Citation
Florida weekly

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Title:
Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
Publisher:
Florida Media Group, LLC
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Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource : ;

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Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
Classification:
AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

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TAKE ME TO Be prepared for an emergency. For your FREE rst aid kit, call 855.831.2803 Behind the wheelThree sedans rarely seen in a showrooom; the dealership unicorns. A16 OPINION A4 GOLF A5 PETS A6 BUSINESS A15 INVESTING A15 REAL ESTATE A19 ARTS B1 COLLECTING B2 CALENDAR B4-5 FILM B7 PUZZLES B9 CUISINE B11 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store.www.FloridaWeekly.comWEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 At HomeDesigners mix Hamptons style, Palm Beach flavor. Inside Writing challengeStep up to the Florida Weekly Writing Challenge B1 Sky outHow to fly to Europe on the cheap. A15 T 11 P.M., UNDER A MOONless sky, Dusty Wildman Crum eased into Everglades waters to grab a Burmese python he had spotted at the surface. It immediately slipped out of my hands, so I dove down and scooped it up and wrapped it around a cypress tree, Mr. Crum said. I was losing it SEE PYTHONS, A10 Pythons are running out of food in the eastern Everglades and are slithering into Broward, Palm Beach and Collier counties.BY CHELLE KOSTER WALTONFlorida Weekly Correspondent COURTESY PHOTODusty Wildman Crum with a Burmese python he caught.A BY RUSTY BROWNSpecial to Florida WeeklyThis is the story of two women who never met but are eternally bound together. One is young with dark eyes and hair, stylishly dressed; the other older and somewhat matronly in appearance. One is articulate and talented, but socially shy; the other, a commanding, dominating presence. The life of the young woman has been largely forgotten, whereas the other woman continues to be an inspiration to the world. She owes her significance to the younger woman, who gave her a voice and an identity, calling her the Mother of Exiles. She welcomes all who pass by, many seeking a new life. She says to them, Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me ... By now you know Im talking about the Statue of Liberty, the striking, robed figure in New York Harbor who has greeted incoming ships and planes for more than 130 years. The young woman was Emma Lazarus, a well-known poet of the times who wrote the stirring, oft-quoted words inscribed on a bronze tablet at the entrance to the monument. Ms. Lazarus died a year after the statues dedication in 1886. The statue, you recall, was a gift not from the French government, but from the people of France, who weary of wars, revolutions and the rule of despots were so admiring of A voice of welcome, hope, still relevant after 132 yearsSEE LIBERTY, A14 COURTESY PHOTOThe Statue of Liberty in New York City. Vol. VIII, No. 40 FREE AT HOMEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYTHE PALM BEACH HOME REDEFINED AUGUST 2018PHOTO BY BLUEPRINT/22 Jennifer Mabley and Austin Handler bring their talents to town Page 6 From Hamptons toPalm Beach GETAWAYDelrays Seagate offers luxury retreat. Page 4 CULTIVATEMounts Botanical turns 40. Page 2

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Before AfterCALL Today 561.575.5599Three Palms CenterPGAdentistryjupiter.comComplete Care in Our State-of-the-Art Facility $250VALUEComplimentary Consultation or 2nd OpinionIncludes Exam & Full-Mouth X-RayChange your smile, change your life!Dr. Joseph Russo is one of only 385 dentists worldwide to hold an Accreditation by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AAACD). He has extensive experience in helping patients who suffer with severely worn down teeth and TMJ pain. Dr. Russo has also earned certication by the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation (DOCS), allowing him to sedate his patients to a very relaxed and comfortable state during dental treatment. Now you can enjoy the life-changing benets of a beautiful smile and a comfortable bite that functions the way it should. Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.comwww.facebook.com/FloridaWeeklyPalmBeachTHERES A LOT TO LIKE 1/2 PRICE SALE 1/2 PLUS buy 3 get a 4th FREE!THE ULTIMATE FOOTWEAR EXPERIENCE Luxury Comft Footar 10953 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 561-775-6113 www.ShoeSpaUSA.comCannot be combined with other offers. Not valid on prior purchases. Sale shoes only. P L U S bu y S L ux u F e t a 4th F R E E E E ! TW EA R EX PE RIEN CE C o mft a r roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com COMMENTARYIn a jamSome time ago, probably in the late Paleolithic, I went to Outward Bound School to spend a month at the end of my 16th year walking, climbing, slogging, rappelling, running, starving and sleeping in snow and rain and the rough country of the Gore Range above Vail, Colo. And now in the 2018 election season one image from that adventure has come whispering back to me: I can still see Judson Williams, frozen by fear and doubt, unable to move on the side of a cliff 150 feet above the trees and 75 or 100 feet below the top. We Floridians have become Jud Williams, it seems to me weve gotten ourselves in a jam of our own doing. An Alabaman set to enter the Air Force Academy that fall, Judsons epiphany came on the morning of our first-ever rappel from a cliff top into the valley below. Our instructor, Arthur Aylen, had reviewed the ropes, the knots and the equipment one more time with us, then put us to the test. Arthur was a tough and careful mountaineer, a Rhodesian (now Zimbabwan) who had served in the British SAS, their special forces, and climbed several of the higher mountains in the Americas. Hed also joined an Everest expedition, I remember hearing. Whatever his experience, he knew what he was doing. Each of us was to climb the cliff and later rappel down. Climbing meant doing it on your own all the way up, but with a rope around you and a trustworthy belay partner, in this case at the top rather than the typical bottom position. Securely anchored, the belayer retrieved rope slowly as you climbed, leaving you a little but not a lot of slack. If you fell and the rope began spinning away, hed clamp it and bring you to a jarring halt somewhere on the cliff face. Although rock climbing that way is relatively safe, nothing about it feels safe, especially to a novice from Alabama. Going up, you have to see everything around you but only that, without worrying about anything else. Its nice to see both handand foot-holds three or four moves ahead, too. The problem comes when you move into a hold both hands and both feet using some tiny outcropping or wedged in a crack and you decide you cant reach the next hold going up. But you cant back out to get another hold, either. Not even the one you were just using below you, because you cant see it below you. Terror or confusion can ensue, along with paralyzing helplessness. Thats what happened to Jud, and thats where we are now all over Florida but especially in the southern Everglades from coast to coast. From Stuart and Jensen Beach on the Atlantics Indian River Lagoon to Charlotte Harbor with Sanibel and Fort Myers Beach on the Gulf, our major surface waters are now toxic, both to people and marine life. Were stuck in that position, in that reality. And like Judsons patrol members who watched his drama unfold from below, a lot of people are screaming advice. The situation is this: A combination of blue-green algae and red tide is sickening people on the spot while killing thousands of fish and other marine life. The cyanobacteria can also cause Alzheimers and related neurological disorders, along with liver cancer and others a couple decades down the line, in those who contact the water now. Thats science, not opinion or mere possibility or conjecture. Its real and demonstrable. So what do we do about it? There are, of course, some wacky and hurried suggestions, some proposed moves (we shouted at Jud, MOVE LEFT! or MOVE RIGHT AND DOWN!). None of them are going to solve this problem. Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in five counties. Good. Some politicians want to hire a company to scoop out the toxic algae now in the Caloosahatchee or tributary waters and do something with it deep injection into the region of the aquifer, perhaps? Great. And none of that has anything to do with getting out of our jam, finally. Both science and engineering offer solutions. But to use them effectively we have to vote, and vote for politicians who will see the massive problem of environmental degradation in Florida for what it is: the biggest threat to a future Florida ever encountered by any generation in the Sunshine State, bar none. Then they have to make the hard, expensive decisions to get us clean, now. Few or none of the current, mostly Republican legislators who let the lost summer of 2016 go away without looking back, until now, are going to do this for us. Up on the cliff of my youth, Arthur Aylen ran a back trail hundreds of feet to the top of the cliff, rigged a harness and the ropes, and rappelled down to Judson Williams. We watched Arthur make the young man rescue himself. He refused to bring Judson off the cliff; he simply held a position nearby and offered some advice, cool as a cucumber. Jud clung to one spot for almost an hour before he worked up the nerve to move no doubt an eternity to him. And when he did finally move he slipped a few feet, scaring the hell out of everybody. But it worked. He got one hold, then another, then another. And he did it himself. Thats what were going to have to do now, in the face of toxic water, excess and untimely flows from Lake Okeechobee down the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers, and lip-service politicians: Make one vote, then another, then another. Ourselves.

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AUGUST Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL 855.857.9610 Smoking Cessation ClassesWednesday, AUG. 22, 29 & SEP. 5, 12, 19, 26 @ 5:30pm 6:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 3 PBGMC is teaming up with the Area Health Education Center to provide education on the health eects related to tobacco use, the benets of quitting and what to expect when quitting. A trained Tobacco Cessation Specialist guides participants as they identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms and brainstorms ways to cope with them. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGSOsteoporosis ScreeningsThursday, August 16 @ 9am 1pm Outpatient Entrance FREE Community Chair Yoga Class Class taught by Sara Chambers, RN, BSN, CYT Wednesday, August 15 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4 Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center now oers a chair yoga class for the community. The class will be taught by the assistant nurse manager of cardiac rehab, Sara Chambers, who is also a certied yoga instructor. Using the same techniques as traditional yoga, the class is modied to allow for gentle stretching, designed to help participants strengthen their muscles and work on their balance. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required. Patient Experience A PBGMC Priority Lecture by Acsah Abraham, MHA Patient Relations Manager Thursday, August 16 @ 6pm 7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4 At Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, hospitality and patient experience are main priorities, which is why we instituted the Patient/Family Advisory Council. Join Acsah Abraham, patient relations manager at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center for a lecture on what we are doing to distinguish ourselves as leaders not only in high-quality care, but in service as well. Reservations are required. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. RECEIVE AFREECOOKBOOK!Hands-Only CPR ClassTuesday, August 21 @ 6:30pm 7:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens Eective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has teamed up with Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue to provide free monthly CPR classes for the community. Classes will be held at Fire Station 1. Local EMS will give a hands-only, CPR demonstration and go over Automated External Debrillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Certication will not be provided. Please call 855.387.5864 to make a reservation. Reservations are required.

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsRoger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Larry Bush Mary Thurwachter Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Gail V. Haines Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.com Production Manager Alisa Bowmanabowman@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Digital Advertising ManagerGina Richeygina.richey@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing ExecutiveMaurice Bryantmaurice.bryant@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez CirculationJean Louis Giovanny Marcelin Evelyn Talbot Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 Fax: 561.904.6456 Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $34.95 in-county $53.95 in-state $60.95 out-of-stateSubscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2018 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. OPINIONAttack of the WIRMS Parasitic worms there are many of them are among the worst health scourges on Earth. The same could be said about the species that frequently infest the world of American celebrity. Theyre called WIRMS, and in this case, the opportunistic organisms latch on to the parasites, particularly those in the political realm. WIRMS is shorthand for What I Really Meant to Say, and weve had an outbreak recently in Washington. It doesnt take an expert to conclude that these particular lice were brought back from Helsinki, where our president was contaminated by his handler, the Russian president. The early-onset symptoms manifested themselves immediately in this case, it was his addled responses to the nagging-headache question about Russian cybertheft of the U.S. election that propelled the Moscowian candidate, Donald Trump, into the presidency. With an apparently menacing Vladimir Putin standing right next to him, Trump managed to really step in it: My people came to me, (Director of National Intelligence) Dan Coats came to me and some others, they said they think its Russia. I have President Putin, he just said its not Russia. I will say this: I dont see any reason why it would be. We all witnessed what happened next: The spit hit the fan. Cries of treason and disgraceful filled the air, the accusations that the U.S. chief executive had declared that he believed the former USSR KGB operative over all the American intelligence agencies. The fever kept rising, and by the next day, full-blown WIRMS had set in. POTUS, his very own self, abandoned his usual efforts at self-medication and read off a prescription concocted by his staff. He misspoke, Trump sniffled to reporters. He meant to say wouldnt, not would. The fury quickly turned to ridicule after that one. Before the laughter had even died down, he was taken over by his chronic illness, the terrifying (to his staff) ad lib disease. Once again, the patient went before cameras and, sure enough, was asked: Is Russia still targeting the United States? meaning, the next upcoming elections. His response: No. So which was it? This time he channeled his response through one of his favorite WIRMSters, Sarah Sanders. He wasnt replying to the reporters question, Sanders explained, but simply saying no to any questions. As usual, Sanders delivered her translation with a straight face. The WIRMS quickly spread to Aspen, Colorado, where Trumps Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats was being questioned by Andrea Mitchell of NBC. Coats had strongly defended the nations spy agencies. Andrea broke the news to him onstage that Presidents Trump and Putin, his boss, were on another collusion course, planning a second summit at the White House in September. Say that again, C oats sp utter ed. Did I hear you right? Assured that she wasnt kidding, Coats muttered to laughter, Thats going to be special. It wasnt long before Coats himself got clobbered by the WIRMS: My admittedly awkward response was in no way meant to be disrespectful or criticize the actions of the president. Coats quickly had been made aware that its uncomfortable being on the Trumpian spit list, proving the adage that the early WIRMS avoid the bird spit from on high. Bob Franken is an Emmy Awardwinning reporter who covered Washington for more than 20 years with CNN. The real conflict with IranIts Tehrans turn for the fire and fury treatment. In response to Iranian President Hasan Rouhani telling Donald Trump not to play with the lions tail because war with Iran is the mother of all wars, the president fired back in an emphatically all-caps tweet warning of CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE. Since the last time Trump theatrically threatened a regime with destruction he quickly turned around and had warm talks with Kim Jong Un in Singapore, his Twitter account has lost some of its deterrent force. But the exchange of words has focused attention on a growing confrontation with Iran, in which the United States has the upper hand. When Trump pulled out of the Iran deal earlier this year, there were warnings that it would split the Western alliance, prompt an Iranian nuclear breakout or leave the U.S. isolated and unable to effectively sanction Iran on its own. Instead, Iran is in the midst of an economic crisis before the U.S. has truly ratcheted up the pressure. In less than a year, the Iranian currency, the rial, has lost half its value. There have been broad-based demonstrations around the country. Major multinational companies are pulling back from doing business in Iran, including General Electric and Siemens. Iran wasnt in position to take economic advantage of the windfall of the nuclear deal. It was most interested in funding its terrorism and foreign adventurism, and even if it werent, its economy is hopelessly corrupt. U.S. sanctions begin to snap back on Aug. 6, and although the administrations goal of getting Iranian oil exports to zero by November is unrealistic, Iran could lose 1 million barrels a day in exports (in May, its exports had hit a record 2.7 million barrels a day). This is nothing less than financial warfare against the regime, aimed at denying it hard currency to fund its foreign operations and ultimately at destabilizing it. The administration denies that it has a policy of regime change, but U.S. demands for a new deal are so sweeping and fundamental that Tehran couldnt comply short of a radical reorientation toward becoming a normal state. The economic campaign is coupled with a strategy of backing our allies Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to the hilt in resisting Iranian aggression in Syria and Yemen. With proxy forces across the region, Iran has cards to play, and the regime is inherently dangerous. At a time when it should be doing everything to curry favor with the Europeans, one of its diplomats was arrested in Germany for plotting a terror attack on an Iranian opposition group in France. But Iran lacks several advantages enjoyed by North Korea. It doesnt have an overwhelming, powerful patron like China. It unites Israel and the Arab states, and none of our regional allies are pressuring us to negotiate with Tehran the way South Korea pushed us to talk with Pyongyang. Finally, Iran doesnt yet have nuclear weapons.This gives the administration leverage. The mullahs shouldnt fear presidential tweets as much as the economic clampdown to come. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYKing Features bob FRANKENKing Features Iranian President Hasan Rouhani

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 A5 ON THE LINKS larryBUSHlbush@floridaweekly.com Knowing the greens may have proven advantageous for Cameron Starr when he won the 43rd annual Palm Beach Kennel Club/County Amateur Championship at the Turtle Creek Club. But in winning by six strokes, he had to have had a lot more going in his favor. A summer member at Turtle Creek, Mr. Starr made 16 birdies and 6 bogeys in three days, scoring 66-69-7106. Knowing the greens helped, he said, but I played pretty well all three days. Mr. Starr made the cut two years ago in his only other appearance in the countys biggest amateur golf tournament. A rising sophomore at LaGrange College, a Division III school in Georgia, Mr. Starr, 19, graduated from Jupiter High School in 2017. Tied for second at 212 were Pete Williams of Juno Beach and Jose Vega of Doral. It was the fourth time in the last six years that Mr. Williams was the low senior. A commercial airlines pilot, Mr. Williams turns 60 in October. He scored 73-70-69 with 11 birdies and 7 bogeys. I pretty much kept the ball in play all three days, Mr. Williams said. Only four former champions were in the starting field of 126. Daniel Eggertsson of The Acerage made the biggest splash, tied for sixth with 70-70-766. He won the 2011 title at Pine Tree, west of Boynton Beach. Between Mr. Williams and Mr. Vega at 212 and Eggertssons 216 were Todd Cantine, Jupiter, and Ronnie Davis Jr., Pembroke Pines, 213; Justin Goodhue, Palm Beach Gardens, 215; and Antonio Maciel, Miami, also at 216. During the second round, David Tassell aced the 148-yard third hole with his pitching wedge. It was Mr. Tassells third career hole-in-one, all in competition, but his first at Turtle Creek, his home course. More from the PBCGA: John Powers of Delray Beach and Mr. Goodhue combined for an eagle-3 on the fourth extra hole at the Florida Club near Stuart to win the inaugural Team Shootout. They had tied at 20 under par 124 with Evan Murphy of Tequesta and Mr. Cantine. The 34th Nicklaus/Junior Championship was played at the Lost Tree Club, where Jack Nicklaus and his family have lived since the 1960s. The overall winners were Fernando Castillo, Wellington, and Laura Edmonds, Weston. Coincidentally, each shot 145. The age group winners: Boys 16-18, Cameron Owens, Wellington, and Leli Sinclair, Stuart, 147; 13-15, Mr. Castillo; 11-12, Pavel Tsar, Palm Beach Gardens, 154. Girls 16-18, Ms. Edmonds; 13-15, Gabriela Mead, Sunny Isle Beach, 165; 11-12, Alejandro Castillo, Wellington, 154. SFPGA: Roger Kennedy Jr. and John Bednar, CC at Mirasol, Palm Beach Gardens, tied for first in the 21st ProAssistant at PGA GC in Port St. Lucie. They scored 11 under par 97 for three nine-hole events: modified alternate shots and four-ball stroke play on the Wanamaker course and scramble on the back side of the Ryder. Also at 97 were Chris Phillips-Jordan Burke, Cypress Woods CC, Naples, and Jeremy WellsTrey Sones, Alico Family Golf Center, Fort Myers. Colin Amaral, also from Mirasol, and Jared Isaacs, Adios GC, Coconut Creek, combined to tie for second in the 37th annual Pro-Pro in Naples. They shot 64-626 but lost when Jon McLean and Rushi Oza, a pair of Jim McLean Golf School staffers, won a playoff at the Naples Beach Club with par-4 at the 18th hole. Also beaten in the same playoff were Justin Ahasic, Synergy Golf, Naples, and Gyles Robin, Verandah GC, Fort Myers. Michael Berger and Fred Biond of Port St. Lucie won the Pro-Junior at Stonebridge CC in Boca Raton. They shot 57 with two eagles and 11 birdies. Josh Pisarri of Naples is just the second amateur in 34 years to win the South Florida Open, scoring 69-70-68 207 at the Bonita Bay Club in Bonita Springs. The first? Dudley Hart at the third staging of the tournament in 1987. Alan Morin of Royal Palm Beach and Mark Mielke of Jupiter were among five pros who tied for second at 208. Jerry Tucker of Stuart was low senior on 66-7137 over the first 36 holes. Southeast Chapter: Mr. Tucker won the senior division for the fifth time in the chapters annual tripleheader. He scored six under par 66 for his 18th Southeast victory since 2003. Other winners at Hobe Sound GC, each for the first time in chapter play and each with 67, were Lee Stroever, Emerald Dunes, West Palm Beach, head professionals, and Thomas Cooper, Pine Tree, Boynton Beach, assistants. Mr. Stroever won the Palm Beach County Amateur in 2001 at Emerald Dunes. Other recent chapter winners were Mr. Amaral and Mike Connors, 29th Pro-Scratch, 30-33, four-ball stroke play, on Dye course at PGA GCPatrick Rada, McArthur GC, in a playoff at 69 with Alan Morin, The Falls CC, in the 12th Jupiter Classic at Jupiter CC. Mr. Tucker, co-founder of the Treasure Coast Senior Tour, has been inducted into the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame. He had been at Bellerive CC in St. Louis for 15 years, the last 11 as head professional, when he retired and moved to Florida after the 1997 season. His younger brother, Mike Tucker, succeeded Jerry Tucker at Bellerive, which will host the 100th PGA Championship next weekend. In the 1992 PGA at Bellerive, Jerry Tucker shot 76-75, missing the halfway cut, but he is still the last host professional to compete in the PGA Championship. STARR Starr turn: Young golfer wins PB Kennel Club tourneyJ. TUCKER www.PapaChiro.com 28 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens!PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458561.744.7373 This certicate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certicate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 8/16/2018.$150VALUE CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATIONCOMPLIMENTARY We accept most insurance providers including: School, Camp or Sports Physical$20 DR. ALESSANDRA COLN Chiropractor Se Habla Espaol DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director AUTO ACCIDENT TREATMENT CENTERWe provide spinal decompression treatments!Will see auto accident suerers same day!FULL PHYSICAL THERAPY FACILITYTreat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by:Bulging/Herniated Discs Degenerative Disc Disease Facet Syndrome Failed Back SurgeryAll without the use of drugs, injections or surgery!

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY *To receive this discount, you must make a reservation ONLINE at: www.agorakitchenwpb.com. Offer available for a limited time only. Join Us for...Belly Dancing Shows and Live Music Fridays & Saturdays starting at 7pm! Agora Kitchens Consecutive Year as the Restaurant on TripAdvisor! 3r Cele atin Numbe On To Show Our Appreciation, Come In and Receive15% Off!* 2505 N. Dixie Hwy., West Palm Beach, FL 33407 561.651.7474www.agorakitchenwpb.com PET TALESOpioid Crisis BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON Andrews McMeel SyndicationIf you dont take pain medications or havent had surgery recently, you probably dont think the opioid crisis youve been hearing about on the news has anything to do with you. But if you have pets, they could be affected. Not because theyre at risk of falling prey to drug dealers pushing controlled substances, but because pets who need surgery or treatment for acute pain are beneficiaries of the same painrelieving medications used in humans. A shortage of the medications caused by a double whammy of inspection issues and production delays related to upgrades at a Pfizer facility in Kansas, plus a DEAmandated 20 percent decrease in overall opioid production in an attempt to curb abuse by humans means the drugs are less available for use in veterinary medicine. Veterinarians use injectable opioids such as morphine, fentanyl, methadone and hydromorphone for surgical procedures and acute pain from trauma. Human doctors get priority when those and other opioid drugs are distributed, leaving veterinarians to scramble for ways to manage pain in pets. The opioid crisis the government is talking about is people ODing, says Sheilah Robertson, a veterinarian who specializes in analgesia and anesthesiology and who is the senior medical director for Lap of Love Veterinary Hospice. Its a different crisis to us. Our crisis is that were short of opioids that our patients need. The shortage is expected to continue into 2019, according to a June 19 statement by the Food and Drug Administration. In one attempt to mitigate the shortage, the FDA and Pfizer coordinated the release of some products that were on hold due to potential quality issues, distributing them with instructions for safe handling and use to reduce risks to patients. What the shortage means for pet owners is that in some instances, a pets surgery or other procedure may need to be postponed or performed with drugs that are less effective in managing pain, says pain expert Robin Downing, DVM, director of the Downing Center for Animal Pain Management in Windsor, Colorado. The potent drugs are a cornerstone of pain relief before, during and after surgery, Dr. Downing says. Their use in anesthesia reduces the need for inhalant anesthetics. In turn, that reduces the risks associated with general anesthesia. To get around the shortage, veterinarians are having to think creatively. They may use less-potent opioids such as butorphanol and buprenorphine in combination with drugs that provide local anesthesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, known as multimodal analgesia. Local anesthetics completely block pain, and a single dose of some new drugs in that category work for 24 to 72 hours. Multimodal analgesia can also help to reduce grogginess, nausea or vomiting after surgery.Sometimes theres a learning curve to using unfamiliar drugs and techniques, though.Ive taken calls from numerous veterinarians asking about alternatives to the opioid they usually use, which they are now having difficulty obtaining, says Jordyn Marie Boesch, DVM, a lecturer in anesthesiology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. The good news is that there is often an alternative opioid available. The silver lining is that the shortage is introducing veterinarians to many other ways of providing analgesia that they may not have been familiar with before. Veterinarians also hope drug companies will take steps to have some opioids labeled specifically for use in animals. In Europe, for instance, versions of fentanyl are made specifically for use in dogs and cats. If theres a human shortage (of opioids in Europe), it doesnt affect veterinarians, and thats what we would like to happen here, Dr. Robertson says. We know that taking a drug through all the trials and FDA costs a lot of money, but we can no longer depend on our supply from human-labeled drugs anymore. Pets of the Week>> Snickers is an 11-year-old, 79-pound male mixed breed dog thats looking for a place to retire. He is a Fospice pet. Adopt him and all routine medical care, food, medication and other supplies will be provided by Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, free of charge. >> Precious is a 14-year-old female cat that is looking for a loving family.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at www.hspb.org. For adoption information, call 561-686-6656. >> Snickers is a 9-year-old, spayed female cat that weighs 10 pounds. Snickers is easy-going and very affectionate toward people and other cats. >> Henny is a 2-year-old female mixed breed dog that weighs 44 pounds. She is house trained, crate trained, good with other dogs and likes kids, too.To adopt or foster a petPalm Beach County Animal Care & Control is at 7100 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach; 561-233-1222 or www.pbcgov. com/ animal The pain pathways in dogs and cats are similar to those in humans, so the same drugs will often work for everyone.

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY C amp Shalom, Alpert Jewish Family & Childrens Service pack meals for local families, Mandel JCCANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1. Amy Gordon, Rachel Fox and Vicki Ward 2. Lucas Eckart, Samuel Schwartz and Jacob Bronson 3. Vicki Roitman, Rachel Fox and Susan Shulman Pertnoy 4. Gianna Giovanco, Rachel Thaw and Talia Schmunes 5. Sammy Engelberg and Ethan Couper 6. Bently Stein, Jessie Mann, Summer Sweeting, Paul Plummer, Jonathan Ott, Matt Bennett and Tommy Natamoros 7. Noa Zaken and Sallie Podgrsky 8. Marissa Bromberg and Sydney Gru 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. 4 5 6 Sophie Garine, Carlos Figueroa and Ethan Schwab

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYagain, so I bit down on its tail, and then I could feel it stopping. With the help of a videographer filming the skirmish, he wrapped his legs around the python and groped to find its head. When he did, the snake tried to strike at him and started flinging me around like a rag doll, carrying me farther into the swamp. The python hunter won the epic battle. I was sore for days. Its more like dancing with the pythons, said hunter Geoff Roepstorff. You grab them by the tail and dodge their attacks until they wear down. With all that muscle, they wear out quickly, in about 10 minutes, said Robbie Roepstorff, Geoff R oepstorffs wife, fellow hunter and business partner. Pythons on the movePython hunters, surveyors, land managers and researchers are never lacking for good stories, but its no tall tale when they tell you that the mammoth snakes are running out of food in the eastern Everglades environment and are moving north and west. We believe it is true that they have decimated their prey base in MiamiDade County, said Michael Kirkland, python program manager for the South Florida Water Management District. Thats why we have expanded from Dade County into Broward, Palm Beach and Collier counties. The shift in python population is part of the reason we do this, said Mr. Roepstorff. Living on Sanibel, those things are moving that way, theres no doubt. They are definitely established in Collier County and are headed to Lee County. There have been pythons caught in (Lee and Charlotte) counties, said Mr. Kirkland. But we dont know if there are established populations there. It could be just escaped pets. Big Cypress National Preserve is a hydrologic resource, so it makes sense that theyve adapted to this habitat, said Ardianna McLane, chief of interpretation and education at the 720,000acre Big Cypress, which is conducting telemetry tagging research on the creature. They are getting closer and closer to Naples. The ScienceDaily.com site reported in February 2008: Burmese pythons an invasive species in south Florida could find comfortable climatic conditions in roughly a third of the United States according to new climate maps developed by the U.S. Geological Survey.The hunt is onHunters first began removing pythons from the habitat in 2013, when the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission issued its first Python Challenge. Mr. Crum, an orchid grower with a retail operation in Venice, participated. It took him seven days to find and capture his first python, he said. After camping in the Everglades for 30 days, he won second place in the contest, which removed only 68 pythons at the hands of more than 1,500 hunters. FWC issued another challenge in 2016. By then, Wildman and other hunters had improved their skills. Mr. Crum and his team brought in 33 snakes in 28 days to win the grand prize of $5,000. That team also brought in the longest snake a 15-footer for $3,000 cash. The Roepstorffs had their first taste of python hunting during that second challenge. They captured their first snake on the last day, Valentines Day. We walked in six miles and saw it what they call porpoising in the sawgrass, with its head up, said Mr. Roepstorff. We had no clue what we were doing. Our adrenaline was going 100 miles PYTHONSFrom page 1 What you can do>> Avoid keeping exotic, invasive animals as pets. The Burmese python is now classi ed a conditional reptile, which makes it illegal to acquire as a pet. >> Take advantage of FWCs Pet Amnesty Days to, without consequence, turn in snakes and other injurious species brought in or bought illegally. >> Download the IveGot1 app to report sightings of invasive species, report online at IveGot1.org, or call the Exotic Species Hotline at 800-IVEGOT1 (800-483-4681). COURTESY PHOTOSDusty Wildman Crum surveys Everglades terrain for pythons to capture.COURTESY PHOTOGeoff Roepstorff with a prize catch an image Rep. Francis Rooney later used in his congressional presentation. Its more like dancing with the pythons ... you grab them by the tail and dodge their attacks until they wear down. Geoff Roepstorff, snake hunterWith all that muscle, they wear out quickly, in about 10 minutes. Robbie Roepstorff, Geoff Roepstorffs wife, fellow hunter and business partner

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 NEWS A11SEE PYTHONS, A12 4 3 2 15 6 7 LENGTH IN FEET COMPENSATION (In addition to hourly rate) $50 $75$100$125$150$175$200 8910 Participants will recieve $8.25 per hour for up to eight hours each day while actively searching for pythons on SFWMD lands. For all eliminated pythons, SFWMD will make an additional payment per python $50 for pythons measuring up to 4 feet, and an extra $25 for every foot measured above 4 feet. The maximum compensation is not to exceed $6,000.NOTE: An additional $200 is awarded for each eliminated python found guarding nests with eggs. Python elimination payoutSOURCE: SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTOScreen grabs of Dusty Wildman Crum catching a Burmese python in videos you can find online. an hour, said Ms. Roepstorff. We really got hooked on it. Once youve removed one, you really get into it, because of all the sad things theyre doing to the environment. You really cant explain how good you feel. Since the challenges, the SFWMD and FWC have formalized python elimination programs, hiring about 25 contractors each to remove the reptiles. Since Big Cypress and Everglades national lands have come on board, they also employ volunteers and contractors in their removal programs. We were able to pick the best hunters from the state winners from the challenges, volunteers, said Mr. Kirkland. We just assembled a great team of hunters to work with a perfect storm of talent that has made it the success that it is. Out of a thousand applicants, Mr. Crum and the Roepstorffs were selected. They have become the faces of the program, in very different ways. Theyre a colorful bunch, and theyre doing some very important work, said Mr. Kirkland, who helped develop the SFWMDs removal program. Wildman, whose long hair and bravado certainly fit the name, has appeared in a number of television spots, including on the Today Show in late 2017 and Swamp Mysteries on the History Channel on June 7. Currently, the 38-year-old is working a deal with the Discovery Channel for a show in the Everglades about invasive species. The exposure brings muchneeded awareness to the situation. The Roepstorffs, on the other hand, are bankers by day and python hunters by night. In fact, those were nearly the exact words that U.S. Florida Rep. Francis Rooney used when he recently pled the case before Congress to launch a removal program, in partnership with the FWC, in Everglades National Park. Rep. Rooney pointed to a picture of Mr. Roepstorff holding a captured python during his congressional presentation. The landmark legislation passed in May 2018. So now, the Roepstorffs, owners of the independent Edison National Bank in Fort Myers and the Bank of the Islands on Sanibel and Captiva, also survey the park. Training involved seminars, said Mr. Roepstorff. They educate (contractors) very well that we dont hunt in the park, we remove. Like Big Cypress National Preserve, the FWC and SFWMD, every agency has its own set of guidelines and regulations. For each group Im in, I have a binder of rules, he said. Each is different. But its a privilege to be selected.The research is on The two federal lands abide by missions to study pythons to best determine how to manage the booming populations. Native to South Asia, the snakes ended up in Florida as a result of pet releases and Hurricane Andrew damage to a private reptile-breeding facility in 1992. Theyre actually a pretty gentle snake, said Ranger McLane. They make good pets (but are now not legal). We want to foster respect for invasive species so people wont release them. And we want to support the science. I respect the snake, said Mr. Crum. We dont like to kill the snakes. Its a bittersweet moment at the end of the hunt. We all have in common a passion for the environment and a respect for snakes. Snakes captured at Big Cypress must be X-rayed to make sure they arent one of the preserves seven tagged and tracked snakes. Other current python studies include the Conservancy of Southwest Floridas sentinel snake program, which successfully broke up what media called a sex party of seven males and one female in a gopher tortoise burrow in April; and a pheromones project by the U.S. Geological Survey that changes the gender of male pythons to female. The hunting program has been the best and cheapest way (of controlling the population), said Mr. Roepstorff, who hunts with his wife and other hunting partners about three times a month. They honed their skills by hunting with Leo Sanchez, whom theyve dubbed The Python King, and later training with Irula tribesmen from India, whom the FWC and University of Florida brought in to teach hunters how to track pythons. It felt like we were with National Geographic, said Ms. Roepstorff. They have this ritual and prayer they say before they go out. We used to run from snakes, said Mr. Roepstorff. It took a while to learn to run to them. Our program, as I like to describe it, is one tool in a large tool box, said Mr. Kirkland. It does not replace the science. So far, the most effective means of both detecting and removing are human detection, but we continue to use an integrated approach to really battle this issue. Hunting is more cost effective, but its important to follow the science and continue the science until we come GEOFF AND ROBBIE ROEPSTORFF / COURTESYGeoff and Robbie Roestorff hold skin from a 10-foot snake they captured on their 25th anniversary. The Roestorffs, who own Edison National Bank and Bank of the Islands, sent skins to Texas to be made into boots, but otherwise give them to a hunter friend who makes bracelets and other items from them. COURTESY PHOTOA python devours a small gazelle. Theyve been known to eat much larger subjects, including gators.

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY JUST LISTED! WWW.PBiLUXURYHOMES.COMYour Lifestyle...Elevated!CALL ANNE LO GIUDICE FOR AN EXCLUSIVE SHOWING561.676.0029WORK WITH THE LOCAL REAL ESTATE EXPERT RECOGNIZED LOCALLY AND NATIONALLY AS BEING THE BEST IN THE BUSINESS! HELLO GORGEOUS! 2580 NATURES WAY, PALM BEACH GARDENS FL 33410 up with a better strategy.Lifestyles of hunted and huntersThe pythons in the Everglades average 8 to 10 feet in length and 16 pounds. The longest python captured by the SFWMD team measured a little over 17 feet; the heaviest weighed 140 pounds. In the summer, the elusive snakes are easier to find at night. When its cool outside, they will come out of their holes to warm in the sun. They are good climbers a tactic they use in ambush hunting. But the well-camouflaged pythons spend a lot of time in their holes, because they dont need to feed often. When they do feed, they require heat to digest the food. When females are nesting, they can spend up two to three months wrapped around the 30 to 100 eggs they lay. As the pythons food source diminishes, they move on, mostly by swimming. We used to find birds, ducks, deer, rabbits, otters and raccoons, said Mr. Crum, who largely captures snakes in the eastern Everglades. Where Ive been hunting, there are none of these animals left. Everglades National Park reports a study that shows nearly complete decimation of marsh rabbits, a 99 percent decline in raccoons, 98 percent decline in opossums and 87 percent in bobcats likely attributable to pythons. If we see a raccoon, we take a picture of it, Mr. Roepstorff reiterates the devastating effect the nonvenomous constrictors are having on native wildlife. Francis Rooney likes to say, Its so important to focus on water quality, but what are we protecting it for if all the wildlife is gone? Although there are no reports of human fatality in Florida due to pythons, their impact could affect human health because the mosquitoes so rampant in the Everglades no longer have all the mammals to feed upon, said Mr. Crum. It used to be mosquitoes fed 85 percent on mammals and 15 percent on rats. Now that has flip-flopped. Estimates of python populations range up to 100,000 best guess. To date, the SWFWMD removal program has eliminated more than 1,090, which doesnt include FWC contractor numbers (about 120 since the programs inception) and removal through other FWC programs and by farmers and other locals who are killing them on private property. Were just trying to put them in the bag one at a time and get rid of the population, said Mr. Crum, who hunts usually barefoot five days a week and catches an average of five snakes per week. He ultimately turns the pythons he skins into wallets, belt buckles and other products to sell. In addition, hunters receive an hourly fee ($8.25 for up to 10 hours a day from the SWFWMD) and typically a $50 bounty for a snake up to 4 feet long and $25 for each foot over 4 feet. The challenge is the frustration of when you go hunting and theyre not out, said Mr. Roepstorff. Youve got to realize that youre NOT going to catch more than you DO catch. The average hunter on our team estimates it takes over 40 (hunter) hours to get one python. But patrolling in itself is wonderful. Its just beautiful going out there, said Ms. Roepstorff. Its a real relief and real calming. Both our mothers loved wildlife and loved nature, and thats why we dedicate these hunts to their memory. The Roepstorffs biggest catch was a 12-footer, but they remember better the 10-foot snake they captured on a hunt with Ms. Roepstorffs sister from Alabama. That was our 25th anniversary catch, said Ms. Roepstorff. We love it! If we lived there, wed go every night we could. PYTHONSFrom page 11COURTESY PHOTODusty Wildman Crum and his team with Burmese pythons they caught.COURTESY PHOTOPythons on their way to a necropsy station.

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Americas liberty and our democracy. The idea for the statue began around the end of our Civil War in 1865. It took shape from sketches on the drawing board of French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. It took hundreds of workmen to build the massive copper monument, with their work stopping and starting as funds from the French people were raised, then depleted. The Mother of Exiles was dedicated on Oct. 18, 1886, with great fanfare and the first ticker-tape parade. Hundreds of boats dotted the harbor shooting off fireworks. But lets get back to Emma Lazarus. During the 21 years it took for the Statue of Liberty to get into place, Ms. Lazarus was growing up in a fashionable brownstone in an upper-class area of New York and summering at Newport. She was born in 1849, one of seven children. The family was Jewish. Her father, Moses Lazarus, was a prosperous businessman in the sugar refining business. When I was researching Ms. Lazarus, I found this quote attributed to her in a 1988 edition of American Women of Achievement (Chelsea House Publishers): I began writing poetry when I was 11 with my fathers encouragement. I was fond of the poetry and essays of the philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. He was called the Sage of Concord for the Massachusetts town where he lived. He wrote about living in harmony with nature and he spoke out against slavery. His writings were my bread and wine. He actually became my mentor for a number of years: critiquing my writing, telling me what to read. With Emersons tutelage and my growing experiences, I began writing poetry and articles for the magazines of the day. Emma knew very little about the political and religious turmoil in Eastern Europe. She became only gradually aware of the persecution of Jews and others in Russia, Romania and Poland. There was economic hardship and Jews became the scapegoats. Jewish homes, shops and synagogues were looted, then set on fire. Russian Cossacks swept through town after town, terrifying, beating and killing Jews. The police and military stood by, refusing to intervene. Thousands left their homes, sold their possessions, fled to England and waited for passage to America. Most traveled in steerage, huddled together with scarce food and water, no privacy. Many sickened and died during their two weeks at sea. Their arrival here was hardly any better. They were ferried to Castle Garden or Wards Island, which were as crowded as the ships. Frankly, New York authorities were overwhelmed with the sudden waves of refugees. Emma went to see them and was overcome with compassion. She returned many times. She brought clothes, food, gave them money and tried to find them jobs. She joined committee after committee to arrange for relief efforts, adequate housing and schools where the refugees could learn English and job skills. She wrote letters, poems and articles to incite indignation for injustice and persecution and the need for sympathy for the refugees. Meanwhile, the Statue of Liberty was nearing completion in France. According to the plan, France would give the statue to the American people, but the U.S. was asked to provide a pedestal for the commanding figure. Our government, still strapped from the Civil War, said no. It was realized the money would have to come from the American people. Pleas went out, but the response was slow. The situation infuriated newspaper editor Joseph Pulitzer, who was a Hungarian immigrant. In an editorial he wrote, New York ought to blush at this humiliating spectacle. The statue, the noble gift from our young sister republic, is ready for us and we stand haggling and begging and scheming in order to raise enough money. Eventually 150,000 people responded, most giving less than a dollar. In one final fundraiser, an art exhibit was held featuring the work of famous U.S. artists. A portfolio of printed and autographed essays by famous writers was offered for auction. Authors included Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, John Burroughs and Emma Lazarus. The poet James Russell Lowell praised Ms. Lazarus contribution, The New Colossus, writing, your sonnet gives its subject a raison detre, which it wanted quite as much as it wants a pedestal. She was thrilled. A year later, at age 38, she was dead from Hodgkins disease. She never saw the 300-foot monument. And her poem was forgotten. It was not until 1903, 16 years later, that Georgina Schuyler, a wealthy patron of the arts, came across the portfolio in a bookstore pile of dusty books. Leafing through, she discovered Ms. Lazarus poem and thought it deserved to be permanently linked with the Statue of Liberty. Now, the entire sonnet is engraved on a bronze tablet placed over the entrance. A million people a year pass by and read it when they visit the Mother of Exiles. Two remarkable women with one voice offer a welcome and hope to all who come to America. Sadly, the political entanglements at our southern border today dim the light of welcome to newcomers yearning to breathe free. Rusty Brown is a writer and dramatist who performs her original onewoman shows throughout Southwest Florida and elsewhere. This article is an adaptation from her performances about Emma Lazarus. A14 NEWS WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then the patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing t o the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n admi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for older adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do much be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up t hei favor of a F lor cohort of Bo o hit their ei gh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e c are? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... LIBERTYFrom page 1 The New ColossusNot like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand A mighty woman with a torch, whose ame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name MOTHER OF EXILES. From her beacon-hand Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame. Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp! cries she With silent lips. Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door! Emma Lazarus Emma Lazaruss manuscript COURTESY PHOTOThe Statue of Liberty in NYC.COURTESY PHOTOEmma Lazarus, c. 1872.I began writing poetry when I was 11 with my fathers encouragement. I was fond of the poetry and essays of the philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. He was called the Sage of Concord for the Massachusetts town where he lived. He wrote about living in harmony with nature and he spoke out against slavery. His writings were my bread and wine. Emma Lazarus in American Women of Achievement (Chelsea House Publishers)

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BUSINESS PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY | A15WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM SEE EUROPE, A17 SEE INVESTING, A17 O YOU WANT TO GO TO Europe without breaking the bank? At Florida Weekly, so do we. But airfares seem to be rising like the proverbial rocket, which gives us a chance this week to answer a simple question: What and where are the least expensive options in central and southern Florida for taking wing and ending up on the European continent? Its roughly the same question Charles Lindbergh asked himself a mere 91 years ago before he embarked from Long Island on the first trans-Atlantic flight to Europe. His plane, the Spirit of St. Louis, got about 10 miles to the gallon using a 223-horsepower radial engine, running at an average speed of 107 mph. He carried 451 gallons of fuel that cost about 21 cents a gallon but used only 401 gallons to reach Paris. The fuel cost would have been roughly $84 at the time not only a good deal but a unique deal, since it had never happened before. Now from Tampa or Orlando in the north or West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Miami and Fort Myers in the southeast and southwest all with major international airports there are good deals to be had, too. But not for those who require convenience. As high as the prices are and I BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com SHow to fly to Europe on the cheapCOURTESY PHOTOIn August and September you can fly Norwegian Air out of Fort Lauderdale to London Gatwick for about $215. MONEY & INVESTINGManufacturers facing high risks, so steer clear of auto stocksWhile sales are critically important to a business, unless you are a start-up tech firm, profits matter more. Unfortunately, the U.S. auto industry learned this the hard way when it announced earnings last week. Despite dramatic increases in new car sales and deliveries, GM, Ford and Fiat Chrysler all saw their stock prices take a significant hit after releasing quarterly numbers. So why are car manufacturers struggling and will this pain continue? This should have been a great earnings season for Detroit. Consumers are spending, the economy is strong and relatively low gas prices encourage people to buy higher margin SUVs. And the top line of these manufacturers was very robust. For example, GM announced that vehicle deliveries rose almost 5 percent, with SUV and truck sales rising by more than 20 percent each. Even international sales were strong for GM, with vehicle exports to China reaching alltime high levels. Despite these fantastic numbers and indications that sales would continue to climb, all three companies slashed their earnings forecasts for the remainder of the year. There were two causes given for this change. The primary catalyst was increased commodity costs. More specifically, many executives blamed President Trumps steel and aluminum tariffs for eating into their profits. Fords CEO stated during the earnings call that he estimated that these tariffs would depress profits by over $600 million in 2018. The second reason given for the drop in earnings was foreign exchange fluctuations. As trade war fears increased over the last several months, investors have parked their money in the safe haven of ericBRETANestaterick@gmail.com SKYOUT

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A16 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY EARL ON CARSConsumer Reports is your best friend when buying a carIf you dont already subscribe to Consumer Reports, you should. I have been a subscriber for as long as I can remember. I get the magazine in the mail and also subscribe online. I rarely buy any product without consulting this great magazine. I subscribe to the online edition because its even more current than the regular magazine, and I get many consumer tips via email. I recently received their annual auto issue, which no car buying family should be without. All libraries would have this on hand. Dont be fooled by other magazines with similar names purporting to objectively analyze and recommend products. There is only one Consumer Reports. They do not accept any advertising and therefore are not beholding to any companies. They even go beyond this and will not allow a retailer or manufacturer to use the name Consumer Reports in their advertising. Even if Consumer Reports gives a product a great rating, that company cannot mention this in their advertising. If they do, they get sued by Consumer Reports. No other company goes this far and is this squeaky clean. J.D. Power is a company that ranks and compares lots of products including cars, but they allow companies to use the J.D. Power name to advertise their products when they rated them good. You can understand why a consumer might be just a little more skeptical of J.D. Powers objectivity than Consumer Reports. You should ignore car enthusiast magazines like Motor Trend and Car and Driver that write articles on the Car of the Year and other articles praising various makes and models. You can be sure that these car manufacturers with the great articles are spending lots of money advertising in these magazines. I am not saying that Consumer Reports is infallible. They do make mistakes and they have been successfully sued by some companies that were affected by their mistakes in testing. But this is very rare. As a car dealer for almost 50 years, I have not always liked what I read about all of the makes and models of cars I have sold, but I grudgingly had to admit that the reports were almost always accurate. Issues of CR recently gave negative reviews to models of the cars I now sell, Toyota. I must confess that with some makes and model cars I have sold over the years, I was very thankful that the circulation of Consumer Reports is not very large. Their circulation is growing as consumers become more educated and sophisticated. This annual auto issue should be a mandatory read before you buy your next used or new car. Here are some of the articles in this issue: Top Picks (the best new vehicles they have tested), Best and Worst (tells you the ones you definitely shouldnt buy), Coming for 2018, Who Make The Best Cars (best manufacturers), Buy Better on the Web (The Internet is the best place to buy your next car), Reliability Trends (repair histories on all makes and models), Whats Next in Auto Safety, and Used Cars, Best and Worst. Consumer Reports also offers other car-buying services like its New Car Price Service, which discloses the best price you should expect from a dealer, rebates and incentive information, negotiating strategies, and their expert recommendations. It also offers a Used Car Price Service, which provides an evaluation tool kit that helps you establish the right price for most used cars. earlSTEWARTearls@estoyota.com561-358-1474 BEHIND THE WHEELDealership unicornsJust because the local bakery might have the common ingredients on hand to make a jalapeno red velvet cake doesnt mean many people are ordering it for their birthday. The same goes for the car industry. Manufacturers might have the ingredients on hand to make many versions of a car, but if few people find them appetizing, they are seldom ordered by the independent lots. Some are so infrequent that they almost have a mystical status. We can call them dealership unicorns. Not every rare sighting is a unicorn. After all, there arent going to be enough $121,000 Corvette ZR1s made for every Chevrolet showroom in the country. The few receiving this supercar will use it as a beacon to draw in customers for the $21,000 Malibu. Instead, unicorns are the ones designed for the mainstream, but are so seldom seen at dealerships that customers might not know they exist. The following are three sedans with a common thread: They can easily be found on a manufacturer website but hardly ever caught out in the wild. Volkswagen Passat SEL V6 The Volkswagen Passat is popular for offering family-sized room and premium quality materials. It feels like a good value starting at $24K. The options list is quite long, including leather seats, blind spot monitoring and trading the four-cylinder for a powerful V6 shared with larger VWs. All these upgrades create the Passat SEL V6, a true unicorn at dealerships. Buyers will pay nearly 50 percent more for the SEL V6 over the base model. It takes what was once a valueminded car and prices it comparably to luxury vehicles and large crossovers. That makes the SEL V6 nearly impossible to find at dealers because its tough to justify the extra cost to customers. Volkswagen is not alone in offering pricier V6 mainstream sedans. Still, the Passat SEL V6 can be singled out because its one of the most expensive from a nonluxury brand. Also, even VW acknowledges its high cost by supplementing the lineup with the Passat GT. It has the same V6 power but starts at $30,040. Thats more than $5K less, and one of the best V6 sedan base prices on the market. This economical alternative ensures the luxury laden SEL V6 will forever be a unicorn. Cadillac XTS V-Sport The V line at Cadillac has created some terrific luxury sports cars, but the XTS V-Sport isnt one of them. The 3.6-liter twinturbo V6 is a great engine, and it has found a good home in cars like the ATS and CTS, but its a little awkward in this larger vehicle. The XTS is a good car. Its for those who want something large, luxurious and premium without being absolutely unobtainable. It hits the heart of Cadillacs more traditional market, and theres little clamoring for a sports car version of this easy-going cruiser. Furthermore, at $73,490 its more expensive than premium versions of the larger CT6 sedan. That kind of money will buy a CT6 with all-wheel drive and a 400plus horsepower twin turbocharged V6, just like XTS V-Sport. This car is stuck between the worlds of obtainable luxury and upper crust premium machines, which makes it a hard sell at dealerships. Thus, customers can build the XTS V-Sport on the Cadillac website, but it will be nearly impossible to find at the local store. Honda Accord Sport six-speed The Accord sedan has a reputation for reliability and practicality. Theres also a small following that loves them for a mix of frugal and sporty nature a tradition going back over 40 years. Honda continues to appease this crowd by offering a six-speed manual transmission in the Accord. Stick shifts are a rarity throughout the industry today. In fact, Honda and Mazda are the only ones to offer it in a sub-luxury family sedan. That distinction is a nice promotional tool to have enthusiast publications sing the praises of the six-speed Accord. The dealerships might even point out the feature for a halo effect, but they are unlikely to have one on the property. After all, a manual transmission car is taking up space until an Accord loyalist discovers it. That becomes less frequent as more generations of drivers have never encountered a stick shift. So not only will many customers be intimidated by the six-speed Accord, but also there might even be a salesperson who doesnt know how to drive it, too. mylesKORNBLATTmk@autominded.com

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A17 dont think weve ever seen prices for convenient flights to Europe as high as they are now I dont think the reason is fuel costs, like they say, said Elisabeth Lahner, who works with Marion Moretta out of the Cape Coral office of Geraci Travel, a longtime agency based in Fort Myers. The two agents have become regionally celebrated for knowing the ropes of efficient, inexpensive international travel. Fuel isnt cheap, of course; at the end of last year on the Gulf Coast kerosenetype jet fuel was running about $1.80 per gallon, and by May this year it was up to $2.16, industry trackers say. A Boeing 747 uses roughly a gallon of fuel every second or five gallons per mile, and a 777 might burn almost $25 per hour, per seat, according to Boeings website and an estimate at the website science.howstuffworks.com. For some airports, however, the rising prices may stem from a lack of competition, Ms. Lahner suggested. Two years ago in Fort Myers (at Southwest Florida International Airport, known as RSW) when we had Air Berlin, everybody had competitive prices. Then unfortunately Air Berlin went under and from October to May no airline was coming in to satisfy the German market. And now everyone is driving prices up Im talking $1,600 to $1,800. But there are still deals for those who dont mind some inconvenience: for example, odd flying hours, delayed or cancelled flights, and a variety of addon charges. The caveats and low pricesAt Preferred Travel of Naples, Marketing Director Karen Pickrum offered a caveat for travelers defining least expensive flight only by a cheap base ticket price. When booking low-cost carriers, you need to be very flexible, she said. The base fare does not usually include a checked bag or seat assignment. Those are additional costs. Some are even adding charges for carryon luggage. Many charge extra if you choose to have your boarding pass issued at the airport. So while your base fare might be a good deal, by the time you include the add-ons and taxes, not so cheap. Plus if your low-cost airline flight is cancelled, the major carriers will not take your ticket. If your flight is cancelled, obtaining a refund can be a difficult process. You are at the mercy of the low cost airline. That said, the fares are appealing to many, said Ms. Moretta at Geraci Travel. These are base fares and one way only, but in August and September, you can fly Norwegian Air out of Fort Lauderdale to London Gatwick for about $215. The airline is opening a new route to compete with British Airways out of Tampa International Airport, as well, where the introductory one-way price will be similar and thats a lot less than the British Airways flight, so far. To Paris its about $315 and into Barcelona $395, Ms. Moretta added. But you can get from Fort Lauderdale into Oslo, Norway for $194.90, and from Orlando to London Gatwick for $199.99. Or you can fly Orlando to Manchester, England for $260. Those are astoundingly good deals in the current market. If you like Belgian chocolate or beer, heres another: TuiFly from Miami to Brussels for about $240, Ms. Moretta said. The flight into Brussels is the Belgian branch of this company. Tui is a big German tour operator. Anything they fly out of Belgium or the Netherlands is called Tui-Fly thats their own ticket. And you dont even stop on the way, which is what Charles Lindbergh predicted would have to happen if commercial trans-Atlantic travel were ever going to occur.Websites and flexibilityBy contrast, if you go to a website such as kayak.com looking for cheap flights from Florida to Europe, and fail to look further, you wont find the cheapest flights. For $1,160 on a roundtrip fare listed last week, a traveler could stop in Cleveland, Ohio, and then in Reykjavik, Iceland, before reaching London, and then stop in Dusseldorf on the return to Florida; or (to contrast some Europe-bound flights with the least expensive), a traveler could spend $3,838 on an American Airlines flight operated by British Airways to get to Londons Heathrow with a stop in Charlotte, N.C., on the way out, and a stop in Chicago on the way back to Florida. If you avoid round-trip purchases and buy an inexpensive one-way ticket to Europe, how much will it cost you to return? If you leave in August and come back in September, it might even be a little cheaper, Ms. Moretta noted. Travelers who are date-flexible and willing to fly anywhere into Europe people who can let the airline pick a round-trip schedule within a given month, based on its needs can find low-cost flights at such websites as www.farecompare.com. For example, the site listed 10 roundtrip fares on four airlines last week from Palm Beach International Airport (PBI) to Milan, Italy for prices ranging from $475 on Alitalia (leaving Sept. 24, returning Oct. 2) to $510 on American for the same dates.Getting off the beaten track cheaply But reaching cities in Europe outside of the most standard inexpensive destinations, from Florida, can be done cheaply too if you can fly first into a well-used hub city, and then book a cheap European flight to a specific destination, Ms. Moretta explained. Sometimes you might have to overnight somewhere, but once you get to Europe, flights can be really cheap. There is a fare from Oslo to Bordeaux, France, for $77. Or if you took the flight from Orlando to Manchester ($260 one way), you can pick up Ryanair, based in Ireland. Ryanair flies into less crowded European cities and airports, such as Londons Stansted. From there, Ms. Moretta found a Ryanair ticket to Spain for $29, and tickets from Barcelona to Rome for $42, and from Barcelona to Athens for $55. If youd rather fly the cheap seats into London before getting out into the real world a little, heres one last option, said Ms. Moretta: Easy Jets, the big orange planes that go out of London. You can get from London to Berlin for (wait for it) $11! EUROPEFrom page 15INVESTINGFrom page 15If delays, cancellations or arbitrary troubles occur during European travel or any other, the ultimate cost to travelers might be much less for those who spend a fee on a good travel agent ($35 to $100, depending on complications), suggests Wilma Boyd, CEO and president of Preferred Travel of Naples. We are your advocate and work on your behalf, she notes. And that can become a significant and cost saving factor, at times if youre standing in a line of frustrated travelers at 3 a.m. who cant get home and your travel agent, getting past the 800 numbers most people have to use, books you into the best deal available while everybody else is still standing in line. Karen Pickrum, the companys marketing director, compared costs. Major airlines such as Delta, American and United are now offering the basic economy type fares in order to compete with low budget carriers, and they do have very similar restrictions. If you are in a particular class, you may not be allowed to put anything in bins. But if you purchase at least a Premium Economy or Comfort Plus-type fare on major carriers, you get extra legroom (average of 4 inches), priority boarding, dedicated overhead bin space, and seats in the front of the economy cabin. Some airlines and aircraft have their own cabin, and include premium drinks and snacks. It could be that all the extras you pay for on low-cost carriers can add up to the cost of a premium-economy ticket. When clients call our air department, they are able to check all of the airports, dates and flights to find the lowest fare. We can advise alternate airports where fares might be considerably lower. For example, departing from Miami is often hundreds of dollars lower per person than from Fort Myers-RSW. We are able to see the available classes of service in our GDS (booking system). We arent biased towards any one airline. We look at what is available and offer the options to the client (including) upfront fees for baggage and seats so they have a real number to make decisions on. We make sure to include client airline mileage numbers, known traveler, passport, and so on. Whatever is required. After the tickets are purchased, we monitor the flights and offer 24-hour emergency assistance. We have a tollfree number where you will always reach a live person, not a recording. We are an advocate for our clients. We will negotiate with the airlines on your behalf when cancellations or schedule changes occur. We have special numbers to call and dont have to sit on hold for hours. When paying more could mean spending less BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com LAHNER MORETTA BOYD the United States until this uncertainty has abated. As a result, the U.S. dollar has risen against the currencies of many countries that U.S. car manufacturers are selling their cars to. This makes U.S. produced vehicles more expensive for these foreign buyers, putting pressure on the manufacturer to cut prices. Other secondary factors affecting profitability for the car producers include higher wages and increasing interest rates. The former also drives costs higher and the latter results in higher-priced vehicles without the benefit of increased margins. In addition, recent increases in oil and gas prices are worrisome for an industry so reliant on large SUV and truck sales. Going forward, many of the key drivers of auto earnings will be outside the control of the automakers. Most significantly, some analysts believe that if the trade wars continue or escalate, many foreign countries will impose tariffs on U.S. auto sales. This will have a devastating effect on Detroit. In addition, continued or expanded tariffs on raw materials will also negatively affect auto sales and profitability. The same is true for higher wages, a stronger dollar and increasing interest rates. I do not believe that companies like GM and Ford will be able to pass these costs on to consumers via higher car prices, so I anticipate even further contraction of margins for these companies going forward. Therefore, I would recommend staying away from these stocks until some of these risks are better priced into the stocks or are neutralized. Singer Island Oceanfront Tower 2BR/2BA w/ Gated Beach Access One Block to Ocean Walk Mall $334,500 Call or Text Today for Details! Jimmie & Judy McAdams Realtors) 561-385-1450 | 561-358-0716Emails: Jimmie@singerislandlifestyles.com | Judy@singerislandlifestyles.com Singer Island Ocea nf rontTower g g Visit us online for all available properties! www.singerislandlifestyles.com Our team will help you start living the Singer Island Lifestyle that you so deserve! INTRACOASTAL WATER VIEWS

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A18 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY William Shepard, Jonah Goldberg, Francisco Gonzalez, Judith Schumacher and Rebel Cook Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Networking photo pages from business events, grand openings, professional associati on meetings, etc. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. NETWORKINGEconomic Forum of Palm Beach County, Kravis Center 1. Jessica Swift, Gregg Weiss and Shanon Materio 2. Rebel Cook, Laurel Baker and Rob Thompson 3. Tim Wilmath, Dorothy Jacks and Lori Berman 4. Jamie Goodman and Greg Tendrich 5. Maria Marino, Kyle Nurmin and Jeri Muoio 6. Daryl Lyon and Claudia Murphy 7. Dodi Glas and Dan Clark 8. Jody Taylorsmith, Michael Solomon and Rose Ann Lovell 9. Jonathan Flah and Linda Oliver 10. Ed Sterling and Rich Simpson 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 W G o 8 8

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| A19WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM REAL ESTATEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYA relaxed luxury retreat SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Ritz Carlton Residences, Singer Island. Fall in love with this professionally decorated 11th floor condominium at the Ritz Carlton Residences, Singer Island, with a spacious open floorplan for relaxed living. Its a perfect winter retreat! Enter the condominium and find a visual masterpiece with Intracoastal views from every room! The balcony is one of the largest in the building, able to accommodate a small crowd for boat watching. There are two bedrooms and an expanded dining area. The master suite includes a spacious bathing area, a walkin closet and Intracoastal views by day and city lights by night. Its move-in ready with tastefully appointed furnishings, including electronics. The kitchen includes beautiful Italian cabinetry and top-of-the-line appliances, including SubZero and Miele. Grandly situated on 8.8 acres along the crystal blue waters of the Palm Beach coastline, The Residences are a private oasis that rises 27 stories and offers panoramic ocean views. Imagine a home not only defined by sophisticated style and sumptuous furnishings, but equipped with impeccable service delivered by the Ritz Carlton, including 24-hour concierge and security. Valet parking, private in-house shipping for small packages, laundry collection and hotel and dinner reservations. Bask in the sun around one of the two pools which include towel service, sun screen and water. The private restaurant with service to the pool area, farm-totable cooking, small bar area and grill area for residents. State of the art fitness center with locker rooms and sauna. The social rooms host many events from Super Bowl to wine and cheese events. The media center includes stadiumstyle comfort seating and viewing area. Spend your days on the oceanfront; just steps away, cabana chairs are ready and waiting. Or relax at the pool, with towel service and a beverage. Come enjoy the lifestyle. Offered at $1,149,000. Call Jeannie Walker, Walker Real Estate Group, for private showing. 561-889-6734, Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com and www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com. Sp st w s l i E 5 e t COURTESY PHOTOS

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Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561.889.6734 Ritz Carlton Tower Suite 7A4BR+DEN/5.5BA $8,495,000 Ritz Carlton Townhome 401A6BR+2DEN/6.5BA $4,700,000 The Resort 6534BR/4.5BA $2,199,999Ritz Carlton Residence 1502B3BR/3.5BA $1,999,000 Oasis Singer Island 18A 3BR/3.5BA $2,385,000The Resort 16503BR/3.5BA $1,699,000 The Resort 20503BR/3BA $1,799,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1105B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,300,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,999,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2101A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,150,000 Water Club 1504-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,349,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $949,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,999 Water Club 1603-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,299,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 306B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $925,000 SOLDMartinique WT8042BR/3.5BA $649,900 SOLD NEW LISTING NEW LISTING SOLD SOLD

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WRITING WFLORIDA WEEKLY STAFF___________________Writing is a little like milking a cow: the milk is so rich and delicious, and the cow is so glad you did it. Anne LamottELCOME TO THE 2018 FLORIDA Weekly Writing Challenge. Over the next few weeks we hope to inspire the writers among our readers to craft their best short fiction based on our photo prompts. The picture of the staircase you see here Step up to the Florida Weekly Writing ChallengeSEE CHALLENGE, B8 BETTY WELLS / FLORIDA WEEKLYWarped tour takes a final bow BY ALAN SCULLEYFlorida Weekly CorrespondentKevin Lyman is out on this summers 24th edition of the Warped tour thinking about something that never needed to enter his thoughts during most of the years hes organized and overseen this tour. Hes thinking about his life without the Warped tour, which rolls into West Palm Beach on Aug. 5. Last fall, Mr. Lyman announced that 2018 would be the last year for Warped as a traveling festival visiting cities coast to coast. Its the end of an era in the concert world. Warped wasnt the first traveling festival Mr. Lyman, before launching Warped, worked for three years on Lollapalooza when it was breaking ground as a touring multi-band festival. But it is the last such tour, having outlasted Ozzfest, Lollapalooza, H.O.R.D.E., Lilith Fair and every other traveling festival tour. Mr. Lyman suspects the concept of the traveling festival has seen its day and sees multiple reasons why tours like Warped, Lilith Fair or Ozzfest are JODI CUNNINGHAM / COURTESY PHOTOWarped Tour veterans Less Than Jake.SEE WARPED, B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY | SECTION BWWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@ oridaweekly.comThe folks at CityPlace and Hilton West Palm Beach recently announced theyll be hosting the second District Fit event in October. The multiple-day event is a multidisciplinary fitness festival focusing on mindful movement. From 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 8, CityPlace is hosting a preview event showcasing some of the fitness experts and programming participants can expect in October, including cardio kickboxing, yoga and other workouts by elite trainers. Youll also find pop-up retail and reps from community organizations like the American Cancer Society and Discover the Palm Beaches. For more info, visit www.DistrictFitWPB.com. CityPlace will host a TGIFamily: Back to School special event from 5:3010:30 p.m. Aug. 10, with live music by Mister Trombone and friends from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. and activities, including science fun by the South Florida Science Center throughout the event. PB Farmyards, Balloon Masterz Entertainment face painting and balloon twisting, and a DJ are on tap. Dont forget you can get free parking for the event by participating in the Feeding South Florida Food Drive which runs through Sept. 30. Visitors who donate three nonperishable food items at Guest Services will receive a free parking voucher valid for four complimentary hours of parking in one of the CityPlace garages. For a list of acceptable donation items and more information, visit www.cityplace.com/ feeding-south-florida. For more information, visit www. cityplace.com/events/tgifamily-fridays. Happy year one! Lost Weekend, the only place for pool on Clematis Street, will celebrate its one-year anniversary on Thursday, Aug. 9, and youre invited to the party. The celebration will feature live music by Spider Cherry, a full open bar from 8 to 10 p.m., and shirt and hat giveaways. Arrive early (doors open at 4 p.m.) to play classic arcade games like Centipede and Ms. Pacman, or challenge your mates to skee, foos ball, or shuffleboard. Theres a zesty Mexican menu with tacos and nachos and the ambience thats made Lost Weekend a success this year is free. Lost Weekend is at 526 Clematis St., West Palm HAPPENINGSSEE HAPPENINGS, B8 CityPlace plans preview of fitness eventCOURTESY PHOTOSpider Cherry will play the Lost Weekends one-year anniversary celebration on Aug. 9.

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY JUPITERTHEATRE.ORG/VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER OPEN HOUSE VOLUNTEER OPEN HOUSESaturday, August 18, 2018 12:00 noon 3:00pm1001 EAST INDIANTOWN ROAD JUPITER, FL 33477 Join us for an informative day to nd out about current and new volunteer opportunities at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. SPONSORED BY COLLECTORS CORNER scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com The love letters were tucked in boxes with photos and stashed in the attic of my grandparents home in Fort Myers, forgotten for decades. But the ardor of 130 years ago still wells from the pages fresh as the day George Remington Carter reminded Sarah Jane Ringold of how much he wanted to marry her. I want to tell you I love you the dearest of all the world. And as you know, I have been so anxious to have you name the day when you will be my wife. You said this morning you will let me know tonight. Nothing you could do would make me happier, but in saying it, your countenance and manner indicated you were not just satisfied and ready to do so just yet. George and Sallie were my greatgreat-grandparents, and to look at their photos, there is little to suggest there was such a passion. These were serious people, but they were in love. Your actions in regard to my letters have led me to believe that you enjoy them so much that it makes the pleasure to me double in writing them, George wrote to Sallie on June 4, 1887. It also brings us great pleasure to read them never mind that the black ink has oxidized to brown and red. As George wrote on March 28, 1887: It was so nice of you to go into the hall to give me that kiss. You do not know how much I appreciated that then. After you got through all your fun, you again bade me good night. You may not have thought of doing anything to especially please me, but you did. He continued the wooing in a note from June 30, 1887: I look forward to the prospect of a pleasant home with a noble wife to enjoy it with me with the anticipation of such pleasure that my life is constantly animated with joy. Can it be any wonder that I sometimes feel that were I to lose you that the prospects of my life would be as a blight. Later that summer, they married, had three children together and settled down in Connersville, Ind., where Georges leather fittings factory made trimmings for carriages and the early automobiles. He died unexpectedly in 1922. Sallie lived on until 1937 those who remember her say she was imperious, but kind. Both are remembered in the town as civic leaders. But its nice to remember them as courting lovers. Or as George signed off: Now Darling, I will bring this to a close hoping to see you soon and to have a nice long pleasant chat with you mixed with much !!!! Love. And now with much Love and Affection, I am yours sincerely, Geo. R. Carter. Dont miss West Palm Beach Antiques Festival Aug. 3-5, South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. www.wpbaf.com. B ought: Art & Antique M elange, 374 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; 561-748-3303. Paid: $160 The Skinny: Papier-mch was a miracle product of the Victorian Age. Paper and glue could be compressed and molded into sturdy pieces of furniture homes of the day were filled with chairs, tables and chests made of the product. There also were decorative accessories, such as boxes and this small writing desk. I dont know whether my greatgreat-grandparents would have had the economic means to own something like this, but one can conjure Victorian loves penning passionate missives on one of these. It measures about 12 inches long and is inlaid with bits of mother of pearl and embellished with gold decoration. According to a beautifully penned note on the underside of the pen tray, it was presented to Sergeant Lewis Maddy in 1888 as a thank-you for his work with the 4th Volunteer Battalion in Essex. I was not able to learn anything about Maddy or that battalion, but its fascinating when we actually can give an item some context. THE FIND:Victorian papier-mch writing boxCould this writing box have inspired a love letter or two?

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1. Regina Collins, Ann Reilly and Cathleen Taylor 2. Jan Morales, Eli Morales, Nathan Morales and Yonel Gonzalez 3. Harmony Hamilton, Nichell Scott and Gloria Scott 4. Augustus Griffith, Jr 5. Barbara Northern and Diane St. Hubert 6. Jocelyn Lutter and Owen Lutter 7. John Hoy and Alesia Hoy 8. Laurie Martuscello and Kat Penley 9. Michael Brooks and Joyce Saltzman 10. Attendees dancing Downtown Shuffle 11. Lora Byrd and Kimble Byrd 12. Matt Thomas and Cathleen Scott 13 Natalie Gonzalez and Lassane Gonzalez 14. Shaunak Maggon 15. Sara Birriel and Vincent Miranda 16. Jorgie Garrido 17. Jeriame Kensinger, Jill Kravitz and Ruby DeVega 18. Bryan Mechmet, Josh Miles and Matthew Quido 19. Nite Box Band 20. Jen Clay, artist creator of Puppet Show 21. Skyler Meany and Abeni Matthews PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B3GAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETYNorton Museums Art After Dark 1 2 3 4 5 6 19 20 21 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 16 14 17 15 18Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com.

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@floridaweekly.com.THURSDAY8/2"Woody Guthries American Song" Through Aug. 5, Palm Beach Dramaworks at the Don and Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. The songs and writings of Woody Guthrie in a production conceived and adapted by Peter Glazer, directed by Bruce Linser. Tickets: $75. Preview tickets, $55, opening night tickets, $90, student tickets, $15. Pay Your Age tickets are available for guests age 18-40. 561-5144042; www.palmbeachdramaworks.orgHigh Gloss 2018: The Art of Fashion and Design! Through Aug. 10, The Box Gallery, 811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach. An exhibition of fine art photography, wearable art, and lifestyle accessories honoring Barbara Hulanicki. Clematis by Night 6-10 p.m. Thursdays, the Great Lawn at the Waterfront, Flagler Drive and Clematis Street, West Palm Beach. Free music, vendors, food and drink. Info: www.wpb.org or call 561-822-2222 or www .clematisbynight.net.Aug. 2: A double header featuring Army Gideon (reggae fusion) and Sweet Justice (reggae.)FRIDAY8/3West Palm Beach Antiques Festival Aug. 3-5, South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. www.wpbaf.com.REEFs 8th annual Palm Beach County Lionfish Derby Aug. 3-5. Team captains must attend the Captains Meeting at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3 at Loggerhead Marinelife Center; all participants are strongly encouraged to attend but one team representative is required. Teams may preregister online (www. REEF.org/lionfish/derbies) or they may register in person between 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. Aug. 3. The competition begins at sunrise Aug. 4, with catch due at the scoring station at Loggerhead Marinelife Center between noon and 1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. Palm Beach Lionfish Festival is Aug. 5. Purchase a VIP Access Pass at www. reef.org/store/derbyvip/palmbeach to taste and vote on favorite cuisines in the Lionfish Culinary Competition, receive two free drinks from the Lagunitas B rewing Company Beer Garden, and get an exclusive tour of Loggerhead Marinelife Center. SATURDAY8/4Brain Sparks 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 4 or Aug. 18, STEM Studio, 1209 Main St., Unit 112, Jupiter. Explore real brains, view fluorescent glowing microbrains, use your brainwaves to control objects. $10, includes snacks and lunch. Register online at www.sfsciencecenter.org USTAs Red Ball Team Challenge 3-5 p.m. Aug. 4, the city of Palm Beach Gardens Tennis Center, 5110 117th Court North in Palm Beach Gardens. Held in conjunction with the centers Family Fun Day. Features the red ball team challenge for the youngest players, green and yellow ball challenges for older youth. Theres also a Tennis Family Feud for parents and children. Pros and staff will direct all activities, and snacks and drinks will be provided. Cost is $10 per person or $20 per family. 561-775-8277.West Palm Bar Crawl Aug. 4, downtown West Palm Beach. Crawl fills the streets of Clematis and CityPlace to get your five free mixed drinks or beers at 5 different bars for $15 in advance. Participating bars include: O'Shea's Pub, Flair Street, Brother Jimmy, Banko Cantina, and Pawn Shop. Take advantage of the buy three-getone-free group discount available online at www.WestPalmBarCrawl.com.TUESDAY8/7The Way Caf Feeding Program 1 p.m. Tuesday, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 100 N. Palmway in downtown Lake Worth will offer free hot dinners at 1 p.m. Tuesday for the homeless and working poor, supported by donations and staffed by volunteers. Info: 561-582-6609.FoundCare Inc.s Back-ToSchool Health Fair 1-6 p.m. Aug. 7, 2330 S. Congress Ave. in West Palm Beach. Back-to-school physicals and immunizations for students plus a superhero-themed event for kids with a DJ, dancers, face painters and a costume contest with prizes. Every child will receive a backpack filled with school supplies. Free. 561-432-5849 or visit www.foundcare.org.WEDNESDAY8/8 District Fit Pre-Event on the Square 6-8 p.m. Aug. 8, CityPlace, West Palm Beach. This pre-event to District Fit a large-scale wellness festival focused on mindful movement, intentional physical fitness, preventative care and living your health-conscious lifestyle taking place Oct. 19-21 will introduce the event. www.districtfitwpb.com or www.cityplace.com LOOKING AHEADClematis by Night 6-9 p.m. Thursday, West Palm Beach Waterfront, West Palm Beach. Music, food, drink, vendors and a sunset. Info: www.clematisbynight.net. Aug. 9: B-Side Jones (Funk/Rock) and headline Andrew Luv & The Franchise Players Band (R&B/Pop/Top 40). Aug. 16: Mischief (Classic Pop Rock) and headliner Poor Life Decisions (Rock). To Kill A Mockingbird 7:30 p.m. Aug. 11, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. A production by the Youth Artist Chair. Tickets: $25 adults, $20 children. Please note that this production explores mature themes. Visit www. jupitertheatre.org or call 561-575-2223.Chuck Gillespies Tribute to Andy Williams 8 p.m. Aug. 11, PGA Arts Theater, Palm Beach Gardens. An intimate, mantic presentation. $25. Get tickets online at www.chucksings. com or 614-804-6359. AT THE COLONYThe Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. 561-659-8100 or 561-6555430; www.thecolonypalmbeach.com.Copeland Davis 5:30-9:30 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.Lenny Zinni 5:30-9:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday in the restaurantJazz Trio 5:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday in the restaurantMotown Fridays 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Royal RoomLive Jazz Brunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. AT CORAL SKY Coral Sky Amphitheatre, 601-7 Sansbury Way, West Palm Beach. 561-795-8883; www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com or www.livenation.com. Kevin Hart Aug. 3 Miranda Lambert & Little Big Town Aug. 4 Pentatonix Aug. 7. Imagine Dragons Aug. 9AT DRAMAWORKSPalm Beach Dramaworks, Ann & Don Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. 561-514-4042, Ext. 1; www. pbdramaworks.org."Woody Guthries American Song" Through Aug. 5 AT THE GARDENSThe Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-775-7750; www.thegardensmall.comBig Summer Fun Activities: For ages 3-10 Wednesdays at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.: Skip a Rope! Aug. 8. The Hurricane Jumpers Competition Jump Rope Team performs.AT THE KELSEYThe Kelsey Theater, 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 561-328-7481; www.thekelseytheater.com or www.holdmyticket.com. Kiss Alive 8 p.m. Aug. 4. The tribute band performs. $20. VIP $40 includes front of stage reserved seating and a meet-and-greet. AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-832-7469; www.kravis.org."I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change" Through Aug. 12. An MNM Theatre Company productionTwo Nights of Miracles Crusade with Apostle Ronald Ssali Aug. 10-11AT THE LIGHTHOUSEJupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Lighthouse Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. 561-747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tours August. Weather permitting. Spectacular sunset views and an inside look at the nuts & bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. Tour time: 75 minutes. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. RSVP required. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour August. See the moon rise over the lighthouse. $20 members, $25 nonmembers. Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids 10:30 a.m. the first Tuesday of the month. For ages 8 and younger. Bring a mat to sit on. Free, but reservations are required. Next meeting: August.Hike Through History 8:30-10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of the month. Discover the topography and natural history of Jupiters National Conservation Lands historic site on this 2-mile trek. Free, but RSVP required. Next hike: August.Lighthouse Book Club 6-7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month. Join the museum staff in book discussions on all things Florida. The complete book list is available online. Donation requested. RSVP. Next club: August.Social Media Bootcamp 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30. Learn the best ways to use social media for personal and professional use. Rajeeyah "GiGi" Madinah will lead this five-week program. $60 with a special Lighthouse discount. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-575-2223; www. jupitertheatre.org."To Kill A Mockingbird" Aug. 11AT THE IMPROVPalm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.comRickey Smiley Aug. 2-4Danny the Jew Live Aug. 5Karlous Miller Aug. 8Claudia Oshry aka @girlwithnojob Aug. 9Dan Cummins Aug. 10-12AT THE BALLPARK Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter. 561-775-1818; www.rogerdeanchevroletstadium.comThe Jupiter Hammerheads and the Palm Beach Cardinals are lighting up the diamond with fast-paced baseball action through Sept. 2. Special promotion nights: Dog Days Aug. 25. Fidos ticket is $5 which benefits local pet charities. ONGOING APBC Art on Park Gallery 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 561-345-2842; www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com. Class: Acrylic painting with Irma Friedman 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Learn your own personal style. Reservations required. Fee. 561-632-6401. Classes from Marsha Bhagwansingh 9:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays. Classes in drawing, painting and calligraphy. Reservations required. Fee. 561-507-4527.The Armory Art Center 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-8321776; www.armoryart.org. Connections Jewelry and Ceramics: Aug. 3-17. Featured student and instructor work by Maria Tritico and Lisa Johnson, jewelry instructors and their students and Mark Walnock, ceramic instructor and his students.Artisans On The Ave Gallery 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. 561-762-8162; The Audubon Society Bird walk info: asetripinfo@gmail.com; 508-2960238. www.auduboneverglades.org. Monthly Membership Meeting: 6:30 p.m. Aug. 7, Rooms 101 and 102 at FAU Pine Jog Environmental Education Center,6301 Summit Blvd, (east of Jog Road) in West Palm Beach. Member photos and ice cream social. Guests are welcomed. Clive Pinnock will speak about the August Bird of the Month: the broad-winged Hawk. CityPlace 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-366-1000; www. cityplace.com

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 TOP PICKS #SFL Miranda Lambert & Little Big Town Aug. 4, Coral Sky Amphitheatre. 561-795-8883; www.livenation.com Woody Guthries American Song Through Aug. 5, Palm Beach Dramaworks. 561-514-4042; www.palmbeachdramaworks.org #FISHY #DONTMISS REEFs 8th annual Palm Beach County Lionfish Derby Aug. 3-5. Festival Sunday at Loggerhead Marinelife Center. www.REEF.org/lionfish/derbies 8.04 Live music 7:30 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday Aug. 3: The Jam Band Aug. 4: Gypsy Lane Aug. 10: TGIFamily on the Square Back to School featuring Mister Trombone & Ellison Kendrick Aug. 11: Static BandSunday Yoga at the Culture Lab: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday. A Vinyasa yoga class. By donation. Register at www.cityplace.com/events/culturelabyoga.Assemblage: An Organically Grown Exhibition: Noon to 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. $5 Ticket Tuesdays at AMC Theaters CityPlace AMC Stubs members (its free to join) entitle you to $5 tickets on Tuesdays. With the $5 Cameo Combo get a savory popcorn and CocaCola, its a cheap date day or night at $10.Walking Art Tour 3-5 p.m. Saturday. Explore the art installations and murals created by artists from around the globe on this 90-minute guided walking tour. The tour ends with refreshments and appetizers at Hilton West Palm Beach. Tickets at eventbrite.comFeeding South Florida Food Drive Through Sept. 30. Donate three non-perishable food items at Guest Services and get four hours of free parking in one of the CityPlace garages. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdaySaturday. Info: 561-471-2901; www.palmbeachculture.com.Educators and Artists Through Aug. 18. VSA Florida Palm Beach County Captured: A Drawing and Photography Exhibition Through Aug. 18Downtown at the Gardens 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-340-1600; www. downtownatthegardens.com.Summer concerts: 7-9 p.m. Free. Aug. 3: California Gwen: No Doubt & Katy Perry Aug. 10: Vertigo / Original Sin: U2 & InxsThe Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter Leads nature walks. New adventurers are welcomed. Get info and register at www.loxfltrail.org. John Prince Park Walk 7:20 a.m. Aug. 4, 2520 Lake Worth Road, Lake Worth. Stroll in the park for about one hour. 561-596-4423. Jonathan Dickinson State Park 7:50 p.m. Aug. 5, 16450 S.E. Federal Highway, Hobe Sound. A 7-12 mile walk. 561-213-2189. The Monthly Chapter Meeting 7 p.m. Aug. 6, Okeeheelee Park Nature Center, 7715 Forest Hill Blvd, West Palm Beach. Talk about your latest hiking adventures. Guests welcomed. Refreshments and a program. 561-307-7792. The Historical Society of Palm Beach County and The Richard And Pat Johnson History Museum 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. 561-832-4164; www.hspbc.orgJohn D. MacArthur Beach State Park 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, Singer Island, North Palm Beach. 7767449; www.macarthurbeach.org. Educational Reef Program 11 a.m. Aug. 4. Learn about the fish and other inhabitants of our near shore reef through a presentation and discussion. A self-guided snorkeling trip follows. Birding at MacArthur Park 9 a.m. Aug. 5. A ranger-led walk identifying birds. Reservations. Free. Learn to Kayak Noon Aug. 5. A land-based course for beginners. Reservations. Free. Beach Cleanup 9-11 a.m. Aug 11. Register at 561-624-6952. Intro to Snorkeling 11 a.m. Aug. 18. Learn the basics of snorkeling in a land-based course for beginners. Reservations. Free.The Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free the first Saturday of the month and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 561-746-3101; www.LighthouseArts.org. Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead Through Aug. 11.Loggerhead Marinelife Center 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach. 561-627-8280; www.marinelife.org.Manatee Lagoon 6000 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. The FPL Eco-Discovery Center. Info: 561-626-2833; www.visitmanateelagoon.com. Sunday Lectures: 2-3 p.m. the first Sunday of the month Manatee Lagoon Tours: Guided walking tours at 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Mindful Moments Yoga: 5:45-6:45 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 8:309:30 a.m. Saturday. Age 21 and older. Artful Learning Kids: Ages 6 to 12 explore art and science on Saturdays 1-2:30 p.m. and Sundays 12:30-2 p.m. through August.North Palm Beach Library 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. 561841-3383; www.village-npb.org. Ongoing: Knit & Crochet at 1 p.m. Mondays; Quilters meet 10 a.m. Friday; Chess group meets at 9 a.m. the first and third Saturday. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-253-2600; www.workshop.org. Renewal: Going Native Through Aug. 4. An exhibition of 100 photographs of native plants and wildlife. The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every day. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 561533-0887; www.palmbeachzoo.org Zoo Camp Through Aug. 10. Safari Nights Aug. 3The River Center 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Hours: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdaySaturday. This teaching facility and recreation area offers programs to enrich the community and the river. Call 561743-7123; www.loxahatcheeriver.org.The Society of the Four Arts 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Call 561-6557227; www.fourarts.org. Art Appreciation with Joan Lipton Aug. 15The South Florida Fairgrounds 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. 561-793-0333; www.southfloridafair.com.Yesteryear Village, A Living History Park Learn what life was like in South Florida before 1940. Town residents will share their stories. Hours are 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Tickets: $10 adults, $7 seniors age 60 and older, $7 children age 5-11, and free for younger than age 5. Info: 561-7953110 or 561-793-0333. West Palm Beach Antiques Festival Aug. 3-5 Jurassic Quest 3-8 p.m. Aug. 10-12. www.jurassicquest.com/westpalmbeachThe South Florida Science Center and Aquarium 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Info: 561-832-1988; www.sfsciencecenter.org. AREA MARKETSSinger Island Green & Artisan Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Singer Islands Ocean Walk, 2401 Ocean Ave. along scenic A1A. Pet and kid friendly. www.singerislandgreenmarket.com.Lake Worth High School Flea Market 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, year-round, under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. Info: 561-439-1539.Palm Beach Gardens Summer GreenMarket Through Sept. 30, at its breezy, undercover summer location at STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage, 11010 N. Military Trail in Palm Beach Gardens. Hours: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays. No pets. 561-630-1100; pbgrec.com/ greenmarket. Jupiter Farmers Market at El Sol 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, yearround, 106 Military Trail, Jupiter. 561-2835856; www.Jupiterfarmersmarket.com.Waterfront Market at Harbourside Place 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays along the waterfront. Fresh produce, specialty foods, flowers and plants and local art. Yoga class at 10 a.m. Live music at noon. Free parking during the market. Pet friendly. harboursideplace.comTiki Market 4-7 p.m. Sunday at the Rivera Beach Marina, 190 E. 13th St., West Palm Beach. Food and Caribbean merchandise. Vendors wanted. 561-844-3408. Rust Market 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month at Kelsey Vintage, 748B Park Ave., Lake Park. Vendors of vintage and collectible items and decor. Brunch, beer and mimosas available from Brick N' Barrel. Next market: Aug. 18. www.kelseyvintage.com CALENDAR #HAHAHA Rickey Smiley Aug. 2-4, Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace. 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.com

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYRed, Rover, Red Rover, A Hero Comes Over, Eastpointe 1. Madeline Tolmach Walsh, Jeff Tart and Blossom Fishmann 2. Karen Golonka and Regina Collins 3. Matt Kleeman, Charlie Brown, Eric, Debra Cohn, Crickett, Pat Deshong, Denise Schank, Socks and Steven Schank 4. Debra Cohn and Socks 5. Denise Schank, Steven Cohn, Socks and Debra Cohn 6. Matt Kleeman, Charlie Brown and Pat Deshong 7. Socks 8. Eric and Crickett 9. Socks and Denise Schank 10. Richard Matthews and Matt Atkins 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 oc s e ven

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 B7 LATEST FILMSMission: Impossible Fallout Is it worth $10? YesNo actor working today is more bold, courageous and daring than Tom Cruise. We thought it was cool when he climbed the outside of the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa, in the fourth Mission: Impossible. Then he dangled off the side of a plane at the start of the franchises next installment. That was mere childs play compared to what he does in the sixth film, the supremely entertaining Mission: Impossible Fallout. Here he jumps out of an airplane at 25,000 feet and opens his parachute at 2,000 feet a HALO jump, for high altitude, low opening. Later, after a helicopter takes off, he climbs up a rope descending from the copter in order to get on board. Once on board, he pilots the copter himself, including a steep descent and 360-degree spin. Yes, Cruise really does all these stunts himself. We take it for granted when he also rides a motorcycle against Paris traffic in an audacious chase; to him (and us viewers) its almost routine, and we lose sight of the fact that this sequence would be the highlight of a normal action movie. This doesnt happen without bumps and bruises, of course. It was widely reported in August 2017 that Cruise broke his ankle while jumping onto a rooftop in London (production shut down for two months afterward). Ive said it before, and Ill probably say it again: Thank you, Tom, for literally risking your life for our entertainment. Best of all, he does these crazy stunts in pretty darn good movies. This one picks up two years after the events of the last film, Rogue Nation. Villain Solomon Lanes (Sean Harris) disciples are planning to simultaneously detonate three nuclear weapons in heavily populated cities. Its up to Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team (Simon Pegg and Ving Rhames) to intercept the sale of plutonium before its too late. At least, this is what the exposition tells us. Before the opening credits, writer/ director Christopher McQuarrie gives us a plot twist you will not see coming, and the movie only gets better from there. In addition to Cruise, Rhames and Pegg, also returning are Alec Baldwin as Secretary of the IMF Alan Hunley, Rebecca Ferguson as Mi-6 agent Ilsa Faust and Michelle Monaghan as Ethans ex-wife, Julia. New to the franchise are Vanessa Kirby (Princess Margaret on The Crown) as a black market broker, Henry Cavill as a CIA assassin and Angela Bassett as his boss. Figuring out whom to trust (or not) is part of the fun, as are the worldly locations and futuristic technology. Collectively, the Mission: Impossible movies represent what is arguably the best action franchise in the film industry today, and Fallout only strengthens that assertion. Its action scenes showcase tremendous imagination largely without the aid of visual effects trickery, and they are riveting. Were talking palmssweating, oh-my-goodness-wow-thatsawesome riveting, and because youre engaged with the story as well, it means something. Dont miss out. I wholeheartedly encourage you to see Mission: Impossible Fallout on as big a screen as you can. dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> YouTube has a great video about all the stunts in Mission Impossible Fallout. Check it out. You wont be sorry. PUZZLE ANSWERS Where Nantucket meets the Florida KeysEnjoy upscale American and Authentic Italian cuisine.Private Parties & Catering Available WhNtkttthFlidK Reservations: 561.842.7272612 US Hwy. 1, Lake Park, FL 33403 Entire Dinner Check$29 plus tax & gratuity Includes: Soup or Salad, Entree, Dessert & Coffee Offers cannot be combined with other specials or coupons.

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY(and in a larger size below) is the first prompt. You have until midnight Sunday, Aug. 12, to send us a story inspired by the image. Well print new prompts and submission deadlines on Aug. 15 and 29 and Sept. 12. Here are the rules: Although we hope all four of our photo prompts enkindle your creative gifts, please limit your output to one per prompt. In other words, you can send us up to four stories, one based on each prompt. Keep your entry to 750 words, please, and no poetry, thank you. Give it a title and run it through Spellcheck. Put your full name, phone number and city/state you live in at the end of your masterpiece. Send it, either attached as a Word document or simply pasted into the body of the email, to writing@floridaweekly.com. Snail mail offerings will not be considered. Our editors look forward to reviewing the entries and selecting one winner, whose author will receive a ticket to the 13th annual Sanibel Island Writers Conference (value: $500). With keynote speaker and New York Times bestselling author Ann Hood (She Loves You Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, An Italian Wife, Somewhere Off the Coast of Maine, An Ornithologists Guide to Life and The Obituary Writer, among others), the conference is set for Nov. 8-11 on Sanibel Island. The 2018 Florida Weekly Writing Challenge winner will be notified by Oct. 15, and the winning entry will be published in all our editions. Questions? Email writing@floridaweekly.com and well get back to you. CHALLENGEFrom page 1 BETTY WELLS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Beach. Call 561-293-2786 or visit www. sub-culture.org/lost-weekend-wpb/Homework help and more Admit it, parents: Back-to-school time is a mixed bag. Everyone wants their children to do well in school, and most of us can use all the help we can get. Get started on the right foot with help from the local library, a great partner in your kids education. At the Mandel Public Library in downtown West Palm Beach, caregivers will find more than a few free programs, tools and resources to help kids and teens succeed in school. In addition to academic support, the library will offer free after-school activities designed to help little minds unwind and activities to help preschoolers get ready for the day when they get on the big yellow bus beginning Sept. 4. From 4-6 p.m. Aug. 14-16, parents and elementary school students are invited to meet the certified teachers at the librarys homework center, enjoy free refreshments, and get tips to make the school year successful. Elementary students who attend and register for the homework center will also receive free school supplies (while supplies last). The programs and the school supplies are a gift from the West Palm Beach Library Foundation.Homework centers provide free assistance for elementary, middle and high schoolers. The centers, equipped with the latest technology and run by certified teachers, provide help with homework projects and test prep, plus healthy snacks and plenty of encouragement. Elementary centers are open 4 to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Middle and high school centers are open 5 to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday. After-school activities are designed to reinforce school conceptsand for fun. Beginning Sept. 4, programming includes dog tales, where kids read out loud to therapy dogs; college prep courses for teens; a STEAM program where kids can play, create and learn while having fun using science, technology, engineering, art, and math skills, including coding workshops. Two cooking classes are also planned for kids in grades 3 to 5. Step by Step Kindergarten Prep! Meets weekly from Sept. 4 through Nov. 16, and features storytime specifically designed to reinforce oral language, print awareness, vocabulary, phonological awareness and letter recognition. Ask a librarian how to incorporate literacy skills into your childs daily routine, which supports learning later on. Need another reason to love the library? The library has more than 140 computers and two separate departments just for kids and teens with computers that have free access to the internet, and your library card provides access to free books, downloadable ebooks, music and movies that can be checked out 24/7 from your desktop, mobile device, or TV using the librarys hoopla and CloudLibrary apps. Best of all, all items checked out will be automatically returned that means no late fees! Ever! The Mandel Public Library is at 411 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. For details or more information, visit www. wpbcitylibrary.org or call 561-868-7703.Bumblefest ticketsAdvance tickets are on sale now for $5 for Bumblefest, the indie rock extravaganza returning to downtown West Palm Beach Sept. 8 with San Franciscobased psychedelics Lumerians, Seattle glam king Scott Yoder and Los Angelesbased surf rockers Los Santoros plus more than two dozen local and national acts on six stages. The music starts at 6 p.m. Pick your favorite stage: Kismet Vintage, Respectables (two), Voltaire, Hullaballoo or Subculture Coffee. Also performing: the female Brooklyn art-punk quintet Gustaf, Pleasures, Hurricane Party (RickoLus and Bleubird), King Complex, Boston Marriage, Cog Nomen, Ella Herrera, Humbert, JM and the Sweets, Lion Country Ferrari, the Mona Lisa Tribe, Nervous Monks, Pocket of Lollipops and Seafoam Walls. For more information, go to www. Facebook.com/PureHoneyMagazine. unlikely to happen again. One r eason is f inances. The transportation costs, in the case of the punk rock/alt-rock leaning Warped, of getting some 70 bands and everything that comes with it to the venues has increased, as have band fees, insurance and other costs that go with the tour. Its also become a bigger challenge in recent years to book bands popular enough to anchor the Warped stages and drive ticket sales. That wasnt such an issue in the first decade or so, when Warped was essentially the only big summer tour going for bands in the punk and alternative rock worlds and managers and record labels clamored for one of the coveted slots on the Warped tour. But the music and touring business has changed in big ways and the changes havent always worked in the Warped tours favor. For one thing, album sales have tanked in the eras of downloading and streaming services. Without much revenue from album sales, bands have to make their money on touring. Lyman said Warped is simply not seen by some industry people as the best summer touring option anymore, particularly for the kind of acts that could bring name recognition and a measure of star power to Warped. When I started Warped tour, there wasnt a full summer (of festivals) in Europe that you could go to. Bands used to go over there in June, do a couple of festivals in early June, and then theyd come back (do Warped tour) and hopefully do a couple (European festivals) in August, Mr. Lyman said by phone. But now theres a full three months of festivals going on in Europe. So the economics have changed for a lot of bands because of lack of payments from records and CDs, that type of thing. Its a time when a band can make their living going to Europe this time of year. On a physical level, the 16-hour days Mr. Lyman, 57, typically spends at each stop managing the tour has become a challenge and he has a knee replacement and a surgically rebuilt ankle to testify to the wear and tear. Physically, its been a drag the last three summers. I go 100 percent on everything I do, Mr. Lyman said. Im always in the middle of it and I will always be in the middle of everything I do. But the physical toll on me has gotten too hard. So yes, Mr. Lyman sounds ready to leave behind the grind of Warped. But not until he takes one last trip around the country this summer. And for Warpeds final voyage, Mr. Lyman has assembled a diverse lineup of talent that includes a number of veteran bands that have had multiple outings on the tour (Less Than Jake, Reel Big Fish and Every Time I Die) as well as emerging acts that touch on everything from pop-rock (Echosmith) to punk (Doll Skin) to metal (Amity Affliction) and beyond. He likes what this years lineup offers and what hes seen with ticket sales so far. I have a very solid lineup and its all people who wanted to be there. Thats really what it is, Mr. Lyman said. Im very happy with the lineup I do have and also how I think were selling our tickets, who were selling our tickets to this year. It looks like were selling to a fan that maybe remembers their good times at Warped tour, thats maybe a few years older, that 20to 35-year-old set. I really think its going to be a celebration of people who are true music fans, who remember those times (at Warped) and are going to come out and have a great last summer with us, he said. Mr. Lymans post-Warped life figures to be busy. Hell remain involved in philanthropy, consult on certain festivals and hes accepted a teaching position at the University of Southern California where hell share his experience in the music business with students. And he has a certain undertaking in mind for next summer. Now Im going to travel in a different way, Mr. Lyman said. I get to take my wife on a summer vacation. It will be awesome. Yeah, next summer will be our first summer vacation in 27 years, between Lollapalooza and Warped tour. HAPPENINGSFrom page 1WARPEDFrom page 1 Vans Warped Tour >> When: Doors open at 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 5. >> Where: Coral Sky Amphitheatre, 601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. >> Cost: Tickets start at $45. >> Info: www.ticketmaster.com V V a a n n s s W W a a r r p p e e d d T T o o u u r r 1 1 8 8 COURTESY PHOTOEmerging punk band Doll Skin is new to the Warped Tour.CHAD SENGSTOCK / COURTESY PHOTOWarped Tour organizer, Kevin Lyman.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 PUZZLESSUPERMARKET OPENINGS HOROSCOPESLEO (July 23 to August 22) There might be some facts you still need to know before leaping onto center stage. Best to move carefully at this time so that you can observe whats happening around you. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Its a good time to expand your outlook by getting out and around, whether you do some longrange traveling or just explore the great things to see closer to home. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your wise counsel continues to be needed as that family situation works itself out. Meanwhile, the decisions you made on your job begin to pay off quite nicely. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your job situation brightens thanks to all your hard work. Now, spend some time repairing a personal relationship you might have neglected for too long. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Aspects favor action in the workplace. Line up your facts and show your superiors why youre the one theyre looking for. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your hard work pays off on the job. Personal relationships also can benefit from more of your time and attention. Spend the weekend with loved ones. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Early feedback on your project might be disappointing. But dont be discouraged. Use it to make needed adjustments, then submit it to your superiors again. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Flattery could lure the otherwise sensible Fish into making an unwise decision. Be careful. All that praise might be an attempt to reel you in before you can learn the facts.ARIES (March 21 to April 19) There might still be some uncertainty about the decision you made. But a quick check of the facts should reassure you that youre doing the right thing.TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The tidy Taurean needs to be a little more flexible about accepting some changes to those carefully made plans. You might be pleasantly surprised by what follows. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Consider stepping away from your concentrated focus on your new project for a bit so you can get some perspective on what youve done and where you plan to take it. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) The understandably angry Crab might not want to accept the reason why someone might have tried to hurt you. But at least youll have an insight into why it happened. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a wonderful sense of who you are. You are a shining example to others, helping them believe in themselves and what they can do. SEE ANSWERS, B7 SEE ANSWERS, B7 By Linda Thistle SUDOKUDifficulty level: Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. 4O7 Northwood Rd. | West Palm Beach, FL 334O7 | 561.847.4O85 www.huttonnorthwood.com Palm Beach Illustrated Best New Restaurant Nominee!FOODFORFOODIES!Live Music Friday, Saturday and Sunday Daily Happy Hour!Valet Parking AvailableMon-Thurs 4-9 | Fri-Sat 4-10 Sunday Brunch 11-4 Sunday Dinner 4-9 S I L K T R E E S & F L O R A L A R R A N G E M E N T STIRED OF LOOKING AT YOUR OLD AND DUSTY FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS? BRING THEM IN FOR A CLEANING AND REARRANGEMENT FOR A TOTAL NEW LOOK! 30%OFFENTIRE STORE L L L L L L L L L L L L O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Dont Miss Out! CRYSTAL TREE PLAZA

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY THEATER REVIEWI Love You, Youre Perfect, gets update BY BILL HIRSCHMANFloridatheateronstage.comLets be brutally honest: If youre over 40 and you heard that some theater was reviving that chamber musical I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change, come on, you said, Again? In revival after revival after revival, the episodic skits and songs dissecting the vagaries of male-female relationships likely has amassed more single performances in South Florida than any other theatrical property, more than Fiddler on the Roof or Shear Madness. So heres the good news, the really good news: Last year, composer Jimmy Roberts and bookwriter-lyricist Joe DiPietro overhauled the 1996 piece and MNM Theatre Company in West Palm Beach is one of the first companies to benefit from the updated lyrics, tweaked book scenes, reordered scenes and two new songs. The result is a freshness and vibrancy that feels 21st century while preserving the timeless verities upon which the original capitalized, becoming the second-longest-running hit in offBroadway history, as well as a perennial regional theater favorite. Theres enough of the old material to summon up pleasant memories and enough new material to make you think you havent seen it before. It simply but subtly infuses everything with such current tropes as cellphone technology and openly gay relationships. The obsessing parents of the newborn child are now both men. The funniest song is how clueless men text photos of their penis to aghast girlfriends, erroneously thinking it will advance their romance. References to Google, Netflix and playing golf at Mara-Lago have been layered in. But what emerges once again is how ILYYPNC keenly observes the awkward, painful and hilarious steps and missteps in burgeoning romance and marriage. From a herky-jerky first date between two nerds, to women pretending to be fascinated by their dates boring chatter, to simply waiting for a spouse to finish dressing to go out, the situations are familiar whether comic or poignant. As strong as the reconstituted material is, MNMs production is elevated by the talents of director Dom Ruggiero, musical director Caryl Fantel and perhaps the most perfectly chosen cast possible at the moment. Clay Cartland, Anna Lise Jensen, Michael Scott Ross and Heather Kopp invest inventive comic chops, persuasively honest emotion, strong singing voices and an unflagging, infectious energy. Jensen has proven a major talent in recent seasons as Clara in Passion and Alison in Fun Home at Zoetic Stage, as the accordion-wielding bar patron in Actors Playhouses Once, and a transcendent performance as the heroine in Slow Burns The Bridges of Madison County. That expressive liquid soprano is deployed once again to caress the heartfelt I Will Be Loved Tonight. But she gets to show for the first time here a well-honed comic bent. Cartland long ago earned the status of one of the regions most inspired clown princes. But keen observers have always seen how his comic parts usually contain a quiet dramatic core. Here he gets to exercise both whether as the overthe-top serial killer advising visitors to his prison about relationships or as the late middle-aged husband quietly marveling at how after years of marriage Shouldnt I Be Less In Love With You? Ross, a MNM stalwart in Hair, Spamalot and The World Goes Round, gets to demonstrate his wide range both as an actor and singer, but no more notably as the gay father who finds himself sinking into a baby talk scat that morphs into a wild hip hop interlude before resuming into infant-speak. Kopp, who has worked throughout the region but rarely here, combines a lovely voice with a talent for comic turns. She melds both as the bridesmaid recounting the endless procession of horrendous gowns and doomed weddings she has been enlisted to attend in Always A Bridesmaid, making the most of some of DiPietros wittiest lyrics. Ruggiero, who has directed virtually every major Broadway musical in regional theaters including his Carbonell-nominated The Dr owsy Chaperone at the Wick Theatre, imbues such shows with drive, polish and verve, but does it invisibly. You arent conscious (and you shouldnt be) of what he (or his cast with his blessing) have invented that adds a sense of volume and weight, such as how Cartland keeps trying to take popcorn from his date at a movie he thinks hes going to hate. Caryl Fantels band, including Rick Kissingers woodwinds, Jackie de los Santos bass and Roy Fantels percussion, is note perfect in the newly expanded arrangements. Fantel expertly melds the quartet, who can sound like a choirs cantata or the Manhattan Transfer. MNMs production quality keeps ratcheting up. Cindi Taylor covers the huge expanse of the Rinker Playhouse with a Mondrian-like array of screens upon which Thomas M. Shorrock projects abstract designs. But Shorrock also communicates the changing environment with his lighting. One stretch only professionals will notice is how he slowly dials down the mood-enhancing light when Jensen sings the lovely I Will Be Loved Tonight. With 50-plus roles and only four actors, Linda C. Shorrock ably carries part of the burden by designing scores of costumes including the horrible frock that Kopp wears in Always A Bridesmaid. Last but not least is Justin Thompsons sound design. Few will notice it because its as close to perfect as anyone could ask. It helps that the performers enunciate the lyrics so well, but Thompsons sound has a clarity and brightness unexpected in what is essentially a room made of concrete. I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change plays through Aug. 12 at the Rinker Playhouse at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach. Tickets $55. Visit www.kravis.org or call 561-832-7469. COCKTAILS & PARADISECars, cocktails and good causesOne of the reasons I chose to move to West Palm Beach from Buffalo is the huge array of unparalleled social and charitable events in South Florida. What better way to enjoy my favorite passions like cars, planes, and exciting social scenes all while making a positive difference in the community? Since co-founding Monkey in Paradise Vodka, Ive had terrific opportunities not just to attend such events, but also sponsor and co-host them. Two of my favorite events that integrate all of these elements are Cars & Coffee Palm Beach and Wheels, Wings & Fashion. If you havent been to both, youre missing out! Cars & Coffee Palm Beach at Palm Beach Outlets is the largest monthly gathering of auto enthusiasts in Florida and is one of the largest in the world, with 1,800-3,500 display vehicles and up to 35,000 spectators each month. This is not your ordinary cars and coffee. Its a Sunday morning spectacle with vendors, stores, refreshments, giveaways, celebrities, and more. There is something for everyone, from rare hyper cars and the unveiling of new super cars to one-of-a-kind classic cars, muscle cars and hotrods. If its on wheels, its there, has been unveiled there, or is scheduled to showcase there. One of the best parts of this monthly event is their focus on raising awareness for local nonprofits, including biannual toy drives for The Childrens Healing Institute; Veterans Adaptive Sports displays around holiday time; upcoming Mission 22 efforts to prevent veteran suicides; and collaborations with Treasure Coast Community Health, and with a variety of other organizations focused on local schools, health issues and causes that are important to show goers. Hope youll join Monkey in Paradise, the good, and the fun at the next Cars & Coffee Palm Beach at Palm Beach Outlets on Sunday, Aug. 26, 8 a.m. to noon. After participating, sponsoring, and being inspired by Cars & Coffee Palm Beach and some of the other great car events in the area, I co-founded the annual Wheels, Wings & Fashion Hangar Party. Monkey In Paradise Vodka, along with Nicholas Castallino of Luxotica and Victor Concepcion of VRC Events, produce the yearly extravaganza. Our goal was to create a remarkable signature event to raise money for three different charities every year. Each of the founding sponsors picks a charity of their choice. The 2018 event charities were Habitat For Humanity, Leukemia Lymphoma Society, and the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. The hangar party featured large business jets, fighter jets, warbirds, exotic cars, race cars, vendors, food from local restaurants, a fashion show, Bikini Show, DJs and a silent auction. The event was sold out and received rave reviews from all who attended. Next years Wheels, Wings & Fashion Hangar Party will return to Signature Aviation at Boca Raton Airport. The party will be in April and will benefit three nonprofits yet to be announced. Its going to be another incredible time. Cheers! alexKOWTUNalex@monkeyinparadise.com, Instagram: @successful COURTESY PHOTOCars & Coffee Palm Beach attracts thousands each month to Palm Beach Outlets.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF AUGUST 2-8, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11The Dish: Chorizo tacos The Place: Zipitios in the Grandview Public Market, 1401 Clare Ave., West Palm Beach; www.grandviewpublic. com/zipitios/ The Price: $7.50 The Details: If there was one thing that amazes me, its the sheer numbers of people who stopped by the Grandview Public Market on a Thursday night it was a lively scene, and the place was packed. A friend and I stopped at the market to attend the opening of a photography exhibition from the Norton Museum of Art and feasted on tacos. The chicken tacos were tender and fresh, and the chorizo tacos were packed with plenty of savory sausage by Graces Fine Foods. They were drizzled with an aioli and garnished with cilantro and other greens. These literally are street foods, and we were able to comfortably stroll the market while enjoying our dinner. Sc ott Simmons, s simmons@floridaweekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus Places in Boynton A trio worth noting3JANSTHREE FOR2 SUSHI SIMON1614 S. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. 561-731-1819. One of the best and most creative sushi restaurants in the south end of the county keeps locals coming back. Its not just sushi the spicy hand rolls are great but friendly service and knowledge that bring it together here. Plenty for traditionalists as well as vegetarians and the sushi-shy. Dont miss the chocolate cake, too.1 JOSIES RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA1602 S. Federal Highway, Boynton Beach. 561-364-9601; www.josiesristorante.com. The James Beard award-winning chef Mark Militello heads up the kitchen at this Italian spot. Dont discount the pizza or entrees, but for our money, the bar menu and small plates are the ticket. Prime short rib meatball, calamari, Josies crisp seafood or stuffed eggplant Stefania are meals. Or go meatless: fresh burrata with beets, Borolo poached pears and arugula is a perfect mesh.3 HURRICANE ALLEY RAW BAR & RESTAURANT529 E. Ocean Ave., Boynton Beach. 561-364-4008; www.myhurricanealley.com. Its a fun crowd that lines the sidewalks and gathers at the surf-themed bar. A lot of bar trivia wound into the menu names of sandwiches as in what year was Hurricane Harvey, Gilbert, or Jeanne? Fish sandwiches, housemade fish dip, seafood baskets and seafood bisque served in a bread bowl are among favorites. Oh, and bring Bowser on a leash and with his bowl, too he gets his own menu. Jan Norris, jnorris@floridaweekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE COURTESY PHOTO Mark Militello supervises the menu at Josies Ristorante in Boynton Beach.A new spot to celebrate Mardi Gras locally is coming to Palm Beach Gardens at Downtown at the Gardens. A Cajun restaurant, dubbed Voodoo Bayou, is in the works. Plans were announced to open early next year in the old Cabo Flats location in the corner space that also once housed Rosa Mexicano. The team behind it owns the busy Mexican restaurant Calaveras Cantina in Harbourside Place in Jupiter. The bar scene, so popular with Cabo Flats, will continue, according to a statement by Christopher Acosta, general manager. Bourbons and American whiskeys will be prominent spirits to match the Southern and Cajun foods. Expect the featured dishes to include both Cajun crawfish and shrimp boils those feature small potatoes, corn and typically Andouille sausage in the boil, along with seasonings and some cayenne to ramp up the flavor. Fried chicken, oysters, shrimp and grits, redfish, and a Cajun delicacy, rabbit with baking-powder dumplings, are on the tentative menu. Curtis Peery, the CEO of Calaveras Inc., has experience with Southern flavors in his former role as vice president of BB Kings Blues Club. He opened the former restaurant and club in West Palm Beachs CityPlace, along with others across the nation, during his seven years with the company.In brief Congrats to Chef Erik Pettersen of Evo in Tequesta. He marks 11 years at the stove at the locals favorite Italian restaurant. Hes given it a reboot, freshening up the interior, and is celebrating winning one of this years Wine Spectator Awards of Excellence. School starts in less than two weeks, and there are still kids without supplies. Donate supplies to the drive at PGA Commons, and get 10 percent off your meal at one of their restaurants (or a purchase at one of the shops). Theyve gone to the dogs at the Butcher Shop Beer Garden and Grill in downtown West Palm Beach. Friday, August 3, bring Fido for a Yappy Hour 5-7 p.m. Its a charity event for medical care for a pooch named Destiny a dog dragged a halfmile behind a truck. Salty Dog Paddle of West Palm Beach is staging the event. Dine Out Downtown Delray is ongoing through Aug. 7. Take advantage of discounted meals and prix fixe menus along Atlantic Avenue. janNORRISjan@jannorris.com Voodoo Bayou bringing Cajun flavor to Downtown at GardensCOURTESY PHOTO Chef Erik Pettersen is marking 11 years at Evo in Tequesta.

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Minimum opening deposit of $10,000 will earn 2.37% APY. Advertised rate applicable to ini tial 12-month term only. CD will automatically renew to a standard 12-month CD term at the current rate and APY available at that time. BauerFinancial is a registered trademark. 7430 0718 HURRY, OFFER ENDS wi t h m inimum $10 000 of new fu n ds N D S S August 31 st 2018!At Florida Community Bank better banking means great rates, convenient locations and personalized service. With 50 banking centers across the state, FCB is committed to ensuring that exceptional banking is right around the corner come experience the way banking should be! FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then the patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing t o the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n admi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for older adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do much be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up t hei favor of a F lor cohort of Bo o hit their ei gh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e c are? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... JUPITERTHEATRE.ORG/VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER OPEN HOUSE VOLUNTEER OPEN HOUSESaturday, August 18, 2018 12:00 noon 3:00pm1001 EAST INDIANTOWN ROAD JUPITER, FL 33477 Join us for an informative day to nd out about current and new volunteer opportunities at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. SPONSORED BY

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AT HOMEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYTHE PALM BEACH HOME REDEFINED AUGUST 2018PHOTO BY BLUEPRINT/22 Jennifer Mabley and Austin Handler bring their talents to town Page 6 From Hamptons toPalm Beach GETAWAYDelrays Seagate offers luxury retreat. Page 4 CULTIVATEMounts Botanical turns 40. Page 2

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2 At Home AUGUST 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherPason GaddisEditorScott SimmonsWritersAmy Woods Mary ThurwachterPresentation EditorEric RaddatzGraphic DesignerMeg RoloffDigital Advertising ManagerGina RicheyAccount ExecutiveMaurice BryantSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez At Home highlights the best of South Florida design. It publishes monthly. Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com 185 EAST INDIANTOWN ROAD SUITE 213 JUPITER, FLinteriorsbylaura.com (561) 747-5527 SHEERS & SHADINGS CELLULAR HONEYCOMB SHADES ROMAN SHADES ROLLER & SOLAR SHADES WOVEN WOODS SHUTTERS VERTICAL BLINDS WOOD & METAL BLINDS PLEATED SHADES DRAPERY AND VALANCES MOTORIZED WINDOW COVERINGS WALLPAPER INSTALLATIONS AND REPAIRS INTERIOR DESIGN CONSULTATIONS UPHOLSTERY CARPETING AND FLOORING Mounts marks 40th with Ruby JubileeFor four decades, Mounts Botanical Garden has been a great place to get inspiration for your landscape. You can walk the paths, escape from reality for a while and emerge with a new vision. As if that were not reason enough to celebrate, heres another: Mounts turns 40 this year. To celebrate this milestone, its ruby anniversary, the garden will host a Ruby Jubilee, with three new attractions during the coming season, which runs October through September. Mounts takes its name from Marvin U. Red Mounts, who served Palm Beach County Extension and Palm Beach County farmers for more than 40 years. He established and cared for the gardens collection of fruit trees to help produce new food resources that could help families overcome vitamin deficiencies. By 1964, there were 69 fruit-producing trees growing onsite, according to the Mounts website. In 1975, Clayton E. Hutcheson, director of the Palm Beach County Extension Service, established a demonstration garden in an old horse pasture to show which plants could thrive best in the South Florida climate. Three years later, Mr. Hutcheson, supported by horticultural groups including the Rare Fruit Council International, two Orchid societies, the Herb Society of Palm Beach County, the Fern Society, Begonia Society, Rose Society and Hibiscus Society, developed the property and the extension office building into The Mounts Horticultural Learning Center. It was dedicated in 1979. Thats the event the Mounts will celebrate with the following exhibitions: Reaching New Heights: Moai in the Mounts Tropical Forest Opening mid-October. This fall, Mounts will make a permanent installation of three replicas of the iconic figurative statues on Easter Island, Chile. Up to 22 feet high, the Moai heads, torsos and colorful top knots will be placed in the Mounts Tropical Forest, where visitors can walk around them and enjoy a spiritual and sensory experience reminiscent of Rapa Nui (the Polynesian term for Easter Island). This artistic tribute is meant to evoke questions, rather than answer them, and to serve as a link to the past our history, art and culture. If a visitor to Mounts feels a sense of mystery and awe while being in the presence of the Moai, then we have achieved our mission, Margaret Blume, sponsor of the project, said in a statement. Twisted: Patrick Dougherty Entwined January-June 2019. North Carolina-based artist Patrick Dougherty is known for his Stickwork projects, which combine both his carpentry skills and love of nature. Over the years, his work evolved from single pieces on conventional pedestals to monumental environmental works that require saplings by the truckload. Over the last 30 years, he has built more than 250 of these works, and become internationally acclaimed. His sculpture has been seen from Scotland to Japan to Brussels, and all over the United States, including two Florida gardens (McKee Botanical in Melbourne and Pinecrest Gardens in Miami) and his recent massive project at Cincinnatis Taft Museum of Art. Each one of Doughertys structures are completely original, as will be his Stickwork at Mounts, Rochelle Wolberg, Mounts curator-director, said in a statement. These giant, all-natural structures take three weeks to hand-assemble and will be an interactive and environmental experience, perfect for adults and children to wander through, admire, and become part of a living art experience. Garden of Lights A Winter Holiday Event at Mounts Nov. 24-Dec. 30. Mounts will be a-twinkle in the evenings during the holiday season with thousands of holiday lights hanging from the trees, illuminating the walkways and landmark structures, with colorful LED trees and glowing lightballs, all along an easy-to-follow route throughout 15 garden areas. In addition, Mounts will present live dance performances and musical presentations from local schools and academies. Mounts Botanical Garden is a facility of the Palm Beach County Extension Service, which is in partnership with the University of Florida and Friends of the Mounts Botanical Garden. Its at 531 N. Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Mounts is open daily (except Palm Beach County-recognized holidays) from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 561-2331757 or visit www.mounts.org. ART NOTEIlluminated palm in the Garden of Lights. Moai sculptures are coming to Mounts in October.COURTESY PHOTOSTwisted, with stickwork by Patrick Dougherty, at the Asheville, N.C., Zoo in 2013.

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4 At Home AUGUST 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYFor a charming close-to-home beach getaway, consider Delrays Seagate BY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@ oridaweekly.comYes, summer is hot and muggy here. Not to worry. We Floridians can take the heat and even embrace it, especially since it means fewer cars clogging the roads and smaller crowds at our favorite restaurants. Another off-season perk we are especially fond of is the lower rates at some of our finest resorts. Were happy to share our tony hotels and welcoming B&Bs with our friends from the north when it is bone-chilling cold up there. But during the summer, we dive right in for our own luxurious vacation experiences. The short travel distance makes the summer season windfall even more tempting. With this in mind and our luggage stocked with hot weather duds, flip-flops and sunscreen we checked in to the Seagate Hotel & Spa (www.seagatehotel. com) four short blocks from the Atlantic Ocean in Delray Beach. Opened less than a decade ago, this sea-inspired charmer features aquariums in the lobby and restaurants and some walls (even in the elevators) are textured to look like ocean waves. Taking advantage of a Florida residents rate, we were able to book a room for $162, a good deal, we thought for a boutique hotel of this quality. But like so many resorts, the Seagate adds on a $30 resort fee and $18.69 for overnight parking. With tips and taxes, our room was well over $200, although we did get a $50 resort credit as part of the Florida residents rate. That covered almost half of our dinner for two at the resorts Atlantic Grille. All guests have access to the Seagates picturesque beach club, with a pool and restaurant; and the golf club, about three miles away. A Cadillac Escalade and a trolley (during high season) will take guests anywhere within a three-mile radius free of charge. We were upgraded to a superior room with a king bed, pull-out sofa, patio overlooking East Atlantic Avenue, marble bathroom complete with walk-in shower, bubble-jet tub and Gilchrist & Soames amenities. Not all rooms have patios or bubble-jet tubs, but all have Egyptian cotton bedding, robes and slippers. While many hotels have discontinued turn-down service, the Seagate still has one, complete with imported chocolates and Elemis (www.elemis.com) Quiet Mind essential oil pillow spray with camphor and eucalyptus a very soothing touch! Speaking of soothing touches, the Seagate also has an on-site 8,000-square-foot spa, pool and fitness center. We didnt have a chance to tryout the spa, which offers a full range of skin care and body treatments, but we did enjoy both the fitness center and the pool beside it. We had the fitness center to ourselves and only a few fellow guests for company at the cool pool. Delray has a robust restaurant scene on both sides of the Intracoastal bridge, but for this trip, we confined ourselves to easternmost eateries including the hotels Atlantic Grille, where we choose to dine outside. The resort also has restaurants at the beach club and the golf course and Etc. Caf, for light breakfast or a quick snack next to Atlantic Grille. But guests have several other good restaurant options within walking distance, including Bostons on the Beach (www.bostonsonthebeach.com), Deck 84 (www.deck84.com) and Caffe Luna Rosa (caffelunarosa.com), where we enjoyed the house specialty Eggs Benedict. At night, a live band plays at the Atlantic Grille, but adventuresome guest may want to cross the street to share a drink or play a game of pool with locals at Delray Hideaway (www.delrayhideaway.com) or to Bostons, which offers live entertainment. Delrays beach remains one of the finest on the east coast and we spent a few hours soaking up the sun and splashing in the surf. Cabanas, towels and chairs for Seagate guests are available at the beach club. Besides the going to the beach, dining and dancing, East Atlantic Avenue offers good shopping, from Style & Wine (which as its name indicates sells fashionable clothes, home dcor and has a really nice selection of wine) to Snappy Turtle (www.snappy-turtle.com) for preppy clothes with a twist. You can do as much or little as you want at this little slice of paradise called Delray Beach. And the Seagate is a good base for all of it. THE GETAWAY The Seagate Hotel & Spa is four short blocks away from the Atlantic Ocean.MARY THURWACHTER / FLORIDA WEEKLY >> The Seagate Hotel & Spa, which also has a beach club, golf course and yacht club, is at 1000 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Summer rates start at $162 (plus resort and parking fees and taxes). For reservations or more information, call 561665-4800 or visit www.seagatehotel.com. The Seagate was built less than a decade ago and is easy walking distance from the lively scene of downtown Delray Beach. Dont feel like walking to the beach? The Seagate has a pool and fitness center. All rooms at the Seagate have Egyptian cotton bedding, plus bathrobes and slippers, and the hotel still offers turn-down service. Cabanas, towels and chairs are available for Seagate guests at the beach club. You can walk a few blocks to Caffe Luna Rosa (above) for breakfast, lunch or dinner. The Eggs Benedict (left) proved satisfying. An aquarium sets the stage for the lobby at the Seagate. There are aquariums throughout. The Seagate offers a fitness center, as well as an 8,000-square-foot spa.

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6 At Home AUGUST 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Jennifer Mabley, Austin Handler bringing their talents to town. TOP: Mabley Handler Interior Design has a transitional style that draws on the colors of nature think ocean blues and sandy beiges. Pictured is the Palm Beach outdoor terrace of the Junior League of Miami Showhouse 2016. MIDDLE: Jennifer Mabley and Austin Handler said it was inevitable that they would work in Palm Beach. They live in the Hamptons. BOTTOM: The Kips Bay Palm Beach Show House was the first South Florida project for Mabley Handler. BY AMY WOODSawoods@ oridaweekly.comHamptons-based Mabley Handler Interior Design brought the serenity of the shoreline to a room in the 2017 Kips Bay Palm Beach Show House and, with it, the husband-and-wife teams decorating debut in South Florida. We are now officially working in Palm Beach, Jennifer Mabley said of the 15-year-old firm. It wasnt a matter of if, it was a matter of when. The Long Island, N.Y., duo designed The Study, a blue-hued, geometrically themed space accented by the Flying Point Sofa, accompanying Flying Point Club Chair and Halsey Grasscloth Bar, each of which they created for the new Mabley Handler for Kravet Furniture Collection. We were extremely interested and put in an application and were thrilled to be included, Ms. Mabley said of the inaugural show house that raised money for the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club in New York City and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County in Boca Raton, Delray Beach, West Palm Beach, Riviera Beach, Wellington and the Glades. It was a labor of love. The vibe in the room reflects not only the couples taste and vision, which they describe as transitional coastal, but also their recently remodeled Hamptons home, which they share with sons Colin, 14, and Wesley, 11. Our remodel was very important to us, Austin Handler said. We wanted the architecture and the interior detailing of the house to show what were interested in design-wise. Mr. Handler said Palm Beach is a natural secondary market for the business similar destinations, different climates and, in many cases, the same clients. Theres definitely a relationship with the work that we do in the Hamptons and the work that we do in Palm Beach, but its got a slightly different flavor to it, he said. Its nice to be able to work in an area that allows us to tap into a slightly different area of our creativity.COVER STORYPHOTOS BY BLUEPRINT/22 From Hamptons toPalm BeachPHOTO BY BRYAN DOWNEYPHOTO BY KIM SARGENT

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com AUGUST 2018 At Home 7 ABOVE: Designers can get away with a lot of fun colors in South Florida, says Jennifer Mabley, who created this room with lots of ocean blues, plus shots of red and orange, that seem to bring the outside in at the Junior League of Miami Showhouse 2016. RIGHT: A classic Palm Beach look combines new and vintage pieces for a style that is timeless in this entry to the dining room of the Junior League of Miami Showhouse 2016. BELOW: Pictured is the Palm Beach dining room of the Junior League of Miami Showhouse. Tell us a little bit about your philosophy of design. Ms. Mabley: I like to take a few initial signs from a client like a favorite color, a piece of furniture they own, how the how house will be used. With those leads, an initial vision of the home comes to mind, and the creative process is off and running. Mr. Handler: Theres definitely 10 percent psychology in what we do. We really get people to think about the space theyre in and the area theyre in. Were very collaborative. But at the same time, we always have an aesthetic vision for a home after we walk through, so its always fun to see where those two roads intersect. How has that evolved over the years? Ms. Mabley: Style and design evolve naturally, and we are always following our instincts on what is relevant yet try to remain true to our look. Mr. Handler: Our style was probably more on the traditional side when we first started, but weve moved into a more transitional aesthetic over the years. Its how we like to live, and I think that theres a general trend towards that. Is there any one constant, or signature look, at Mabley Handler Interior Design? Ms. Mabley: Were very inspired by nature, so that always gets incorporated in our design. A lot of the colors we love are referential to outdoors ocean blues, sandy beiges, cloudy gray tones. Mr. Handler: Well, the easy answer to that is, in a word, blue. We love its versatility, so I dont think well be giving it up any time soon. Is there a look that says South Florida or Palm Beach? Ms. Mabley: I always just loved old Palm Beach. Some of the design trends that have come about from the past have been fun to use. You can pretty much get away with a lot of fun colors and patterns in South Florida. Mr. Handler: When I think of Palm Beach / South Florida, that look that always comes to my mind is balancing new furnishings with great antique / vintage pieces. And I also envision homes that are playful with color when I think of a classic Palm Beach home. What is your favorite design trend right now? Ms. Mabley: I really try not to follow trends. Mr. Handler: I like to think that we set trends rather than follow them. How do you balance your time between Palm Beach and the Hamptons? Ms. Mabley: When our kids were younger, we tried to stay based in the Hamptons as much as possible, but now that theyre older, we find that were able to spend more time in Palm Beach. Mr. Handler: Its getting easier to travel between the Hamptons and Palm Beach. The direct flight out of Islip to West Palm has been a game changer. What is your favorite place for relaxation? Ms. Mabley: At home on our back deck. When traveling, I love spending time in the desert of New Mexico or the highlands of Scotland two of my favorite places. Mr. Handler: Standup paddleboarding. To me, theres nothing more relaxing than getting out on the water and surrounding myself with wildlife and nature. For more information, visit www.mableyhandler.com or call 631-726-7300. COVER STORY 40% o any order of $1000 or more. 30% o any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Oce. Not valid with any other oer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. 40% OPlusFree Installation

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JO AN WENZE L R ealto r A ssociate M: 5 61. 37 1. 5743 j oan.wenze l @e lli man.com G L O RIA R O DRI GU EZ-ALLS UP Realto r A ssociate M: 5 61. 44 1. 5 2 8 1 gl or i a.ro d r ig uez-a ll su p @e lli man.com DREAMING OF YOUR OWN HIDDEN PARADISE? IT'S TIME FOR ELLIMAN 1 306 S Lakeside Drive Lake Wort h | $ 2,999,000 | 4-BR, 3.5-BA | Web# RX-1 0 4 3 11 97 NEW YORK CITY | LONG ISLAND | THE HAMPTONS | WESTCHESTER | CONNECTICUT | NEW JERSEY | FLORIDA | CALIFORNIA | COLORADO | MASSACHUSETTS | I NTERNATIONAL elliman.com/florida1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300. 2018 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTE NDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSI ONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWA L WITHOUT NOTIC E. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTU NITY.