Citation
Florida weekly

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Title:
Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
Publisher:
Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
Language:
English
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1 online resource : ;

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Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
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AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

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TAKE ME TO Be prepared for an emergency. For your FREE rst aid kit, call 855.831.2803 Vol. VIII, No. 43 FREE Alliance of farmers, scientists and promoters share cautious optimism in fight to save Floridas citrus crop. Tesla Model 3 Performance whispers into warp-drive VinoOur wine columnist offers a few favorites worth savoring. B10 OPINION A4 BUSINESS A14 EARL STEWART A16 INVESTING A16 REAL ESTATE A17 FLORIDA WRITERS A18 ARTS B1 COLLECTING B2 CALENDAR B4-5 PUZZLES B9 VINO B10 CUISINE B11 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store.www.FloridaWeekly.comWEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 Drama laboratoriesA look at regional theaters national impact. B1 SEE TESLA, A6 Money & InvestingThe time is now to buy homebuilding and construction stocks. A14 Hollywood has teased us with views of optimistic futures, filled with vehicles that quickly hum down the streets. So while it seems a clich to call electric cars space age, the Tesla Model 3 really is that whisper-quiet machine, and the new Performance model is like a warp-drive upgrade. This is intended to be the most mainstream of the companys current threemodel lineup, and the design is a good SocietyHundreds attend PBCHRC Summer Soiree. A8 $2,000$8.645,000The price of growing citrus per acre in Florida. Billions of dollars lost in revenue from 2007 to 2016 due to greening. Workers employed in the citrus industry in Florida.BY THE NUMBERS: SEE ORANGE, A10 AYNE SIMMONS PARKED his Ford truck sporting a Drink Orange Juice tag on a dirt track near a 60-acre Hendry County grove of members of the Rue family (Rutaceae), which could appear in a hospital soap opera if they were W VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYWayne Simmons in his orange grove, observing the effects of greening.BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com BY MYLES KORNBLATTmk@autominded.com COURTESY PHOTOTesla rarely allows test drives of its new models. The future will catch up to Model 3.

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Before AfterCALL Today 561.575.5599Three Palms CenterPGAdentistryjupiter.comComplete Care in Our State-of-the-Art Facility $250VALUEComplimentary Consultation or 2nd OpinionIncludes Exam & Full-Mouth X-RayChange your smile, change your life!Dr. Joseph Russo is one of only 385 dentists worldwide to hold an Accreditation by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AAACD). He has extensive experience in helping patients who suffer with severely worn down teeth and TMJ pain. Dr. Russo has also earned certication by the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation (DOCS), allowing him to sedate his patients to a very relaxed and comfortable state during dental treatment. Now you can enjoy the life-changing benets of a beautiful smile and a comfortable bite that functions the way it should. COMMENTARYThe broadside harvestThe broadside harvest is coming in this year as robustly as the citrus harvest should, stuffed with political promises and attacks.Broadsides, like oranges, are the culmination of an elaborate process: Trees make the paper that forms the broadsides that hold the print that tout the claims that fill the trucks that transport all that political flatulence to the local branches of the United States Postal Service, that employs the hardworking men and women who deliver it to us. Just in time for the Florida primary elections, which culminate on Tuesday, Aug. 28, when Republicans and Democrats alike (or more accurately, unalike) complete casting ballots to decide who faces off in the general elections, come November. The broadsides will help them decide. When a candidate has no challenger from the other party, the primary itself determines the future. That happens in my neck of the woods from time to time because Democrats may no longer exist on the southwest coast although one was spotted trying to cross the highway at dusk by a wildlife biologist in the fall of 2016. The creature was described as limping, muttering, drooling and decidedly underfed, apparently having hallucinations. Floridas east coast is different, of course: Everybody has hallucinations, Republicans and Democrats alike. The motto of the U.S. Postal Service, meanwhile, remains unflinching in the face of this propaganda blizzard: Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds. Which is to deliver what amounts to mostly crap, every single day. That motto should be inscribed on every public building in Florida especially schools where many kids have never heard of snow or gloom of night, and houses of ill repute that depend on heat and gloom of night.Those include the Republican state house, various courthouses, all county government buildings, and police and sheriffs headquarters in each of 67 Florida counties.In her case, appointed rounds for my mail courier has meant weeks of daily deliveries stuffing Republican broadsides into my wooden mailbox. Im stunned in this digital age we still rely on the mail delivery and on paper, but we do. And a great deal of political paper this year seems to be heavily influenced by the gravity of Donald Trump. For example, this one: KEEP FLORIDAS VITAL SIGNS STRONG: Donald Trump Needs Dr. Julio Gonzalez. Beautifully produced on paper so stiff it could have been used to seal a roof leak, this broadside shows a smiling orthopedic surgeon from Venice standing next to a digital display of some pretty comforting vitals: Pulse 72, oxygen 98, respiration 22, blood pressure 126 over 72. Dr. Gonzalez, a Navy veteran, is challenging a lawyer and fellow Republican, state Sen. Greg Steube, an Army veteran, for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from District 17. The district includes Charlotte, DeSoto, Glades, Hardee, Highlands and Okeechobee counties in their entirety, as well as parts of Lee, Polk and Sarasota counties. The broadsides from both men insist the NRA adores them and they will champion guns; they will work to build Trumps wall; they will keep out immigrants crossing the border without permission or using resources in Florida; they will defend families, fight terrorists, and (I quit reading at this point, but there was more), probably bring Jesus back for the Second Coming. Sen. Steube, who championed more than 10 legislative bills designed to reduce or do away with any gun regulations last year, even appears in photos with guns on his hip or wearing military gear and clutching an M-4 held at port arms. Hes usually scowling and staring at something. One wants to whistle the theme song from The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. Then it gets interesting. Another broadside just as shiny and stiff pictures a scowling President Obama beside a scowling Hillary Clinton. It asks this question: What kind of Republican supports the most Liberal, Anti-Trump DEMOCRATS? The type is urine-yellow against a black background and the answer is on the flyers backside, above a picture of a haggard, jowly looking Julio Gonzalez: THIS KIND. Come to find out in the smaller print (which I did read) that Dr. Gonzalez gave Liberal Debbie Wasserman Schultz a personal check for $500. It was, he admitted, an effort to find new friends in the Democratic Party.That bastard. Just un-American.This kind of tension ramps up even more with state Rep. Matt Caldwell, who has spent the last six months or so campaigning across Florida to become commissioner of agriculture, a powerful position in state government now held by Republican gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam. Rep. Caldwell, long a supporter of Big Sugar and corporate agricultural interests who bills himself as a principled conservative, pushes all the right buttons on one broadside: A+ rated and endorsed by the NRA; Slashed taxes by over $10 billion; 100-percent rating by Florida Right To Life, among others.But he also wrote an op-ed piece published in The News-Press in Fort Myers, in March 2016 that included these words: I cannot in good conscience support Donald Trump for President I also cannot and will not vote for him in the general election.Thats trouble for Rep. Caldwell; either that, or his political enemies who printed and mailed that broadside, the Committee To Protect Florida, just gave him the win by also describing him as a Trump hater. Heres the strangest thing about the mountains of material I have from these Republicans. Almost none of them mention the single greatest threat Floridians have ever faced: Water, and the toxic, collapsing environment. roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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SEPTEMBER Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com Hands-Only CPR ClassTuesday, September 18 @ 6:30pm 7:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens Eective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has teamed up with Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue to provide free monthly CPR classes for the community. Classes will be held at Fire Station 1. Local EMS will give a handsonly, CPR demonstration and go over Automated External Debrillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Certication will not be provided. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL 855.857.9610.FREE Community Chair Yoga Class Class taught by Sara Chambers, RN, BSN, CYT Wednesday, September 5 or 19 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4 Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center now oers a chair yoga class for the community. The class will be taught by the assistant nurse manager of cardiac rehab, Sara Chambers, who is also a certied yoga instructor. Using the same techniques as traditional yoga, the class is modied to allow for gentle stretching, designed to help participants strengthen their muscles and work on their balance. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. Smoking Cessation ClassesWednesday, Aug. 22, 29 and Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26 @ 5:30pm 6:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 3 Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is teaming up with the Area Health Education Center to provide education on the health eects related to tobacco use, the benets of quitting and what to expect when quitting. A trained Tobacco Cessation Specialist guides participants as they identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms and brainstorms ways to cope with them. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. Depression and Epilepsy EFOF Support GroupLecture by neuropsychologist Monday, September 24 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 3 Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is teaming up with the Epilepsy Foundation of Florida to give patients and families the opportunity to engage with others living with seizures and dealing with the obstacles that come along with epilepsy. Attendees are encouraged to share their experiences and will be educated by guest speakers in the medical eld. This month, join a neuropsychologist for a lecture on depression and epilepsy. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGSFree Heart Attack Assessment Screenings (blood pressure, BMI, glucose and cholesterol) Wednesday, September 12 @ 7am 11am Classroom 3 Osteoporosis ScreeningsThursday, September 20 @ 9am 1pm Outpatient Entrance Cosmetic Procedures Lecture by Dr. Mark Pinsky, MD Plastic Surgeon Thursday, September 20 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4 Interested in having a cosmetic procedure, but dont know where to start? Join Dr. Mark Pinsky, a plastic surgeon on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center for a lecture on the following: RECEIVE AFREECOOKBOOK!new ller and injectable techniques breast body eyelid rejuvenation hand rejuvenation Reservations are required. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Light dinner and refreshments will be served.

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsLeslie Lilly Roger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Larry Bush Mary Thurwachter Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Gail V. Haines Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.com Production Manager Alisa Bowmanabowman@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Digital Advertising Manager\Gina Richeygina.richey@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez CirculationJean Louis Giovanny Marcelin Evelyn Talbot Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 Fax: 561.904.6456 Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $34.95 in-county $53.95 in-state $60.95 out-of-stateSubscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2018 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. OPINIONElections will say a lot about who we areOur votes this November will tell us who we want. But even more, they will tell us who we are. Donald Trump will not be on any ballot, yet he cant help being a major factor and the results of this election cant help being seen as an endorsement or repudiation of his malevolent presidency. Republican officeholders have had repeated chances to assert our best American principles and almost all have failed. With few exceptions, GOP congressional critics have been those leaving office. Those who want to stay have cowardly overlooked or capitulated to the present disgrace putting whats right and needed for the future of their country and party below their hunger to protect their careers at any cost. So this election will determine whether Congress counters Trump or further acquiesces in his debasement of our civil affairs. That is the critical issue. And thats primarily how candidates should be measured. Trumps base, likely a minority, will surely vote to affirm its mindless, fanatic devotion. But the crucial determinant will be whats decided by the majority of voters, who oppose Trump. We must elect to Congress those who will be unintimidated by Trump and resist his authoritarianism. And we must elect candidates with that same responsibility and backbone at all levels of government, for the disease of Trump can infect every part of public life, if we let it. Can we imagine any other president Democratic or Republican, liberal or conservative displaying such bombastic narcissism and embarrassing our country with international ineptness and petulant immaturity? And that raises more basic questions: What kind of country is this? What kind of people are we? What will we rationalize? And what do these times say about us? We must decide how long to tolerate incessant lying, bigoted fear-mongering, incorrigible incompetence and juvenile cruelty, or condone an evilly disposed president who immorally tore immigrant children from their parents and would deny immigrants the constitutional right of due process. We should not become so inured to Trumps defilement of our highest office that we normalize it or ignore the consequences of letting it hurtle unchecked. History will judge what we now do what we stand for when the tipping point could go either way. For this is a crossroads. The course we choose will reflect on us for generations, and future generations will commend or condemn what we did. It transcends differences of party or ideology. Its not a question of Democrats vs. Republicans or liberals vs. conservatives, where good, rational people can respectfully disagree and even compromise. Trump has made this election a profound choice of right vs. wrong, decency vs. depravity. In that spirit of moral imperative, Trumps opponents must advance whats right in decent ways, by advocating and voting not, as some adversaries prescribe, by imitating Trumps harassment and threats. If their methods amplify the madness, it will backfire. No matter what happens in November, our resilient country will survive. But will its international honor survive? Domestically, our civic ideals and democracy also will survive. But will they be strong or weak, triumphant or struggling? Ultimately, we, our countrys citizens, will emerge degraded or elevated whichever result we foster or allow. Defining moments come rarely in life. But when they come, they mark us for what we truly are. This midterm election is such a moment. Roger Buckwalter is a retired editorial page editor of The Jupiter Courier.The Turkish hostage crisisIts never a good idea to negotiate with a hostage-taker, but when its a NATO ally, there isnt much choice. The Trump administration has been trying to get back a Christian pastor detained in Turkey since October 2016, and when a possible deal at the sidelines of the NATO summit fell through, decided to drop the hammer. The administration sanctioned Turkeys justice and interior ministers remember, these are top officials of a fellow NATO country. The action hit the Turkish currency and stock market hard. Then President Donald Trump intervened in his inimitable style, with a tweet promising a doubling of aluminum and steel tariffs against the country and pointedly noting the drop in the value of the lira. As always, the presidents shoot-fromthe-lip style is open to question, but Turkey deserved every last character including the two exclamation points in that presidential tweet. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is not Justin Trudeau or Angela Merkel, a leader firmly within the liberal West who annoys Trump. Hes an Islamist authoritarian who is fundamentally changing the character of an erstwhile ally. Erdogans resort to hostage-taking as a tactic to gain leverage over allies its not just us is a barbarous throwback and a disgusting homage to rogue states like Iran and North Korea. He also has grabbed a Turkish-American NASA scientist and local employees of American consulates. The case against the pastor, the highest-profile case, is ludicrous. Andrew Brunson lived with his family in a seaside city, Izmir, for more than 20 years until the government, after Erdogan survived a coup, decided that he was guilty of aiding terrorist organizations and military espionage. The alleged supporting evidence is a collection of absurdities a video of a traditional Arab dish sent to Brunson by his daughter, a church member texting the pastor about missing a service, a photo of him with a man in a scarf bearing certain colors, and so on. What this clearly is about is holding Brunson to try to get Fethullah Gulen, a former Erdogan ally and cleric who lives on a farm in Pennsylv ania. With great fervency but little evidence, the Turkish government accuses Gulen of being behind the shadowy July 15, 2016, coup that became an occasion for Erdogan to seize emergency powers and purge the state and civil society of his political enemies. This isnt a trade the U.S. should be willing to make. Erdogan blames an economic war for his countrys dire economic straits. He should instead blame his own mismanagement. Turkey was already vulnerable to an end of the era of cheap capital, even before it pursued a course of confrontation with a country vastly richer and more powerful than it is. There were always going to be stresses in the U.S.-Turkish alliance; Turkey views the Kurds as a threat, and we consider them allies. But the chief cause of the radical deterioration in the relationship is Turkeys rank anti-Americanism, a paranoia stoked at every turn by Erdogan for his own cynical purposes. He is now reaping what he sowed, and if Erdogan wants relief, his first step should be releasing the hostages. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYKing Features roger BUCKWALTERSpecial to Florida Weekly

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 A5 Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by: All without the use of drugs, injections or surgery! papachiropractic.com 28 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens!PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458561.744.7373 This certicate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certicate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 9/20/2018.$150VALUE CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATIONCOMPLIMENTARY We accept most insurance providers including: School, Camp or Sports Physical $20 DR. ALESSANDRA COLN Chiropractor Se Habla Espaol DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director We provi d e spina l d ecompression treatmen ts! W W W W W W W W W e e e e e p p p p p p r r r r r o o o o o v v v v v i i i i i i d d d d d d d e e e e e s s s s s s p p p p p p i i i i i i n n n n n a a a a a a l l l l l d d d d d d e e e e e c c c c c o o o o o o m m m m m m p p p p p p r r r r r e e e e e s s s s s s s s s s i i i i i i o o o o o o n n n n n t t t t t t r r r r r e e e e e a a a a a a t t t t t t m m m m m e e e e e n n n n n t t t t t t s s s s s ! ! Will see auto accident suerers same day! Full Physical Therapy Facility Loggerhead seeks nominees for Go Blue Awards LuncheonLoggerhead Marinelife Center will accept nominations until Saturday, Aug. 25, for the 10th annual Go Blue Awards Luncheon, featuring renowned conservationist Jeff Corwin. The awards recognize and award four individuals and one business or nonprofit that have promoted, implemented or contributed to a blue lifestyle of marine conservation and have made significant contributions to improve and protect our oceans, beaches and wildlife. The event will feature Emmy Awardwinning television show host, conservationist and biologist Jeff Corwin as special guest and keynote speaker. Mr. Corwin is the host of Ocean Mysteries, where he shares his perspective on wildlife conservation. To nominate a person or business for one of these awards, visit marinelife.org/goblue. Nominations close Aug. 25. Finalists will be announced at the Blue Friends Society Cocktail Social being held at the Hilton West Palm Beach, at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20. Winners in each category are announced during the luncheon at the Kravis Center, West Palm Beach on Friday, Oct. 26. Nominations are based on several criteria: The Eleanor Fletcher Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes a person who exemplifies a lifelong, extraordinary commitment to marine conservation through their work or volunteer activities similar to LMC Founder Eleanor Fletcher. The Blue Ambassador of the Year Award will recognize a person who has made significant contributions in ocean conservation through volunteer-related activities. The Blue Friend of the Year Award recognizes a person who has made significant contributions in ocean conservation through work-related activities. The Blue Hatchling Youth Award recognizes students up to and including 12th grade who have made significant contributions in marine conservation through volunteer related activities. The Blue Business of the Year Award will recognize a business that has made outstanding contributions toward promoting conservation or restoration of marine life or ecosystems through their practices, products or technology. This years panel of judges includes: Gary Adkison, U.S. Shark Foundation director; Fabien Cousteau, aquanaut, oceanographic explorer, conservationist and documentary filmmaker; Greg Marshall, inventor and scientist, National Geographic Society; Cristina Mittermeier, awardwinning photographer and marine biologist; Sally Murray, daughter of LMC founder Eleanor Fletcher; Susan Murray, Oceana U.S. Pacific deputy vice president, granddaughter of LMC founder Eleanor Fletcher; Paul Nicklen; photographer and marine biologist, National Geographic; Joel Sartore, photographer, speaker, author, teacher and 20-year National Geographic Magazine contributor; Brian Skerry, National Geographic award-winning photojournalist; and Jim Toomey, Mission Blue executive director, Shermans Lagoon Comic Strip creator. WPTV News Channel 5 meteorologist Glenn Glazer will once again serve as the introductory host for this years luncheon. For more information about the Go Blue Awards Luncheon, to purchase tickets or to learn about sponsorship opportunities, visit www.marinelife.org/ goblue. Choral Society plans auditionsFeel like breaking into song? The Choral Society of the Palm Beaches may be able to help. The Choral Society begins rehearsals for its 2018-19 season beginning 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4, at Gardens Presbyterian Church, 4677 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. New singers are welcome to join in the following sessions: 7 p.m.-9:15 p.m. Sept. 4, Sept. 11 and Sept. 25. Arrive early to register. All prospective members will meet with the artistic director for a basic audition/interview. No specific piece of music is required. The Choral Societys 57th season of singing is set to open with a Holiday Goes Pops concert Dec. 15 and Dec. 16. The program will feature holiday favorites for all ages with chamber orchestra, soloists and chorus. For more information about The Choral Society of the Palm Beaches, visit www.choralsocietypalmbeaches. org or call 561-626-9997. Economic Council taps Michele Jacobs to be president and CEOThe Economic Council of Palm Beach County has named Michele Jacobs as president and CEO. She is the organizations first female leader in its 45-year history.She fills a job that had been held by Michael DeBock, who joined the organization one year ago and has stepped down to accept a newly created position with FPL. Ms. Jacobs joined the Economic Council in November 2017 as chief strategy officer. Prior to joining the Economic Council, Ms. Jacobs, 51, spent 10 years as corporate director of marketing and operations for The Forbes Companys Florida portfolio of shopping centers, including The Gardens Mall. Her volunteer service includes sitting on the board of directors of The Honda Classic, as grants chair and executive committee member, American Heart Association board of directors; Cultural Council of Palm Beach County board of directors and the Quantum House board of directors. Ms. Jacobs received her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from The University of Florida and grew up in Palm Beach County. She resides in Palm Beach Gardens with her husband and son. JACOBS

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY reflection of that philosophy. There are unique pieces enhancing aerodynamics, like the flush-fitting door handles and front end without a grille. Still, the overall appearance is like a Porsche Panamera that got shrunk in the wash. So while there are distinctive touches, the Model 3 also buddies-up to an established look of sleek and premium. Inside is an experience like no other production car its even distinctive from its Tesla Model S and X siblings. Aside from the steering wheel, the entire sedan is controlled with one large central touchscreen. Maps, climate control, regenerative braking, stereo and much more are all adjusted through one sizeable table-like interface. Features like the speedometer that are traditionally directly behind the steering wheel are also part of the touchscreen. This leaves a large airy feeling for both the passenger and the driver. It doesnt deliver the total luxury immersion that comes from buying a Mercedes at a similar price/size level, but thats not missed much in the Tesla because its such a simple clean-sheet design. The unique dash also creates some clever solutions. For example, the air conditioning doesnt use traditional vents. Instead, the full-width front air panel can be directionally adjusted through the touchscreen. It creates nearly infinite ways to channel air. This setting and many more are remembered and identified through a smart phone. So it all automatically adjusts when theres a driver change.TESLAFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTOThe Tesla Model 3 has a sleek design.COURTESY PHOTOThe entire sedan is controlled from one large touchscreen.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 NEWS A7 FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then t he patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing to the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n admi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for olde r adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do much be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up thei favor of a Flor cohort of Boo hit their eigh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e care? ipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... Not everyone is going to like this minimal interior, and some might find such a feature-filled touchscreen downright distracting. But the car is built to be ahead of its time because it has to be. Tesla is fully committed to an autonomous future, so a Model 3 needs to look like its just a software update away from driving itself to the grocery store. In fact, there are already seven cameras, 12 sensors and radar built into every Model 3. It allows Teslas semiautonomous Autopilot to be standard on all cars. It also means the hardware is there for any owner to upgrades to a fully autonomous vehicle once it becomes legal. So its a car that is actually waiting for the future to catch up to it. While Autopilot is looking to eliminate the driver, the Model 3 is a drivers car. Unlike combustion engines, electric motors have their full power and torque instantly available. Plus, Tesla builds the batteries (one of the heaviest components) into the platform floor to keep the center of gravity low. This creates a quick and nimble vehicle. The sporty feeling is amplified by the new Performance line. Its an upgrade from the base Model 3 that includes a second electric motor for all-wheel drive and a serious rise in power. The Model 3 Performance began most of its initial deliveries earlier this month, and so it was fortunate that Tesla of Naples was one of the few in the country that had it available for us to test drive. Teslas official 0 to 60 mph time for this car is 3.5 seconds. That makes it as fast as the best cars from BMWs M and Cadillacs V series of performance heavyweights. While those feel raucous and wild, the Tesla is a different kind of fun. The Model 3 Performance doesnt have an engine growl or wheel spin. Instead, the electric motors give a whoosh of power as they instantly deliver a seat-pinning amount of torque. The all-wheel drive and low center of gravity create a package that feels as planted and controlled as a bullet train on fresh rails. When used as a real commuter car, the 310-mile range should be plenty to get through a weeks commute. Plus, a full charge can be achieved with one night on a home charger. For longer trips, Teslas proprietary rapid chargers have been established along enough interstate corridors that its possible to be electric coast-to-coast. Theres an even quicker Tesla out there. The Model S P100D is a specialty model that is a full second quicker from 0 to 60 mph. Starting at $135,000 (before the $7,500 tax incentive all Teslas can receive,) its more than double the Model 3 Performances $64K base price. That puts the smaller Tesla directly in competition with other fast luxury cars like the BMW M4. Thus, while the Model S in supercar-like trim will always be equated to home values, the Model 3 Performance feels like obtainable premium. The Tesla Model 3 Performance is quick, nimble, quiet, somewhat affordable and fulfills a future we were promised long ago. Just as some people dont enjoy a science-fiction movie, this can be an intimidating vehicle. But for the same reason that theres always a line for the latest iPhone, theres no shortage of eager technology early adopters out there, too. COURTESY PHOTOWhen used as a commuter car, the 310-mile range should be plenty to get through a week.COURTESY PHOTOThe Performance line is an upgrade from the base Model 3 and includes a second electric motor for all-wheel drive and a serious rise in power.COURTESY PHOTOThe Model 3 doesnt have an engine growl or wheel spin.COURTESY PHOTOThe electric motor has its full power and torque available immediately.

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYPalm Beach County Human Rights Council Summer Soiree, Croquet Center 1. Barry Hayes and Mauricio Busa 2. Kaci Bloemers and Andy Bloemers 3. Bobby Powell and Whitney Powell 4. Joan Waitkervicz, Lois Frankel and Shirley Herman 5. Andy Amoroso, Albert Kirchner, Cathy Turk and Anthony Barressi 6. Mary Lou Berger, Dorothy Jacks and Rebecca Weiss 7. Alex Heathcock, Ashley Zuckerman and Alexandria Ayala 8. Charles Muoio and Jeri Muoio 9. Deb Willard, Julia Murphy and Kelly Shoa 10. Brandi Baumkirchner, Cindy Gretzula and Christopher Kron 11. Felicia A. Scott and Tonya Davis Johnson 12. Susan Reinheimer, Nancy Proffitt, Wood Kinnard and Alberto Arias 13. Joseph Abreu, Joshua Daniel and Bryan Clara 14. Alicja Majer, Donna Weinberger and Jason Corbiere 15. Matthew Gotha, Niki Donner and Dave Shaunessy 16. Michael McAuliffe and Sydney McAuliffe 17. Peter Emmerich and Adrienne Percival 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1X 16 15 17 ny a Davis y y a a n d n d 14 1X 16 1X 1X 15 Lorna James, Rand Hoch and Keith James

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYhuman. But they arent. The most prominent and troubled family member is citrus, but the Rues include such relatives as roses, among many others. Citrus is gravely ill, but still productive. Beneath the truck tires, the track was covered with the chopped mulch of once-upon-a-time orange trees killed by mischance. Most were destroyed by Hurricane Irma almost 12 months ago. But some were the victims of an insect-borne bacterial disease more dangerous to citrus farmers over time than any 10 hurricanes. Mr. Simmons had cut the ruined trees out of the gr ove, dragged them clear, and run them through an industrial mulcher before spreading the result back on the ground. At least theres some use out of them, he said. Cheerful and fit-looking, Mr. Simmons, 60, grew up on a farm near Plant City, like five generations of his family before him. Hed stopped here on the first morning of August to greet two visitors: a Florida Weekly reporter and a man familiar to citrus farmers internationally farmers growing citrus from China, India, Spain, North Africa and Brazil to the five counties of Southwest Florida Dr. Mongi Zekri, a University of Florida citrus extension agent based in LaBelle. They had come to assess the current condition of Floridas citrus industry, a powerful economic force in the Sunshine State from the late 1940s to 2005. For 13 years since then, citrus has been beleaguered and in decline though still a significant producer, the victim of the seemingly unstoppable disease called greening. Now, farmers, agricultural scientists and promoters of the industry working together in a unique historic alliance all express a cautious optimism about the future. Its like AIDS, but in citrus, said Mr. Simmons, echoing the comparison of others to the HIV and AIDS epidemic of the 1980s in humans. Citrus industry growers and researchers have now spent hundreds of millions of dollars not only to control the Asian citrus psyllid that spreads the greening bacteria, but to create new rootstock more tolerant to it while also developing chemicals that can be more effective when sprayed on trees. Their goal, like that of AIDS researchers: To find workarounds, as Mr. Simmons puts it new ways of growing good citrus, of living productively even with the disease, just as AIDS victims can now do. But they also remain sobered by the past and by what they still dont know.In the groveBeneath Hendry Countys blue bowl of summer sky the flat track where Mr. Simmons stopped to greet his visitors is flanked by 9,000 trees his trees, rank-and-file producers of Valencia juice oranges, their long rows plumbed straight as strings in sets of two, each two rows separated by a drainage swale. To a reporter, the trees looked good, the verdant canopies together supporting countless thousands of small green orbs swelling toward late fall or winter. Then, as they turn orange and become the newest citrus crop, pickers from Mexico, the beneficiaries of the H-2A visa program for agricultural workers, will arrive in the United States to harvest them if the season goes as Mr. Simmons hopes. After picking the fruit from thorny trees at high speed between about November and March, theyll return south of the border, home. Well have to see how that program works this year, Mr. Simmons said, referring to the trouble immigrants have had recently on this side of the border. Certainly no domestic workers are going to do that job. To Dr. Zekri, however, field workers were only a secondary problem. To him, apparently, the trees looked troubled. But they also looked well managed by a capable, smart farmer who has adopted new growing regimens. A native of Tunisia, Dr. Zekri, 67, grew up on a grapeand fig-producing farm before immigrating to the U.S. to earn a Ph.D. in horticulture from the University of Florida in 1987. His latest book appeared from the University of Florida Press in 2016, The Critical Importance of Citrus Tree Nutrition. The title alone suggests how much science is required for successful farmers. Dr. Zekri ultimately became a resource for knowledge and help beloved by farmers in the Southwest Florida region, the state and even the world, many say. But they dont tend to call him Dr. Zekri. They call him Mongi.ORANGEFrom page 1 VANDY MAJOR/ / FLORIDA WEEKLYGreening has caused this orange tree to blossom and later produce fruit out of sync with the normal rhythms of flowering, setting fruit, maturing, ripening and harvesting. Its like AIDS, but in citrus. Wayne Simmons, above, echoing the comparison of others to the HIV and AIDS epidemic of the 1980s in humans.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 NEWS A11SEE ORANGE, A12 Looks like you are doing a very good job, the tree doctor told Mr. Simmons, quietly, studying his trees and their fruit. So you get an A, a reporter added. I wish I could take that A to the bank, Mongi, the farmer replied. They both smiled. Behind them, a roadside sign announced the business Mr. Simmons kicked off three decades ago, about the time Dr. Zekri got his doctorate in Gainesville: Labelle Fruit Company. Mature trees rose 15 feet above the inhospitable sand that passes for farming soil here, with newer trees of one to three years, standing waistto headhigh, patched into the rows sporadically. They wont begin producing fruit until theyre about four years old. Some trees were flushing producing healthy new leaves of light green, indicating nutrition is reaching them, along with the right amounts of sunlight and water. Black irrigation hoses threaded the rows at the base of tree trunks, a system designed to jet water and nutrition to each trees roots in a life-giving, life-saving cocktail delivered by a powerful well-pump embedded at the top of the grove. Nutrition (though not water) must be delivered not just to the root-system of the tree, but to the canopy, nowadays, Dr. Zekri explained. Thats part of the regular spraying of groves undertaken by farmers about every four to six weeks, instead of only four times a year as they used to, Mr. Simmons said. As a result, the cost of growing (citrus) has gone from about $800 to about $2,000 an acre, Dr. Zekri noted. Mr. Simmons described more than 10 herbicides, pesticides and nutrient-rich fertilizers that must be added to trees each year. In the (early) 1 990s it was very easy, Dr. Zekri recalled. We didnt use a lot of chemicals at that time, we had fewer pests, we did not have exotic diseases like now citrus canker and greening are the most devastating diseases, but there are others. Some of the chemicals now used are so severe farmers call them chemotherapy. They kill the good bugs and the bad ones, Dr. Zekri acknowledged. Those who apply them wear suits to protect themselves, and strict regulations determine when they can be applied and how much time must pass before the produce goes to market, designated safe for consumers. The schedules nowadays are sometimes too strict, said Rene Curtis Pratt, a member of a family beekeeping business in LaBelle, Curtis Honey. Farmers in the region from Sanibel to Clewiston have long come to Curtis to lease beehives and bees brought into their groves to pollinate trees, which then become productive, setting abundant fruit but sometimes these days Curtis cant help. Now with all the chemicals and regulations and I understand why they have them the window for the bees to get in and pollinate is so narrow. Maybe only a couple of weeks when they arent spraying. So the bees dont have time to set up, she said. When they set up under ideal conditions, they find food and establish their hives for a few weeks before the citrus groves bloom, usually in March. Then bees cover the flowering trees and groves with a blizzard of energy and activity, making orange blossom and other honey while pollinating trees in an ancient cycle of plant-productive life. But now some farmers even have to worry about bees, and their availability.The numbers storyAnd thats just the start of a laundry list of challenges for people like Mr. Simmons. Floridas citrus farmers, now about 4,000 who cultivate more than 430,000 acres, according to Florida Citrus Mutual, a trade organization, are 13 years into the fight of their lives to survive greening a fight that includes challenges from other fronts as well: labor, a changing market for citrus and juice, and other disease threats. Between 2007 and 2016, the citrus industry lost almost $8 billion in revenue and more than 160,000 acres, along with about 7,500 jobs, government statics show. Now, the trade organizations that market the fruit farmers grow say the industry is still worth $8.6 billion in Floridas economy each year, employing 45,000 workers truck drivers who haul fruit, people who maintain the trucks, people who make or sell specialized farm equipment, pickers, grove tenders, operators of processing plants and the like. But the figures are fuzzy because theyre interpreted in different ways. The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis said two years ago agriculture as a whole in Florida including both beef and all crops amounted to about $6 billion of the states economy. And trade associations are no longer just marketers for citrus. Now, theyre also research promoters who fund solid science. If you dont have fruit, you wont have anything to market, said Andrew Meadows, a spokesman for Florida Citrus Mutual, with 3,000 farmer members. For that reason, he said, citrus farmers agreed to tax themselves on every box of fruit packed and sold, diverting part of the money from marketing to research $100 million so far. Thats almost as much as the effort of federal and state governments, which have contributed $125 million to date, mostly in the fight against greening. And this year, the Florida Legislature designated $25 million annually for citrus greening research in an Emergency Citrus Disease Research and Development Trust Fund. In the private industry itself, weve launched a multimillion-dollar research effort and have turned over every rock possible from a research standpoint, Mr. Meadows said. Growers are learning new ways and new production techniques, how to get nutrition to plants, what kind of nutrition, theyre thinking about water quality, replanting with greening-tolerant root stocks, doing high-density planting at 350 trees per acre to get investment and return sooner there are tools in the tool box. In the mind of Dr. Michael Rogers, an entomologist and director of the Citrus Research and Education Center at the University of Florida, all that is unique. I have never seen a disease bringing so many people together. In the past decade alone weve learned more about this disease than in the past century. Were all hands on deck.The back story In the minds of many farmers, the real fight for a future didnt begin in 2005. Instead, hard times first stepped out of the swamp when the fair-weather citrus industry experienced mid-state freezes in the 1980s. Those freezes drove some farmers south, including Mr. Simmons. Freezes were followed by a terrible canker blight that precipitated the loss of significant citrus lands throughout the state, including almost 50,000 of the one-time 190,000 acres of citrus in Southwest Florida, said Ron Hamel, who retired Aug. 1 after 30 years as vice president of the Gulf Citrus Growers Association of farmers on the southwest coast. In those days every damn grove had to have an inspection program, and entry spray. All people who went in and out along with all vehicles had to be sprayed down, he said. And they had monitors from the Department of Agriculture following people around because they felt they had a good shot at eradicating canker. And we were taking a pretty good lick at it. But then the hurricanes came. Four hurricanes arrived in one year, the first time that had happened in the U.S. since 1886, in Texas, records show. Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne hit Florida one after the other in 2004 like runaway trains. Since canker is borne in rain on the wind, it spread everywhere. Again. Until then the states canker program had required that every time a tree with the disease was found, every other citrus tree within 1,900 feet about 250 acres in an orange grove had to be removed. But in the year of the hurricanes, when greening was first detected in Brazilian groves, the canker program fell apart. The next year, greening arrived in Florida. Remembering all that, Mr. Simmons sees his problems differently than he used to. I wish all we had now was canker, he said. You cant sell the fruit itself in the market because canker makes it look bad. But you can still use it for juice. And the trees dont die. Farmers managed to have some very ROGER WILLIAMS / FLORIDA WEEKLYDr. Mongi Zekri, a University of Florida citrus extension agent, has worked with farmers in Collier, Lee, Hendry, Charlotte and Glades counties since the 1980s. As a result, the cost of growing (citrus) has gone from about $800 to about $2,000 an acre. Dr. Mongi Zekri, at left, a University of Florida citrus extension agent based in LaBelle Top 11 citrus-producing counties, 2016-17 COUNTY BOXES PRODUCED DeSoto 11.67 million Polk 11.65 million Hendry 10.95 million Highlands 9.16 million Hardee 7.87 million Collier 5.01 million St. Lucie 4.55 million Indian River 4.29 million Manatee 2.77 million Charlotte 2.14 million Lee 1.72 millionFlorida acres planted in citrus YEAR ACRES PLANTED 2018 454,973 2017 480,121 2016 501,396 2014 515,147 2013 524,640 2012 531,493 2011 541,328 2010 554,037 2009 568,814 2008 576,577SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYgood years while they were fighting canker. In 1997-98, they produced the biggest crop ever recorded in the state, coming in at about 245 million 90-pound boxes, and giving Florida status as the second-largest citrus-producing region in the world, behind Brazil.The biggest fightThen the real trouble started, and it hasnt stopped. It landed near Clewiston first in 2005, in the sprawling groves of Southern Gardens Citrus, a subsidiary of U.S. Sugar now headed by company President Ricke Kress. Although he did not return a phone call from Florida Weekly asking for an update on greening in the 3,000 acres of Southern Gardens Citrus around Lake Okeechobee, two years ago he spoke about the greening fight in a YouTube video promoting science in particular science at Cornell University in New York as the way to defeat the disease. In 2005, we were one of two growers who first saw the disease, he said. Every researcher has indicated the ultimate solution will be biotechnology. (But) greening has the potential to wipe out the citrus industry if biotechnology doesnt hurry up its game. One of the greatest problems still, Mr. Kress pointed out, is a problem in the lab: Its a bacteria thats never been cultured in the world, and its in citrus throughout the world. Thats because researchers have so far failed to isolate the bacteria and study it under specific conditions. We havent been able to culture the bacterium using traditional methods because we havent been able to develop the right media or diet to put it in a petri dish, Dr. Rogers said. Sounds simple enough; apparently not. Meanwhile last year, in large part due to Hurricane Irma, Florida growers only produced 45 million boxes, although they had hoped for upward of 70 million boxes before the storm. Although this year could show some promise for a future in citrus, the loss of farmers and groves in the last decade, not to mention processing plants down to about six in the state from 26 two decades ago has been astounding.Greening itselfCitrus originated in parts of southeast Asia or even the Himalayan region a few thousand years ago, and like a lot of things horses, hogs and domestic cattle, wheat and oats, for example arrived in the New World with the Spanish, in the 1600s. The Asian citrus psyllid and greening were not part of those imports, however. Nobody knows how they got here, but a number of researchers suspect they arrived in somebodys undeclared tree or plant samples designed for grafting as tree scions in the 1990s perhaps an ambitious cultivator of new root stock, or perhaps a traveler with a hankering for an Asian fruit tree in the nursery or back yard. However it happened, now its a done deal. Greening by any name is here to stay, predicts Dr. Zekri. And it has other names. The disease is sometimes called HLB, the acronym for its Chinese name, Huanglongbing. Farmers also call it Yellow Dragon or Yellow Chute, both translations of the Chinese name. In China and Southeast Asia greening first appeared a century ago. Little or no research was done to combat it because it was so poorly understood, scientists say and until it hit the Americas starting less than two decades ago, spreading elsewhere as well, not much was known about it. Thats changed. When a tree becomes infected, leaves take on a faintly yellow striping. They become stunted just like the fruit that will later set haltingly and mature only as small, hard produce useless to farmers and consumers. Eventually branches wont bear leaves and the trees die. The Asian citrus psyllid that carries the bacteria appeared in Florida in 1998, seven years before anybody spotted the disease a tiny, mottled brown bug in the groves. Smaller than a pin-head so small it remains almost invisible to the naked eye, at about .05 inches in its adult phase the bug began spreading bacteria through citrus trees and related plant species in the Rue family, with devastating results to citrus. Greening causes the roots of citrus trees to swell and then shrink, preventing them from sending water, minerals and nutrients up though the tree in its xylem (pronounced zy-lem), the vascular system that works nutrition upward from the roots. At the same time, when the leaves in the canopy use the sun and nutrients to make food in photosynthesis, they are suddenly unable to transfer those sugars and starches downward through tissue called phloem (pronounced flo-em), shut down by the bacteria. In effect, both the tree and the leaves themselves become simultaneously starved, and constipated. And they look it. Growers have handled this by having to learn to grow citrus all over again, said Dr. Rogers. Theyve adjusted how they grow it. Theyre very educated and adopt tactics to keep the trees going. But in the lab, scientists still cant figure out what makes the bacteria tick.Back in the groveBack in the grove or at least the grove offices, meanwhile, its paperwork season, the time when farmers try to arrange dependable labor for the harvest that begins in October and November. With the reduced crop size, the labor markets arent in short supply so much, said Mr. Meadows, of Florida Citrus Mutual. We have transitioned our industries, and now the vast majority of the fruit is picked under the H-2A visa program they pick the crop and then go home. And theyre eager to do it, apparently. We have growers who go down to Monterey, Mexico, and conduct interviews a lot of people apply, Mr. Meadows said. And a lot of growers find and work with the harvesters who are good workers. Mr. Simmons is thinking about the same thing, and doing the paperwork these days, he says trying to hire the 30 or so farmworkers who will pick his crop. Theyre really good, hard-working people, he said. Unlike the soil hes standing on that supports his beautiful but troubled trees on 60 acres, with a couple hundred more acres of the LaBelle Fruit Company just down the road; its neither good or hard-working, apparently. The soil here mostly just holds up the trees, Mr. Simmons explained cheerfully, indulging in a moment of wishful thinking: Now, if we just had the soil they have in Indiana or Ohio or Kansas ... But thats not how it ever worked in Florida, especially not these days, as nobody knows better than Mr. Simmons or Dr. Zekri. We have to live with this, Dr. Zekri repeated but hopefully food and juice prices will stay on the high side so growers can make a profit. That would be nice for consumers, too. But a lot of people who didnt make a profit for a few years have given up the hard life; piles of dead trees and naked fields that once produced sizeable orange groves and will never be planted again are visible almost in the shadow of LaBelle. Mr. Simmons is not one of them. Im not a gentleman farmer, he said. Im all in, completely committed. This is my life. He will continue to grow about 150 trees per acre until he cant, he says. Thats twice what farmers once grew when 75 trees per acre was standard, and about half what they might plant now or in the future when they scrape old groves from the Earth en masse, and try to start over. Which is not his plan. Unfortunately, the disease is still only partly understood by entomologists, agricultural scientists and the farmers themselves but theyre racing toward an understanding that will give them control, Dr. Rogers says. New research now identifies the genes responsible for the disease. Scientists the most muscular group in the world are probably University of Florida researchers are striving to turn off the gene markers and create new citrus trees that simply dont react to bacteria carried by the Asian citrus psyllid. I am very optimistic were going to solve this, he said. I just hope its soon enough. So does everybody else. ORANGEFrom page 11COURTESY PHOTOThe mural at Curtis Honey suggests how important citrus and its flowers are to honey bees, and vice versa.COURTESY PHOTOA T-shirt at Curtis Honey, which citrus growers in the region have relied on for decades to pollinate their groves.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 NEWS A13COURTESY PHOTOS Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Juno Beach Civic Association sponsor appreciation breakfastRichard Barbakoff and Joe LoBello Trish Hawthorn and Tom Battaglia Sofia Gill, Ann OShea and Deb Rand Scott Gustafson, Mitch Frownfelter and Jason Haselkorn Rick Opton and Brian Smith Jennifer Easton, Robert Bosso, Anne Bosso and Emily McGee Don Smith, Richard Barbakoff and Bob Hamilton Connie Eckerle and Jim Lyons Cathi Dorn and Tom Cole Stuart Katz and Joi Cardwell Roy Speiser, Jeff Sabin and Rick Opton Donna Hamilton and Jeri Glynn Chris Roe and Jack Kneuer Joe LoBello, Joi Cardwell, Frank Fahy, Jim Lyons, Joe Saviak, Jason Haselkorn, Peggy Wheeler, Brian Smith and Richard Barbakoff

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BUSINESS PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29 2018 A14 | WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM SCOACHINGALES IS A HIGHLY COMPETITIVE FIELD. People who sell for a living often face more than a few rejections before receiving a yes. Coaching can be helpful to struggling salespeople, as shown by a recent Forbes article that reported many salespeople who quit cited a lack of coaches and mentors as one of the top reasons they bolted. Some in sales management see their role as comparable to a sports team coach, given the attributes SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________SEE SALES, A15 As a sales leader, you will often find your people looking to you for wisdom, direction and reassurance. Lance Tyson, president and CEO of Tyson Group YOURSALESSTAFF LIKEAWINNING SPORTSTEAMJupiter Medical Center continues to grow. The hospital has opened a new urgent care center in Stuart, at 2628 SE Federal Highway. Located in the new Baron Shoppes, just south of the Regency Square Shopping Center. The center is the hospitals fifth, and its first in Martin County. Our urgent care centers have the distinction of being backed by a worldclass hospital system and a team of leading medical professionals, Jupiter Medical Center President and Chief Executive Officer Don McKenna said in a statement. The new Stuart location reflects our commitment to ensuring that our neighbors to the north receive the same level of urgent care and services that we provide in our Palm Beach County locations. Jupiter Medical Center Urgent Care gives area residents immediate access to high-quality health care and services in locations that are close to home, without the wait or expense of an emergency room visit. Like the hospitals four urgent care locations in Palm Beach County, Jupiter Medical Center Urgent Care Stuart provides walk-in care for adults and children after hours, on weekends and on holidays. All five centers are open Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sundays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Each site offers urgent care services for minor emergencies and illnesses, as well as on-site laboratory testing and X-rays to enable rapid diagnosis and treatment. Services to support healthier living also are available, such as flu shots and other immunizations; lab services; travel medicine; school, camp and sports physicals; pre-employment testing; and preoperative clearance. All five centers are supervised by physician medical directors and staffed by a team of certified physician assistants, advanced registered nurse practitioners, radiology technologists and urgent care technologists. In addition to the Stuart location, Jupiter Medical Center operates two urgent care centers in Jupiter, at 1335 W. Indiantown Road and 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64; one in Palm Beach Gardens, 3250 PGA Blvd.; and one in West Palm Beach, 625 N. Flagler Drive. For more information on Jupiter Medical Centers urgent care services, visit www.jupitermedurgentcare.com or call 772-219-9362. Jupiter Medical Center opens Stuart urgent care center COURTESY PHOTOJupiter Medical Centers new urgent care is in the Baron Shoppes in Stuart.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A15 Singer Island Oceanfront Tower 2BR/2BA w/ Gated Beach Access One Block to Ocean Walk Mall $334,500 Call or Text Today for Details! Jimmie & Judy McAdams Realtors) 561-385-1450 | 561-358-0716Emails: Jimmie@singerislandlifestyles.com | Judy@singerislandlifestyles.com Singer Island Ocea nf rontTower g g Visit us online for all available properties! www.singerislandlifestyles.com Our team will help you start living the Singer Island Lifestyle that you so deserve! INTRACOASTAL WATER VIEWS required to drive success in sales and sports are similar: encouraging a positive attitude, motivating, presenting a clear strategy, insisting on dedication and breeding consistent winning habits. As a sales leader, you will often find your people looking to you for wisdom, direction and reassurance, says Lance Tyson, president and CEO of Tyson Group and the author of Selling is an Away Game: Close Business and Compete in a Complex World. As a franchise owner of Dale Carnegie operations in the Midwest, Mr. Tyson drove them to 230 percent growth before starting his own company. He conducts more than 100 workshops annually in areas such as performance management, leadership, sales, sales management, customer service, negotiations and team building. Sales managers need a coaching process that allows them the time to build up the people who make up their talent pool, Mr. Tyson says. You need to look beyond what they can do today and help them realize whats possible tomorrow. Mr. Tyson, whose clients include the sales departments of numerous professional sports and entertainment franchises, thinks improvement in sales teams starts with how effectively sales managers coach their teams while emphasizing a competitive mindset. He offers five ways sales leaders can improve their coaching and thus facilitate more team success much like a sports coach looks for ways to lead his or her team to more wins. Identify weaknesses Mr. Tyson says sales leaders must keep their eyes and ears open to find areas that need improvement. This information could come from a customer or vendor, a performance review or observations from a colleague. Regardless of the source, always assess different opportunities for coaching and improvement, he says. Establish desired results This requires a leader to describe to salespeople the gap between what they are currently doing and what they should be doing. Associate an identifiable action with all the steps in between, Mr. Tyson says. When you outline the process up front, your team member can envision well-defined results. Provide resources For the coaching process to be successful, you must clear away obstructions and make the appropriate resources available: time, money, equipment, training, upper management buy-in and support Most importantly, Mr. Tyson says, your salespeople must commit to the process and want to achieve the results. Practice, practice, practice. And observe implementation Better results require new behavior, which wont come overnight. Once you have the resources in place and youve explained and demonstrated the desired skill, its time for the team member to implement it, Mr. Tyson says. They must sharpen the behavior with the help of a coach. Practice allows the coach to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement while witnessing the skill in real-time. Use effective follow-up Many training sessions have gone for naught when there was no follow-up and new ways toward success were forgotten. Remember as a sales leader that your goal is to effect a behavioral change, Mr. Tyson says. Coaching is a process, and it never really ends. The next step is follow-up at regular intervals to review results. And when your salespeople reach goals, take time to acknowledge and celebrate it. As a sales leader, you just cant settle for telling your team what they should do. You need a process for coaching them to achievement. This gives you a framework to accommodate an individuals unique personality through small adjustments. SALESFrom page 14TYSON A local marketing and events executive is joining Susan G. Komen South Florida Denise Mariani, former owner of Mariani Marketing and Events, will join the breast cancer charity as development and event manager. Ms. Mariani brings her specialization in large-scale events and public relations for local businesses and nonprofits to Komen South Florida, the local first responder to breast cancer serving Palm Beach, Martin and St. Lucie counties. While Ms. Mariani is responsible for the affiliates signature Race for the Cure event on Jan. 27, her role is to keep a year-round focus on the importance of breast health and early detection. She is kicking off her new job by expanding Downtowns Go Pink, a shopping and dining event that will take place at Jupiters Harbourside Place, Palm Beach Gardens, West Palm Beach, Delray Beach and Boca Raton on Oct. 25, 2018, in celebration of Octobers Breast Cancer Awareness month. Ms. Mariani is a graduate of the 2017 class of Leadership Palm Beach County and a previous board member of Executive Women of the Palm Beaches, where she co-chairs its Programs Committee. She lives in Jupiter with her husband, Rick, and enjoys fitness walking, trying new restaurants and wines, traveling near and far, and entertaining. Mariani joins Komen teamMARIANI

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A16 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY MONEY & INVESTINGNow is the time to invest in homebuilding, construction stocksIf you ask an average homeowner across the U.S. how the housing market is performing, the vast majority would say fantastic. After all, home prices are close to historical highs and when houses are listed they are quickly sold. One would think that in such an environment, homebuilder and construction stocks would also be performing very well. But the opposite is true. In fact, just last week, the largest ETF that tracks these companies fell into bear market territory, falling over 20 percent in 2018. Many of the stocks that make up this index have fallen more than 50 percent in the last several months. Why are publicly traded homebuilders and construction companies falling while the housing market is doing so well? What does that tell us about the housing market going forward? The iShares US Home Construction ETF (Ticker ITB) is a $1 trillion asset fund that tracks U.S. companies in the home building sector. The largest companies in this fund are the publicly traded homebuilders like Lennar Corp. and D.R. Horton. However, it also contains companies like Home Depot and Sherwin Williams. Some companies, like Home Depot, have held their ground in 2018. Most have not, with the homebuilders and material providers like Lumber Liquidators getting beat down by the markets. In fact, more than 80 percent of the firms in the fund have lost more than one fifth of their value this year. There are three primary reasons that investors have lost faith in these stocks. The first is rising interest rates. While mortgage rates have only risen by around .75 percent this year, many analysts fear that rates will be significantly higher in the years ahead. And that would increase the price of houses for most homebuyers. Second, many commodity prices are starting to increase both because of higher demand and the Trump administrations tariffs. These make houses more expensive to build and the construction companies are not always able to pass these higher costs on to the consumer in the short run. And finally, homebuilders are suffering because of an unwillingness to produce high volume of product. With a dramatic increase in land and building supplies, home manufacturers are hesitant to commit to large scale projects unless they can be fairly certain that they will sell at a high price point. Many still remember what happened before the financial crisis when they were stuck with massive inventory when the market turned. As a result, sales are not as robust as many investors and analysts would like. Despite these problems, some analysts believe that this correction in the housing sector is too great and these companies are a great value at these levels. While every investor wants to exit a position before an inflection point, I believe that a 20 percent to 50 percent drop in stock price while current market fundamentals are so positive does represent a good risk/reward at this point. Homebuilders are still optimistic. Earnings are good. Home prices continue to rise. As a result, I would be a buyer of both the homebuilders ETF along with many of the individual companies that make up this fund. Eric Bretan, the co-owner of Ricks Estate & Jewelry Buyers in Punta Gorda, was a senior derivatives marketer and investment banker for more than 15 years at several global banks. ericBRETANestaterick@gmail.com EARL ON CARSHold the owners or CEOs of car dealerships accountableA few years ago, Congress passed a law that really shook up publicly owned companies. Its called Sarbanes-Oxley, named after the congressmen who sponsored the bill. Basically, this law says that the CEO and other high-echelon management of a publicly owned company cannot get off the hook for wrong doings because he or she claims they didnt know what their employees were doing. I believe the same rules should apply to all businesses, even if their stock is not publicly held. The boss always should be held accountable for the actions of his employees and this should apply especially for car dealerships. Most of the employees customers meet in a car dealership are paid on commission. Those employees get a percentage of the profit that the company makes on the transaction. Car sales people, service sales people (also called service advisors or assistant service managers), parts sales people, and the mechanical technicians who work on your car are mostly all paid on commission. This method of pay tilts the relationship between the customer and employee in somewhat of an adversarial manner. The employee wants the profit to be as high as possible, but the customer wants it to be low. In a car dealership that has talented, fully engaged and ethical management, this potentially adversarial relationship is kept in a fair balance. Without the oversight of upper and middle management and careful hiring practices, some employees will exploit a customer to increase their commission.What brought the subject of this column to mind was a call I received yesterday from a 78-year-old widow from Fort Pierce. She called to thank me for writing my column and to tell me that she wished she had read some of my columns before she bought her 2005 used Mazda. This was the first car she had bought on her own. Her husband had always taken on this responsibility. She paid the dealership a huge profit on her purchase. She was sold a maintenance package that she believed cost only $25 but it really was $2,500. She was rushed to sign the papers at night because the dealership was closing. In the morning, when she realized the mistake, she drove back to the dealership and asked to back out of the sale but was told it was too late. She was told she had signed all the papers and that they had already sold her trade-in even though she had not given them the title. When she asked to speak to the general manager, three different employees identified themselves as the general manager. I get a lot of sad calls like this.The owner of that dealership should know whats going on. Im giving him the benefit of the doubt by saying that he doesnt know because if he does know its even worse. The owner should look at the big picture and the long-term view of his business. You can take advantage of customers and benefit in the short run, but you eventually pay the piper when your bad reputation spreads far enough. Most of the bad things I hear about car dealers from their customers are not illegal things. They are simply unethical and not the way one human being should treat another. Refusing to refund the money of an elderly widow after she realized that she had been taken advantage of is not illegal, but it sure stinks. Jim Press is the top executive for Toyota over all of North America and he is also the only non-Japanese person to occupy a place on Toyotas board of directors. He was quoted in the book, The Toyota Way by Jeffrey Liker, as saying Its what you do for a customer when you dont owe him anything that is the true measure of character. Its like sticking up for somebody who cant defend himself. I really like this quote and I have it engraved on a plaque that I give out each month to the employee who wins the Above and Beyond Award. This award goes to our employee who does something for her customer above and beyond what the customer would have expected. If you have a bad dealing with your car dealership, do your best to contact the owner. This is impossible with publicly held dealerships like AutoNation and United Auto Group, but you should be able to talk to their general managers. If its a privately owned dealership, dont give up until you see the owner. earlSTEWARTearls@estoyota.com561-358-1474

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WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 | A17WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM REAL ESTATEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYWelcome to paradise! This stunning direct oceanfront penthouse condo at Ocean Club has 12-foot ceilings you cannot find anywhere on the beach! This one-of-a-kind penthouse residence is a complete open floor plan, located in an intimate 48-unit boutique building featuring prime southeast exposure and spectacular views of the Atlantic Ocean and Juno Beach Pier. This unit has an open concept kitchen, coffee bar, hurricane impact glass windows, hickory wood and marble flooring, granite and quartz countertops and wine cooler. This unique floor plan features two bedrooms and two baths, including breathtaking views throughout. A luxury master suite features an extended sitting area overlooking the ocean. Resort-style living includes a large pool, clubroom, pool table, barbecue area, ping-pong, gym, sauna, overly large air-conditioned storage units, and many more. Close to Harbourside Place, with restaurants and entertainment. Do not miss out on this amazing opportunity! Lang Realty has this oceanfront penthouse offered at $925,000. Contact Jeff for more information and a private showing today at 201-919-7969 or jmolner45@ gmail.com. Ocean Club penthouse with a view COURTESY PHOTOS

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A18 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Malloy Realty Group at Premier Brokers International 9123 N. Military Trail Suite 104, Palm Beach Gardens Florida 33410 WWW.MALLOYREALTYGROUP.COM When you want a SOLD sign CALL 561-876-8135 WHY CHOOSE THE MALLOY REALTY GROUPTO SELL YOUR HOME?JUST LISTEN TO WHAT OUR CLIENTS HAVE TO SAY! Buyers do not miss out on our Coming Soon properties!Email dawnmalloy@gmail.com your contact information and request to be sent our Coming Soon properties. Dan and Dawn Malloy are extremely knowledgeable and most attentive to all matters. ey not only make sure to properly value your home and price it correctly, they make sure that you are on track every step of the way. In the beginning, we were treated to a full day of consultation as we staged our home for photos and an open-house. During the Listing phase, they remained patient and did not force us to do anything that took us out of our comfort zone. Once we had the right o er, they made sure that all documentation was in order and that we were prepared for the closing. We could not have asked for any better representation. Gary and Ruthanne Z. We were extremely impressed with Malloy Realty, they were exactly what we needed to sell our property quickly, e ciently and for top market price. Very professional, knowledgeable, honest and pleasure to work with. I would recommend them 100% of the time and from now on they will always be my agents for all my real estate needs. Karina and Kysto K. Dawn and Dan Malloy are very personable and professional realtors. ey made the sale of our home a very smooth and quick process. ey got a buyer on the rst open house which was only a short time a er we put it on the market. We closed within 60 days of when it went on the market. ey have done a tremendous job with our sale. ey also handled three other purchases in our family within the last few years. We highly recommend them. Richard and Patricia K. FLORIDA WRITERSFlorida, families and fruit trees anchor an ambitious work of fiction Goldens Are Here by Andrew Furman. Green Writers Press. 364 pages. Trade paperback, $21.95.There are so many strands and points of interest in this fine, highly original novel that its hard to know where to begin. In the background are the Cuban Missile Crisis, the blooming (technically and economically) of Floridas Space Coast and the Civil Rights struggle. In the foreground is the Florida citrus industry in the early 1960s as represented by a body of small grove owners along or near the Indian River. In these communities, the white folks own the groves and the black folks perform much of the labor. Race relations are in an uneasy truce, a tangle of old habits and shaky dependencies. A great freeze threatens to destroy the groves, even if insects dont. The central character, Isaac Golden, has abandoned his career as a physician and set out on a grand adventure with his wife Melody and their two young children, Sarah and Eli. Moving away from the Philadelphia area, where their Jewish identity was readily reinforced, they have settled in a small town with only one other Jewish family and a considerable ride to Jewish institutions. The Goldens are clearly outsiders, and the way they are addressed by many of the townspeople carries a brand of politeness that barely veils a cultural tradition of anti-Semitism. Author Andrew Furman portrays how Isaac and Melody deal with their displacement and discomfort with skill and sensitivity. The story of Isaacs attempt to develop improved breeds of oranges becomes a continuing lesson in citrus science. Mr. Furman provides a large specialized vocabulary that is the basis for reader understanding of Isaacs mission and of the industry he has entered. This material and the extensive exposition should fall flat, but the author makes it sing. He does this by capturing Isaacs poetic passion, especially his interest in avoiding chemical pesticides and protecting his groves using natural, nontoxic agents.But he is spending more money than he is likely to make. Melody develops a roadside business selling from her vegetable garden, from the groves and from the kitchen (her wonderful pies add muchneeded income to the familys enterprise). Eli is an undersized, sickly child with serious respiratory challenges. How each parent treats him, and how they treat toddler Sarah, defines them credibly and even admirably. For example, Isaac, though it brings him pain, forces himself to avoid coddling Eli or setting low expectations for the boy. Melody, and ultimately her marriage, is challenged by her loneliness and by the wiles of an African-American labor organizer who is the returned prodigal son of Isaacs grove manager. The townspeople provide a chorus of reprehensible, yet understandable attitudes toward the curious Jewish family that doesnt quite know how to fit in. Melody has movie star looks; Isaac has stature, strength and not a trace of a conventional Jewish face. They are some sort of new breed. Yet they plan to raise their children in traditional Jewish ways. Elis bar mitzvah is out there on the horizon. Isaac and Melody are well stocked with Yiddish phrases and a modicum of Jewish knowledge and wisdom. This is an extremely ambitious novel, delightfully blending the ups and downs of domestic life, an exploration of culturally engrained prejudices, the EastCentral Florida ethos, the major issues of national and international concern and the vibrant interplay of man and nature. I love the authors chutzpah in bringing this all together, and I love the cascades of language and lists that carry it along.About the authorAndrew Furman is a professor of English at Florida Atlantic University and teaches in its creative writing MFA program. He is the author, most recently, of the environmental memoir Bitten: My Unexpected Love Affair with Florida (2014, reviewed in these pages), which was named a Finalist for the ASLE Environmental Book Award, and My Los Angeles in Black and (Almost) White (2010). His fiction and creative nonfiction frequently engages with the Florida outdoors, but he has also written about Jewish identity, basketball, lighthouses, swimming and cast-iron cookware. His essays and stories have appeared in such publications as the Oxford American, The Southern Review, Ecotone, Poets & Writers, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Agni Online, Terrain.org, and The Florida Review. He lives in South Florida with his family. Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. philJASONphiljreviews@gmail.com FURMAN a h nd y y e anddiscomfort f l l Afri

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 A19 40% o any order of $1000 or more. 30% o any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Oce. Not valid with any other oer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. 40% OPlusFree Installation Art of Livingsothebyshomes.com/palmbeach Palm Beach Brokerage340 Royal Poinciana Way | Palm Beach, Florida 33480 | 561.659.3555Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents aliated with Sothebys International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sothebys International Realty, Inc. Banyan Lodge Ranch Over 3000 acres in Okeechobee | $14,541,800 BANYANLODGERANCH.COMWally Turner 561.301.2060Part 2: The Florida Weekly Writing ChallengeI hate writing, I love having written. Dorothy ParkerWelcome to Part 2 of the 2018 Florida Weekly Writing Challenge. The photo of the garden cherubs you see here is the second prompt of four that will make up this years contest. Wordsmiths who accept our challenge have until midnight Sunday, Aug. 26, to send us a story inspired by the image. Part 1 of the contest is closed. Well print new prompts and submission deadlines for Part 3 on Aug. 29 and Part 4 on Sept. 12.Here are the rules: If you submitted something for Part 1, great. Thank you. You are also welcome to take us up on Parts 2, 3 and 4 of the challenge. But please limit your output to one per prompt. Keep your narrative (no poetry) to 750 words. Give it a title and run it through Spellcheck. Put your full name, phone number and city/state you live in at the end of your masterpiece. Send it, either attached as a Word document or simply pasted into the body of the email, to writing@floridaweekly.com. Snail mail offerings will not be considered.Our editors look forward to reviewing the entries and selecting one winner, whose author will receive a ticket to the 13th annual Sanibel Island Writers Conference (value: $500). With keynote speaker and New York Times bestselling author Ann Hood (She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, An Italian Wife, Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine, An Ornithologists Guide to Life and The Obituary Writer, among others), the conference is set for Nov. 8-11 on Sanibel Island.The 2018 Florida Weekly Writing Challenge winner will be notified by Oct. 15, and the winning entry will be published in all our editions.Questions? Email writing@floridaweekly.com and well get back to you. IVAN SELIGMAN / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561.889.6734 The Resort 16503BR/3.5BA $1,699,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,999The Resort 20503BR/3BA $1,799,000 Water Club 1504-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,349,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,300,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,999,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2101A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,150,000 SOLD Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $949,000Water Club 1603-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,299,000 Martinique WT8042BR/3.5BA $649,900 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 SOLD Oasis Singer Island 18A 3BR/3.5BA $2,385,000 The Resort 6534BR/4.5BA $2,199,999 Oasis Singer Island 19A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,399,000 NEW LISTING NEW LISTINGRitz Carlton Residence 1502B3BR/3.5BA $1,999,000 UNDER CONTRACT

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY | SECTION BWWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@ oridaweekly.comThe artwork of the late local photographer/artist Tim Rivers is being auctioned to provide scholarships to Junk Camp at Resource Depot in West Palm Beach. Mr. Rivers worked for more than four decades, starting with the Burlington (VT) Free Press, where he was named New England Press Photographer of the Year and then for three decades with the Fort Lauderdale News and Sun-Sentinel. After retiring, Mr. Rivers taught photography at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, juried fine art shows and showed his work locally. Now you can own a piece of Mr. Rivers legacy and help local kids discover art. Beginning at 5 p.m. Aug. 31, the public is invited to Resource Depot, at 2510 Florida Ave. in West Palm Beach, for a unique fundraiser. Mr. Rivers, an award-winning photojournalist, turned his camera toward South Floridas subtropical nature subjects after his retirement. Mr. Rivers work will be available to view beginning Aug. 28 through Sept. 8. Resource Depot is a nonprofit dedicated to the creative upcycling and reuse of donated items. Stuff that some would call junk and that otherwise would end up filling local landfills becomes useful fodder for artwork. At Resource Depots Junk Camp, children learn to transform everyday objects into works of art. These outside-thebox activities stretch kids imaginations and encourage problem-solving skills. The camp is open to children from kindergarten through fifth grade. The cost is $180 per week for members and $195 for nonmembers. The proceeds from the auction will support the Tim Rivers Junk Camp Scholarship Fund. Donations can be made directly to Resource Depot. Sales and donations are tax deductible. For more information about Resource Depot, visit www.resourcedeHAPPENINGSSEE HAPPENINGS, B6 Photographic sales to benefit Resource DepotCOURTESY PHOTOTim Rivers First it was J.T. Realmuto, a catcher for the Miami Marlins. Next up is Evan Cohen, a longtime sportscaster for ESPN West Palm. And on Sept. 1, it will be WPEC-TV morning-news anchor Suzanne Boyd. All three celebrities had their likenesses captured as bobbleheads by Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium. I wish I looked that good in real life, Mr. Cohen said. They did an unbelievable job with it. The latter two plastic playthings can be purchased for $25 apiece, with a portion of the proceeds going to local charities such as the Duffys Foundation, a supporter of Forgotten Soldiers Outreach, Honor Flight and Meals on Wheels of the Palm Beaches. Ive worked with Duffys since 2003, Mr. Cohen said. I cant tell you the amount of events Ive been to in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast that have the Duffys logo. If youre doing something good, if youre doing SEE CHARITY, B10 Roger Dean bobbleheads help charityBY AMY WOODSawoods@ oridaweekly.com The importance The importance of producing of producing original works original works out of the out of the provinces provincesHEATERGOERS ALWAYS ENJOY HEADING out to see the latest hit musical or play, but few appreciate the humble beginnings from which these works spring and the important role regional theaters play in nurturing them to fruition. William Hayes, Andrew Kato and Louis Tyrrell know and respect this process well. Mr. Hayes is producing artistic director BY STEVEN J. SMITH BY STEVEN J. SMITH ssmith@ oridaweekly.com ssmith@ oridaweekly.comSEE THEATER, B6 TFLORIDA WEEKLY FILE PHOTOAbove: A scene from Academy, at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. At right: Theatre Labs Be Here Now, with Gretchen Porro, Laura Turnbull, Elizabeth Dimon.COURTESY PHOTOKiara Blye, Trevon Bailey, Antoine Roodolph, Juliana Alvarez and Ana Cardenas received scholarships from Take Stock in Chldren.

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY COLLECTORS CORNER scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com Im constantly amazed at the things I learn and the people I meet. Take Pegi Hamner. Pegi, who died in May at 80, was an old-time Floridian who was born up North, grew up in Delray Beach and raised a family in West Palm Beach, while teaching high school. After she retired, Pegi literally did it all, volunteering at The Episcopal Church of Bethesdaby-the-Seas thrift shop, The Church Mouse, and working with her sorority. I never actually knew Pegi, other than to say hello, but I knew she was a collector she attended a couple of the talks I gave on antiques and collecting, and I always saw her at thrift shops and markets. You probably know someone like her Pegi had a ready smile and a wonderful, quirky style, and could make up a divine plate of deviled eggs yes, I sampled them when I lectured at one of those aforementioned sorority luncheons. Her daughter-in-law, Palm Beach Countys property appraiser, Dorothy Jacks, smiled when I mentioned Pegi at a recent Palm Beach County Human Rights Council gathering. Pegi was a collector, Ms. Jacks said, with lots of one and two pieces of just about everything. That caught my ear, and it was natural that I had to attend the estate sale at her beautiful home. The place was, well, full Ms. Jacks had not exaggerated. But the objects were lovingly gathered, with fine china mixed with crystal and cut glass, some nice artwork and a lot of, well, everything. The kitchen cupboards brimmed with every accoutrement for entertaining. Taking it all in reminded me that I need to do a little editing of my own collections. I smiled at the sight, even if it was a bit overwhelming, bought a single piece and left happy. Later that evening, I chatted with a former co-worker and his partner, who asked if I had been to the estate sale on their street. Turned out it was Pegis house. Theyve lived in the neighborhood near the Intracoastal Waterway for a quarter-century and remembered that Pegi was the first neighbor who made the effort to learn each of their names and to remember them correctly. That didnt always happen for samesex couples back in the day. Then again, most neighbors didnt happen to be Pegi. Bought: W est P alm B each sale run by DejaVu Estate Liquidators; www. dejavuestateliquidators.com. Paid: $5 The Skinny: This weeks find underscores how dramatically the market for certain things has changed, especially in South Florida, where people have embraced a casual lifestyle. This large, 10-inch cut glass bowl would have sold for a couple hundred dollars 30 years ago. But it sat for two days at a wellpublicized, well-run and well-attended West Palm Beach estate sale priced at $5 before I came along and snagged it. Its American made, possibly by your choice of companies Libbey, Dorflinger, Sinclaire or Hawkes, though I could find no signature, and dates from the third quarter of the 19th century or the first decade of the 20th imagine how the glass would have sparkled in the gaslight of the day. I will have to spend a little time poring over catalogs to track down the pattern name the American Cut Glass Associations website, at www.cutglass. org, should be helpful. The bowl does have a few nicks, but at 120 or so years old, its a survivor. And now its mine. THE FIND:A large brilliant cut glass bowlYes, its about antiques; its also about the peopleHAMNER SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Over 20,000 Sq.Ft. Fine Furnishing | Art & Antiques | Estate JewelryDESIGN SERVICES AVAILABLE561-225-1950Monday through Saturday 10am to 6pm and Sundays 12 to 4pm eres Always Something New at Dj Vu e in Palm Beach!Best Finds Join us Just East of I95 on PGA Blvd behind the Shell StationSunday, September 2nd12:00-4:00pm at DejaVu Art Gallery 4078 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FLFeaturing Estate Jewelry, Couture Clothing, Mid-Century Modern, Art, Collectibles and More!

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Return to Southwest Florida this fall for the 5th annual Island Hopper Songwriter Fest. Catch dozens of free shows and acclaimed singer-songwriters at intimate venues across Captiva Island, Fort Myers Beach and Downtown Fort Myers. Download our app and get Midland tickets at IslandHopperFest.com Sept. 21Sept. 30 | #IslandHopperFest

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@floridaweekly.com.THURSDAY8/23Clematis by Night 6-10 p.m. Thursdays, the Great Lawn at the Waterfront, Flagler Drive and Clematis Street, West Palm Beach. Free music, vendors, food and drink. 561-8222222 or www. clematisbynight.net. Aug. 23: Khemistry (Top 40) opens. Headliner: Eclipse (Variety/Classic Pop). Antique and Flea Market: 6-10 p.m. Aug. 23 and 30, and 6-9 p.m. Thursdays beginning in Sept. under the trellises along S. Clematis St. with antiques and crafts, including jewelry, clothes and decorative items.Voltaire Turns One Aug. 23-26, 526 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. No cover and free drinks until 11 p.m. Entertainment by: Zigtebra, Donzii, Monster Teeth, DJ Lindsey Mills Aug. 23. Mood Swing, The Ricca Project, The Basement Presents Aug. 24. Bashaum Stewart Trio, Michael Mayo, Val Verra. Sushi Tasting by YellowJack Sushi Aug. 25. JM & the Sweets Aug. 26. FRIDAY8/24The 2018 Football Season Kickoff Party 5:30-8:30 p.m. Aug. 24, Roxys Pub, 309 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Meet fellow Gators for a happy hour specials, networking and prizes and raffles. www.roxyspub.com or 561-2967699.Summer Opera Nights 6-10 p.m. Aug. 24, Elizabeth Avenue Station, 1500C Elizabeth Ave., West Palm Beach. A family-friendly evening of opera, drinks and games. Tickets: $10 adults, $5 students, free for children younger than 12, which includes one drink. A food truck will also be on site. Street parking. 561833-7888. SATURDAY8/25Polish Craft Beer & Polka Block Party 2-8 p.m. Aug. 25, West Palm Beach Brewery and Wine Vault, 332 Evernia St., West Palm Beach. Theyll be shutting down the block for a Polish party with Jan Lewan, the Polka King, Polish food vendors and Polish beer. Info: 561-619-8813.Noche Latina 4-7 p.m. and 9 p.m. to close Aug. 25, Guanabanas Island Restaurant & Bar, 960 N. A1A, Jupiter. The monthly music series continues with two Miami acts plus Ephniko, a world music DJ. Cortadito play the Cuban folk, the Nag Champayons perform a blend of Afro-Galactic and Tropidelic music. Free. Age 21 and older after the sun sets. 561-747-8878; www.guanabanas. com.Bamboozle 2018 to Support Little Smiles Aug. 25 along Clematis St., West Palm Beach. From 6-8 p.m., teams of four use clues to complete tasks, challenges and obstacles with different levels of difficulty and point values. The team with the most points wins. Team entry fee: $100. Register from 4:30-6 p.m. at Roxys Pub. Afterparty on the rooftop with free food, drink specials and awards. Proceeds help Little Smiles grant wishes and sponsor activities for children in hospitals, group homes, hospices and shelters. Ask about sponsorship opportunities. For info, visit the Facebook page at LittleSmilesofFlorida. Feminism in Flux opening reception 7-9 p.m. Aug. 25, the Grand Hall Gallery at Compass Community Center, 201 N. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth. An exhibition exploring feminist art, performance and text of the trans and gender-nonconforming people. Curators: Rolando Chang Barrero and Heather Wright. On display through Nov. 1. RSVP at www.eventbrite.com. Call to schedule tours: 786-521-1199. Email: ActivistArtistA@gmail.com.Fredi Cohen: Celebrate Our Evolving Feminine: In Life, Art, Architecture, & Furniture Through Aug. 31, Armory Art Experience at CityPlace, 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. Free standing multimedia sculpture and original art built into architecture and furnishings, a preview of work shell show at Spectrum Miami and ArtExpo New York. Free. www.fredicohenart.com. 561-832-1776; www.armoryart.org.SUNDAY8/26Susan G. Komen South Florida Cycle for the Cure Noon to 2 p.m. Aug. 26, CYCLEBAR Palm Beach Gardens, 4550 Donald Ross Road, #100, Palm Beach Gardens. A rockin pink party on wheels to benefit Susan G. Komen South Florida with classes, friendly competition, prizes and healthy treats. All levels. $50 individual rider, $200 for a team of four, or $500 for an elite team of four. Support Komen South Florida. Register online at www.komensouthflorida.org.TUESDAY8/28Schools Out Camp August 28, Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. For kids in grades K-8. A variety of on-site activities. $42 residents, $53 nonresidents. Register online at pbgrec.com/ login or in person; 561-630-1100. The 28th Annual Football Roast 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, at the Palm Beach Gardens Marriott. Kicks off with a tailgate party, then emcee Paxton Boyd of ESPN West Palm 106.3 Radio will handle the speakers on hand to pay tribute to this years coaches: Jeremy MarksPeltz (UM), Graham Elder (FSU), Andy Treadwell (UF), Ken LaVicka (FAU), and Erik Kohler (UCF). Plus food, cocktails, college sports memorabilia silent auction, a live auction and raffles. Hosted by the Kiwanis Club of Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets are $65 in advance and $70 at the door. 561-838-4556; www.KiwanisCollegeFootballRoast.com.LOOKING AHEADPalm Beach Chamber of Commerce Breakfast Aug. 30, The Breakers Palm Beach. Program: A panel discussion of safety and security in the workplace. Free for members, $40 guests in advance, $50 at the door. RSVP at www.palmbeachchamber.com.Clematis by Night 6-9 p.m. Thursday, West Palm Beach Waterfront, West Palm Beach. Music, food, drink, vendors and a sunset. Info: www.clematisbynight.net. Aug. 30: Sunset East (Alternative Pop-Rock) opens. Headliner: Krazy Train (Rock/Top 40).Sunset Celebration 6-9 p.m. Aug. 31, Lake Park Harbor Marina, 105 Lake Shore Drive, Lake Park. Music by the Caribbean Chillers. Cash bar, food, arts and crafts. 561-840-0160; www. lakeparkmarina.com. Northwood Village Art Night Out 6-9 p.m. Aug. 31, Northwood Road. Local arts and craft vendors display their work, galleries and boutiques stay open, theres live music and eclectic street artists performing, and local eateries offer specials and treats. For more information, call 561-822-1550 or www.wpb.org/cra.La Cage Aux Folles Aug. 31-Sept. 23, The Lauderhill Performing Arts Center, 3800 NW 11th Place, Lauderhill. Book by Harvey Fierstein, music and lyrics by Jerry Herman, based on the play by Jean Poiret. Tickets: $48. 954-344-7765; www.stagedoorfl.org. Flavor Palm Beach Sept. 1-30, Palm Beach County. Lunches for $20 and dinners priced from $30 to $45 at more than 50 restaurants including Charleys Crab, Imoto, Mortons The Steakhouse, Ruths Chris, Sant Ambroeus, Temple Orange at Eau, and Tommy Bahama in Harbourside Place. Make reservations online or contact the restaurant directly. www.flavorpb.com.AT THE COLONYThe Colony Hotel 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. 561-659-8100 or 561-6555430; www.thecolonypalmbeach.com. Copeland Davis 5:30-9:30 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday in the restaurant. Lenny Zinni 5:30-9:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday in the restaurant. Jazz Trio 5:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday in the restaurant. Motown Fridays 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Royal Room. Live Jazz Brunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. AT CORAL SKY Coral Sky Amphitheatre, 601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. 561-7958883; www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre. com or www.livenation.com Jeff Beck, Paul Rodgers & Ann Wilson Aug. 25 Charlie Puth Voicenotes Sept. 1AT THE GARDENSThe Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-775-7750; www.thegardensmall.com.Kids Club SafariParty 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 25, Nordstrom Court. AT THE KELSEYThe Kelsey Theater, 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 561-328-7481; www.thekelseytheater.com or www.holdmyticket.com. Rockliscious Battle of the Bands 8 p.m. Sept. 1. Rebel Scum Burlesque: A Science Fiction Parody 8 p.m. Sept. 14-15.AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-832-7469; www.kravis.org.Brian Regan Sept. 20My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra Sept. 27-Oct. 14 Rock of Ages Nov. 6-11AT THE LIGHTHOUSEJupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Lighthouse Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. 561-747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tours Aug. 29. Weather permitting. Spectacular sunset views and an inside look at the nuts and bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. Tour time: 75 minutes. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. RSVP required. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour Aug. 25 and 26. See the moon rise over the lighthouse. $20 members, $25 nonmembers. Twilight Yoga at the Light Aug. 27. By donation. Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, leads.AT THE IMPROVPalm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.com.Tom Segura Aug. 24-26The Nick & Trey Show Aug. 30Deray Davis Aug. 31-Sept. 1AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-575-2223; www. jupitertheatre.org.Single Tickets $60 and up, on sale now to the following shows: Steel Magnolias Oct. 28-Nov. 11 Beauty and the Beast Nov. 27-Dec. 16 Mamma Mia! Jan. 15-Feb. 10 A Dolls House, Part 2 Feb. 24-March 10 West Side Story March 26-April 14AT THE BALLPARK Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter. 561-775-1818; www.rogerdeanchevroletstadium.com.The Jupiter Hammerheads and the Palm Beach Cardinals are lighting up the diamond with fast-paced baseball action through Sept. 2. Special promotion nights: Evan Cohen Bobblehead Night and Dog Days of Summer Aug. 25. Get a bobblehead with the purchase of a special ticket package. Proceeds benefit Duffys Foundation. Plus, its dog days of summer so Fido can come too. Fidos ticket is $5 which benefits local pet charities. Tire America Day Aug. 30. Fun for the whole family including bounce houses and post-game fireworks and the Zooperstars, a hilarious inflatable show. Superhero Night Sept. 1. Fans can dress up in their favorite superhero costume for special music, activities and a costume contest. Get a special ticket package that includes a bobblehead of CBS12 morning news anchor Suzanne Boyd! Proceeds from the bobbleheads will benefit Take Stock in Children Palm Beach County.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 TOP PICKS #SFL Jeff Beck, Paul Rodgers & Ann Wilson Aug. 25, Coral Sky Amphitheatre. 561-795-8883; www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com or www.livenation.com The 22nd Annual Members Juried Exhibition 2018 Aug. 24Oct. 27, The Palm Beach Photographic Centre. 561-253-2600; www.workshop.org #DRINK #PICTURETHIS Polish Craft Beer & Polka Block Party 2-8 p.m. Aug. 25, West Palm Beach Brewery and Wine Vault. Polish party with Jan Lewan, the Polka King, Polish food vendors and Polish beer. 561-619-8813 MR.GUITAR Season Finale Sept. 2. Playoff games The Palm Beach Cardinals play Sept. 5 and 6.ONGOING American German Club of the Palm Beaches 5111 Lantana Road, Lake Worth. www.americangermanclub.com or 561-967-6464, Ext 2. Friday Night Dinner Dance Party 5 p.m. Aug. 25. Entertainment from 7-11 p.m. by Dean Richards Fruehschoppen Bavarian Brunch! 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Aug. 26. Free admission, a la carte German specialties.The Armory Art Center 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-8321776; www.armoryart.org.The Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre Village Shoppes of North Palm Beach, 133 U.S. Highway One, Suite 115, North Palm Beach. Regularly scheduled classes are $30 per week or $100 per month. 561-743-9955; www.burtreynoldsinstitute.orgClasses offered: Intermediate Acting for age 8 and older Junior Acting and Improv for age 8 and older Fundamentals of Acting Improvisation Plus for adults Creative Writing for serious writers Specialty classes such as the On-Camera Workshop, Monologue Techniques and Teleprompter Proficiency are available on a rotating basis.CityPlace 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-366-1000; www. cityplace.com Wellness Wednesday: Fitness Hub 6:30-7:30 p.m. Aug. 29. Fitness Hub will offer a Zumba or Body Combat class on the Square. Free. Sunday Yoga at the Culture Lab: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday. A Vinyasa yoga class. By donation. Register at www. cityplace.com/events/culturelabyoga. Assemblage: An Organically Grown Exhibition: Noon to 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. $5 Ticket Tuesdays at AMC Theaters CityPlace AMC Stubs members (its free to join) entitle you to $5 tickets on Tuesdays. With the $5 Cameo Combo get a savory popcorn and CocaCola, its a cheap date day or night at $10. Feeding South Florida Food Drive Through Sept. 30. Donate three nonperishable food items at Guest Services and get four hours of free parking in one of the CityPlace garages. Live music 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Aug. 24: A special evening of Latin music sponsored by MOJITO Latin Cuisine & Bar. Aug. 25: Lauren Echo Aug. 31: Mister Trombone & Live DJDowntown at the Gardens 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-340-1600; www. downtownatthegardens.com.Summer concerts: 7-9 p.m. Free. Aug. 24: Trezz Hombres: Zz Top Aug. 31: Jaded: Aerosmith The Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter Leads nature walks. New adventurers are welcomed. Get info and register at www. loxfltrail.org. Hike on the Apoxee Wilderness Trail 7:50 a.m. Aug. 25, 3125 North Jog Road, West Palm Beach. A strenuous 9to 12-mile hike. Joe at 561-859-1954. Frenchmans Forest Stroll 7:20 a.m. Aug. 26, 12201 Prosperity Farms Road, Palm Beach Gardens. An hourlong walk on shady trails. 561-586-0486.The Historical Society of Palm Beach County and The Richard And Pat Johnson History Museum 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. 561-832-4164; www.hspbc.orgJohn D. MacArthur Beach State Park 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, Singer Island, North Palm Beach. 7767449; www.macarthurbeach.org. Butterfly Walk 11 a.m. Aug. 25. A walking tour. Reservations required at 561-624-6952. Introduction to Surfing 1-3 p.m. Aug. 25. A ranger-led course for adults and age 12-17, with an adult. Free. Reservations required. 561-624-6952. The Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free the first Saturday of the month and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 561-746-3101; www.LighthouseArts.org.Multilingual Language & Cultural Society 210 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Register at 561-228-1688; www.multilingualsociety.org; or email nk@multilingualsociety.org. French for Complete Beginners 9-11 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept. 6-Oct. 26. Register before Aug. 25 and get one free private class.North Palm Beach Library 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. 561841-3383; www.village-npb.org. Ongoing: Knit & Crochet at 1 p.m. Mondays; Quilters meet 10 a.m. Friday; Chess group meets at 9 a.m. the first and third Saturday. The Palm Beach Gardens City Hall Lobby 10500 N. Military Trail. Exhibit hours are Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. 561-630-1100 or go to pbgrec.com/ gardensart. Wet & Wild Water Media Journey A solo exhibition by artist Tammy Seymour opens Aug. 27. On display through Oct. 4. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-253-2600; www.workshop.org. The 22nd Annual Members Juried Exhibition 2018 Aug. 24-Oct. 27. The exhibition, which is open to photographers worldwide, both amateur and professional, encourages experimental and mixed techniques. 561253-2600.The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every day. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 561-533-0887; www.palmbeachzoo.orgThe Society of the Four Arts 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Call 561-6557227; www.fourarts.org.The South Florida Fairgrounds 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. 561-793-0333; www.southfloridafair.com.Yesteryear Village, A Living History Park Learn what life was like in South Florida before 1940. Town residents will share their stories. Hours are 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Tickets: $10 adults, $7 seniors age 60 and older, $7 children age 5-11, and free for younger than age 5. Info: 561-7953110 or 561-793-0333. Lecture Series in Yesteryear Village Aug. 25. Speaker: Elliot Kleinberg, The Palm Beach Post. Kids World Family Fun Fest Aug. 25-26.The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Info: 561-832-1988; www.sfsciencecenter.org. AREA MARKETSSinger Island Green & Artisan Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Singer Islands Ocean Walk, 2401 Ocean Ave. along scenic A1A. Pet and kid friendly. www.singerislandgreenmarket.com.Lake Worth High School Flea Market 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, year-round, under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. Info: 561-439-1539.Palm Beach Gardens Summer GreenMarket Through Sept. 30, at its breezy, undercover summer location at STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage, 11010 N. Military Trail in Palm Beach Gardens. Hours: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays. Fresh produce, pastries, coffee, seafood, flowers, cheeses, spices, handmade crafts. No pets. 561-630-1100; pbgrec.com/greenmarket. Rust Market 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month in the parking area at Kelsey Vintage, 748B Park Ave., Lake Park. Vendors of vintage items and decor, clothing, jewelry, artisan pieces, and more. Brunch, beer and mimosas available from Brick N Barrel. Free parking. Next market: September. www.kelseyvintage.com CALENDAR #HAHAHA Tom Segura Aug. 24-26, Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace. 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.com

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLE ANSWERS pot.net or call 561-882-0090.Happiness workshopWhat if someone had the key to happiness. Would you want it? Olympic weightlifting champion and mental toughness expert Laura Eiman will offer a workshop designed to improve personal satisfaction. The West Palm Beach mental and physical fitness coach will teach her course Master Your Emotions to Win from 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 13 at Kitchen Restaurant, 319 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach. The gold medal winner, 65, believes she has the practical solutions you need to develop mental toughness, a quality required for success and personal happiness. Tickets are $75, which includes the workshop, one beverage and hors doeuvres. The workshop is hosted by the Happiness Club. For more information or reservations, visit www.lauraeiman. com or call 561-406-8415. Volunteer opportunity Are you looking for a volunteer opportunity? The Kravis Center wants to hear from you. The theater is recruiting volunteers for its 2018-19 season and will host new volunteer orientation at 10 a.m. Sept. 14 in the Kravis Centers Persson Hall. If not for the hundreds of volunteers who donate their time, the shows could not go on at the Kravis Center. Volunteer opportunities include positions as ushers and tour guides, hospitality and gift shop staff, data entry, in the education department and the administrative offices. For ushers, a training course about Kravis Center operations that covers emergency evacuations, seating, show procedures and customer service skills is required. Applications are available online at www.kravis.org/volunteer. BOOMing at the YMCAPlanning to get in shape this year? This new Silver Sneakers class at the YMCA of the Palm Beaches might be just the ticket. BOOM is a new cardioyoga-strength training class for seniors thats a complete workout of body, mind and spirit. The regimen combines movements that support heart health, build muscle strength, and encourage mindfulness, which are key in managing most health conditions. Boom is taught by the Ys certified Silver Sneakers instructor Shaina Debye and is free for members and $10 for guests. Classes meet from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Mondays and are appropriate for all fitness levels. The YMCA of the Palm Beaches and Oelsner Skate Park are at 2085 S. Congress Ave., West Palm Beach. For more information, call 561-968-9622 or visit www.ymcapalmbeaches.org. for Palm Beach Dramaworks, Mr. Kato is producing artistic director and chief executive of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and Mr. Tyrrell is founding director of Theatre Lab at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. Each has many years of experience producing well-known plays and musicals for their audiences, while holding fast to the conviction that regional theater is the necessary gateway through which new and original works must make their way into the world.Palm Beach Dramaworks and its DramaworkshopWe will continue our commitment to developing new works, which is one of the primary functions of regional theater, said Mr. Hayes, whose Dramaworkshop program was set up to discover and develop new plays and musicals. Just think of the many great American classics. All of them started at one particular regional theater, then transferred from city to city as the playwright continued to develop the work. All the great masterworks of Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman and Eugene ONeill, to name a few, started in one particular theater then moved on to other cities and venues throughout the country for further development. Mr. Hayes quickly added that his commitment to classic and contemporary plays remains steadfast, but he believes producing new plays is crucial. Thats why the organization devotes nearly $100,000 annually to workshops, readings and various stages of development. Its a critical part of the mandate of notfor-profit, regional theaters, he said. Decades ago, Broadway was the place to see new American plays. But as costs soared, the number of brand-new plays on Broadway diminished to practically nothing. Think about it. Almost all the new plays that make it to Broadway today get there only after a successful run in London, OffBroadway or in regional theater. Mr. Hayes pointed to Pulitzer Prize winners Fences (Yale Repertory Theatre in New Haven, Conn.), August: Osage County (Steppenwolf Theatre in Chicago), Disgraced (American Theater Company, also in Chicago) and Angels in America (Eureka Theatre Company in San Francisco) as prime examples of plays that came out of regional theater and found success on Broadway. He added Palm Beach Dramaworks has carried out that mission as well, recently producing Joseph McDonoughs Edgar & Emily, a fictional encounter between Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson, who, between quips and barbs, grapple with their deepest fears. In the upcoming 2018-19 season, PBD also will produce Lyle Kesslers House On Fire, a dark comedy of love, rage and redemption as an old man and his two sons battle for dominance. Also currently in development is Ordinary Americans, another original work by Mr. McDonough, about actress and early television pioneer Gertrude Berg. Im proud to share that Edgar & Emily will be receiving a second production in Tampa and the playwright will continue to develop it, he said. But how exciting that it started at PBD. And were doing House On Fire and have commissioned Ordinary Americans as part of the evolution of our organization and the responsibility of a regional theater to develop new work, because if were not doing it, nobody is.The Maltz Jupiter Theatres ARC FestivalAndrew Kato also supports new voices and original theater pieces, which spawned the ARC New Works Theatre Festival this past April at his Maltz Jupiter Theatre a free, weeklong event that showcased new and established theater writers from Florida and New York through a variety of play readings, concerts and student-produced 10-minute musicals, all in different stages of development. Its very important that regional theaters add to the national landscape of new works, Mr. Kato said. Especially when it relates to opportunities for writers. When I was in New York, I grew increasingly frustrated with the lack of support, especially for musical theater. Broadway producers, musical licensors and theater owners are making hundreds of millions of dollars, yet there is not one not-for-profit theater company there that has an actual performance space that they own exclusively for the creation of new musicals. The ARC festival followed up on another effort he spearheaded about six years ago called the Emerging Artists Series in Musical Theatre Playwriting. From that sprang an original musical called Academy, written by John Mercurio and directed by Mr. Kato, which told the story of a Faustian bargain made by two high school senior boys involving a nave and unsuspecting freshman. That musical went to New York and then on to South Korea. Mr. Kato also commissioned a new play with music in 2010 called Fanny Brice: The Real Funny Girl, a four-character play by David Bell that was produced at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre then went on to a subsequent production at Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota. In addition, an original childrens show called Through The Looking Glass was produced at his theater and has enjoyed several other incarnations around the country. The proposition of getting your work out is very expensive for an individual to bear, he said. The price tag for the ARC festival, for example, was $50,000. Our number one objective was to be supportive of the writers. The second objective was that the writers would hopefully learn something from the experience to improve their product. The third objective was to educate our audiences and give them a deeper appreciation for what new work is and what it takes to create it. Next year the ARC festival will take a new form, as Mr. Kato will develop a new project with Gordon Greenberg, who directed MJTs recent production of South Pacific. We will re-envision Dracula, focusing on this one project instead of the five we did this year, Mr. Kato said. And well include our audience in the process so they can watch it progress through its different iterations. Our ultimate goal will be to get this production to our mainstage. Regional theater has always been the Petri dish for new and original work. And to be a great regional theater you need to have great education, great product and a new works festival.Theatre Lab: A cultural incubator for hatching new worksTheatre Lab is all about new and original works. It came into being a couple of years ago at FAU through the efforts of Louis Tyrrell, whose talents in the Palm Beach County theater scene have been on display for many years with Florida Stage in Manalapan and Arts Garage in Delray Beach. Starting up a new theater company at FAU has been a unique opportunity for Mr. Tyrrell, who recently handed over the reins of artistic director to local actor and playwright Matthew Stabile, his former associate artistic director. Theatre Lab is a cultural laboratory for learning, growing and expanding the horizons of knowledge, Mr. Tyrrell said. Budgeted very modestly, at about a half a million dollars a year, we focus on new work in American theater. That is our passion and our mission. That mission, he added, has encompassed a number of series including: Making Musicals, a musical theater/ concert/play reading series dedicated to producing original works, similar to the program he headed at Arts Garage; Play Slam, a succession of readings of new plays incorporating discussions with the playwright, director and cast; The Playwrights Forum, a series of staged readings along with workshops, lectures and master classes with wellknown American playwrights; The New Play Festival featuring staged readings of works in progress; The Young Artists and Writers Project, an educational outreach program. We feel the playwright is at the center of the theater exercise, Mr. Tyrrell said. And were trying to help playwrights, whether theyre emerging or established or even some of our national treasures, such as John Guare, Marsha Norman or even Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz from Miami. Another Miami-based playwright, Christopher Demos-Brown, he added, has had several plays produced by Mr. Tyrrell. Mr. Demos-Browns new play, American Son, received an early reading at Theatre Lab and will be produced at the Booth Theatre on Broadway this fall. Meanwhile, Theatre Labs 2018-19 season will feature no fewer than three new works: Tar Beach by Tammy Ryan, which recounts a tale of lost innocence against the background of the 1977 New York City blackout; We Will Not Be Silent by David Meyers, which tells a tale of civil disobedience in Nazi Germany; and Harlowe by Jennifer Lane, a story of sisters, bodies and how we heal, according to its description. Unless we support new work at regional theaters across the country, we wont be able to identify and help to nurture the new work that will become the classics of tomorrow, Mr. Tyrrell said. I think 9/11 and the economic downturn had a real impact on peoples comfort. Theyve circled their wagons, both economically and emotionally. In my experience of over four decades of working in the theater, Ive noticed the adventurousness of our audience has diminished and we need to reengage them. Here at Theatre Lab, we take no ownership of the plays we develop. We just want to see them thrive and be viewed by as many people as possible, at regional theaters all around the country. HAPPENINGSFrom page 1THEATERFrom page 1 KATO TYRRELL HAYES

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 B7 CASUAL DINING AND ATTIRE ON WORTH AVENUETHREE COURSE PRIX-FIXE DINNER $39.00Monday thru Sunday 5:00PM TO 9:00PM TABOORESTAURANT.COM FOR MENU JUNE THRU OCTOBEROPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30AM TO 10:00PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30AM TO 3:00PMHAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4 TO 7561.835.3500RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED 221 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, FL LATEST FILMSAlphaIs it worth $10? NoBased on the trailers and marketing, viewers have every right to expect Alpha to eagerly embrace the standard dog movie tropes: Lost soul human befriends a feisty canine, and the two form a symbiotic bond that changes both of their lives. These things do happen, but it inexplicably takes director Albert Hughes 40 minutes nearly half of the 96-minute running time to get there. Its an example of too much tedious exposition leading to a level of indifference from which the movie cannot recover. Theres also this: Its fully subtitled, meaning not one word of English is spoken. Twenty thousand years ago in Europe (does it matter where the story is set when theres no civilization in the world?), humans survive by hunting and taking care of their own. They hunt for food, not sport, and must store enough rations to last through the brutally cold and snowy winter. The leader of the tribe is Tau (Johannes Haukur Johannesson), and for the first time his son Keda (Kodi Smit-McPhee) is joining him on the hunt. It will make a man out of him, Tau insists, but Keda is not a natural warrior. Things go wrong, and Keda is believed to be dead. This is both the best and worst part of the film. Its the best because Keda is trapped on a small ledge in the middle of a cliff with seemingly no chance of escape. Its perilous and palm-sweat inducing, and it has us genuinely wondering how he can escape. Its the worst because far too much time is spent with Tau lamenting the supposed death of his son, which everybody whos seen the trailer knows isnt real. Tau mourning is therefore a complete waste of time. Keda eventually befriends a wolf dog and they help one another survive, with Keda knowing he needs to return home before winter comes. There are impressive visual sequences, and as seen in 3D some landscapes and action scenes inspire awe. Its not, however, so cinematically stunning that it sufficiently compensates for the sluggish story. Animal lovers, the target audience for the film, are unlikely to find much joy here. Theres ample hunting and killing, for one. The visual effects for the larger animals, particularly wolves and a panther, are murky and feel a little cheap, for another. Most of all, though, a 2016 news story about the production reported four bison were slaughtered for a scene (that was cut from the film). The report depicted the removal of the animals hides (source: https://www.cbc. ca/news/canada/calgary/bisons-killedfilm-alberta-1.3653436). This negative press perhaps also explains why Alpha was on the shelf for a year before getting a never-desirable August release date. Offensive to some peoples sensibilities or not, Alpha as a whole simply isnt that good. Its structurally flawed and not nearly as accessible to mainstream audiences as the marketing would lead you to believe. No harm in catching this on home video when the time comes and even then only as a second or third choice. dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> Filming for Alpha took place in Vancouver, Alberta and Iceland. FILM CAPSULES BY DAN HUDAKBlacKkKlansman (John David Washington, Adam Driver, Topher Grace) In the early 0s, an African-American police officer (Washington, Denzels son) in Colorado Springs infiltrates the Klu Klux Klan with the help of his white Jewish colleague (Driver). Director Spike Lees film is a bit long at 135 minutes, but its also nicely acted and well told. Rated R.Christopher Robin (Ewan McGregor, Hayley Atwell, Bronte Carmichael) An adult Christopher Robin (McGregor) tries to keep his job, and his family together, when his old friend Winnie the Pooh (voice of Lee Cummings) finds him in London in need of help. The visual effects are impressive, but the story isnt really for kids or adults and its pretty dull. Rated PG.Mission: Impossible Fallout (Tom Cruise, Henry Cavill, Rebecca Ferguson) Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team botch a mission and then have to save the world to make up for their mistake. The action is once again top notch, and the story has more twists than you expect. This is one of the best action franchises in movies today. Rated PG-13.Leave No Trace (Ben Foster, Thomasin McKenzie, Dale Dickey) A father (Foster) and daughter (McKenzie) live off the grid in Oregon, but things change when he is arrested for living on public land. Its a minimalist, fascinating study of an unusual but healthy father-daughter relationship that features solid performances from Foster and McKenzie. Rated PG.

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLYErika Larson, Nicky Schneider, Beth Kigel and Jill Mondo Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYJupiter Medical Center Loggerhead Triathlon 1. Cory Pelletier, Doug Avdellas and Matt Brooks 2. Heather Storm and Jakob Dawson 3. Donna Neary, Marty Frezza, Robin Neary and Linda Neary 4. Kellie Roedig and Nicole Roedig 5. Jamie Wagner and Tiffanie Veau 6. Alexander Newby, Cathy Spicer, Dawn Newby and Craig Newby 7. Stephen Thomas and Tawn Shaler 8. Lee Chimerakis, Theresa Chimerakis, Karen Dietrick, Dimitri Chimerakis and Jen Chimerakis 9. Nancy Brooks, Carol Pelletier and Cathy Salter 10. Kristy Breslaw, Jessica Van der Brook and Olivia Van der Brook 11. Omar Castillo Jr. and Omar Castillo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 8 9 10 11 8 9 1 1

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 Bring this ad to receive 20 % o your purchase(Not to be combined with other o ers) Shop Well! Do Good! Bene tting those in need in Palm Beach CountyAlso visit our South Store3757 S.Military Trail St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store JupiterUpscale Resale 250 W. Indiantown RoadJust west of Alt. A-1-A and RR Tracks Mon-Sat. 10-4 p.m.561-401-9585 www.svdp-palmbeach.org Shop-Donate-VolunteerSt Vincent de Paul Thrift Store Jupiter PUZZLESHOPPER IN THE SOOT HOROSCOPESVIRGO (August 23 to September 22) There might be mixed signals from a certain someone who doesnt seem all that certain about their intentions. Best to sort it all out before it becomes more confusing. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Get all the facts about that investment opportunity before you put even one dollar into it. There could be hidden problems that could prove to be costly. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Compromising on a matter you feel strongly about not only ends the impasse, but can be a win-win deal for all. Remember: Scorpios do well with change. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) With all the demands you currently have to deal with, accepting the help of family and friends could be the wisest course to take at this time. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Recent upsetting incidents might have left you with a big gap in your self-assurance. Refill it by spending time with those who know how worthy you really are. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A dispute about money needs to be resolved quickly, before it festers into something more serious. Consider asking an impartial colleague to mediate the matter. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A soft approach could be more effective than making a loud demand for the information you need. You might even find yourself with more data than you expected. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A little wool-gathering for the usually productive Lamb is all right if it helps you unwind. But be careful; too much daydreaming can put you behind schedule in your work.TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A work problem is close to being resolved. Now you can go ahead and celebrate the week, accepting invitations from friends who enjoy your company.GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Getting your new plan accepted wont be a major hassle if you have the facts to back it up. Your supporters are also prepared to help you make your case. Good luck. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dealing with a pesky job problem might be time-consuming but necessary. The sooner you get this situation settled, the sooner you can move on to other matters. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Career advancement is favored thanks to your impressive work record. On the personal side, you should soon hear some good news about an ailing family member.BORN THIS WEEK: Youre sought out for the wonderful advice youre able to offer to others. And sometimes you even take it yourself. SEE ANSWERS, B6 SEE ANSWERS, B6 By Linda Thistle SUDOKUDifficulty level: Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Opera Fusion will host An Evening of Puccini at Sunshine Cathedral on Aug. 26, featuring scenes from six of the theatrical and musical genius works: Madama B utterfly, La bohme, Tosca, Gianni Schicchi, Turandot and La Rondine. In An Evening of Puccini, the companys Rene Greenberg Emerging Artists will be led for a second time by Maestro Stephen M. Crawford and Stage Director Martha Collins, who both led Opera Fusions 2017 Emerging Artists Program of Strauss and Verdi opera scenes. Ms. Greenberg, of Palm Beach Gardens, is a founding board member of the company, a frequent sponsor of South Florida opera singers and major Puccini fan. Opera Fusion has performed previously at Sunshine Cathedral, including its 2017 Emerging Artists Program and its 2016 debut of portions of its world premiere of Not In My Town, spotlighting numbers from the story of the friendship of LGBT activist Romaine Patterson and Matthew Shepard, who was murdered in Wyoming. Composer/ librettist was Michael Ross and conductor was Maestro Gordon Roberts, both of Broward County. An Evening of Puccini will feature minimalist staging and costumes. The show is divided into three sections, with two intermissions. There will be supertitles. A cash bar will be available. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. at Sunshine Cathedral, 1480 SW Ninth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets cost $25 for General Admission, and $40 for VIP seating. Purchase tickets via www.Opera Fusion.org and at the door. Opera Fusion plans Evening of Puccini

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY VINOFrom dark red, to ruby to toasty oak, try these winesAs you know, we wine journalists receive sample bottles from wineries and their public relations firms, shipped to us in the hope that well swirl, sip and review the products favorably in our columns. When I first started writing this column, I knew the Fed Ex and UPS trucks would be unloading boxes at my office, but I was a bit unprepared for the flood of samples Id receive. This is not a complaint. I am delighted with the range and quality of the wines Im privileged to sample and evaluate. And, as Ive mentioned in past columns, I take the responsibility seriously and have a tasting panel of very knowledgeable friends who join me in monthly sipping sessions. However, I do get emails from the wineries and their ad agencies asking, Did you have a chance to try the Chateau Bonjour we sent? But, since my column is published only every other week, and since I have room for three or maybe four reviews in each, I do get a bit behind and the bottles stack up in the cellar. So, every once in a while, I try to catch up a bit and offer you a range of new choices and recommendations. When my wife Debi and I first fell down the rabbit hole into the wine world, I made myself one promise: I would never serve or recommend a wine I wouldnt drink myself. In fact, when the panel is finished sampling and evaluating the wines, we finish some of them off with dinner, and then everybody takes home a few bottles. We like them, so we continue to enjoy them. And on more than one occasion, Ive tasted a sample bottle and immediately ordered a case. Or two. In order to get a bit ahead of the sample shipments, Im happy to offer your new shopping list of excellent value wines. We liked them all. Most may be available locally or can be ordered on line and shipped to you. Ranch 32 Cabernet Sauvignon Monterey 2015 ($39) The dark ruby color in the glass promises a full-bodied palate with exuberant black mixed fruit, leather and smoke. WW 88. Clos Pegase Estate Chardonnay Napa Valley Mitsukos Vineyard 2016 ($30) After nine months in the barrel, this wine offers toasty oak on the nose with hints of vanilla and caramel. Melon and apricot flavors predominate, riding on a creamy texture from the malolactic fermentation. If you like an oak-style Chardonnay, try this one. WW 89-90. Les Dauphins Ctes du Rhne Rserve Rouge 2016 ($11) A characteristic Rhone blend of Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvdre with a rich ruby color. Black mixed fruit, with currant flavors predominant and hints of spice, plum and smoke. Excellent value. WW 88. Fetzer Riesling Monterey County NV ($10) An off-dry example of this German varietal with a rich yellow color in the glass, a bit of characteristic petrol on the nose and round mouthfeel with predominant melon flavors and a long finish. Great value for the price. WW 87. Gato Negro Sauvignon Blanc Chile 2017 ($5) A pleasant, light summer sipper, with pronounced lemon and grapefruit aromas and flavors and a bit of a green note as well. Nicely balanced between the lively acidity and fruit flavors. Another very good value. WW 87-88. Scheid Family VDR Red Blend Monterey Hames Valley 2015 ($20) The VDR stands for very dark red, and it is. An uncommon blend of Petit Verdot and Petite Sirah, theres nothing petite about the flavors. Explosive blueberry, vanilla and pepper, along with mouth-filling deep plum and tobacco. Definitely a sipping wine. WW 93.Ask the Wine WhispererQ. I was watching a few wine experts sampling and evaluating wines, and they slurped them pretty noisily from the glass. Why are we supposed to slurp wine? Caroline L., Port St. LucieA. Slurping has the same effect as when you swirl the wine in your glass before tasting, only more so. Both swirling and slurping are ways to get oxygen into the liquid and help it to open up, bringing out the aromas and flavors. So, go ahead and slurp. Its the professional thing to do. Jerry Greenfield is The Wine Whisperer. He is wine director of the international Direct Cellars wine club. His book, Ask the Wine Whisperer, will be published in September. Read his other writings at www.winewhisperer. com. jerryGREENFIELDvino@floridaweekly.com something kind, Duffys is going to be involved. To me, that speaks volumes. We cant thank Evan enough, said Geri Emmett, the foundations chairwoman. He does everything he can to support Duffys. He was a huge fan of my husbands, and my husband was a huge fan of him. Paul Emmett, who died in 2015, bought the four original Duffys Drafthouse restaurants in 2001, rebranding them as Duffys Sports Grill. The chain that now has nearly three dozen locations throughout the state built a reputation on giving back to the communities it served. He would do what he could for anyone, Ms. Emmett said. Whatever it was, my husband would say yes to it. We pretty much follow in those footsteps. Ms. Boyds bobblehead will benefit Take Stock in Children, an organization that provides college scholarships to low-income, at-risk boys and girls. I just really believe that education can change someones life, she said. I think when you give somebody an education, it can turn things around for them. It can break the cycle of poverty. Catherine Awasthi, marketing and communications manager for Take Stock in Children, said 1,200 students from 29 public middle and high schools have enrolled in this years program. We always say were the best-kept secret in Palm Beach County because we serve a lot of students and we have a very high graduation rate, Ms. Awasthi said. We just hope that this doesnt only generate funds to send our kids to school but also awareness and what we do to help our underserved students. The Bobblehead Giveaway Night promotions take place Aug. 25, when the Jupiter Hammerheads play the Palm Beach Cardinals, and Sept. 1, when the sharks take on the Saint Lucie Mets. There is a limited quantity 400 each and their cost includes a ticket to the game. Both Mr. Cohen and Ms. Boyd will throw out the ceremonial first pitch and sign autographs for fans. We are thrilled to partner with Evan Cohen and Suzanne Boyd during our two bobblehead nights, said Mike Bauer, the stadiums general manager. They are both well-known in the Palm Beach market due to their media careers, but they are also known for their philanthropic endeavors. CHARITYFrom page 1Captain America, Deadpool and Flash, along with Spiderman and Superman, will show off their colorful costumes and prodigious powers during Super Hero Night at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium. The real-life versions of the iconic comic-book characters come to the ballpark courtesy of Jeffros Heroes, a nonprofit that uses the positivity of superheroes to bring smiles to sick children. Fans who attend the Sept. 1 game between the Jupiter Hammerheads and the Saint Lucie Mets can suit up as superheroes themselves and enter a contest for the best-dressed. Also, the first 300 children through the gates will receive navy-blue capes. The promotional night kicks off with a ceremony honoring five local superheroes nominated by their peers. The Hometown Heroes campaign will recognize those who have gone above and beyond as coaches, firefighters, mentors, philanthropists, police officers, public servants and teachers. We have the application listed online and are also promoting the campaign through social media and other marketing outlets, said Sarah Campbell, the stadiums marketing and promotions manager. Once applications are submitted, theyre reviewed by a panel of judges, and five local heroes are then selected. Superhero-themed activities, games and music will entertain the crowd between innings, and the grand finale is a post-game fireworks display. Super Hero Night coincides with Bobblehead Giveaway Night >> What: Super Hero Night >> Time: 4:30 p.m. doors open, 5:30 p.m. rst pitch >> Date: Sept. 1 >> Where: Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter >> Cost: $7-$9, free for children ages 2 and younger >> Info: rogerdeanchervoletstadium.com >> What: Evan Cohen Bobblehead Giveaway Night >> Time: 4:30 p.m. doors open, 5:30 p.m. rst pitch >> Date: Aug. 25 >> Where: Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter >> Cost: $25 includes one ticket and one bobblehead >> Info: rogerdeanchervoletstadium.com >> What: Suzanne Boyd Bobblehead Giveaway Night >> Time: 4:30 p.m. doors open, 5:30 p.m. rst pitch >> Date: Sept. 1 >> Where: Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter >> Cost: $25 includes one ticket and one bobblehead >> Info: rogerdeanchervoletstadium.com BY AMY WOODSawoods@ oridaweekly.com COURTESY PHOTOSales of Suzanne Boyds bobblehead will benefit Take Stock in Children.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 23-29, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11The Dish: Steak Frites The Place: The Cooper, PGA Commons, 4610 PGA Blvd., #100, Palm Beach Gardens; 561-622-0032 or www.thecooperrestaurant.com. The Price: $19 at lunch. The Details: Lets get this out of the way first: The Coopers Kale & Florida Watermelon Salad may be the most refreshing dish on any menu, anywhere. Its cool and its soothing, with creamy feta and slightly bitter arugula and is dressed with a sweet and tangy orange citronette. And ordinarily, thats what wed have ordered for lunch at The Cooper. But the restaurant did not disappoint with its Steak Frites, with a tender flatiron steak grilled medium as ordered, with plenty of fresh, crisp fries served on the side. The salsa verde and house steak sauce served on the side werent necessary this beef was flavorful enough on its own. Sc ott Simmons, ssimmons@florida w eekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus Places for Chinese take-out A trio worth noting3JANSTHREE FOR2 HONG KONG WOK N GRILL185 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-746-6798; www.hongkongwokngrillfl.com. Its always busy with take-out here, a good thing what it lacks in atmosphere it makes up for in food. Often mentioned by those from New York and New Jersey as being like home take-out. Egg rolls get high marks here, and we favor the duck main dish although the General Tsos chicken is a tasty version.1 CHINA TOWN CHEF4324 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-626-7722; www.chinagarden33410.com. Theres some seating here, but its predominately take-out service for this spot in the Winn-Dixie shopping center. Very friendly service and fresh food make it a winner. They dont skimp on chicken in the cashew chicken, and dumplings are nicely al dente and not mush in the won-ton soup.3 SINGING BAMBOO2845 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach. 561-686-9100; www.singingbamboofl.com. Theyll deliver from here with independent companies; you dont have to go in, though theres seating and dim sum if you do. Theyve been doing it so long they get it right, even with one of the most extensive menus around. Accommodations for diets is easy with suggestions from staff. Noodle dishes are on point. Note: Sushi here gets rave reviews. Jan Norris, jnorris@floridaweekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTO The folks at the West Palm Brewery & Wine Vault are putting on a Polish Craft Beer and Polka block party Saturday, from 2-8 p.m. In downtown West Palm Beach, the 300 block of Evernia Street will be shut down and covered with tents and stages where the polka king, Jan Lewan (Lewandowski), and the Alex Meixner Band, will perform for dancing in the street. The food is all Polish favorites pierogi, kielbasa and kapusta (a braised cabbage stew) served alongside imported Polish and Belgian craft beers. Beers from Browar Fortuna in Miloslaw, Poland, include Grodziskie, Baltic Porter; Perry (pear cider); Plum fruit beer, apple cider and more. At the event, West Palm Brewery will unveil two new house beers, Uncle Stashs Imperial Stout and Uncle Mitchs Ale. Admission is free; call the brewery for more details. West Palm Brewery & Wine Vault, 332 Evernia St., West Palm Beach. Phone 561-619-8813; www.westpalmbeer.com.Wine & All That Jazz in BocaOn Aug. 25 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, the Boca Chamber and JM Lexus sponsor the event Wine & All That Jazz The wine-around features more than 100 wines to sample, and dine-around plates prepared by more than 15 area restaurant chefs. Live jazz, late-night club dancing, and a raffle for luxe items are part of the event that benefits the Golden Bell Education Foundation. Special rates at the resort are being offered for the wine party. General admission tickets are $75. For details, visit www.wine-and-jazz. com. The Boca Raton Resort & Club is at 501 E. Camino Real, Boca Raton. Phone 561-447-3000; www.bocaresort.com.PGA National Craft Beer Bash PGA National Resort and Spa is gearing up for its annual Craft Beer Bash on Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m. Theyve announced the musicians: Timothee Lovelock, the DJ violinist, and the band Sweet Justice. Eventgoers will sample more than 150 craft beers and ciders from a variety of producers around the country. Food stations with foods for purchase will be set up among the beer booths, and shopping vendors also will be featured. There also will be timed releases of certain brews; a homeb rewers contest, and an after-party on site at i-Bar. Tickets are $39 in advance; $49 at the door. Special room-plus-ticket packages are available from the resort. PGA National Resort & Spa, 400 Avenue of the Champions, Palm Beach Gardens. Phone 561-627-3111; www.pgaresort.com. In brief Flavor Palm Beach starts Sept. 1, with a variety of restaurants offering discounted prix fixe meals at lunch and dinner. A listing is available online at www.flavorpb. com. ... September also sees Boca Restaurant Month in effect with the same types of deals. Restaurants see their slowest months in the hospitality industry; deals are in effect around the country, so if traveling, check out the city youre in there may just be a discount available. ... The Cooper in PGA Commons is hosting a tequila-pairing dinner Thursday, Aug. 23. The five-course meal with extras is $79 before tax and tip. Each dish is paired with a different tequila. Call the restaurant at 561-622-0032 for tickets and details. janNORRISjan@jannorris.com Evernia Street to go Polish for craft beer, polka party SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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Locations:Jupiter 1335 W. Indiantown Road West of Delaware Blvd., next to Harmony Animal Hospital Jupiter 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64 Located in the Abacoa Shopping Center, next to McDonalds Palm Beach Gardens 3250 PGA Blvd. Glass building at the southeast corner of PGA Blvd. and Fairchild Gardens Avenue West Palm Beach 625 N. Flagler Drive On the west side of the Flagler Memorial BridgeConvenient, Walk-in ServiceMonday-Saturday: 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sunday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 561-257-5982 | jupitermedurgentcare.comAugust is National Immunization Awareness Month Take your best shot against illness and disease with vaccinations at Jupiter Medical Center Urgent CareTetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) Hepatitis B Shingles Pneumococcal disease Seasonal flu Meningitis (appointment required) Travel vaccines FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are prop art of will you on edu cafor famict of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then the patt ern s. Wev e also ctice in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing t o the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n a dmi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for older adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do m uch be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up t hei favor of a F lor cohort of Bo o hit their ei gh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e c are? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... Florida Based. 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