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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Naples, FL
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Naples (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Collier County -- Naples

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 2-8, 2008)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on10387 ( NOTIS )
1038797485 ( OCLC )
2018226752 ( LCCN )
on1038797485
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AN1.F6 N37 F56 ( lcc )

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BILL CORNWELL A2 OPINION A4 HEALTHY LIVING A26 PETS OF THE WEEK A29 BUSINESS B1 MOTLEY FOOL B6 REAL ESTATE B9 EVENTS C6-7 FILM REVIEW C11 BOOK REVIEW C14 SOCIETY C21-22-25 CUISINE C27 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. III, No. 34 FREE WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. Pretty in pinkThe Naples Players promise to take the (cup)cake with Pinkalicious. C1 Advice for gradsSage words from local achievers for the Class of 2011. B1 The morning afterNaples team had leading role in filming water scenes for The Hangover Part II. A6 Back in charge: James Billie wins Seminole Tribe chairmanshipJames Billie, the controversial former chairman of the Seminole Tribe of Florida who pioneered the Indian gaming industry in the United States, has hit the jackpot. Mr. Billie, who was forced from his position as head of the Florida Seminoles nearly a decade ago, will be sworn in as the new chairman of the tribe on June 6 in Hollywood. The ceremony will mark a serendipitous comeback by Mr. Billie, who reclaimed the chairmans job in a landslide during the tribal election earlier this month. Mr. Billie, 67, won 58.4 percent of the 1,757 ballots that were cast in the election, according to the Associated Press. In doing so, he defeated two-term Chairman Mitchell Cypress, who was regarded as the favorite in the contest. Mr. Billie will serve a four-year term. Mr. Billie could not be reached for comment regarding his upset victory. Four years ago, Mr. Billie sought to regain the post he had lost after tribal leaders forced him from office amid charges of financial misdeeds and a sexual harassment complaint. He denied wrongdoing on all counts and vowed to win back his job. But in the elections of 2007, he was denied a spot on the ballot because of alleged irregularities involving residency requirements. Mr. Billies 22-year reign as chief of the Seminoles was marked by flamboyance and controversy. A battle-hardened veteran of BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@floridaweekly.com BILLIE SEE BILLIE, A28 NEW TOOLS THE NEW FACE OF HEALTH CARE NEW BUILDINGSLIKE PROVERBIAL SUNLIGHT SPILLING INTO A SPRING day, Dr. Craig MacArthur slips into a patient and family waiting room that has been pressed into sudden service as an overnight suite where parents can sleep on chairs or cots. The room is tucked tightly into a wing set aside for childrens oncology and hemat ology cancer and blood care. No matter that the four white walls lack windows; Dr. MacArthur shines in his own right. Bright, clear, warm and to the point, he is also gentle, which helps in a crowded setting at the Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, part of Lee Memorial Health Systems sizeable health-care network that treats patients from SEE HEALTH, A8 BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com COURTESY PHOTOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY ILLUSTRATIONThe da Vinci Surgical System is in place at Physicians Regional and NCH hospitals. A day to rememberTake time on Memorial Day to honor veterans. A23

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Dr. Jamie E. Weaver, DPM Foot and Ankle Surgeon DR. JAMIE E. WEAVER, DPM the latest addition to the Joint Replacement Institute, will further the Institutes goal to provide comprehensive orthopedic care as a specialist in Foot and Ankle Surgery. She has distinguished herself as a podiatric physician who offers complete patient care with state-of-the-art treatment modalities and surgical techniques. Keeping patients pain free and active is both her passion and her mission. NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Privileges at BCHC | Most Insurances Accepted Specializing in FOOT & ANKLE SURGERYBunion and Hammertoe Surgery Diabetic Foot Care Laser Therapy for Toenail Fungus PodoPediatrics Flat Feet and Toe Walkers Achilles Tendonitis Heel Pain/Plantar Fascitis Foot and Ankle Arthritis Management Sports Medicine Neuropathy 239 676. 2663 (BONE) www.JointInstituteFL.com 3501 Health Center Boulevard, Suite # 2180 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 Monday Friday 8:30 AM 5 PM NOW OFFERING $ 100 OFF INTRODUCTORY SPECIALEffective and pain-free, the COOL TOUCH VARIA LASER, is the latest technology for treatment of TOE NAIL FUNGUS. Call for more details or to schedule your appointment. www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Sexual misconduct has been much in the news as of late, and the sordid stories that have dominated the headlines do not reflect well on the males of our species. Lets be honest. It has not been a good couple of weeks to be a man. While it could be argued this is an appropriate time to take a metaphorical baseball bat to the collective heads of all men, there was an incident right here in Florida that offers a glimmer of hope. Indeed, I submit (and will later in this column prove) that the Sunshine State has produced a man of such noble gallantry that he has committed the 21st Century equivalent of Sir Walter Raleigh flinging his cloak across a puddle in advance of Elizabeth I. Before I unveil my new hero, lets first address the ugliness. In New York, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former chief of the International Monetary Fund, was charged with the attempted rape of a hotel maid. So powerful and famous is Mr. Strauss-Kahn that in rarified salons of Paris, Washington and New York he is known simply as DSK. I shall now, however, refer to the 62-yearold disgraced global banker and politician as DOM (Dirty Old Man). DOM was widely regarded as the person most likely to unseat the unpopular French President Nicolas Sarkozy in next years election. DOM was to run as a candidate of the Socialist Party and, like any good socialist, he was ensconced in a $3,000-a-night hotel suite in Manhattan when the alleged attack took place. DOM has a well-documented history of aggressive womanizing that borders on the predatory. But none of this was seen as much of a liability in France. To the French, sex is only scandalous if youre not getting any. DOM was years ago dubbed the great seducer a sobriquet he relished and nurtured. He must be quite the sweet talker, because the guy who showed up for arraignment looked something like a cross between a Hobbit and Gerard Depardieu. DOM is using his legendary charm as a defense. He apparently will claim that whatever sexual contact occurred was consensual. His lawyers version goes something like this: DOM emerged naked from the shower, and the 32-year-old chambermaid (who is a native of Guinea, where French is spoken) was immediately and overwhelming smitten by the sight of this pallid dumpling of a man. Sacre bleu! she must have been thinking if we are to accept this improbable scenario. Ici vient le grand seducteur! (The above roughly translates into idiomatic English as: Hot damn! Here comes the great seducer!) As the yucky details of the DOM case unfolded, another sex scandal exploded on the opposite coast. Arnold Schwarzenegger, the steroidenhanced body builder who went on to become a movie superstar and governor of California, admitted to fathering a child out of wedlock some 14 years ago. This love child (the mother is a housekeeper who worked in the Schwarzenegger home for more than 20 years) and a son Mr. Schwarzenegger fathered with his now-estranged wife Maria Shriver were born less than a week apart. As with DOM, Mr. Schwarzenegger has an extensive history of tawdry and unwelcomed behavior that borders on the criminal. One entertainment website said in 2003 that Mr. Schwarzenegger was widely known for his enthusiastic breast-fondling and b utt-gr abbing. This became a campaign issue when he first ran for governor, but Ms. Shriver leapt to his defense and that pretty much put the matter to rest at least until this latest bombshell went off. That Mr. Schwarzenegger turned out to be more The Fornicator than The Terminator should come as a shock to no one. And given the mess he made of California as governor, Im betting many of the states voters feel The Fornicator did to them what he did to his housekeeper.Now, on to something more upbeat. Down around Key West a 37-year-old woman was arrested for grooming her nether region with a razor while driving a Thunderbird. A neat trick, if you can pull it off. Unfortunately, Megan Mariah Barnes couldnt, and her car plowed into another vehicle, slightly injuring its occupants. Ms. Barnes, who was on her way to a date with a boyfriend, sped from the scene and was later apprehended down the road. Everyone except perhaps Ms. Barnes and the folks who were bruised in the collision got a chuckle out of this weird tale. But overlooked and ignored was the extraordinary role played by her ex-husband.It seems that Charles Judy, the former husband, was in the car and, while sitting in the passengers seat, actually took the wheel and steered the Thunderbird so Ms. Barnes could tidy herself. Mr. Judy also tried to take the fall for Ms. Barnes (who the day before had been convicted of DUI and had had her drivers license revoked).Mr. Judy and Ms. Barnes switched seats before the cops showed up so it would appear he had been behind the driver all the while. This ingenious plan was foiled when it was noted that Mr. Judy suffered burns to his chest when the passengerside airbag deployed something the drivers airbag did not do. Think about this. Here is a man who not only helped his former wife get spiffy for an assignation with another fellow but was willing to go to the hoosegow on her behalf as well. For those who insist gallantry is dead, I offer Charles Judy as Exhibit A to the contrary. I attempted, without success, to speak with Mr. Judy as much to congratulate him as to interview him. Call me a head-in-the-clouds romantic if you will, but Id like to believe he was unreachable because he was out helping another damsel in distress. So damn The Fornicator and DOM and all others who disgrace the gender. For one brief, shining moment, a simple chap named Charles Judy has yet again made me proud to exclaim that, yes, I am a man. The seducer, the fornicator and a man named Judy y c a a w o billCORNWELL bcornwell@floridaweekly.comCOMMENTARY

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 PublisherShelley Lundslund@floridaweekly.comManaging EditorCindy Piercecpierce@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsLois Bolin Bill Cornwell Karen Feldman Artis Henderson Jim McCracken Jeannette Showalter Nancy Stetson Evan Williams Roger WilliamsPhotographersPeggy Farren Bernadette La Paglia Dennis Goodman Marla Ottenstein Charlie McDonald David MichaelCopy EditorCathy CottrillPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comProduction ManagerKim Boone kboone@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersJon Colvin Paul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Hope Jason Nick BearCirculation ManagerPenny Kennedy pkennedy@floridaweekly.comCirculationDavid Anderson Paul Neumann Greg TretwoldAccount ExecutivesNicole Masse nmasse@floridaweekly.com Cori Higgins chiggins@floridaweekly.com Jeff Jerome jjerome@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantSandi HughesBusiness Office ManagerKelli CaricoPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: Naples Florida Weekly 9051 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 202 Naples, Florida 34108 Phone 239.325.1960 Fax: 239.325.1964 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2011 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 239.325.1960 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $29.95 in-county$49.95 in-state $54.95 out-of-state OPINION Judy Ancel, a Kansas City, Mo., professor, and her St. Louis colleague were teaching a labor history class together this spring semester. Little did they know, video recordings of the class were making their way into the thriving sub rosa world of right-wing attack video editing, twisting their words in a way that resulted in the loss of one of the professors jobs amidst a wave of intimidation and death threats. Fortunately, reason and solid facts prevailed, and the videos ultimately were exposed for what they are: fraudulent, deceptive, sloppily edited hit pieces.Right-wing media personality Andrew Breitbart is the forceful advocate of the slew of deceptively edited videos that target and smear progressive individuals and institutions. He promoted the videos that purported to catch employees of the community organization ACORN assisting a couple in setting up a prostitution ring. He showcased the edited video of Shirley Sherrod, an African-American employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which completely convoluted her speech, making her appear to admit to discriminating against a white farmer. She was fired as a result of the cooked-up controversy. Similar video attacks have been waged against Planned Parenthood. Judy Ancel has been the director of the University of Missouri-Kansas Citys Institute for Labor Studies since 1988. Using a live video link, she coteaches a course on the history of the labor movement with professor Don Giljum, who teaches at University of Missouri-St. Louis. The course comprises seven day-long, interactive sessions throughout the semester. They are video-recorded and made available through a password-protected system to students registered in the class. One of those students, Philip Christofanelli, copied the videos and, he admits on one of Breitbarts sites, that he did give them out in their entirety to a number of my friends. At some point, a series of highly and very deceptively edited renditions of the classes appeared on Breitbarts website. It was then that Ancels and Giljums lives were disrupted, and the death threats started. A post on Breitbarts BigGovernment.com summarized the video: The professors not only advocate the occasional need for violence and industrial sabotage, they outline specific tactics that can be used. Ancel told me, I was just appalled, because I knew it was me speaking, but it wasnt saying what I had said in class. She related the attack against her and Giljum to the broader attack on progressive institutions currently: These kinds of attacks are the equivalent of electronic brownshirts. They create so much fear, and they are so directed against anything that is progressive the right to an education, the rights of unions, the rights of working people I see, are all part of an overall attack to silence the majority of people and create the kind of climate of fear that allows for us to move very, very sharply to the right. And its very frightening.Ancels contact information was included in the attack video, as was Giljums. She received a flurry of threatening e-mails. Giljum received at least two death threats over the phone. The University of Missouri conducted an investigation into the charges prompted by the videos, during which time they posted uniformed and plainclothes police in the classrooms. Giljum is an adjunct professor, with a full-time job working as the business manager for Operating Engineers Local 148, a union in St. Louis. Meanwhile, the union acceded to pressure from the Missouri AFL-CIO, and asked Giljum to resign, just days before his May 1 retirement after working there for 27 years.Gail Hackett, provost of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, released a statement after the investigation, clearing the two professors of any wrongdoing: It is clear that edited videos posted on the Internet depict statements from the instructors in an inaccurate and distorted manner by taking their statements out of context and reordering the sequence in which those statements were actually made so as to change their meaning. The University of Missouri-St. Louis also weighed in with similar findings, and stated that Giljum was still eligible to teach there. On April 18, Andrew Breitbart appeared on Sean Hannitys Fox News program, declaring, We are going to take on education next, go after the teachers and the union organizers. It looks as if Ancel and Giljum were the first targets of that attack. In this case, the attack failed. While ACORN was ultimately vindicated by a Congressional investigation, the attack took its toll, and the organization lost its funding and collapsed. President Barack Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack apologized to Shirley Sherrod and Vilsack begged her to return to work. Sherrod has a book coming out and a lawsuit pending against Breitbart. Lets hope this is a sign that deception, intimidation and the influence of the right-wing echo chamber are on the decline. Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!, a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 900 stations in North America. She is the author of Breaking the Sound Barrier, recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.Electronic brownshirts trumped againH.L. Mencken defined Puritanism as the haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy. The National Labor Relations Board is haunted by the fear that a company somewhere might be creating jobs with a nonunionized workforce.Boeing has run afoul of that fear by investing more than $1 billion in a new plant in the right-to-work state of South Carolina. With only the flimsiest legal justification, the board wants to force Boeing to reverse course and locate the facility with its current operations in Washington state, where its workers are unionized.The NLRBs claims are laughable on their face, although Boeing -trying to run a business in a highly competitive global market -can be forgiven for missing the joke. The board accuses Boeing of interfering with, restraining, and coercing its union employees in the exercise of their rights by making a thoroughly understandable business decision.The CEO of Boeing stands accused of saying the company could ill-afford the strikes happening every three to four years in Puget Sound. In a memo, paraphrased in the NLRB complaint, Boeing management said it wanted to reduce vulnerability to delivery disruptions caused by work stoppages. Whats notable about these statements is that they are so obvious, they should go without saying. As the NLRB itself notes, Boeing suffered strikes with some regularity, in 1977, 1989, 1995, 2005 and 2008. These job actions werent good for business, or the unions wouldnt have undertaken them: Their express purpose is to exact pain on the company. The logic of the NLRBs position is that businesses shouldnt notice strikes, and if they do, they should learn to like them and never factor their potential cost into investment decisions.There are rules against runaway shops (i.e., picking up and moving a plant to evade a union) and against retaliating against workers for striking or organizing. Boeings decision to expand its business into South Carolina is manifestly none of those things. It is leaving its Washington state facility intact. In fact, Boeing has expanded it, adding 2,000 jobs. When the Charleston facility is brought online, Boeing will build 10 of its 787 Dreamliners a month seven of them still in Washington state. If every company were abusing its workers by continuing to employ them and adding to their ranks, the unemployment rate wouldnt be 9 percent. The NLRB cant point to any Boeing worker in Washington who has been harmed -let alone restrained or coerced -by the companys decision to hire additional workers in South Carolina.The desperation of President Barack Obamas NLRB is understandable. It is fighting a losing battle against the inexorable erosion of the supports of the semi-guild system of 20th-century unionization. In its overreach, though, it is creating yet another disincentive for business to locate in union-heavy blue states. What company wants to risk having to fight a union and the federal government for years in court just to defend a common-sense business decision? Clearly, Boeing made a grave mistake in its labor relations. It should have located its production in South Carolina from the beginning. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.The persecution of Boeing amyGOODMAN Special to Florida Weekly t p richLOWRY Special to Florida Weekly

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THE FIRST TO BRING YOU THE...Softec HD LensThe Softec HD is the newest cataract replacement lens available, from the most experienced ophthalmology team in S.W Florida.It is designed to be the World's Most Accurate Lens and is three times more precise, to more closely match your vision needs. And best of all, it is covered by Medicare and most insurance plans.Bonita Springs 26831 S. Tamiami Trl.239.992.1422 www.ecof.comDavid C. Brown, M.D., F.A.C.S.Founder and Medical Director Ophthalmologist and Cataract Surgeon Barrett R. Ginsberg, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmologist Cataract Surgeon Laser Vision Correction Naples 2352 Pine Ridge Rd.239.263.2700 North Naples 877 111th Ave., Unit 2239.591.2949 www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Predicted to be an early summer smash hit at the box office, Warner Brothers The Hangover Part II found the cure for coordinating and filming water scenes and stunts with a Naples-based company. Marine Team International is owned and operated by the family that owns and runs Cruise Naples. Capt. Lance Julian, a familiar face around Tin City and Naples Bay, led the crew that traveled to Thailand to shoot four water scenes, including one major stunt, for The Hangover Part II. Opening in theaters on May 26, the movie stars Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis. When the friends travel to Thailand for a wedding, its all fun and games until something goes seriously awry. When I read this script, I realized this production would have its challenges, such as demanding scenes in one of the busiest rivers in the world, says Capt. Julian, who is the co-founder, president and marine director of Marine Team International. The team, which also managed water safety for everyone involved in the film, has been behind the scenes in a similar capacity for films including Titanic, Red, Water World, The Thomas Crown Affair, The Thin Red Line and I Love You Phillip Morris. They also provided marine coordination, logistics and water transport for the reality TV show Survivor in seasons six through 13 and assisted with season 14 in Fiji. Capt. Julian and his son, Capt. Harry Julian, founded Marine Team International in 1994 to provide consulting, project management and production services for commercial marine projects and for water-related feature films, television programs, commercials, videos, documentaries, etc. They moved the companys headquarters from Hawaii to Naples in 2009 and still operate a location in their home country of New Zealand as well. Capt. Julian says Cruise Naples plans to extend its products this year by introducing Eco and Thrill adventures drawing from Marine Team Internationals experiences in the film industry and commercial nautical world. For more information, including a complete listing of films and film credits, visit www.marineteam.net and www. cruisenaplesflorida.com. Naples company has the cure for Hangover Part IISPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTOSAbove: Capt. Lance Julian with locals on location Thailand. Below: Filming called for two identical boats named Perfect Life. www.marinemax.com WORLDS LARGEST BOATING SALEWhen: June 3-4 Friday: 10am-5pm Saturday: 10am-5pm Where: MarineMax Retail Sales 1146 6th Ave. South Naples, FL 34102 (239) 262-1000 from MarineMax. When: June 3-4 Friday: 10am-5pm Saturday: 10am-5pm Where: MarineMax Retail Sales 1146 6th Ave. South Naples, FL 34102 (239) 262-1000 from MarineMax.

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Health & Wellness Positively Great for Physicians Regional Healthcare SystemCALENDARJune 2011Free Upcoming Seminars www.PhysiciansRegional.com Learn about EsophyX TIF, an effective surgical procedure performed through the mouth to reconstruct the bodys natural barrier to reflux. Available only at Physicians Regional. Tuesday, June 21, 5:30 pm Thomas Bass, M.D. Hospital Lobby 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about the most advanced techniques in modern weight loss surgery, including adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass that can help you get back to your life faster. Tuesday, June 21, 6:30 pm Thomas Bass, M.D. Hospital Lobby 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about the many innovative procedures available for knees and hips, including Direct Anterior Total Hip, MRI-Directed Custom Aligned Total Knee, Oxford Unicompartmental Knee and the Rapid Recovery Program. Thursday, June 16, 6 pm Robert Zehr, M.D. Hospital Lobby 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 596-0100 Skin Cancer: What you Should Know Learn about one of the latest advances for treating knee pain: MAKOplasty joint resurfacing an innovative new treatment option for people with early to midstage osteoarthritis of the knee. Available only at Physicians Regional. Tuesday, June 14, 6 pm Jon Dounchis, M.D. Hospital Cafeteria 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about the various causes of shoulder pain and the latest treatment advances, including shoulder resurfacing, arthroscopic surgery and joint replacement surgery. Wednesday, June 15, 6 pm Steven Goldberg, M.D. Hospital Lobby 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about diagnosis and treatment advances, including MAKOplasty joint resurfacing, an innovative new treatment option for early to mid-stage osteoarthritis of the knee. Available only at Physicians Regional. Wednesday, June 29, 6 pm Frederick Buechel, Jr., M.D. Hospital Lobby 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about menstrual disorders, fibroids and endometriosis, and the minimally invasive treatment options available today. Thursday, June 16, 6 pm Dennis Hidlebaugh, M.D. Education Room 8300 Collier Boulevard RSVP: 348-4180 Learn about various skin cancers and the effective treatments available, including Mohs Surgery, a stateof-the-art procedure now available at Physicians Regional. Thursday, June 9, 4 pm Robert Tomsick, M.D. Hospital Cafeteria 6101 Pine Ridge Road RSVP: 348-4180 Robotic Arm Knee Surgery Newest Advances in Shoulder Surgery Women...This One is For You Innovation in the Treament of Knee Pain Weight Loss Surgery Options Incisionless Surgery for Severe Heartburn Whats New and What Works for Painful Knees & Hips

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Collier, Lee, Charlotte, Glades and Hendry counties. Uncertain and full of trepidation, his young patient and parents can hear a child down the hall crying, No, no, no. At first, the press and proximity of other lives and other struggles is unnerving to the family of newcomers at hand. But before long, Dr. MacArthur has answered detailed questions from the parents and coaxed the boy out of a stoic state of fear and into a game room for a go at pinball. There, the good doctor proves himself a wizard of long experience. He leaves the patient, finally, with these simple words: Its going to get better. Indeed it is, although pain may be part of the process. But Dr. MacArthurs words ring with a resonance that echoes out far beyond the parochial concerns of the occupants of a single room on a single hallway in Lees sprawling, single system of hospitals and specialty treatment centers the largest public facility in Florida that operates without a single cent of local tax support, and the seventh-largest such institution in the nation, according to Lee officials. Highly rated across the board, the Lee Memorial Health System is supported by a patchwork of government medical programs, private insurers of individuals, and the startling but difficult-to-quantify generosity of private benefactors. Almost counter-intuitively, while the region has been saddled since 2007 with the worst effects of a national recession, and while politicians both federal and state have been belting it out since the Clinton administration over how to pay for the increasingly heavy demands of health care with diminishing resources, a fortuitous constellation of ingenious officials at hospitals in Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties were not only planning but putting into effect striking new improvements to meet the needs of the extended community. Being the largest hospital system in Florida and the second-largest in the nation that operates without any tax support, weve been able to take risks that permitted us to remain viable without the public helping us, says Jim Nathan, president and CEO of the Lee system. And Lees leaders arent the only ones taking risks. At Naples Community Hospital, Dr. Allen Weiss, president and CEO, with his team of managers, faces a different set of economic and social factors, but one similar challenge: to make improvements in the midst of hard times. New technologies and savvy arrangements or rearrangements of logistics and resources are making that happen. In Naples, for example, the rooms are getting smarter 64 of them, to be exact, on the North Naples campus. Theyre state-of-the-art, computerwired patient rooms that will enhance the experience of the patient and his or her family, while educational opportunities are incorporated into the hospital routine, explains Dr. Weiss. Not only will patients and families learn a lot more, and more quickly, about whats happening to them putting them in the advantageous position of being able to ask better questions and collaborate in their care with doctors but new medical personnel will be able to participate and learn too, through the Smart Rooms. Thats just one example; there are many. At the Charlotte Regional Medical Center, part of Health Management Associates, hard times have not prevented the center from buying a da Vinci Surgical System. The robot, of sorts, allows surgeons or teams of two to operate from a console with such precise focus that large incisions are often unnecessary, blood loss is greatly reduced and patients recover more quickly. Its a million-dollar investment that helps everyone. This is at the cutting edge, says Dr. Arvind Sharma, a urologist who led a team to remove a cancerous prostate two weeks ago, in his first operation with the da Vinci. The robotic tool consists of three integrated components: a console at which a surgeon or two can sit while performing the procedure, a patient side cart with four robotic arms, and a video tower with a large monitor so that the entire operating-room staff can witness the surgery. Although the da Vinci is robotic, its not a robot, Dr. Sharma notes. Its simply a tool that a surgeon uses, such as a scalpel. Ultimately, the machine is only as good as the surgeon using it.Building for the futureAnd a hospital system is only as good as the men and women guiding it especially at a time when community and society pressures to provide more for less seem to be increasing. So-called safety net hospitals such as those in the Lee system, for example, account for about 12 percent of Florida hospitals, but they provide 50 percent of charity care and 43 percent of Medicaid. Not only that, but growth here outpaced that in Florida as a whole by 41 percent to 18 percent in the last decade. And the region Lee serves includes a population of those 65 and older that number almost twice the national average 24 percent as opposed to the national average of 13 percent. By 2030, the region will average 34 percent. In the meantime, seniors use healthcare services twice as frequently as everyone else, they stay twice as long, and their care is measured at twice the intensity, according to Lee system numbers. But the economic risks made on behalf of seniors and everybody else, as Mr. Nathan aptly puts it risks made in Collier, Lee and Charlotte hospitals alike are now about to pay off in a series of improvements ranging from large to smaller. Especially at Lee Memorial Health System. For example, theres a new, much more spacious Childrens Hospital about to arise on the east side of HealthPark. It will be attached by two floors to the current care center, while remaining a separate entity. The hospital promises the advantages not only of more and more comfortable space, but of windows and sunlight not simply the light of good doctors. Theres the new Park Royal Psychiatric Hospital that will provide many more beds and a stronger focus on the mental health of older patients. Theres a new 7,000-square-foot Collier County Childrens Hospital Clinic part of the Lee system designed to CH andprovide follow-up care, including care with the regions finest specialists, for Collier children with extraordinary medical problems treated initially at The Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida in Fort Myers. (Lees Childrens Hospital provides the only services of its kind in neonatal care, oncology and other specialties, between Miami and Tampa, so travel is inevitable for some patients and parents in Collier or Charlotte counties.) There is a new flagship Regional Cancer Care Center that offers complete, state-of-the-art care for patients at a single site yet another benefit never before available to patients in the region. And on the smaller, but no less important, side, Lees Trauma Care Center, which has saved many lives in part by allowing patients to reach its 24/7 dedicated trauma doctors in the golden hour realistically about the first 30 minutes after a calamity has a newly acquired helicopter that can take the pressure off the sole aircraft used for the last two years. That will make a difference not only in Lee County, but in Collier, and parts of Charlotte, Hendry and Glades, from all of which traumatized victims have been saved in the Trauma Center, in recent years. For those who hate paperwork, finally, theres a new, much more efficient, online billing system in Lee that makes clear every step of the process which will sound like a small thing only to the uninitiated, who have never wandered like lost souls through a disorganized billing process. None of this is easy, especially post-recession. Which raises the question HEALTH From page A1 n a series lt C H and p rovid e fll ildiithth WEISS NATHAN COURTESY RENDERINGSThe Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida will have an emergency room and advanced neonatal intensive care facilities. COURTESY PHOTOThe state-of-the-art da Vinci Surgical System is in use at NCH and Physicians Regional hospitals in Naples, at Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers and Charlotte Regional Medical Center in Port Charlotte.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 NEWS A9 of the ultimate state-of-the-art gift to residents, visitors and all citizens alike: superb and superbly trained men and women who staff it all. In Lee, for example, there are 9,500 employees, including 1,200 doctors who use the systems resources, or work exclusively in it. And though they are often considered last, Mr. Nathan insists, they are not least. The one thing I feel the least fulfilled about in my many years at Lee Memorial Health System are these amazing, talented people, who are never recognized enough for the phenomenal services they provide, in an extremely challenging community. We say amen to that. Here is a closer look at some of the vital new non-human improvements in the regions medical care, made on behalf of all of us, by variety of forwardthinking leaders in health care: New Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida:Americas newest childrens hospital will never be a beautiful thing to a child first arriving. But to parents who will always be frightened for their children, the new structure will become a Mecca. Not one that sprang up over night, either. We started to travel this journey because of a lack of bed capacity, says Kathy Bridge-Liles, vice president The Childrens Hospital at HealthPark Medical Center. Everybody needed beds. So who gets them first? The children, of course. And when they get those new beds, others open up for older patients elsewhere in the hospital. Here it is by the numbers: $226 million, including a $198.1 million tower with a soaring glass atrium, 50 new pediatric beds added to the existing 98 beds for a total of 148 beds, a 68-bed neonatal intensive care unit and a 20-bed emergency department for children only. And lets not forget the spin-off benefits: a six-story parking garage right there. Six stories and 400,000 square feet with a new childrens emergency room. A separate MRI and pediatric imaging department, along with separate and selfcontained areas for surgery preparation and surgery recovery. Since 25,000 children made visits to the medical centers all-purposes emergency room last year, the new childrens ER will take significant pressure off the current ER. If you happen to have $50 million or so lying around looking for a good cause or any portion of that here it is, suggests Dr. Eman Salman, a pediatric oncologist and the interim medical director of The Childrens Hospital at HealthPark Medical Center in Fort Myers. Thats how much officials hope to raise from philanthropists, who have proven themselves far beyond expectation in times past. The new building will really help us decompress the ER, says Ms. Bridge-Liles. Its a win-win-win. Adults get the ER beds they need, and we bring all childrens services together. Parents will take their children to one building. If they have to. In which case, it wont be as bad as they think, and no matter how extreme or unusual their condition, they wont have to go as far, says Dr. Salman. Collier County Childrens Hospital Clinic:The reasoning behind the Lee Memorial Health Systems new, centrally located 7,000 square-foot colorfest of a clinic in the Polaris Center on Immokalee Road in North Naples is a simple statistic: one in every four patients arriving at Childrens Hospital about 40 miles north of Naples hails from Collier County. Such children may still have to travel to Lee for a first consultation; but for second, third or tenth consultations, which often happens in difficult cases, they will not have to drive so many miles. In fact, doctors and staff are sometimes the ones doing the driving, for the sake of children. The clinic itself, meanwhile, is a state-ofthe-art design with children in mind. Tests rely on video games, or colorful climbing apparatuses, or blocks of color set at precise distances to measure walking skills, or other ingenious methods. Specialties practices here include endocrinology, neurology, nephrology, oncology, hematology, allergy and immunology, and orthopedics, with future plans to add pulmonology and cardiology. Jewels in the NCH crown:In one of the nations premier community hospitals, things just got even better. By years end, 64 new smart rooms completely wired to connect them to the latest computer technologies that advance care literally at the speed of light, right from the bedside, will be occupied. They offer not only peerless technology, but privacy too, part of the NCH conversion from semi-private to private rooms. Thus, says President and CEO Dr. Allen Weiss, the community-wide system will jump from 681 to 715 beds, with 325 at the North Naples campus. That campus will also include two new large operating rooms and the operative support area. NCH is not just tech-savvy, however. The hospital is also looking ahead to preventive care, which is where the Telford Building downtown comes in. The hospital will completely refurbish this site to provide both medical education and public education, which means that healthy people can stay that way, here, where health through prevention is the goal. Finally, although long known for its superb cardiovascular care, NCH is now bringing together a team of 15 cardiologists, who will be headquartered at the Briggs Wellness Center. The aim, says Dr. Weiss, is to have an integrated diagnostic and therapeutic approach to cardiovascular disease. This new combined team anticipates having a national presence and becoming a medical destination, thereby adding further to the growth of our region. The idea of which, alone, makes the heart beat faster. Lee Memorial Health Systems Park Royal Psychiatric Hospital:For years or even decades, one of the significant weaknesses in medicine on the southwest coast has fallen under the category of comprehensive behavioral care. In nine months, that will change. Beginning next February, Park Royal Psychiatric Hospital, centrally located at HealthPark in South Fort Myers, will open its doors not only to offer strong outpatient programs, but 76 beds in 72,200 square feet of space for adults 18 and over, with a special focus on geriatric problems. The two key words in this new effort, suggests Jim Harper, president of Park Royal, are compassionate and comprehensive. Indeed, it will seem both for the patients and families who have scattered seemingly to the four winds for care, in the past. Lee Memorials new patient billing:Dont laugh, not unless youve wrestled with medical billing in the past, and discovered it to be fun and easy (in which case you may need to check into the new Park Royal Psychiatric Hospital). While others may play with bricks and mortar and hundreds of thousands of square feet of new space and new medical teams or technologies sometimes almost seemingly capable of bringing back the dead, somebody has been doing the grunt work, as they used to say. Lucky for all of us. In this case, that includes the creation of a new website (www.MyLeeBill.org) that can take you through the steps like Disney can take a tourist through the rides. Its almost fun, for Gods sake. We know hospital bills can be confusing, says Anne Rose, vice president of the Lee System Revenue Cycle, and we wanted to make the process as patient-friendly as possible. If numbers crunchers dont usually talk like that, then rest assured they almost never talk like this, either: Our patients dont stop being our patients when they leave our facilities. To prove it, the new billing system comes complete with human beings, who will also help if the computer just isnt your thing. If little cartoons designed to help with each step dont, and if sample letters provided in case an insurance carrier denies coverage of something, and if instant online access to your bill isnt good enough, and if the glossary of terms just wont do it for a good explanation, a pro will be waiting for you to help. True to form, Ms. Rose explains it this way: The needs of our patients and loved ones come first, no matter if theyre receiving medical treatment or need help settling their account. These people, in other words, are not going to show up in the middle of the night and repossess your car. One more thing: Well continue rolling out improvements and new features to make the site even more patient friendly, says Ms. Rose. Thats what we like to hear. Charlotte Regional Medical Centers da Vinci robotic tool:This is one cool million-dollar telesurgical machine (the surgeon operates controls and watches a screen), made by a company called Intuitive Surgical and known rather ambitiously as the da Vinci Surgical System. For good reason. Just as Leonardo da Vinci was able to do different things with each arm or hand at the same time, this machine relies on arms. And video, and as any great machine a very skillful human being. Although the machine relies on a console with high-def video where two surgeons can work the controls at once, the action takes place with the four robotic arms emerging from a bedside station. Each comes equipped with an endoscopic camera and the ability to carry a variety of instruments, giving the surgeon a 3-D image of the site, and complete control of the knife, as it were. The da Vinci translates the surgeons hand, wrist and finger movements into precise movements of the miniaturized instruments on the tip of the robotic arms, according to hospital literature. The arms allow a greater range of motion and dexterity than the human hand and wrist. And a feature known as motion scaling allows the surgeon to adjust the sensitivity of his hand movements to the corresponding micro-movements of the instruments. What all that means, ultimately, are much smaller, more precise incisions, shorter hospital stays, less pain, less blood loss, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recoveries. In the case of certain cardiac surgeries in which the chest must be cut open and the ribs separated, the da Vinci can instead sneak between the rib bones to get to the heart, according to officials. That alleviates the dreaded roughly 10-inch scar left by traditional open heart surgery. So major surgery becomes minimally invasive surgery. In the first surgery using the da Vinci early in May, a patient named Thomas (the hospital would not provide his last name), lost his cancerous prostate, while two surgeons who had trained three weeks on the machine worked the console. I had no fear, knowing that Dr. (Arvind) Sharma would be doing the surgery, he said. You have to have a good doctor behind the wheel. Contrary to the typical prostate removal experience, Thomas was moving around with little pain the next day, he says. COURTESY PHOTOA Smart Room at NCHCOURTESY PHOTOLee Memorial Health Systems Park Royal Psychiatric Hospital.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 In 1991, a group of golf club members from Pelican Bay decided to raise scholarships funds for children of staff members at Club Pelican Bay. Their mission soon expanded to include students throughout Collier County. Over the past 20 years, the Founders Fund has awarded $2 million in scholarships to 479 local students. For the 2011-12 academic year, 23 recipients are Collier County students and three are also children of Club Pelican Bay employees. This years winners are: n Margit Mikkelsen and Alina Winschel Barron Collier High School n Sophia Kyle Community School of Naples n Haylee Stokes Everglades High School n Alexis Schlaupitz, Camila Perez, Katherine Estrada and Xiomara Brioso-Rubio Golden Gate High School n Tania Saade, Kristi Balavage and Danielle OConnell Gulf Coast High School n Brenda Gutierrez, Maria FrancoMunguia and Yaresly Trejo Immokalee High School n Dennis Alas and Bailey Quinn Lely High School n Maritza Payan Lorenzo Walker n Nicholas Dudley, Michael Lopez and Brittany Hunter Naples High Schooln Nathan Andrus Palmetto Ridge High School n Christie Kuzma and Elba Campos St. John Neumann High School n Pierce Bittner, David Lucks and Chris LaCivita Club Pelican Bay Founders Fund scholarships are renewable each year for students who keep a B average. For more information, call Sue Davenport at 593-0124 or 597-2244 or visit www.thefoundersfundinc.org. Four members of the Philharmonic Y ou th Orchestra have been named recipients of the 2011 Joyce Anne Vitelli Scholarships awarded by the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. Morgan Block and Cameron Holder each received $8,300. Mr. Block plans to attend Florida State University, where he will major in music with emphasis in sound engineering; Mr. Holder will attend Hope College in Michigan and major in chemistry.Rafael Rivas and Frankie Vitiello each received $4,000 scholarships. Mr. Rivas will major in music performance at Florida Southern College; Mr. Vitiello plans to major in the classics (Latin/Greek) and economics at Florida Gulf Coast University. The Naples Press Club has awarded scholarships for $1,000 each to two students who plan to study journalism or a related field in college. The Terrence J. Miller Renewable Scholarship for the 2011-12 school session was awarded to Oscar Santiago of Golden Gate High School and Steven Waller of St. John Neumann High School. Mr. Santiago plans to attend Edison State College-Naples and study communication and graphic design. Mr. Waller is bound for the University of Central Florida to study radio/television broadcasting. Two other students will have their current NPC $1,000 scholarships renewed for the 2011-12 school year. They are Caitlin Crum, a 2007 graduate of Naples High School who is majoring in communications/public relations at Florida State University, and Nicole Groll, a 2008 graduate of Palmetto Ridge High School who is studying mass communications at the University of South Florida-St. Petersburg. Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southwest Florida has awarded $1,000 RMHC U.S. scholarships to 12 high school seniors throughout Southwest Florida. From Collier County, the following five students are recipients: Juan Marante, Tania Saade, Yenny Ramirez-Lee, Dennis Alas and Hilary Thoemhe. The Naples St. Patrick Foundation has funded a four-year scholarship to pay for one Collier County student in the Take Stock In Children program administered by the Education Foundation of Collier County. Jim McEvoy of the Naples St. Patrick Foundation announced the $7,500 gift. Through a partnership with the Florida Prepaid Scholarship Foundation, Take Stock can match the donation and purchase a scholarship that will provide two years of tuition to a community or vocational school and two years of tuition to a Florida state college. 26 college-bound seniors receive Pelican Bay Founders Fund awardsVitelli awards go to youth orchestra members Naples Press Club awards two scholarships Five Collier students among RMHC recipientsSt. Patrick Foundation takes stock in higher educationCOURTESY PHOTOThe Pelican Bay Founders Fund scholarship winners for the 2011-12 academic year. See more photos from the awards ceremony on page C25.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 NEWS A11 Friends of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park honor foundersIm often asked what qualifies me to talk and write about history. My usual response is, Because Im Southern, and Southerners love their families and their familys families. And what is history, really? Its talking (or writing) about someone whos done something worth talking about. Such doings are wrapped around a time and place that hold some kind of meaning. The depth of that meaning depends upon the proximity of blood or heart relations. This place I came to live some 30-plus years ago has a unique history complete with its own lore and characters that transcends time and socio-economic barriers. Earlier this month, I was invited as a representative of Naples Backyard History to attend the Friends of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park Founders Day Luncheon. It was important that Lavern Norris Gaynor, the co-founder of Naples Backyard History, be in attendance because the refurbished garden there was being dedicated that day and was being named Delloras Garden in honor of her mother. Ms. Gaynor decided that Mary Ellen Hawkins, Collier Countys state representative from 1974-1994 (first woman and Republican from Collier County to hold that seat), should also attend, as it was Ms. Hawkins who ensured that Delnor was part of the state parks name.A heart connectionAlthough they never met, Joe Wiggins and Dellora Norris had a special connection to this last undeveloped barrier island in Collier County. Not much information can be found about Mr. Wiggins, other than a few records from the late 1800s noting that he was a homesteader who built his bee-keeping establishment on a foundation originally laid by the Calusa Indians, and that their canals served as the pathway to his apiary and trading post, where he traded with the Indians and settlers alike.One hundred years later, a woman would take her visiting daughter to the area and insist: You must tell your father to do something. We have to protect this area. That woman was Dellora Norris, and her daughter, who saw the area more times than she can count, is Ms. Gaynor.Eventually Lester Norris, Delloras husband, gave in to the badgering and on April 24, 1964, Mr. and Mrs. Norris arranged to purchase the parkland for Collier County through their St. Charles, Ill., charities. The Board of County Commissioners of Collier County originally named the park Delnor Park, as a tribute to Mrs. Norris, who loved the area because it reminded her of Key Island (its correct name not Keewaydin), the land she and her husband had purchased in 1945, where the much beloved Keewaydin Club once stood. In 1970, when the state purchased the area from the county, it was renamed Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Recreation Area. The Norrises made possible the construction of several facilities there.Historys valueThe greatest gift the Friends of DelnorWiggins Pass State Park gave at their Founders Day Luncheon was not just two speakers who knew the facts on the founding history of the state park; they gave the gift of love and respect often not seen in todays time. The Friends funded the garden themselves and named it in honor of Mrs. Norris after learning of her love for the area. The Norris family and many others in our area have made countless contributions to the community. Too often they are forgotten or, in order not to be forgotten, the families are asked to ante up to keep the name alive. Henry Adams, a great grandson of John Adams and one of Americas greatest historians, said historians must not try to know what truth is, if they value their honesty; for if they care for their truths, they are certain to falsify their facts. The fact is, the Friends of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park set a new standard in honoring history this month. I hope its a standard that will be modeled for years to come as the memory of Joe Wiggins and Dellora Norris lives on in the hearts of these Friends. To learn more about becoming a member of the Friends of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park, call 597-6196 or visit www. delnorwiggins.org.BY LOIS BOLIN ____________________Special to Florida WeeklyUNDERCOVER HISTORIAN COURTESY PHOTOThinking of how Joe Wiggins might have looked back in the day, Rod Wiley staged this photograph of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park Ranger Bruce Nichols sitting on the beach at Wiggins Pass. COU RTE S Y PH O TO

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Inadditiontotheamazingsavingsfeaturedhere,SunshineAceprovides theexpertiseandfriendlyserviceyoudeserve!Shopthe MemorialDay SaleMay27throughMay30 totakeadvantageofgreatdealsthroughout thestore.VisitoneofSunshineAcessixlocationsinLeeandCollier countiesorfindusonlineat www.SunshineAce.com.atSunshineAce! DowntownNaplesGoldenGateBonitaSpringsSanCarlosMarcoIslandEastNapleswww.SunshineAce.com Finduson AmericanFlagSet Microfiber AutomotiveCloth-3packafter$1.50mail-in-rebate Youpay$1.508189979Limit1rebatepercustomer FREEPricesvalid 5/27/11-5/30/11. Whilesupplieslast. $9.99HTHLiquid ChlorinatorGallon8006454 $5.00Home&Garden Sprayer-1Gallonafter$5.00mail-in-rebate Youpay$7.997215023Limit1rebatepercustomerafter$5.00mail-in-rebate Youpay$14.998268419Limit1rebatepercustomer $2.99 2forVisitoneofSunshineAces sixlocationsinLeeand Colliercountiesorfindus onlineat www.SunshineAce.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 NOW AVAILABLE IN SW FLORIDA! A GUARANTEED WATERPROOFING SYSTEM FOR YOUR HOMESTOP WASTING MONEY ON COSTLY REPAIRS!Roofs Walls Decks Wood Brick Masonry StuccoWE CAN WATERPROOF ALMOST ANYTHING! s s W W o oo o o d d s s D ec ec c c c ks ks ks k k k k ks k k k ks ks k k s s SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER20% OffANY WATERPROOFING PROJECT OVER $150Expires 6/30/11Service contracts available Includes pre and post hurricane inspections.*ASK ABOUT OUR COOL ROOF SYSTEM SAVES FLORIDA RESIDENTS UP TO 43% IN COOLING COSTS!ONTHELINEMGT@GMAIL.COM 239.271.4719 | 813.299.5403www.HYDROSTOP.com **10 YEAR WARRANTY**Restrictions may applyHURRICANE TESTED FREE ESTIMATES! Se Se S S Se Se S S S S e *A R The Collier County Sheriffs Office is conducting a book drive for the K is for Kids Foundation. Books can be dropped off at CCSO headquarters, 3319 Tamiami Trail E., Building J-1. Through Thursday, June 2, donors can view the K is for Kids Power of the Word art exhibit in the gallery on the second floor in the records office at the same location. The exhibit showcases works by local middle school students who were invited to visually express the power of words and the importance of reading. From more than 140 entries in the art contest, 28 finalists were chosen to hang in the exhibit.K is for Kids collects books and raises money to purchase new books for children of all ages and donates them to libraries, book nooks and shared reading environments in schools, preschools, daycare centers and after school programs. Most recently, the foundation delivered 1,100 books to a meeting of media specialists from public schools throughout Collier County.For more information and a complete list of organizations receiving books, visit www.KisforKids.org or e-mail info@KisforKids.org. Donate a book and check out students winning artwork

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA14 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 A.B.F. Drywall Inc. Acushnet Company Titleist & FootJoy Adams LaRocca Consultants Bank of America Merrill Lynch Barraco & Associates, Inc. Bonita Bubbles Car Wash & Lube Bryan Cave Law Firm (Julian Nealy and Teresa Pernini) BSB Design Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs, LLPSM Build LLC A Deangelis Diamond Company Carlton Fields, Attorneys at Law Castle Management, LLC Central Florida Truss Cherry, Edgar & Smith, PA Chick-l-A at Naples Center Coastal Beverage Diamondhead Resort, Ft. Myers Beach EP Pro Ernst & Young LLP Ft. Myers Coca-Cola The Goldberg, Yolles & Lepore Consulting Group of Wells Fargo Golfers Guide Gravina, Smith, Matte & Arnold Greg Norman Collection Heritage Carpet & Tile, Inc. The Holiday Inn Express at Gulf Coast Town Center Howard Fertilizer & Chemical Company, Inc. Hyatt Place Coconut Point Mall Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa Inn on Fifth, Naples Iron Mountain J&D Heating & Air Conditioning Jan-Pro Cleaning Systems, Inc. Koenig & Dinkin, PL Lockton Companies Masco Cabinets McGriff, Seibels & Williams, Inc. Mitchell & Stark Moen Nike Precision Plumbing Q. Grady Minor & Associates, PA The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples RWA Consulting Inc. Seabreeze Electric, Inc. Southern Wine & Spirits Sunnygrove Landscaping TaylorMade / Adidas Thrifty Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Inc. Titleist Tri County Landscape Svcs Inc. Trianon Hotel, Bonita Springs USI Insurance Services, LLC Vanguard Janitorial Services, Inc. Waste Management Wells Fargo Insurance Services USA, Inc. White & Case, LLPWCI Communities, Inc.would like to thank these companies for their participation inBuilding the Fight Against HungerOn May 21, together we were able to exceed our goal of 105,000 meals for those in need in Collier, Charlotte, Glades, Hendry and Lee counties. The Florida Department of Elder Affairs has awarded a mini-grant to Legal Aid Service of Collier County to fund free programs to educate seniors about the legal rights and protections available to them. Legal issues can develop when questions arise over a seniors housing, public assistance benefits and Medicare and Medicaid as well as protecting assets from debt collection firms. Legal Aid Service will hold three free education events focusing on medical care and consumer law issues. Senior attorney Robert Bencivenga will discuss medical care issues, and attorney Albert Batista will present information regarding consumer law issues. Meetings are set for: n 1 p.m. Thursday, May 26: Immokalee Public Library, 417 N. First St., Immokalee. Spanish and Creole interpreters will be on hand. n 3 p.m. Thursday, May 26: Cypress Run Apartments, 550 Hope Circle, Immokalee. Spanish and Creole interpreters will be present. n 1 p.m. Friday, May 27: Golden Gate Public Library, 2432 Lucerne Road, Naples. Spanish interpreters will be present. For more information, Call Legal Aid Service of Collier County at (866) 5065553. Legal Aid Service conducts programs about rights, protections for seniorsThe Greater Naples Better Government Committee has elected the following members to serve as officers on the board of directors for the coming year: Sally Tiffany, president; Rhona Saunders, vice president; Dave Trecker, secretary; and Jim Brennan, treasurer. Re-elected to two-year positions on the board were: Mr. Jrennan, Jim Carter, David Farmer, Linda Penniman, Doug Rankin, Bob Raymond, Ms. Saunders, Bill Spinelli, Ms. Tiffany, Mr. Trecker and Lou Vlasho. For more information about the Greater Naples Better Government Committee, call Ms. Tiffany at 595-9345. Citizens committee elects officers, directorsLearn about volunteer opportunities at the Naples Preserve and Eco-Center as well as at other city parks during open house at the preserve from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, June 4. Among the volunteer duties at the preserve to be filled this summer are greeters to welcome visitors and members of the green team to do gardening and grounds keeping. The Preserve is at 1690 Tamiami Trail N., at the corner of Fleischmann Boulevard. For more information, call 261-4290 or e-mail cspreserve@centurylink.net. Naples Preserve has openings for volunteers

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It has been written by some in the medical eld that 3050% of prostate cancers may be insignicant. This is easy to say when it is not you or one of your loved ones. Knowing which 3050% this applies to is not necessarily simple when we still lose nearly 40,000 men per year to this disease. The board certied physicians at Specialists in Urology have diagnosed and treated tens of thousands of cases of prostate cancer. Whether it is watchful waiting with close follow-up or one of many dierent treatment options, our team is equipped with the experience, technology and vision to treat each patient as though he is one of our own family members. Simply put, our team members are your experts. Your Husband? Your Dad? Your Brother? Your Experts. Our Team. (239) 434-6300www.SpecialistsInUrology.com

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A16 Molly Begor(518) 572-6204 mbegor@twcny.rr.comJeanne Lindberg (715) 220-3125 jlbl@centurytel.netJanet Carter821-8067 janetrcarter@gmail.comLinda Andersen293-0284 lindaandersen@earthlink.netLucy Maglione248-0221 lucymag2@yahoo.comScott Leiti628-6181 scott.leiti@yahoo.comCarol Baker(847) 421-5068 baker78@comcast.netRoss Valenza248-4821 rossvale@aol.com Julie Dixon (239) 269-5701 juliettedixon1@aol.comKeith Davison 571-1610 kadavison@comcast.net Pam Maher(239) 877-9521 agentpam007@gmail.comDon Lasch285-6413 dlasch_swa1@comcast.netSandy Lasch218-5495 dlasch_swa1@comcast.net REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US 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REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US REMEMBER US 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Happy Memorial Day!

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA18 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 FORTMYERS 11380LindberghBlvd. 239.561.7215 | HOURS Mon.Fri.7:30a.m.:30p.m.;Sat.7:30a.m.p.m. NAPLES 3747TamiamiTrailNorth 239.687.7215 | HOURS Mon.Sat.8:00a.m.:00p.m NEWNAPLESLOCATIONNOWOPEN.PersonalSouthwestFloridaDeliveryService. www.NormanLoveConfections.com Gourmetpastries Smoothiesandcoffees Giftsandspecialties Weddings,eventsandcorporategifting Word-cass oca artisancocoaecreationsmadewithLOVE. The Living Gulf Coast: A Nature Guide to Southwest Florida, by Charles Sobczak. Indigo Press. 512 pages. $26.95. People who live in and visit Southwest Florida are drawn by its natural beauty. In spite of many decades of development, the region still has a remarkable diversity of life forms and relatively unspoiled habitats in which they thrive. Furthermore, public and private efforts have done much to ensure the future of these natural treasures. The Living Gulf Coast is a generous, lavishly produced and inspiring guide to this distinctive paradise. Mr. Sobczaks encyclopedic effort is divided into two major sections of approximately equal size. The first section is the field guide itself. Defining the region as including Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee, Collier, Glades and Hendry counties, the author provides detailed information on the birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians to be found here. He employs an efficient set of symbols and abbreviations to map basic facts of size (for birds, length, wingspan and weight), degree of endangerment, where found, the various names applied to the species and so forth. He also provides vivid descriptions of each creatures appearance, behavior, habitat and diet. Blending information and entertainment, he entices his readers to move beyond the passive engagement of entering a book. He urges them to engage directly and actively with their fellow creatures. Whether introducing the green iguana, the Everglades mink, the pileated woodpecker, the Florida banded eater snake or the lowly nu tria, he gives each critter its due. Often, his discussions are leavened by humor and wit. Where to engage? Thats what the second half of the book is all about. Nature lovers will revel in Mr. Sobczaks survey of managed lands available for public exploration and enjoyment in this six-county region. More than 2,000 of the regions 6,000 square miles are under federal, state or local public or private management, providing countless opportunities for birding, hiking, kayaking, camping and just plain meditation. The author provides information about 162 destinations, 61 in elaborate detail and the others in a more compact overview. FLORIDA WRITERS A delightful inventory of the Gulf Coasts natural delightsSEE WRITERS, A19 SOBCZAK philJASON pkjason@comcast.net

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Every day is cause for celebration when you consider the newest choice in retirement living in the Naples and Marco Island area The Arlington. Thats because this exceptional community is so much more than just a new address or residence. Its the start of a whole new phase of life. One in which growth and discovery become the norm. Where generosity and gratitude create the kinds of bonds that turn new neighbors into new friends. A place for individuals to thrive while knowing the kinship of others is always nearby. Its like opening the door to endless possibilities. And when the possibilities are endless, so are the reasons to live every day like never before. Whether its raising a toast or raising your hand for lifes next greatest adventure. MODEL AND INFORMATION CENTER12276 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 501, Naples, Florida 34113 (239) 206-2646 or toll-free (866) 986-9690www.ArlingtonNaples.org Located on Tamiami Trail East, across from the Freedom Horses Monument at Lely Resort. Open 8:30 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Sundays by appointment. The Arlington of Naples welcomes those of all faiths, beliefs and tradi ons.How about a toast to new possibilites? South Floridas largest RV and boat consignment sales center Floridas largest indoor RV & boat showroom South Florida s largest independent RV and boat Service Center Insurance work welcomed 4628 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33980941-883-5555 1-877-883-5555 www.CharlotteRVandMarine.com Charlotte RV & Marine $50 COUPON $50 COUPON $50 COUPON $50 COUPON$50DISCOUNTApplies to labor charge for any RV repair. If your labor bill will be paid by an Extended Service Agreement company or insurance company then the discount will be applied to the customer responsibility portion of the bill. Limit one coupon per visit.Expires June 17, 2011 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 A19 This latter half of the book is arranged by county, with a north-to-south plan within each chapter. With Mr. Sobczak as our guide, we can travel from Sarasotas Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium to Punta Gordas Peace River Wildlife Center to Boca Grandes Gasparilla Island State Park to the Naples Botanical Garden and to various ecodestinations out east in Hendry and Glades counties. Many of these destinations are well known, while others are relatively obscure. The author locates each entry not only by address, but also by GPS coordinates. You wont get lost. One glory of The Living Gulf Coast is the authors thoroughness and enthusiasm. Another is the attractive layout that includes more than 600 color photographs by award-winning masters like Dick Fortune, Sara Lopez, Alan S. Maltz, Judd Patterson, R.J. Wiley, David Siebel, Bob Gress, David Irving and Heather Green. Is this a complete nature guide to the area? Not quite. However, supplemented by Mr. Sobczaks earlier Living Sanibel: A Nature Guide to Sanibel & Captiva Islands (Indigo Press, 2010), the missing pieces fall into place: fish and shellfish, insects and plants as well as the unique barrier island environment. I cant imagine two more essential volumes for Floridas nature lovers than The Living Gulf Coast and Living Sanibel. Between them, the natural riches of Southwest Florida are given abundant and loving exploration. These books are great additions to any personal library, and they make great gifts as well. Mr. Sobczak writes: I pray this book will help everyone understand the need to protect and preserve these precious landscapes and the wild things that roam them, because now, more than ever, we need them just as much as they need us. Without them, we are nothing more than selfish fools living in an empty house. We can, and will, do much better than that if we care enough about the future of this wonderful world we live in. Amen to that! Philip K. Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text.WRITERSFrom page A18 a e s n o u t n d Manyofthesedestinap l a n un iq e nv i I m or um na t T h Co S a n the ri c Fl ab in T g t o li m w w t e ver y one un d toprotectandpreserv

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What Will Your Legacy Be? Spending time with a child can be one of the most rewarding legacies a grandparent can provide, but saving a childs life may be your greatest of gifts. We are building a new Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida that will provide 148 beds and all of the specialty services to treat the most critically-ill children and their families. As the only Childrens Hospital between St. Petersburg and Miami, we provide treatment programs and lifesaving care to infants and children from Collier, Lee, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades counties. We hope you will join us in helping to create a brighter and healthier future for the children of our community. For more information on how you can save a childs life through a personal, corporate or legacy gift to e Childr ens Hospital of Southwest Florida please call 239-343-6950. Book Now! Sanibel Island, FL Super Summer Specials Vacation Condos from $600/weekNow thru July 2 N N o o w w w t t t t t h h h h h r r r r u u u u J J J J J u u u l l y y y y y 2 2 of Sanibel & Captiva, Inc. Island Vacations 1-888-451-7277 www.SanibelIslandVacations.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA20 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Give to Harry Chapin and get a golf outingDonors who give $150 to the Harry Chapin Food Bank through the WCI Communities website www.WCIGolf.com will enjoy a golfing foursome at one of five WCI courses. Gift certificates for the golf foursomes are valid for play June 1-Sept. 30. Tee time reservations are available two days in advance at the following: n In Naples: Tiburn and Hammock Bay Golf & Country Club; n In Bonita Springs: Raptor Bay Golf Club and The Colony Golf and Country Club; n And in Fort Myers: Pelican Preserve Golf Club. The Harry Chapin Food Bank solicits, collects and stores food for distribution to families in need through a network of more than 170 nonprofit agencies in Collier, Lee, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades counties. In the past fiscal year, the food bank distributed more than 9 million pounds of food and other grocery products. For more information or to donate, visit www.WCIGolf.com and select the Harry Chapin Food Bank icon. Hit the linksHere are some charity golf tournaments coming up in the area: The Economic Development Council of Collier County holds its fourth annual golf tournament Friday, June 3, at the Club at Tiburon. Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. precedes the 8 a.m. shotgun start. Registration is $150 per person, $600 for a foursome or $1,000 for a corporate team. For more information, call 263-8989 or e-mail beth@enaplesflorida.com. The Lee County Bar Association is hosting a golf tournament to benefit Voices for Kids of Southwest Florida on Saturday, June 4, at Old Corkscrew Golf Club. VFK is the financial support arm of the Guardian ad Litem program that recruits and trains volunteers to advocate for children in the court system. Registration begins at 7 a.m. and the shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $90 per person. For registration and sponsorship information, call Nanci DuBois at 334-0047, e-mail info@leebar.org or visit www.leebar.org. The 20th annual Florida Gulf Coast University Founders Cup to benefit the FGCU Foundation is set for Friday, Oct. 14, at Pelicans Nest Golf Club in Bonita Springs. The day begins with lunch in the clubhouse before the 1:15 p.m. shotgun start. Dinne and awards reception will follow the tournament. Registration is $2,000 per foursome or $500 for individuals. A championship sponsor level is available for $2,500 and includes a four-player team and logo on a sponsors golf towel. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information or to register, call Michele Kroffke at 590-1074, e-mail mkroffke@ fgcu.edu or visit www.fgcu.edu/ foundation. GOLF NOTES i es in an d y ear, h an 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r g ro d onate lec t th e n aments o pment h olds its Friday, r eak f ast s hotgun o n, $ 600 Friday, Oct. 14 in b R f ou r al a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a s. l ev e i nc l an d t o w o pp Fo re g i s at 5 9 f gcu. e f ound a

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA22 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Weekly nonstop service between Southwest Florida International Airport and Aalborg, Denmark, begins June 21 and will run for five weeks, ending on July 19. Comefly, a Scandinavian tour operator, will offer the Monarch Airlines flights every Tuesday aboard a Monarch Airlines A330 aircraft with 358 seats. This is the first time RSW has offered nonstop service to Scandinavia and will be the only nonstop flight between Aalborg and the United States. For more information about the flights and to make reservations, visit www.comefly.dk. For more information about Southwest Florida International Airport, visit www. flylcpa.com. The Renaissance Academy of Florida Gulf C o ast University has openings on two fall trips for adventuresome travelers. Limited to 24 people each, the high-end, concierge-style excursions cater to those who share a love of learning and a sense of adventure. Heres where theyre headed: Invitation to Tuscany Sept. 10-18; $3,295 (land only)Explore the cultural, artistic and architectural treasures of Florence, Siena, Lucca, Certaldo, Greve, Radda, Castellina, Volpaia, Bologna and San Gimignano, and end the adventure with a farewell feast at the private castle of Santa Maria Novella set amidst the Tuscan countryside. Pearls of Dalmatia Sept. 29-Oct. 13; $4,095 (land and air) Independent, democratic Croatia again welcomes visitors eager to absorb its history, culture and unspoiled Dalmatian coastline. To receive complete itineraries and registration forms for travels with the Renaissance Academy of FGCU, call 425-3272 or visit www.fgcu.edu/ racademy.RSW-Denmark nonstop flights set to take off for the summer Renaissance Academy has the ticket for concierge-style travel adventures r g, Denmark, will run for on n onstop f b A f l y l c

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UP TO12 MONTHS SAME AS CASH FINANCING*A NEW TRANE/LENNOX AC SYSTEM$3,500 OFF MARKET OPENNNUMC Art & Farmers Market6000 Goodlette-Frank Road, Naples Saturdays 7:30am 2:00pmProduce, Seafood, Art, Crafts, BBQ Complimentary Health Screeningswww.NNUMC.org or call 239-398-8623 Do You Suffer from 2nd-Hand Snoring?Millions of Americans suffer from the effects of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) although as many as 90% have never been diagnosed. OSA occurs when the muscles and tissue surrounding the throat relax causing the airway to collapse and block air ow to the lungs. This creates sound vibrations in the throat know as snoring. Sleep interruptions caused by OSA can cause high blood pressure, stroke, daytime sleepiness, impaired driving, depression and not to mention a restless nights sleep for the person who doesnt snore. The Thornton Adjustable Positioner (TAP) may be the solution to a restful nights sleep for the both of you. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 A23 239-261-7157 www.WynnsOnline.com 141 Ninth Street North Naples For over 70 years offering Wholeseome fresh products to our customers. Wynns is now carrying a large selection of Natural, Organic, and Gluten-Free products. Free with a $25 Grocery Order1 Pint of Blue Bell Ice CreamMust have coupon at time of purchase Free with a $25 Grocery OrderSantos Sangria .750 mlMust have coupon at time of purchase N26 20.315 W 081 49.677ALL BOATERS WELCOME ABOARD! Bonita BayMARINA DIRECT GULF ACCESS FULL SERVICE MARINA Boat storage & slip rentals from $264/month Dry storage for up to 32 & wet slips with lifts Fuel, ships store, boat launch & detail services COME BY BOAT AND DINE ON THE WATERat Backwater Jacks OPEN DAILYCall 239-495-3222 or visit BonitaBayMarina.net Marco bank displays flags, memorabilia IberiaBank on Marco Island welcomes the public to view an exhibit of Presidential American flags adorned with cords, tassels and American eagle finials as well as veterans memorabilia on display through Saturday, June 18. The flags are on loan from Rick Borman, president of the Naples Town Hall Distinguished Speaker Series. Numerous local veterans have contributed other items to the display. Although the bank will be closed for business on Monday, May 30, the lobby will be open for visitors immediately after the Memorial Day ceremony at the Marco Island Cemetery. Bank manager Keith Dameron will serve refreshments until 3 p.m. The patriotic exhibit will remain in place until the banks next shred party on Saturday, June 18. All proceeds from the event will benefit the veterans memorial project in Veterans Community Park on Marco.Collier County Veterans Council plans ceremonyA Memorial Day ceremony hosted by the Collier County Veterans Council takes place Monday, May 30, at Hodges Funeral Home at Naples Memorial Gardens. The prelude will begin at 9:45 a.m., with a formal ceremony scheduled from 10-11 a.m. U.S. Navy Lt. Tim Richardson, who served in Desert Shield/Desert Storm 20 years ago, will be the keynote speaker. Remembrance and special honors will be rendered for Sgt. Linda Pierre, U.S. Army, who was killed in Afghanistan on April 16 this year. Full military honors including the folding of the Flag of Honor, presentation of a memorial wreath and rifle salute and taps will be rendered. In these unsettled times, it is critical that all citizens pause to pay homage and give honor to those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in developing and maintaining our country, says James Elson, president of the CCVC. Decoration Day, created in May 1868, was intended to pay honor to the hundreds of thousands of soldiers who died in the Civil War. April 12, 2011, was the 150th anniversary of the mortar round that was the opening fire of the War Between the States. Lunch will be served after the ceremony. Hodges Funeral Home at Naples Memorial Gardens is at 525 111th Ave. N.Patriotic concertgoers can give to scholarshipThe Philharmonic Center for the Arts partners with the Sergeant Linda Pierre Memorial Scholarship during the annual Patriotic Pops concerts. Concertgoers will be able to donate to the scholarship fund before, during and after performances that begin at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, May 26-28. The Sergeant Linda Pierre Memorial Scholarship honors the 28-year-old Immokalee native who died on April 16 in Afghanistan. Donations will be used to provide scholarships to Immokalee High School graduates. A committee consisting of Immokalee community leaders and representatives of Immokalee High School will award the scholarships. For more information about the scholarship, contact Tim Nance at 641-5414. For tickets and information about the concerts, call 597-1900 or visit www. thephil.org. MEMORIAL DAY COURTESY PHOTOThe patriotic display in the lobby at IberiaBank on Marco Island

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in cooperation with Lisa Romano, License #FL BK3006884 Built in 2005 this is the only available single family home with full maintenance provided by the HOA in all of Olde Naples. The fact that the Villa home is located off of 8th Avenue South and only three blocks from the beach and famous Fifth Avenue makes it an easy walk to everything that Olde Naples has to offer. Restaurants, shopping, entertainment and parks are just steps away. 3,600 sq ft, 4 Bedrooms, 41/2 Bathrooms Plus a Den and 2 Car Garage Beautifully Landscaped and Fenced Back Yard with Pool & Patio Surrounded by 10 Ficus for Privacy Gourmet Kitchen Features Professional Appliances, Custom Cabinetry, Large Island, Granite Countertops and a Wine Cooler Master Suite Offers a Separate Sitting Room, Balcony, Morning Kitchen, Walk-In Closets and a Spa Like Master Bath with Jacuzzi Extras Include Elevator, Travertine Floors, Hurricane Glass, a Whole Home Water Purification System, Custom Wood Shutters and High Ceilings Throughout NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA24 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Outdoor Furniture & Accessories Bedroom Dining Living Room Sink VanitiesInside Out Furniture Warehousewww.insideoutwarehouse.com 592-1387 2097 Trade Center Way NaplesWHY PAY MORE?WHOLESALE to the PUBLIC! SHOP US LAST FOR THE BEST PRICE!UP TO 40% OFF ALL FLOOR SAMPLES We Now Carry: Irwin & Sons Telescope Casual Chicago Wicker Hanamint Huffman Koos Windward & More Must Make Room For New Inventory Mon-Fri 9-5 Sat 9-1 Sun closedOPEN MEMORIAL DAY Monday, May 30 9-2pm Bonita Zontians seek nominations for Woman of the YearThe Zonta Club of Bonita Springs is seeking nominations for its 2011-12 Wolman of the Year. The award will be presented at the annual Glass Slipper Ball set for Friday, Nov. 18, at The RitzCarlton Golf Resort. Since 1988, the club has selected a Woman of the Year who has played a key leadership role in local charitable organizations and foundations. Many recipients have worked hard on womens issues that represent the heart of the clubs mission to improve the circumstances of women everywhere. Past winners include: Jane Wheatley, Arden McCurdy, Cherrill Cregar, Fran Luessenhop, Nancy Near, Marjorie Rubacky, Patsy Graham, Nancy Keefer, Diane Lepola, Barbara DuFrane, Jacqueline McCurdy, Marie Tranovich and Jane Hogg. The deadline for nominations is Wednesday, June 1. Submit a brief biography including the nominees education and careers, charitable organizations she is or has been involved with and her perspective on the communitys strengths as pertaining to womens issues. E-mail nominations to Patty Gift, club president, at patty.gift@morgankeegan.com. In other news, the club installed officers and new board members for the coming year at its May meeting. They are: Patty Gift, president; Maggie Petraits, president-elect; Flo Rogers, treasurer; Michele Shelly Gentile, secretary; and new board members YVonne Murray and Dawn Rocco-Babon. Returning board members are Karen Berens and Denese Mattrey. Get acquainted with newcomersThe Naples Newcomers Club welcomes women who have been permanent residents of Naples for no more than five years and who want to meet others who are new to the area. The club meets for luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on the second Thursday of every month at country clubs throughout the area. Prospective members are invited to coffee at 10 a.m. on the first Thursday of each month. For meeting locations and more information, call 298-4083 or visit www. naplesnewcomers.com. The Bonita Springs Newcomers Club welcomes women who have lived in Bonita for less than three years. Luncheons are held at area country clubs on the third Thursday of every month. For more information, e-mail bonitanewcomers@gmail.com. Christian women plan June luncheonThe Naples Christian Womens Connection meets from 11:30-1:30 p.m. Friday, June 3, at Quail Creek Country Club, 13300 Valewood Drive. NCWC is a part of Stonecroft Ministries. For reservations or more information, call 597-8798. CLUB NOTES

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Dr. Paul DiGiorgi, Cardiothoracic Surgeon Barry Crandall, Bypass Surgery Patient At 60 years old, Barry Crandall felt good. He exercised everyday, rode his Harley Davidson as much as possible and worked hard at his construction job. What Barry thought was heartburn and jaw pain turned out to be a lot more serious he suered a heart attack. Da Vinci robotic bypass surgery performed by Paul DiGiorgi, M.D., helped Barrys heart heal and quickly got him back on his bike. To read more of Barrys story, please visit www.LeeMemorial.org/caring accredited centers in the United States with a combined 85 years of service performing 30 percent of all cardiac surgeries with this minimally invasive approach , www.LeeMemorial.org

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA26 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 HEALTHY LIVINGOur mission is to care for patients and cure sickness. Our core competency is execution; in other words, we get things done. In that spirit we recently celebrated National Hospital Week, a celebration of the history, technology and dedicated professionals that make our facilities beacons of confidence and care, according to its organizers. Those ideals were showcased when Scott Wiley, director of respiratory therapy, invited COO Phil Dutcher and me to visit recently with the 25-member North Naples Hospital respiratory therapy team. These health care professionals add value at the bedside of our sickest patients from premature newborns to frail, failing geriatric patients. Our respiratory therapy team has an average of 19.5 years of experience, with more than half of that here at NCH. The technology employed by respiratory therapy has become more and more complex. The North Naples campus has evolved over the past 22 years to include sicker, more complicated patients (from pre-school drowning victims to end-stage lung disease to severe congestive heart failure). Many patients who previously would not have survived now are comforted, educated and go home intact.Patients doing poorly and about to take a turn for the worse can be rescued by our SWAT team (Stabilize While Awaiting Therapy). Respiratory therapists are core members of this team, and many times they are preferred partners by nurses assisting a patient who is developing trouble.Once, there were expected complications to being on a respirator (breathing machine). Today, those complications are almost gone. We have not had a pneumonia induced by a respirator in more than 15 months in any of our 58 ICU beds on either campus. The length of stay in the ICU and on the respirator is also coming down as respiratory therapists, along with critical care physicians and ICU nurses, move patients as quickly as possible to breathing on their own. With these new and better abilities to change the course of disease, the sophistication and size of the equipment needed has grown markedly. Unfortunately, the respiratory therapy departments footprint has lagged behind in size. Over the next year, as the North Naples campus undergoes yet another metamorphosis, this essential department will be reborn in a larger, more functional area.In other developments at the North Naples campus, we will add 64 new private rooms to the fifth and sixth floors of the Baker Tower. These will include six Gulf View rooms to match those at the downtown campus. These new floors will include an educational center/conference area on each floor with nursing stations at both ends of the floor, which lessens the distance between patients and nurses. We also plan to make each of these rooms a Smart Room with the latest computer technology to give the patient and his/her family a safer, more educational and comfortable experience. Smart Rooms recognize whenever a caregiver enters the room and share this information with the patient. We will also begin a project to migrate the radiology department closer to the emergency room, where most of the need for X-rays arises. And we are adding to stateof-the-art operating rooms as well.Five years ago, before the Baker Tower was started, we predicted there would be construction continuously at North Naples for a decade. So far, were right on track. Stay tuned for the latest in caring, curing and getting things done. Growing and changing to fulfill a mission of caring and curing allenWEISS allen.weiss@nchmd.org Writing for Wellnessessay winner draws on her personal experienceEmotional Eating and the Desire to Look Good, an essay by Barron Collier High School student Caily Horbal, won first place in a contest at the school sponsored by BistroMD. The Writing for Wellness competition drew 120 entries; Ms. Horbals essay (see excerpts at right) was chosen as the top one from among 12 finalists. What the judges found particularly compelling about Cailys essay was her real-life perspective on the topic, says Dr. Caroline Cederquist, medical director of the Cederquist Medical Wellness Center in Naples and founder of the BistroMD diet meal delivery program. As the grand prizewinner, Ms. Horbal received a $500 college savings bond. The other finalists in the contest were: Alexa Ballenger, Jessica Cederquist, Tara Cioffi, Emma DeFrancesco, Faleesha Fernandez, Cooper Fulcher, Dani James, Jessica Klahm, J.D. Mankiewicz, Stacia Moyer and Austin Nolz. STRAIGHT TALK New classes to help blind and visually impairedLighthouse of Colliers Center for Blindness and Vision Loss offers two classes to help those who are blind and visually impaired gain independence. New sessions are beginning soon in: Daily Living Skills Class meets from 9 a.m. to noon every Monday, June 6-Aug. 29. This class is designed for anyone who has been recently diagnosed with macular degeneration, cataracts, tunnel vision or other eye conditions. Participants learn how to socialize, navigate, communicate and feel safe in a sighted world. Coping with Vision Loss Class meets from 1-3 p.m. every Monday, June 6-Oct. 17. Both classes meet at Lighthouse of Collier headquarters, 424 Bayfront Place. Attendance is limited, and registration is required. Call 430-3934.For more information about Lighthouse of Collier, visit 222.lighthouseofcollier.org. Lifestyles After 50 coming June 10The second annual Lifestyles After 50 Expo takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, June 10, at North Collier Regional Park. The county and Senior Friendship Centers will serve free lunch as a way to encourage and enhance social interaction among seniors in the community. For more information, contact Kristina Rodriguez at 275-1881 or visit www. friendshipcenters.org. Free workshop about congestive heart failureThose caring for someone suffering from congestive heart failure can learn patientand self-care techniques at a SEE TO YOUR HEALTH, A27 FLORIDA WEEKLY STAFF REPORT___________________________news@ oridaweekly.com Dr. Caroline Cederquist and Caily Horbal, center, are flanked by contest finalists from Barron Collier HIgh School.COURTESY PHOTO TO YOUR HEALTH Emotional Eating and the Desire to Look GoodTeenagers today grow up with the idea of what the perfect body, hair, and face are supposed to look like. They get pulled into cycles of peer pressure, and will hurt themselves, and their health, if it means they can obtain this perfect persona. Girls will turn to disorders such as anorexia and bulimia to achieve that size 0 that all the guys want; and guys will try things like steroids so they dont get bullied for being the little kid. These problems can lead to a very emotional time during adolescence and can even be carried into adulthood. Many people dont know how to cope with their troubles, so they turn to things that give them a temporary good feeling, like emotional eating Most people occasionally comfort themselves with food; it only becomes a problem when its an addiction. When I was 7 years old, I remember seeing my sister eating all the time and I used to think she was so lucky to still be so thin I didnt know what eating disorders were when I was that little, so I didnt think there was a problem with eating so much in such a small amounts of time. I recall my mom was consistently taking my sister to the doctor and yelling at her for losing so much weight in a period of two weeks. At the time, I didnt understand that it was bad to look the way she did and do the things she did, but now I understand that my sister had a problem. It started with emotional eating and turned into something much more serious. In order to stop the cycle of emotional eating, you have to make the first step. Try and figure out what emotions make you turn to the comfort of food and attempt to find other ways to distract yourself from them. Joining a sport at school, a new club or even something just for yourself that makes you happy can help you see you dont need food to feel at ease. Dont let emotional eating become who you are; instead, find whats making you feel the way youre feeling and go about it in a way that will truly make you happy in the long run. Caily Horbal

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Experience You Can Trust Cataracts LASIK Laser Vision Correction Cornea Treatment Glaucoma Dry Eyes Comprehensive Eye Exam Pediatric Eye Care Glasses & ContactsFULL SERVICE VISION CARE MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED LASIK FINANCING AVAILABLE www.sw eye.com Fort Myers 13670 Metropolis Avenue 239-768-0006 Cape Coral 1109 Del Prado Blvd. 239-574-5406 Naples 11176 Tamiami Trail 239-594-0124 Rick Palmon, M.D. Richard Glasser, M.D. Leonard Avril, O.D. Brian Marhue, O.D. Penny J. Orr, O.D. Mark GeneralesSr. V.P. of InvestmentsTime for a Second Opinion?If your nancial advisor isnt calling you, then you should call me239-676-5676 *Financial Planning Magazine Annual Dealer Survey; June 2009 **STFP is not in the business of providing tax advice and this information although taken from public sources believed to be reliable, may not be accurate and complete. You should consult your CPA to fully understand how these tax issues could affect you. Investment Advisory Services offered through Southern Trust Financial Planning, Inc. Securities offered through Securities America, Inc. Member FNRA, SIPC, Southern Trust Financial Planning Inc. is not afliated with the Securities America companies.9420 Bonita Beach Rd | Suite 202, Bonita Springs, FL 34135 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 A27 TO YOUR HEALTHFrom page A26free workshop from 1-3 p.m. Wednesday, June 29, at the Ispiri community center on the Avow Hospice campus. Participants will receive practical advice from Avow staff on reducing caregiver stress and increasing patient comfort. Topics include: Understanding Congestive Heart Failure: How the Disease Manifests and Progresses, presented by Dr. Paul Mitchell; Tips for Taking Care of the CHF Patient: Real-life Techniques for Increasing Comfort and Improving Quality of Life, presented by Mary Brodeur, R.N.; and How to Ease Your Worries and Physical Stress with Music, Self-Massage, Guided Imagery and Other Techniques, presented by Karla Mramor, LMT-BC, and Louise Kenny, LCSW. Registration in advance is requested. Trained Avow Hospice volunteers may be available to sit with patients while their caregivers attend the session. To register or for more information, call 649-3689. Dance class and support group for Parkinsons patientsThe Parkinson Association of Southwest Florida provides several regular programs and services for those who have Parkinsons disease and their caregivers. Free dance classes: 1 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday at Fleischman Park. Support group meetings: 1 p.m. every Tuesday at Bentley Village; 10:30 a.m. every Thursday at PASFL headquarters, 2950 Tamiami Trail N. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 417-3465. Take the time to give bloodCommunity Blood Center locations in Collier and south Lee counties always welcome donors to replenish blood supplies. Donors can give at CBC donation centers or at the bloodmobile as it makes its rounds. In Naples, the blood center is at 311 Ninth St. N. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. Call 436-5455. The Bonita Springs center is at 9170 Bonita Beach Road. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Thursday and Friday. Call 495-1138. For a complete list of times and locations for the bloodmobile, visit www.givebloodcbc. org.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA28 NEWS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 the Vietnam War and an alligator wrestler of wide renown, he piloted airplanes and helicopters owned by the tribe and generally conducted himself in a fashion that was guaranteed to attract attention. The signal accomplishment of his tenure was the establishment of Indian gambling facilities, which became models that have been emulated by other tribes across the United States. Mr. Billie was the driving force behind the tribes opening of a highstakes bingo operation in Hollywood in 1979. Not content with a bingo parlor, he and the tribe pursued an aggressive legal campaign designed to make the Seminoles a major player in the gaming industry. Today, the tribe owns the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino franchise, which it purchased six years ago for nearly $1 billion, and operates six other casinos around the state, including one in Immokalee. Although the tribe refuses to disclose financial details of its privately held businesses, it is estimated that it takes in nearly $2 billion annually from its gaming operations alone. Proceeds from the gaming empire are used to pay dividends to each of the tribes 3,200 members who live in Florida. According to at least one source, each tribal member receives a stipend of $14,000 a month from the gambling operations, and the top leadership fares far better than that. When Mr. Billie was pushed from office, his salary was said to be about $315,000 a year, which made him the highest-paid elected official in the state. Today, the chairmans salary is reported to be more than $1 million, although the tribe will not confirm that figure. Although Mr. Billie left under a cloud, his successor, Mitchell Cypress, and the elected tribal council that served under him were dogged by accusations of financial mismanagement and neglect. Despite the tribes repeated pronouncements that issues such as health care and treatment for substance abuse were top priorities, life expectancy for the average Seminole in Florida dropped from 59 years to 48 years over a 10-year period beginning in 1999. A newspaper examination of deaths occurring in the first eight months 2008 revealed that the overwhelming majority of deaths involving tribal members could be traced to drug and alcohol abuse. When he first sought the chairmans post in 1979, Mr. Billie campaigned on a promise to improve health care and living conditions. BILLIEFrom page A1James Billie released an album in 1986 and a 20th anniversay CD in 2006. a g o a nd a sinos c lude e e ts e sses, t ta k e s a nnu opera ds f r o m a r e d s to p campa ig n th e S e mi p layer in t ry H ar d no According to e ach tribal me m o f $ 14,000 a m o op erations, an d Left: The Seminole Tribe of Florida purchased the Hard Rock franchise in 2006. Below: The Seminole Casino in Immokalee. COURTESY PHOTOS Nominate a do-gooder for an awardThe Everglades Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals is soliciting nominations for its 2011 Innovation in Philanthropy and Outstanding Fundraising Executive awards. The Innovation in Philanthropy award is presented to an organization or group of individuals that have fostered positive change in the Naples philanthropic community through increased productivity, a new service/ product/program or a multi-party collaboration. The Outstanding Fundraising Executive award honors an individual who practices his/her profession in an exemplary manner and who has at least 10 years of professional fundraising experience, among other criteria. Deadline for nominations is Aug. 1. Anyone can make a nomination. AFP members are also encouraged to nominate a Distinguished Volunteer before Sept. 1. Visit www.afpeverglades.afpnet.org or e-mail afp.everglades@gmail.com for nomination forms or more information. The awards will be presented at the National Philanthropy Day reception Thursday, Nov. 10, at The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort. Tickets for the reception will go on sale in October. The Everglades Chapter of AFP was formed in 1994 and has more than 50 members from throughout Collier County.

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TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS DR. KEVIN LAM, DPM*Ilizarov Fixation Methods-LE DR. BRIAN TIMM, DPM* DR. MALINOSKI, DPMUMDNJ Foot & Ankle Trauma Weil Foot & Ankle Institute *Board Certi ed: NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 NEWS A29 Swimming is good for dogs, as long as you watch out for hazardsFinally, obedience training is extremely important. Your dog should come when called, even when swimming, so you can call him back before he heads into deeper water or stronger currents. Emergency shortcut: Always carry extra retrieving toys. A dog whos heading out into a dangerous area after a ball or stick can often be lured back into shore with a second item thrown closer in. Its no substitute for training, but it could save your dogs life. Preparedness: Before letting your dog swim in any natural surroundings, survey the area for safety. Rivers and oceans can change frequently, and an area that was safe for swimming one visit can be treacherous the next. Consider currents, tides, underwater hazards and even the condition of the water. In the late summer, algae scum on the top of standing water can be toxic, producing substances that can kill a pet who swallows the tainted water. When in doubt, no swimming. Better safe than sorry. One of the best things you can do is to take courses in first-aid and CPR for your pets. Many local Red Cross chapters offer these classes, and some veterinarians may also teach them in your community. A dog whos pulled out near death from drowning may be saved by your prompt actions if you know what to do. If your dog isnt much of a swimmer, or is older or debilitated, get him a personal flotation device. These are especially great for family boating trips because most have sturdy handles for rescue when a pet goes overboard. Awareness: Be aware of your dogs condition as he plays. Remember that even swimming dogs can get hot, so bring fresh water and offer it constantly. When your dog is tiring, be sure to call it a day. A tired dog is a good dog, but an exhausted dog is in danger of drowning. Be particularly careful of young and old dogs. Both can get themselves into more trouble than a healthy adult dog with lots of swimming experience. Young dogs can panic in the water, and old dogs may not realize they arent as strong as they used to be. Keep them close to shore, and keep swimming sessions short. Swimming is great exercise and great fun for all, and with these few simple precautions you can keep the cool times coming, with safety in mind. Many dogs enjoy swimming as much as people do, and cool times in the local swimming spot or backyard pool are one of the best parts of warmer weather. But you have to look out for your pet around water, since even the strongest, most enthusiastic swimmers can get into trouble. The keys to water safety for dogs: prevention, preparedness and awareness. Prevention: No dog should be given unsupervised access to a backyard pool or a neighborhood pond or creek. Swimming pools are best fenced-off for safety. And if thats not possible, they should be equipped with alarms that sound when the surface of the water is broken by a child or pet falling in. Escape tools like the Skamper-Ramp (skamper-ramp.com; 800842-6543) are a good idea, but its better to prevent pets from getting in unsupervised in the first place. Prevention also includes teaching your pet what to do when hes in the pool. Dogs dont get the idea that the steps are on one side only, and they may tire and drown trying to crawl out the side. If your pet likes to swim, work with him in the pool to help him learn where the steps are, so he can get out easily. PET TALES Pool cautionsBY GINA SPADAFORI _______________________________Special to Florida WeeklyLike many dogs, retrievers usually love swimming and take to it naturally. Pets of the Week >>Blaze is a handsome, blue-eyed guy whos about 2 years old. He loves people and gets along very well with his roommates at the shelter. >>Mickey is a Pomeranian mix whos about a year old. He weighs about 9 pounds and like to have fun with cats and people. >>Sailor is a sweet little guy whos about 7 months old. His favorite place is in a persons lap, and he loves to be petted.>>Iza is a Labrador retriever mix whos about 3 months old. Friendly, gentle and very alert, shes good on her leash and she even likes cats.To adopt a petCollier County Domestic Animal Services is at 7610 Davis Blvd. Hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Adoptions begin at 11 a.m. and are processed through closing time. Adoption fees are $60 for cats and $85 for dogs and include spay/neuter surgery, a bag of pet food, pets license and a micro-chip ID. Call 252-PETS (7387) or visit www.collierpets.com to search for a lost pet or to nd a new pet.

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Dont Move IMPROVE! SOLID SURFACE COUNTER TOPSas low as$19per sq. ft. QUARTZ COUNTER TOPSas low as$29per sq. ft. 3CM GRANITE COUNTER TOPSas low as$39per sq. ft. DREAM KITCHENS | CUSTOM CLOSETS | LUXURIOUS BATHROOMSwww.cornerstonebuilderssw .comGive us an opportunity to wow you!Cornerstone stands behind every job... BEFORE. DURING. AFTER.Factory Direct Pricing... We are the Factory!Lifetime Warranty on any product we manufacture! Your complete satisfaction is my rst and foremost priority.Tony Leeber Sr., Owner/Contractor VISIT OUR SHOWROOMS Located in Naples & Fort Myers NAPLES SHOWROOM7700 Tamiami Trail N. 239-593-1112 FORT MYERS SHOWROOM3150 Metro Parkway 239-332-3020Licensed and Insured General Contractor #CBC1253280 Youre invited to our ...OPEN HOUSECOMPLETE REMODELING | NEW COUNTERTOPS | CABINET REFACINGThinking of Moving?Kitchen Refacing at Half the Cost of New Cabinets and More. We Do Complete Home Remodeling FORT MYERSHANSONFOWLER ST METRO PKWYWINKLER COLONIAL N S WE NAPLESPELCIAN BAY BLVDVANDERBILT BEACH RD IMMOKALEE RD N S WE VD 41 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 NEWS A31 Im gonna keep on lovin you. Cause its the only thing I wanna do. I dont wanna sleep. I just wanna keep on lovin you. REO Speedwagon The abolition of ...the illusory happiness of the people is the demand for their real happiness. To call on them to give up their illusion about their condition is to call on them to give up a condition that requires illusion. Karl Marx Pretty woman, walkin down the street. Pretty woman, the kind Id like to meet. Pretty woman: I dont believe you. Youre not the truth. No one could look as good as you. Roy Orbison Girl is on my mind. Girl is on my mind. The Black Keys Many dreams have been brought to your doorstep....Are you real, Mona Lisa? Nat King ColeEverything I needed to learn I learned in Paris. At the Louvre. At the feet of the Mona Lisa. I know she has become a cliche to most, a scorned object to many. With Warhols 30 copies she was put on equal footing with Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley and Campbells soup. Dalis self portrait look-alike didnt help either. Nor did Duchamps cheap copy, mustachioed and inscribed L.H.O.O.Q., letters read aloud in French that sound like She has a hot ass. Sapecks La rire, the laugh, shows La Gioconda smoking a pipe. The pipe dream of all this irreverence only makes me love her more. Leonardo began painting her in 1503, in Florence. He worked on her for four years, never reaching completion. Then, after moving to France, he worked on her for three more years. Da Vinci claimed never to have finished any painting. Others felt that Mona was completed in 1519, just before her artist died. Walter Pater, the mid-19th century symbolist, wrote about her. What he wrote was used as the first poem in Yeats 1936 Oxford Book of Modern Verse. Pater sees her as older than the rocks among which she sits. Like the vampire, she has been dead many times, and learned the secrets of the grave. And has been a diver in deep seas, and keeps their fallen day about her; and trafficked for strange webs with Eastern merchants; and, as Leda, was the mother of Helen of Troy, and, as St. Anne, was the mother of Mary; and all this has been to her but as the sound of lyres and flutes, and lives only in the delicacy with which it has molded the changing lineaments, and tinged the eyelids and the hands. In her enigmatic smile, she is this eternal woman. Yet her utter lack of facial hair, her having not even eyelashes or eyebrows, was once believed to be a reflection of the merely contemporary fashion. The genteel of the day perceived all facial hair as undesirable and pluckable. Now it is claimed that it was repeated cleansing, not temporary fashion, that washed away Monas brows and lashes. Not only the subject of such petty concerns, La Gioconda has also inspired anger and violence. She has been stolen. She has been accosted with acid, rocks, red paint and a teacup. Today she lives behind bulletproof glass. But it is not with any of this that I am entranced. Sfumato is the Italian word meaning to vanish or to shade. This word is used to describe one of the classic Renaissance painting modes. And it is the use of this technique in da Vincis portrait that seems to enchant me. Sfumato is like low-contrast photography. It creates a veil of smoke between the viewed subject and the one who sees. A brightness is given to pure darks; the pure brights are softened. This technique begins with painting a translucent dark. While this dark is wet, an opaque light is painted into it. The dark darkens the light. And the darks are lightened. The experience gone thus is lucid, vibrant, ardent awareness of the between mysteriously between the object perceived and the one viewing. This is a new clarity, a fresh focus. Da Vinci described it as being without lines or boundaries. So, where is the enchantment, really? Seeing Mona Lisa, neither object nor viewer vanishes. No dead shades. It has all been the same shade all along. Gone thus, it is the spell itself that has been broken. Clearly, the girl is on my mind.... But what does Mona Lisa see when she looks at me? Ah, were not in Paris anymore. Rx is the FloridaWeekly muse who hopes to inspire profound mutiny in all those who care to read. Our Rx may be wearing a pirate cloak of invisibility, but emanating from within this shadow is hope that readers will feel free to respond. Who knows: You may even inspire the muse. Make contact if you dare.MUSINGS le tr D in in a s G Rx rx@floridaweekly.com Sfumato

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BUSINESS & REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES BUS INESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES BSECTIONWEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011On the moveSee whos going where, doing what on the local business scene. B4 Home sweet homeFlorida is top choice for foreign buyers. B9 INSIDEFools SchoolWhat did Warren Buffett tell Berkshire Hathaway shareholders at their annual meeting? B6 Florida Weekly wins 23 state awards for writing, designBuilding on last years designation as the states best weekly newspaper by the Florida Press Association, Florida Weekly picked up 23 writing and design awards for work published in 2010. Contest organizers announced the winners names last week. Final placing (first, second or third place) will be announced at FPA annual convention in St. Petersburg on July 1. Staff writer Roger Williams led the Florida Weekly team with six awards. He won for humorous column, serious column and education, environmental and investigative reporting. Bill Cornwell took three awards, including best feature story. Evan Williams won for best obituary and news reporting, and Oswaldo Padilla, editor of Fort Myers Florida Weekly, won for business writing. Other winners include: Nancy Stetson for criticism and best obituary; Phil Jason for criticism; Jeannette Showalter for health reporting and Betsy Clayton for outdoors writing. Were very pleased that our peers recognize all the talent and hard work from each of our writers, said Florida Weekly Executive Editor Jeffrey Cull. And, although the editors of each of our publications dont directly share in the awards, they are a big reason why were able to put out a quality product each week. On the design side, Presentation Editor Eric Raddatz won for front-page design, an award hes taken in each of the past four years. He also won for best individual graphic.Florida Weekly also won awards for its Best of special section and its website development.Florida Weekly is locally owned and publishes newspapers in Greater Fort Myers, Greater Naples, Charlotte County and Palm Beach Gardens with a combined circulation of 80,000. The FPA Better Weekly Newspaper Awards are open to monthly, semi-monthly, weekly, semi-weekly and tri-weekly newspaper members. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE SUCCESS. But as countless graduates from colleges and universities will discover as they graduate this spring, getting their first taste of success can be difficult especially in these trying economic times.Florida Weekly asked several Southwest Floridians with proven track records of success and achievement to offer counsel to members of the Class of 2011 who are beginning to take their first, tentative steps into the real world. While their advice is most relevant to those just entering the working world, it is just as valuable to old pros who may still be chasing success. Those who contributed thoughts and observations were: Wilson Bradshaw, president of Florida Gulf Coast University; Guy Emerich, director of the law firm of Farr, Farr, Emerich, Hackett & Carr in Punta Gorda; Joan P. Larson, BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@ oridaweekly.com SEE GRADS, B8 NOW WHAT?[advice for 2011 grads and the rest of us]

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 MONEY & INVESTINGReal estate investment trusts offer tax incentiveLong gone are the days of the 4 percent two-year CD or treasury bills. As such, the investor who is hungry for safe and healthy yields has largely gone unsatisfied. But there might be some opportunities for extremely high yields in a very misunderstood equity sector: mortgage real estate investment trusts or REITs. True, there is wisdom to not reach for yield as incredibly high dividend yields suggest greater-than-acceptable risks. The risk with high dividends is that the dividend will be severely cut. More specifically, the concern is that management is denying the harsh reality that financial collapse is at their doors. If not that, the company might be known to be paying the dividend from sources of capital other than operating cash flows (i.e. the sources for the dividend are thought to be non-sustainable). The other thought is that if these high dividend-paying companies are not too good to be true, then Wall Street analysts and gurus would have found them out and bid up the price until any pricing inefficiency is eliminated. But, investors have also come to understand that sometimes market inefficiencies exist and persist for a long time. Not all investors know what it means to be a REIT. These entities most often own real estate commercial, apartment building, industrial, shopping malls, hotels, timberland, farmland, etc. And some invest in mortgages. What makes a REIT different from other corporate entities is their unique favorable taxation; they are not double taxed on distributions as are corporate dividends, which are taxed first as corporate income and then taxed as a dividend at the personal income level. Rather, the distribution made by REITs is taxed only at the shareholder level as ordinary income dividends. The IRS requirement for that taxation privilege is that 90 percent of a REITs annual income MUST be distributed to owners. There are three types of mortgage REITs: those that only buy federally insured mortgages from the U.S. agencies of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginny Mae (known as agency mortgage REITs or AMreits); those that only, or largely, buy private or uninsured mortgages (known as mortgage REITs or Mreits) and those that buy both types of mortgages (known as hybrid REITs). But how they finance their assets and the extent of leverage depends upon their asset type. Because the banks trust the federal agencys explicit guarantee of principal and interest, the AMreits can borrow from the banks at 0.20-0.25 percent and leverage at levels of $8 of debt for every dollar of capital. So, though the mortgages are low yielding (3.5 percent average portfolio yield), the incredibly low borrowing costs allows a very large spread or profit. Now, multiply the spread by the degree of leverage and you get a return on net equity of 20 percent and higher. And from this a high dividend of 14 to 20 percent can be paid. Are the assets good? As good as the agencies guarantees. Will Freddie and Fannie ever default? It is possible, but it is a low, low probability in the current environment. Will the spread remain large? No, eventually the spread will narrow as the economy improves. But until the fat lady sings, until Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke stops saying that rates will remain low for the foreseeable future, it would seem that the spread will remain very good. So how does this group grow if it is always paying out its income? It issues additional amounts of stock, called secondary offerings, which happen like clockwork, often once a quarter. It raises capital in order to take on more debt in order to buy more mortgages as the 90 percent distribution does not allow growth through retention of earnings. So what happens with a secondary? The AMreit stock generally goes down on the news of the secondary and then rises through the quarter in anticipation of the declaration of the hefty quarterly dividend. Once the stock goes exdividend (or trades without right to the dividend), then the stocks drop and then the cycle is repeated. Pretty boring; pretty profitable boring. One caveat: If the AMreit is issuing stock below book value, the secondary is not accretive to shareholder value (not a good thing). Conversely, the secondary is good for shareholders if it is issued at above book value even though the immediate market reaction might be, or is often, an initial decline in stock value. The Mreit group is generally not leveraged as AMreits; these REITs cannot get low rate bank financing using private mortgages as collateral. Unlike the AMreits hefty dividends returns of 14-20 percent, this group offers 10-14 percent dividends; its portfolio is largely private mortgages issued prior to 2009 (at higher rates) but bought after the financial crisis at oft times 50 cents on the dollar. So the unleveraged yield of 5-7 percent translates into a 10-14 percent return on net assets. No question that AMreits, Mreits and hybrid mortgage REITs entities get hurt if there is a precipitous rise in interest rates, but that rise might still be a year away. And if the interest rate rise is coincident with an improved economy, then the market might perceive the Mreit mortgage assets to be of much higher quality.a buffer of sorts. And many of these entities hedge or lay off a certain amount of their interest rate risks. As always recommended, speak to your advisers as to suitability. No doubt, the merits of investing in mortgage REITs is much debated and your experts might well warn against this exposure. Jeannette Rohn Showalter, CFA, can be reached at (239) 444-5633, ext. 1092, or jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com. Her office is in Bonita Springs. o w m m A o t fa jeannetteSHOWALTER, CFA jshowaltercfa@yahoo.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 ON THE MOVE EDC solicits nominations for awardsThe Economic Development Council of Collier County is accepting nominations for its 2011 Excellence in Industry awards. The EDC has also launched an Excellence in Industry awards website. Designed and donated by 4What Interactive, www.excellenceinindustry.com has information about applications, sponsors and past winners. The Excellence in Industry awards honor the best companies in Collier County that exemplify the use of innovation and a responsible approach to economic diversification and business and community enhancement. Awards are presented in the following categories: Entrepreneurship, Business Expansion, Innovation, Newcomer, Export Excellence, Green-to-Gold and Civic Responsibility. The EDC encourages any company or organization to apply or to nominate other companies for the awards. Sponsored by Moorings Park, Gulfshore Insurance, IberiaBank and Structure Medical, the awards luncheon will be held Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Hilton Naples. Sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information about applying for or sponsoring the Excellence in Industry awards program, contact Beth Sterchi at the EDC by calling 263-8989, ext. 105, or e-mailing Beth@ eNaplesFlorida.com. Visit www.ExcellenceinIndustry.com to download an application form or reserve tickets to the luncheon. Learn how to SCORE with word-of-mouthWord-of-mouth is considered the most cost-effective and practical way to build an existing business. SCORE Naples presents a workshop devoted to understanding and applying the best word-of-mouth techniques to grow your business from 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, at the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. Building business with and through existing customers should be the top priority for all companies, says presenter Frank Friend, director of education for SCORE and a consultant in loyalty management. Loyal customers stay longer, buy more and most importantly they act as advocates for your company with that valuable and free marketing method called word-ofmouth. Attendees will learn a simple way to determine which of their customers are loyal and which are not. They will learn ways to increase retention and referral rates, and how to calculate the lifetime value of their customers. Registration is $35 per person. Sign up at www.scorenaples.org or call the SCORE office at 430-0081 between 9 a.m. and noon any weekday. Chamber welcomes new membersThe Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce welcomed the following 39 new members in March and April: AAMCO Transmission and Total Car Care American Momentum Bank Argus Management Corp., Tampa Awesome Signs of Southwest Florida Best of Everything Bostons Restaurant & Sports Bar Canine Command The Card Management Group Cardinal In-Home Drapery Cleaning Coupon Cocktail Naples, Diamond Custom Homes Everglades Edge Eyeglass World Florida Community Bank Golden Gate Fire Control & Rescue District GulfShore Photography Hurley Travel Experts Idylwild Sailing Catamaran James K. McCauley Insurance Agency, Bonita Springs Jim Duffy Construction Journeyman Gallery-Photography by Josh Manring Kite Realty Group Madison Security Group Mar.Dru Inc., Bonita Springs Mullets Appliances NAACP of Collier County Novastar Solutions, Livonia, Mi. The Parrot Bar & Grill Premier Sothebys International Realty-Richard and Susie Culp Prestige Jets Progressive Insurance Agency Inc. Quantum Consulting Seniors Helping Seniors Sonjas Hair Design The DrainMasters of America Two Men And A Truck Weldon & Rothman, PL Worship Safe Church Security SolutionsTo learn more about any of the above, visit the chambers online business directory at www.napleschamber.org. For information about chamber membership, contact Don Neer, new member services manager, by calling 403-2906 or e-mailing don@napleschamber.org. Job search support group meets weeklyA job search support group for downsized employees of local businesses meets at 10:30 a.m. every Monday at the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce. The group is geared toward white collar, administrative and professional workers, rather than trade and service workers. Emphasis is on networking, resumes, interviewing skills and best practices for a successful transition. Participants should come prepared to discuss who they are, what type of opportunity they seek and what makes them good candidates for jobs. Assistance is available to those who are still working through these topics. Attendance is free. For more information, e-mail Karen Klukiewicz at kluk77@comcast.net. BUSINESS BRIEFS Awards & Recognition Robert Ball, executive director of the Lee County Port Authority, has been named 2011 Airport Professional of the Year by the Southeast Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives. Mr. Ball joined the LCPA in 1993 and has served as executive director since 1996. He has served as president of the Florida Airports Council as well as a member of its board of directors. He holds a bachelors degree in air commerce/flight technology from the Florida Institute of Technology and is a licensed private pilot. Board Appointments Todd Caruso has been appointed to the board of directors of Investors Security Trust Company. Mr. Caruso is a certified public accountant and partner in the firm of McHale, Caruso, Scullion & Knox, CPAs. He is also a certified health care business consultant. Christopher Bray, managing director and co-founder of Willow Street Advisors LLC, has been elected chair of the board of trustees for the Community Foundation of Collier County. Effective July 1, Mr. Bray will succeed Dolly Bodick Roberts, who will continue to serve on the board as immediate past chair. In addition, the following new members have joined the board: JoAnna Bradshaw, Kim Ciccarelli Kantor, Pat Jilk, Rev. Dr. Kathleen Kircher, Suzanne Lount, Richard Munro, Deborah Russell, Mario Valle and Jennifer Walker. The boards newest trustee emeriti, each of whom has served two, three-year terms, are Jeffrey Erickson, Duane Stranahan Jr. and William Thomas. New members on the board of directors of The Naples Players for 201112 are: Joel Banow, David Corban, Tom Fioretti, Janus King, John Lane, David McCurry and Claire Skinner. Val Trotman has been elected chairman of the board for Fun Time Early Childhood Academy. Jinny Johnson and Priscilla Washburn have joined the board as new members. Mitzi Spence Magin has been appointed to the advisory board of Catholic Charities of Collier County. In addition to volunteering for Catholic Charities, Ms. Magin offers her time to St. Ann Parish, the St. Ann School board of directors and school foundation, St. John Neumann Catholic High School, The Blessed Edmund Rice School of Pastoral Ministry and Professional Givers Anonymous. She was honored as one of 2010s Women of Initiative by the Community Foundation of Collier County. June Ricks and Ellen Rindfleisch have joined the board of directors for Voices of Naples as directors at large. They join the following officers of the organization for 2011-12: Mariellen Lemasters, president; Jack Smith, vice president; Sally Ward, secretary; and Arland Waters, treasurer. Business Development Pam Fultz has joined LifeBridge Solutions LLC as director of business development. She is responsible for client and referral development, outreach and marketing activities and community education. LifeBridge Solutions provides family transition coaching and caregiver support services along with daily money management, medical billing advocacy, household transitions and estate administration support. Ms. Fultz holds an associate of arts degree in communications arts from Sinclair Community College and a bachelors degree in communications studies from Wright State University, both in Dayton, Ohio. Nonpro t Organizations Becky Higgins has joined Catholic Charities, Diocese of Venice Inc., as director of development. A former public and Catholic school teacher, she previously served as director of community campaigns for United Way of Sarasota County. Donna Kordek has joined the Guardian ad Litem/Voices for Kids Program in Collier County, recruiting volunteers to speak up for abused, neglected and abandoned Collier County children. Her position is provided through a United Way grant. A Guardian ad Litem volunteer, Ms. Kordek is a nine-year Naples resident and business owner. She has been the spokesperson for several Fortune 500 companies and has worked locally on fundraising and public relations campaigns with The Naples Zoo, the American Heart Association and the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The Boy Scouts of America Southwest Florida Council executive board has named Randy Braun, senior vice president and senior commercial banker for Fifth Third Bank-South Florida, chairman of its Alligator District. CARUSO HIGGINS KORDEK MAGIN

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First Class Clothing For A First Class Lifestyle.www.tomjames.com F Cbt Annfr M-F 8-5 and Sat 8-12239-775-6860 www.economybodyshop.com Email : economybodyshop@aol.com 2240 Davis Blvd., Naples, FL 34104Complete Collision Repair 24 hour Towing Rentalswww.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 O er Good thru 05/31/11 WITH THIS AD $350.OFFNew Orders OnlyCoupon Must Be Presented At Time Of Order. Why Do More Home Owners ChooseComplete Line of Rolldowns Clear Pan ccordionsCall For FREE Estimate594-16161762 Trade Center Way, Naples Florida, 34109Hurricane 2 WEEKS INSTALLATION GUARANTEED!! QUALITT RVICE THE MOTLEY FOOL In late April, around 40,000 Berkshire Hathaway shareholders flocked to Omaha to listen to Chairman Warren Buffett and his partner, Charlie Munger, answer their questions for five hours. Here are some snippets from the annual meeting, paraphrased: On Americas future: The potential of America has not been used up, but the rest of the world is starting to catch on. Over the next 100 years, well have 15, maybe 20, lousy years, but well end up far ahead of where we are right now. On railroads: They should have a good year, as theyre becoming more competitive economically. On attractive sectors: Buffett and Munger would both invest considerable time learning more about technology companies if they had many more years ahead of them. Energy, too. On currencies: Currency-related investment is a bet. Almost all currencies have declined in value over time, due to inflation.The Buffett and Munger Show What Is This Thing Called The Motley Fool?Remember Shakespeare? Remember As You Like It? In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only people who could get away with telling the truth to the King or Queen. The Motley Fool tells the truth about investing, and hopes youll laugh all the way to the bank. Mutual Fund Basics Q How do mutual funds work? J.R., Pueblo, Colo.A They feature the pooled money of many investors that is managed by a company of professionals. Mutual funds make sense for most people, since few of us have the time or skills to choose investments carefully. Instead, we can tap the services of pros, who will increase our wealth for a modest fee. At least, thats how its supposed to work. There are many kinds of mutual funds. Some invest just in stocks, others in bonds, and some in both. Some focus on large companies, others on small companies, and others on a mix. Some seek income through dividendor interest-paying securities, and others aggressively seek fast-growing firms. Some specialize in one industry (such as energy or biotechnology) and others in a region (such as Africa or Latin America). Unfortunately, many professionally managed mutual funds dont do so well for their investors, due to hefty fees or manager problems, such as poor investment choices or a counter-productive focus on short-term results. To combat this, it makes a lot of sense to just opt for broad-market index funds, which tend to have very low fees and invest only in the stocks of major indexes, such as the S&P 500. Over the long run, these have outperformed most managed, nonindex funds. Learn more about funds at www.fool. com/mutualfunds/mutualfunds.htm and research them at www.morningstar. com. Also, check out our recommended funds via a free trial of our Rule Your Retirement newsletter at www.ruleyourretirement.com.Q Where can I learn about Real Estate Investment Trusts? A.M., Butler, Pa.A Try Investing in REITS by Ralph L. Block (Bloomberg, $28). REITs are worth considering, as good ones can pay hefty dividends. Got a question for the Fool? Send it in see Write to Us. Ask the Fool Fools School My Dumbest InvestmentTo Educate, Amuse & Enrich On gold: They remain rather bearish on commodity investing in general, viewing it like this: You buy and hope that someone else is willing to pay more for it later. Take all the gold in the world, put it together in a cube. You can climb on it, fondle it, polish it it isnt going to do anything. Buffett recommends buying productive assets (such as a business) instead of speculating in commodities. Munger quipped, Theres something peculiar about buying an asset that will only go up if the world goes to hell. On index funds: Buffett thinks most people would do well to buy broad-market index funds (such as those based on the S&P 500 or the total stock market) if theyre going to invest consistently over time. On taxes: Munger noted that hedge fund managers in America are getting lower tax rates than physics teachers. That is demented.Well offer more nuggets next week. In the meantime, read Buffetts letters to shareholders at www.berkshirehathaway.com. Years ago, two friends in the oil business introduced me to a possible investment in an oil partnership. Im a geologist, so I researched the wells and reports and was confident it was going to be very profitable. I sold $48,000 worth of Exxon stock and bought in. After receiving a few sizable monthly checks, the cash flow began to diminish. The barrel counts were fairly consistent, but excuses were offered for the reduced payouts until the receiver took over.Yes, brother Ponzi had had his way with me. I had certificates of ownership issued by the state of North Dakota, but several others had the same serial numbers on theirs! I received a compensation check from the Treasury for a whopping $25. Had I kept those Exxon shares, theyd be worth more than $380,000 today! M.J., Los AngelesThe Fool Responds: Such ventures are often very speculative. Though they look promising, theres little you can count on. And if crooks are running the show, youll really be in trouble. Stocks may seem less exciting, but at least their financials tend to be audited. The Motley Fool TakeFord is making money hand over fist and gaining around the world. Solidly profitable General Motors is the China sales king and is investing heavily in a new lineup of products. And Chrysler has just returned to profitability with help from partner Fiat. As key competitors Toyota and Honda reel from the effects of the Japan disaster as well as problems of their own making, each of the once-Big Three are thriving despite a U.S. auto sales rate that remains well below pre-2008 levels. So how do you feel about those auto bailouts now? While Ford didnt need the kind of aid that GM and Chrysler got, it nevertheless benefited from the bailouts. If its rivals had Auto Bailouts Worth It Name That CompanyFounded in 1899 in Pennsylv ania as a mitten and glove company, today Im a $10 billion enterprise and the worlds largest apparel company. You may have heard of some of my brands: Wrangler, The North Face, Lee, Vans, Nautica, 7 For All Mankind, Eagle Creek, Eastpak, Ella Moss, JanSport, John Varvatos, Kipling, lucy, Majestic, Red Kap, Reef, Riders and Splendid. Im growing rapidly Last weeks trivia answerYou may not have heard of me, but Ive been around since 1818 (almost 200 years!) and Im valued in the stock market at roughly $11 billion. I was founded in Amsterdam as an import/export trading company. Today, based in New York, Im a food and agribusiness giant, employing some 32,000 employees in more than 30 nations. I deal in oilseeds, grains, sugarcane, wheat, corn and fertilizers. I process and transport them, serving the food service, farming and biofuel industries, among others. I make margarine in Europe, and process soybeans in China and oilseeds in Brazil. Who am I? ( Answer: Bunge )abroad. My name, now abbreviated, used to evoke a famous work by Thackeray. My stock has gained an average of more than 14 percent annually over the past 20 years. Who am I? Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and youll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! collapsed, many of Fords suppliers might have followed suit. The bailouts helped make possible one of the great turnarounds in business history. They also kept hundreds of thousands of Americans employed, preventing a bad recession from becoming something worse. But will we ever be paid back? Yes and maybe. Chrysler is aiming to pay off its loan soon. General Motors has technically paid its loan back in cash and stock, but a higher stock price is needed for Uncle Sam to break even. (General Motors is a Motley Fool Inside Value selection. Ford Motor is a Motley Fool Stock Advisor pick and the Fool owns shares of it.) Do you have an embarrassing lesson learned the hard way? Boil it down to 100 words (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked? Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we print yours, youll win a Fools cap! Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The Motley Fool. Sorry, we cant provide individual financial advice. Ponzi Oil y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y v e l ion g est ave r an n s, l e Sy r s dl y a a a er a an perc e 2 0 yea r Know with Fool yo ull be en nifty prize!

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Please join us in saluting our Veterans.Memorial Day CeremonyNaples Memorial GardensIn remembrance of those who gave the ultimate sacrice to protect and preserve our One Nation Under God. Monday, May 30, 2011 9:45 a.m. Prelude 10:00 11:00 a.m. Formal Ceremony concluding with Taps In addition to offering tours of the Memorial Gardens, Hodges Funeral Home will also host an All Day Community Open House where information will be available concerning your VA Burial Benets. You may also request a copy of the Veterans Planning Guide and Five Wishes booklet. HODGES FUNERAL HOMEATNAPLESMEMORIALGARDENS525 111th Avenue North Naples, Florida 34108 239-597-3101 www.hodgesfhatnaplesmg.com Presented by Collier County Veterans Council.Hosted by Hodges Funeral Home at Naples Memorial Gardens, a Dignity Memorial provider. Join us for a complimentary picnic of hotdogs and hamburgers! For more information call 239-597-3101 or visit www.hodgesfhatnaplesmg.com

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB8 BUSINESS WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 chief financial officer for the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce; Brian Presley, senior partner, Presley Beane Financial Services in Punta Gorda; Michael Reagen, president and CEO, the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce; Robbie Roepstorff, pr esident, Edison National Bank in Fort Myers; Reinhold Schmieding, founder and president of Arthrex Inc. in Naples; and James Seals, Circuit Court judge, Juvenile Dependency Division, Fort Myers. Here is a sampling of their observations and insights on the challenges facing this years graduates.Finding a job This can be truly scary in todays depressed job market. Seek out and ask for help from at least three people who know how to job search, advises Dr. Reagen. Go online for tips. Go to a good library or bookstore and research how to search, including how to craft a hardcopy and Internet resume. Dr. Bradshaw counsels graduates to keep an open mind about their career opportunities. Your first job may not be the one you desire the most, but youll be able to use the skills you learn as you progress in your career. Mr. Schmieding echoes this thought. Be prepared to locate anywhere, with minimal or no income, for the right learning experience, he says.Financial planning Things happen, says Mr. Presley. I would suggest learning from the beginning to make a best case, middle case, worst case scenario on your finances and not over commit to car payments, TVs, trips, etc. Build up some reserves for negative events. Mr. Schmieding says that recent graduates must accept the reality of their situation. Be prepared to live sparsely, he says. Learn to live and be happy with a roof over your head and something to eat. The rest is earned through sacrifice, ambition and achievement. Learn to cook and shop prudently for groceries, adds Judge Seals. Avoid eating out as the default meal plan. On another front, Ms. Larson reminds graduates that those student loans will kick into repayment status as sure as the sun will rise every day plan for it!Acquiring new skillsThis trait alone can set you apart from your competitors. General business skills are a dime a dozen, says Mr. Schmieding. Try to learn skills that are unique and not taught in school. Learn skills no one else has. Dont ever think that something is not your thing, says Judge Seals. Educationally, I trained to be an engineer, then a businessman, then a lawyer. What I do now is very far from my formal training. Dr. Reagen says grads should keep an open mind about what their true skill set is. Dont rule out a particular company or a specific kind of job before you really know what you are talking about, he says. Do not make decisions ahead of time, and make no decision unless you have two or more equally valued alternatives.Staying positive Life is neither fair nor easy. Struggling to get established in a career and in a new life can seem overwhelming at times. Perseverance and optimism are essential. Dont let a bad economy or any other negative be your excuse not to reach your highest career goals, says Ms. Roepstorff. You will get there if you remain motivated and positive. Being realistic about your initial goals will help you lay a foundation for future success, says Mr. Presley. He explains: If you understand that we are in a recession and (that) you probably cant maximize your current position, you make the best deal available until you get to the other side of the recession and then reposition using your skills and added experience. While adjustments to career plans and life goals may be necessary, Mr. Emerich stresses that remaining true to your principles and beliefs is paramount. Heres how he puts it: I think the key to success in the business world or in our own personal relations with family and friends is to try to put the other person first. It runs counter to human nature, but it is what I have found to have brought me what successes I have enjoyed. If a person can give and give without expectation of return then frequently the bounty of life in businesses and in relationships comes back in a form greater than what you gave.Finding your passion All of the successful people surveyed agreed that passion is a vital element in any form of success. It is of paramount importance to work with people who are honest, loyal and share your visions and ideas, says Ms. Roepstorff. Mr. Schmieding says passion flows from a fearless resolve and a willingness to take risks. Dont hesitate, go for it, he urges. You never know how careers, or life, can turn out. Take hold of forming your own destiny; dont let destiny take hold of you. How do you find (passion)? asks Ms. Larson. Stay exposed. Expose yourself to new organizations, movements, hobbies, etc. Keep your mind open to experience as much of life as is possible. You will know (what your passion is) when you feel it. Judge Seals, who took a circuitous path to his place of passion as a member of the judiciary, says remaining aware of your circumstances is key. Chances are you and your passion will find one another, he says, and you will be highly motivated to learning the skills necessary to be effective at it. Think wisely and strategically and keep the faith. Sometimes, the judge observes, passion has a way of sneaking up on us. Keep in mind that chances are your passion may discover you, not you your passion, he says. None of the people who contributed to this article claimed to have a secret formula for success. But all of them had through trial and error and determination attained fulfillment in careers that they find satisfying, meaningful and enjoyable. That alone makes their words well worth heeding. In the end, however, members of the Class of 2011 will have to find their own unique ways of building solid, successful lives, both on the job and off. GRADSFrom page B1REAGEN BRADSHAW EMERICH PRESLEY SCHMIEDING The Collier County Medical Society and members of the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce Executive Club will meet for networking from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 2, at Blue Martini in Mercato. RSVP by June 1 at www.napleschamber.org/events. Wake Up Naples with the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce takes place at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 8, at the Hilton Naples. The meeting is sponsored by the Naples Airport Authority. Guest speaker Robert Cohen will discuss The Evolution of the TSA: Where We Are and Where Were Headed. Sign up at www.napleschamber.org/events. The Collier County Lodging & Tourism Alliance holds its next meeting at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, June 8. Guest speaker will be Jack Wert, executive director of the Naples, Marco Island and the Everglades Convention and Visitors Bureau. In addition, Steve McIntire, president of the alliance, will give an overview of the organization. Prospective members from the local tourism industry are welcome. Attendance is free, but reservations are required by June 1. Contact Pam Calore at pam.cclta@gmai.com. The Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce holds its 17th annual B2B Expo at Vi at Bentley Village from 4-7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 9. Booth reservations must be made by Wednesday, May 30. Call 992-2943 or visit www.bonitaspringschamber.org. The Marco Island Area Chamber of Commerce hosts State Rep. Kathleen Passidomo with a legislative update at Business B4 Breakfast from 8-9 p.m. Wednesday, June 8, at Bistro Soliel. Cost is $15 per person. Reservations are due by June 6 and can be made by calling 394-7549 or e-mailing Vicki@marcoislandchamber.org. The Real Estate Investment Society of SWF meets at 11:30 a.m. Friday, June 10, at Pelican Preserve in Fort Myers. Guest speaker Jeff Kottkamp will present his analysis of the recently completed Florida legislative session. Cost is $25 for REIS members and $35 for others. Reservations are required by Saturday, June 4, and can be made online at www. reis-swfl.org. The Collier Building Industry Association holds its next general membership meeting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 16, at Olde Cypress. State Rep. Kathleen Passidomo and Sen. Garrett Richter will present a recap of the 2011 legislative session. Cost is $25 per person, and reservations are required by June 14. Call 4366100 or visit www.cbia.net. Business Before Business with the Bonita Springs Area Chamber of Commerce takes place from 8-9:15 a.m. Thursday, June 23, at Cozmo the School. Registration by June 21 is $5 for members and $30 for others. Call 992-2943 or visit www.bonitaspringschamber.orb. Success in the City is the theme of the 2011 trade show sponsored by the Greater Naples Chamber of Commerce from 3-7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18, at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club. To reserve an exhibit space, contact Brenda OConnor at Brenda@napleschamber.org. BUSINESS MEETINGS

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REAL ESTATENAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY B9WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 REAL ESTATE NEWSMAKERS Molly Grup, ASID, has joined Ficarra Design Associates Inc. at its new location in North Naples. Ms. Grup has eight years of experience in residential interior design. She has designed model homes in Grey Oaks, Mediterra, Port Royal, Aqua and the Strada at Mercato and has received numerous Sand Dollar and Pinnacle awards from the building industry. A member of the American Society of Interior Designers, she earned a bachelors degree in interior design from Adrian College in Michigan. Thomas Andrea, Lois Hilger, Nicholas Naples and Jill Nesbitt have joined the Uptown office of John R. Wood Inc. Realtors. Mr. Andrea, a former general contractor, is part of the Laurie Bellico team. Ms. Hilger studied real estate law, real estate practice and real estate appraisal at the University of Maine in Augusta and is a member of the Naples Area Board of Realtors. Mr. Naples moved to Southwest Florida from New York City in 2004 and is a member of the Naples Area Board of Realtors. Ms. Nesbitt worked as a dental hygienist in her husbands dental practice before joining the real estate profession. Steve Suddeth was the Top Listing Producer for the month of April in the Naples office of Royal Shell Real Estate. Karen Sweatlock of John R. Wood Inc. Realtors has been named London Bay Homes 2010 Realtor of the Year. The award comes with a grand prize trip for two on a transatlantic cruise aboard the Queen Mary II. Dave Clements, Luann Collins, Pam Doyle, Ken Kraynak, Lauren Twente and Debra Valentine have joined the Bonita Springs office of John. R. Wood Inc. Realtors. NESBITT GRUP SUDDETH SWEATLOCK THE U.S. CONTINUES TO REMAIN A top destination for foreign buyers as international purchases surged by $16 billion this year, one of the highest increases in recent years. This is according to the National Association of Realtors 2011 Profile of International Home Buying Activity. According to the survey, total residential international sales in the U.S. for the past year ending March 2011 equaled $82 billion, up from $66 billion in 2010. Total international sales were split evenly between nonresident foreigners and recent immigrants, while combined total domestic and international existing-home Florida top choice for international buyersForeignbuying boomsSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYSEE FOREIGN, B18 SEE NEWSMAKER, B18 The Mariana, a 7,000-square-foot model by Covelli Development Group in Estuary at Grey Oaks, has sold. The announcement was made by Premier Sothebys International Realty. The home at 1280 Osprey Trail has six bedrooms, five full baths, a powder room, pool bath, theater room, cherry wood paneled library and an 1,100bottle wine room. Estuarys first green model home certified by the Florida Green Building Coalition, the Mariana has won several awards from the building industry. From among 220 entries in the 2010 Aurora Awards, it won Best Home Award-winning model in Estuary at Grey Oaks sellsTOM HARPER PHOTOGRAPHY / COURTESY PHOTOOutdoor area SEE MARINA, B12 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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'Download AT&T code or = scanner on your 'Smart phone' and read our QR code' INTEGRITY EXPERTISE DIRECTION FOR REAL ESTATE AMERIVEST Realty 3+Den/3.5Ba. completely refurbished 2872SF end unit. $985,000 Dramatic 2677SF, elegant upgrades, beach/Wiggins Pass views. $799,000 Walk into breathtaking views! 2677SF, Wood rs, Granite kit. 3/3. $889,000 3096 SF, lanais off living & Master suite, amazing views. $1,499,000. Marble rs, new granite kit, Gulf views, 3+Den/3.5Ba. $1,299,900 New Kit, tile/wood rs., W.Gulf/Wiggins Pass Views, 3/3 2677SF. $874,900 Estate home/guest house, 1.4 acres, 9640SF, exceptional detail! $3,950,000 Elegant 4669SF, 4+Den/4.5Ba. w/private guest cabana. $1,900,000 10 Acre w/home, can be subdivided, west of 75. $3,900,000 Authentic beach cottage, 2642SF, amazing views, replace. $999,000 3+Den, oversized pool-extended lanai, like new. $695,000 Immaculate home, spacious lanai w/ 33'x13 pool, Motivated! $237,000 S. Ft. Myers: Well maintained, new A/C,carpet, paint, lake view, 3/2. $239,900 Bermuda Bay II: Refurbished, 2/2, Hi-Ceilings, top r, single car garage. $238,000 32'x14'x4', slip is permitted for a vessel w/ LOA of 32ft. $94,500 S. Boat Slip #11: LOA of 125'/24', close to 5th Ave. $1,349,000 Pelican Isle II #201 Pelican Isle II #303 Pelican Isle II #302 Bright, spacious great room, w/ water views, 2 lanais, 2428SF. $749,000 Beautiful waterfront! New decor, 2677SF, 3/3. $799,000 Granite kit, new carpet, upgrades, spacious 2428SF, Views!. $779,000thefosterteam@comcast.net www.youtube.com/fosterteamnaples Pine Ridge | 60 North Street Mediterra | 15204 Medici Way Livingston Woods | 6520 Daniels Rd. Estancia | 4801 Bonita Bay Blvd. #603 West Bay Club | 22129 Natures Cove Ct.Spring Lakes | 11600 Red Hibiscus Dr. Bay Forest | 15465 Cedarwood Ln. #303 Laurel Oaks | 5769 Elizabeth Ann Way Old Naples Seaport | 1001 10th Ave. Marina Bay Club | 13105 Vanderbilt Dr. #4 4Br./3.5Ba. New A/C units,hot water heater, fresh paint. Furnished! $1,125,000 Pelican Isle III #403 Pelican Isle III #503 Pelican Isle II #402 Pelican Isle II #404 Pelican Isle III #602 W-21: $82,500, W-31:$191,000 N-25: $249,900GENE FOSTER 239.253.8002 BRIDGETTE FOSTER 239.253.8001 Private 15 Acre waterfront community. Ask for the Foster Team at the guard gate. Pelican Isle III #605 Pelican Isle III #906 Boat Slips Available Pelican Isle Condominiums

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B12 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 550 5th Ave S., Naples, FL 34102 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned And Operated ByNRTLLC FLORIDAMOVES.COM GREY OAKS $1,895,000 3BR + Den, 4 BA home in Grey Oaks. Incredible views of Golf Course. 40' pool, spa, tr opical landscaping. Circular driveway. Only home for sale on Spicebush and priced to sell! Sally Masters or June Miller 239 or 502 Just Listed!SHADOW WOOD $1,795,000 Estate La Fontana oers: 4bd/Den+Lo, 4.5bth, 3car, 2 repls, 3 Lanais and c apvang views. Elegance & amaz ingly priced! Aldee Rosenberg & Glenn Bradley 239 or 239 Where Excellence & Tranquility meet!CLARIDGE IN PELICAN BAY $1,160,000 Panoramic views of Gulf & golf course from this updated 3BR/3BA c ondo on the 21st oor. The Claridge oers a casual but elegant lifestyle with pool/spa, guest rooms, library & more. Steps to tram to private beach pavilion plus all the fabulous Pelican Bay amenies. Larry Bresnahan 239 OLDE NAPLES $999,999 Just a block from the beach on Fih Avenue South in Olde Naples, this drama c turnkey furnished villa fea tures 3BRs & a den, 2 1/2 BAs, a spacious living area, custom kitchen, private courtyard with pool and a garage. Barry Brown 239 IMPERIAL GOLF ESTATES $409,000 3BR 2 BA home with great oorplan. Hardwood oors in Living R oom & 2 Bedr ooms, granite counters in kitchen, large spacious led lanai with spa. Low HOA fees. Price reduced to sell! Sally Masters, P.A. 239 Priced Reduced!CLERMONT IN PELICAN MARSH $364,500 Enjoy the southern exposure & golf course view from the lanai & sundeck of this 1s t oor 3BR/2BA unit with 2 car garage. Amenies include community pool, club house, tennis, tness center, nature trails & more. Close to beaches, shopping & dining! The Price Team 239 THE STRAND $319,500 Terric 2nd oor Golf Course view coach home w/glass eleva tor! Brand NEW Granite in Kitchen & NEW S/S Sink. Home has never been lived in! Reduced to sell. Sally Masters, P.A. 239 Priced Reduced!VENETIAN BAYVIEW $309,000 Rarely available lovely 5th oor 2BR/2BA furnished unit with lake view s in movein condion. Small friendly com plex only 1 block to the beach & Venean Village shop ping & dining. Community amenies include tennis, pool, billiards room, sauna & parklike grounds. Carole DiCupero 239 GRANDEZZA $309,000 Immaculate and move in ready 2nd oor 3 bedroom, 2 bath c ondo overlooking the lake & golf course. This pro fessionally decorated residence is the former Oakwood Model, oered furnished. Built in 2004 w/2 car garage. Debra Gladchun 239 HIGH POINT COUNTRY CLUB $120,000 Well maintained 2BR/2BA condo on the 1st oor overlooking 9 hole golf c ourse. 55+ Building is just north of clubhouse. Com munity amenies include golf, clubhouse, tennis, pools, dining & more. Minutes from Olde Naples & only a mile from the beach. 1 year home warranty. Garry Moore 239 Doreen Vachon 643-0636Home Grown Girl!Resident in Naples since 1969 OWNER FINANCE OR LEASE OPTION 161 4th St. 3/2, tiled oors, updated kitchen/baths. New windows. Wrap around covered deck, carport, workshop/shed. $809 per month* $159,500*owner nance with 15%-20% down PITI, amortized over 30 years at 6% interest Top oor 2 Bed, 2 Bath Bradford model overlooks 15th tee. Panoramic views of lake and greens. Minutes from Olde Naples and Marco Island. $129,900 $10,000 Down, 6% Interest, Amortized over 20 years per month* $29,900 2 bed plus den, 2 bath Carport, parking for 3 cars. Workshop shed and lanai. Quiet end of the road community with pool clubhouse. Recreation room, BBQ area. 4/3 newer 2 stories, large barn/workshop, 2 laundry rooms, in-law suite, plenty of storage for RV, boats, 4 car garage $49,900 $474,800 No Brainer! Garage in the category of single-family homes over $3,000,001. The Aurora competition covers a 12-state region of builders, developers, architects, planners, interior merchandisers, landscape architects and other disciplines demonstrating excellence in building and design. The Mariana also earned awards for Best Home over $3.5 million, Best Kitchen Design, Best Theater, Best Outdoor Living, Best Master Suite and Best Interior Design in the 2010 Sand Dollar competition sponsored by the Collier Building Industry Association. Naples-based Covelli Development Group is one of the preferred custom builders at Estuary at Grey Oaks. Premier Sothebys International Realty is the exclusive representative of Estuary at Grey Oaks. Estuarys sales center is off Golden Gate Parkway, immediately west of Airport-Pulling Road N. For more information, visit www.estuaryatgreyoaks. MARINAFrom page B9TOM HARPER PHOTOGRAPHY / COURTESY PHOTOGreat room

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DAVID WILLIAM AUSTON, PA AMERIVEST REALTY | NAPLES, FL | 239.273.1376www.DavidNaples.com SW Gulf views. Over $300K in renovations. 2,076 sq ft. $1,329,000 in The Moorings. The Moorings Brand new luxury beachfront condos from $2.4 million and up Moraya Bay From $2 million in Park Shore to over $10 million in Port Royal Luxury Waterfront Luxury high rise beachfront condos. Priced from $2 million + Bay Colony Rare pie-shaped lot. Approx 135 of waterfront. Quick access to the Gulf of Mexico. $2,499,000 Aqualane Shoresnaples luxury real estate 2,873 sq ft. Rarely occupied 2nd oor coach home. Southwest golf course view. $649,500 at Mediterra Built in 2007. 3,925 living sq ft. Private lake views. $1,995,500 at Mediterra 3,786 sq ft. 4bed/4bath. Built in 2007. Private lake views. $1,999,999 at Mediterramediterra 1.27 acre lot. golf/lake views. New 5bed/6bath. 10,262 total sq ft. $4,995,000 at Mediterra Brand new. 7,316 total sq ft. 1 acre lot. 4bed/4bath. Offered at $2,750,000 at Mediterra SOLD Call 239-280-5433 or visit www.DavidNaples.com Your Property Here!Call today to nd out more about the extensive and e ec ve marke ng services provided by David William Auston PAPlease visit my newly redesigned website! 4,164 sq ft. 4bed/5bath. Lake & Golf views. $1,495,000 at Tuscany Reserve Tuscany Reserve 2,505 sq ft. 1st oor 3+den/3 bath coach home with spectacular long lake views. $559,000 at Mediterra Built in 2006. Southern exposure. 4,111 sq ft. 4+den/4.5 bath/3 car $1,999,999 in Connors Vanderbilt Beach 3 distinct golf courses. Single family homes from $1.5 million to $5 million + Grey Oaks PENDING

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B14 NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NAPLES NEW LISTING UNDER CONTRACT REDUCED NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL ANNUAL RENTAL

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11125 Gulf Shore Drive, Naples, FL 34108. PRIVATE. BEACH. CLUB. LIVING. Panoramic blues from the Gulf of Mexico illuminate each new luxurious residence and every on-site amenity. Including your very own personal beachside service, restaurant, resort-style pool, grotto bar, fitness center and concierge to fulfill your every need. Even if you choose not to buy here, you have to see this architectural beachfront masterpiece. Over $66 million in sales. Prices from $2.5 million. 239.514.5050. MorayaBay.comEXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB18 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 sales in the U.S. were $1.07 trillion. Historically, foreign buyers have been attracted to property ownership in the U.S. for a number of reasons. U.S. homes are generally less expensive than comparable foreign properties, homes in this country are viewed as a secure investment, and the U.S. market offers rental opportunities and long-term appreciation potential. More recently, Realtors have noticed new factors motivating foreign buyers. Many U.S. colleges and universities have a significant number of international students, and some foreign families are purchasing U.S. properties in college areas so their child has a place to live. Another source of international demand is foreign executives temporarily working in the U.S., some of whom prefer to purchase a residence instead of renting. Almost every state had at least one international transaction in the past year. The four states with the heaviest concentration of international buyer activity have remained the same over the past five years. Florida had 31 percent of total international transactions this year, the most of any state. California had 12 percent, Texas had nine percent, and Arizona rounded out the top four with six percent of international transactions. Recent international buyers came from 70 different countries, up from 53 countries in 2010. For the fourth consecutive year, Canada was the top country of origin, with 23 percent of sales to foreigners. China was the second most popular country of origin, with nine percent of international sales this year. Tied for third were Mexico, the UK and India. Argentina and Brazil combined reported an increase in foreign sales with 5 percent, up from 2 percent in 2010. The top five countries of origin accounted for 53 percent of international transactions in 2011. The average price paid by an international buyer was $315,000 compared to the overall U.S. average of $218,000. However, 45 percent of international purchases were under $200,000. This price segment has grown significantly over the years, most likely due to overall price declines in the U.S. as well as the strengthening of some foreign currencies. Foreign buyers are primarily interested in three factors when deciding where to buy in the U.S.: proximity to their home country; convenience of air transportation; and climate and location. Generally, the East Coast attracts European buyers. The West Coast remains popular for Asian purchasers. Mexican buyers are traditionally attracted to the Southwestern markets. Florida is most popular among South Americans, Europeans and Canadians. Similar to last year, 28 percent of Realtors in 2011 reported working with an international client. Fifty-five percent served at least one foreign client, while the bulk of international transactions were handled by a small percentage of Realtors. Only 8 percent of members obtained 50 percent or more of their transactions from international clients. Sixty-one percent of foreign buyers purchased a single-family home while 36 percent bought a condo/ apartment or townhouse. In addition, 62 percent of international purchases were reported as being all cash. This percentage is significantly higher than all-cash purchases for domestic buyers, mostly due to the differences in international credit reporting standards. Financing challenges continue to be a major hurdle for international buyers, with 32 percent reporting these as their reason for not buying a home. Many Realtors reported that their foreign clients faced mortgage financing issues, as well as problems with legal, tax and immigration laws. The National Association of RealtorsMr. Clements, a native of North Carolina, worked for 30 years as a procurement manager for an international engineering and construction corporation before moving to Bonita Springs in 1997. He is a member of the Bonita Springs-Estero Association of Realtors. Ms. Collins moved to Southwest Florida from Columbus, Ohio, in 1984 and previously owned and operated Paragon Florida Realty and Paragon Property Management. She and her family own Jaguar Data Systems, a marketing and direct mail company in Fort Myers. Ms. Doyle, a member of the Bonita SpringsEstero Association of Realtors, moved here from Columbus, Ohio, where she worked with Coldwell Banker, almost 20 years ago. Mr. Kraynak is a graduate of Queens College and a member of the Bonita Springs-Estero Association of Realtors. Ms. Twente is a former television news anchor in Chicago. Ms. Valentine has been a multi-million dollar agent in Maryland and Pennsylv ania and now brings her 25 years of experience to Southwest Florida and the John R. Wood team. FOREIGNFrom page B9NEWSMAKERFrom page B9 CLEMENTS DOYLE

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YOUR GOLDEN MOMENT OF OPPORTUNITY AT GREY OAKS IS NOW. Be among the select few to build at Grey Oaks. While the new home designs are timeless, availability is not. THE ALESSANDRA at Miramonte THE HIBISCUS at Miramonte THE WISTERIA at Torino THE BOUGAINVILLEA at TorinoVilla homes priced from $995,000. GREY OAKS IS OFFERED BY GREY OAKS REALTY, INC., A LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER. PRICES, FEATURES AND AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. Platinum Clubs of America Top 100 Award Winner 54 holes of championship golf Two magnicent clubhouses 5,500 square feet of tness facilities Minutes from the beaches, shops, dining and rich cultural diversions of Floridas Gulf Coast In the heart of Naples, discover new residential offerings at Grey Oaks two luxury villa neighborhoods, Torino and Miramonteprivate enclaves full of tradition and charm, natural beauty and uninterrupted tranquility. There is no other Naples communityso exquisitely designed, rich with private club amenities, visually enchanting and prestigious in name and locationnor will there ever be. Secure your spot at Naples premier address. For more information, call 239.262.5557 or visit the Sales Center.Resident and Non-resident Memberships available. Inquiries welcome. www.greyoaks.comAirport Pulling Road, north of Golden Gate Parkway in the heart of Naples.

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THE BEST SOURCE FOR EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTIESDISCOVER ELITE HAVENS FOR THE WORLDS MOST PRIVILEGED FAMILIES GATE HOUSE + MAIN HOUSE BAYFRONT ESTATE SETTING OFFERING ENHANCED STRATA OF PAMPERED PRIVACY! Vivacious Gregarious Setting Custom-Crafted To Enjoy A Passionate Quality Of Life! 7+ Bedrooms, Study, Billiard Room, Game Room, Theatre. Dockage For 2 Vessels & Jet Skis. Gracious 60 Ft. Negative-Edge Pool w/Cascading Spa. Rare Offering! Serious Seller $12,950,000 THE FORREST COMPANY REALTY OF NAPLES, INC.www.theforrestcompany.com Ofce (239) 434-7228 Cell (239) 860-1644 Toll Free (866) 434-7228JAMES E. FORREST, REAL ESTATE CONSULTANT ADVISORS TO THE PRIVILEGEDCreate Your New Beachfront Life... Motivated Seller. $6,675,000 Sensual Sunsets! Soothing Sounds of Surf 3888 Gordon Drive 124 +/Ft. Beach Frontage DIRECT BEACHFRONT SITERemarkable 8/10 Acre Site Fronting Broad Deepwater Cove. $3,995,000 For Immediate Sale EXTRAORDINARY DEEPWATER ESTATEExquisite Interior. 5 Bdrs, Study + Den. Sublime Setting. Riveting Views Of Nature 2-Bedroom Main House w/2-Bedroom Guest House. Southern Exposure. $4,125,000 Furnished $2,550,000 Steps to 3rd Street Bistros New Construction 392 11th Avenue South 3 Blocks To Beach NEW LISTING OLDE NAPLESMAIN HOUSE + GUEST HOUSE5 Bedrooms, Study, 4-Car Garage. 1-1/2 Sites. Dramatic Interior! Spectacular Views! Cul-De-Sac Location 4296 Cutlass Lane 164 FT. WATER FRONTAGE3 / 4 Acre Site. Steps To Private Beach Access. Accommodates Main House + Guest House. Rare Location. $4,250,000 SOUTHWEST WIDE-WATER SITEBuild Your Dream On Finest Site Value In Port Royal Under $3 Million. Spectacular Offering. $2,900,000 UNIQUE DEEP WATER COVE SITE Best Value Scenic Setting 4-Bedroom Residence w/Study. Large Dockage + Boat Lift. Garage Accommodates 4 To 5 Cars. $2,545,000 AQUALANE SHORESGREAT FAMILY HOME! 640 17th Avenue SouthSouth Exposure. 4 Bdrms. 14 Ft. Cathedral Ceilinged Great Room. 46 Ft. Pool + Spa. Complete Renovation Year 2000. $2,299,000 AQUALANE SHORESUNIQUE LOCATION, BOATERS PASSION 390 14th Avenue South Rare Commodity. Spectacular Setting. Deepwater Dockage. Serious Seller. $4,590,000 AQUALANE SHORESNAPLES BAY SETTING Captivating Main House & Guest House Mesmerizing Sunsets Over Tranquil Lake. Huge Tropical Grounds. 4 Brs & Den. Pool Lakeside. $2,495,000 LANTERN LAKE/SOUTHWEST EXPOSURE4 Bedrooms, TV Room, Game Room. 36 Ft. Boat Slip + Separate Dock. 40 Ft. Lagoon Pool w/Waterfall. $2,890,000 AQUALANE SHORESVIEWS UP WATERWAY TO YACHT CLUB L / S / E

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Visit your new house today!www.OpenHouseSWFL.comThe rst stop to nding your new house!OpenHouse Southwest Florida lists the open houses for any given day in Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero. Customize your search by choosing location, living area, price range and more, quickly and easily.We make nding your new home easy!The Of cial Naples, Bonita Springs and Estero REALTORS Website NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 B21 Jacki Strategos SRES, G.R.I., e-Pro239-370-1222JStrategos@att.netwww.JackiStrategos.com Richard Droste Realtor239-572-5117rddsmd@comcast.net Built 2004, 3BR/2BA home on quiet cul-de-sac. Extended lanai, pool. Upgrades that count.Masters Reserve Lely Resort $439,500Popular complex & oor plan. 3 BR/2BA, furnished. Golf course/lake view. Ascot at Lely Resort $320,000 Large Coach Home Delightful 1 BR/1 BA mfg. home on lake. Large screened porch. 55+ community.Imperial Wilderness $128,000 Immaculate-Must See Membership Included Become an EXECUTIVE! Join the original 100% Company.Downtown Naples oce with ample parking Friendly environment Traditional training, mentoring Technology and tools for success Variety of commission plans available World-wide web presence/referrals (24 countries) Contact Pat to discuss Realty Executives Exclusive lead generation/marketing system.Call/text 239-398-8650 PatPitocchi@RealtyExecutives.com Our company focuses on you. 850 Central Avenue, Suite 102 Na ples, FL 34102 Signature 791 10th Street South Suite 202 Naples, FL 34102239.352.6400 .877.352.6404 .Naples@BristolRE.com www.BristolRE.comNaples, FL Boca Raton, FL .Palm Beach, FL .Blue Bell, PA .Paris, France West Bay 6023 Bayshore Drive 19505 Emerald Bay, #102 3 Bed / 2.5 Bath Like a Model Beach & Golf Club Nick Angelillo 860.729.8088 6023 Bayshore Drive Commercial Zoned C-2 Bayshore Gateway Triangle Joni Henderson 239.877.6399 Judy Farnham 239.405.3258Simplify your life! Call us today to speak with one of our real estate experts. A Whole New World Of Real Estate Services TM$324,900 $205,000 1.877.352.6404 Jean Ankner Raymond Ankner Judy Farnham Nick Angelillo Joni Henderson Dave Ison Alan Caroll Mary Carol Fitzgerald Keri Johnson-FitzgeraldBroker/CEO Realtor Realtor Realtor Realtor Realtor Broker Assoc. Realtor Realtor Captain Slap LLC has purchased a 3,000-square-foot industrial building at 3639 Bayshore Drive for $305,000 from John Ernest Schneider Trust. George Atkinson and Doris Taylor of CB Richard Ellis, Fort Myers/Naples represented the buyer, and Lee Ann Moates of Moates Realty represented the seller. Discovery Day Academy has leased 6,250 square feet of office space at 3480 Pelican Colony Blvd. from Vatter Investment LLC. Patrick Fraley of Investment Properties Corp. negotiated the transaction. Dr. Carl Liebert Jr., M.D., has leased 900 square feet of office space at 848 First Ave. N., #220, from Professional Arts Building. Patrick Fraley of Investment Properties Corp. negotiated the transaction. Germain Real Estate Company LLC has purchased 4.15 acres of land on Pine Ridge Road for $2,525,000 from Pine Ridge Investors of Naples LLC. David Stevens of Investment Properties Corp. negotiated the transaction. Goodwill has leased 10,000 square feet of retail space at Freedom Square, 12683 Tamiami Trail E., from Centro Properties Group. Walt Nelson, Dan Oberski and Matt Fredrickson of CB Richard Ellis, Fort Myers/Naples represented the tenant. RECENT TRANSACTIONS

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J Cbt287-6732 Bn Cn370-8687 239-596-2520 3250 VILLAGEWALK CIRCLE, #101, NAPLES, FLORIDA STOP BY TO VIEW THESE AND OTHER PROPERTIES Village Walk and Island Walk Homes Price from Mid 200's-Mid 500's Enjoy the Ultimate Florida Lifestyle! Established Communities with Unbeatable Amenities and Low Association Fees! ISLANDWALK VANDERBILT BEACH LOCATION Sellers will consider all serious offers! One of a kind Carlyle boasts 4 BR, 3.5 BA private pool, and top of the line designer upgrades! A "DREAM HOME" pristine and ready to move right in! A must see! $549,000 PENDINGPristine 2/2 Capri nicely upgraded home with tile throughout, plantation shutters, private solar heated pool and more! Turnkey Furniture Package Available separately! $239,900 PENDINGCausal Elegance 4BR,3.5BA, features both formal living and dinning, replace, custom moldings, and pool w/lake views! Pristine Condition. Furnishings Included! Shows Like New $499,000 TURNKEY PACKAGETown home offers 3BA,3BA and 2 car-garage! Great light and bright end unit offers freshly painted interior, new carpet ,and large screen lanai, Ready to move right in! Owners will consider all serious offers. $229,900 GREAT BUY OTHER FINE LOCATIONSBeautiful lake and preserve views from this 2 plus den, 2 bath condo with 1 car garage. Low condo fees, 1st oor, great location near pool and entrance. Buy it now for $148,000 SHERWOODGreat Cul-de-sac location! Oakmont Single family 3BR,2.5 BA in Village Walk of Bonita, extra clean, not a distress sale. $289,900 VILLAGE WALK BONITA NEW PRICE The unique over-sized lot is only one of the fabulous features this 3BR,2.5 BA plus den has to offer. Upgraded throughout with tile in living areas, new stainless appliances, granite, private pool with lake view and more! $379,000 Extra clean Oakmont with real wood oors, full hurricane protection"turn key" package available. $339,000 PRISTINE Completely renovated 3BR, 2.5 BA plus den, 2Car garage. Offers 20"tile in living areas, granite, new A/C, new carpet, freshly painted interior, and complete hurricane protection. Must See! $357,900 The Manor, only 18 of these beauties were built in Village Walk. 4 plus den, 3 1/2 baths, 3 car, with pool. $589,000 3BR, 2.5 Plus Den Very upgraded pool home on wide easement lot on quiet street. Not for the bargain hunter, but rather for the quality seeker. $449,900 Breath taking views of 3 bridges from inside and out. Extended Capri 2BR,2BA with pool and roll down shutters, granite,side patio and more. MUST SEE! $285,000 Oakmont 3BR,2.5BA,plus den spacious single family home features open oor plan with upgrades including private heated salt pool with lake views! Accordion Hurricane protection for entire home and much more! $377,000 LIKE NEW UPGRADEDOpportunity Knocks! 2BR,2BA Capri located on large corner lot with abundance of privacy! Great investment! Priced to sell! $195,999 SHORT SALE SHORT SALEATTENTION ALL GOLFERS! Lovely 2nd oor condo offers 2 BR,+ Den and a 1 car garage. Home is offered turnkey furnished and is just prefect for the full time resident or occasional vacation home! Your Golf and Club membership is included with your purchase! $179,900 CYPRESS TRACEOakmont 3BR, 2.5BA with South facing solar heated pool. Glass enclosed lanai, wall unit, electric hurricane shutters, upgraded kitchen counters, front load garage. $399,000 VILLAGE WALK VANDERBILT BEACH LOCATION VILLAGE WALK PENDING

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYB26 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 41 41 41Bonita Springs Bonita SpringsNaplesImmokalee RoadLivingston RoadBonita Beach Road3 Oaks PkwyCoconut RdOld U.S. 41Old U.S. 41Pine Ridge Road Golden Gate Blvd. Davis BlvdCollier Blvd Collier Blvd Airport Pullimg RdGulf Shore Blvd.Park Shore Dr. Rattlesnake Hammock Road Goodlette Frank RoadVanderbilt Beach Road Radio Road Marco Island Florida Weeklys Open Houses Open Houses are Sunday 1-4, unless otherwise markedPointe From $1,499,000 Premier SIR Call 239-261-3148 Mon. Sat. 9-5 and Sun. 12-5 19 OLD NAPLES 663 11th Avenue South $1,795,000 Premier SIR Brock/Julie Wilson 595-5983 20 OLD NAPLES 877 7th Street South $1,799,000 Premier SIR Debbie Broulik 297-5152 21 PELICAN BAY ST. RAPHAEL 7117 Pelican Bay Blvd. #1105 $1,895,000 Premier SIR Jean Tarkenton 595-0544 >$2,000,00022 OLD NAPLES 266 Central Avenue $2,395,000 Premier SIR Carolyn Weinand 269-5678 23 VANDERBILT BEACH MORAYA BAY 11125 Gulfshore Drive From $2,500,000 Premier SIR Call 239-514-5050 Mon. Sat. 10-5 and Sun. 12-5 24 OLD NAPLES 124 13th Avenue South $2,995,000 Premier SIR Virginia/Randy Wilson 450-9091 >$7,000,00025 PORT ROYAL 3243 Gin Lane $7,895,000 Premier SIR Scott Pearson 612282-3000 Also Mon. Sat. 2-4>$200,0001 VILLAGE WALK 3250 Village Walk Circle Ste #101 low $200,000s to mid $400,000s Illustrated Properties Real Estate, Inc. Call 239596-2520 Mon. Fri. 11-4 and Sat. Sun. 11-4>$400,0002 LEMURIA 7172 Lemuria Circle #1602 Prices fr om the mid $400s. Premier Sothebys International Realty Tom Gasbarro 404-4883. Open Mon. Fri. 11-4 and Sat. Sun. 1-4 Closed May 30th 3 THE STRADA AT MERCATO Located just North of Vanderbilt Beach Rd on US 41 From $400s Premier SIR Call 239-594-9400 Mon. Sat. 10-8 and Sun. 12-8 4 PELICAN BAY LAMBIANCE 900 LAmbiance Circle #105 $475,000 Premier SIR Jeannie McGearty 248-4333 5 PARK SHORE PARK SHORE LANDINGS 255 Park Shore Drive #331 $495,000 Premier SIR Larry Roorda 860-2534 >$500,0006 BONITA BAY ESPERIA AND TAVIRA 26951 Country Club Drive New construction from the mid $500s. Premier SIR Call 239-4951105 Mon. Sat. 10-5 and Sun. 12-5 7 PELICAN MARSH ISLAND COVE 2271 Island Cove Circle $575,000 Premier SIR Linda Perry/Judy Perry 261-6161 >$600,0008 MOORINGS EXECUTIVE CLUB 3300 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #405 $649,000 Premier SIR Roxanne Jeske 450-5210 9 PARK SHORE 4770 Whispering Pine Way $669,000 Premier SIR Richard/Susie Culp 290-2200 >$700,00010 THE DUNES GRANDE PRESERVE 280 Grande Way Starting in the $700s. Premier SIR Call 239-594-1700 Mon. Sat. 10-5 and Sun. 12-5 11 PELICAN ISLE YACHT CLUB CONDOS 435 Dockside Drive $749,000 to $1,499,000 Bridgette Foster 239-253-8001, Amerivest Realty 12 PARK SHORE ESPLANADE CLUB 4551 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. #202 $799,900 Premier SIR Patrick ODonnell/Phyllis ODonnell 250-3360 REDUCED 13 PELICAN LANDING SANCTUARY 23817 Sanctuary Lakes Court $799,900 Premier SIR Roxanne Jeske 450-5210 >$800,00014 BONITA BAY RIVERWALK 3371 Myrtle Oak Court $850,000 Premier SIR Cathy Lieberman/Cindy Reiff 777-2441 15 VANDERBILT BEACH VANDERBILT GULFSIDE I 10951 Gulfshore Drive #302 $899,000 Premier SIR Pat Callis 250-0562>$1,000,00016 AQUA 13675 Vanderbit Drive (take Wiggins Pass Road to Vanderbilt Drive) Priced from the low $1,000,000s Premier SIR Call 239-591-2727 Open Mon. Sat. 10-5 and Sun. 12-5 Closed May 30th 17 MERCATO THE STRADA 9115 Strada Place #5517 $1,199,000 Premier SIR David Milner 223-6023 18 ESTUARY AT GREY OAKS 1485 Anhinga 2 4 3 5 15 6 10 16 18 13 14 11 7 20 8 9 12 19 1 21 23 24 25 17 22

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Pinkalicious Pinkerton is a precocious little girl who loves everything and anything pink, from her clothes to her shoes to her fairy wings and wand. Pink is the perfect state of mind, she pontificates. When she and her mom bake pink cupcakes, its no surprise that Pinkalicious happily gobbles up one after another, not even leaving one for her little brother to enjoy. What happens next, however, is a surprise: Pinkalicious turns pink from head to toe even her pinky fingers. The doctor prescribes the only known cure for a Pinkititus predicament: a diet of everything green and only green. Needless to say, Pinkalicious doesnt find a Brussels sprouts burger, French-fried lima beans and an asparagus milkshake very appetizing. Her brother, however, eats every bite and turns green with envy because of all the attention his sister is getting. And thats just part of the fun. Based on a popular childrens book of the same name written by Victoria and Elizabeth Kann, Pinkalicious! The Musical! opens Saturday, May 28, at the Sugden Community Theatre. Pinkalicious! promises to take the (cup)cakeShe cleans the stove of the oil. If that isnt love, I dont know what is. Connie Kurtz about her partner of 36 years, Ruthie Berman OUTIN AMERICACONNIE KURTZ FRIES LATKES IN A PAN, flipping the cakes of grated potato and onion in sputtering oil until they are evenly browned. She presents a taste to her partner of 36 years, Ruthie Berman. She cleans the stove of the oil, Ms. Kurtz says of Ms. Berman. If that isnt love, I dont know what is. Cleaning up after someone else? Just a routine scene from any long-term relationship, one of the myriad adjustments, compromises and trade-offs that couples accept as part of the bargain. Whether theyre gay, lesbian or straight. That kitchen moment is just one scene from a new documentary airing on PBS stations that explores the everyday lives of Americas gay, lesbian and transgender citizens. As Ms. Kurtz, Ms. Berman and others in the community show in Out in America, life isnt all gay pride parades and marriage equality demonstrations. Its going to church. Its taking care of a sick partner. Its making latkes. Southwest Floridas public TV station, BY DREW STERWALDFlorida Weekly correspondent PBS documents progress, but shows theres still a long way to go SEE OUT, C4 COURTESY PHOTORuthie Berman and Connie Kurtz of West Palm Beach recently celebrated their 36th anniversary. They will attend a screening of Out in America on June 4 at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers.SEE PINK, C5 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE NAPLES ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE CSECTIONWEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 BROUGHT TO YOU BY: INSIDEThe High-Rises at Bonita Bay 495-1105 Estuary at Grey Oaks 261-3148 The Strada at Mercato 594-9400 The Village 261-6161 The Gallery 659-0099 Old Naples 434-2424 North Naples 594-9494 The Promenade 434-8770 Fifth Avenue 643-3445 Marco Island 642-2222 Rentals 262-4242 TKArtists Among UsMeet the woman behind the animal masks made from palm fronds. C9 Sweet Baby BenBen Taylor sings to a sold-out crowd, and more fun times around town. C21, 22, 25 Just enoughIn the right amount, sex appeal is what it takes to get a date. C2 o unt, wh at i t d ate. BY NICOLE GROLLSpecial to Florida Weekly

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 TM Men use sex appeal to judge a womans availability for the night. What comes afterward is another story. The answer then is a woman has to be just enough sexy, just enough available and just enough easy for a man to approach. The trick, of course, is knowing where to draw the line. I just dont get it. I was at a house p art y on a recent Saturday night at an apartment complex hilariously called Melrose Place. The gathering was in the courtyard around a pool, and people drank and talked and made awkward attempts at dancing while music played from a stereo inside. I showed up in my standard going-out attire: something with bare shoulders and a flowing hemline, a strapless dress that reached to the floor. Just the right amount of skin, I thought. Just the right amount of sexy-without-really-trying. But trying, of course. My friends and I poured drinks in the kitchen and made our way to the pool. We sipped and chatted and moved our hips to the music. We waited for the men to approach. Over time, they did and my friends peeled off from the circle. Petra in her low-cut chemise; Mara in her tight dress. And me? I politely sipped my drink, waiting. And waiting. Waiting until I finally gave up. By the end of the night, my friends had handed out their numbers and scheduled rendezvous for the week ahead. I had worked my way through a bottle of wine. On the way home, they tittered What it takes to get a date SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTS artisHENDERSON sandydays@floridaweekly.com If you want to attract somebody, you need to look like you want sex...about the great guys they met. I sulked in silence. Dispirited, I phoned my friend Gabe the next day. Not one man approached me last night, I wailed into the receiver. Why dont men talk to me? I imagine your intelligence and independence are intimidating, Gabe said. The kind of answer I like to hear. But whats the real reason? I said. Gabe was quiet for a few seconds. They dont think youre easy, he said finally. I didnt say anything on my end of the phone. Gabe must have thought I needed further explanation. You dont look slutty, he clarified. I laughed. Well, theres that. If I dont look slutty, does that mean I look boring? It means you dont look easy. Unfortunately, thats what most people at bars or clubs are looking for. So how do I look approachable? Gabe reflected. Men are simple creatures, he said after a pause. If you want to attract somebody, you need to look like you want sex. The opposite of classy. I thought of my younger, wilder days when I wore miniskirts and see-through tops and had a date every weekend. But I wised up over time and eventually realized the finer principles of relationships. Namely, just because youre down for a good time doesnt mean youre long-term romance material. The question is where men and women find a meeting point.Women are supposed to use our sex appeal to attract a man, but once we pique his interest we better not make good on that promise. Otherwise we become a passing fling. M e n judg e abili t Wh a t is ano t T he a woman has s exy, just en o ju j st eno ug h t o a pp roac course, is k draw th e l long-term romance material Th e qu estion is w he r e m e n a nd w o m e n find a m ee ti n g point. W omen are su pp ose d to use our sex a pp ea l to attract a man, but o nce we pi qu e his i nterest we b et t e r n o t ma ke good on th at p romise. Ot he rw is e w e b ecome a pass i ng f ling

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Dancing Under The StarOpening Night is Wednesday May 18th 8:30pm!ENTERTAINMENT LIVE BY MELVIN MC -RADIO GURU DAVE ELLIOT VVER INAG GREAT FOOD, GREAT ENTERTAINMENT, GREAT AMBIANCE, GREAT SERVICE, GREAT DANCE CONTEST! 2011 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C3 1209 3rd Street S. (239) 261-2253 www.janesnaples.comNATURAL & ORGANIC BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND WEEKEND BRUNCH GLORIOUS PATIO & COURTYARD DINING Sunday Brunch 8am-3pm oldenaplesvet349 14th Ave. South Naples, Florida 34102 239.331.3345 www.OldeNaplesVet.com NOW OPEN Full Service Boutique Style Veterinary Hospital in the Heart of Naples. Jack Everly, principal pops conductor of the Naples Philharmonic Orchestra, will conduct the National Symphony Orchestra for the 2011 National Memorial Day Concert and A Capitol Fourth, two of PBSs highest-rated programs, which air live from the West Lawn of the United States Capitol. Mr. Everly has been principal pops conductor for the NPO since 2009. In addition to having guest conducted the NSO for the past 10 years, he is the former music director of the American Ballet Theatre, a position to which he was appointed by Artistic Director Mikhail Baryshnikov. He has conducted numerous shows on Broadway and is also principal pops conductor of the Indianapolis and Baltimore symphonies and the National Arts Centre Orchestra of Ottawa, Ontario. The National Memorial Day Concert honors the service and sacrifice of American men and women in uniform, their families at home and all those who have given their lives for our country. It airs live from 8-9:30 p.m. Sunday, May 29. A Capitol Fourth will air at 8 p.m. Monday, July 4. Both programs are broadcast on PBS before a concert audience of hundreds of thousands, and millions more at home, as well as on the American Forces Network to troops serving around the world. Some of the best organists in Southw est Florida will per form a wide range of music on the 3,604-pipe Casavant organ at the Festival of Great Organ Music at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 5, at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. Participants are members of the Southwest Florida Chapter of the American Guild of Organists, including the following well-known organists from local churches and other performance venues: Sandra Averhart Jonathan Birner, Grace Lutheran Church, Naples James Cochran, Vanderbilt Presbyterian Church, Naples Richard Crofts, Moorings Presbyterian Church, Naples John Fenstermaker, Trinity-by-theCove Episcopal Church, Naples Joyce Finlay, Emmanuel Lutheran Church, Naples Brice Gerlach, First Presbyterian Church, Naples Paula Leighton, Faith Lutheran Church, Naples James Lorenz, St. Lukes Episcopal Church, Fort Myers Mary Moz elle, Covenant Presbyterian Church, Fort Myers James Crawford Wiley Selections will include classic organ works from all periods of music history. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students. For more information or to order tickets, call 597-1900 or visit www. thephil.org. Naples pops conductor leads National Symphony Orchestra In Memorial Day, July 4 concertsPhilharmonic presents areas best organists

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 WGCU, presents a special free screening of Out in America at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 4, at the Alliance for the Arts in Fort Myers. The film will air nationwide on PBS stations on Wednesday, June 8, during Gay Pride Month. One of the cornerstones of PBS is to give viewers opportunities to explore worlds that they traditionally would not be a part of, says Dan Nelson, development director for WGCU Public Media. When I learned from the shows producer that two of its stars live in Florida, we decided to bring together our viewers and members to meet Ruthie and Connie and celebrate the diversity of Southwest Florida and the high quality programs available on WGCU. Ms. Kurtz and Ms. Berman live in West Palm Beach. Both will attend the Fort Myers screening and a reception afterward. The two women are no strangers to publicity. In 1988, they sued the New York City Board of Education for domestic partner benefits, winning the landmark case in 1994. Theyve been interviewed by Phil Donohue and Geraldo Rivera and were the subject of a 2002 documentary, Connie and Ruth: Every Room in the House. We have been very public for a very long time, Ms. Kurtz said in a phone interview. We have a website and a blog. We are able to really let our hair down in all ways to get the message out. Things have changed, but not enough that I can sit back and accept and be appreciative. Theres more to be done. Out in America filmmaker Andrew Goldberg agrees, though he didnt set out to make a political film. He wanted to pan away from politics and zoom in on the diversity within the LGBT community and the commonalities its members share with the rest of the world. When you turn on the TV, its almost always something like marriage equality, bills and laws, Mr. Goldberg said in a phone interview from New York. Part of the reason I wanted to make this is because theres no frank discussion about just being lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. I asked a gay friend of mine how much of his life he spent talking about all these issues in the headlines, and he said, Most of my life is not much different from anybody elses.Tremendous progress madeMr. Goldberg interviewed hundreds of people all over the country to find those featured in the hour-long film. There are the Harolds one black Harold, one white Harold whove been together 45 years. Theres a man who used to be a woman and a woman who used to be a man. Theres a gay cowboy as well as a gay minister, a lesbian professor and a lesbian country music star. Their conversations about coming out of the closet, fighting discrimination and AIDS and finding love are stitched together with news footage chronicling 60 years of changing American attitudes toward the LGBT community. A clip from a Miami TV station shows cops using entrapment to arrest gay men in 1965. Mike Wallace gravely discusses the psychology of the homosexual in a black-and-white news report. Fastforward to lesbian couples marrying on courthouse steps. Weve made a tremendous amount of progress, activist Robyn Ochs says in the film. There are rights that exist now that would have been unimaginable 15 years ago. None existed when Ms. Berman and Ms. Kurtz fell in love in 1974. Both were married and had children. Ms. Berman was a teacher and school administrator; Ms. Kurtz was a bookkeeper. Theyd known each other since the 1950s when they were neighbors in Brooklyn, but love blossomed later. We have a long history two married women, five children, 21 grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, Ms. Berman said. And it wasnt easy. We knew we couldnt stay in our marriages once we fell in love. After more than three decades together, the women finish each others sentences, phone each other several times a day when theyre apart and arent shy about dancing in front of the Out in America cameras. Their relationship is like a tandem bicycle, they say. Nobody has to say, Start with your left, Ms. Berman says. Straight people tend to think of gays and lesbians only in terms of sexuality, the couple believes, so they only see part of the picture. Ms. Berman: They put us in the bedroom. Ms. Kurtz: We are in every room functioning. Ms. Berman: We celebrate holidays, go to the movies, socialize with non-gays as well as gays. We go to theater, the opera. We have a full, rich life. The only difference is we have to be concerned about our finances together and who can visit in the hospital.Hatred still out thereNews of people coming out of the closet might not raise eyebrows as much as it used to, and a handful of states have even approved same-sex marriage. But thats a far cry from full acceptance and equality nationwide. As recent headlines proved, there are still young gay men killing themselves to escape public torment and personal hopelessness. There are still people like the Rev. Fred Phelps preaching that God hates fags. Toxicity and hatred are so contagious, Mr. Goldberg said, adding thats why films like Out in America that bring human faces and personal narratives to the public arena are still needed. We can never have too many of these things. Most people dont hear any of this. The film shows that (gays and lesbians) can have long-term relationships, have grandchildren. Growing up in Chicago, Mr. Goldberg, who is straight, said he was taught all sorts of bigoted things. But the lessons of hatred never took hold in him. He couldnt see that being gay was any different than, say, having brown hair. In he was in college in the early 1990s, a male roommate came out of the closet and Mr. Goldberg was shocked to see how others reacted to the revelation. What he was doing was disliked by a lot of people friends and family, Mr. Goldberg said. His family was not warm at all. I kept thinking, Why is this so horrible? That stayed in my mind, this sort of dishonesty were all living with. OUTFrom page C1 >> Out in America, a PBS documentary >> Free screening: 2 p.m. Saturday, June 4, at the Alliance of the Arts, Fort Myers. Reservations required. Call 590-2506. >> Television premier: 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 8, on WGCU-TV in the know TWO CAT PRODUCTIONS / COURTESY PHOTOMike Hartman was an out cowboy in Oregon before the movie Brokeback Mountain was released. TWO CAT PRODUCTIONS / COURTESY PHOTOCountry music star Chely Wright, who came out as a lesbian, is featured in Out in America. TWO CAT PRODUCTIONS / COURTESY PHOTOHarold Herman and Harold Mays have been together 45 years.COURTESY PHOTORuthie Berman and Connie Kurtz were the subject of a 2002 documentary titled Connie and Ruth: Every Room in the House. Theyve also been interviewed by Phil Donohue and Geraldo Rivera.

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Hot Nightswith CoolSummer Sounds!2011 Shell Point Summer Concert Series Individual Concerts$15 Entire Series$35 Dan McMillion Jazz OrchestraTuesday, June 14, 2011Join us for a tribute to the Great Jazz Orchestras. Grammy nominated leader, Dan McMillion, has played with some of the greats in jazz including Joe Williams, Peggy Lee, Carmen McCrae, and the Four Freshmen. Crossroads QuartetFriday, July 22, 2011The Crossroads Quartet is a highly anticipated new vocal quartet steeped in tradition of the Barbershop genre. Crossroads entertains with a wide variety of musical styles in addition to Barbershop, including vocalizing, Blues, Gospel, standards from the Great American Song Book, and Pop Classics. Reiko, Violinist and Friends A Night of favorite Classical & PopsThursday, August 18, 2011Since 1982, Reiko has been the Concert Master of the Southwest Florida Symphony and has been one of the most prominent freelance violinists in the county. Reiko and friends will present a concert of both classical and popular favorites. General Seating Concerts begin 7:30 p.m.Shell Point is located in Fort Myers, 2 miles before the Sanibel Causeway. Call 454-2067 for Tickets & Info 2011 Shell Point. All rights reserved. ACT-468-11visit www.shellpoint.org/concerts Series Tickets$35 NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C5 Performances are set for 2 and 4 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday through June 26 in the Toybe Studio, where some members of the audience might even have to help Pinkalicious in her quest for more pink cupcakes. Megan McCombs, a veteran director with The Naples Players and its KidzAct troupe, says she has wanted to stage Pinkalicious for some time, but there challenges to overcome. Of most importance, and the most obvious: How would they make Pinkalicious pink? It wasnt easy, but Ms. McCombs and crew came up with a somewhat practical plan that doesnt involve paint. For that, Whitney Bunch, who stars as Pinkalicious, is most appreciative. Music for Pinkalicious is by Lisa Federico. Dolores Fetrers is the stage manager, and Mike Santos designed the set. In addition to performing in the starring row, Ms. Bunch is the shows choreographer. Now 25 years old, she started dancing when she was a toddler and was teaching her own classes by the time she was 14. Pinkalicious is the first Naples Players production for which she has auditioned. Ms. Bunch allows that taking on the dual roles of leading lady and choreographer has not been easy. It was hard to see it (the choreography) in my head and then turn around and do it, she says. Completing the cast of Pinkalicious are: Lifelong Neapolitan Kristin Cassidy as Mrs. Pinkerton, Pinkaliciouss very busy, very uptight mother. Ms. Cassidys real-life daughter (who is not pink) helps out backstage. As Mr. Pinkerton, Les Prebble has the pleasure of being able to improvise in every performance of Pinkalicious. He promises no show shows will be the same. Matt Striegel, who graduates from Barron Collier High School in early June, as the pesky little brother, Peter Pinkerton. This story is really great to get lost in and have fun, Mr. Striegel, whos acted with The Naples Players in several shows over the past three year, says. A big fan of musicals, he says he especially likes Pinkalicious because of how happy it is. Florida Gulf Coast University adjunct professor of education, Beverly Canell as Dr. Wink. Sharon True as Allison, Pinkaliciouss best friend. Last but certainly not least, the Naples cupcake boutique known as Sassy Cakes fills a critical role in the production of Pinkalicious. Sassy Cakes owner Bayah Boczen-Harrison says shell turn out about 450 bitesize pink cupcakes to carry the show from rehearsals through the final curtain. The order includes sweet treats for openingweekend audiences as well as the three to five cupcakes that Pinkalicious helps herself to in every performance. PINKFrom page C1 >> Pinkalicious by The Naples Players >> When: 2 and 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 28-June 26 >> Where: The Tobye Studio at the Sugden Community Theatre >> Tickets: $25 for adults, $10 for ages 18 and younger >> Info: 263-7990 or www.naplesplayers.org in the know COURTESY PHOTOMatt Striegel as Peter Pinkerton and Whitney Bunch as Pinkalicious.COURTESY PHOTOWhitney Bunch, front center, is Pinkalicious. Other cast members, left to right, are Beverly Canell, Sharon True, Matt Striegel, Les Prebble and Kristin Cassidy. CANELL CASSIDY PREBBLE BUNCH

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NAPLES bucadibeppo.com Also try our traditional Italian dishesfeaturing CHICKEN PARMIGIANA, SPAGHETTI WITH MEATBALLS, CHEESE MANICOTTI, MOZZARELLA CAPRESE and many more! LOBSTER SPECIALS Summer Lobster Ravioli www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Wine Tasting! 6/29/11 5:30-7:30pmWine, Appetizers, Live Music WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Weekend Best Bets May 27-29: Photography of Clyde Butcher. Marco Island Historical Museum. 642-1440 or www.colliermuseums.com. May 27-29: Camera USA exhibit. The von Liebig Art Center. 262-6517 or www.naplesart.org. May 26-28: Patriotic Pops. Naples Philharmonic Orchestra. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org. May 27-29: Naples Zoo Celebrates Memorial Day weekend. 262-5409 or www.napleszoo.com. May 28-29: Storytime in the Childrens Garden. Naples Botanical Garden. 643-7275 or www.naplesgarden.org. May 28-29: Coppelia. Naples Ballet. 732-1000 or www.naplesballet.org. May 29: Opera Scenes for Teens. Opera Naples. 514-7464 or www.operanaples.com. May 29: The Impact of the Normandy Invasion. Holocaust Museum of Southwest Florida. 263-9200 or www. hmswfl.org Theater Pinkalicious By The Naples Players at the Sugden Community Theatre May 28-June 26. 263-7990 or www. naplesplayers.org. See story on page C1. See How They Run By Theatre Conspiracy, Fort Myers, May 27-June 11. 936-3239 or www.theatreconspiracy.org. Bug At the Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center, Fort Myers, May 26-28. 3331933 or www.sbdac.org. Smoke on the Mountain At Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre, Fort Myers, through July 2. 278-4422 or www. broadwaypalm.com. Thursday, May 26 Art Reception Napes Backyard History hosts a reception for Alan Maltz, official wildlife photographer for the state of Florida, from 5-8 p.m. at the Old Naples Museum, 1170 Third St. S. 7742978 or www.naplesbackyardhistory.org. Art Walk The Center for the Arts Studios at the Promenade at Bonita Bay holds Art Walk from 5-8 p.m. at 26811 S. Bay Dr. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Saturday, May 28 String Along The Naples Philharmonic Orchestra performs Magic Carpet Strings: Carnival of Animals! at 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. 597-1900 or www. thephil.org. Sing Along Join in the karaoke fun from noon to 4 p.m. at Bahama Mommas Tikie Bat at Flamingo Island Flea Market, Bonita Springs. 948-7799 or www.flamingoisland.com. Rhythm & Jazz Doc Booth performs from 1-4 p.m. in the restaurant piazza at Miromar Outlets. www.miromaroutlets.com. Dixieland Jazz The Naples Jazz Masters perform from 1-3 p.m. at The Norris Center. $15 per person, $25 for two. 213-3049. Mob Music Enjoy blues and Motown sounds by The Chicago Mob from 8-10 p.m. at Gulf Coast Town Center. 267-0783 or www.gulfcoasttowncenter.com. Sunday, May 29 Young Voices Opera Naples presents Opera Scenes for Teens at 3 p.m. in Beverly Hall at the United Church of Christ. Young singers will be in costume as they perform songs from The Magic Flute, Hansel and Gretel, The Mikado and Les Miserable. $10 per person. 5200 Crayton Road. 592-9698 or www.operanaples.org. Roller Derby The Fort Myers Derby Girls present Wreckfest of Champions at Bamboozles Skating & Event Center, 2095 Andrea Lane, Fort Myers. In their third bout of the 2011 home season, the Derby Girls go up against the Tampa Bay Bruise Crew. Doors open at 5:45 p.m. $8 in advance; $10 at the door. www.fortmyersderbygirls.com. Wednesday, June 1 Go Underground The North Naples Art Alliance holds Underground Art Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. Tour more than a dozen studios and galleries in the Pine Ridge Industrial Park. 821-1061. Open Mic Freds Food, Fun & Spirits hosts open mic/singer/songwriter night from 7-10 p.m. 2700 Immokalee Road. 431-7928. Coming up Cake Boss Americas favorite baker, Cake Boss Buddy Valastro, brings his Bakin with the Boss Tour to the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall at 7:30 p.m. June 4. 481-4849 or www.bbmannpah.com.COURTESY PHOTOMoon Over Mangrove is one of several paintings created over a period of 18 months in Everglades National Park by Miami Springs artist Linda Apriletti. The works comprise an exhibit titled The Uncommon Beauty of the Everglades on display through June 4 at the Museum of the Everglades in Everglades City. 695-0008 or www.colliermuseums.com.

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QUICK PASSLunch Specials 11.95Served Monday through Sunday11:30 AM 2:30 PM8 oz. Prime RibFrench Dip Reuben Sandwich Coaches Steak Sandwich Turkey Burger Blackened Chicken Alfredo Barbecue Beef Sandwich Hawaiian Chicken Salad Soup and Salad Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich Reservations Always Suggested 239.430.4999 Voted Naples Best Steakhouse!Text SHULAS to 97063 for exclusive offers, event updates, complimentary appetizer and more! Steak Sandwhich May 27th 2011 CUBAN AMERICAN HERITAGE FESTIVALMay 28th 10TH ANNUAL YAMAHA DOLPHIN MASTERS INVITATIONALJune 3rd LOVE EXHIBITIONJune 3rd CLAIRE PERRAULT EXHIBITIONJune 4th FLAGLER BICYCLE TOUR June 5th WINE ON THE WATERAn evening of Epicurean Delicacies prepared by Top Toques & paired to perfection with ne wines. $ 5 OFFFull Fare Roundtrip AdultCannot be combined with other offers. 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 K K K K K K W W W W W W E E E E E E 7 7 7 7 7 7 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 9 9 9 9 9 9 ww ww w w. se se k ak ak ey ey we we t st st ex ex pr pr es es s s. co co m m facebook.com/KeyWestExpress twitter.com/KeyWestExpress youtube.com/KeyWestExpress Reasons to VISIT KEY WEST WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C7 THE ENGLISH PUBNaples Oldest Authentic British Tavern EST. 1969Featuring Our Seasonal Summer Menu SUPER SUMMER SPECIALS!Tuesday: 25 Friday: Show BUY ONE GET ONE on Fish N Chips or Shepherd s Pie Bring In This Coupon Jazz It Up Songstress Nevada Wilkins, accompanied by Gary Goetz on the paino and other local musicians, performs at 2 p.m. June 5 at Community Congregational Church of Naples. $10. 15300 N. Tamiami Trail. 597-1000 or www.cccnaples.org. Organ Music The best organists in Southwest Florida will perform a wide range of music on the Philharmonic Centers 3,604-pipe Casavant organ at 3 p.m. June 5 at the Philharmonic Center for the Arts. 597-1900 or www.thephil.org. Foreign Film FGCUs Renaissance Academy presents a screening and discussion of The Chorus (France, 2004) beginning at 1 p.m. June 5. 1010 Fifth Ave. S. $5. 425-3272. Local History Learn about Marco Island pioneers Mary and Charles Olds as they are portrayed by Kathy and Ed Miracco at 2 p.m. June 7 at Headquarters Library, 2385 Orange Blossom Drive. Free. 593-0177. Movie Night Gulf Coast Town Center presents a free screening of Over the Hedge as part of its Cinema Under the Stars series on June 7. Movies start at 8:30 p.m. in the Market Plaza courtyard. www.gufcoasttowncenter.com. The Kings Speech See the Academy Award-winning film at these Collier County public libraries: South Regional, 5 p.m. June 7; Headquarters, 2 p.m. June 8; Naples Regional, 2 p.m. June 9; and Marco Island, 2 p.m. June 15. Free. 263-7768. Island-Style Fun The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs presents Live at the Promenade! Caribbean Party featuring the island sounds of John Frinzi and Jon Patti beginning at 7 p.m. June 9 at 26811 S. Bay Drive, Bonita Springs. $15 for members, $20 for others. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Hello Summer The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs hosts an opening reception for the Well, Hello Summer exhibition from 6-8 p.m. June 10. 495-8989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Family Film The Center for the Arts of Bonita Springs presents a screening of Spirited Away at 7 p.m. June 13 at the Promenade at Bonita Bay, 26811 S. Bay Dr., Bonita Springs. $5 children/$8 adults. 4958989 or www.artcenterbonita.org. Opera in HD See the Metropolitan Opera performance of Madama Butterfl y broadcast live in high definition at area cinemas at 6:30 p.m. June 15. Also coming up: Don Pasquale, June 22; Simon Boccanegra, June 29; La Fille Du Regiment, July 13; Tosca, July 20; and Don Carlo, July 27. Screenings are at the Hollywood Stadium-20 in Naples, Hollywood Coconut Point-16 in Estero and the Bell Tower-20 in Fort Myers. $18-$24. www.metopera.org/hdlive. Send calendar listings to events@ floridaweekly.com. Plain e-mail, jpegs or Word documents, please. No pdfs.COURTESY PHOTOCool off to the Caribbean sounds of the Island Breeze Trio, above, and R&B numbers by Wendy Renee during Village Nights from 6-9 p.m. June 2 at the Village on Venetian Bay.

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Sorry Were Closed! Paradise Shrimp Co. is closed and will be reopening in late May at their new location. New restaurant featuring breakfast, lunch and dinner. Gourmet market featuring new products. Seafood market featuring a live aqua farm. We apologize for the inconvenience... Stay tuned for updates!Bonita Springs Location 25010 Bernwood Ave. Off Old 41 behind Truly Nolen 239.593.5555www.randys shmarketrestaurant.com10395 Tamiami Trail N. Naples, FL 34108 In the Meantime Visit...North Naples, 10395 Tamiami TrailOPEN 7 DAYS A WEEKAt your table enjoy...Colby Red Wine $ 12.99 Tuesdays starting May 3rdBlack Angus Prime Rib Special Everyday Fish Taco Lunch Special $ 12.95 $ 7.99Pick up a signed bottle of Fuzzys Ultra Premium VodkaA portion of all proceeds goes to The Magnolia Health Systems Wolf Challenge, to help children in numerous ways. HAPPY HOURMonday Friday 3-6 Saturday & Sunday 11-6bottle domestic beer draft beer wells (one shot only) $ 2selected appetizers 1/2 price 10% OFFyour next retail purchase at Randys seafood market in Naples Park!!With this ad. May not be combined with any other offer. Its Huuuuge!"Fuccillo Kia of Cape Coralwww.fuccillokiacapecoral.com FEATURED INDEPENDENT BUSINESS NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC8 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Android and iPhone photographs taken by three Southwest Florida personalities will comprise an exhibit to raise funds for three area charities in conjunction with the June Art Walk in downtown Fort Myers.In One Instant Gallery of Photography will showcase 150 images captured on smartphones by Stephanie Davis, Mike Kiniry and Paul Rodino. Each of the 8-by-10 images will be available for purchase for $30, with proceeds designated for Hope Hospice, the Alliance for the Arts and Community Cooperative Ministries Inc.The goal is to sell all 150 images and raise $1,000 for each of the three organizations. Mr. Rodino, who owns the gallery, says the idea for the show came up during a conversation with Ms. Davis, who had been taking iPhone photos and posting them to Facebook as a contrast to the social photography she does for her column The Downtown Diva in The News-Press. I thought doing a show of her work would be fun and show a different side of her for the public to see, Mr. Rodino says. She then mentioned to me that Mike Kiniry shot a lot of images on his Android phone and was posting them to Facebook as well. Mr. Rodino knew Mr. Kiniry from his work on WGCU-FM and from his traditional photography. His droidography was also a way for him to express himself outside of his public persona, he says. As for his own smartphone pictures, Mr. Rodino has had several iPhone photographs chosen for the iPhone Photography Awards over the past couple of years. Hes never shown them in public, however. He saw the opportunity to combine the work of three photographers and make it a fundraiser as a great way to kick off the summer season.In One Instant Gallery of Photography is at 1526 Jackson St. in downtown Fort Myers. The show and sale on Friday, June 3, will open at 6 p.m. and end at 9:30 p.m., or whenever all the photographs are sold.Mr. Rodino suggests arriving early in order to see the show in its entirety, as photos will be removed as they are purchased. Exhibit of iPhone, Android photographs will raise funds for three charities COURTESY PHOTOOne of Mike Kinirys photographs taken with his Android phone

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C9 SWEDISH MASSAGE50 minutes A perfect way to start your spa experience amidst the unique architecture of the Golden Door Spa. Allow your therapist to gently apply pressure, promote relaxation, ease muscle tension and create a state of harmony.RESTORATIVE FACIAL50 minutes This hydrating facial is infused with the healing properties of the Stone Crop plant. This Restorative Facial will enhance your youthful appearance while brightening your natural skin tone and helping to reduce ne lines and wrinkles. Leaving you with a healthy rejuvenated glow that radiates the very essence of life.CLASSIC MANICURE & PEDICURE90 minutesSoak your hands and immerse your feet in a choice of fragrant mineral salts designed to uplift and awaken your senses. Calming lavender mist relaxes your mind while a gentle exfoliating organic sugar scrub softens your soles. Your hands and feet will be refreshed as your nails are reshaped, buffed and beauti ed. *$109.00 per service. *Price excludes 22% service charge. Summer Special may not be combined with any other offer. ARTISTS AMONG US >> Where can we see your work? I participate in both the Naples ArtCrafters and Naples Art Association art shows and festivals. My works are also on exhibit at the Oasis Visitors Center in the Everglades, at the Artist Boutique in Tin City and at Art, Etc. in Bonita Springs. My works will also soon be seen at the new Marco Island Historical Museum and at Randys Fish Market.>> What is your art form?I make wall-hanging animal masks from recycled palm fronds. My medium is acrylic on palm frond. I also paint on canvas. My three-dimensional animal masks are as unique as the trees from which they came.>> How do you describe your style?Whimsical and imaginative. Ive spent the past 15 years perfecting my craft. I call it FrondZoo.>> What inspires you?I am inspired by the beauty of nature, the subtle distinction in each animal and the true joy FrondZoo has given to me, my students and collectors.>> How has living in Naples inspired you?Being surrounded by so many varieties of palms has inspired me to create my artwork.>> Where do you work?I work out of my home studio, where I am able to create in my own backyard.>> Are you a full-time artist?I am a full-time artist and art teacher. I offer FrondZoo and canvas classes to children and adults throughout Collier and Lee counties.>> Where do you teach?I teach classes at a variety of locations: Masterpiece Mixers, Pelican Marsh, Divosta/Pulte Properties, The Ritz-Carlton and at my home studio. I have also taught at Family Art Night events for the United Arts Council.>> Outside of your art, what are you passionate about? I am passionate about recycling, volunteering and the diminishing number of animals on our planet. Also, my sons Josh and Sam, and their baseball games they play year-round!>> How do you contribute to the community?My art inspires others to think outside the box!>> Who have you studied with?I am a self-taught painter. I studied zoology and art history/composition at Bethany Lutheran College in Minnesota.>> Who is your favorite artist?Picasso Artists Among Us is provided by the United Arts Council of Collier County. The council promotes all the arts in Collier County and provides education in the arts for at-risk students. For more information and a calendar of arts and cultural events, call 263-8242 or visit www.CollierArts.com. Hometown: Naples Education: Barron Collier High School; Bethany Lutheran College Website: www.FrondZoo.comHeidi SaletkoCOURTESY PHOTO PUZZLE ANSWERS

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RadiesseCOMBAT PREMATURE AGING SKIN Look Your Personal Bestwww.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 PAIN RELIEFHOLISTIC HEALTH SOLUTIONSBreakthrough Non-Invasive Pain Relief Technology. Deep Tissue Laser Therapy Providing Profound Results for: ONE FREELaser Therapy Session with this couponExp. 6/2/11. New clients only.(239) 566-1210877 91st Ave. N. Naples, FL 34108Across From Whole Foods SEE ANSWERS, C9 SEE ANSWERS, C9011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 011 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved.FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLES HOROSCOPES TIME WARP By Linda Thistle TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Bra vo to the determined Bovine. While others might give up, you continue to search for answers. Expect your Taurean tenacity to begin paying off by weeks end. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Y ou might w ant to consider stepping back from the task at hand for a while. This could help you get a better perspective on what youve done and what still needs to be done. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Y our k een Cancerian insight should help you determine whether a new offer is solid or just more fluff n stuff. The clues are all there, waiting for you to find them. LEO (July 23 to August 22) B eing ignor ed is difficult for any proud Leo or Leona. But pushing yourself back into the spotlight might be unwise. Instead, let things work themselves out at their own pace. VIRGO (August 23 to Sept ember 2 2) Trying to uncover a colleagues secret under the pretext of showing concern is ill-advised. Control your curiosity in order to avoid raising resentment in the workplace. LIBRA (September 23 to October 2 2) Expect to hear good news about a loved one. Also, be prepared for some changes in several family relationships that could develop from this lucky turn of events. SCORPIO (October 23 to N o vember 21) Some surprises are expected to accompany a number of changes that will continue through part of next week. At least one could involve a romantic situation. SAGITTARIUS (November 2 2 t o December 21) You might be upset by some of your critics. But most of your associates continue to have faith in your ability to get the job done, and done well. CAPRICORN (December 22 t o J anuary 19) A workplace goal that suddenly seems out of reach is no problem for the sure-footed Goat, who moves steadily forward despite any obstacles placed in his or her way. AQUARIUS (January 20 to F e bruary 18) Uncertainty about who is right and who isnt might keep you from making a clear-cut decision. Wait until you know more about what youre being asked to decide. PISCES (February 19 to Mar ch 20) Be careful to keep your emotions in check when dealing with a demanding personal situation. You need to set an example of strength for others to follow. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Lots of pos sibilities begin t o open up by midweek. Some seem more appealing than others. But wait for more facts to emerge later on before you consider which to choose. BORN THIS WEEK: Y ou ha ve an extraordinary ability to rally people to do their best. You would be a treasure as a teacher. Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Sponsored By: Moderate Challenging ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week:

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SHOULDNT EVERY DAY BE THIS GOOD?ENJOY 3 OR MORE NIGHTS WITH US. ENJOY DINNER ON US. Tween-waters.com/SummerSavings 866.609.4796 captiva island Book three nights or more May 30 October 6, 2011, and youll enjoy new, all-low in-season rates plus FREE $80 Dining Credit! Its our birthday, but you get the gifts!THREE NIGHTS ONLY$120PER NIGHT POOLSIDE+80TH BIRTHDAY$80FREE DININGBOOKNOW! Valid May 30 October 6, 2011.NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C11 You know that feeling when someone whos trying to impress you but acts weird because they cant relax and go with the flow? Thats what its like watching Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides. Its trying so hard to impress and entertain that it comes across as desperate and boring. Johnny Depp said he wanted to simplify the story for this film after the convoluted mess of the last two Pirates movies. Director Rob Marshalls (Nine) film is comparatively a bit simpler, sure, but theres still far too much going on. Why screenwriters Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio cant streamline their scripts (theyve written all four movies) is anyones guess. Mr. Depps Jack Sparrow is on a quest for the Fountain of Youth. But so are Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush), whos now working for the British crown; the King of Spain (Sebastian Arnesto), who sends his own fleet; and Blackbeard (Ian McShane), the pirate whose daughter Angelica (Penelope Cruz) has a history with Jack. Throw in voodoo, zombies, a priest (Sam Claflin) and his beloved mermaid (Astrid Berges-Frisbey), and you have a lot of tangential moving parts that only distract from, and in no way add to, the main storyline. Mr. Depp was an Oscar nominee the first time he played Jack, but at times here hes clearly going through the motions. At other times hes the only good thing the movie has going for it, as he continues to make Jack an incorrigibly lovable scoundrel. Its also nice to see Mr. Rush return, but the new actors to the franchise (Mr. McShane and Ms. Cruz) have little impact. As for the action, theres plenty of it too much, in fact, to the point where it gets redundant, especially at times when its there for no discernible reason. Action for the sake of action such as the scene when Jack fights Angelica before they meet is the worst type of action of all. This is also infuriating because it slows the story down with poorly edited, mindnumbing silliness. Worse, the 3D adds little visual appeal; no doubt this will play better on regular screens. The end (including a brief scene after the credits), of course, sets us up for a fifth film, but we have to wonder if theres really a story left thats worth telling. By this point Captain Jack and company have exhausted numerous high-seas possibilities, and the franchises once delightful charm is no longer anywhere to be found. The first Pirates was a great swashbuckling adventure with a straightforward story of good vs. evil and Jack Sparrow stumbling about in the middle. The second and third films got away from this simplicity, meaning its especially sad to see that the lesson has not been learned with the oversaturated On Stranger Tides. Watching these movies should be enjoyable not like a chore. Where has all the fun gone? LATEST FILMS Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Is it worth $10? No >> Penelope Cruz was pregnant during lming, which led to wardrobe issues later in production. During some long shots, her sister stood in for her. in the know danHUDAK www.hudakonhollywood.com Meeks Cutoff (Michelle Williams, Bruce Greenwood, Will Patton) In 1845, settlers struggle to survive as they travel the Oregon Trail and encounter a potentially dangerous Native American. The acting is fine but the story is painfully dull: Its 104 long minutes in which virtually nothing happens. Rated PG.Bridesmaids (Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne) Unlucky in love and with little going for her, Annie (Wiig) even fails at being a good maid of honor for lifelong best friend Lillian (Rudolph). Consistent laughs redeem the clunky pacing, extensive running time and scenes that run far too long. Rated R.Everything Must Go (Will Ferrell, Michael Pea, Rebecca Hall) An alcoholic (Ferrell) loses his job, wife and home in the span of a few hours, forcing him to live on his front lawn. Youd think the premise would make for a laugh-out-loud Will Ferrell comedy, but this is really a thoughtful drama with brief comedic interludes. Credit to Ferrell for giving a real performance rather than acting like an idiot as he usually does. Rated R. CAPSULES REVIEWED BY DAN HUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com ............

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Bha!Bha!A Persian Bistro 3 COURSE SET MENU Not valid on holidays. Expires 6/2/11 2-4-1 Sunday thru Thursday 5pm-6pm18% gratuity added before discount. Must present coupon. Dine-in only. Limit 2 persons per coupon. Expires 6/2/11 Two Dinners & a Bottle of Wine239-263-45811100 Tamiami Trail N., Naples 6 blocks South of the Coastland Mall, next to the RamadaFilet Mignon En Brochette Broiled Atlantic Salmon Nantucket Cod Provencal Barbs Crispy Fish Stuffed Chicken Breast Filet Mignon N.Y. Strip Sirloin Roast Prime Rib Grilled Pork Chop Beef Stroganoff ALL NIGHT EVERY NIGHT!King sh Napa ValleyCabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay{} Entertainment Beatlemanias Peter McGann Saturday 6-9Wine & Dine$1795Dinners Include:per personNAPLES PREMIER STEAKHOUSE Open 7 Days Dinner 5:00pm-10pm Happy Hour 4:30pm 6:30pm Serving the Evening Meal Since 1947 All Entrees Include Your Choice of a Fresh Garden Salad or Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup. Baked Potato, Garlic Mashed, French Fries or a Medley of Vegetables. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC12 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 THURSDAY, MAY 26, 9 P.M. Smart H ealth The HealthyState.org Collaborative project presents breakthroughs and advancements in medicine, healthy aging, innovative treatments and personal triumphs real life stories that produce practical advice and insight in Southwest and Central Florida. FRIDAY, MAY 27, 8:30 p.m. CRE W : Keepers of the Watershed Through extensive interviews and onsite footage, the history and importance of the 60,000-acre Corkscrew Regional Ecosystem Watershed are explored. SATURDAY, MAY 28, 10:30 p.m. Ar e Y ou Being Served? Set in the antiquated Grace Brothers department store, this innuendo-laden comedy with a penchant for slapstick has been a BBC classic since the 1970s. SUNDAY, MAY 29, 8 p.m. N a tional Memorial Day Concert The 22nd annual, award-winning spectacular features an all-star lineup in performance with the National Symphony Orchestra, directed by top pops conductor Jack Everly of the Naples Philharmonic, to honor the men and women in uniform, their families and all who have given their lives for this country. MONDAY, MAY 30, 9 p.m. American E xperienc e: War Letters This collection of personal correspondence brings to life the deepest, most human side of war, from the American Revolution to the Gulf War. TUESDAY, MAY 31, 8 p.m. Gr ea t Performances Carnegie Hall @ 120: Anniversary Celebration Carnegie Hall commemorates its 120th anniversary with an all-star gala concert featuring conductor Alan Gilbert and the New York Philharmonic. Pianist Emanuel Ax, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinist Gil Shaham, and singer and actress Audra McDonald perform works by Ludwig von Beethoven, Duke Ellington, Antonin Dvok and George Gershwin. This week on WGCU TV

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24041 S. TAMIAMI TRAIL, BONITA SPRINGS 239.390.3187 | WWW.ANGELINASOFBONITASPRINGS.COM Follow me on Twitter AngelinasBonitaReal. Italian.Join me as mySD Sb WineContinuesJune 15th Burgundy Part II cote Du Beaune July 20th Bordeaux Left Bank August 17th Bordeaux Right Bank September 21st Champagne Summer Wine PromotionHalf ot bottles of wine up to $175 throughout the restaurant from Tuesday-SaturdaySummer Hours: Closed Sunday and Monday beginning June 5th$89 per person + tax and gratuity Reservations are required and can be made by calling the restaurant at 239.390.3187Dinner begins at 7:00pm Seating begins at 6:45pm

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1/2 PRICED WINE LISTbottles up to $100expires 6/2/11 BUY ONE GET ONEpurchase one dish, get the second freegood for lunch or dinner = or lesser value +18% gratuity before discountexpires 6/2/11must present coupon at time of purchase. cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer2455 vanerbilt beach road naples 34109 239.254.0050 BEST HAPPY HOUR IN TOWNALL drinks 1/2 price 4-8 NIGHTLY Interactive Friendly Pirate Fun for the Whole Family 1-800-776-3735 www.PiecesOfEight.com 2500 Main Street Ft Myers Beach Located at Salty Sams Waterfront Adventures Arrive 30-40 minutes prior to departure. Call For Times and Reservations 1-800-776-3735 2 2 2 2 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W I Text CBAKE to 97063 to receive more special offers & promos! NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC14 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Minding FrankieIn her latest novel, bestselling Irish author Maeve Binchy delivers an emotional story about a single father who agrees to take guardianship of his terminally ill former-girlfriends baby after the young woman dies in childbirth. Noel, a recovering alcoholic, adapts to the demands of fatherhood as best he can in spite of the crushing weight of his ever-present demons. He soon realizes, however, that he cant do it alone. Fortunately, he has the help of a competent network of caring family and neighbors, all of whom rally around Noel and mind Frankie while he works and attends evening classes. But not everyone is so supportive of this unconventional arrangement. Moira, a jaded social worker with family issues of her own, is convinced that Frankie would be better off in a foster home. Set in a close-knit working-class community in Dublin, Ireland, Minding Frankie is populated with a colorful cast of well-developed characters. There is a lyrical quality to Ms. Binchys writing style as she reveals whats inside the hearts and minds of these flawed characters. Fans of Ms. Binchy will be pleasantly surprised to see the reappearance of characters from her previous novels. While Ms. Binchy weaves them seamlessly into the story line, readers new to her work may feel bogged down by remembering so many ancillary characters and their relationship to the main characters. In a tale where relationships arent quite what they seem, Minding Frankie explores unconventional families and what it means to be a family. At the heart of the story is Noels moving relationship with Frankie, and how she completely changes his life and the lives of everyone around her in ways they could never imagine. Minding Frankie is a reminder that is really does take a village to raise a child. By Maeve Binchy (Knopf Doubleday, $26.95)REVIEWED BY ROSE M. CROKE___________________________Special to Florida Weekly BEACH READING

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INFO: (239) 948-3766 www.MiromarOutlets.com HOURS: Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. LOCATION: I-75, Exit 123, Corkscrew Road/Miromar Outlets Blvd. In Estero, between Naples & Fort MyersVisit www.MiromarOutlets.com for more details on spectacular offers and events.VOTED SOUTHWEST FLORIDAS BEST FACTORY OUTLET SHOPPING CENTER 12 YEARS IN A ROW OVER 140 TOP DESIGNER AND BRAND NAME OUTLETS COVERED WALKWAYS DINING GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE AT THE VISITOR INFORMATION KIOSK AND MALL OFFICE**Subject to monthly maintenance fee. Terms and Conditions of the Card Agreement are set forth at www.MiromarOutlets.comCOVERED KIDS PLAY AREA 052511-1422 FOLLOW US ON: MAY 27-30 ENJOY ADDITIONAL SAVINGS on Already Low Factory Outlet Prices!UP TO 70% OFF RETAIL PRICES!ENJOY ADDITIONAL SAVINGS on Already Low Factory Outlet Prices!UP TO 70% OFF RETAIL PRICES! OPERATION SHOEBOXTroop Donation Collection Now Through May 30 Drop off at participating stores LIVE MUSIC In the Restaurant PiazzaSaturday, May 28 1 4 p.m. Sunday, May 29 1 4 p.m. KIDS MAY BIRTHDAY PARTYAt PlaylandSaturday, May 28 11 a.m. 12 p.m.MIROMAR OUTLETS MEMORIAL DAY SIDEWALK SALE

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LOCATED AT NAPLES GRANDE BEACH RESORT A Waldorf Astoria Resort 475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34103 *PRICES INCREASE $3 PER HOUR UNTIL 7 PM THEN DECREASE $3 PER HOUR UNTIL 12PM AURA BAR AND RESTAURANT NAPLES GRANDE BEACH RESORT AURA BAR VEUVE CLICQUOT HAPPY HOUR Every Friday 3PM-12PM Featuring: $3* VEUVE CLICQUOT at 3pm $5 Appetizers and Specialty Cocktails New Flatbread Menu AURA PRIX FIXE MENU 4 Course Menu $32.95 per person**Mention this ad and receive a complimentary bottle of house wine with the purchase of 2 Prix Fixe Menus**Contact Aura Restaurant 239.594.6000 for more information and reservations. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC16 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 This is the month we celebrate a holiday that goes back to 1868, after the Civil War. Flags were put on soldiers graves in the North, and Gen. John Logan of the Union Army declared May 30 to be Decoration Day for the nation. Twenty-seven states celebrated it that year. Next, it became a tradition to have a Decoration Day speech and events in cemeteries. In 1866, the South celebrated its own holiday remembering Confederate soldiers, and by 1916 it was held each year on June 3, the birthday of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Gradually the holidays merged and came to be called Memorial Day. Celebrations eventually honored soldiers who died in World War I and all the wars that have followed. The holiday was moved to a Monday in 1968 so a long weekend was available for family events, visits to graves of family members and soldiers, and parades, speeches and flag waving. Other days that call for flags include the Fourth of July, Presidents Day, Flag Day and Pearl Harbor Day. Toymakers, even in Victorian times, realized that a flag on a toy made it attractive to a child, so many flags were included in playthings. Althof Bergmann, a German toymaker, created a bell toy in 1875 that would charm anyone. Three people are riding a wheeled parade vehicle, and one of them is holding an American flag. When the toy was wound, it ran in circles or a straight line, the bell rang and the flag waved. It is a rare antique patriotic toy that expresses the spirit of flag-waving events. Q: I found a collection of World War II paperback books that are sexually explicit. Nothing is left to the imagination. I was told they were given to our servicemen overseas. Is there a market for something like this? A: The books you have were probably given to servicemen to explain the dangers of sexual activity in war zones. Erotica of all sorts sells, but there are laws or antique-show rules about how it is displayed, so it is rarely seen at shows or shops. Ask a local antiquarian bookseller how to sell this type of book in your area. If no one can help, try going online to antiquarian booksellers, shops or auctions that sell war memorabilia. It is part of our history and will be wanted by researchers. Many rare and artistic pieces of erotica, like early Japanese scrolls and prints that instruct new brides, are in museums and libraries today. And some things considered improper in the past are offered for sale today and do not offend anyone.Northern and Southern traditions merge into Memorial DayKOVELS: ANTIQUES terryKOVEL news@floridaweekly.com

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The Naples Jazz Masters performing Dixieland Jazz Group discounts available. For Tickets or more information call the box of ce at 239-213-3049.PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM PERFORMANCE DATE.Every Saturday through the Summer 1pm 3pm Tickets: $15 per person or $25 for two Presents... 800-715-8517 marcoresort.com Naples/Marco Island, FLWith a perfect Southwest Florida location, pristine white-sand beach, beautiful suites, a variety of dining options and nearby shopping and golf, Marco Beach Ocean Resort could easily become your favorite vacation getaway. Oceanfront Getaways All Suites on the GulfS Rb Stn $139Oer available week days during June & July. Promo code weeklysummer. NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C17 Q: I have a silk scarf my grandpa bought for my grandma while he was serving in the U.S. Navy at Gibraltar during World War I. It is decorated with a group of flags, including those of Britain, France and the United States, and the words Gibraltar Present embroidered above them. I would like to know how much it is worth and how to store it. A: The greatest harm to a fabric can come from strong sunlight and dirt. Keep the scarf out of direct sunlight. To store it, wrap it in unbleached muslin or acid-free paper. Do not wrap it in old newspaper, which may leave permanent stains. Dont store it in or on cardboard or unsealed wood. If the fabric is decorated with metal threads, it should not be washed. If it is dirty, it should be dry-cleaned. If you want to display the scarf, it can be mounted on acidfree backing or unbleached muslin and framed under glass. To remove wrinkles, iron on the wrong side with a warm iron. Value: about $50. Q: I have a Pearl Harbor pin that my uncle gave my grandma when he returned from serving in the Pacific during World War II. It is simply the written words Remember Pearl Harbor with a pearl attached. I was wondering what the value is. A: Many different pins were made commemorating the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. Remember Pearl Harbor was a popular slogan. Some pins, like yours, include a fake pearl. Others say Remember above a large set pearl, then say Harbor below the pearl. The rebus is often puzzling to those who are under 50 years old. Collectors call jewelry like this brought back by soldiers, sailors and marines for their wives, mothers or girlfriends sweetheart jewelry. Pins usually sell for $40 to $50. Tip: When cleaning silver, use plastic or cotton gloves, not rubber gloves. Rubber makes silver tarnish faster. Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. a lt ar P re se nt em br oi e th em. I o k now h ow w o rth a nd it e atest h ar m can come g sunli g ht ep the scar f c t sunl ig ht. wrap it in mus l in or p er. Do not o ld news ch m ay m anent o nt o r r d d h e co e t al h ou ld h ed. If hould H ar b or was a popu l ar s lo pi ns, like y ours, include a Ot h ers say Remem b er a b set pear l t h en sa y Har b or pearl. The rebus is o f ten p t hose who are under 50 ye a lectors call jewelry like this b ack b y soldiers, sailors and t heir wives, mothers or g i r sweetheart je welr y. P sell for $40 to $50. T i p: W h en c l ea n use plastic or co t n ot rubber glo v m akes silver ta r K an m tio sib th e Bysen COURTESY PHOTOThis surviving clockwork bell toy shows a rider waving a flag while standing on a parade vehicle. It sold at a 2010 James D. Julia auction (JamesDJulia.com) in Fairfield, Maine, for $7,475.

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BOAT RENTALS 239-530-5134 RATES: OPEN DAILY7AM TO 3PM SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH BEER & WINE SERVED25091 Bernwood Drive Bonita Springs, FL 341352399484190BEST PHILLY CHEESE STEAK NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC18 WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 FOX 4 News anchor and reporter Amy Wegmann landed a role in the award-winning Lifetime Television Series, Army Wives. The episode is set to air at 9 p.m. Sunday, May 29. It was shot two months ago on location in Charleston, S.C. It was a great experience, says Ms. Wegmann. I have about six lines in the episode. The scene is very intense within the storyline. I had a blast. The character role as a reporter wasnt much of a stretch for the veteran journalist. I cant give away anything, but yes, youll see me with mic-in-hand, reporting from a dramatic scene of breaking news, she says. The fictional drama follows the lives of several Army wives and their families, through the ups and downs that come with military life. It features big-name stars like Kim Delaney, best known for her role as a detective on NYPD Blue, and Catherine Bell from the JAG and the movie Bruce Almighty. Ms. Wegmann could not pass up the opportunity to appear on the show, considering shes a huge fan. She says shes been watching Army Wives since the first season aired in 2007, adding she was hooked after the first episode. Local TV reporter enlisted in Army WivesWEGMANN

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550 Port-O-Call Way | Naples, FL 34102 Call (239) 649-2275 for reservations. www.NaplesPrincess Cruises.com Naples Bay Port Royal The Gulf of Mexico BUY 1, GET 1 1/2 PRICE ON WEDNESDAY Dinners, Saturday Lunches, Sunday Hors doeuvres. Starting Saturday, June 4th. Valid on adult tickets. Based on availability. SUMMERSPECIAL SAVINGSSTAYCATION SPECIALS Naples Princess Naples Princess NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 C19 Ava l on DrLakewood Blvd 41 Sugden Regional ParkTami ami Tri EChoose from 7 Entres with a Drink for Just $7 Each, MondayFriday 11ampm4270 Tamiami Trail East Naples (239) 692-9294 WWW.BOSTONS.COM BP International Rights Holdings Inc. 2011 (BPIRH). All Bostons the Gourmet Pizza trademarks are owned by BPIRH and are duly licensed by Boston Pizza Restaurants, LP in the United States.HAPPY HOUR3pm-7pm Daily7$7FOR17 Kinds of Beer 23 TV Screens Patio Seating Available Celebrating Our10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY! 12995 S. Cleveland #235A Fort Myers, FL 33919 239-466-8605 www.FLDayLight.comSolatubes are Perfect for Dark Kitchens, Bathrooms & Living Rooms.STOP LIVING IN THE DARK!Solar Solutions Solar Solutions $525 Solar Powered Attic Fan 10w or 10" Solatube Installed(Tile roof additional charge) Expires 06/30/11 The Opera Naples Guild is holding a Summer Solstice evening of fine dining and entertainment beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, June 25, at Windstar Country Club overlooking Naples Bay. Young artists from the Opera Naples summer youth program will perform, and guests will be able to dance to live jazz. Tickets are $80 per person. For reservations, call 514-7464. Membership in the Opera Naples Guild is open to all who want to be involved with Opera Naples in numerous ways, including: volunteering in various capacities during the performance season and throughout the year; participating in educational outreach programs; attending dress rehearsals; participating in opera study groups, lectures and demonstrations; assisting with fundraising events; and traveling to performances by other opera companies. Annual membership is $35 per person or $50 per couple. For more information, visit www.operanaples.org. Opera Naples Guild plans Summer Solstice evening

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SIGN UP FOR SEMINOLE CASINOS PLAYERS CLUB & GET ONE OF THESE TWO GREAT OFFERS. ITS FREE TO JOIN!$ 50 FREE PLAY *You will receive $50 instantly. Valid for new members only and must be redeemed in person with approved ID. See Players Club for complete details. Must be at least 21 years old to participate. Offer valid through 5/31/11. Limit one coupon per person per day. Alteration or unauthorized use voids this offer. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this promotion at any time based on operational and/or business concern. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. PRIZE CODE: INWNM511 Present this coupon to the Seminole Casino Immokalee Players Club to receive your FREE PLAY*.$ 50 MATCH PLAY*You will receive $50 instantly. Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Valid ID req uired for redemption. Valid for new members only Use of a match play voucher requires an even money bet. Voucher may only be used on even money wagers at authorized blackjack tables. Offer valid through 5/31/11. Limit one coupon per person. No cash value, nontransferable and may not be redeemed for cash or chips. Alteration or unauthorized use voids this offer. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this promotion at any time based on operational and/or business concern. Persons who hav e been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are prohibit ed from participating. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. PRIZE CODE: INWNMP511Present this coupon to the Seminole Casino Immokalee Players Club to receive your MATCH PLAY*. 506 South 1st Street, Immokalee, FL 800-218-0007 seminoleimmokaleecasino.com Like Us On FacebookMust be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Players Club member to participate. Management reserves the right to change or cancel this promotion at any time based on operational and/or business concern. Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida or those who have opted into the self-exclusion program are not eligible. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMIT-IT. OPEN 24/7Be Ready to Party All WeekendMEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND IS EXPLODING WITH FUN Be One of Ten Winners Each Day!$2,500 hourly drawings May 29th and 30th NoonpmGet your ll Saturday, Sunday and Monday with mouthwatering BBQ and live bands.

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C21 Gentle, Caring Dentistry Since 2003 Initial Comprehensive Exam Full set of X-Rays Healthy Mouth Cleaning $95 regular $338239.261.7291 | www.naplesdentalcenter.com201 8th St South, Suite 106, Naples | Downtown at the Baker Center 1. Ben Taylor, the son of James Taylor and Carley Simon, gave the shoes off his feet to the auction 2. Dr. Thomas McCool, Elly Hagen and Jason Frede 3. Chris and Ruth Davies 4. Paul Delfore, Kim and Michael Morris 5. Suzanne Hearn, Susan Suarez and Steve Hearn 6. The CSN Rock Band 7. Merry and Hannah Kandel Ben Taylor performs sold-out concert for Eden Autism ServicesFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY COURTESY PHOTOS

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www.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 L O T S A L O B S T E R ! Waterfront Dining Friday, Sunday Saturday, TWO 1 pound lobsters with Lunch, Dinner & Sunday Brunch 263-9940 263-2734 www.napleswaterfrontdining.com fries and slaw or black beans and rice $26.95 Limited time offer. Not good with any other offer.FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY A Port Royal Friendraiser for the David Lawrence FoundationWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com. 1. Nancy Slater, Carol Shaw and Robin Stranahan 2. Elizabeth Star, Shirley Benson and Evelyn Leamon 3. Elva Sill, Rev. Edward Gleason and Virginia Gleason 4. Charles and Marilyn Doherty 5. Jean Ann Lynch, Debi and David Schimmel, Evelyn and George Leamon COURTESY PHOTOS Friends of Delnor-Wiggins Pass State Park honor founders f Delnor-Wi gg ins Pass S tate Park honor founders S Y P H OTO S S S S S S 1 2 3 4 5 1. Arthur and Catherine Peley 2. Marcia Byrd, Mary Ellen Hawkins, Lavern Norris Gaynor, Shannon Soltis and Mark Nicoletti 3. Rosemary Miktuk, Joan anad Lou Erb and Edith Sadowski COURTESY PHOTOS 1 2 3

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C25 FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Opening reception for Camera USA at The von Liebig Art Center We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www. oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@ oridaweekly.com.BOB RAYMOND / COURTESY PHOTOS 1. Sue McNaghten, Brenda Guiterrez, Yaresly Trejo and Maria Franco-Munguia 2. Tani Kristi and Joseph Balavage 3. Kay Drolet, Diana Costa and Alexis Schlaupitz 4. Mary Joe, Pierce and Rob Bittner A reception at Pelican Bay for Founders Fund scholarship winners 1 234 5 6 78 1. Viviana and Rafael Gabeiras 2. Tom Larson and Sandy Birney 3. Rob and Joy Davidson 4. John and Elaine Jung 5. Jane Manus, Susan Lloyd, Harry Benson, Rene von Richthofen and Gigi Benson 6. Joey Arcari and Vanessa Rogers 7. Brad Wolmack and Laure DePamphilis 8. Linda Johnson, Carol Hutton and Vida Rekleitis 1 2 3 4COURTESY PHOTOS

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Beautiful Be THIS SUMMER JOIN US FOR OUR SPECIAL SUMMER EVENT Kimberly Davidson, MD Board Certied DermatologySchedule your complimentary consultation today! FREEBOTOXPurchase 30 units of BOTOX and get 10 units FREE or purchase 20 units and get 5 units FREE Receive $50 Off JUVEDERMTM Treatments NAPLES 239.596.9075 June 8thJune 17thFORT MYERS239.313.2553 r y a nd R EE E $ 50OFF *Restrictions may applywww.riverchasedermatology.comwww.FloridaWeekly.com NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLYC26 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 Sunday Brunch 10:30-3 Key to ratings Superb Noteworthy Good Fair Poor Here are some capsule summaries of previous reviews: Caf Normandie, 3756 Tamiami Trail N.; 261-0977This low-key outpost along U.S. 41 manages to provide delightful French fare and casual, laid-back hospitality, compliments of owner Benoit Legris. The wine list is brief but well chosen, a snapshot of wines that please the owner. You cant go wrong with mussels in Normandie cream sauce or the escargots de Bourgogne. Roasted duck with spicy peach sauce was a glorious variation on duck lorange, and the shrimp and sea scallops au gratin were simple yet elegant. Dinner concluded with a classic raspberry tart and whisper-thin crepe Suzette. The service, Old World atmosphere and moderate prices all enhanced a wonderful meal. Beer and wine served. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed December 2010 Food and Thought, The Gateway of Naples, 2132 Tamiami Trail; 2132222Organic fast casual might seem like an oxymoron, but not at Frank Oakes Food and Thought. Step up to the counter secure in the knowledge that whatever you order will be organic and healthy, whether its an all-fruit-and-vegetable smoothie (I loved the pina colada, with pineapple, papaya, mango, banana and pineapple coconut juice), a freshly made glass of juice (like The Doctor, a tangy blend of carrots, beets, celery, apple, lemon, ginger and parsley) or the solid food. The menu changes daily but always features a vegetarian entre as well as poultry and seafood, lots of side veggies, salads and wraps. The salmon cakes were excellent, as were the smashed yams and pinto bean side dishes. I also liked the dilled potatoes and bright, still-crunchy collards. A large, chewy chocolate chip cookie and a slice of strawberry shortcake proved that food can be healthy and delicious at the same time. Dine at one of the nicely shaded outdoor tables if weather permits. Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed June 2009 Old 41 Restaurant, 25091 Bernwood Drive, Bonita Springs; 948-4123Diner lovers especially those who appreciate the Philadelphia version will rejoice at finding Old 41, which doesnt have the chrome-covered exterior, but possesses the heart and soul of a true diner, complete with hoagies, Philly cheese steaks and scrapple. I can attest that the cheese steak is a winner, consisting of thinly sliced steak, melted American cheese and grilled onions contained in a sturdy Amoroso Bakery roll. The fries that came with it were golden, crisp and devoid of grease. My companions spinach, feta and onion omelet was well balanced, properly cooked and accompanied by just-right home fries. The boardwalk waffle sundae a Carbons malted waffle with two mounds of Royal Scoop ice cream, chocolate syrup, whipped cream and a cherry was perfect for sharing. Service was great from start to finish. Beer and wine served.Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed July 2010 Pelagos Caf, 4951 Tamiami Trail N., Naples; 263-2996The management calls whats served here Mediterranean soul food, and thats an excellent description. Primarily Greek, the menu also offers a smattering of other dishes from the region. Portions are large and most dishes are ample for two. I can recommend the fried calamari with its cinnamon-scented marinara, and a vegetable plate that contained roasted peppers, grilled artichoke hearts, beet salad and the best dolmades (stuffed grape leaves) Ive had outside of Greece. The avgolemono soup, Greek salad and gyro platter were spot on. Also delicious was a simply grilled mahi fillet topped with asparagus, artichokes, olives and cherry tomatoes. For dessert, one large wedge of baklava more than satisfied two of us. A bonus at Pelagos is its moderate prices. Odds are youll have enough leftovers for another meal. Beer and wine served.Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed March 2009 Sophias Ristorante Italiano, 3545 Pine Ridge Road, Naples; 597-0744This classic and classy establishment serves ultra-fresh Italian dishes along with house-made breads and desserts. From the warm bread with olive oil and tender-crisp broccoli rabe with spicy homemade sausage and crisp polenta to the vivid red tuna carpaccio with caper berries to the huge and delicious zuppe di pesce and desserts of tiramisu and sfogliatelle, this was an exceptionally good meal. Service was also excellent, including table checks by owner Jay Cherr, one of which included a visit with his young daughter, Sophia, on whom he and wife/co-owner Camille clearly dote. The ambience is lovely as well, reminiscent of trattorias found in Italy. Beer and wine served.Food: Service: Atmosphere: Reviewed August 2010 PAST REPASTS ne r co n c lud e d with a cl c c c c c c c cl cl cl cl cl cl cl l l l l l c c c c cl cl c c c cl cl l cl cl c c cl cl cl c cl c c c cl l c c l c l c c c c c c c c l c l c c c c a a a a a a a as as as a a as as a a a as a a a a s s s as s a a a a a si si si si si si si si i si si i s si si si si c c c c c c c c c c c c c ra ra ra ra ra ra ra ra a ra ra a a a a ra ra a a a a a ra a a a a a a r ra a a a a sp sp sp sp sp sp sp p p p sp sp sp p s p be be be b be be be be be be be be be be e e e e b e b e e b e b e e e b e b e e e e e e b b rr rr rr rr rr rr rr r r rr rr rr rr r r r r r r y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta ta a a a a a t ta t a a ta a a a a a a a a t rt rt rt rt rt rt rt rt t rt rt r rt rt t rt r t r r t r t r r a a a a a an a a a an n n n n n n n n n n n a a n n a a n n n a a n n a n a n a n n n n n n n n a n d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d p i ne a pine a m ad e a ta n er e y, or o o t h d ail y entr l ots Th e w ere side d t oes a l ar ge a s th c w

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NAPLES FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2011 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C27 If you need proof that tourist season is over beyond the fact that traffics thinned out and you can always find a parking space downtown check out these summer specials offered around town: Create your own dinner special with three courses from Sea Salts a la carte menu for $29.95 from 5-6:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday. On Mondays from 4-6 p.m., its complimentary mussels at the bar with purchase. Sea Salt is at 1186 Third St. S. Call 434-7258 for reservations. Usually wine specials are good on traditionally slow weekday nights, but Caf Normandie now offers a 50 percent discount on its entire wine list on Friday and Saturday nights. On Tuesdays, buy one entre and receive a second one free. On Wednesdays, buy two entrees and receive a free bottle of wine. Thursdays are all-you-can-eat mussels day (regular menu also available). Caf Normandie is open for lunch 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday and dinner starting at 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Its at 3756 Tamiami Trail N. Call 261-0977. Caffe dellAmores summer special menu features a three-course meal for $29. Start with organic mixed greens with goat cheese, walnuts and cherries, then choose from lasagna alla Bolognese or hazelnut and goat cheese sachettini in fennel orang e butte r, and finish with house-made gelato. The deal is good all night, every night. The restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Its at 1400 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. Call 261-1389 for reservations.Freds fat and hes smokinThose who have dined at Freds Food, Fun & Spirits know the place is named for the owners portly Chihuahua. In keeping with that theme, the restaurants pet-friendly patio attracts canines and their people on a regular basis.Now Fred is ready to bring the grub to you. Freds Express, a meat smoker shaped like a train, offers smoked pork and other proteins and all the fixings for corporate events, private parties, fairs, festivals and fishing tournaments, among other events that bring barbecue-loving people (and pets) together.For more information about Freds Express, call 431-7928, visit www.fredsnaples.com or e-mail freds08@live.com. New menus at HBs on the Gulf The Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Clubs beachfront restaurant, HBs on the Gulf, has introduced new lunch and dinner menus. New lunch items include Tortuga shrimp (with jalapeno pepper wrapped in bacon and fire roasted); a mahi mahi taco; and a grilled tuna burger.New dinner appetizers include seared jerk rubbed shrimp with coconut-Key lime tequila sauce; chicken bruschetta over hummus on a crostini with Mediterranean salsa; and the chefs appetizer sampler, which consists of a crab cake, jerk rubbed shrimp and chicken bruschetta. New entrees include macadamia-crusted grouper medallions, poppy seed-crusted ahi tuna, Florida snapper and crab meat Napoleon and miso-glazed sea bass.The restaurant also offers a complimentary bottle of Frogs Leap wine (chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, merlot or zinfandel, with cabernet sauvignon available at additional charge) with the purchase of two dinner entrees. The offer is good through Oct. 31, excluding holiday weekends or with other offers. Lunch dishes start at $10.50; dinner entrees range from $20.50-$34. Its open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for lunch and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for dinner. The resort is at 851 Gulf Shore Blvd. N. Call 435-4347 for reservations. karenFELDMAN cuisine@floridaweekly.com food & wine CALENDAR Thursday, May 26, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Whole F oods: Raw food educator and fitness coach Bethany Tait demonstrates how to incorporate more raw food into your diet and shows how to prepare quick and delicious raw fare; $5, Mercato; 552-5100 or online at www. acteva.com/go/LifestyleCenter. Reservations required. Thursday, May 26, 5 p.m.-close, Bleu P r ovence: Sample Chateau Tour Bayard 2007 at a discounted price ($30 a bottle, $6 per glass) and pair it with a charcuterie plate ($9.99) or veal tenderloin medallions ($29.99); 1234 Eighth St. S.; 261-8239. Reservations requested. Saturday, May 28, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p .m., Whole F oods: Celebrate the holiday weekend with a beef or veggie burger or hot dog, apple and drink. You can practice shooting hoops with the Florida Vision basketball team, and the kids can get their faces painted. Enter for a chance to win a $25 gift card by cheering on a favorite team member in the apple pie-eating contest; $5 for the meal, Mercato; 552-5100. Monday, May 30, 5 and 7:30 p .m., F reds Food, Fun & Spirits: Tenor Maurice LoMonaco performs A Night at the POPera during this dinner show, with music from Puccini, Verdi, Pavarotti, Bocelli, Groban and more; $34.95, 2700 Immokalee Road; 431-7928. Thursday, June 2, 6-8 p.m., ABC F ine W ine & Spirits: Sample from a variety of wines, enjoy hors doeuvres and chat with wine experts, receive a souvenir wine glass and sample a cigar (outdoors only); $10, 6425 Naples Blvd.; 514-2316. Wednesday, June 15, 6-8 p.m., T he Good Lif e of Naples: Learn how to make creative Asian appetizers at a demonstration and cooking class; $50, 2355 Vanderbilt Beach Road; 514-4663. Reservations required. Wednesday, June 15, 7 p.m., Ang elina s Ristorante: The Summer Wine Dinner series focuses on French food and wine. This dinner features Burgundies from Cote du Beaune and food to match; 24041 S. Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs; 390-3187. Reservations required.Farmers markets Saturday, 7:30-11:30 a.m., T hird Street South, behind Tommy Bahamas between Third Street and Gordon Drive. Saturday, 8 a.m.1 p .m., North Naples Green Market, Collection at Vanderbilt, northwest corner of Vanderbilt Beach and Airport-Pulling roads; 594-9358. The market spends the summer in 8,000 square feet of air-conditioned space across from Lifestyles Fitness. Send items to cuisine@floridaweekly.com.FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Restaurant specials heat up as summer approaches 8 7 a.m. Third g oo d a ll t w s a e a t r s n s t e g g s s r a n d y a n COURTESY PHOTOIt looks like a train, but Freds Express is really a meat smoker.COURTESY PHOTOHBs on the Gulf at the Naples Beach Hotel & Golf ClubNoodles celebrates two decadesTo celebrate the restaurants 20th year in business, Noodles Italian Caf & Sushi Bar is offering specially priced dinners on the 20th of each month. Its too late to take advantage of the May evening, but on June 20 (and every 20th thereafter this year), enjoy a four-course dinner including salad, calamari, Italian Four Play and tiramisu for $20 for two people. Other options: 20-cent tiramisu or 20 percent off your entire check.Noodles is at 1585 Pine Ridge Road. Call 592-0050 for reservations.Bamboo Caf offers cruises, fondueWhether its rich cheese or decadent chocolate, its now available in fondue form at Bamboo Caf. The cheese fondue is a blend of French and Swiss varieties accompanied by artisanal bread, fingerling potatoes, vegetables and cornichons. Its $24 per person, with a two-person minimum. The chocolate fondue features 54 percent Swiss couverture chocolate served with fruit and Madeleine cookies. Its $9 per person with a twoperson minimum.For another change of pace, consider a sunset cruise aboard the 53-foot catamaran Sweet Liberty, with a two-course dinner at Bamboo Caf either before or after the cruise. The package is $56 per adult, $21 for children 12 and younger. Reservations required.Bamboo Caf is at 755 12th Ave. S. Call 643-6177 for reservations.Alexanders takes a breakChef/owner Alexander Bernard is taking his customary summer hiatus starting Saturday, May 28. Hell be closed through September. Alexanders is at 4077 U.S. 41 N. Call 262-4999 for details or a reservation on Thursday, May 26, or Friday, May 27. Angelinas sets summer hoursFrom June 1 through Sept. 30, Angelinas Ristorante will be closed on Sundays and Mondays. Dinner hours will be 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, with pianist Kary Regragui performing in the lounge on Fridays and Saturdays. The restaurant is at 24041 S. Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs. Call 390-3187 or visit. www.angelinasofbonitasprings.com.New buffet opens in Bonita Chens Buffet has opened in the former Duval Street Seafood Company site at 26051 S. Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs. The restaurant offers all-you-can-eat Chinese, American and Italian dishes as well as sushi. Its open 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. Call 390-0088.