannot be repeated. The only meaningful exception to the excessive sovereign debt rule of thumb is Japan, carrying debt at approximately 200 percent of its GDP, but also going no place fast for the past 20 years. So if you are thinking, If Japan can carry its load, then why cant other countries? Good question. Beyond the fact that stagnation is an undesirable economic condition, the answer is unique to each countrys lenders. In Japans case, its debt is very largely owned/ bought by its own senior population (which embraces saving) and by its pensions and institutions. Contrast this to the U.S. dependence on external sources of financing. The same is true for Greece, Italy, Ireland and a long list of other countries. This is not the first time the U.S. or world has seen credit excess. But it is the first time since 1900 that the world has seen multiple sovereign debt problems happen all at the same time and at critical levels. In the past, when there have been excesses in U.S. credit, it has been largely in the private sector. How were such excesses solved? The lenders would take it on the chin, suffering full or partial losses on their holdings e.g. companies closed their doors or they recapitalized and started anew with new management, a new strategy and less of a debt burden or none at all. And, sometimes, if the private sector losses were big enough to cause a serious retraction in the economy, the Fed would come along and lower rates, spurring the rest of the economy. But repudiation of debt and haircuts on debt (and an en masse change of congressional guard) are not options for world powers and certainly a country with the responsibility and privilege of being the worlds reserve currency. Sure, Iceland did it in 2009 and, yes, there is a long history (20-30 years ago) of South American countries doing so. But this is not an option for the U.S. if the dollar is to remain the worlds reserve currency. In coming days, the headlines will all be about extending the U.S. debt limit. Beyond all the political maneuvers and positions and party sound bites, the reality is that whatever the U.S. government decides to do, the result will probably translate into a drag on gro wth. Cut ting spending and raising taxes is a drag but continued deficit spending is also a drag.In times of heightened and prolonged uncertainty, all cash might be a nonsolution; the best course for investing is a truly diversified portfolio that includes alternative assets in addition to traditional asset classes of equities, bonds and real estate. Jeannette Rohn Showalter, CFA, can be reached at 444-5633, ext. 1092, or jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com. Her office is at The Crexent Business Center, Bonita Springs. jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFA jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com

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Rum RowMarvelous waterfront estate with over 9,500 square feet of living space. With architecture in the Bermudian tradition and breathtaking views over Buccaneers Bay, this immaculate estate oers the rare opportunity for elegant entertaining and luxurious family living. Quick access to the Gulf. Port Royal Club membership eligibility. $12,950,000 Nelsons WalkSensational vistas from this stunning residence situated on two Port Royal lots with expansive water frontage. Beautiful Southern exposure facing the conuence of Naples Bay and the picturesque inland waterways leading to Rookery Bay and the pristine coastal estuaries. Port Royal Club membership eligibility. $11,990,000

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Same IT problems again and again?Let Neiert help you out of the technological rut with LOCAL IT assistance! www.ne I er T .com239.362.3727 Of ces in Naples & Fort Myers A Job Search Support Group meets fr om 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays at the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. Contact Karen Klukiewicz at kluk77@comcast.net or visit www.napleschamber.org. Business After 5 f or member s and guests of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 21, at CNL Bank, 1435 Pine Ridge Road. Cost is $5 for members, $25 for others. Sign up at www.napleschamber. org/events. The Collier Building Industry As socia tion holds a members mixer at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, July 21, at ProFloors, 3060 Tamiami Trail N. Sign up by calling 436-6100 or visiting www.cbia.net. SCORE Naples and the Gr ea ter Naples Chamber of Commerce present a workshop titled Start, Buy or Franchise? for people who have decided to go into business for themselves, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, July 23, at the chamber, 2390 Tamiami Trail N. Registration is $35 and can be completed at www.napleschamber. org/events. The N.A.P.L.E.S. Group holds a casino night t o benef it St. Matthews House from 6-10 p.m. Saturday, July 23, in the clubhouse at Saturnia Lakes. Admission is $35 in advance, $40 at the door. Register at www. naplesgroup.net. The Public Relations Society of AmericaGulf C oast Chapter meets for lunch and a program from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Tuesday, July 26, at the Hilton Naples. Reservations are required by July 22. Cost is $24 for PRSA members and $29 for others. Sign up at www.gulfcoastprsa.org. Members and guests of the B onit a Springs Area Chamber of Commerce meet for lunch and a program at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 27, at Carrabbas in Bonita Springs, 27220 Bay Landing Drive. Southwest Florida College representatives will conduct a lesson in networking and communications. Sign up by calling 992-2943 or visiting www.bonitaspringschamber.com. Members and guests of the B onit a Springs Chamber of Commerce can enjoy a mini-trade show during Business Before Business from 8-9:15 a.m. Thursday, July 28, at Costco in Gulf Coast Town Center. Admission is $30 for non-members (e-mail kim@bonitaspringschamber.com), $5 for members who sign up by calling 992-2943 or visiting www.bonitaspringschamber.com/events by July 26, and $10 for members thereafter. A reception for the new class of Lea dership B onita takes place from 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday, July 28, at the Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa. An alumni dinner will follow the reception. Sign up by calling 992-2943 or visiting www.bonitaspringschamber.com/events. The American Marketing Association-N ap les chapter and Young Professionals of Naples will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, July 28, at Flemmings. Guest speaker Ken Kelly of Kelly Roofing will talk about how his company has overcome the economic challenges many businesses face today. Free for members, $10 for others. RSVP to 682-0082. The American Business Womens As socia tion-Neapolitan Chapter holds its year-end picnic and installation of new officers beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, July 30, at Wiggins Pass State Park. Family members are welcome. Cost is $15 for adults and $9 for children (free for those 5 and younger). No walk-ins. Sign up by July 28 at www.abwaneapolitan.org. CBIA holds its next g eneral membership meeting Thursday, Aug. 11, at Olde Cypress. Florida Weekly is the sponsor. Guest speaker Nick Casalanguida will discuss changes in Collier Countys Growth Management Division that affect the building industry. Networking begins at 5:30 p.m. Cost is $25 per person. Call 436-6100 or visit www.cbia.net to sign up.AM Blend, a new networking event sponsored by the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, takes place from 8-9:30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 11, at Costco. Free, but registration is required at tinyurl.com/gnccevents.The Collier County Lodging & Tourism Alliance presents Marketing Your Business to Area Hotels at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 24, at Bellasera Hotel, 221 Ninth Street S. Beth Preddy of Preddy PR will give tips to restaurant owners, attractions, tour guides and others seeking to increase their business with area hotels. CCLTA President Steve McIntire will provide an overview of the alliance and its efforts to build a stronger presence and membership base. Attendance is free and limited to two individuals per organization. Register by Aug. 17 by e-mailing Pam Calore at pam.cclta@gmail.com.Success in the City is the theme of the 2011 trade show sponsored by the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce from 3-7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Sign up for an exhibit space or to advertise in the program by July 25. Contact Lauren ONeal at lauren@napleschamber.org.The Bonita Springs Chamber of Commerce holds its annual meeting and awards luncheon Wednesday, Sept. 21, at the Bonita Bay Club. Outgoing board chairman Sabra Smith of Algenol Biofuelds will give the state of the chamber address, and numerous awards will be presented. The members-only event costs $45 per person. Sponsorships are available starting at $250. Call 992-2943 or visit www.bonitaspringschamber.com. BUSINESS MEETINGS BUSINESS BRIEFS Author and motivational speaker Joan Brock will be the keynote speaker for the 17th Annual Southwest Florida Blue Chip Community Business Award luncheon Thursday, Nov. 3, at Harborside Event Center in Fort Myers. Coordinated and sponsored by BB&TOswald Trippe and Company and BB&T Bank, the Blue Chip Award program recognizes small businesses that have overcome adversity to achieve success. We are inspired by Joans determination, says Gary Trippe, managing director at BB&T-Oswald Trippe and Company. She has an incredible story that will motivate Blue Chip attendees. Ms. Brock has transformed adversity into challenge and frustration into opportunity. At the age of 32, while working at a school for blind children, she suddenly lost her sight from a rare eye disease. Five years later, she lost her husband to cancer and was left to raise her young daughter as a blind, single parent. In 2003, her life story was made into an original television film for Lifetime. More than Meets the Eye: The Joan Brock Story was based on Ms. Brocks book. She was also featured in a coffee table book titled Believing in Ourselves as one of 35 inspirational women in America. Her second book, Come to Your Senses, is currently being developed. For-profit business in Collier, Lee and Charlotte counties that have been in operation for at least three years and employ five to 400 people are eligible for the Blue Chip Award. Applications must be submitted by Sept. 12 and can be obtained by calling Stacey Mercado at 433-7189 or e-mailing SMercado@ BBandT.com. More than Meets the Eye author will address Blue Chip luncheonBusinesses invited to apply for awardThe Small Business Development Center at Florida Gulf Coast University, in partnership with several Southwest Florida agencies, will host a free hurricane preparedness seminar beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, July 23, at Sunshine Ace Hardware, 9100 Bonita Beach Road in Bonita Springs. Refreshments will be provided by Perkins restaurant in Bonita Springs. Panelists include representatives from the Lee County Emergency Operations Center, Small Business Administration, Bonita Springs Fire & Rescue and the city of Bonita Springs. Dan Regelski, director of the SBDC, will moderate the discussion from 10:30-10:45 a.m. A questionand-answer session will follow.The Southwest Florida Urban Search & Rescue team will be on hand, and attendees will be able to tour the Florida Small Business Mobile Assistance Center bus that is used during natural disasters to help small businesses get up and running. In addition to the panel discussion, several Sunshine Ace vendors will display their companies goods and will donate door prize giveaways. The American Red Cross will also provide resource information. Attendance is free, but registration is requested. Call the SBDC main office at 745-3700 or sign up at www.sbdc.seminars.org. The Ritz-Carlton, Naples, and The Ritz-C ar lton Golf Resort, Naples, recently received a series of accolades from Travel + Leisure magazine and U.S. News, the news and research organization. In its July issue, Travel + Leisure revealed its 2011 Worlds Best List, on which readers voted the Forbes Five-Star, AAA Five-Diamond Ritz-Carlton, Naples, as No. 9 among the Top 50 Resorts in the U.S. and Canada. The beachfront resort was the highest rated resort in Florida, jumping from its No. 24 ranking last year. Readers also ranked the resort No. 32 among the Top 50 Best Family Hotels in the U.S. and Canada, and No. 70 among the Top 100 Best Hotels in the World. The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples, was ranked No. 33 among the Top 50 Hotels in the U.S. and Canada, up from its 2010 position as No. 39. In June, U.S. News & World Reports parent company, U.S. News Media Group, announced that The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples, was No. 10 on its list of the Best Hotels in the U.S. Among the 852 luxury hotels analyzed by U.S. News, 86 properties with the highest overall ratings were named to a selective list of the Best Hotels in the U.S. The U.S. News hotel rankings are based on the aggregate opinion of published travel experts and the overall customer satisfaction expressed in online guest reviews. Free hurricane seminar coming upNaples Ritz-Carlton hotels earn high marks BROCK

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 THE MOTLEY FOOL Its easy to drool over biotechnology companies that are busy developing tomorrows blockbuster medications. Some will end up delivering powerful long-term performances. Its hard to know which ones, though, so be careful. Biotech stocks can be volatile. For example, prostatecancer-treating Dendreon lost between 30 percent and 50 percent of its value in 2001, 2002 and 2005, and then surged more than 400 percent in 2009. The promise of a wonderful new drug is exciting. But it can take 10 years or longer to get from development to market and there are plenty of risks along the way. Near the end of the process, the drug must clear several Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hurdles. Testing on humans begins with Phase I trials, continues with more-involved Phase II trials and concludes with Phase III. The entire trial process can take five years or longer. It can take another year to apply for and receive a verdict on FDA approval, and the answer can be no.Bumpy Biotechnology What Is This Thing Called The Motley Fool?Remember Shakespeare? Remember As You Like It? In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only people who could get away with telling the truth to the King or Queen. The Motley Fool tells the truth about investing, and hopes youll laugh all the way to the bank. Researching Risks Q How can I research the risks facing various companies? R.M., Woodbridge, Va. R.M., Woodbridge, Va.A Companies disclose many risks on their own. Publicly traded American enterprises are required to file annual 0-K reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Accessible at websites such as finance.yahoo.com and from the companies themselves, they detail a companys financial and operational progress and also address risks facing the business. For example, General Electrics recent 10-K cites many risk factors the company faces: Significant raw material shortages, supplier capacity constraints, supplier production disruptions, supplier quality issues or price increases could increase our operating costs and adversely impact the competitive positions of our products. Other risks include global political or economic volatility that could disrupt business, computer crimes that could threaten company systems, deteriorating conditions in financial markets that could hurt GE Capital, and increases in the cost of pension and health-care benefits that could reduce company profitability. Many companies cite increased regulation worldwide as a risk, which increases their cost of doing business. In developing nations, the lack of relevant laws or the presence of new and untested laws can also be an issue. Dont let the risks listed in 10-Ks make you want to avoid investing in any company at all. Every company faces risks. They shouldnt scare you away, but do consider them. Also, know that companies can manage many of their risks, such as via insurance, or by locking in currency rates or commodity prices via futures contracts. Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest InvestmentTo Educate, Amuse & EnrichDont despair, though. You can still invest effectively in drugs, via pharmaceutical giants such as Merck and Eli Lilly. Although the idea for a new drug might start with a scientist working for a small developmentstage company, its likely to end up marketed and sold by these big guns, which often buy or license drug technology from small developers. They may even fund drug development at small firms in exchange for marketing rights. (You might also look at big biotech firms, such as Amgen.) Focus on pharmaceutical giants with broad and deep product pipelines. To see some that our analysts have recommended, try our Motley Fool Inside Value newsletter for free, at www.insidevalue.fool.com. Another option is to invest in a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund (ETF) that focuses on biotechnology stocks. That way your money will be diversified across many companies. Smart investors try to stick to what they understand. If youre not a scientist, think twice before investing in a small, unproven firm pinning its hopes on a possible big breakthrough. I could have lost my shirt, twice. I love my brokerages online platform. Type in a ticker symbol, and out spews any information you want: charts, news, analysis, and so on. But when you go to place an order and you enter the ticker, you get lots of info, but not the company name. This shouldnt be a problem, but twice now, over some seven years, Ive entered my order and later found out I had transposed letters in ticker symbols. The first time, I found out the day after the order filled, so it cost me $14 in commissions to buy and sell the stock over two days. The other time, I only noticed because the stock suddenly surged 14 percent, and I looked into what my boring old manufacturer could have done to wow the market. Oops. D.M., Lincoln, Neb.The Fool Responds: This lesson seems trivial, but its important. Some companies tickers arent what you might expect: Intel, for example, is INTC, not INTL. Most brokerages trading systems will show you the company name when you enter the ticker, so double-check. The Motley Fool TakeLooking for a good performer for your portfolio? Consider Cisco Systems (Nasdaq: CSCO).Some think the company is in major trouble. Amid a more competitive landscape, gross profit margins have fallen, as has net income. In switches and routers, generating much of Ciscos revenues, the company has been losing ground. Cisco has also been too slow to take advantage of other key areas of networking growth such as WAN optimization.Yes, Cisco took its eye off the ball, delving into consumer markets and letting small upstarts get in the game. But it seems to be acknowledging its mistakes. In its recent quarterly report, management Cisco Undervalued Name That CompanyOne of my founders patented a postage-stamping machine in 1902. The other provided the U.S. Postal Service with stamp-canceling machines beginning in 1908. I was founded in 1920, the year I introduced the postage meter. I later pioneered lots of mailrelated innovations, such as remote downloading of postage, Internet postage and networked digital mailing systems. Today I offer other companies software, hardware and Last weeks trivia answerI trace my history and management back to Wilbur and Orville. Im the product of a 1929 merger of 12 companies. One of them was the worlds largest aviation company during World War I, churning out 10,000 aircraft during it. In 1927, one of my newfangled air-cooled engines performed well in Charles Lindberghs famous Spirit of St. Louis flight. In the 1950s, I pioneered the development of flight simulators for military and commercial aircraft. Today I specialize in motion control, flow control, and metal treatment technologies for industries such as defense, commercial aerospace and energy. Who am I?. ( Answer: Curtiss-Wright )services to improve their communications management. I employ more than 30,000 people and rake in more than $5 billion annually. I serve 2 million customers in more than 100 nations and hold 3,500 patents. Who am I? Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and youll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! asserted that it will divest or exit underperforming operations and it has killed its Flip video recorder. Management vowed to refocus on core businesses: routing, switching, and other services (cloud, virtualization and mobility solutions). Meanwhile, the market is pricing Cisco as if it will undergo a total catastrophe. Cisco is still the gold standard and the go-to when it comes to overall enterprise solutions, enjoying massive advantages of scale. And its stock price seems cheap, with a recent priceto-earnings (P/E) ratio near 12 vs. a five-year average of 20. Cisco churns out gobs of free cash flow every year and offers a 1.6 percent dividend yield, as well. (Motley Fool newsletters have recommended buying options and shares of Cisco Systems). Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Details, Details y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y 0 2. Ser i nes d in t age a il t e e t i le r nd s c m 30, 0 mo I ser more t h 3 ,500 pa Kn ow t h Foolish Triv entered into a COMMODITIES AND MANAGED FUTURES Worldwide Futures Systems specializes in the development, monitoring and execution of alternative investment strategies using what we consider to be one of the best Futures Trading Systems. We feel that it is our experience that has made us a leader in futures systems portfolio trading.Call now for a FREE consultation 239-571-8896Jeannette Showalter, CFA & Licensed Commodities Broker of Worldwide Futures Systems, LLC.showalter@wwfsystems.comwww.wwfsystems.comAn investment in futures contracts is speculative, involves a high degree of risk and is suitable only for persons who can assume the risk of loss in excess of their margin deposits. You should carefully consider whether futures trading is appropriate for you in light of your investment experience, trading objectives, nancial resources, and other relevant circumstances. PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS.Jeannette Showalter, CFA & LICENSED COMMODITIES BROKER Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 239.325.1960 Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$2995PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. 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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 BUSINESS B7 Admittedly, Im not a great administrator of managing people and wanted to make sure everythings handled very hands on, Mr. Cone said. That strategy worked even when clients started purchasing less of his services during the recession. A few disappeared altogether. The companys ties with the community and diverse clients also made the economic test bearable. Mr. Cone had been a journalist at The Naples Daily News for more than a decade before being recruited in 2000 to run the communications department at a Florida bank. In 2005, he was laid off when the bank went through a merger. He decided the time was right to start his company. 2006 and 2007 were both very good years, Mr. Cone said. And actually, 2008 wasnt so bad, he added. I didnt notice the slowdown until 2009, 2010. And that was primarily with clients in the financial services sector and real estate really just those two were the ones that were impacted the most. Some areas did especially well. Health care has remained strong, he said. Certainly it seems that the not-for-profit realm is still very steady, and government-related industries still seem to be paying for promotional and marketing campaigns. Through it all, hes remained the sole proprietor. Will he ever hire an assistant? He laughs. With any business there always seems to be administrative work Im talking about billing and invoicing, making runs to the bank, typing up documents; and sure, Id love to have assistance with that, but its not really how I set up the firm from the start. Overall, he sees a bright future. Some clients are loosening the purse strings on promotional budgets, but the recession lingers. The government says it ended two years ago, but I dont think anyone really believes that, Mr. Cone said. Lily & Co. Jewelers, Sanibel IslandSome say we were crazy to start when we did, said Dan Schuyler, co-owner of Lily & Co. Jewelers. And looking back, we were crazy. Thats crazy in a good way. The island store remained a profitable industry favorite with a mixture of chameleon-like change to meet consumer demand, along with strong community ties and a positive mindset, Mr. Schuyler suggests. We took some risks and they ended up paying off. It started when Mr. Schuyler, an experienced jeweler, opened the store with Karen Bell, a Sanibel and Captiva Realtor who knew all the right people. Mr. Schuyler sold Ms. Bell a pair of diamond earrings one fateful evening five years ago. They decided to go out for dinner later that evening and talk business. When Mr. Schuylers wife got back the next day from a trip, and discovered the two had already decided on a building for their new store, she was fully supportive, Mr. Schuyler remembers, laughing. He and Ms. Bell went ahead and bought the building. Others were concerned. I think a lot of people were afraid for us because of the economy, to open up a jewelry store in the worst economy since the Great Depression, he said. We didnt listen to a lot of that negative talk. We dont surround ourselves with that; we dont put up with that. Thats just not mine and Karens cup of tea. They were able to defy a trend toward cutting back on advertising during the slowdown, spending 10 percent of their budget on it every year. They also completed three remodeling and expansion efforts, and adjusted their inventory when consumers started spending in smaller increments. Expensive items still sold fairly well (this is Sanibel and Captiva after all), but there was a sharp drop in the prices middle-class consumers could command. The middle class drive the economy and theyre the ones you have to adjust to, Mr. Schuyler said. Thats Business 101 for you. He and Ms. Bell worked to become even more of a neighborhood jeweler, with lower-priced items as well as higherpriced ones. He likened it to a restaurant that serves mostly filet mignon also adding less-expensive cuts to the menu. If you dont put in the pot roast thats going to create cash flow to pay the electricity bills, and all the bills that come up every month, youre in trouble, Mr. Schuyler said. Last Saturday, Lily & Co. celebrated a fifth anniversary with food and entertainment, as well as one of the stores signatures: the event proceeds went to a local charity. Those types of commitments reinforce the stores connection to the island community, as well as Ms. Bells longstanding business relationships built as a realtor on Sanibel and Captiva. Thats been a huge boon for the store, Mr. Schuyler said. Visani Restaurant & Comedy Zone, Port CharlotteMark Visani has been a Charlotte County resident for two decades with dreams of opening his own restaurant and comedy club that go back just as far. When Hurricane Charley devastated the area in 2004, he had already invested thousands into planning the building where Visani Restaurant & Comedy Zone now stands. He reasoned then that the companies and workers who showed up to rebuild would be gone a few years later, leaving a profit vacuum. He didnt yet see how the broader economy would come near collapse as well. In any case, he pursued opening the new business. Im 44 at that point and I had a discussion with my wife. I said, If Im going to do this its going to be the hardest fight of my life because the economys going to tank and I just meant Charlotte County. He opened in November 2005 and noticed an economic slowdown a year later. Things had already started drying up, he said. The rest of the country was not into recession at that time but Charlotte County fell into the recession in November of 2006, in my opinion. Since then, keeping the doors open has been a battle, Mr. Visani said, exacerbated by the reputation comedy clubs have for treating food as a second thought. That made him even more determined to stake his claim to great food going with the show, an all-in-one night out. Were like a great restaurant that is also an entertainment venue, he said. I believe in giving the top quality product, the best entertainment I could bring into town, the highest quality food. I just preach that over and over again. Advertising outside the county also helped draw customers to his unique destination. And regular Wednesday and Thursday fundraisers for local charities also brought good karma, Mr. Visani said. It comes back and rewards you. You could say its a form of advertising but at the same time its doing good. Its a winwin for everybody. MILESTONEFrom page 1Jeffrey Novatt, Cheffy Passidomo PA; Kamela Patton, Collier County Public Schools; Kevin Pendley, Stanco, Robinson & Pendley LLP; Valerie Pike, Collier Enterprises Management Inc.; Daniel Rodriguez, Collier County Government-Public Utilities Division; Jessica Rosenberg, City of Naples Aimee Schlehr, Naples Art Association/The von Liebig Art Center; Jeffrey Sonalia, Barron Collier Companies; Nikki Strong, Neighborhood Health Clinic; Fritz Sullivan, Sullivan/Tassin; Aysegul Timur, Hodges University; Monica Villa, Barron Collier Companies; Jim Von Rinteln, Collier County American Red Cross; Daniel Washington, AMIkids Big Cypress; Stacy Welch, Collier Mosquito Control District; Greg Wetzel, Coldwell Banker/GT Partner Holdings LLC; Tom White, Hawthorn Suites of Naples; Tanya White, Pelican Bay Foundation; and Cyndee Woolley, C2 Communications. The Leadership Collier Foundation, a division of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce, administers programs including Leadership Collier, Growing Associates in Naples, Youth Leadership Collier, Campaign for Leadership and Leadership Institute. There are more than 800 alumni of the foundations programs, many of whom are leaders in local and regional government, nonprofit agencies and businesses. For more information, call 262-6376 or visit www. napleschamber.org. LEADERSHIPFrom page 1 Orderonline: www.jasonsdeli.com Homemade,Fresh&Oh, SoDeliciousStrawberryShortcakewith Driscollsstrawberries WeDeliverDailyPortCharlotte:USHwy.41&776941-235-3354 FortMyers:ReectionsPkwy.@CypressLake239-590-9994 CapeCoral:SantaBarbaranearVeterans239-458-8700 Naples:ImmokaleenearAirport239-593-9499 COURTESY PHOTOMark Visani of Visani Restaurant & Comedy Club told his wife, If Im going to do this, its going to be the hardest fight of my life because the economys going to tank. He was right.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB8 BUSINESS WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Wells Fargo grand opening at Pelican Bay 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 We tak em ore so cie ty and ne two rki ng pho tos at ar ea eve nts th an we can ti nt he new spa per S o if you th ink we mi sse dy ou or one of yo ur fri end s 8 9 10 11 1. Laura Wrenn and Danny Worzella 2. Erica and Todd Rosenthal 3. David Kasper and Myra Daniels 4. Rae Cella and MJ Scarpelli 5. Jeff Stedry, Paul LoPresti and Debbie Musick-Guill 6. Michelle Roy and Sean McVey 7. Elizabeth Davison, Anthony Scrocco, Tiffany Kuehner and Stephanie Jepsen 8. Chris LeMan, Bob Edwards and David Kasper 9. Amie and Sean Sanders 10. Gabrielle Nappo and Mark Schlehr 11. Laura Wrenn and David KasperPEGGY FARREN / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 BUSINESS B9 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.NETWORKING Lunch n Learn with The Arlington at Marco Island Yacht Club1. Marlene Heeman and Mary Riccardi 2. Herb Savage, Jeanette Simmermon and Emily Savage 3. Rose Roper and Silvano Moghazeh 4. Rachael Klein and Vicki Tracy 5. Rene Villeneuve and Bonnie Grace 6. Jerry Gerolomo and Rachael Klein A Friendraiser at Avenue Wine Cafe hosted by Young Executives for the David Lawrence Center 1 2 3 4 5 6 BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1. Daniel Dragan 2. Ryan Needler, Matt Sutton, Bill Benson, Shanna Short, Allison Durian and Brian Benson 3. Melanie Watterson and Daniel Dragan 4. Michael Cordone and Kelly McCready 5. Matt Sutton and Lauren Wright 1 2 3 4 5 COURTESY PHOTOS

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The Lutg ert Companies report sales continue at a strong pace at the luxury high-rise Tavira at Bonita Bay. From January through June 2011, there were 17 closed sales and two pending contracts totaling $31 million in sales activity. With the improving general economy, consumer confidence is improving, and buyers are making decisions, Mike Hoyt, senior vice president of Lutgert Development, says. Tavira is an attractive choice for the second-home buyer who wants a carefree lifestyle afforded by condominium living yet still needs space for family and entertaining, Mr. Hoyt adds. Taviras floor plans live like single-family homes. Soaring 25 stories, Tavira has 90 residences with floor plans encompassing 3,500 to 4,100 square feet of air-conditioned living space. Every residence has views of the Estero Bay Park preserve, Estero Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. It is the sixth of eight planned highrises in Bonita Bay. Taviras amenities range from social to recreational to therapeutic and athletic. The landscaped deck area has a heated pool with lap lane, individual poolside cabanas and covered screened cabana with fireplace, grills and Wi-Fi. Indoors is a health club with fitness center and mens and womens steam and massage room, card room, billiard room, theater and club room with bar and catering kitchen overlooking a preserve stand. A rooftop deck has custom seating, a bar area and grill. For worry-free living, Tavira has a resident manager. There is controlled-access parking, bicycle storage and climatecontrolled resident storage. Residents can also purchase memberships to the memberowned club with five championship golf courses, tennis and swim center, walking and cycling paths, three waterfront parks within the community and a private beach park on the Gulf of Mexico. The marina cub has a full-service marina with storage, dining facilities and egress to the Gulf of Mexico via the Imperial River and Estero Bay. Premier Sothebys International Realty, the real estate division of The Lutgert C ompanies, is the exclusive representative for The High-Rises at Bonita Bay. Residences at Tavira start at $1,200,000. Models are open daily. For more information, call 495-1105 or visit www.BonitaBay.com. Second-home buyers living the high life in Tavira at Bonita BaySPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY ED CHAPPELL / COURTESY PHOTOSTavira at Bonita Bay rises 25 stories. REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY B11WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 The housing supply in the Naples area dropped sharply during the past 12 months, according to the latest report from the Naples Area Board of Realtors. NABOR tracks home listings and sales within Collier County (excluding Marco Island). Although inventory has been consistently decreasing since November of 2008, the percentage decline of 18.5 percent during the past year is indicative of a rapidly escalating market, says Brenda Fioretti, NABOR president and managing broker of Prudential Florida Realty. Overall home sales continue a steady increase, resulting in the continuing reduction of available inventory. Overall pending sales increased 3 percent in the second quarter of 2011, with 2,879 contracts compared to 2,807 contracts in the second quarter of 2010. The Naples Beach geographic area saw the most activity, where pending sales increased 23 percent with the posting of 537 contracts in the second quarter of 2011, compared to 435 contracts in the second quarter of 2010. The largest increase in pending sales for the second quarter of 2011 is in the Naples Beach area, says Steve Barker of Amerivest Realty. This area continues to impr ove, and as the volume of inventory declines its creating urgency for the serious buyer to purchase now, before the best properties disappear, Mr. Barker adds. Phil Wood of John R. Wood Realtors predicts teardown sales will begin increasing because of the new construction shortage and the volume of sales activity in the Naples Beach area. Available properties declined to 7,208 at the end of the second quarter, an 18.5 percent drop from the 8,845 available at the end of the second quarter of 2010. The reduction in inventory and available properties that we are seeing in the resale market will encourage builders to step up their new production to meet this demand, says Kathy Zorn, broker/owner of Florida Home Realty. The second quarter report provides annual comparisons of single-family home and condo sales (via the SunshineMLS), price ranges and geographic segmentation. It also includes an overall market summary. The statistics are presented in chart format, along with the following analysis: Overall pending sales for the 12 months ending in the second quarter of 2011 increased 6 percent, with 9,950 contracts compared to 9,364 contracts in the second quarter of 2010. Single-family home sales for the 12 months ending in the second quarter of 2011 increased 5 percent, with 5,127 sales compared to 4,881 sales in the second quarter of 2010. Single-family home sales in the $2 million-plus category increased 56 percent, with 64 sales in the second quarter of 2011 compared to 41 salesNABOR report indicates home inventory decliningSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY SEE NABOR, B17 Left: The pool at Tavira Below: The rooftop deck e s r y m r e nvnv, of h e em l y

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B12 CAPTIVA ISLANDFORT MYERS NAPLESSANIBEL Relax. Finding Your Next Home is Just a Click Away. elaxR inding F Fi elax ust a is J Ju e x t our N Ne Y Yo inding wayAust a Click ome tH Ho y y. SLAND I A CAPTIV VA T M F OR R R E T MYERS E A L E S T A T E V A C A T I O APLES N O N R E N T A L S APLES P R O P E R T Y M M A N A G E M E N T ANIBEL S NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES UNDER CONTRACT REDUCED UNDER CONTRACT NEW LISTING NEW LISTING ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL

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DAVID WILLIAM AUSTON, PA AMERIVEST REALTY | NAPLES, FL | 239.273.1376www.DavidNaples.com Please visit my newly redesigned website! SW Gulf views. Over $300K in renovations. 2,076 sq ft. $1,329,000 in The Moorings. The Moorings Brand new luxury beachfront condos from $2.4 million and up Moraya Bay From $2 million in Park Shore to over $10 million in Port Royal Luxury Waterfront Built in 2007. 100 waterfront w/85 dock. Naples Bay view. SE exposure. 4,126 sq ft. $2,499,000 Royal Harbor Totally remodeled waterfront home. 4+den/4bath 3,400 sq ft. $3,079,000 in Aqualane Shores Aqualane Shoresnaples luxury real estate Call 239-280-5433 or visit www.DavidNaples.com Your Property Here!Call today to nd out more about the extensive and e ec ve marke ng services provided by David William Auston PA Built in 2006. Southern exposure. 4,111 sq ft. 4+den/4.5 bath/3 car $1,999,999 in Connors Vanderbilt Beach 3 distinct golf courses. Single family homes from $1.5 million to $5 million + Grey Oaks Luxury high rise beachfront condos. Priced from $2 million + Bay Colony 2,873 sq ft. Rarely occupied 2nd oor coach home. Southwest golf course view. $599,900 at Mediterra Built in 2007. 3,925 living sq ft. Private lake views. $1,995,500 at Mediterra 3,786 sq ft. 4bed/4bath. Built in 2007. Private lake views. $1,999,999 at Mediterramediterra 1.27 acre lot. golf/lake views. New 5bed/6bath. 10,262 total sq ft. $3,995,000 at Mediterra Brand new. 7,316 total sq ft. 1 acre lot. 4bed/4bath. Offered at $2,750,000 at Mediterra SOLD 3,204 sq ft. 2nd 3/3 coach home. Lake and preserve view. $699,900 at Mediterra REDUCED

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Put Your Investment Property To WorkWe have qualied tenants lined up and ready to rent! VacationRentals |Seasonal Rentals | Annual Rentals Theres no reason for your investment properties to be sitting idle and under performing. From Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero to Sanibel, Captiva and Fort Myers, we have quality, prospective tenants ready to rent your home now. Whats especially helpful for you is that our professional management team takes care of 100% of the details so you dont have to. Whether your property is available for rental for a week, a winter season, or a year from housekeeping to keeping it rented, were here for you. So, youre happy and your tenants are happy. Thats The Royal Treatment.Naples, Bonita and Estero | 601 5th Avenue South 239-213-3311 | 855-213-3311 | RoyalShellRentals.com Sanibel | 1547 Periwinkle | Captiva | 15050 Captiva Drive 239-472-9111 | 800-656-9111 | RoyalShell.com Fort Myers | 1870 Clayton Court 239-689-7653 | 800-805-0168 | RoyalShellRealEstate.comThis is not intended to solicit property that is already listed.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB17 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Visit your new house today!www.OpenHouseSWFL.comThe rst stop to nding your new house!OpenHouse Southwest Florida lists the open houses for any given day in Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero. Customize your search by choosing location, living area, price range and more, quickly and easily.We make nding your new home easy!The Of cial Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero REALTORS Website Jacki Strategos SRES, G.R.I., e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netwww.JackiStrategos.com Richard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.net Reserve this parcel for next season. Golf course view, storage shed. Motivated.Silver Lakes Mfg/RV Park $92,000 RENT OR PURCHASE Agricultural exemptions apply. Large pond, ready to build, 3 stall barn. Good location.11441 Riggs Road 5 Acres-$299,000 Like new, rarely used 3 BR/3BA home. Built in 2000 w/extended lanai, desired Southern exposure for afternoon sun.8836 Lely Island Circle $490,000 NO MANDATORY FEES LOWER MILLAGE RATE 791 10th Street South, Suite 202, Naples, FL 34102239.352.6400 .877.352.6404 .Naples@BristolRE.com www.BristolRE.comNaples, FL Boca Raton, FL Blue Bell, PA Paris, France Moorings Moorings 2401 Gulf Shore Blvd. N #12 2 Bed / 2 Bath Beachfront condominium at the Shores of Naples! Mary Carol Fitzgerald 239.641.1063 2401 Gulf Shore Blvd. N #8 2 Bed / 2 Bath Beachfront condominium at the Shores of Naples! Mary Carol Fitzgerald 239.641.1063Simplify your life! Call us today to speak with one of our real estate experts. A Whole New World Of Real Estate Services TM$675,000 $1,450,000 877.352.6404 Jean Ankner Raymond Ankner Judy Farnham Nick Angelillo Joni Henderson Dave Ison Alan Caroll Mary Carol Fitzgerald Keri Johnson-FitzgeraldBroker/CEO Realtor Realtor Realtor Realtor Realtor Broker Assoc. Realtor Realtor in the second quarter of 2010. Condo pending sales increased 6 percent, with 1,383 contracts in the second quarter of 2011 compared to 1,308 contracts in the second quarter of 2010.And just for JuneThe June report provides annual comparisons of single-family home and condo sales (via the SunshineMLS), price ranges, geographic segmentation and includes an overall market summary. The statistics are presented in chart format, along with the following analysis: Overall home sales in the $1 million to $2 million price range increased 21 percent, with 41 sales in June 2011 compared to 34 sales in June 2010. Single-family pending sales in the $2 million and above category increased 100 percent in June 2011, with 22 contracts compared to 11 contracts in June 2010. Condo sales saw a 7 percent increase, with 381 sales in June 2011 compared to 356 sales in June 2010. The high end of the market continues to strengthen as pending and closed sales increase in the $1 million and above price categories, says Wes Kunkle, broker/owner of Kunkle Realty. View the entire report at www.NaplesArea.com. NABORFrom page 11

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Our goal is to help you become the most productive executive possible.Signature | O ce : 239-384-9633 where the experts are Today is a great day to be an Executive.Realty Executives provides the right environment for my success, and allows me to interpret, adjust and customize my future, my way.I am an Executive.Call or email us today. Pat Pitocchi, Broker Cell: 239-398-8650 O ce: 239-384-9633 patpitocchi@realtyexecutives.com INTEGRITY EXPERTISE DIRECTION FOR REAL ESTATE AMERIVEST Realty Dramatic 2677SF, elegant upgrades, beach/ Wiggins Pass views. $799,000 Walk into breathtaking views! Wood rs, Granite kit. 3/3. $889,000 Granite kit, wood/tile rs, direct Gulf of Mexico views, 3/3 2677SF. $874,900 Beautiful waterfront! New decor, 2677SF, 3/3. $799,000 Waterfront, amazing views, furnished, 4/3.5Ba., end unit. $1,125,000 Granite kit, new carpet, upgrades, spacious 2428SF, Views!. $779,000 3096 SF, lanais off living & Master suite, amazing views. $1,499,000. Marble rs, new granite kit, Gulf views, 3+Den/3.5Ba. $1,299,900 (W-10 $82,500) (W-31 $191,000) (N-25 $249,900) Pelican Isle II #602 Pelican Isle III #503 Pelican Isle III #906 Boat Slips Available Pelican Isle II #302 Pelican Isle II #303 Pelican Isle II #404 Pelican Isle II #402 Pelican Isle III #605www.GulfnGolfNaples.com www.WigginsPass.com www.Fosterteam.Listingbook.com www.youtube.com/fosterteamnaples thefosterteam@comcast.net GENE FOSTER 239.253.8002 BRIDGETTE FOSTER 239.253.8001 'Download AT&T code or = scanner on your 'Smart phone' and read our QR code' Residences of Pelican Isle, Open House Sunday, July 24th 1-4pm PENDING 550 5th Ave S., Naples, FL 34102 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned And Operated By NRT LLC. FLORIDAMOVES.COM CLARIDGE IN PELICAN BAY$1,160,000 Panoramic views of Gulf & golf course from this upda ted 3BR/3BA condo on the 21st oor. The Claridge oers a ca sual but elegant lifestyle with pool/spa, guest rooms, library & more. Steps to tram to private beach pavilion plus all the fabulous Pelican Bay amenies. Larry Bresnahan 239 MARTINIQUE CLUB IN PARK SHORE$619,000 Awesome views of beach, Gulf & sun sets from this 2BR/2B A 1st oor coop (no land lease). 2 Master suites, large kitchen, marble oors in living areas & Berber carpet in bedrooms. High impact sliders & electric hurricane shuers. Beauful grounds & community pool. Garry Moore 239 EMERALD LAKES $239,000 Incredibly priced 3BR/2BA residence on lushly landscaped lot minut es to the beach, shopping & dining with preferred southern exposure, 11 vaulted ceilings, granite counter, le throughout with room for pool & more. Judy Hansen 239 THE QUARRY $400,000 Located in The Quarry, this impeccably maint ained 5BR 3 1/2BA SF home fea tures granite counters, upgraded cabi nets, diagonal le & a large 1st oor master suite with walk in closets & mas ter bath. Barry Brown 239 Recently Reduced!

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB22 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Blvd. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Marco Island Florida Weeklys Open Houses Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise marked>$1,000,000 13 OLD NAPLES PARKSIDE OFF FIFTH 601 7th Avenue South #202 $1,299,000 Premier SIR Richard/Susie Culp 290-2200 14 ESTUARY AT GREY OAKS 1485 Anhinga Pointe From $1,499,000 Premier SIR Call 239-261-3148 M-Sat:9-5 & Sun: 12-515 OLD NAPLES 663 11th Avenue South $1,795,000 Premier SIR Carol Steeves 240-7809 16 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #1105 $1,895,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 595-0544 17 ROYAL HARBOR 2192 Kingfish Road $1,895,000 Premier SIR Isabelle Edwards 564-4080 18 PELICAN BAY COCOBAY 7823 Cocobay Court $1,999,900 Premier SIR Jeri Richey 269-2203>$2,000,000 19 VANDERBILT BEACH MORAYA BAY 11125 Gulfshore Drive From $2,500,000 Premier SIR Call 239-5145050 M-Sat: 10-5 & Sun: 12-5>$3,000,00020 OLD NAPLES 175 3rd Street South $3,450,000 Premier SIR Celine Van Arsdale 404-9917 21 OLD NAPLES 155 20th Avenue South $3,995,000 Premier SIR Jan Martindale 896-0360>$6,000,000 22 PORT ROYAL 3999 Rum Row $6,950,000 Premier SIR Karen Van Arsdale 860-0894>$7,000,000 23 PORT ROYAL 3243 Gin Lane $7,895,000 Premier SIR Susan Barton 860-1412 >$10,00,00024 PORT ROYAL 3045 Fort Charles Drive $11,950,000 Premier SIR Michael Lawler 571-3939>$200,0001 VILLAGE WALK 3250 Village Walk Circle Ste #101 low $200,000s to mid $400,000s Illustrated Properties Real Estate, Inc. C all 239-5 96-2520 Mon-Fri 11 to 4 & Sat-Sun 11 to 4>$400,0002 THE STRADA AT MERCATO Located just North of Vanderbilt Beach Rd on US 41 From $400s Premier Sothebys International Realty Call 239.594.9400 M-Sat: 10-8 & Sun: 12-83 PARK SHORE VENETIAN COVE CLUB 3500 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #304 $425,000 Premier SIR Pat Duggan 216-19804 LEMURIA 7172 Lemuria Circle #1602 Prices from the mid $400s. Premier SIR Tom Gasbarro 404-4883. Open Mon-Fri: 11-4 & Sat/Sun: 1-4>$500,0005 BONITA BAY ESPERIA & TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive New construction from the mid $500s. Premier SIR Call 239.495.1105 M-Sat:10-5 & Sun: 12-56 MARCO ISLAND 1562 Jamaica Court $569,000 Premier SIR Roe Tamagni 3981222. FRIDAY OPEN HOUSE7 PARK SHORE ALLEGRO 4031 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #2E $599,000 Premier SIR Richard/Susie Culp 290-2200>$700,000 8 THE DUNES GRANDE PRESERVE 280 Grande Way Starting in the $700s. Premier SIR Call 239-594-1700 M-Sat: 10-4 & Sun: 12-49 PELICAN ISLE YACHT CLUB CONDOS 435 Dockside Drive $749,000 to $1,499,000 Amerivest Realty Bridgette Foster 239-2538001 10 PARK SHORE ESPLANADE CLUB 4551 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #202 $799,900 Premier SIR Patrick ODonnell/Phyllis ODonnell 250-3360>$800,000 11 VANDERBILT BEACH REGATTA I 400 Flagship Drive #PH07 $825,000 Premier SIR Patricia Bucalo 248-0694>$900,000 12 PELICAN ISLE YACHT CLUB II 435 Dockside Drive #703 $925,000 Premier SIR Suzanne Ring 821-7550 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 17 13 14 11 7 19 8 9 12 18 1 20 22 23 24 21

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE CSECTIONWEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: INSIDEThe High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Old Naples 434-2424 North Naples 594-9494 The Promenade 434-8770 Fifth Avenue 643-3445 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 A very good yearFor oenophile Jerry Greenfield, a trip to Bordeauxs biennial Vinexpo doesnt disappoint. C22 Hooray for HarryFilm critic Dan Hudak says Deathly Hallows: Part 2 is a grand finale, indeed. C11 The 26th annual SummerJazz on the Gulf continues with Late Night Brass, returning to the series for the third time, from 7-10 p.m. Saturday, July 23, on the lawn at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Admission is free. A high-energy band with a four-piece horn and rhythm sections and two vocalists, Late Night Brass performs a range of songs from such popular horn bands as Chicago, Earth Wind and Fire, Tower of Power, Blood, Sweat and Tears, and The Doobie Brothers. The group has opened for Chicago, Chris Botti, Huey Lewis and the News, Billy Joel and Elton John together, Michael Bubl and Sting, among others. Their performance will be the second in this years SummerJazz series, which continues on Aug. 27 with Monique and NuVibe and concludes on Sept. 24 with Blue Dice. Parking for all SummerJazz concerts is just north of the hotel at Lowdermilk Park (free for those with a Naples beach sticker). Free trolley service is provided from the park to the hotel. Lawn chairs and blankets for seating are encouraged; no coolers permitted. The hotel will have full bar service and food concessions on the lawn. The July 23 concert is sponsored by Insurance and Risk Management Services Inc. and CIGNA HealthCare of Florida. For more information, call 2612222 or visit www.naplesbeachhotel.com. Jazz up your summer at the Naples Beach HotelSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Artists Among UsMeet contemporary painter Tim Parker. C3 eah Diederich writes thank-you notes. Not the flowers and rainbows with curlicue script Hallmark kind. And not the obligatory Dear Aunt Mildred, thanks for the birthday gift kind, either. Ms. Diederichs thank-yous are edgy and unexpected, written to things and moments and also to people shes never met. Just like Pablo Neruda penned poems about common things, writing odes to his socks and bed and scissors, Ms. Diederich addresses her appreciation to dust, to clean sheets, sneezes, doors and the turntable I said I wouldnt buy but bought anyway. Shes even written notes to headaches, fog and the half-dead plants on my desk.nstetson@ oridaweekly.com Offbeat thank-you notes keep author true to herselfSEE NOTES, C4 COURTESY PHOTO SummerJazz on the Gulf

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The Naples Jazz Masters performing Dixieland Jazz Group discounts available. For Tickets or more information call the box of ce at 239-213-3049.PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM PERFORMANCE DATE.Every Saturday through the Summer 1pm 3pm Tickets: $15 per person or $25 for two Presents... Bha!Bha!A Persian Bistro BELLY DANCERS NIGHTComplimentary while you dine.2-4-118% gratuity added before discount. Must present coupon. Dine-in only. Limit 2 persons per coupon. EVERY DAY ENJOY LUNCH WITH PRIX-FIXE 3-COURSE MENU Not valid on holidays.EVERY NIGHT ENJOY DINNER WITH PRIX-FIXE 3-COURSE MENU Not valid on holidays.www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 SUMMER SAVINGS With the purchase of 2 Dinner Menu Entres. Not valid with any other discounts. One coupon per table. Expires September 30, 2011 Must present coupon in advance. WINE DOWN WEDNESDAY 6pm-9pmLive Jazz Reduced Prices Complimentary Wine TastingsHAPPY HOUR 1/2 OFF All Drinks in the M Lounge Every Day 4pm-6pm SUNDAY BRUNCH Serving 10:30am-3pm In the Pacific Northwest, where Im attending a writers conference all week, the sky stays light long into the evening, even after the heat has passed from the day and cool air has rolled down from the mountains like fog. The conference is set on the sprawling green campus of a small liberal arts college. Before I arrived, I asked a friend what the experience would be like. Like summer camp for adults, she said. I saw early-on that she was right. We stay in dorm rooms with walls so thin we might as well be sleeping in side-byside bunks. We brush our teeth at communal sinks in the mornings and we eat breakfast together in a vast dining hall where we return again for lunch and again for dinner. At night we attend authors readings that feel like campfire circles. The wind blows through the leaves of the alders while the last light drains from the sky. But it took me a few days to understand what she really meant. That, like summer camp, the conference is a time apart from the world, untethered, without the restrictions and ambiguities that guide our daily lives. In that Summer camp for adults SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTS artisHENDERSON sandydays@floridaweekly.com space away from normal life the few days weve created by stepping back and apart the strangest relationships bloom. The first night of the conference I lay in my narrow bed and listened to the nocturnal sounds of the man, Charlie, in the next room. Hes in his 70s, and he came alone to the conference. He writes about the South during the middle of the last century. When he reads during the open mic sessions, his voice thunders as if he were giving a sermon. Through the dorm room walls at night, I hear him push back the wooden chair in his room. He breaks wind loudly, like an organ tuning before church. Later, I wake during the brief hours of the dark night and hear him snoring. Sometimes he talks in his sleep, urgent and mournful. I came back from a reading on the second night and saw Charlie in the dorms lounge. He spoke with Patty, a When he reads during the open mic sessions, his voice thunders as if he were giving a sermon. few b ac k h ips I lay t h e r lie and H e m i d e ads o ice m on. gh t, h air l i k e e r, I d ark m es u rnthe the t y, a c r e short, round woman from Boca Raton I met on the first day. She caught me coming out of my room as she stepped out of hers. Youre from Fla-ri-da? she said, pronouncing each syllable. Me too. Moved down after I retired. The third night, I came back later than usual. The reading had run late and the coolness of the evening had seeped into our toes and fingers. We stood and stretched, shivered in our light coats, and made our way back to the dorms. The lounge area was empty but I heard whispered voices through the thin walls when I let myself into my room. I heard Charlies voice and the voice of a woman, the kind you hear in South Florida. They laughed softly and whispered long into the night, the way campers will when the boys have snuck over to the girls side, huddled in the dark, letting improbable romance blossom miles away from the ordinary world.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C3 ARTISTS AMONG US >>Describe your art form. Mixed media contemporary. >>How do you explain your style? My paintings often take on lives of their own and almost paint themselves as I explore the interaction between texture, brush strokes, color, the human figure and other forms. I strive to create paintings that, at first glance, exhibit a multidepth work of art that can stand on its own; upon closer look, one can find a figure or figures intertwined with expressive brush strokes and blocks of color to finish the painting, giving it multiple dimensions. >>Where can we see your work? I am the principal artist of Art2D.com, a custom fine art business here in Naples. My studio/gallery at 2076 J&C Blvd. is where I paint and exhibit my art. Also, I participate in several juried fine art shows between Florida and New York. >>When did you discover your creative talents? It was something that came naturally to me at a very young age, and I followed that path. I always enjoyed painting and drawing. As time went on, I explored and experimented with various mediums such as canvas, jute, wood and aluminum to create 3-D sculptures that I would finish off with a painted scene or subject. >>Where are you from and where have you studied? I was raised in Ohio and moved to New York City to study art at Parsons School of Design. I worked for the next 22 years as an artist, illustrator and creative director. I earned my masters degree in art education from Adelphi University. I moved to Florida in 2003. >>What did you do before becoming a full-time artist? As a creative director in New York City, I spent many years marketing, branding and creating advertising for high-end fashion, fragrance and cosmetic companies. My work revolved around images of beautiful women in ads and sales materials for such clients as Christian Dior, Victorias Secret, Elizabeth Arden, Revlon, Clinique, Escada, Sephora, Bali, Ralph Lauren Intimates, Hanes Hosiery, Avon and Leggs. >>What inspires you? Nature and music. The flora and fauna in Naples; I enjoy painting tropical sunset scenes and the magnificent birds here. >>How do you use technology in your work? The computer is a very useful part of my business in terms of illustrating concepts to show a client a fairly clear layout for a specific idea in a painting. This is very helpful for those who prefer to look at something more concrete beforehand. >>Who is the artist you would most like to meet? Francis Bacon, a very interesting artist. >>Outside of your art, what are you passionate about? All sorts of history. Im reading a book about the history of the Civil War now. >>Tell us about some of the recognition youve received for your work. I was proud to be chosen as the poster artist for ArtFest Fort Myers, and I have received various awards from the Naples Art Association. >>What would you want to be doing if you werent an artist? Playing in the NFL. >>Who are your favorite artists? Francis Bacon, Salvador Dali, John Singer Sargent, Veloy Vigil. Artists Among Us is provided by the United Arts Council of Collier County. The council promotes all the arts in Collier County and provides education in the arts for at-risk students. For more information and a calendar of arts and cultural events, call 263-8242 or visit www.CollierArts.com.Tim Parker, painter Dibtf iMklddi COURTESY PHOTOFloating Grace by Tim Parker www.janesnaples.comNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING 15% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 2011 15% OFF WITH THIS AD. VALID UNTIL OCT. 2011 Sunday Brunch 8am-3pm oldenaplesvet349 14th Ave. South Naples, Florida 34102 239.331.3345 Mobile Pet Club: Text ONV to: 97063 www.OldeNaplesVet.com 20% OFFALL SERVICESWITH THIS AD.EXPIRES 8/31/11. Full Service Boutique Style Veterinary Hospital in the heart of Historic Olde Naples.Anne Lozynski, D.V.M

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Like everyone else, she was forced to write thank-you notes for gifts when she was a kid. My mother was really serious about it, she says. As a kid, I thought it was a pain. As an adult, I saw how much it means to people to be thanked. I think its rare. That connection with people made me want to keep doing it long after my mom had an influence on me. A number of years ago, she had the idea for an art project: Shed write thank-you notes to things. But, after doing it for a while, she let it lapse. Then, in 2009, her partner had the opportunity to move to New York City for a yearlong art residency. Wed been living together for quite a long time, six years, she says. But I wasnt ready to leave L.A. She did, however, want him to follow his dream. So while he was gone, she returned to her thank-you note project. Pretty much everything in my life had turned into this flux, she says. I was looking for something to ground me. I was feeling unsure about the future of my relationship, and was looking for one thing to be thankful for. It helped keep me in the present. I felt more grounded, calm and happy. The first thank-you she wrote was to words: Dear Words, Thank you for letting me make art with you. I cant really draw well, so youre a big help. See you soon. And she just kept going. After shed written a number of notes, she shared them with a friend, who told her she should start a blog. But she wasnt sure. Theres a huge culture of cynicism right now, she says. I felt the Internet has made it easier to by cynical and snarky. Coming up with this thing that made me feel good, I thought itd be perceived as uncool to be grateful. Then I thought, Screw it. Why should I be embarrassed of that? It doesnt have to be uncool or soft to be grateful. So she started the blog www. thxthxthx.com posting one thank-you a day. It became a thing to me; I had the feeling that I want to be true to myself, and it doesnt have to be uncool. It started to get passed around on the Internet, and now Ive got thousands and thousands of people who look at it every day. Its mind-blowing. And if you think her thank-you notes are all sunshine and lollipops, consider this one: Dear Kindness, Thank you for killing people. Youre definitely my favorite weapon. If only they made a holster for you, perhaps I could wield you more quickly. Thanks again, Leah.From blog to bookA literary agent saw the blog and asked her if she wanted to do a book proposal. I had envisioned it as a book, Ms. Diederich says. I envision everything as a book. I love books. That had been my intention, to do a book of these. thxthxthx: thank goodness for everything ($14.99, Andrews McMeel Publishing) was released at the end of May. Each page contains a thank-you note written by Ms. Diederich in her distinctive, half-printed, half-cursive hybrid handwriting. Most are no longer than two or three sentences. I think all of the other activities that I engage in my job as a creative director, the short films I make help me structure the ideas I have naturally, she says. One good thing about advertising is that it focuses you to be really concise. Advertising has taught her how to be creative within constraints, to write a small headline, or to make a spot no longer than 30 seconds long. The sort of odd things that I might think of to thank, though, she says, is just my personality. A unique perspectiveShe has a unique way of looking at things, coming at them from an oblique angle. For example, her thank-you note to heavy eyelids: Dear heavy eyelids, Thanks for being a reason to stop. Id been looking for one, and you were just the thing. Thanks. Or this one: Dear Songs Im Embarrassed to Like, Thanks for making times when Im alone at home or in my car that much more delicious. Ill sing you at the top of my lungs and get that amazing guilty pleasurable feeling thats hard to come by without chocolate, drugs or alcohol. Love you! Or: Dear People Who Dont Get It, You make me explain my ideas more clearly, and sometimes that helps me understand them better too. So thank you for that. All the best, Leah. Some of her blogs are to authors or books. Shes thanked Don DeLillo, the novel Infinite Jest, Books, Piles of Books I Havent Read Yet, Printed Reading Materials and Haruki Murakami (Thank you for making me confuse your stories with my own dreams. When I read one of your books, I have that perpetual was-thata-dream-or-real-life-or-something-I-read feeling. Its a pretty enchanting state of mind. Thanks again.) Books are so hugely important to me, she says. When you read something and you connect to the characters, you feel gratitude for the person who wrote it. You dont ever get a chance to thank that person who allowed you to have these feelings or make that connection with those authors. The obvious thing to me is to thank them.Memoir of a yearShes enjoyed a great response to her own book. Ms. Diederich and thxthxthx were written about in the Atlantic magazines blog, in an NPR blog and in The Book Bench, The New Yorker blog. A couple of people have told me, I thought I would just read one or two, and I wound up reading all of them. Its really nice that its not repetitive. And while readers might feel the notes are random, Theyre almost completely in chronological order in the way I wrote them, she says. So it reads very much as a memoir of my year to me: Oh yeah, I remember what that note is associated with. In a sense, she created a memoir of things she was grateful for over a period of time. Writing her quirky thank-you notes has changed her life, she says. It forces a shift in her mindset, knowing she has to post a thank-you each day on her blog. In the back of my mind, on a subconscious level, Im always looking for something to write about, she says. It has subtly shifted the way I see the world, to have something to be thankful for, to find the thing that I can learn from or thank, even if its not a good thing or something that makes me happy. Thats the beauty of it. It has the ability to change my life, to have that shift in view. It makes the world so much more alive. There are so many more things to be aware of. It makes life a lot richer. NOTESFrom page C1DIEDERICH COURTESY PHOTOSLeah Diederich got a book deal after posting her thank-you notes on the Internet.

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Saturday, July 23 at 2 p.m. at Fashions from Miromar Outlets The hottest looks for all ages from students to teachers! Meet Miss Florida-US International and Jr. Miss Florida-WorldFor more information, please contact Suzi Hosfeld at (239) 822-4661 or email at famemodeltalent@aol.com FOLLOW US ON:Presented byMIROMAR OUTLETSandENVY MODELS & TALENT B A C K T O S C H O O LF in So INFO: (239) 948-3766 HOURS: Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. LOCATION: I-75, Exit 123, Corkscrew Road/Miromar Outlets Blvd. In Estero, between Naples & Fort MyersVisit www.MiromarOutlets.com for more details on spectacular offers and events.07202111-1886

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 AVON PRODUCTSBy Linda Jones IN-STORE DISCOUNTStore 239.331.7491 Fax 239.331.7492 mayihelpu2day@comcast.net www.youravon.com/ljones6508 1/2 PRICED WINE LISTbottles up to $100expires 7/28/11 BUY ONE GET ONEpurchase one dish, get the second freegood for lunch or dinner = or lesser value +18% gratuity before discountexpires 7/28/11must present coupon at time of purchase. cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer2455 vanerbilt beach road naples 34109 239.254.0050 BEST HAPPY HOUR IN TOWNALL drinks 1/2 price 4-8 NIGHTLY WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Weekend Best Bets July 22: Friday Boredom Buster Films. Headquarters Library. 593-0870 www.collier-lib.org. July 22: Music Around the World. Marco Library. 394-3272 www.collier-lib. org. July 22-24: Collier County Museum self-guided tours. 252-8476 or www. colliermuseums.com. July 23: Duke Turner oral history film. The Naples Historical Society at Palm Cottage. 261-8164 or www. napleshistoricalsociety.com. July 23: Glory matinee. Collier County Museum. 252-8476 or www.colliermuseums.com. July 24: Nowhere in Africa foreign film. FGCU Renaissance Academy, Naples Center. 434-4737 or www.fgcu. edu/racademy. July 24: Summer Sunday. Kathleen Bradford Studio/Gallery. 776-6844 or www. artistkb.com. Theater 42nd Street By The Naples Players at the Sugden Community Theatre through July 30. 263-7990 or www. naplesplayers.org. New Plays Audience members help judge Theatre Conspiracys annual New Play Contest as part of a fundraiser at 7 p.m. July 23 at the Alliance of the Arts, Fort Myers. $50. 936-3239 or www. theatreconspiracy.org. Annie By Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Fort Myers, through Aug. 13. 278-4422 or www.BroadwayPalm.com. 42nd Street By KidzAct of the Naples Players at the Sugden Community Theatre Aug. 5-7. 263-7990 or www. naplesplayers.org. Run For Your Wife By the Off Broadway Palm Theatre, Fort Myers, July 21-Aug. 28. 278-4422 or www.BroadwayPalm.com. Disneys Aladdin Jr. By the Broadway Palm Childrens Theatre at Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Fort Myers, through Aug. 12. 278-4422 or www.BroadwayPalm.com. School House Rock Live Jr. By the Youth Theater Department of the Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs, Aug. 5-6. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Thursday, July 21 Road Trip The FGCU Renaissance Academy hosts a day trip to the Chihuly Collection and Salvador Dal museums in St. Petersburg. $100. Register at RA.fgcu.edu or 434-4737. Friday, July 22 Art Party Sweet Art Gallery hosts an opening reception for All Mixed Up from 6-8 p.m. 2054 Trade Center Way. 5972110 or www.TheSweetArtGallery.com. Dig It A ground penetrating radar survey presented by the Southwest Regional Center of the Florida Public Archaeology Network starts at 11 a.m. at the historic Kirkland Cemetery on Shell Island Road. 590-1476, 417-6310 or www. flpublicarchaeology.org. Tortugas Talk Everglades National Park ranger Susan Reece discusses the Dry Tortugas National Park at 2 p.m. at Naples Regional Library, 650 Central Ave. 263-7768 or 262-4130. Bluegrass Tunes The Lost Rodeo performs from 7-10 p.m. at Freds Food, Fun & Spirits. $5 cover. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928 or www. fredsdiner.com. Gambling Girls Its Girls Night from 9-10 p.m. at Seminole Casino Immokalee. (800) 218-0007 or www. seminoleimmokaleecasino.com. Saturday, July 23 Fine Felines The Platinum Coast Cat Fanciers annual cat show takes place today and Sunday at the Araba Temple, 2010 Hanson St. in Fort Myers. jcampb4244@aol.com, 772-5399 or www.catshows.us/platinumcoast. Dixieland Jazz The Naples Jazz Masters perform from 1-3 p.m. at The Norris Center. $15 per person, $25 for two. 213-3049. Sing Along Join the karaoke fun from noon-4 p.m. at Bahama Mamas Tiki Bar at Flamingo Island Flea Market in Bonita Springs. 948-7799 or www.flamingoisland.com. Fall Fashions Miromar Outlets and Envy Models and Talent present a Back-to-School Fashion Show from 2-3 p.m. Meet Miss Florida-US International and Jr. Miss Florida-World. 822-4661 or famemodeltalent@aol.com. Foreign Film The South County Regional Library presents Mine at 2 p.m. Free. 21100 Three Oaks Parkway. 533-4440 or 533-4415. Back To Woodstock The Groovy Music Festival, hosted by the Morgan House, runs from 5-11 p.m. at the Patio de Leon in downtown Fort Myers. Live music by The Oysters Fantastic Band, M80s, Memphis 56, Stolen Fruit and David C. Johnson. 337-3377. Hot Autos Cool cars of all makes and models cruise into downtown Fort Myers from 5-8 p.m. 332-4443. Late Night Brass The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club presents Late Night Brass as part of its SummerJazz series from 7-10 p.m. on the lawn overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. Free. 2612222 or www .naplesbeachhotel.com. More Free Music Gulf Coast Town Center presents The Hat Boys playing classic oldies from 8-10 p.m. under the stars in Market Plaza. 267-0783 or wwwgulfcoasttowncenter.com. Sunday, July 24 Summer Art The Kathleen Bradford Studio/Gallery hosts Summer Sundays from 1-4 p.m. today and Aug. 28. Meet the gallery artists, enjoy refreshments and register to win artwork. 4259 Bonita Beach Road. 776-6844 or www.artistkb.com. Foreign Film FGCUs Renaissance Academy presents a screening and discussion of Nowhere in Africa (Germany, 2001) beginning at 1 p.m. 1010 Fifth Ave. S. $5. 425-3272. Monday, July 25 Rainbow Town Watch the film and discuss it afterward with friends of the Fort Myers Film Festival beginning COURTESY PHOTOOriginal paintings by Art League of Marco Island member Carolyn Burger including Dusk, above are on display this month at the Marco Island Library. In addition to local landscapes, flora and fauna, Ms. Burger paints scenes from her travels to places far and wide, such as Greece, Guatemala and Nova Scotia. Her studio, Portside Studio, is part of the Artist Colony at the Esplanade on Marco. The Marco Island Library at 201 S. Heathwood Drive is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Call 394-3272.

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Naples Best Kept Secret 4221 Tamiami Trail East NaplesLocated on US 41 opposite Sugden Park Open Mon-SatQuality Food. Exceptional Service.Call 239.793.2644 or visit www.mongellos.com Our outdoor patio is PET-FRIENDLY anytime, any day! SUMMER SPECIALSChoice of 2 Dinners & Bottle of House Wine $26.95 Lunch Daily from $4.95 Dinner Daily from $12.95FREE Appetizer Sampler PlatterEvery Night with Purchase of a Reg. Priced EntreLive Entertainment NightlyThis Week Featuring...Myles Loud Michael Angelo Wendy Renee Jackie Lee Karaoke with Steve SmithDANCE PARTYTues & Fri 7PMKARAOKEWed 6:30PM Join us as we celebrate with our new Award-WinningChef James Buis! & Nicks Place Saturday, July 30thNevada Smith & the Bud Girls Starting at 7pm We will be introducing our new F rank n St ein Special. $4.95 for a 20 oz stein of beer and hot dog. For $4.95 more, you can keep the stein! 2nd Wounded Warriors Bene t in conjunction with the Womens Auxiliary of the American Legion. Thursday July 21st, 6:00pmAuctions, Raf es & Prizes! All proceeds will go to help our Military overseas. WE WILL BE MATCHING ALL FUNDS RAISED. *Michael Angelo Performing* *Remote Broadcasting with Sunny FM 106.3WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO at 6:30 p.m. at the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center in downtown Fort Myers. $5. www.fortmyersfilmfestival.com. Tuesday, July 26 Just Curious Gulf Coast Town Center presents Curious George beginning at 8:30 p.m. under the stars in Market Plaza. Free. 267-0783 or www.gulfcoasttowncenter.com. Wednesday, July 27 Opera in HD See The Metropolitan Operas performance of Don Carlo in high definition at area cinemas at 6:30 p.m. Screenings are at the Hollywood Stadium-20 in Naples, Hollywood Coconut Point-16 in Estero and the Bell Tower-20 in Fort Myers. $15. www. metopera.org/hdlive. Open Mic Freds Food, Fun & Spirits hosts an open mic/singer/songwriter night from 7-10 p.m. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928 or www.fredsdiner.com. Coming up Art On The Promenade Watch the artists at work when the Center for the Arts Studios at the Promenade at Bonita Bay presents Studio Walk from 4-7 p.m. July 28. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Whatll It Be? Shulas at the Hilton Naples presents celebrity bartender and former Miami Dolphin Charlie Babb in a fundraiser for the Make-A-Wish Foundation from 5-7 p.m. July 29. Admission is free and drinks are half-price. 9929474 or www.sfla.wish.org. Local Talent Naples singer/ songwriter Frankie Colt performs from 8:30-10:30 p.m. July 30 at Freds Food, Fun & Spirits. Guy Time Guys Night Out starts at 6 p.m. Aug. 2 at The Hurricane Grill & Wings at Coconut Point. Enjoy gentleman-friendly fun including cocktails, cigars, jazz and blues to benefit the Bonita Springs Assistance Office. $40. 989-2588 or http://bonitaassistance.org. Summer Art The Caribbean Chillers play Jimmy Buffett tunes from 2-6 p.m. Aug. 6 at Seminole Casino Immokalee. 658-0204 or www.seminoleimmokaleecasino.com. Submit calendar listings and photos to events@floridaweekly.com. E-mail text, jpegs or Word documents are accepted. No pdfs or photos of flyers. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C7 KEN HOWARD / THE METROPOLITAN OPERAFerruccio Furlanetto as Philip II in Don Carlo, playing in theaters July 27.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch 263-9940 263-2734 www.napleswaterfrontdining.com fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Limited time offer. Not good with any other offer.The genius of Kickstarter is that people can donate small amounts of money; maybe one person cant donate $100, but 10 friends can donate $10 apiece. Chris tells me he has just cast actress Tina Alexis Allen, who recently workshopped a one-woman show in New York City, to play the title role. The 13-minute film will be shot in New Jersey and on Long Island, N.Y., with Chris directing. For the two-minute trailer, Chris interviewed a number of people who are out of work. He had extra footage he didnt use, so, like a fabric artist, he decided to create something with the scraps the result: Down and Out in NYC, a short documentary about Generation Yers struggling with unemployment. From time to time, I think of that scene in the 1980 movie Fame, where an acting student is irritated with a fellow student. She says, I must remember this feeling and use it in my acting! And thats what all artists do. If all youre seeing right now is a pile of ashes, maybe its time for the phoenix to appear. To learn more about Molly, go to www.kickstarter.com and key in the word Molly. Its the first film that comes up.hits the job boards. Some days Im super Zen about the whole thing. Other days I feel like the world is in motion and Im standing still. What keeps him going? His creative endeavors.I cant really control when Ill return to work full time, he says, but I can park myself in front of my laptop for two hours a day and write. Ive also been fortunate to get enough freelance work to keep my head above water. Hes worked as a script reader, and for three summers now, has been the head media instructor for the Youth Media Symposium at Rutgers University, teaching kids from underprivileged neighborhoods in Newark, N.J., the basics of filmmaking. They then produce a short documentary together. Chris has made short films of his own and is gearing up to make another. Molly is the story of a woman whos lost her job and her apartment and is living out of her car with her cat, Sylvie. In desperation, she turns to her brother, Brendan, on his birthday. But theres bad blood between the two. As hard as it was for me to be laid off, Im a young guy and dont have a family yet, Chris says. Ive read many accounts of mothers and fathers being laid off, breadwinners who cant support their families or pay their mortgages. Ive read stories about people living out of their cars or in tent cities, when a year ago they had health insurance and a roof over their heads. Ive seen members of my own family, as well as friends, lose their jobs and have to endure extreme hardships; people who fancied themselves middle class and were firm believers in the promise of the American Dream knocked down a socioeconomic peg in the span of a couple years. This recession is persistent and has destroyed the lives of so many people. And that was the first seed of inspiration for writing Molly. My own personal experience and ARTS COMMENTARY One of the magical things about the arts is the way writers, filmmakers, musicians and artists can turn dross into gold. They take their struggles, their pains, their heartaches and transform them into art. Its a way of making sense of our lives, and its a way of taking something negative and turning it into something good.And because its personal, its paradoxically also universal. Rafael Yglesias, whose wife struggled with cancer and died, turned that experience into a critically praised novel, A Happy Marriage. Filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock was able to make many suspenseful movies because he personally was afraid of so many things he could see the potential danger someone else might not think twice about. The songs on British pop singer Adeles latest bestselling album, were inspired by a breakup. (And the guy actually had the nerve to show back up in her life and ask for a cut of the CDs profits, reasoning that because she was writing about him, he deserved part of the money. I am not making this up.) Sue Graftons series of alphabetical mystery novels (starting with A is for Alibi) was inspired by two things: One, during a long and painful divorce, she daydreamed of creative ways to kill her ex, and put those schemes on paper. And two, someone told her she lacked the skills to create a good plot, so she decided to write a book in one of the most plot-driven genres she knew the mystery. And now we have the private investigator Kinsey Millhone and, so far, 22 books in the series. (Thats also counting V is for Vengeance, which will be released in November.)So when I learned about my nephews new project, it made perfect sense to me.My nephew, Chris Stetson, is an actor and also a writer/director living in New York City. He lost his job as the multimedia producer for Autism Speaks a couple of years ago and, like many in this difficult economy, has been scrambling ever since. I feel like weve been programmed to get up and go to work and follow a set pattern, he says. When you deviate from the pattern, its jarring. Most days, he says, he wakes up and h Z t l m i nancySTETSON nstetson@floridaweekly.com Making Molly out of unemploymentinterest in family dynamics helped me develop the story from there, Chris explains. I kept wondering, What happens when your unemployment runs out and youre still out of work? Its easy to say someone should just pick up a shovel or apply for a gig at Starbucks. In reality, though, pride often gets in the way. Not to mention the fact that youre probably competing with hundreds of others for the same job and the odds are against you. So what happens? Do you hit rock bottom? Then what? Those are the questions that kept bouncing around in my head when I was developing the screenplay. To raise the money needed to make the short film, hes posted a page on Kickstarter, an online fundraising venue. (Theyre aiming for $5,000 and hoping for $12,000.) People can go online, read about the project and watch a trailer about Molly. If they feel its a worthwhile project, they can donate any amount from $1 on up. If they raise $5,000 by their deadline (Aug. 4), then Chris, producer Javian Le and their film crew get the money and can make Molly. If not, Kickstarter doesnt take any money from any of the donors, and the project doesnt happen. e r e l n m ol k I n t w o e te e d a r w, d r i d s ed COURTESY PHOTOTina Alexis AllenCOURTESY PHOTOChris Stetson

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C9 PUZZLE ANSWERS Steven Weinman, executive vice president and COO at CHS Healthcare, recently received the Lois Potter Hill Award at the 30th annual meeting of the Florida Association of Community Health Centers. The conference brings together healthcare professionals, academic scholars, researchers, state policy makers and other stakeholders in the effort to provide high quality, cost efficient health care services. The Lois Potter Hill Award recognizes individuals for their personal commitment and contribution to the improvement of the health, education and social well-being of all individuals. Recipients of this award are advocates for migratory agricultural workers and the less fortunate. A colleague of Mr. Weinmans stated, Steve has dedicated a lifetime to ensuring that CHS, his state affiliations and the national partners remain true to the intent of farmworker health programs: affordable, accessible health care for the neediest of the neediest His efforts on the frontlines as well as at the state and national levels have contributed to the improvement of the programs serving farm workers and his organization. It is for his dedication to the farm workers that Mr. Weinman is so very deserving of this award. He has been in management with CHS Healthcare for more than 27 years. A not-for-profit, Federally Qualified Health Center, CHS was founded in 1977 by a group of community leaders for the purpose of improving the health of migrant and seasonal farmworkers, the rural poor and other citizens in Collier County. As the population in Collier County has increased, so has its need for quality, professional medical and dental health care. Always sensitive to these growing needs, Mr. Weinman and the CHS administration and staff have responded by expanding its services and locations. What began in a pair of trailers in Immokalee has grown into an organization with 11 locations and the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile, a mobile pediatric medical and dental office. This expansion has helped to establish multiple partnerships with colleges, universities and other organizations in an effort to ensure the availability of quality primary health care in our community. Examples of these partnerships include a pediatric dental residency program with the University of Florida College of Dentistry and a medical student training facility with the Florida State University College of Medicine. Mr. Weinman began his career at CHS as the director of information technology. During four years in that position, he produced a practice management software system that was used at CHS and other health centers for nearly 15 years. In 1988, he became one of two CHS vice presidents, as well as CFO of the organization. Under his stewardship, organizational revenues have increased from less than $3 million to more than $45 million in 2010. During the same period, our dependence on federal grants has dropped significantly. Mr. Weinman also played an integral role in implementing an electronic health record system at CHS. In addition to his work at CHS, Steve has done extensive consulting for other health care organizations. He has performed board training, strategic planning, IT and financial analysis, grant preparation and an extensive number of programmatic reviews for the federal government. A frequent speaker on various health center issues, he serves on the board of directors for the National Center for Farmworker Health, whose president and CEO, E. Roberta Ryder, says, Steve is one of those unique individuals whose personal drive is an example to each of us. His accomplishments make it clear that diligence and respectful consideration of the needs of all are essential components for professional and personal success. I had the privilege of knowing Lois Hill and know that she would be very proud of Steves dedication to farm workers in Florida and across the nation. Congratulations, Steve. You make us very proud, indeed. Connie Dillon is the executive director of the CHS Healthcare Foundation. For more information, visit www.collier.org or www.chshealthcarefoundation.org.GIVING VPs lifetime of advocacy for the less fortunate earns a statewide honorBY CONNIE DILLON____________________Special to Florida WeeklyCOURTESY PHOTOSteve Weinman, center, is congratulated by Connie Dillon, left, and Pat Mabe, board secretary of the Florida Association of Community Health Centers. LOCATED AT NAPLES GRANDE BEACH RESORT A Waldorf Astoria Resort 475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34103 AURA BAR VEUVE CLICQUOT HAPPY HOUR Every Friday 3PM-12AM Featuring: $3* VEUVE CLICQUOT at 3pm $5 Appetizers and Specialty Cocktails 50 Minute Swedish Massage 50 Minute Restorative Facial 75 Minute Classic Manicure & Pedicure

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 NAPLES bucadibeppo.com Also try our traditional Italian dishesfeaturing CHICKEN PARMIGIANA, SPAGHETTI WITH MEATBALLS, CHEESE MANICOTTI, MOZZARELLA CAPRESE and many more! LOBSTER SPECIALS Summer Lobster Ravioli SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved.FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLES HOROSCOPES WHIRLED TOUR By Linda Thistle CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A change y oud been hoping for carries an unexpected complication. Stay the course, and things will work themselves out. Be sure to make time for family and friends. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Aspects f a vor spending time with loved ones. On the job, new ideas are generally welcomed. But some demands for changes could cause problems. Be ready to defend your choices. VIRGO (August 23 to September 2 2) Good news: That workplace problem is close to being resolved with results that should please everyone. Take time off to indulge your love of fun and games. LIBRA (September 23 to October 2 2) Most of the time you are the most unflappable person around. But be ready to be thrown off-balance in the nicest way when Cupid takes aim in your direction. SCORPIO (October 23 to N o vember 2) Its not often when someone tries to sting the sharpwitted Scorpion. But it can happen. Continue to be skeptical about anything that seems too good to be true. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to Dec ember 21) Your strong sense of self-esteem helps you serve as a role model for someone who needs personal reassurances. Your efforts pay off in an unexpected way. CAPRICORN (December 22 to Januar y 19) Someone close considers revealing a painful secret. Withhold judgment. Instead, open your generous heart, and offer dollops of your love and understanding. AQUARIUS (January 20 to Februar y 18) Your talents as a peacemaker are called upon once more as an old problem re-emerges with new complications. Move cautiously in order to avoid falling into hidden traps. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your artistic side is enhanc ed with the reception given to your new project. Use this success as encouragement toward fulfilling your larger goals. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A misunder standing t ests the temperament of the sometimes headstrong Aries. Instead of blowing your top, take time for a pleasant diversion while things cool down. TAURUS (April 30 to May 20) A wor kplace problem could make the divine Bovine see red. But talk it out before you consider walking out. Some surprising facts emerge that change your earlier focus. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You f ace a choice between ignoring your uneasy feelings about your relationship with that special person and demanding explanations. A close friend offers wise counsel. BORN THIS WEEK: Your natur al sense of leadership is combined with a deep sense of responsibility. People trust you to give them both guidance and understanding.Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Sponsored By: Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week:

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C11 Harry Potter deserved to go out on a high note, and with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, he has. This film is a fitting conclusion to a grand, 10-year saga told on an epic scale. Action-packed and emotionally fulfilling, it does justice to its predecessors. In short, its everything we want, expect and need it to be. Deathly Hallows: Part 2 begins right where the lackluster Deathly Hallows: Part 1 released last November ended: With Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) securing the Elder Wand and Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grint) and Hermione (Emma Watson) trying to destroy the remaining Horcruxes (parts of Voldemorts soul) in order to kill Voldemort for good. If you havent read the books and/or dont have the last film fresh in your mind, it might be difficult to get up to speed, as theres no introduction here to remind us of plot points. No matter: Its all self-explanatory rather quickly, and much of the 130-minute running time is focused on Voldemorts attack on Hogwarts, which boils down to a classic battle of good vs. evil. Accordingly, director David Yates has crafted intense action sequences that are also meaningful to the narrative, which allows them to look fantastic and have a purpose. Some fans were disappointed when the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 wasnt released in 3D, with Warner Bros. (in a rare bit of Hollywood studio honesty) saying the conversion didnt look good enough. In an industry in which every last dime counts, this continues to impress me. Better, we now understand what they were waiting for: The 3D in Deathly Hallows: Part 2 looks fantastic crisp and clear, no clutter, very dynamic. If you dont see this in 3D, youre missing something. But for as good as it looks, its the storytelling that makes the film shine. Its great to see Professor McGonagall (Maggie Smith) and Neville (Matthew Lewis) come through when needed, and the emotional highpoints courtesy of Snape (Alan Rickman) and Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) are stunning. And then theres the unexpected moment when Ron and Hermione finally kiss, which is perfect. When Deathly Hallows: Part 2 ends, it leaves you with a sense of satisfaction not just for having seen a good movie, but also for the eight films that comprise the franchise. Given the immense success of J.K. Rowlings books, it was hard to imagine the movies doing the source material justice. To a large extent, they have. Kudos. As the final credits roll, theres an emotional finality to it all, which prompted many members of the audience to shed a tear. No shame in that. In a sense, weve been like aunts and uncles to Harry, Ron and Hermione, and darn if we arent proud of how theyve turned out. Saying goodbye to them is like losing good friends and having only letters (books) and videos to recall the memories: Its something, but its not the same. Dan Hudak is the chairman of the Florida Film Critics Circle and a nationally syndicated film critic. You can e-mail him at dan@hudakonhollywood.com and read more of his work at www.hudakonhollywood.com.LATEST FILMS Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2Is it worth $14 (3D)? Yes >> The epilogue was reshot last December to accommodate improvements in makeup. in the know danHUDAK www.hudakonhollywood.com Colby Red Wine $ 9.99 HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6domestic draft beer wells (one shot only) $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 priceEveryday Fish Taco Lunch Special $ 7.99Black Angus Prime Rib Special $ 12.95while it lasts Its Finally Open! Freshest Seafood Take-OutBONITA SPRINGS25010 Bernwood Ave. | (239) 949-6100 Randy's paradise Shrimp Co.www.randys shmarketrestaurant.comNAPLES10395 Tamiami Trail | (239) 593.5555 GRILLED RUEBEN SANDWICHHeaping portion of fresh cooked sliced corned beef, real sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and our own Russian dressing all grilled on thick-sliced pumpernickel bread. Served with choice of fries or potato salad and pickle $ 8.99PASTRAMI SANDWICHMounds of thin sliced hot pastrami on fresh pumpernickel bread covered with stone ground mustard. Served with fries or potato salad and pickle $ 7.99 Mile High SandwichesCome Visit the Fishtine Chapel of Fish Murals! HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6bottle domestic beer and select wines $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 priceOpen Monday thru Sunday 7:00am to 9:00pm www.paradiseshrimponline.com

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RadiesseCOMBAT PREMATURE AGING SKIN Look Your Personal Best Hours: Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30-4 Dinner Sun-Thurs 5-10 Fri & Sat 4-11 1585 Pine Ridge Road, Naples 239-592-0050 www.noodlescafe.com $ 15 00 OFFWITH PURCHASE OF $50 OR MOREGratuity added before discounts. One coupon per table. Valid Sun-Wed 4-7 pm. Not valid holidays. Not valid with special offers.EXPIRES 7-31-11Sunday Summer SpecialAll You Can EatSpaghetti & Meatballs $ 9 955-9 PMNot valid with any other offer or discount.Independently Owned & Operated The OriginalSince 1991 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC12 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 KOVELS: ANTIQUES & COLLECTING Antiques are mysterious in many ways. Some, like an asparagus server, were made to do jobs that are no longer necessary. Some, like the Jenny Lind bed with spiral posts, are named for forgotten celebrities. An antique mechanical bank with a hunter aiming his rifle at a bear cub is more than a toy. It represents the day President Theodore Roosevelt refused to shoot a bear. But most intriguing are patterns that carry hidden meanings. In recent years, researchers have learned that some 19thcentury quilts included unique blocks that gave directions to those escaping slavery on the Underground Railroad. Hidden messages are not new. After the French Revolution in the late 1700s, it was not safe to side with the monarchy. But some members of the royal family and their friends wanted to show their loyalty to the king. A design for Chinese export dishes based on an engraving published during the revolution shows an urn filled with weeping branches displayed in a circular medallion. Only a few realized that the urn was part of a message. The white space on each side of the base of the urn is shaped like silhouettes of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. In the tree branches are profiles of the two royal children. The plates, with the pattern name Urne Mysterieuse, sell for thousands of dollars each today, but the hidden message usually has to be explained.Q: I found a big old automobile horn in a pile of junk. It has three long brass tubes attached to the base thats marked The Minerva Auto Horn, HHM Co., Pat. April 9th, 1912. Please tell me something about it. A: The base of your old automobile horn could be attached to the exhaust system of an old car to produce a loud noise resembling the sound of a trains steam engine horn. The level of sound could be adjusted by the driver. The April 9, 1912, patent for the horn (No. 1,022,564) was granted to Willard Pennock of Minerva, Ohio. Pennock apparently opened a manufacturing company in Minerva or assigned the patent to a manufacturer. Eventually, four different sizes and styles of the horn were made. They originally sold for $5 to $10. One like yours auctioned in 2005 for $140. Q: I have an old phonograph that has a metal plate that reads The Pooley Grand Prix Eufonola, Manufactured by the Pooley Furniture Co. Inc., Philadelphia. It has a crank turntable. The bottom doors open to reveal shelves for record storage. What is the age and value of this phonograph?A: Pooley Furniture Co. was founded by James Barnum Pooley in 1892. The company made all sorts of furniture, including cabinets for phonographs and radios. Some antiques carry hidden messages terryKOVEL news@floridaweekly.com SEE KOVELS, C13 550 Port-O-Call Way | Naples, FL 34102Call (239) 649-2275 for reservations. www.NaplesPrincess Cruises.comwww.NaplesPrincessCruises.com Naples Bay Port Royal The Gulf of Mexico BUY 1, GET 1 1/2 PRICE, valid on... Wednesday Sunset Dinner Cruise Saturday Seabreeze Lunch Cruise Sunday Sunset More Than Hors doeuvres Cruise Valid on adult tickets. Subject to change without notice. SUMMERSPECIAL SAVINGS Naples Princess Naples P rin cess We cruise rain or shine! Enjoy air conditioned comfort! Friday, July 29th: Wearable Art Fashion Show, 12-2pm

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(239) 261-1177 (800) 523-3716www.preferrednaples.comSunTrust Building at Pelican Bay 801 Laurel Oak Drive Suite 300 Wir Sprechen Deutch Hablamos Espanol Wilma Boyd CEO VISIT EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS MARKETS & Enjoy Triple Savings!Save $500, Complimentary Upgrade & $100 Shipboard Credit*Christmas Time Cruise*7 Night Budapest Nuremberg, 2 Night post-cruise stay in Prague 2011 U.S. Departures: Dec. 15, 17, 18 or 22The Legendary DanubeHosted by Karen Kelley, Preferred Travel of Naples 3 Night pre-cruise stay in Prague, 7 Night Nuremberg Budapest U.S. Departure: Nov. 21, 2011All-Inclusive Premium River CruisingState-of-the-Art ships 148 Guests Luxurious Staterooms with French Balconies Complimentary Internet & Wi-Fi Gourmet Dining with Wine, Beer & Soft Drinks Shore Excursions with personal headsets and more!*Savings and shipboard credit are per stateroom, based on double occupancy. Upgrade subject to availability. Restrictions apply. Reverse itinerary depends on departure date. Please contact us for complete details. Eyelid SurgeryAustin Wm. Coleman, D.O.As an ophthalmologist, Dr. Coleman is a board certi ed physician and a trained microsurgeon. Many of the surgeries he performs include procedures so delicate, they require microscopic techniques. Eyelids are more than simply excess skin, and their primary function is to protect the eye. If the eyelids are interfering with vision, Dr. Coleman has the diagnostic equipment to demonstrate this to insurance companies, many of which will reimburse for medically indicated procedures. As a fellowship trained neuro-ophthalmologist, Dr. Coleman has additional education in neurological diseases that affect the eyelids. Although eyelid changes are typically a function of age, they can occasionally represent serious disease processes.www.colemaneyecare.com 239-597-279210661 Airport Pulling Road, Suite 12, Naples 34119 Why trust your eyes, your eyelids, and your vision to anyone else? Monthly Facial Cosmetic Specials Allergan Brilliant Distinctions Physician Friday, July 29, Botox $10/unitDr. Coleman is the only surgically trained neuro-ophthalmologist in Collier County. Dr. Coleman is trained in complete eye care, including surgery of the eye and eyelids. Phonograph cabinets were made by several different manufacturers. An ad in a 1916 edition of Talking World Magazine listed Acme Cabinet Co. of New York City as the maker of the Eufonola disc player. The first 78-rpm records were made about 1900, but the speed at which a record turned (revolutions per minute) was not standardized until about 1930. The Pooley is not selling well today and usually sells for less than $100. Q: Id like to know something about a silver-plated tea set I bought at an estate sale. Its marked Academy Silver on Copper on each piece. The mark is round like a stamp.A: Academy Silver was in business in New York City from 1951 to 1961. The company made silver-plated hollowware. Q: I have an ice crusher that appears to be made of cast iron and has four feet adapted so it can be clamped or screwed down. It has a wheel on the side with a wooden handle that turns the toothed bar on the inside. The front of the crusher reads Lightning Ice Breaker, Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. No. 106, North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phila. Pa. U.S.A. Pat. Pend. 106D. I would like to know a little about it and if it is of any value.A: Selden Gladwin North established a foundry in Philadelphia in 1878. His brother, Ralph, joined the company in 1880, and the company became North Brothers. The name was changed to North Brothers Manufacturing Co. in 1887. The company made ice-cream makers, egg beaters, meat cutters, tobacco cutters and other metal items. By 1910 it was making screwdrivers, drills, braces and other tools. North Brothers Manufacturing Co. was sold to The Stanley Works in 1946. Value of your ice crusher is about $250. Tip: Lead garden sculptures should not be cleaned. The dirt and discoloration add to the beauty of the piece. Lead is so soft that most types of cleaning will harm the finish. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C13 KOVELSFrom page C12COURTESY PHOTOLook for the hidden faces under the tree. This Urne Mysterieuse pattern plate, 95/8 inches in diameter, sold for $1,888 at a Brunk auction in Asheville, N.C., in 2009. Identical single plates auctioned for $3,200 in 2008 and for $1,600 a short time later. One was offered in a shop for $4,800 in 2011. g s to of h e l i k e t an d w Br C o. i m

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC14 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 $ $ VVER INAG 700 Fifth Ave. S. Naples, FL 34102(239) 659-7008 www.VerginaRestaurant.com Dancing Under The StarsBALL ROOM DANCE NIGHTSEvery First and Last Wednesday of the Month from 8:30-10:30$24.953-COURSE DINNERAND A GLASS OF WINE Offered Sunday-Thursday 5:00-Close Friday & Saturday 5:00-7:00pm Hosted By: Fred Astaire Dance StudioEach Wednesday will end with a special dance by professionals f rom Fred Astaire Dance Studios. The Summer of Sharks continues at the Rookery Bay Environmental Learning Center with the following lectures aimed at adult audiences: 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday, July 27 In The World Of Sharks, presented by Stan Waterman, a pioneer of scuba diving. The program will include an eightminute excerpt from Blue Water, White Death, the 1971 documentary featuring Mr. Waterman with oceanic sharks in open water 100 miles to sea off South Africa. 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17 Shark Nurseries in the Ten Thousand Islands Estuaries, presented by Pat ODonnell, long-time fisheries biologist with the Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Admission to each Summer of Sharks lecture is $5 for Friends of Rookery Bay members and $10 for others. Doors open at 5 p.m. and refreshments are served. Seating is limited. Sign up by calling 417-6310, ext. 401, or visiting www.rookerybay.org. The environmental learning center is at 300 Tower Road. While there, guests are welcome to peruse the Sharkabet traveling exhibit of paintings by Alaska-based artist Ray Troll. On display through Sept. 2, the exhibit panels are drawn from Mr. Trolls shark alphabet book of the same name. Sharks make a splash at Rookery Bay 14 Day Hawaiian Islands CruiseFall 2011 Departures~ RT from Los Angeles Hilo ~ Honolulu ~ Kauai ~ Maui ~ Ensenada, Mexico Outside rates from $1261* PP/DBLCall NOW & receive a reduced deposit of $100 per person & an on-board booklet valued at up to $650 per stateroom! 11 Day Hawaii & Tahiti CruiseDecember 27, 2011January 7, 2012 Cruise from Honolulu to Tahiti Discover Small Ship Cruising on the Ocean Princess Inside Rates from $1862* Includes a $50 Shipboard Credit per stateroom*Rates are based on double occupancy and subject to restrictions, availability and change. 14 Day Cruise Rate is based on Category M and 11 Day Cruise Rate is based on Category L. Ships Registry: BermudaLush tropical rainforests, towering waterfalls, magni cent beaches of powdery white, volcanic black sands, the soothing sound of ukuleles, sea turtles swimming amidst coral reefs this is Hawaii! Simply add Tahiti & you have the Best of all Worlds... Discover enchantment and take the time to relax & unwind on pristine beaches, snorkel sheltered waters or peruse the many quaint shops for the nest black pearls and local crafts!Tropical Dreams can come true ...4 Convenient Locations to Serve You!www.cinaples.comPelican Bay 597-6700 Get-Away Club 597-2961 Village Walk 514-2047 Verona Walk 430-1254

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C15 www.RiverchaseDermatology.com W.G. Eshbaugh, Jr., MD FACS, Board Certi ed Plastic SurgeonUPPER EYELID LIFTIN OFFICE PROCEDURE LITTLE DOWN TIME Call for Special Event Pricing.Fort Myers and North Naples Spa Blue MD locations Call today. Appointments are Limited.239.313.2553Dr. Eshbaughs specialties include: Rejuvalift/In of ce Mini F ace Lift Liposuction Arm Lift Body Lift Tummy Tuck Breast Augmentation Cosmetic Breast Revision ASPS Member Surgeon Eyes Wide Open... Summer Event 24041 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL, BONITA SPRINGS 239.390.3187 | WWW.ANGELINASOFBONITASPRINGS.COM Follow me on Twitter AngelinasBonitaReal. Italian. Summer Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday-AngelinaExperience award winning, romantic dining at Southwest Floridas most elegant restaurant. Recently voted Most Romantic Dining by Naples Daily News 2011 Southwest Floridas Readers Choice Awards & e News-Press Readers Choice Poll 2011 Bonitas Best* rough July 31stTo celebrate, Im offering 4 full courses, no gimmicks, for only $65* 239-263-45811100 Tamiami Trail N., Naples 6 blocks South of the Coastland Mall, next to the Ramada HAPPY HOUR 4:30-7pm ENTERTAINMENTBeatlemanias Peter McGann Saturday 6-9Serving the Evening Meal Since 1947 The Best Deal In TownOpen 7 Days Dinner 5:00pm-10pm Filet Mignon! Prime Rib! N.Y. Sirloin! Broiled Salmon! And much more... Wow!King sh Cabernet Sauvignon or ChardonnayTwo Dinners & a Bottle of WineWine & DineAll Entres Include Wine, Salad & Potato$1795per person Rainy Day, Go AwayI am listening to you, raindrops, As you fall on the pane and roof tops. Usually you are a very welcomed sight, But raindrops, not today, not tonight! We have big plans for this summer day, Before school starts and our summer passes away. A big picnic at the park, with burgers and hot dogs, Salads, and desserts from brownies to pecan logs. We were all packed and ready to leave. Then your drops came down and now I grieve, For the loss of the fun wed planned for this day. Mother Nature, please dry the rain and send the sun our way. Arlene Kincaid, Port Charlotte WRITING CHALLENGE Local writers have already started to send in their stories and poems for Florida Weeklys latest Writing Challenge, when we turn the tables and ask readers to tell us a story for a change. Last year, more than 100 submissions came in from readers who found their respective muses awakened by our various challenges. Weve already done some work to help get your creative juices flowing. Using the photo above as a prompt, we invite you to craft an original work of fiction narrative story or poem of no more than 1,000 words. Well accept entries as an attachment in Word format or pasted into the body of an e-mail sent to writing@floridaweekly.com. Deadline for submissions is Wednesday, Aug. 3. Be sure to include your name, address and contact information with your submission. Feel free to include a headshot of yourself as well. The earlier we receive your submission, the better your shot at being printed. Thanks for taking the time to write us. Take the challenge. Send us your stuff

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NATURAL & ORGANIC LUNCH & DINNER EMPIRE FUSION www.thejollycricket.com720 5th Avenue S. (239) 304-9460 15% OFF with this coupon Valid until Oct. 2011.We would like to thank our loyal customers for their support! Sunday Brunch 10:30am-3pmC16 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 K K K K K K W W W W W W E E E E E E 7 7 7 7 7 7 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 9 9 9 9 9 9 ww ww w w. se se k ak ak ey ey we we t st st ex ex pr pr es es s s. co co m m facebook.com/KeyWestExpress twitter.com/KeyWestExpress youtube.com/KeyWestExpress Reasons to VISIT KEY WEST July 21st SLOPPY JOES PAPA HEMINGWAY LOOK-ALIKE CONTESTThis annual contest takes place at Sloppy Joes Bar, 201 Duval St., where Ernest Hemingway often enjoyed cocktails with cohorts.July 21st 3RD ANNUAL TSKW MEMBERS SUMMER SALONJuly 23rd HEMINGWAY 5K SUNSET RUNJuly 23rd 14TH ANNUAL RUNNING OF THE BULLSJuly 27th MINI LOBSTER SEASONTwo-day event draws hundreds of sometimes frenzied recreational boaters in search of Florida lobster. $ 5 OFFFull Fare Roundtrip AdultCannot be combined with other offers THURSDAY, JULY 21, 9 P.M.Britains Royal Weddings Part 2This entertaining program captures all the emotion, excitement and style of the nations royal weddings preceding William and Kates. Going behind the pomp and circumstance of weddings from 1923 onwards, it offers a fun, intriguing glimpse into an exclusive world and charts how changing social attitudes and circumstances have influenced what the public has come to expect from Britains royal weddings. FRIDAY, JULY 22, 8:30 P.M. Edge o f the Everglades: Big Cypress National Preserve In 1974, a new park was added to the National Park system the Big Cypress National Preserve. The countrys first national preserve allowed traditional uses of the land, including hunting, air boats even oil drilling. It was a landmark conservation compromise that allowed unprecedented resource usage, while protecting the vast swamp from development. SATURDAY, JULY 23, 10 P.M. T he Old Gu ysHousemates Tom and Roy are the ying to each others yang. Roy is organized, clean and sensitive. Tom, well, isnt. As they settle into retirement, they are faced with the prospect of life simply not turning out quite how they imagined. SUNDAY, JULY 24, 9 P.M. Masterpiec e Mystery! Zen: Cabal A disgraced aristocrat jumps off a bridge. Or was he pushed? The Ministry of Justice wants a ruling of suicide, while a powerful (and beautiful) female prosecutor hints that Zen had better start looking for the murderer. The plot thickens when it appears that the victim was trying to inform on an unknown group called the Cabal, with conspirators at the highest levels of Italian society. MONDAY, JULY 25, 8 P.M. Antiques R oa dshow Chattanooga Hour 3An heirloom 18th-century Chippendale chest; an -ball presented to Harry Truman in 1948 by the Los Angeles Press Club; and a 1930 Lionel train set. TUESDAY, JULY, 26,10 P.M. P. O.V. Mugabe and the White African Much of this documentary was filmed clandestinely to shed light on one of the worlds most troubled nations. In Zimbabwe, de facto dictator Robert Mugabe has unleashed a land reform program aimed at driving whites from the country. One proud white African has challenged Mugabe with human rights abuses. WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 8 P.M. NO V A Lizard Kings Though they may inspire stories of man-eating, fire-spitting monsters with long claws, razor-sharp teeth and whiplike tails, these creatures are actually monitor lizards, the largest lizards to walk the planet. With their acute intelligence including the ability to plan these lizards blur the line between reptiles and mammals. This week on WGCU TV T JU B W Pa rt T h is in g t u re ti o an na

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 396737 P P i i r r a a t t e e s s B B a a l l l l F F r r i i d d a a y y A A u u g g u u s s t t 2 2 6 6 t t h h 7 7 1 1 1 1 p p m m PiratesBall-FridayAugust26th7-11pmLiveEntertainment,Food,DrinksandPlentyofPirates! ThePiratesBallwillbeheldattheElegantlyCasual C C A A P P T T A A I I N N S S T T A A B B L L E E CAPTAINSTABLELocatedattheendofFishermensVillage ThePiratesBallwillfeatureacostume contestthatwillbejudgedat10pm,withthe victorsreceivingcovetedprizes. EachticketforthePiratesBallincludesentry intothecostumecontestandadonationfor twolocalcharities VIPTickets are$40perperson;includesthe famousCaptainsTableSurfnTurfBuffetwith TableReservationsandentertainment. GeneralAdmissionTickets are$15per person;includesfirstcomefirstserved seatingandsimplehorsdoeuvresand entertainment. Awell-stockedCashBarwillalsobeavailable. Reserveyourplace atthePiratesBall;purchase yourticketsonlinetodayat fishermensvillagepiratefest.com Surf&TurfBuffet Surf&TurfBuffetCarvedRoastPrimeRib SteamedCrabLegs StuffedSolewithLobsterSauce BeefShortRibs ScallopsinBrandyCreamSauce TilapiaFlorentine MusselsMarinara LittleNeckClamsinGarlicSauce NewEnglandClamChowder LargePeel&EatShrimpCocktail RawOysters ShrimpLoMein LargeSaladBar andMuchMore. C T Thismildlybawdy,adultsonlyfundraisingadventurewill featurepiraticalentertainmentincludingoldworldstyled folkmusic,seashantiesandamixoforiginaland contemporarymusicperformedbyCELTICMAYHEM Formoreinformation,Call941575-3067 Formoreinformation,Call941575-3067 OffMarionAvenue,PuntaGorda OffMarionAvenue,PuntaGorda Hispanic business council plans galaThe Council for Hispanic Business Professionals will hold its third annual gala on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Kensington Golf & Country Club. The council has chosen School on Wheels, an outreach of Guadalupe Society Services/Catholic Charities, as the beneficiary of this years event. School on Wheels helps migrant women in Immokalee learn basic English skills. Five Collier County students who have received CHBP scholarships to attend the youth program of Leadership Collier will be honored at the gala. All are invited to enjoy the evening of Hispanic-style food and entertainment. For information about tickets and sponsorships, e-mail events@CHBPnaples.org or visit www.CHBPnaples.org. On your mark, get set, sprint!The second annual Stiletto Sprint to benefit the Garden of Hope and Courage and Susan G. Komen for the Cure-Southwest Florida takes off at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21, along 500 yards of Fifth Avenue South. Runners, walkers and all styles of footwear are welcome, but only those in heels at least 2 inches high will qualify for the first-place prize. Registration is $25 for adults and $10 for kids younger than 15. Participants who raise $50 for the cause will receive a Stiletto Sprint T-shirt, and those who raise $250 will be invited to the VIP cool-down party at Caf & Bar Lurcat.Sign up in advance at www.komenswfl.org or beginning at 5 p.m. on the day of sprint.For more information, call 498-0016 or 434-6697. Step out and dance for Sunlight HomeSunlight Home for expectant women and teens invites everyone to put on their dancing shoes for an evening with Cahlua & Cream on Friday, Nov. 4, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. Tickets are $60 per person. Proceeds will benefit mothers and babies at Sunlight Home, where they are empowered to overcome poverty, abuse and homelessness through education, training and spiritual growth. For more information, call Linda Hale at 352-0251 or e-mail Linda_lee_hale@ yahoocom. Be a goddess for an eveningGoddess Night 2012, an evening of pampering and enlightenment sponsored by the Naples Art Association, takes place Thursday, March 29, at The von Liebig Art Center. A champagne reception gets thing going, and guests enjoy a seated dinner and keynote speaker as well as their choice of informative breakout sessions. For more information, call Aimee Schlehr at 262-6517, ext. 120, or e-mail aimee.schlehr@naplesart.org. SAVE THE DATE n t Sp rint e and n for k es o ff a l on g o uth. o f l Be a g f or a n Go dd ess N n in g o f pa m enme n N a pl e s t a k es

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Fresh. Natural. Delicious.NORTH NAPLES Fountain Park 7941 Airport Rd. (239) 596-8840 NAPLES CoastlandCenter 1860 Tamiami Trail N. (239) 352-8642 FT. MYERS Gulf Coast Town Center 9924 Gulf Coast Main St. (239) 466-8642 $2 OFFany purchase of $6.99 or moreSome restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offer. Must present coupon. No cash value. One coupon per customer per visit. Valid only at participating locations. LIMITED TIME OFFER EXPIRES 7/28/11 www.CalistogaCafe.com FREE Text CBAKE to 97063 to receive more special offers & promos! Interactive Friendly Pirate Fun for the Whole Family 1-800-776-3735 www.PiecesOfEight.com 2500 Main Street Ft Myers Beach Located at Salty Sams Waterfront Adventures Arrive 30-40 minutes prior to departure. Call For Times and Reservations 1-800-776-3735 2 2 2 2 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W I NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 C19 SAVE THE DATE Love That Dress! for the girls of PACEPACE Center for Girls-Immokalee is having its first Love That Dress! sale and party from 6-9 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 31, at the Naples Grande. Guests will get to stake their claim on new and gently worn dresses and accessories to benefit the center that provides girls and young women an opportunity for a better future through education, counseling, training and advocacy. Tickets for Love That Dress! will go on sale Aug. 1 for $25 per person. In the meantime, the United Arts Council of Collier County is serving as a collection point for donations during office hours from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, through July 28. UAC is at 2335 Tamiami Trail N., Suite 504, in the Moorings Professional Building (next to Red Lobster). For more information, contact Marianne Kearns, PACE-Collier executive director, at Marianne.kearns@pacecenter.org. Getting in step for literacyLiteracy Volunteers of Collier County will hold the fifth annual Dancing with the Stars for Literacy on Friday, Nov. 11, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. LVCC teaches illiterate and non-English speaking adults to read, write and speak English. A number of prominent Neapolitans are paired with professional dancers to perform. Prizes are awarded based on dancing ability as well as the amount of money dancers raise for LVCC. For tickets or more information, call LVCC at 262-4448 or visit www.collierliteracy.org. Saddle up for Bootstrap BoogieNaples Equestrian Challenge holds its sixth annual Bootstrap Boogie barn dance Saturday evening, Nov. 12, at NEC headquarters off Goodlette-Frank Road north of Pine Ridge Road. Live countrywestern music, a mechanical bull, line dancers and Pony Pie Bingo are all part of the fun. NEC provides therapeutic riding and other equine-related programs for Collier County children and adults with disabilities. For more information, call 596-2988 or visit www.naplesequestrianchallenge.org. Send Save the Date information about galas and other fundraising parties to cpierce@floridaweekly.com. THE FUTURE OF NEWSPAPERS IS HERE FREE FOR ALL Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comEnjoy a complete issue of Florida Weekly on your iPad. Get News, Arts & Entertainment, Business & Real Estate, everything that is in the print edition, now on the iPad.Download our FREE App today!

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC20 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 Gentle, Caring Dentistry Since 2003 Initial Comprehensive Exam Full set of X-Rays Healthy Mouth Cleaning $95 regular $338239.261.7291 | www.naplesdentalcenter.com201 8th St South, Suite 106, Naples | Downtown at the Baker Center 1. Blake Owen, Evelyn Cannata, Zach Franklin and Amy Owen 2. Kim Caronchi, Ashley Solomon and Jean Pikus 3. Lisa Lipman, Alicia Kelley, Shelly and Fred Church 4. Shannon Franklin and Ellen Goldberg, NIFF executive director and program director, respectively An evening at Silverspot with the Naples International Film Festival Tony Marino shakes things up at Shulas for the Make-A-Wish FoundationFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY MARLA OTTENSTEIN / FLORIDA WEEKLY SEE MORE FROM SHULAS 1 2 3

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C21 Tony Marino shakes things up at Shulas for Make-A-WishFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.1. Sandra Buxton and Tony Marino 2. Susan and John Mayer 3. Margie McGlynn, Lou Traina and Joetta Abbazio 4. Brendan Duffy and Howard Isaacson 5. Cheryl Lampard and David Frost 6. Tony Marino and Shannon Livingston 7. Jim Bloom, Karen Alukiewicz and Patrick Neale 8. Sandi Benson and Trevor Tibstra 9. Rick and Lori Borman 10. Judith Yevick and Taylor Marini 11. Mary Kaye Rueth, Joel Soorenko and Michelle Borders 12. Winifred Smith, Lesley Colantonio and Susi Winchell BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA / FLORIDA WEEKLY W e n e ev t t o w an d f ro m c ov e o f t h o ci e c lu d h e p ty@ f c o s o In c in t h socie t 9 5 4 7 10 8 11 12 6

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 As it has every other year for three decades, Bordeaux recently hosted Vinexpo, the worlds most extensive and well-attended wine and spirits trade fair. Showcasing products from 47 countries, the June event attracted more than 48,000 visitors from 148 countries with French attendants making up the largest group and, for the first time, the Chinese delegation the next most populous to see the best the world of wine and spirits has to offer. Although he isnt in the business of selling wines, Fort Myers resident and wine devotee Jerry Greenfield, who is considering becoming an importer, took part in the five-day event. It was a great opportunity to get a handle on the whole market and see whats hot in the marketplace, he says about tasting wines and meeting and talking with producers from around the globe. Booths hosted by trade associations representing specific winegrowing regions afforded the opportunity to sample a wide range of products. Mr. Greenfield says he was especially impressed by ross, wines from Languedoc and malbecs, not from Argentina, but from Cahors, where malbec has been made for centuries. The booth for the Cahors malbec producers showcased dozens of their wines from southwest France, and Mr. Greenfield tasted about 20 of them. They were big and chewy, and will go great with grilled meats because they are definitely a rustic style of wine, he says. The prices were good, mostly in the $20 to $35 range. Theyre definitely fuller bodied than their Argentinean counterparts. Another up-and-coming district likely to be exporting more to the United States is Frances Languedoc region stretching along the Mediterranean coast. Most of the traditional grapes of France are grown here, but some of the best wines made here contain grenache, syrah and mourvedre, due in part to the proximity of the Rhone district to the east. There were some very well-made wines, wonderful bargains, with prices in the $10 to $15 range, and made in a more elegant style than the malbecs, Mr. Greenfield says. These wines are better matches with food, and very satisfying to drink. Yet another promising trend is the emergence of ros wines from around the world. Everyone in the world is making ross, says Mr. Greenfield. The wines from Tavel and Lirac showcased a wider range of styles and colors than ever before. Some we tasted were just the slightest shade of pink, and others were so rich and dark in color they looked like light-bodied pinot noir. He believes these wines are gaining popularity as wine drinkers get to know them better. There have been a lot of changes in the last five years in the way wine drinkers view ross, he says. Ross have gained respect because people are understanding this is not white zinfandel. They also appreciate how food friendly ros wines are. Winemaker Sasha Lichine, with his savvy marketing skills and money, has popularized ross today much like Robert Mondavi did the fume blanc back in the s. Winemakers are investing more effort and quality into making ros wines, as recently confirmed in Wine Spectator magazine. Theres probably never been a better time to be a ros drinker, Jennifer Fiedler writes in the July 31 edition. Vintners everywhere have been upping their game in the vineyards and cellars. The result is a new wave of high-quality dry ross from around the world. Mr. Greenfield also devoted some time and energy to the Bordeaux Classified Growth booth, where a vast selection of 2010 vintage Bordeaux was available for sampling. Because these were so young in the bottle, it was hard to pick a winner, he says. They just all needed more age and development. Not only that, he adds, the wines are very pricey. My friends and I are drinking the Bordeaux we have in our cellars, but were not replacing them. Instead, he says, hes filling his racks with California cabernets and other wines. He zeroed in on a couple of wines that interested him most and is exploring the prospect of importing them to the states. One is a white Bordeaux, Ch. La Fleur Jonquet, a blend of sauvignon blanc and semillon that he believes would sell at about $25 per bottle. He wasnt the only one looking for new merchandise. Bethany Frick is the senior vice president of merchandising for Total Wine & More. Quoted in the final Vinexpo press release, Ms. Frick says, We met with over 200 producers and will be bringing in over 50 products. Adam Strum, co-founder and chairman for Wine Enthusiast magazine, was upbeat about this years fair. Its the best exhibition I have taken part in for many years, he says in the Vinexpo release. jimMcCRACKEN vino@florida-weekly.com Biennial Vinexpo provides a taste of whats new in wine and spirits VINOCOURTESY PHOTOJerry Greenfield with California winemaker Stephane Derenoncourt. Say Cheers and help make wishes come true!Join the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Southern Florida for: 1972 Miami Dolphins Defensive Back Charlie Babb!Celebrity Bartender Event to Bene t Make-A-Wish!Friday, July 29th 5-7PM at Shulas Naples Details: Leslie Colantonio at 239-992-9474 or lcolantonio@sawish.org. Say Cheers and help make wishes come true!Complimentary Admission & Appetizers!July 27th Wine Tasting 5:30-7:30PMSample 4 wines from Markham Vineyards, chef paired appetizers, live music!$25 advance/$35 doorTix: www.ShulasNaplesEvents.EventBrite.com Text SHULAS to 97063 for event updates and oers sent to your mobile phone! Av alon DrLa kewood Blvd 41 Sugde n R egiona l ParkTa mi ami Tr i ELo cat e d ac r o ss from W algree n s in Sugden Par k Plaz a Choose from 7 Entres with a Soft Drink for Just $7 Each, MondayFriday 11ampm4270 Tamiami Trail East Naples (239) 692-9294 WWW.BOSTONS.COM BP International Rights Holdings Inc. 2011 (BPIRH). All Bostons the Gourmet Pizza trademarks are owned by BPIRH and are duly licensed by Boston Pizza Restaurants, LP in the United States.HAPPY HOUR3pm-7pm Daily7$7FOR17 Kinds of Beer 23 TV Screens Patio Seating Available LIVE MUSICEvery Friday and Saturday Night Cloud 9 performs from 7:00pm-10:00pm

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 21-27, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C23 Chef Harold Balink has developed a loyal local following since he opened his eponymous downtown restaurant, Harolds on Bay. He migrated south to Bell Tower Shops a couple of years ago, which has afforded him a larger space and open kitchen in which to create his signature cuisine, characterized by ultra-fresh ingredients paired in imaginative ways. Cru is at U.S. 41 and Daniels Parkway in Fort Myers. It has a full bar, well-appointed dining room and tables outdoors for dining and drinking. Call 466-3663 for reservations. Q: How did you acquire your cooking chops? A: I was born and raised in Boulder, Colo. I received a culinary degree from Johnson & Wales in Rhode Island and a bachelors in hospitality management from Boston University. I apprenticed at The Greenbrier in While Sulphur Springs, W. Va.; Le Circque in New York City; and The Flagstaff House in Boulder. My first stint in Lee County was as executive chef at Kings Crown at South Seas Plantation on Captiva. Other positions included chef/partner of The Magnolia House in Lake Oconee, Ga., and executive sous chef at The Ocean Reef Club in Key Largo. Then I came back to Fort Myers and opened Harolds on Bay in downtown Fort Myers, followed by H2, then became chef/partner at Cru. Q: When and how did you know you wanted to become a chef? A: I was cooking at a restaurant in high school and some local chefs held their monthly meetings there. A couple of them went to the Culinary Institute of America and a couple to Johnson & Wales and they said I should look into it. I took a trip to each on consecutive weekends, and when I got back my parents asked if I made a decision. I said, Well, yes. You see there is this girl I met from Michigan going to hospitality school at J&W, so I think Im going to Rhode Island. Q: How would you describe your culinary style/philosophy? A: Its changed over the years, so now I buy really good products and try desperately not to screw them up! Q: What is it about foie gras that you love so much? A: Foie gras is the epitome of hedonism and sensuality in food. Being one of the most hedonistic gourmands I know, its a natural fit. The texture, richness, versatility, exclusivity and flavor make it the perfect food to incorporate in my menus. Q: What ingredients do you always have in your home refrigerator/pantry? A: Sea salt, truffle oil, Dijon mustard, peanut butter and jelly. Q: Your wine lists are consistently unusual and include some great but lesser known brands. How do you select the wines on Crus list? A: I drink and taste constantly. Ive been drinking wine for 23 years and have been fortunate enough to taste wines from every part of the world, old and young, so it has taught me to know that I dont know anything; therefore, I must continually drink and research and learn. Most lists I use are eclectic examples of wines I love and think pair well with our food at the right price point. Q: Whats your ideal dinner? A: A large group of friends, great wines, old vinyl jazz and blues and a long table of the simplest, freshest dishes we can create. Q: Who are your heroes? A: My father, God (or whatever name your particular religion uses) FDR, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Keller (for food and philosophy). Q: What keeps you motivated? A: Im fortunate enough to have a great family that needs me, so that certainly helps with motivation. Also, I think the energy of people; my staff and guests really feed that need. Q: Whats your favorite dish on your current menu and why? A: Our foie gras appetizer: seared foie gras, braised pork belly and seared tuna with Yukon chips and ponzu. It might be the simplest, most complete dish Ive ever had. Q: Any memorable kitchen disaster youd like to share, and did you learn something from the experience? A: I was doing a large party on Captiva I think for about 300 people and it was outside. We delivered food on big rolling carts over cobblestones. Up to this point in my career I was a loud, domineering, intimidating jerk. Well, two of the wait staff tipped over two of the carts during delivery about 30 minutes before the function. For the first time, instead of blowing my top and losing my cool, I calmly put about 15 people in action and was able to pull together some semblance of the party on time from other restaurants and through sheer luck. It was then I knew I had to grow up and handle things differently. Q: Hobbies and/or passions? A: I love to travel, read, play golf and chess, spend time with friends and family. Q: Tell us about your family. A: My wife is Julie. I have two daughters, Kayly, who goes to Florida Gulf Coast University; and Makenzie, who attends Fort Myers High School; and three bulldogs, Abby, Oscar and Oliver. Q: What kind of restaurant do you like when you go out? A: Im not picky about the type of restaurant I eat in. Ive had great meals in dives and palaces, but I need that restaurant feng shui, the melding of ambience, food, wine and service, whatever that might be. karenFELDMAN cuisine@floridaweekly.com food & wine CALENDAR Thursday, July 21, 5:30-8 p.m., Decanted W ines: The Century Club meets to taste 25 varietals as part of the members quest to sample 100 types; $10, 1410 Pine Ridge Road; 4341814. Reservations required. Thursday, July 21, 6 p.m., The S auc e Lady: A Chicago chef joins The Sauce Lady for a class about dishes that are simple, fast and economical; $30 (includes instruction and a sauce to take home), 1810 J&C Blvd.; 592-5557. Friday, July 22, 6:30 p.m., R u ths Chris Steakhouse: The Samuel Adams lobster boil beer dinner features fried oyster with remoulade sauce, Ruths crab and corn chowder, watermelon and mixed greens summer salad, lobster boil and chocolate sin cake, with Samuel Adams beer paired with each course; $65, Coconut Point, 23151 Village Shops Way, Estero; 948-8888. Reservations required. Saturday, July 23 and Aug. 27, 9-11 a.m., Ridgw ay Bar & Grill: Chef/owner Tony Ridgway helps students move beyond the four tastes sweet, salty, bitter and sour to the fifth taste, umami, a savory flavor found in a wealth of food. Students will undergo a blind tasting to test their skills and will cook a variety of entrees; $75, 1300 Third St. S.; 262-5500 or visit www.ridgwaynaples.com. Saturday, July 23, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., T he Good Life of Naples: Shelly Connors demonstrates how to create homemade pasta; $25, 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road; 514-4663. Reservations required. Monday, July 25, 6:30 p.m., M W a terfront Grille: Executive chef Brian Roland teams up with Sea Salt chef/owner Fabrizio Aielli for a five-course dinner, with each chef producing two courses, followed by a collaborative dessert; $95 for dinner, plus $45 for wine pairings, 4300 Gulfshore Blvd., Naples; 263-4421. Reservations required. Wednesday, July 27, 5:30-7 p .m., Sea S alt: The summer wine series continues with a tasting of wines of Spain with Danielle Stalzer and Bottles of Naples; $1(with reservations, stay for dinner and receive a $10 credit), 1186 Third St. S., Naples; 434-7258. Saturday, Aug. 13, 9-11 a.m., Ridgw a y Bar & Grill: Chef/owner Tony Ridgway guides participants through the process of smelling and tasting morsels of cheese and discussing their flavor profiles, and then assists in pairing them with champagne, wine, beer and condiments; $55, 1300 Third St. S.; 262-5500 or visit www.ridgwaynaples.com. Farmers markets Saturday, 7:3011:30 a.m., T hird Street South, behind Tommy Bahamas between Third Street and Gordon Drive. Saturday, 8 a.m.1 p .m., North Naples Green Market, in the Fright Factory at Olympic Plaza, 2320 Vanderbilt Beach Road behind Liberty Bank. Send items to cuisine@ floridaweekly.comFLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Crus top chef keeps it real as in simple, fresh and creative of m orsels o f heir flavor s in pairin g w in e, b eer ts do you alwa ys m e il, u t t s y e r w e e n n a ught me to know f i l h d h U l W t 3 f a 15 t o o t h I fe KAREN FELDMAN / FLORIDA WEEKLYChef Harold Balink

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