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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
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AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

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The Health Care District of Palm Beach County recently unveiled a clinic on wheels. The new 38-foot, custom-built Mobile Health Clinic, operated by the districts C. L. Brumback Primary Care Clinics, will hit the road to deliver medical and behavioral health services to the countys chronically homeless and other underserved adult patients. The Mobile Health Clinic is staffed by an Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Registered Nurse and a driver who also registers patients. The medical staff provides a range of primary care and preventive services physicals, screenings for diabetes and colorectal cancer and behavioral BY JANIS FONTAINE pbnews@ oridaweekly.comON DAVIS IS EASY TO TALK TO. People like to tell me things, he says. Its a good skill for a documentary filmmaker to have. Mr. Davis new film, Life in the Doghouse, debuts at the Royal Palm Beach Stadium 18 and CityPlace 20 theaters Sept. 13. Its the story of two Wellington horse trainers, by trade, turned dog rescuers, by choice. TAKE ME TO Be prepared for an emergency. For your FREE rst aid kit, call 855.831.2803 ROGER WILLIAMS A2 OPINION A4 GOLF A5 PETS A6 BUSINESS A14 EARL STEWART A17 REAL ESTATE A19 ARTS B1 COLLECTING B2 CALENDAR B4-5 PUZZLES B9 CUISINE B11 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store.www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 Behind the WheelChallenger SRT Hellcat Widebody dodges convention. A17 Health Care District opens mobile clinicSEE CLINIC, A7 Fall film previewMercury, Redford and Poppins dominate movies. B1 Downton at CityPlace Exhibition coming to former Macys space. B1 The Dish Housemade sausage from The Butcher Shop. B11 Vol. VIII, No. 46 FREE R Life in the Doghouse highlights homeless pooches and the two Wellington men who save themTheirSEE DOGHOUSE, A8 yappyplaceDanny Robertshaw and Ron Dantas last 15 years have been dominated by rescuing dogs. Their story is documented in a new film, Life in the Doghouse. COURTESY PHOTOSFLORIDA WEEKLY STAFF_________________________COURTESY PHOTOThe Health Care Districts Mobile Health Clinic

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Before AfterCALL Today 561.575.5599Three Palms CenterPGAdentistryjupiter.comComplete Care in Our State-of-the-Art Facility $250VALUEComplimentary Consultation or 2nd OpinionIncludes Exam & Full-Mouth X-RayChange your smile, change your life!Dr. Joseph Russo is one of only 385 dentists worldwide to hold an Accreditation by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AAACD). He has extensive experience in helping patients who suffer with severely worn down teeth and TMJ pain. Dr. Russo has also earned certi cation by the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation (DOCS), allowing him to sedate his patients to a very relaxed and comfortable state during dental treatment. Now you can enjoy the life-changing bene ts of a beautiful smile and a comfortable bite that functions the way it should. FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then the patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing t o the r adihange s adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n admi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for older adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do much be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida ec onomy? For business es there will b e ste term. Deter iora in the North eas ing seniors to s or give up t hei favor of a Flor cohort of Boo hit their eigh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e c are? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... COMMENTARYRed-white-and-blue patriotWhen I stepped out of the graduate school of journalism at Columbia University on 116th Street and Broadway in New York City in 1993 with a masters degree in one hand and an honorary lifetime membership at Cannons Bar on 107th in the other, I didnt have a clue even though Id learned a thing or two up there in the Ivies. I learned, for example, that Republican President Theodore Roosevelt had coined the term muckrakers to describe reporters he didnt like. And I learned that one single sentence, known as the First Amendment, not only provided for freedom of boneheads like me in the press, and for free speech (for all the other boneheads), but it allowed folks to peacefully assemble and demand that government redress their grievances, while simultaneously enshrining the separation of church and state. Talk about a hat trick! I also learned that Cannons Bar was a private government and bank, serving as the mailing address for a number of upstanding citizens who had their Social Security or retirement checks mailed directly to the Cannon brothers. They owned the place after their father.The Cannons provided a fourth free drink to any who could get through the first three and remain upright on a bar stool. That was the government giving back. They kept a little black account book behind the bar, cashing the checks of their faithful citizens, the drinkers, and deducting what each owed for the previous month. The rest they returned over the bar in cash, right down to the penny. So I knew how things worked. But I had no idea Id spend the next 25 years working in an environment shaped largely by Teddy Roosevelt in the first decade of the 20th century. I also didnt know how reviled journalists would one day be by some Americans, or how beloved to others. And I never even imagined that one day Id write about an American president named Donald Trump, and have the privilege of calling him Reviler-in-Chief. Mr. Trump, elected 107 years later, has one trait in common with the swaggering, tough, moody, bold, publicity loving, progressive Republican do-gooder Theodore Roosevelt: Hes a spin master. But unlike Roosevelt, the Reviler-inChief doesnt spin the press by meeting and communicating with reporters by using them to get the public behind his goals he does it instead by castigating them, en masse, often through Twitter (Roosevelt would have had a blast with Twitter, too, I figure). Mr. Trumps labels are not nearly as elegant as muckrakers, but theyre thumpingly effective, nevertheless: enemies of the people or fake news. Although Roosevelt criticized and complained about the press frequently, he also let them see for themselves what he was trying to do, famously bringing them into the White House to chat while he shaved in the afternoon, or fixing up a more commodious pressroom. And he followed up on their reports describing terrible injustices in American society by investigating them. Mr. Trump plays golf. When Upton Sinclair, a reporter turned novelist, published The Jungle about grotesquely unhealthy conditions in the Chicago meatpacking plants, he and the president formed a testy alliance. After calling Sinclair a crackpot, Roosevelt investigated. Meat-industry officials expressed outrage, many congressional leaders sided with them, but ultimately the president and Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. It stopped manufacturers from adulterating or mislabeling what they sold people to eat, to drink or to take as medicine. Sinclair told of rats scampering across heaps of rotting flesh, leaving droppings; of tubercular meat packaged and sold at market; of acid corroding workers flesh; and, most shockingly, of men tumbling into cooking-room vats and ignored till all but the bones of them had gone out to the world as Durhams Pure Leaf Lard!, writes historian David Greenberg in The Atlantic, recounting stories from his book, Republic of Spin: An Inside History of the American Presidency. Congress had gotten behind Roosevelt, more or less not for ethical reasons but because hed reached the people. Hed done that with the press. And congressional leaders feared the vote, as a result. Roosevelt used the press to get public backing when he created the Panama Canal, allowing the Navys new steelhulled ships (which he strongly pushed to build, talking about it in the press) to move quickly between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. And he used the press to help establish and safeguard nearly 230 million acres of land, including 150 national forests, the first 55 federal wildlife refuges, five national parks, and the first 18 national monument sites, according to historians at Theodoreroosevelt.org. Teddy Roosevelt hated criticism and he didnt love the press, per se. But he loved the American system, based on the First Amendment, and he cherished the contribution of a free press to the muscle and endurance of the United States. This was his comment in 1918, reacting to a proposal by then-President Woodrow Wilson to allow the president to censor or silence the press at certain times. I hadnt known about Roosevelts observation until now, in spite of my fancy journalism degree; the comment was shared with me by Dr. Robert L. Hilliard, professor emeritus of Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College, a combat-wounded veteran of World War II, a novelist, a playwright, a poet, and the author of a number of books on media, now a resident of Sanibel Island. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public, Roosevelt said. Yes, sir. roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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SEPTEMBER Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com Hands-Only CPR ClassTuesday, September 18 @ 6:30pm 7:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens Eective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has teamed up with Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue to provide free monthly CPR classes for the community. Classes will be held at Fire Station 1. Local EMS will give a handsonly, CPR demonstration and go over Automated External Debrillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Certication will not be provided. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES Depression and Epilepsy EFOF Support GroupLecture by neuropsychologist Monday, September 24 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 3 Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is teaming up with the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida to give patients and families the opportunity to engage with others living with seizures and dealing with the obstacles that come along with epilepsy. Attendees are encouraged to share their experiences and will be educated by guest speakers in the medical eld. This month, join a neuropsychologist for a lecture on depression and epilepsy. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGSOsteoporosis ScreeningsThursday, September 20 @ 9am 1pm Outpatient EntranceCosmetic Procedures Lecture by Dr. Mark Pinsky, MD Plastic Surgeon Thursday, September 20 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4 Interested in having a cosmetic procedure, but dont know where to start? Join Dr. Mark Pinsky, a plastic surgeon on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center for a lecture on the following: new ller and injectable techniques breast body eyelid rejuvenation hand rejuvenation Reservations are required. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL 855.857.9610. RECEIVE AFREECOOKBOOK!

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Editor & Interim Publisher Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsRoger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Larry Bush Mary Thurwachter Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Gail V. Haines Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.com Production Manager Alisa Bowmanabowman@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Digital Advertising ManagerGina Richeygina.richey@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez CirculationJean Louis Giovanny Marcelin Evelyn Talbot Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 Fax: 561.904.6456 Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $34.95 in-county $53.95 in-state $60.95 out-of-stateSubscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2018 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. OPINIONGood grief, bad griefIt was the best of times, it was the worst of times. Arguably these are even worse times than the mid-19th century, when Charles Dickens wrote his Tale of Two Cities. In the 21st century, we have effectively divided into two countries, separated by impenetrable fortifications. President Donald Trump heads up the hordes on the right. Those on the left are led by, well, actually theyre not really led by anyone. Thats a big part of their problem: All they really do is focus their utter contempt on Trump. Hes constantly making that easy for them. With the latest legal setbacks for Trump and his cartel, the Trump enemies cling to the hope that hell somehow be run out of office. However, their mood darkens the moment they review their track record. Trump is, after all, president of the United States, a concept they couldnt even fathom until he had pulled it off, leaving them in the dust of despair. How could this happen? they wailed. Let us count the ways: For starters, there was the elitist candidate, Hillary Clinton, whose qualifications were so superior to Trumps that it shouldnt have been a contest for her, except she appeared to place herself so much higher I believe high and mighty is the phrase that she really couldnt relate to the rabble below, the ones she called deplorables. When the effete suffered the agony of defeat, they zoomed right into the KublerRoss stages of grief: Their first stop was denial, as in This is just a bad dream. When they woke up to realize that the nightmare was here to stay, they settled on anger. That lasted until their first latte of the morning-after. Then it was on to the bargaining stage, as in I need to understand this, so it never happens again. Unfortunately, they are not really that good at introspection, so when they desperately tried to relate to all those put off by their pretentiousness, they scurried to their Kindles and read Hillbilly Elegy so they could comprehend the motivations of the millions of Trumpsters. After that, they felt that they had done all they needed to do to comprehend what makes the bourgeoisie tick. Then they returned to their safe spaces. By the way, Hillbilly Elegy is about a grossly dysfunctional Appalachian family. It had nothing to do with the mass of Americans who were so fed up and frightened that they voted for Donald Trump because he convinced them he was not part of the corrupt establishment. Many of the anti-Trump forces are stuck in the depression phase. Other than their protest rallies, they sulk in their bubbles. Theyll never move to acceptance, the final stage. The question is whether theyll overcome their usual complacency and actually condescend to vote in November. If they do not and decide that Trump is in such trouble that control of Congress will be a cakewalk, theyll get another pie in the face. Their dreams of rescue by Bob Mueller will be dashed. Donald Trump will stay in office. They, in short, will have blown it. To quote Charles Dickens one more time, the spring of hope will become the winter of despair. Bob Franken is an Emmy Awardwinning reporter who covered Washington for more than 20 years with CNN.Neil Armstrong didnt forget the flagHistory is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment. The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon. Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I dont think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero. Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (Youre a hero whether you like it or not, one newspaper admonished him.) Gosling added that Armstrongs walk transcended countries and borders, which is literally true, since it occurred 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit and returned home to America. Apollo 11 was, without doubt, an extraordinary human achievement. Armstrongs famous words upon descending the ladder to the moon were apt: One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. A plaque left behind read: HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON, JULY 1969 A.D. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND. But this was a national effort that depended on American derring-do, sacrifice and treasure. It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasnt about the brotherhood of man, rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did. The Soviets putting a satellite, Sputnik, into orbit first was a profound political and psychological shock. The U.S. felt it had to rise to the challenge. As Vice President Lyndon Johnson put it: Failure to master space means being second best in every aspect, in the crucial arena of our Cold War world. In the eyes of the world first in space means first, period; second in space is second in everything. The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched it would be an American flag and only an American flag. The video of Armstrong and his partner Buzz Aldrin carefully working to set up the flag fully extend it and sink the pole firmly enough in the lunar surface to stand after their awe-inspiring journey hasnt lost any of its power. There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYKing Features bob FRANKENKing Features

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 A5 Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by: All without the use of drugs, injections or surgery! papachiropractic.com 28 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens!PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458561.744.7373 This certicate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certicate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 9/20/2018.$150VALUE CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATIONCOMPLIMENTARY We accept most insurance providers including: School, Camp or Sports Physical $20 DR. ALESSANDRA COLN Chiropractor Se Habla Espaol DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director We provi d e spina l d ecompression treatmen ts! W W W W W W W W W e e e e e p p p p p p r r r r r o o o o o v v v v v i i i i i i d d d d d d d e e e e e s s s s s s p p p p p p i i i i i i n n n n n a a a a a a l l l l l d d d d d d e e e e e c c c c c o o o o o o m m m m m m p p p p p p r r r r r e e e e e s s s s s s s s s s i i i i i i o o o o o o n n n n n t t t t t t r r r r r e e e e e a a a a a a t t t t t t m m m m m e e e e e n n n n n t t t t t t s s s s s ! Will see auto accident suerers same day! Full Physical Therapy Facility ON THE LINKSBrooks Koepka headed for third U.S. Open title run in 2019There probably isnt much left that hasnt been written or said about Brooks Koepkas victory in the PGA Championship last month at Bellerive in St. Louis, as well as back-to-back wins in the U.S. Open the last two years. He will go for an almost unprecedented third straight U.S. Open title next June at another special place, the Pebble Beach Golf Links on Californias Monterey Peninsula. There has been only one other winner of three U.S. Opens in a row and that was so long ago you have to look it up but its right there in the book. It was Willie Anderson in 1903-04-05 at Baltusrol (NJ), Glen View (IL) and the Myopia Hunt Club (MA), respectively. He had also won the 1901 U.S. Open at Myopia. Mr. Koepka has a pretty full plate that will take time to digest before he has to start thinking seriously about the pursuit of a third straight U.S. Open title. And it starts with the Tour Championship next week in Atlanta and the Ryder Cup in Paris the week after that. He should have lots of opportunities to show he can win before The Masters next April, too, and that brings up one of the few knocks left that Koepka may still hear, that he cant, or doesnt, win regular PGA Tour events. He has won three major championships but only once otherwise in the U.S., the 2015 Phoenix Open. That he missed The Masters earlier this year because of a wrist injury should create special incentive going into Augusta National. Next will be defense of last months PGA Championship, moved to May in 2019 and scheduled for Bethpage Black on Long Island, another special venue no matter the extenuating circumstances. There should also be plenty of chances to re-live past local successes: Age group victories in Palm Beach County and South Florida PGA junior championships; the state high school individual title while representing Cardinal Newman of West Palm Beach; and eight starts on the Minor League Golf Tour between August 2012 and the following March, earning more than $16,000, including $10,000 from the 2012 Tour Championship. His mother, Denise Jakows, a former WPTV staffer, and his girlfriend, Jena Sims, star of such flicks as Attack of the 50-foot Cheerleader and Sharknado 5, were at Bellerive for the PGA. His father, Bob, stayed home this time but has traveled extensively with Brooks in the recent past A couple of days later, dad told local TV that he knew Sunday morning that it was going to be a good day for Brooks. He could tell, he said, by the look in his sons eyes. It will soon be time to again look for The Look. Meanwhile, elsewhere in Palm Beach County golf recently: SEC: Tim Turpen of West Palm Beach sank a three-foot birdie putt on the fourth extra hole to win the ninth annual Boca Classic at Gleneagles CC, Delray Beach. Turpen, head professional, The Preserve at Ironhorse, outlasted Mike Valicenti, Jonathans Landing GC at Old Trail, and Colin Amaral, CC at Mirasol, after they tied at three under par 69. Mr. Turpen and Mr. Amaral birdied the first extra hole and matched pars on the second and third before Mr. Amaral missed a 12-inch birdie putt on the fourth. Kent Graham of the Broken Sound Club, Boca Raton, won his first Southeast Chapter title, the Vero Beach Shootout, on the River course at Grand Harbor G&BC with 48 Stableford points. Twotime former champion Alan Morin of The Falls CC was second among 58 starters with 46 points, followed by Rick Gomes, Trump National GC, 43. PBCGA: Deron Zendt of Jupiter won the 22nd annual Tire Kingdom Stroke Play title at the Polo Club of Boca Raton. It was Mr. Zendts seventh Palm Beach County victory but his first in three years. He captured five PBCGA events in 2006-09. Mr. Zendt shot 64-7438, six under par, followed by Kyle Nathan, Coral Springs, 141; Tire Kingdom executive Chris Hatfield, Palm Beach Gardens, 143; and Minor League Golf Tour owner-operator Scott Turner, Stuart, 144. SFPGA: Gene Fieger of Naples won the Florida Senior Open for the third time, scoring 70-64-7105 at the Mission Inn Resort, Howey-in-the-Hills. His previous wins in the 42-year history of the tournament were in 2010 and 2012. Seven strokes back at 212 was runner-up Mark Mielke of Jupiter. Miles McConnell of Tampa was the low amateur at 213, third overall. Tied for fourth at 214 were Jerry Tucker of Stuart, Don Bell, Daytona Beach, and Dan Heaslip, Naples. FWSGA: In contrast to the historic Florida Senior Open, the Florida Womens Open and Womens Senior Open were played for just the second time. Sandra Angulo Minarro of Port St. Lucie won the younger bracket at Quail Creek CC, Naples, 206 to 208 over last years champion, Sandra Changkija of Kissimmee. Mary Jane Hiestand of Naples won the senior division (50-older) on the fourth extra hole after she tied at 227 with Kim Keyer-Scott of Bonita Springs, and Susan Boyd, a pro from Ponte Vedra. CHATCHAI SOMWAT / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM Brooks Koepka, seen here in Thailand, won the PGA Championship last month in St. Louis. larryBUSHlbush@floridaweekly.com

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PET TALESMystery of the heart BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTONAndrews McMeel SyndicationFor several months, the United States Food and Drug Administrations Center for Veterinary Medicine, in partnership with independent diagnostic laboratories and veterinary cardiologists and nutritionists, has been investigating reports of a trend that began at least two years ago: Some 150 or more dogs (and at least seven cats) that ate pet foods containing plantbased sources of protein among their main ingredients have developed dilated cardiomyopathy. Canine DCM is a disease of the heart muscle that causes the heart to enlarge and decreases its ability to pump blood, often leading to congestive heart failure. It has a number of possible causes, including genetic predisposition, infection or toxins, and diet in particular, a lack of taurine. Heres what is known so far. The reported cases of DCM are unusual because they are occurring in breeds such as golden and Labrador retrievers, whippets, a Shih Tzu, a bulldog, miniature schnauzers and mixed breeds, none of which are typically prone to the genetic form of the disease. (Breeds genetically predisposed to DCM include Doberman pinschers, Great Danes and boxers. Cases of DCM responsive to taurine supplementation have been reported in cocker spaniels.) Reported cases are also unusual because many of the dogs consistently ate what are popularly described as grain-free foods, with high levels of legumes such as peas, beans and lentils; legume seeds (known as pulses); potatoes; or foods with exotic protein sources such as kangaroo. Investigators have so far been unable to determine why these ingredients might be linked to cases of DCM. In some cases, dogs had not eaten any other food for months or years before exhibiting signs of DCM. At least four dogs in reported cases had low blood levels of taurine, an amino acid that helps power excitable tissues such as the brain, skeletal muscles, retina and heart. Taurine deficiency is documented as a potential cause of DCM. That said, in four other cases, the dogs had normal blood taurine levels. In some cases seen by cardiologists, though, dogs who were not taurine deficient improved with taurine supplementation and diet change, according to an article by veterinary nutritionist Lisa M. Freeman, a member of the clinical nutrition service at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University. It may be that individual dogs have different taurine requirements based on breed, size or some unknown factor. The FDA notes that other factors could include nutritional composition of the main ingredients or how dogs process them, sourcing or processing of primary ingredients, and amount of the ingredients used. Various proteins, including meat proteins, have different nutritional profiles and digestibility. Studies have found that certain large dogs fed commercially available complete and balanced lamb and rice diets may have increased risk of developing taurine deficiency-induced DCM. A 2007 study found that giant dogs took in less taurine than small dogs, possibly because of a slower metabolic rate. Because it is not yet understood how or if grain-free diets are linked to cases of DCM, the FDA recommends consulting a pets veterinarian about whether to change a diet. Dogs or cats with signs of DCM or other heart conditions such as low energy, cough, difficulty breathing and collapse should be seen by a veterinarian immediately. Guidelines released by veterinary cardiologists and nutritionists advise testing blood taurine levels of dogs diagnosed with DCM and changing the diet based on consultation with a veterinary cardiologist. A taurine supplement may be recommended. Improvement after dietary change and supplementation can take up to six months. Report possible dietary cases of DCM to the FDA. >> Makenzie is an 11-year-old, 32-pound female beagle thats laidback and well mannered. She takes medication for thyroid, but part of the shelters Fospice program. Adopt her and all routine medical care, food, medication and other supplies will be provided. >> Cindy is a 3-year-old female cat thats a little shy at rst, then warms to her human.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at www.hspb.org. For adoption information, call 561-686-6656. >> Zeppo is a 4-month-old playful gray kitten who is the only male of his litter. He and his sisters love to be held. This bonded sibling group will need to be adopted in pairs. >> Sylvester is a large male tuxedo cat with beautiful white whiskers and an awesome personality. He loves people of all ages and other cats.To adopt or foster a petAdopt A Cat is a free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment (call 561-848-4911, Option 3). For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or on Facebook, Adopt A Cat Foundation. Pets of the Week Grain-free diets are not necessarily meat-free but include plant-based proteins as a less expensive source of nutrition. They also are riding the coattails of popular low-carb diets for humans. 1681 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach, FL 33409 www.foreignaff airsauto.comSCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT! Monday-Friday: 7:30AM-5:30PM, Saturday: 7:30AM-2:00PM SERVICING THE PALM BEACHES FOR OVER 35 YEARS!Why pay dealer service prices?Save up to 50% versus the dealer AWARD-WINNING CUSTOMER SERVICE SEE OUR REVIEWSDavid O. 5 Stars! Really a nice, knowledgeable and friendly staff at Foreign Affairs Auto, Im happy I found a new home outside my home for my Porsche and Audi needs.Betsy M. Took my car in for service, being a young woman thats never an easy thing with typical mechanic shops. Everyone was extremely friendly and honest!Raquel G. The atmosphere is very warming and the service desk is very accommodating. I didnt have a ride to work so this business uses UBER to take me home and pick me up. Very professional and the prices are reasonable...so much more affordable than the dealership. Call Us: 561-440-1471 Better Service Same Day Appointments. Same Day Repairs.More Convenient Free Express Pick Up/Drop Off to Home or Work.

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Palm Beach Gardens11380 Prosperity Farms Rd., Ste #103 or visit online at www.FloridaWeekly.comAD DEADLINES & PUBLISH DATESSPACE RESERVATIONS: Wednesday, September : Noon ADS REQUIRING PROOF: Wednesday, September : Noon CAMERA-READY ADS: Friday, September 28th: Noon PUBLISH DATE: North Palm Beach and Central Palm Beach October 4, 2018NORTH PALM BEACH AND CENTRAL PALM BEACH EDITIONS SHOW YOUR SUPPORT IN THIS SPECIAL EDITION! In recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness month, Florida Weekly turns PINK to raise money with special advertising opportunities available for your business to show support with 10% of the proceeds going directly to Partners for Breast Cancer Care. Turn your business PINK in October and lets support the fight against breast cancer in our community. CONTACT YOUR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE OR CALL 561.904.6470 FOR MORE DETAILS! forAWARENESS!Breast Cancergoes goesFlorida Weekly Florida Weekly 0 1 8 es es es s e s e s s es e s e s 2 0 B O N US : P ICK-UP AN ADDITIONAL MARKET FOR 50 % OFF FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 A7 health. The project opens the door for the Brumback Clinics medical staff to improve the health of those in need who do not traditionally visit the clinics. This initiative expands access to preventive care for individuals who often delay treatment, Darcy J. Davis, the Health Care Districts chief executive officer, said of the vehicle. By not proactively seeking health care, their conditions often escalate and they find themselves in and out of emergency rooms. The ADA-accessible vehicle, which was purchased with support from the Quantum Foundation, features two fully equipped exam rooms with one hydraulic exam bed for bariatric patients, a consultation area and bathroom, as well as a hydraulic wheelchair lift. The clinicon-wheels has three television screens for patient education, a large retractable awning and access to the Health Care Districts Electronic Health Record System. The Mobile Health Clinic joins the Brumback Clinics network of nine Federally Qualified Health Center sites throughout the county serving adults and children with or without insurance. For more information about the C. L. Brumback Primary Care Clinics, visit www.BrumbackClinics.org. CLINICFrom page 1COURTESY PHOTOA treatment area on in the Health Care Districts Mobile Health Clinic. The American Association of University Women is planning its first meeting of the season at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 17 in the Thelma Obert Room of the North Palm Beach Library. Guest speaker will be AAUW Florida President Pat Ross. AAUW works to advance equity for all women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. AAUW, established in 1881, is the oldest womens organization in the United States, with over 170,000 members and supporters in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico. Membership is open to women with at least a two-year college degree or to students earning a degree. The North Palm Beach Public Library is at 303 Anchorage Drive. The meeting is open to the public and a special discount will be given to new members. University womens group plans first meeting of season treyABSHIERCEO, Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center Having the SOMATOM Definition Flash from Siemens Healthineers provides patients with a new advanced radiologic offering. The Definition Flash is one of the most important developments in diagnostic imaging. The dual source, 2 x 256-slice CT is better at freezing motion than a single source CT, allowing a patients heart along with the arteries and anatomy to be better captured in a single beat, even at higher heart rates. This new technology will help our radiologists improve the quality of images while also reducing the radiation dose a patient receives. Physicians can then view clearer images that make a condition easier to diagnose. The SOMATOM Definition Flash from Siemens Healthineers creates new opportunities for patient-friendly imaging at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. The SOMATOM Definition Flash is one of the fastest computed tomography (or CT) scanners available. For most adults, it can image the entire chest in less than a second and it can scan the whole body in less than 5 seconds. For children, many scans can be completed in less than one second. With such fast imaging times, Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center can generally perform these studies using less radiation than conventional CT scanners meaning a safer imaging procedure. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is taking imaging and patient care to the next level. The new Definition Flash brings exceptional image quality and can also reduce the number of scans a patient may need to receive an efficient and accurate diagnosis; this means improved quality of care, as well as patient safety and comfort. The SOMATOM Definition Flash also employs Siemens FAST CARE technology, which allows technologists at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center to conduct high quality imaging that minimizes radiation dose levels, while spending more time with patients. In addition, the Flash offers a new technique for reducing artifacts from metal, allowing better imaging of patients with implants. For more information about our diagnostic services and how we can potentially help you, call our Radiology Department at 561-694-7180 or go to our website at www.pbgmc.com. Advanced dual source CT imagingHEALTHY LIVING

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Ron Danta and Danny Robertshaw are well-known in horse show jumping circles, but for the last 15 years, their work rescuing dogs has dominated their lives. When Ron Davis wanted to add a dog to his family, everyone told him to go see Danny and Ron. When he met them, his gut told him theyd make a darned good documentary. Twenty-five years ago, Danny Robertshaw, an in-demand horse trainer and judge, teamed up with his best friend and life partner, Ron Danta, a born horseman and winning hunter champion. Mr. Danta left the Midwest after a particularly tough winter and the greener pastures and more temperate climate of South Carolina suited him. The duo put down roots in Camden, merging their talents and building a significant and successful business the 22-acre Beaver River Farm. At 64, Mr. Robertshaw recently was inducted in the National Show Hunter Hall of Fame, a shiny embellishment on an outstanding career. Also 64, Mr. Danta has trained several USEF Horse of the Year recipients, and in 2013, The Chronicle of the Horse named him its Horseman of the Year.As their training business flourished, the partners began rehabilitating and rehoming a few dogs at a time in their 4,400-square-foot home, taking in the tough cases no one wanted. Mr. Robertshaw concedes he was drawn to the dogs with the saddest eyes. But when Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, it changed the course of their lives. The socially conscious duo responded immediately by offering boots-on-the-ground assistance to people devastated by the storm, but quickly recognized that many beloved dogs had been left behind when their owners were forced to flee or were rescued. Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw filled horse trailers with pet supplies and exchanged the load for abandoned dogs, which they took back to their home in Camden. They thought the chaos would be over in a few months, but 13 years later, their home boasts about 80 dogs, living as one giant pack. Each night, about 15 of the smaller dogs claim the lions share of their California king-size bed. Whats important is, since they began their rescue mission, Danny & Rons Rescue has found homes for more than 11,000 dogs, including 600 Katrina dogs. Many of those dogs found homes with horse show regulars at the annual Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington where their business takes them every winter. They still own a house in town, and theyre a familiar sight on their souped-up red golf cart always with a few canine companions. A favorite story claims a breeder who made a good living selling puppies at the Winter Equestrian Festival went out of business; everyone wanted a rescue dog from Danny & Rons Rescue. Doghouse is Mr. Davis fourth film. His last was the critically acclaimed, award-winning Harry & Snowman, about another horse jumper and his miracle horse. Before that he made two films about alternative beauty pageants: Miss You Can Do It, a captivating film about a pageant for girls with a variety of physical challenges, and Pageant, an award-winning film that explored the underground Miss Gay America competition. As Doghouse comes to the big screen in theaters, Mr. Davis is working on his next film, I Am We, about people with dissociative identity disorder, previously called multiple personality disorder. A third film is in its earliest stages. Davis juggles the films like a parent with twin toddlers and a newborn, and, somehow, he is able to manage them all and a personal life. The film also is making the circuit of film festivals from Providence, R.I., to San Francisco, and Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw were in Los Angeles the first week of September to walk the red carpet in Beverly Hills. The couple has been rebranded as movie stars, something they never considered during the two years they spent filming with Mr. Davis. At first, neither man was eager to invite a camera crew into their home, but Mr. Davis convinced them it would bring much needed publicity to the rescue. It would help more dogs, he told them. Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw had no idea what to expect from the 83-minute film. It delves into our personal lives, Mr. Robertshaw said, because it shows how we got here, but its about the dogs, which is what we wanted. They didnt know it would make them movie stars. We didnt know it would snowball like it has, Mr. Danta said by phone. And we didnt anticipate being away from the horses. But they decided to devote one more year of their lives to this film and see where it led. It recently led to CBS Evening News, which profiled the couple and the film on its national broadcast. The film is opening peoples hearts and wallets across the country, Mr. Davis said, and rescue groups have benefited by holding fundraisers at film screenings. As a storyteller, Mr. Davis says there is no formula to making a film. He follows his gut almost the whole way, from the time he chooses subjects to the final edits. He starts the process with a blank slate, an open mind, and no preconceptions, but there is no detail too small for his attention. Mr. Davis says he doesnt really know what shape the story will take until hes almost finished filming. As the footage grows, the story emerges like a man walking out of the fog. Through development and filming, the story reveals its details, like polishing tarnished silver to reveal engraving. A positive sign for Mr. Davis Wellington-based Docutainment Films is that both Life in the Doghouse and I Am We have been purchased by FilmRise, a film acquisition and distribution company. Its a solid nod to Mr. Davis skill as a filmmaker, even if it doesnt come with a bundle of cash. Like everything else, raising money to make these films is the toughest part of his job. Donations and grants provide some of the money, but cash flow and operating expenses are struggles he shares with Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw. Their 501(c)3 rescue also depends on donations and grants, and the couple has already invested nearly half of their retirement income into the rescue. They hope the movie will energize young people to help with the rescue work. Its a lot to ask, because at Danny & Rons Rescue, the dogs live in a pack in the house, not in kennels or cages. Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw surrendered their home, where they once held dinner parties with a dozen guests, to make room for dozens of dogs. The dogs live like the cherished pets they will become, free to roam, with access to a huge yard, plenty of organic dog food, and lots of love and attention. The rescue employs a few people who spend much of the time keeping the house clean. Beds are washed and floors are mopped, dogs are bathed and poop is scooped and scooped and scooped. Its a hard, relentless life with no end in sight and the film points its finger squarely at two demons in the pet world: Overpopulation from people failing to spay and neuter their pets and the puppy mills that exhaustively breed substandard, health-compromised puppies under brutal living conditions. Unlike the happy, playful dogs in the first part of the film, its ugly and upsetting. Mr. Davis includes drone footage of euthanized dogs being buried in a mass grave and undercover footage of puppy mill dogs forced to breed in cages so small the dogs cant even turn around. The pictures are painful to watch, but Mr. Davis was careful he didnt want to make a film that is too painful to watch. Mr. Davis drives home his point with words. The statistics, according to the film: Four million dogs are euthanized every year. And that dog you think you saved when you bought it from the pet store? Theres a 99.9 percent chance that precious pup came from a place of unspeakable cruelty. Despite those painful moments, the film is joyful and uplifting (its about dogs!), and Mr. Danta and Mr. Robertshaw are calm, strong, not strident, voices for the cause. Both men say they are pleased with the final product. Ron did a beautiful job, Mr. Robertshaw said. He told the story very tastefully, but with a lot of truth. A8 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Life in the Doghouse>> When: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 13. Additional screenings may be added. >> Where: Royal Palm Beach Stadium 18 & RPX, 1003 N. SR 441, West Palm Beach, and CityPlace 20, 545 Hibiscus St., West Palm Beach. >> Tickets: $12 >> Info: www.lifeinthedoghousemovie.com COURTESY PHOTODirector Ron Davis last film was the critically acclaimed Harry & Snowman.COURTESY PHOTODanny Robertshaw and Ron Dantas last 15 years have been dominated by rescuing dogs. Their story is documented in the film Life in the Doghouse.It delves into our personal lives because it shows how we got here, but its about the dogs, which is what we wanted. Danny RobertshawDOGHOUSEFrom page 1

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Baers Welcomes The American Express Card We Export Worldwide Design Studio Services Are Complimentary To Customers On In-Stock Items. Ask Store Personnel For Details. *Savings based on Baers retail. Baers never sells at retail (MSRP). Exclu des fair traded items, rugs & chandeliers. Design License #IBC000503. Next Working Day Delivery2324 N. Military Trail(Just North Of Okeechobee Blvd.)561-684-3225 WEST PALM BEACH910 North US Highway 1(1/2 Mile South Of PGA Blvd.)561-626-6100 NORTH PALM BEACH1421 S. Federal Hwy.(South Of The Roosevelt Bridge)772-221-8679 STUART Quality Furniture & Interior DesignShop 24/7 at baers.comBrowse locations, collections, promotions & much more,SHOP: WEEKDAYS 10 AM to 9 PM, SATURDAY 10 AM to 8 PM & SUNDAY 12 NOON to 6 PM Our Lowest Prices of the year! 50% Off on the entire product line Limited Time SavingsBaers is your one stop destination for name brand furniture, mattresses, rugs, accessories & interior design services. Ocean Club CollectionPeninsula Dining Table & Kowloon Chairs

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. NETWORKINGGrand opening of Studio 411 at the Mandel Public Library 1. Janet Schreiber and Paula Ryan 2. Cindy Bartosek, Sibel Kocabasi, Elle Schorr and Jane Jones 3. Debbie Young and Velene Smith 4. Andrea Peppers and Tina Maura 5. Joyce Pericone, Lisa Hathaway, Paula Ryan, Chris Murray, Teneka James, Nickie Hennevelt and Raphael Clemente 6. Kat Able and Evelyn Ramirez 7. Maxine Schreiber, Anita Lovitt and Ken Dempsey 8. Nancy Tilles, Joyce Pernicone and Trish Kahn 9. Nickie Hennevelt, Alan Murphy, Robert Sanders and Lesley Hogan 10. Steve Brouse and Anita Lovitt 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7 8 9 0 10 Norma-Anne Chattin and Ryvis Sierra

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 NEWS A11PHOTOS BY TRACEY BENSONMichelle McGann, Simone Sellier, Nan OLeary and Patty McDonald Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Capital Strategies Womens Forum, Manatee Lagoon 1. Barbara Best and Denise Groo 2. Katie Hayes, Vivien Henderson and Sarah Palmer 3. Bonnie Brown and Angel Chen 4. Kaitlyn Pennesi, Kristi McDonald and Kelly Sudell 5. Kristen Lindstrom and Janine Boylan 6. Sophia Eccleston, Kelly Cashmere and Cathy Helowicz 7. Nicole Meyers, Barbara Best, Nancy Rizzuto and Katie Hayes 8. Tamra FitzGerald and Nancy Rizzuto 9. Soana Fuentes, Dr. Evelyn Higgins and Jackie Borstock 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYOpening of members and FOTOCAMP show, Palm Beach Photographic Centre 1. Alina Morrison, Ingrid Morrison and Tony Morrison 2. Art NeJame and Fatima NeJame 3. Dori McKearn and John McKearn 4. Bev Caparella and Dede Dehone 5. Carol Roberts, Pam Rembaum and Sonya Robbins 6. Carol Singer and Adam Singer 7. Jim Gallegos and Danny Gallegos 8. Fatima NeJame and EJ Morales 9. Nikita Whitfield, Damisha Jones, Gertsey Moise, and Abramarie Khan 10. Hubert Phipps and Bruce Helander 11. Jamie Jerchower and Jessica Jerchower 12. Mary Mandel and Alex Mandel 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Lila Rubin and Janie Ehlers G L i l a R ubi n a nd Ja n i e Eh le rs

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 NEWS A13GAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Evan Cohen Bobblehead Giveaway Night, Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium 1. Kara Mahunik, Doreen Mahunik, Lily Ritter, Jett Ritter and Jeff Ritter 2. Nick Bernstein, Captain Joker, Michael Sihvola and Joey Duhon 3. Maria Herrera, Valentina Herrera, Ian Herrera and Luis Herrera 4. Chantell Mercer, Teresa Fisher and Fion 5. Nancy Stellway, Wayphian Henry, David Graham, Rhandi Wallace, Sydney Davis, Bizzie Gardner and Catherine Awasthi 6. Ricky Torres and Jacob Torres 7. Philip Dixon and Lily Ritter 8. Ryan Gural and Diane Gural 9. Ian Rice and Hillary Sampliner 10. Nicole Slonaker, Chris Slonaker and Davin Slonaker 11. Suzanne Boyd, Trace Phipps, Laila Walker, Jonathan Walker, Jack Rex and Ryan Walker 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1 Sherry Norris, Olivia Daws, Grayson Daws, Bonnie Wolfe and Landon Terceria

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World class care, close to you in Wellington. 800.639.DOCTOR clevelandclinicflorida.org/WellingtonAppt Same-day appointments Village Green Center 2789 S. State Road 7 Suite 100 Monday Friday | 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.Cleveland Clinic Florida in Wellington is now open and accepting patients. You and your family now have access to expert primary and heart care. NOW OPEN!

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ECHNOLOGY DOES A LOT, BUT IT CANT do everything. Sometimes we forget that. We can get so dependent on email and social media that we lose sight of what people really need from us especially in business. Yes, clients expect to connect with us in various high-tech ways, but they also crave the deep and meaningful connections that can only come from face-to-face or at least voice-to-voice connections. It can be tricky to walk the line, says Paul G. Krasnow. Too little tech and youll seem out of touch; too much and youll lose the personal touch that keeps customers loyal and engaged, says Mr. Krasnow, author of The Success Code: A Guide for Achieving Your Personal Best in Business and Life. BUSINESS PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY A14 | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM TSEE BALANCE, A15 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY THE HIGHTECH/ HIGHTRUSTHow to make smart use of technology without losing the personal touch clients craveBALANCETeam of wealth advisors joins FineMarkFineMark National Bank & Trust is continuing to grow and has assembled a team of wealth advisors. Paul Blatz, Dean Borland and Kim Bagatell have joined FineMark after serving more than a decade each at GenSpring Family Offices and working with ultra-high net worth families. We are resolute to seek out the very best individuals in the business who align well with our mission to go above and beyond for our clients, FineMark President & CEO Joseph R. Catti said in a statement. We believe this group does that. Bringing on this team of three seasoned professionals with stellar reputations is a huge win for FineMark. They share FineMarks commitment of putting clients first, while delivering a very high level of service, David H. Scaff, president of FineMark National Bank & Trust, Palm Beach, said in the statement. Because of their decades of experience working with families, they have the insight and experience needed to fit seamlessly into our culture of service. The new team will work directly with individuals and families, with Mr. Blatz focusing on portfolio construction and investment management, Mr. Borland focusing on comprehensive wealth planning and Ms. Bagatell providing day-to-day client service and interface. The three have worked together as a team for years, and in their new roles, they will continue to serve each client family by helping them implement a plan that fits their needs and financial goals. PHOTO BY BRIAN TIETZDean Borland, Kim Bagatell and Paul Blatz, who worked for many years at GenSpring Family Offices, have joined FineMark National Bank & Trust.SEE FINEMARK, A15

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A15 Visit us online for all available properties! www.singerislandlifestyles.com Singer Island Oceanfront Tower 2BR/2BA w/ Gated Beach Access One Block to Ocean Walk Mall $334,500 Call or Text Today for Details! Jimmie & Judy McAdams Realtors) 561-385-1450 | 561-358-0716Emails: Jimmie@singerislandlifestyles.com | Judy@singerislandlifestyles.com Our team will help you start living the Singer Island Lifestyle that you so deserve! As youre trying to find the right balance, just remember this: Your client relationships are built on emotions and trust, so use technology only in a way that maintains, enhances and propels those relationships to the next level, he advises. Mr. Krasnow attributes his career journey to his ability to build strong personal relationships. Following early success in the clothing industry, he experienced a devastating bankruptcy that forced him to rebuild his life from scratch. He went on to join Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, where he created an impressive financial portfolio and won multiple Top Agent awards. He still serves clients today and they love him as much as they ever did. Human needs dont change, he says. Relationships mattered in the days of pencil, paper and snail mail, and they still matter in the days of Facebook and Skype. Ideally, you would meet with all of your clients in person, but of course thats not always practical. Still, Mr. Krasnow says you should invest in at least one face-to-face meeting with your top clients. Then, use a carefully balanced mix of technology to maintain the relationship. Here are a few of his tips for using tech the right way. Dont let faceless and voiceless technology become your primary communication tool Nothing can replace the effectiveness of a face-toface encounter (even if its by Skype), especially in the early phases of your client relationship. And meaningful phone conversations can be great, too. Its fine to use less powerful tech solutions like email, texting and e-blasts to stay in close contact with your clients. These can enhance and strengthen a well-established relationship. But they should only be supplemental. Skype important meetings when you cant be there in person In-person interactions are best for relationship building especially with your top clients but of course they cant always happen. Video conferencing is second best. Make sure you use this tech tool often. Its a great way to read body language and facial expressions, which is crucial for building trust and establishing positive, productive relationships. Pick up the phone regularly Many people dislike the phone. Conversations can be long and meandering, and were all busy. But you must overcome your phone phobia. In terms of relationship building (not to mention problem solving), there is no substitute for the give and take that happens voice-to-voice. Schedule phone conversations with clients to catch up and find out how they are doing. Keep that human connection alive. Pay attention to how the client communicates If a client seems to prefer phone, text or in-person communication, make a note of it and honor his or her preference while maintaining your own dedication to person-toperson contact. This shows clients you care about and respect their preferences. Find a happy balance between the clients style, yours and the demands of the day. Match the medium to the message If you want to distinguish yourself and have something very important to say, write a letter. If you are trying to book an appointment with a busy person, or if you have to figure out something complex or discuss a potentially sensitive issue, pick up the phone. If you only want confirmation of a small piece of information and youve recently spoken with a client, feel free to use email. Let your instinct be your guide. Be thoughtful and deliberate with social media Your competition is taking advantage of these platforms and so should you. But make sure your online presence is well planned and executed. Your Facebook or LinkedIn posts should meaningfully connect back to your brand and mission and provide value to clients and other readers. Dont bombard your followers with inane content. This negates your credibility. Post less and make sure your content is good. Keep your website young and agile Is your website in alignment with your business image and your mission? Make sure its as professional and sleek as your personal appearance is when you meet a client for the first time. Successful companies have streamlined, up-to-date websites with modern fonts, colors and layouts. If its been a while since youve changed your website design, a tune-up and a facelift are most likely in order. Use email to send links to articles you think your client might enjoy Trusting relationships thrive on frequent contact. To solidify your connection to clients, especially when you havent talked in a while, send them little links and articles you know they will enjoy. This gesture shows you are thinking about them and know where their interests lie. Just keep these communications in balance; bombarding clients with superficial links and articles could actually weaken the value of your contact with them and undermine your relationship. Send e-newsletters to all your clients This a good way to engage regularly with clients and stay on their minds. Create compelling content that connects with the various lines of services you are currently offering and craft interesting articles for your clients around related topics. Personalize your high-tech communication Sometimes e-blasts make sense, but whenever possible, include a small personal note at the top that lets the client see they matter to you. Allow clients to login and access their information Whenever possible, empower clients by putting information at their fingertips. This not only saves time for your clients when they need to get a small piece of information, but also goes a long way toward building mutual trust. If you harness the power of technology correctly, it can do wonderful things for your business, Mr. Krasnow concludes. But remember that it is only one tool in your toolbox. Use technology to enhance business, but dont let it overshadow your mission to keep trust-based client relationships at the center of everything you do. KRASNOW BALANCEFrom page 14Prior to FineMark, Mr. Blatz was a managing director and senior family investment officer with GenSpring Family Offices. He was the recipient of the SunTrust Platinum Excellence Award in both 2016 and 2017. He graduated magna cum laude from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. He also is a Chartered Financial Analyst and member of the CFA Institute. Mr. Borland was a family wealth advisor and senior vice president at GenSpring Family Offices. Mr. Borland graduated from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. He is a Certified Public Accountant and a Certified Trust Financial Advisor. Prior to FineMark, Ms. Bagatell was a family wealth analyst with GenSpring Family Offices. Ms. Bagatell graduated from Pennsylv ania State University and has resided in South Florida for 30 years. She volunteers with the Palm Beach Philanthropy Tank. FineMark National Bank & Trust offers an array of banking, trust and investment services and has been awarded a 5-Star Superior Rating for 29 consecutive quarters from Bauer Financial, the nations leading independent bank rating and research firm. FINEMARKFrom page 14

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A16 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Networking photo pages from business events, grand openings, professional associati on meetings, etc. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. NETWORKINGChamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches, Palm Beach County Convention Center 1. Brittany Wilson, Bill Shepard and Gabrielle Finley-Hazle 2. Don Kiselewski, Christina Lambert, John Pankowski and Anuj Chokshi 3. Cliff Hertz, Kelly Smallridge and Rick Greene 4. Gary Vonk, Fran Vaccaro and Tony DeLisi 5. Joe Peduzzi, Sarah Moore and Michael Odum 6. Vince Cerone, Justin Cerone and Dennis Grady 7. Michele Jacobs and Jean Wihbey 8. Lew Crampton and Jeri Muoio 9. Sarah Inesedy, Scott Powers, Laura King and Jodi Chu 10. Raphael Clemente and Teneka James 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7 8 Christine Shaw, Cheryl Pugliesi and George Gundersen

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A17 BEHIND THE WHEELWidebody owns the roadThis car was built to own the road. Period. The Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody has a long name, because its the culmination of everything Dodge has been doing to reignite the muscle car era. It takes the 707 horsepower Hellcat setup and drops it into the aggressively flared fender body of the 840 horsepower Demon. While that might seem like Dodge is just rooting around the Challenger parts bin, there is some logic behind it. The Demon might be the most powerful coupe in the lineup, but its a whole different animal than the rest. Its a drag racer on street tires and just legal enough to hang a license plate on the back. That might sound like a cool car to own, yet anyone who wants to use it for actual communing is insane. On the other hand, the Hellcat is impractical, but it has everyday usability. Thus, the Widebody edition allows the Hellcat to have the extra street-eating persona of the Demon without requiring a second car to get to work. While the exterior is exaggerated, inside are the same sensibilities that are available on the full Challenger lineup. That means a large coupe with good headroom and a ton more back seat space than most other sports cars out there. The Hellcat Widebody has a base price of $72,600. Thats luxury car territory, and so Dodge loads it with standard features. Power front seats, Harmon Kardon 18-speaker stereo, touchscreen infotainment system, dual-zone climate control, heated/cooled seats, and a special adjustable electronic power steering system help keep everything comfy. The standard radar-assisted parking assist is especially helpful with the coupes wider stance. This car also reminds drivers its a special performance machine with a full array of Performance Pages on the center screen that can dial-in the steering, suspension, and engine response. The SRT badge in the steering wheel even glows red at night. While the Widebody upgrade is mostly for appearance, there is a practical application. It adds 3 inches of width over the standard Hellcat. Super sticky Pirelli performance tires come standard on the Widebody, and the contact patch is over 1 inches greater. According to Dodge, this allows for faster quarter mile times and better grip. Still, theres no amount of extra rubber that can compensate for the Hellcat motor. Most people would be happy with the serious power produced by a 6.2liter V8, and then the Hellcat adds a supercharger on top. The engineers have tried as hard as they could to corral the full 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque. Theres launch control, traction control, and adaptive Bilstein shocks. Thats whats needed to take the retro-style Challenger and make it a 199 mph supercar. But this coupe produces nearly as much torque as a diesel truck. Plus, its one of the few high horsepower cars that still comes standard with a six-speed manual transmission (an eight-speed automatic is a $2,995 option.) That means anyone who wants to have a little fun can find plenty of ways to shred those expensive Pirelli tires. This knack for hijinks is how the Hellcat lives up to its name. Obviously, this is not a vehicle for the timid. Thats what makes the Widebody so appealing. The Hellcat already has enough growl at idle to scare away the neighborhood children, and so utilizing the meanest stance available just seems like the right upgrade. It creates a complete package that looks and sounds like it will pillage suburbia Not everyone will feel its worthwhile to spend $6,000 more over the standard Hellcat for wide fenders, special 20-inch Devils Rim wheels, and upgrades to deal with that thicker setup. Its not cheap, but who ever said owning the road would be economical? mylesKORNBLATTmk@autominded.com EARL ON CARSHoldback or holdup?If a car dealer shows you his invoice, hes lyingBack in 1968 when I first went into the retail car business with my father, I can remember asking him, What is holdback? I was learning the business and had been studying the invoices on new Pontiacs that General Motors sent us when they shipped a new car that we had ordered. We had to pay the invoice immediately when it was issued, sometimes even before the car arrived at our dealership. In most cases, it was our bank or GMAC who paid GM and we borrowed the money from them to pay for the car. My fathers answer to my question about holdback was that it was an increase in the amount of the invoice that we paid General Motors that was not really part of the price of the car. It was just an extra amount added to the real price of the car and included in the invoice. At that time, it was 2 percent of the MSRP (manufacturers suggested retail), so if a new Pontiac Bonneville had an MSRP of $10,000 and a true cost of $9,000, the factory invoice would be $9,200. I asked my father, when do we get the $200 back? He said, at the end of the year. I asked him if they paid us interest on our money and I can remember him laughing loudly and saying no. Of course my next question was to ask why they do that. He told me the reason they gave him was to help dealers sell their cars for more money, so they didnt go broke. He said that because they didnt get their holdback money for such a long period of time, they began to think of their invoice as being the actual cost of the car. General Motors felt that many dealers were such poor businessmen that they might sell their cars so cheaply that they would go out of business. Now, because GM was kind enough to hold back hundreds of thousands of dollars of the dealers money (and pay them no interest on it), but return the money to them once a year, it could help the dealers make a bigger profit and maintain adequate working capital. At that time, I thought this was the biggest bunch of baloney I had ever heard and I was sure that this was a scheme by the manufacturers to keep a free float of millions of dollars of their dealers money under the guise of helping the dealers. I asked my father why the dealers didnt strongly object to this, and he said that most dealers actually liked the idea of holdback. When I heard that, I thought that maybe GM and the manufacturers were right about the dealers not being smart enough to sell their cars for a reasonable profit. It took me a few more years in the business before I understood what was really going on with holdback. It was a no brainer as to why the manufacturers liked it, but at last I understood its attraction to dealers. Because we had to pay an extra amount over the true price of the car and not see that money for up to a year, we began to think of the invoice as the true price, even though it was inflated by hundreds of dollars. Because all manufacturers added holdback to all dealers invoices, the net effect was to raise the price of all cars to all buyers by the amount of this holdback. I know this is a dirty word, but its price fixing on the grandest scale. This might have been something that Henry Ford, Alfred Sloan and Walter Chrysler concocted while playing golf at Bloomfield Hills Country Club outside Detroit. Another neat thing about holdback for us dealers is being able to tell our customers that we are only charging them X dollars over invoice; or we can tell them that we will sell them this car at invoice with no profit to us at all! Dealers often have invoice sales, with copies of the invoice pasted on the car windows. Thats what the dealer paid the factory all right, but its not what he paid the factory after he got his holdback check in the mail or, his kickback. You might be thinking, so were talking about $200 more or less on a $10,000 car. Who cares? Dont forget, that was almost 50 years ago. Holdbacks have expanded considerably and now, instead of several hundred dollars, were talking several thousand. Also, dealers no longer must wait a year to get their hold back money back. Now they get it back monthly. Manufacturers even changed the names of these monies they hold back. These are innocuous names, so that if you see them on the invoice, you will have no suspicion names like floorplan assistance, advertising, PDI, Administrative or DAP. Of course, there also are cash rebates to dealers that dont even show on the invoice. I estimate the average car invoice today includes $3,000 to $4,000 in hidden holdbacks to the dealer. Holdbacks also are applied to factory or distributor accessories like protection packages (wax, undercoat, window etch, roadside assistance), floor mats, window tint, etc. The bottom line is that you should never rely on the dealers factory invoice to determine the price you are willing to pay for a car. And be especially suspicions when the dealer quotes you a price of X dollars over invoice or shows you the invoice. Youve heard the old joke, How can you tell when a politician is lying? Answer: When his lips are moving. How can you tell when a car dealer is lying? Answer: When he shows you the invoice. earlSTEWARTearls@estoyota.com561-358-1474

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www.langrealty.com KING ARTHUR ESTATESPBG ABACOAJUPITER JOGGERS RUNGREENACRES JUPITER INLET BEACH COLONY PGA NATLPALM BEACH GARDENS WELLINGTONS EDGE PGA NATLPALM BEACH GARDENS FOREST RIDGE PARKWPB BAY HILL ESTATESWEST PALM BEACH PGA NATLPALM BEACH GARDENS ABERDEEN BOYNTON BEACH JUPITER COUNTRY CLUB THE BARCLAY SOUTH PALM BEACH JUPITER FARMS OCEAN CLUBJUPITER JUPITER COUNTRY CLUB IBIS-SANDHILL TRACE3BR/2BA Fully remodeled, granite kitchen, SS appliances. $218,900SCOTT WARNER 5613BR/2.1BA This end unit is nicely maintained with large great room downstairs. $323,900SUSAN HYTE 5612BR/2BA Light, bright & spacious corner villa on a magnificent waterview lot. $189,900IRIS HOFFMAN 5613BR/3BA Incredible location on higher wide interior lot. $1,399,900LINDA GIANNETTI 561 3BR/4.1BA Totally updated residence on a wide lake/golf location with a view of the Squire 9th hole. $924,900RON FALCIANO 5613BR/2BA Completely renovated home with 2 car garage. $324,900LAURA LUMBRA 3052BR/2BA Freshly painted, overlooks the lake and PGA Park. $234,950SCOTT WARNER 5612BR/1BA Recently updated adorable cottage in quaint neighborhood. $215,000NICOLE KOLA 561 4BR/3BA Open floor plan w/spacious kitchen/family room leading to covered patio w/views of the lake & fountain. $615,000ANN MARIE MINERVINI 5614BR/3BA Fabulous No HOA fee home on oversized lot in Golf Club Estates. $537,500GABRIELLE FAZIO 5613BR/3BA Breathtaking lake view, dover model with oversized pool/patio. $265,000JONATHAN HARRIS 5613BR/2.1BA Absolutely amazing extended Salerno model on one of the best lots in Jupiter CC w/side entry 3 CG. $945,000CAM KIRKWOOD 5612BR/2BA Florida living at its finest in this beautiful, lanai condo. $397,500JONATHAN HARRIS 561 3BR/2.1BA This is a must see custom home built for entertaining! $509,900NICOLE KOLA 5612BR/2BA Gorgeous direct oceanfront penthouse condo featuring 12 foot Ceilings you can not find anywhere on the Beach! $925,000JEFF MOLNER 2013BR/3.1BA Tastefully updated waterfront townhome is a must see. $659,000ZACHARY SCHMIDT 561Featured Listing3BR/3BA Fabulous + den/office, home, extended back yard, phantom screen & awning, custom pool & spa with jandy system, summer kitchen w/granite counter, gorgeous sunsets! Kitchen w/granite counters, built-ins gas appliances & breakfast area. Separate dining room, opens to large great room with built-in entertainment system & wet bar. Custom paint in living room & master bedroom. 2 CG w/golf cart storage. Office has custom built-ins & plantation shutters, large master bedroom w/2 large closets, master bath has dual sinks, separate toilet & bidet, marble floors & counters. Membership required.$519,000IRENE EISEN | 561 Jupiter Palm Beach Gardens West Palm Beach Delray Beach ManalapanOfce Locations: Boca Raton Port St. Lucie West Boca Raton East Boca Raton Boca West Country Club Boyton Beach at Hunters Run

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40% o any order of $1000 or more. 30% o any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Oce. Not valid with any other oer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. 40% OPlusFree Installation | A19WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM REAL ESTATEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYOld Palm masterpiece SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYCompleted in 2017, this clean and transitional masterpiece highlights endless detail throughout, with breathtaking views of the Pete Dye golf course at Old Palm Golf Club from the indoor and outdoor living spaces, custom pool and summer kitchen. This impeccable estate home offers four bedrooms, 4.1 baths, high ceilings, a spacious kitchen with Wolf/Sub-Zero appliances and 10-foot sliding glass doors. An air-conditioned four-car garage is designed with the automobile enthusiast in mind.Its offered at $2,895,000 by Douglas Elliman.For information, contact Craig Bretzlaff at 561-601-7557 or Craig.bretzlaff@elliman.com; or Heather Bretzlaff, 561-722-6136 or Heather. bretzlaff@elliman.com. COURTESY PHOTOS

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Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561.889.6734 The Resort 16503BR/3.5BA $1,699,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,999The Resort 20503BR/3BA $1,799,000 Water Club 1504-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,349,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,300,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,999,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2101A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,150,000 SOLD Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $949,000Water Club 1603-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,299,000 Martinique WT8042BR/3.5BA $649,900 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 SOLD Oasis Singer Island 18A 3BR/3.5BA $2,385,000 The Resort 6534BR/4.5BA $2,199,999 Oasis Singer Island 19A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,399,000Ritz Carlton Residence 1502B3BR/3.5BA $1,999,000 UNDER CONTRACT

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Jupiter lighthouse plans Season of LightFor more than 150 years, the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse has cast a beam across northern Palm Beach County. And the lighthouse, now known as the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, will continue to shine as it rolls out its 2018-19 season, dubbed Season of Light, with dates set for its special events and programs, and a regular calendar of free admission opportunities offered to veterans, military families and members of the local community. On Sept. 27, members and guests are invited to mix and mingle with others who share a passion for preserving this iconic site at an inaugural Lighthouse Luminary social event, A Little Piece Of Paradise. The night features sparkling wine, Florida style desserts and Perry Como on the speakers. Guests will be invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse. Free for Luminary members; $20, for guests. To join, or to learn more about the benefits of becoming a Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum Luminary, visit www. jupiterlighthouse.org/joingive/lighthouse-luminaries/ or call 561-747-8380, Ext. 107. The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museums annual fundraising waterfront par-ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY | SECTION BWWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COMWEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@ oridaweekly.comFans of the wildly popular Downton Abbey, PBSs award-winning series set in early 1900s England, have probably pictured themselves in the Crawley familys grand home. Some imagined sipping tea with Lady Mary, while others imagined serving. The dichotomy of richer and poorer presented so eloquently over the six seasons the show aired is replicated in this exhibition. The new exhibition is coming to the old Macys space, at 575 S. Rosemary Ave. in CityPlace, on Nov. 10 and promises even more Abbey than the New York exhibition. More of the series most recognizable sets from Mrs. Patmores kitchen to the family dining room are included in this new display and about 50 of the original costumes worn also will be included. They also promise some fresh film footage. Some speculate that it was West Palm Beachs historic similarities to the setting of the show that made this the perfect place to kick off its multiple city tour. Both the show and Palm Beach share a historic past, set during the same Gilded Age, and were present at some of the greatest world events: World War 1, the sinking of the Titanic, the Great Depression and more. Our wonderful weather and ability to host tons of tourists was surely not a factor. The show will be open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., including holidays. Tickets will be $35, but will be free for children younger than 14. VIP packages and private hire options will be offered available. For more information on the exhibition, visit www. downtonexhibition.com.Downtown this weekendDont forget Screen on the Green with free kids activities and a family friendly movie from 7 to 11 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14 on the Great Lawn at the West Palm Beach Waterfront, Clematis Street at Flagler Drive. The film is the sci-fi marvel A Wrinkle in Time. Then on Sunday, Journey fans will HAPPENINGSSEE LIGHTHOUSE, B8 SEE HAPPENINGS, B8 Downton Abbey exhibit headed to CityPlaceCOURTESY PHOTODownton Abbey: The Exhibition features several beloved rooms from the TV series, including the Crawleys glamorous dining room. HE HEADLINES FOR THIS FALLS NEW RELEASES are sure to get any movie fan excited. We have Robert Redfords last film, a remake of a Hollywood classic with the fourth A Star Is Born, a Freddie Mercury biopic and a return of Mary Poppins. We also have new films from Damien Chazelle (La La Land), Barry Jenkins (Moonlight), Luca Guadagnino (Call Me By Your Name) and Steve McQueen ( Years A Slave).BY DAN HUDEKFlorida Weekly Film Critic SEE MOVIES, B6 T B B p p t s h i S M T p s i t m a t s M d d c T f P t t p B i s i r r THE OFAND Redford, Mercury and Poppins highlight films coming up this fall and its a dandy crop, our critic says.Robert Redford in The Old Man & The Gun, top. Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody, above. Emily Blunt as Mary Poppins in Mary Poppins Returns, right. PHOTO BY WILLIAM A. LEONARDThe Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum plans a full season of activities, plus special admission for locals and members of the military. FLORIDA WEEKLY STAFF_________________________

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CASUAL DINING AND ATTIRE ON WORTH AVENUETHREE COURSE PRIX-FIXE DINNER $39.00Monday thru Sunday 5:00PM TO 9:00PM TABOORESTAURANT.COM FOR MENU JUNE THRU OCTOBEROPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30AM TO 10:00PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30AM TO 3:00PMHAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4 TO 7561.835.3500RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED 221 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, FL COLLECTORS CORNER scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com My grandmother always sewed when I was a boy. As I remember, the Singer Featherweight sewing machine frequently stood in the corner of the back bedroom, the black legs of its folding table and foot pedal contrasting with the stark white of the terrazzo floors. The black case had a slightly stale odor, but the gentle whirs and clicks of that machine were soothing, the sounds promising anything from beautifully stitched pajamas to curtains. For women of Grandmas generation, sewing was a key part of domestic life. I remember the pilgrimages wed make to McConnells Fabrics in the old Boulevard Plaza along McGregor Boulevard in Fort Myers. The women who worked there also were of a certain age, and they smiled as they showed the new fabrics the cute conversation prints of the s gave way to the shimmery brocades of the s and the bold prints of the 0s. Not to worry no natural fibers were harmed in the manufacture of those later materials, as cottons gave way to nylon and polyester. Yes, the materials changed, but the rituals endured, as Grandma rolled out a protective pad over the dining table, pinned patterns to the fabrics and carefully cut them with the big Wiss shears. Then, shed pin the fabrics and head to the sewing machine. Grandma had begun sewing as a young woman, turning out frocks in the 1930s from her grandmothers treadle machine she remembered sitting carefully while on a date wearing a dress that still had its hem in pins because she hadnt finished it in time. But it was with her mother-in-law that she began sewing in earnest. Shed sigh as she remembered my great-grandmother, who had bought her that Featherweight (the machines weigh about 11 pounds) so the two of them could sew together on her porch in Indiana. There, they would while away the hours turning out matching coats for my mother and my aunt and other necessities of the day. Grandma Bolender, as everyone called my great-grandmother, did everything on a grand scale, buying miles of extra yardage to make aprons and pillows. Those good times did not last Grandma Bolender died just a couple years later at 58. Grandmas machine came with the matching card table that had an opening into which the machine would drop, making a solid work surface that offered plenty of room for the full skirts of the day to spread out. My mother remembers a green formal Grandma made as Bought: Goodwill, 3500 Broadway, Riviera Beach; 561-842-9112 or www. gulfstreamgoodwill.org. Paid: $39.95 The Skinny: I always pick up these Featherweight machines whenever I see one thats reasonably priced the coterie of quilters I know adores them because they only weigh 11 pounds, making them easy to transport to bees and other sewing events. Singer first marketed the machines in 1933 and continued making them until 1969 the company stopped making machines in black in 1961. Based on its serial number, this machine was made in 1957 the website www.singer-featherweight.com offers a guide to looking up a machines serial number. Its in immaculate condition, with no wear to its paint or the gold decals that decorate it. Yes, its case has that familiar, slightly musty odor, but my guess is that its ready for another six decades of stitching. THE FIND:A Singer Featherweight sewing machineSinger sewing machine stitches up a memory or two being simply beautiful. She still has the white eyelet dress Grandma made for her to wear to her high school graduation in 1958 the voluminous skirt showcased her tiny waist. And Grandmas Featherweight? Its still stitching clothing and sewing up a memory or two. This Singer Featherweight Model 221 sewing machine weighs 11 pounds. It dates from 1957.SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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TIM NORRIS A2 OPINION/C.B. HANIF A4 PETS A10 MUSINGS A16 BUSINESS A19 NETWORKING A22-24 REAL ESTATE A25 ARTS B1 EVENTS B8-11 FILM REVIEW B13 SOCIETY B15-17 CUISINE B19 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715POSTAL CUSTOMER DATED MATERIAL REQUESTED IN-HOME DELIVERY DATE: MARCH 23, 2011 Accidental artistTransplanted sand sculptor enthralls beachgoers. A18 Madly matchlessCrazy for You dishes classic Gershwin at the Maltz. B1 SocietySee whos out and about in Palm Beach County. B15-17 www.FloridaWeekly.com A Palm Beach Gardens company says it has found a fresh-squeezed Florida formula for profit with vodka. Imperial Brands Inc., a subsidiary of Belvdre S.A., launched its 4 Orange Premium Vodka last year. only orange vodka made from oranges, says Timo Sutinen, vice president of marketing and development for Imperial Brands. Other flavored vodkas are made of potatoes and such, and then have the flavors added. The vodka is made from the juice of Florida-grown Parson Brown, Temple, ValenciaBY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@ oridaweekly.comTimo Sutinen is vice president of marketing and development for Imperial Brands, which makes 4 Orange Premium Vodka and other brands of spirits.SEE VODKA, A20 COURTESY PHO TO INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW HAS Annual boat show expected draw up to 50,000 people. 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Gershwin at the Maltz. hw w wi a t th wi win n Gershwin a a sh hw in n a a e e r rs s sh hw wi a B1 B1 B1 B B1 1 1 Society ciety c See whos out and abou whos ou e whos out w w whoso w o t in Palm Beach County. mB Beach B Beach Count Beach m m m each m m m B B h m m m B B Be each m m B B 15-17 odka mad d de e fr fr d d e d e e r d e e om oranges, sa om oranges, say om oranges, say s ys y ys n, vice p p pr re esid id p r re p pr r re p ent of marke fmarke et t tet f arke et t opment f fo or I or I t f fo mperial Brand mperial Brand ra d d ds. d ds d d d d vodkas s a are re ar s a ar e e s a ar made of potatoe made of potato madeofpota es madeofpotatoe e e e then ha t e t av v ve e av v ve e av ve e he flavors added e flavors ad d he flavo d he flavors ad d d d d. d d. s made f f om th om th m th f fr f r ro f fr r ro o e juice of e juice of Flo e juic ce of ro or o or o o rson Bro o ow w w wn n n, T w o ow w w w wn w w emple, Valen le, Vale lenc c i ia ci c c SEE SEE E VODKA, A20 VODKA, A20 A20 VODKA, A20 nnual boa at at t t t t t at t t at t t a at t a at t ow expect t t t ct t t e e e ed e d e ed e e e e e e e draw up to o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 000 peop p p p p p p p p p o p p p p o p p p p p le le. e T T T T T T U T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T KED KED ternatio ter nal l p map. p ma pm &9 &9 & &9 & de: POSTAL CUS CU ST TOMER C S T ST DATED MATERIAL REQUESTED IN-HOM HOME E E E DE LIVERY DATE: MARCH L EL EL L h f B m Tim dev Oran COU OU OU U OU OU O CO CO CO RT E TE TE TE TE TE TE RT SY PH Y PH S O O O O O O O O T T O O O O O O NORTH PALM BEACH & CENTRAL PALM BEACH Visit online at www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH COUNTYS GUIDE TO THE ARTS ARTS PREVIEW As Preview is the insiders guide to the highlights of the seasons best peorming and fine as events. Be pa of the special section and reach your target audience.ACT IPUB DATE: November 8, 2018 SPACE DEADLINE: Wednesday, October 31st @ 12pm ADS THAT NEED PROOFS: Wednesday, October 31st @ 12pm CAMERA READY ADS: Friday, November 2nd @ 10amACT IIPUB DATE: February 7, 2019 SPACE DEADLINE: Wednesday, January 30th @ 12pm ADS THAT NEED PROOFS: Wednesday,January 30th @ 12pm CAMERA READY ADS: Friday, February 1st @ 10am

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@floridaweekly.com.THURSDAY9/13Music in the Courtyard 5-7 p.m. Thursdays, in the Courtyard at Royal Poinciana Plaza, 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach. Local artists. Bring a blanket or find a seat on the patio. www. theroyalpoincianaplaza.com.Clematis by Night and Antique and Flea Market 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, the Great Lawn at the Waterfront, Flagler Drive and Clematis Street, West Palm Beach. Free music, vendors, food and drink. The market takes place under the trellises along S. Clematis St. with antiques and crafts, including jewelry, clothes and decorative items. 561-8222222 or www .clematisbynight.net. Sept. 13: Slip and The Spinouts (Swing/Rockabilly/Roots) | www.slipandthespinouts.com/Collaboration: African Diaspora Exhibition IV Sept. 132. Hosted by ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC at CityPlace. Highlights 38 artists whose work reflects African Diaspora, the movement of Africans and their descendants, mostly to the Americas. Features art, music, literature and food experiences. Info: www.cityplace.com/africandiaspora. Sept. 13: Exhibition opens from 70 p.m. Free. Ask about the ticketed VIP food tasting. Sept. 14: Visit the Mlange Fashion Bazaar which will showcase the work of local designers from 5:30 p.m. Sept. 15: A meet-and-greet with the artists from 6-8 p.m.Wind Down with Wine and Music 7 p.m. Thursdays, Midici, 218 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Live music and 50 percent of wine and bubbles. 561-6195299 or www.visitmymidici.com.FRIDAY9/14The ninth annual Florida Marine Flea Market and Seafood Festival 9-5 p.m. Sept. 14-16, South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. Antique collectibles and maps, marine artifacts, rods, reels, lures and lines, boating apparel, taxidermy, diving equipment. $8 early bird special, $10 at the door, free for age 12 and younger. www. flnauticalfleamarket.com; 954-205-7813. Singer Island Green & Artisan Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Singer Islands Ocean Walk, 2401 Ocean Ave. along scenic A1A. Pet and kid friendly. www.singerislandgreenmarket.com.SATURDAY9/15Photographer Barry Seidman speaks 3 p.m. Sept. 15, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth. Topic: Bananas Dont Smile: And Other Pitfalls of Food Photography. The first of seven lectures about food and art is in conjunction with the Play With Your Food! exhibition on display Sept. 14 Nov. 3. The lecture is free for members, $10 nonmembers. Info: www.palmbeachculture.com.Storm of Memorial Event 90th Anniversary 3-6 p.m. Sept. 15, 924 25th St., at the corner of Tamarind Ave., West Palm Beach. Mayor Jeri Muoio will lay a wreath at the site to honor the victims, followed by a community gathering with music and beverages. Free. www. wpb.org/cra or call 561-822-1550. SUNDAY9/16Music at St. Pauls 3 p.m. Sept. 16, St. Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. Program: Chopin and the Americans with the Delray String Quartet and pianist Jure Rozman. Arrive by 2:30 p.m. for the pre-concert conversation with Dr. Paul Cienniwa. $20 suggested donation. Free for age 18 and younger. www.music.stpaulsdelray.orgThe Quaker Meeting Houses Chapel of Eternal Life 6:30 p.m. Sundays in September. Call Richard Johnson at 561-373-5299 or visit www.palmbeachquakers.org/chapel-of-eternal-life Sept. 16: Movie Night Raymond Tarpey: The New Atlantis, Our Time Has Come: The Readings of Edger Cayce. Sept. 23: The Rev. Liz Petipren will speak about In the Moment: embracing your experiences. Sept. 30: Movie Night Valerian and the City of a Thousand PlanetsTUESDAY9/18The Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce Breakfast 7:30 a.m. Sept. 18, The Breakers, Palm Beach. Program: Stacey Watson of Achieve Palm Beach County will speak: What Businesses have stepped up to support education and why. Free for members, $40 guests in advance, $50 guests at the door. RSVP at 561-655-3282 or www.palmbeachchamber.comWEDNESDAY9/19Hot Topic Luncheon: Whats On the November Ballot 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 26, Atlantis Country Club, 190 Atlantis Blvd., Lake Worth. Get an Explanation of the States 13 Amendments from a panel from the speakers bureau from the League of Women Voters of Palm Beach County. Registration starts at 11 a.m. Tickets: $25 per person until Sept. 19 and $35 after that date. RSVP at www.lwvpbc.org or 561-968-4123. LOOKING AHEADTastings at The Tiki 6-9 p.m. Sept. 20, Cranes Beach House Boutique Hotel & Luxury Villas, Delray Beach. This benefit for the Arts Warehouse in Delray Beach will support artist services and will feature a tasting of exciting wines from Chalk Hill Winery and Smith & Hook Winery, plus beers and ales by Saltwater Brewery. Also includes an array of amazing hors doeuvres, live music and a raffle of art. Tickets: $25 at Eventbrite.com or at the door. Info: www.cranesbeachhouse. com or www.artswarehouse.org.Clematis by Night 6-9 p.m. Thursday, West Palm Beach Waterfront, West Palm Beach. Music, food, drink, vendors and a sunset. Info: www.clematisbynight.net. Sept. 20: Spred the Dub (Reggae) | www.spredthedub.com/ Sept. 27: Mighty Quinn (Rock-NRoll), www.themightyquinnband.com/AT THE COLONYThe Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. 561-659-8100 or 561-6555430; www.thecolonypalmbeach.com.Copeland Davis 5:30-9:30 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday in the restaurantLenny Zinni 5:30-9:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday in the restaurantJazz Trio 5:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday in the restaurantMotown Fridays 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Royal RoomLive Jazz Brunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. AT CORAL SKY Coral Sky Amphitheatre, 601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. 561-7958883; www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre. com or www.livenation.com.Dierks Bentley Mountain High Tour 2018 Sept. 14Niall Horan: Flicker World Tour 2018 Sept. 23Lady Antebellum & Darius Rucker Summer Plays Sept. 29AT THE GARDENSThe Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-775-7750; www.thegardensmall.com.Kids Club Space Party 10 a.m.noon Sept. 15, Kids Clubhouse, Nordstrom Court. Star-related activities with the South Florida Science Center. RSVP at Eventbrite.com AT THE KELSEYThe Kelsey Theater, 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 561-328-7481; www.thekelseytheater.com or www.holdmyticket.com. Rebel Scum Burlesque: A Science Fiction Parody 8 p.m. Sept. 14-15.Kelsey Custom Getdown Car Show and Block Party 4-8 p.m. Sept. 29. Free. Ghost Hunt at Kelsey Theater 8 p.m. Sept. 29. AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-832-7469; www.kravis.org.Brian Regan Sept. 20My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra Sept. 27-Oct. 14Lightwire Theater: The Ugly Duckling 10 a.m. Sept. 29AT THE LIGHTHOUSEJupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Lighthouse Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. 561-747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org.Free admission in September: As a Blue Star Museum, active duty U.S. military and their immediate families, are admitted free year-round. Valid U.S. military ID required. Love our locals: Each Wednesday in September, Palm Beach and Martin County adult residents get in free. Children admitted at the regular rate. Lighthouse Sunset Tours Sept. 19, weather permitting. Spectacular sunset views and an inside look at the nuts & bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. Tour time: 75 minutes. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. RSVP required. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour Sept. 24 and Oct. 24. See the moon rise over the lighthouse. $20 members, $25 nonmembers. Twilight Yoga at the Light 7-8 p.m. Sept. 17 and 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29. By donation. Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, leads.AT THE IMPROVPalm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.comGary Owen Sept. 14-16Bob Marley Sept. 20-23Karlous Miller & Jasmin Brown AKA Toya Turnup Sept. 30AT THE JCCMandel Jewish Community Center, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens; 561712-5200; www.jcconline.com. Ongoing: Duplicate Bridge 12:30-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. $9 members; $11 guests. Timely Topics Discussion Group 10:30 a.m.-noon Mondays. Lively discussions. $4 drop-in fee. Bridge: Advanced Beginners Supervised Play 9:30-11:30 a.m. Mondays. $13 members; $15 guests Bridge: Intermediate Class 9:30-11:30 a.m. and 1:30-3:30 p.m. Thursdays. $13 members; $15 guests Bridge: Advanced Beginners Supervised Play 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Fridays, $13 members; $15 guests. Special events: JBiz Networking Group 7:309 a.m. Sept. 14. Get breakfast and make new business connections. Free. Open to the community. Ladies of Literature: American Pastoral, by Phillip Roth 10 a.m. Sept. 26. Join other women who love to read and discuss literature. $5 dropin fee. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-575-2223; www. jupitertheatre.org.Single Tickets $60 and up on sale now to the following shows: Steel Magnolias Oct. 28 Nov. 11 Beauty and the Beast Nov. 27 Dec. 16 Mamma Mia! Jan. 15 Feb. 10 A Dolls House, Part 2 Feb. 24-March 10 West Side Story March 26-April 14ONGOING American German Club of the Palm Beaches 5111 Lantana Road, Lake Worth. www.americangermanclub.com or 561-967-6464, Ext 2.The Armory Art Center 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-8321776; www.armoryart.org.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 TOP PICKS #SFL Dierks Bentley Mountain High Tour 2018 Sept. 14, Coral Sky Amphitheatre. 561-795-8883; www. westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com or www.livenation.com #HAHA #CAMPY Gary Owen Sept. 1416, Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace. 561-833-1812; www. palmbeachimprov.comNew & Now: Work By New Faculty Through Oct. 12. Opening reception: Sept. 14. A gallery walk and talk takes place Oct. 6.Artists Eye Gallery Boutique 604 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth. Hours: Noon 4 p.m. Tuesday Sunday. www. lwartleague.org or 561-586-8666.The Audubon Society Bird walk info: asetripinfo@gmail.com; 508-2960238. www.auduboneverglades.org. Bird walks: Frenchmans Forest 8 a.m. Sept. 15. Moderate difficulty. Leaders: Melanie and Steve Garcia. Spanish River Park 8 a.m. Sept. 16. Easy walk along boardwalk or paved level surfaces. Associated cost, see website. Leaders: Linda McCandless and Kathy Walters Wakodahatchee 5-7 p.m. Sept. 22. Easy along boardwalk or paved level surface. Family friendly and disabled accessible. Leader: Valleri Brauer. Juno Dunes 8 a.m. Sept. 23. A challenging walk on unimproved trails and uneven, rocky, and/or wet surfaces. Leaders: Melanie and Steve Garcia The Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre Village Shoppes of North Palm Beach, 133 U.S. 1, Suite 115, North Palm Beach. Regularly scheduled classes are $30 per week or $100 per month. 561-743-9955; www.burtreynoldsinstitute.orgClasses offered: Intermediate Acting for age 8 and older Junior Acting and Improv for age 8 and older Fundamentals of Acting Improvisation Plus for adults Creative Writing for serious writers Specialty classes such as the OnCamera Workshop, Monologue Techniques and Teleprompter Proficiency are available on a rotating basis.CityPlace 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-366-1000; www. cityplace.com Sunday Yoga at the Culture Lab: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday. A Vinyasa yoga class. By donation. Register at www. cityplace.com/events/culturelabyoga. Assemblage: An Organically Grown Exhibition: Noon to 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. $5 Ticket Tuesdays at AMC Theaters CityPlace AMC Stubs members (its free to join) entitle you to $5 tickets on Tuesdays. With the $5 Cameo Combo get a savory popcorn and Coca-Cola, its a cheap date day or night at $10. Feeding South Florida Food Drive Through Sept. 30. Donate three non-perishable food items at Guest Services and get four hours of free parking in one of the CityPlace garages. Live music: 7:30 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Sept. 14: Mister Trombone Band; Soul & Funk Sept. 15: Khemistry; Top 40s Sept. 21: Southern Sounds Sept. 22: Lauren Echo & the Living Room Band; R&B/Soul Rock Sept. 28: Jam Band; Top 40s Sept. 29: Bryant Del Toro; Funk & RockDowntown at the Gardens 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-340-1600; www. downtownatthegardens.com. A Magical Night to Fight Hunger 6 p.m. Sept. 27. A three-course dinner with proceeds benefiting the Palm Beach County Food Band. Friday Night Live 6-9 p.m. Fridays. Family-friendly concerts in Centre CourtFeminism in Flux Through Nov. 1, the Grand Hall Gallery at Compass Community Center, 201 N. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth. On display through Nov. 1. Call to schedule tours: 786-5211199. Email: ActivistArtistA@gmail.com.The Historical Society of Palm Beach County and The Richard And Pat Johnson History Museum 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. 561-832-4164; www.hspbc.org Building Paradise: Addison Mizners Legacy Through June 29. Remembering the Storm of Sept. 17-Jan. 5.John D. MacArthur Beach State Park 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, Singer Island, North Palm Beach. 7767449; www.macarthurbeach.org. International Coastal Clean Up 8 a.m.-noon Sept. 15. Participate in the worlds largest volunteer effort for our oceans and waterways. Birding at MacArthur Park 8:30 a.m. Sept. 16. A ranger-led educational walk identifying many species of birds. Free but reservations required at 561-624-6952. Bluegrass Music Untold Riches 1-3 p.m. Sept. 16. Free. National Public Lands Day Sept. 22. The Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free the first Saturday of the month and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 561-746-3101; www.LighthouseArts.org.North Palm Beach Library 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. 561841-3383; www.village-npb.org. Ongoing: Knit & Crochet at 1 p.m. Mondays; Quilters meet 10 a.m. Friday; Chess group meets at 9 a.m. the first and third Saturday. The Palm Beach Gardens City Hall Lobby 10500 N. Military Trail. Exhibit hours are Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. 561-630-1100 or go to pbgrec.com/ gardensart. Wet & Wild Water Media Journey A solo exhibition by artist Tammy Seymour on display through Oct. 4. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-253-2600; www.workshop.org. The 22nd Annual Members Juried Exhibition 2018 Through Oct. 27. The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every day. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 561-533-0887; www.palmbeachzoo.org National Drive Electric Week Wrap-Up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 15. See cars and learn all about electric cars, how they drive, what they cost to run, and how to help the environment from EV experts. Brew2 at the Zoo Sept. 22. Age 21 and older. The South Florida Fairgrounds 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. 561-793-0333; www.southfloridafair.com. Yesteryear Village, A Living History Park Learn what life was like in South Florida before 1940. Hours are 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Tickets: $10 adults, $7 seniors age 60 and older, $7 children age 5-11, and free for younger than age 5. Info: 561-7953110 or 561-793-0333.The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Info: 561-832-1988; www.sfsciencecenter.org. AREA MARKETSSinger Island Green & Artisan Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Singer Islands Ocean Walk, 2401 Ocean Ave. along scenic A1A. Pet and kid friendly. www.singerislandgreenmarket.com.Lake Worth High School Flea Market 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. Info: 561-439-1539.Tiki Market 4-7 p.m. Sundays at the Rivera Beach Marina, 190 E. 13th St., West Palm Beach. Food and Caribbean merchandise. Vendors wanted. 561-844-3408.Jupiter Farmers Market at El Sol 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, yearround, 106 Military Trail, Jupiter. 561-2835856; www.Jupiterfarmersmarket.com.Waterfront Market at Harbourside Place 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays along the waterfront. Yoga class at 10 a.m. Live music at noon. Free parking. Pet friendly. www.harboursideplace.comRust Market 9 a.m.-1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month in the parking area at Kelsey Vintage, 748B Park Ave., Lake Park. Vendors of vintage and collectible items and decor, clothing, jewelry, artisan pieces. Brunch, beer and mimosas available from Brick N Barrel. Free parking. Next market: Sept. 15. www. kelseyvintage.com CALENDAR 9.20 Brian Regan Sept. 20, Kravis Center. 561-832-7469; www.kravis. org 9.14 Rebel Scum Burlesque: A Science Fiction Parody 8 p.m. Sept. 14-15, The Kelsey Theater. 561-328-7481; www.thekelseytheater.com or www.holdmyticket.com

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGiven that statistics suggest October and November releases are the most likely to win major Oscars, its possible that the next Best Picture Oscar winner is included below. So, let the Oscar bait begin. Remember, release dates are subject to change, but youll want to keep this lighthearted preview handy to know what to look for. Sept. 14The Predator Yet another Predator movie, this time following the efforts of soldiers and a science teacher as they fight off the titular villain after a kid welcomes it to Earth. Damn kids. A Simple Favor Bridesmaids director Paul Feig helms this crime drama in which Anna Kendrick tries to figure out why Blake Lively disappears from their small town. It begs the question: If Blake Lively disappeared from Hollywood, would anyone notice? White Boy Rick Matthew McConaughey stars as the father of a street hustler, drug kingpin and FBI informant. Nothing about that seems all right all right all right. Sept. 21The House With A Clock In Its Walls This adaptation of John Bellairs novel stars Jack Black and Cate Blanchett, and was directed by horror maestro Eli Roth. With the PG rating, it seems the only thing horrific about it is its title! Fahrenheit 11/9 Documentarian Michael Moore goes full throttle on President Trump, no doubt similar to what he did to George W. Bush in Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004). The Sisters Brothers Its a western starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Joaquin Phoenix as brothers who are assassins, but its title has me thinking about how our mothers have fathers, aunts have uncles, etc. Colette Keira Knightley often plays trailblazing women, and this is no exception. As the title character, whos perhaps best known today as the author of Gigi, she writes for her husband, then for herself, and has relationships with women in early 1900s Paris. Sept. 28Night School Kevin Harts Teddy needs his GED, and Tiffany Haddish (Girls Trip) plays his teacher. If youre familiar with these two, youll likely find this idea funny; if not, never mind. Smallfoot Heres a twist: The animated tale is about a Yeti (voice of Channing Tatum) who hears there is a new, potentially dangerous creature living near his tribe: Humans. The Old Man & The Gun Robert Redfords final performance! The 81-year-old plays a bank robber who falls for Sissy Spacek while being chased by a detective (Casey Affleck).Oct. 5Venom Theyve given a Spider-Man villain, Venom, him/its own movie. This is not a Marvel Cinematic Universe release, so heres hoping its better than the last time Sony put Venom on screen in SpiderMan 3 in 2007. A Star Is Born Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga step into the lead roles of a story thats been filmed three times before. The good news is the trailers and buzz are cause for excitement!Oct. 12First Man Damien Chazelle follows up his Oscar-winning La La Land with Ryan Gosling as astronaut Neil Armstrong and the story of Apollo 11. Its the movie Im most looking forward to this awards season. Bad Times At The El Royale The El Royale is the kind of 1960s hotel you check into, but may not check out of. Jon Hamm, Cynthia Erivo, Jeff Bridges, Chris Hemsworth and Dakota Johnson are among the guests in this twisty crime thriller. Beautiful Boy Call Me By Your Names Timothy Chalamet plays a drug addict whose story is recalled through the eyes of his father, played by Steve Carell. Expect tears and pathos, and possibly Oscar noms for both. Oct. 19Halloween Its a direct sequel to the original Halloween (1978), and Jamie Lee Curtis returns with David Gordon Green directing. If nothing else Green knows that, heck, it cant be worse than any of the other Halloween sequels! Serenity Matthew McConaughey again, this time as Anne Hathaways ex. They conspire to kill her current husband. It makes you wonder if her character has any friends at all.Oct. 26Johnny English Strikes Again This is the first time Rowan Atkinsons Johnny English has struck anything since he was Reborn in 2011.Nov. 2The Nutcracker And The Four Realms Its about time somebody brought this story to the big screen during the holidays. Bohemian Rhapsody Is this the story of Freddie Mercurys real life? Or is it just fantasy? This Queen biopic as well as Rami Maleks performance as Mercury is guaranteed to rock you. Nobodys Fool Of all the movies opening this fall, this is the most likely to be immediately profitable. Why? Because Tyler Perry made it, and his films almost always turn a profit on opening weekend. Boy Erased Russell Crowe and Nicole Kidman play religious parents who send their homosexual son (Lucas Hedges) to gay conversion therapy. Proof the question to be begged: Has such therapy ever worked for anyone, ever? Suspiria Yup, theyve remade Dario Argentos horror classic, and its Call Me By Your Name director Luca Guadagnino whos done it.Nov. 9The Girl In The Spiders Web Lisbeth Salander lives, just not in a story written by the late Stieg Larsson. The film, based on the book of the same name by David Lagercrantz, stars The Crowns Claire Foy as Lisbeth and Swedish actor Sverir Gudnason as Mikael Blomkvist. The Grinch Benedict Cumberbatch voices The Grinch in this new animated interpretation that no one asked for. The Front Runner Hugh Jackman doesnt sing or slash people with Wolverine claws in this story of Gary Harts ill-fated and scandalous 1988 presidential campaign. Directed by Jason Reitman (Juno). Holmes And Watson Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly play the detective duo in this Sherlock spoof. Ralph Fiennes is Moriarty. Nov. 16Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes Of Grindelwald The second Harry Potter prequel finds Newt (Eddie Redmayne) and Dumbledore (Jude Law) squaring off against Grindelwald (Johnny Depp). Widows Director Steve McQueens follow-up to Years A Slave follows four women whose dead husbands leave them in debt, so they take matters into their own hands. Viola Davis, Daniel Kaluuya, and Michelle Rodriguez star. The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs Youll be excited to learn this is a Joel and Ethan Coen (Fargo) film, but that will be dampened upon discovering that it was intended to be a Netflix anthology series and was edited down to two hours and 12 minutes.Nov. 23Ralph Breaks The Internet The Wreck-It-Ralph sequel follows Ralph (voice of John C. Reilly) going into the internet (as opposed to video games). Disney princesses have a much talked about cameo. Creed II This sequel to the surprisingly stellar Creed follows Adonis (Michael B. Jordan) as he fights Ivan Dragos son, Viktor (Florian Munteanu). Remember: Ivan killed Adonis father, Apollo.Nov. 30If Beale Street Could Talk Barry Jenkins follows up his Oscarwinning Moonlight with this adaptation of the James Baldwin novel. For the record, La La Land is still better than Moonlight.Dec. 7Mary, Queen Of Scots Saoirse Ronan is Mary Stuart, and Margot Robbie is her rival Elizabeth I in this drama that chronicles their relationship. Both women were Best Actress nominees last year, and if this is as good as it looks, they may well be again this year.Dec. 14Backseat Christian Bale stars as Dick Cheney in the latest from Adam McKay (The Big Short) that also includes Amy Adams as wife Lynne Cheney, Sam Rockwell as George W. Bush and Steve Carell as Donald Rumsfeld. Dec. 19Mary Poppins Returns Twenty years later, Mary Poppins (Emily Blunt) returns to find a grown Jane (Emily Mortimer) and Michael (Ben Whishaw), and a family in need of her magical help once again. Meryl Streep, Lin Manuel Miranda and Dick Van Dyke also star.Dec. 21Aquaman We know director James Wan (Furious 7) can handle the action. The reality, though, is that all DC Comics Extended Universe movies not named Wonder Woman have been disappointments, and the trailers give little reason for optimism. Bumblebee If the Transformers movies have been losing money, why does Paramount think a spinoff would be a success? Welcome To Marwen Fantasy and reality merge once again for Robert Zemeckis (Who Framed Roger Rabbit?) in this story of a man (Steve Carell) who uses photography and figurines to recover from a brutal attack. This is the third Carell movie this season!Dec. 25On The Basis Of Sex Biopic of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg starring Felicity Jones as Ruth and Armie Hammer as Ruths husband, Marty. Along with the doc RBG earlier this year, the Notorious RBG continues to create headlines in her mid-80s. MOVIESFrom page 1

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 B7 FLORIDA WRITERSBlood, bullets, brutality abound in latest from Jeffery HessTushhog by Jeffery Hess. Down & Out Books. 330 pages. Trade paperback, $17.95.Set in 1981 in Fort Myers and nearby Lehigh Acres, Jeffery Hess second Scotland Ross novel abounds in blood, bullets and brutality. Rival crime cadres vie for power, alliances are reshaped and conditions are such that not taking sides can be an act of courage. Scotland, still mourning the death of his young son, is preoccupied with trying to achieve a life on the right side of the law, but all around him forces are at work to push him over to the wrong side. Though he has a sense of right and wrong, Scotland has a history of poor choices. Also, he has difficulty in checking his instinctive reactions to situations that come his way. Does he have a girlfriend? Well, of course. What would a tall, trim, muscular dude be without a beautiful girlfriend? Gorgeous Kyla, his sexy drummer girl, has an independent streak that makes Scotland nervous. He wants to take care of her to keep her safe. But she has other ideas. Kyla is a fine character, and readers can hope she has a future in Mr. Hess future Scotland Ross installments. Like all of us, Kyla keeps secrets. Finding the balance of intimacy and independence is difficult for both her and Scotland, and the author paints their ups and downs with convincing precision. For an action novel, this one has a lot of talk. Ordinarily, I would find dialogue this detailed and prolonged out of balance with the other elements of storytelling. But Mr. Hess has a flair for orchestrating the v arious voices (characters) he has created, individualizing them and giving their interplay rhythm and force. The voices project social class, ethnicity, education and personal style. Its mostly a southern smorgasbord, with a bit of New York and Cuba thrown in depending upon which part of the novels criminal spectrum is being represented. Like many a good guy, Scotland gets into trouble by trying to help someone else. A former Navy man, he tries to navigate the streams of criminal interest (violence, drugs, theft, intimidation) that swirl around him, but he can barely keep his head above water. His good heart, his loyalty, his courage and his physical prowess are all on display. Numerically and in other ways, however, the odds seem against him. His lack of caution is also a handicap. When Kyla becomes a hostage in the game, the stakes grow higher and higher. Mr. Hess provides fight scenes galore that build into a frenzy of carnage. Almost like a second language, fight seems to be bred into the culture that has penetrated Scotland Ross. In the front matter of the book, the author defines his title for us: A Southern male who always finishes fights. Several of the characters are unforgettable. These include Cara Quemada, Gator Doug and Luno Luzazzi. In a way, this muscular exercise in Florida noir is also a kind of comingof-age tale. Scotland Ross adolescence has, from one perspective, been delayed way too long. Its time for him to grow up, and he knows it. He takes some giant steps forward in this novel, but he still has a long way to go. Mr. Hess makes Scotlands unsteady progress fascinating and largely admirable. I cant help but root for him. About the authorAside from Tushhog, Jeffery Hess is the author of Beachhead, which launched the Scotland Ross series, and a story collection titled, Cold War Canoe Club. Both earlier books were reviewed in these pages. Also, he is the editor of the award-winning anthologies Home of the Brave: Stories in Uniform and Home of the Brave: Somewhere in the Sand. Prior to earning a masters in creative writing from Queens University of Charlotte and a bachelors in English from the University of South Florida, he served aboard the Navys oldest and newest ships. He has published numerous short stories that recall this period of his life. Mr. Hess has held writing positions at a daily newspaper, a Fortune 500 company and a university-based research center. He leads the Tampa-based DD-214 Writers Workshop for military veterans. Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. philJASONphiljreviews@gmail.com HESS Call Today and Pay Nothing for Your Birthday Month !* Theres always excitement in the air at HarborChase. Here, youll happily immerse yourself in a daily calendar of exhilarating social events, incredible learning opportunities, invigorating tness classes and fun recreational experiences. Its enough to make you feel like dancing! Embrace the Rhythm of Life. HarborChase oers: Seasonal menus created by award-winning Chefs Generous amenities Energizing experiences and social events daily Scheduled transportation Central Gardens Circle Palm Beach Gardens, FL btbnf www.HarborChasePalmBeachGardens.com ALFb tnt Palm Beach Gardens *Expires //. New residents only. AL only. Some restrictions may apply.

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY be basking in the musical calisthenics that characterize the band, performed by the tribute group Chain Reaction from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 16, at the Meyer Amphitheatre, 104 Datura St., West Palm Beach. Both events are free. Bring your own blankets and chairs for seating and pack a picnic or pick up take-out downtown. For more information, visit www. wpb.org/events.Brew2 at the ZooThe Palm Beach Zoo is hosting a beer tasting with more than 25 brewers and 60 different beers on Sept. 22. All the beer is local brewed within 100 miles of West Palm Beach. Youll also meet some animals and enjoy live music in Fountain Plaza by Spider Cherry. This event is for age 21 and older. General admission is $40, which includes a collectible sampling mug and samples from 25 breweries. Additional food is available for purchase. VIP admission is $70 which also includes early entry at 5:30 p.m., special VIP only samples, a Tshirt and free food by Flanigans Seafood in the Tropics Caf from 5:30-8 p.m. Ask about the special deal for designated drivers. For more information, visit www. palmbeachzoo.org.Attention dancers! The Kravis Center for the Performing Arts will be hosting auditions for the Magnifique Winter Intensive Oct. 14 from 1-3:30 p.m. Students who are selected will participate in the Magnifique Winter Intensive, taking place Jan. 2-6. The intensive will give dancers a chance to train with ballet dancers and instructors from France in the pure tradition of lEcole Francaise (the French School). Auditions for dancers in grades 4-6 will take place from 1 to 2 p.m. and auditions for grades 7-12 will take place from 2 to 3:30 p.m. The audition fee is $35. The 5-day Magnifique Winter Intensive tuition is $495. To register, call 561-651-4251 or visit www.parisballetdance.com. Let them eat cake! September is Hunger Action Month and TooJays wants everyone to eat a piece of cake, and not just because they sell cake. If you eat a slice of cake from TooJays famous bakery during September, TooJays will donate $1 to Feeding Florida. Its part of Hunger Action Month and TooJays Too+You partnership with Feeding Florida, which has raised almost $20,000 to fight food insecurity in Florida. Experts estimate that one in six people dont know what or where theyll eat dinner today. A lot of those hungry stomachs belong to kids. Eat a piece of cake, feed a few kids. Feeding Florida is a statewide network of Feeding America food banks, and every dollar donated provides 11 meals through the Feeding Florida network. Guests can also make donations by rounding up their checks in September. For more information, visit www. TooJays.com. ty event of the year, Rendezvous at the Light, is set t o take place Saturday, Nov. 17. Toast the Jewel of Jupiter at this anticipated, twilight occasion, with a special program, food, live music and fabulous silent auction. Steve Weagle, chief meteorologist, WPTV-News Channel 5, will serve as emcee. $75 per person; $700 package of 10. Tickets online are available for purchase beginning Sept. 3. On Dec. 7, the lighthouse will host its Holiday Movie Night, screening White Christmas outdoors by the water. Bring lawn chairs; food and drink will be available for purchase. Tickets $5. Online sales begin Nov. 1. Sea Fest for Kids, the lighthouses annual celebration of all things maritime, music and fun, offers a family day on the waterfront, with sea-inspired education and adventures for kids to celebrate Jupiters coastal heritage and history. Its 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 23. Adults, $10; children, free. The Wild & Scenic Film Festival returns April 13, with international short films. Admission: $15. There also are admission specials for members of the military and local residents. Year-round, members of the U.S. military and their families are recognized with free regular daytime admission to the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, with ID. Every Wednesday through Sept. 30, the lighthouse offers free admission to adult residents of Martin and Palm Beach counties, with ID. Children are admitted at regular price. In November, U.S. veterans receive free regular daytime admission, with ID. Programs and exhibits offered to visitors throughout the year include Twilight Yoga at the Light, Sunset and Moonrise Tours, Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids, Lighthouse Book Club and Hike Through History. Now, with paid admission, visitors can choose to Tour Your Way with the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museums signature mobile app. Guided, docent tours available daily, with registration. For more information about the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, visit: www.jupiterlighthouse.org, or call: 561-747-8380. LIGHTHOUSEFrom page 1HAPPENINGSFrom page 1 PUZZLE ANSWERS Take the challenge now: Enter our writing contestI try to leave out the parts that people skip. Elmore Leonard Welcome to Part 4 of the 2018 Florida Weekly Writing Challenge. The photo of the red door you see here is the final of four prompts that make up this years contest. Wordsmiths who accept our challenge have until midnight Sunday, Sept. 30, to send us a story inspired by the image. Parts 1, 2 and 3 of the contest are closed, and we have received 325 entries to date. Here are the rules: If you submitted something for Parts 1 and/or 2, great. Thank you. You are also welcome to take us up on Parts 3 and 4 of the challenge. But please limit your output to one per prompt. Keep your narrative (no poetry) to 750 words. Only one offering per prompt, please. Give it a title and run it through Spellcheck. Put your full name, phone number and city/state you live in at the end of your masterpiece. Send it, either attached as a Word document or simply pasted into the body of the email, to writing@floridaweekly.com. Snail mail offerings will not be considered. Our editors look forward to reviewing the entries and selecting one winner, whose author will receive a ticket to the 13th annual Sanibel Island Writers Conference (value: $500). With keynote speaker and New York Times bestselling author Ann Hood (She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, An Italian Wife, Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine, An Ornithologists Guide to Life and The Obituary Writer, among others), the conference is set for Nov. 8-11 on Sanibel Island. The 2018 Florida Weekly Writing Challenge winner will be notified by Oct. 15, and the winning entry will be published in all our editions. Questions? Email writing@floridaweekly.com and well get back to you. BETTY WELLS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 PUZZLESTECH COMPANY CLOSINGS HOROSCOPES VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone in authority might decide to select you as a candidate for a project that carries more responsibilities. Be prepared to show why youre the right choice for the job. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) That new workplace problem should be dealt with as soon as possible. Leaving it unresolved for too long could lead to an even more unsettling and timeconsuming situation. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You might have to do some fancy juggling to keep both your work responsibilities and personal obligations on track. But ultimately, youll work it all out, as you always do. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You might hear some upsetting things about a situation in your life. But dont be swayed by talk. Demand proof before making any decisions on the matter. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Dont risk depleting those precious energy levels by taking on more tasks than you can realistically handle. Also, remember to ask for help when you need it. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) It might be difficult for the Aquarian who is used to giving advice to take counsel when offered. But its a good idea to listen to what trusted friends feel you should know. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Things might be a little unsettled as you move through a period of reassessment. But once you get your priorities sorted out, you should be ready to tackle an important decision. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The changing season brings new experiences as well as challenges for the ever-adventurous Aries. Your social life expands, as do the opportunities at your workplace. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) That recent period of uncertainty has passed. You now can feel more confident about making decisions, especially those that relate to an important personal relationship. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Although you might be faced with a number of tasks on your to-do list, try to take time out to enjoy the arts. Music, especially, can be soothing to the sensitive soul of a Gemini. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A disagreement with a colleague or friend is best resolved with open and frank discussion. Trying to force the other party to see things your way is bound to backfire. LEO (July 23 to August 22) That Leonine pride might be ruffled by a colleagues challenge to one of your pet ideas. But stop growling and listen. You could learn something that will work to your advantage. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre able to achieve a happy balance in your productive life by never feeling overwhelmed or underappreciated. SEE ANSWERS, B8 SEE ANSWERS, B8 By Linda Thistle SUDOKUDifficulty level:Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Jazz in the Gardens coming to arts centerPGA Arts Center is getting into the swing of things this fall. Jazz in the Gardens is a new weekly, live jazz-music series that will be held 5:30-8:30 p.m. each Friday at the PGA Arts Center, 4076 PGA Blvd., just east of Interstate 95 in Palm Beach Gardens. The first concert, set for Sept. 14, features internationally known trumpeter Carle Wayne Vickers and Syracuse, N.Y.-based pianist Mark Doyle. Tickets are $15 and include hors doeuvres. Parking is free, and beer and wine will be available for sale. The series was created by the South Florida Society for Arts & Culture and is seeking weekly sponsors, food and merchandise vendors and, going forward, jazz performers. For more information, call 561-840-5351 or visit www. southfloridafinearts.org. 4O7 Northwood Rd. | West Palm Beach, FL 334O7 | 561.847.4O85 www.huttonnorthwood.com Palm Beach Illustrated Best New Restaurant Nominee!FOODFORFOODIES!Live Music Friday, Saturday and Sunday Daily Happy Hour!Valet Parking AvailableMon-Thurs 4-9 | Fri-Sat 4-10 Sunday Brunch 11-4 Sunday Dinner 4-9

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYCraft Beer Bash, PGA National, Palm Beach Gardens 1. Aaron Otto, Brittany Otto, Kelly Dunn and Steve Dunn 2. Crystal Foreman and Christina Simmons 3. Becca Hansen, Kim Jalm, Johnnie Hubbard, Lauren Syverson and Janina Jeffs 4. Allison Frankiewillz and Colby Deen 5. Christie Graham-Southards and Kym Federer 6. Franca Vassalotti, Dorita Deveney, Randy Vas, Valarie Vas, James King, Jeana Colby and Paul Colby 7. Erika Balser, John Metzger and Dustin Balser 8. Lief Broberg and Sedrick Aiken 9. Alex Milton and Carol Waldenburg 10. Madysen Graham and Ryan Reeves 11 Kerry Potts and Elton Potts 12. Jay Brandli and Anne Brandli 13. Patti Contartesi, Mike Butler, Nicole Ferris and Jeremy Ferris 14. Andrew Egitto, Cristyle Egitto, Chris Sbei and Alex Le Clainche 15. Robby Sklar, Tali Rosman, Jenn Gonzalez and Natalie Sklar 16. Casey Runner, David Runner, Lyndsey Vaz and Danny Vaz 17. Pat Bloebaum, Kari Bloebaum, Leslie Soufis, Jeremy Ferris and Nicole Ferris 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13-19, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11In the kitchen with...THOMAS OPT HOLT, 50 Ocean, Delray Beach BY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@floridaweekly.comThe Dish: Smoked Polish Kielbasa The Place: The Butcher Shop Beer Garden and Grill, 209 Sixth St., West Palm Beach. Phone 561-812-2336; www. butchershopbeergarden.com. The Price: $12 The Details: This started out as pierogi, but we ate those bad boys too quickly, and failed to get a proper photo. So we moved on, thankfully, to the smoked kielbasa. As are all the sausages, its made in-house, this one is flavored with garlic and marjoram, then smoked, and grilled up and served on a pretzel stick/ bun. Its served with the tangy housemade mustard, caramelized onions and sauerkraut also quite tasty. Add crisp hand-cut fries for $2. With a nice craft beer selection, many local, to quaff along with it, its a package. Sharing? Go for the sausage platter and ask for a kielbasa on it with three other sausages for $30. Fun beer garden out back in decent weather, and up front is a real butcher shop to get take-home meats. And pierogies. Tip of the day: They have an extended Happy Hour till 8 p.m. Deals abound and you get out without wallet burn. J an Norris, jnorris@florida weekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus Flavor Palm Beach restaurants A trio worth noting3JANSTHREE FOR2 COOLA FISHBARLegacy Place, 11340 Legacy Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-622-2227; www.coolafishbar.com. Fish lovers, land your Flavor deal here. The three-course dinner is $35. Start with coconut curry mussels or maybe the hot crab and artichoke dip, then try the coconut-crusted catch of the day with two sides, or the yellowtail almondine or a grilled rainbow trout with macadamia nut pesto. Save room for the peanut butt er pie for dessert. 1 III FORKSMidtown, 4645 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-630-3660; www.3forks.com. Their deal for the $45 dinner is three courses. Start with a pork belly on a buttermilk biscuit, get a steakhouse wedge salad, and wind up with a filet mignon, blackened snapper or double-cut pork chop. Its a friendly steakhouse experience at a reasonable price. Youll find a nice wine list here, too.3 CAF CHARDONNAY4533 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-627-2662; www.cafechardonnay.com. Whats unique about Caf Chardonnay is that its Flavor menu changes weekly. A recent one featured escargot casserole, or pan-seared scallop with pork belly among appetizer choices; beef bourguignon, pan-seared swordfish or a Duroc pork chop Valdostano as entrees and warm chocolate truffle or lemon blueberry cake for dessert. Three courses are $35. The wine bar makes a nice waiting room. Jan Norris, jnorris@floridaweekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE COURTESY PHOTO The wine cellar at III Forks is impressive. Youll want to order a glass or a bottle to enjoy with your dinner special JAN NORRIS / FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTOThomas Opt Holt came to South Florida from Chicago. Note: These are special menus in the Flavor Palm Beach program honored through September. For the details, go to www.flavorpb.com. Like so many of the diners who frequent 50 Ocean, Executive Chef Thomas Opt Holt cant help but be blown away by the restaurants spectacular ocean view. The view is so incredible, says Chef Opt Holt, who has been at the popular eatery almost a year. I marvel at it every day. There are not a lot of places like it between Fort Lauderdale and Jupiter, so thats sort of amazing. No one can be blamed for admiring the vista from 50 Ocean, perched upstairs from Bostons On the Beach, an iconic seaside bar and restaurant in Delray Beach for 35 years. But for Chef Opt Holt, born and raised in Chicago, that view, and all it says about the Sunshine State, was a big impetus for his move to Florida five years ago. Like so many northerners, he had grown weary of chilly winters. One night the tires on my Hyundai Sonata froze to the street, he says. I got in the car and started the engine, but my tires wouldnt even move. Eventually, with the help of a neighbor and a pickaxe, Chef Opt Holt extricated his vehicle. I remember thinking that I was done with it. Winters in Chicago, that is. A call about a job opportunity in Florida could not have come at a better time. That first position didnt work out so well, he says, but while he was doing cooking jobs he met a woman and decided to stay. He really enjoys being part of the Delray Beach dining scene. As a whole, the Delray community is more in tune with the national food trends, he says. Its really cool to find blocks, essentially, of upbeat and highend restaurants. But back to that great view at 50 Ocean. We know that our view is incredible, so we have to make our food that much more incredible, he says. Thats how I always explain it to our cooks. In my opinion, we have the best in all of Florida, and we want to make sure we live up to that. Guests say were consistent, which is so important. His first memory of cooking was as a boy making scrambled eggs on Saturday mornings, but he became more interested in culinary pursuits during home economics classes in middle school. A cooking instructor in high school pointed him to the Culinary Institute of America. When I was there (CIA) I didnt like cooking anymore, I loved cooking, and I was good at it, he says. I really enjoyed pushing myself to get better. In his spare time (and there isnt so much of that), Chef Opt Holt and his wife, Lauren, a banker, enjoy movies, cooking and playing on the beach with their dogs, Roscoe and Moxie. He wishes he were better at golf, but doesnt have much time to devote to the sport now. Thomas Opt Holt Age: 31 Original hometown: Chicago Restaurant: 50 Ocean, 50 S Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, 561-278-3364, www.50ocean.com. Open for lunch Monday-Friday, dinner daily and brunch on weekends. Mission: The continual pursuit of excellence and making fresh and approachable food. Cuisine: Florida seafood Training: The Culinary Institute of America at Hyde Park in New York. After working his way up through the ranks at various restaurants around Chicago, he moved to Florida. Whats your footwear of choice? Birkenstocks because they are comfortable. Ive worn them for more than a decade. Im always in Birkenstocks even outside of the kitchen. What advice would you give someone who wants to be a chef? I would advise them to work in a busy kitchen for a year before going to culinary school. The journey doesnt end with a degree. You have to keep learning every day. Lobstahs and Lagahs 50 Oc ean will host A S am Adams Social at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 20. Tickets: $85, excluding tax and gratuity. Reservations: 561-278-3364 or www.50ocean.com.

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So what exactly is Labiaplasty?Labiaplasty is an elective procedure, with little downtime, that reduces the size or corrects an asymmetry of the Labia Minora. Labiaplasty procedures have increased more than 200% over the past 5 years! Labiaplasty/Feminine Rejuvenation procedures are currently the fastest growing female elective procedure in the United States. WHY?...as women are becoming increasingly more comfortable talking about it and realizing the empowerment in optimizing and embracing their feminine health and intimacy. For their relationships... and for themselves.12650 World Plaza Lane, Building 72, Suite 1, Fort Myers, FL 33907239.243.8222 | UFirstHealth.com Rejuvenation LABIAPLASTY 101... LETS TALK ABOUT IT! ADVERTISEMENT | j *Individual results may vary.Is this procedure for you OR someone close to you? or pain during intercourse? Urinary Tract discomfort/ infections? outline through swimsuits, yoga pants, etc.? wearing fitted pants or clothing? awareness is holding you back? movements? If you answered YES, to any of these questions, we can help U!Does Dr. Anne perform Labiaplasty? 2 even elevated result.*P.S. Trust your lady parts with a woman...and a board certified woman...at that. (Who has been taking care of vaginas for nearly 20 years!) DR. ANNE LORD-TOMAS, D.O.AAAASF Certified Surgical Facility I am privileged to help women live and age well in all aspects of their wellness...healthy, empowered intimacy is no exception. Dr. Anne Dr. Anne has been in clinical practice for 18 years. She received her medical degree as a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from NSU in South Florida. Dr. Anne is co-partner and founder of U First Health & Rejuvenation/U First Surgical Center & U First MedSpa in SW Florida, alongside her husband, Dr. Robert Tomas. 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September 28th, 2018!OFFER ENDS FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then t he patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing to the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n a dmi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for olde r adults to and consiste ncy of ca especially h ard on pe tia who do m uch be familiar car egiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up thei favor of a Flor cohort of Boo hit their eigh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out wh not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e care? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ...

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