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Florida weekly

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Title:
Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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Weekly
regular
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
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AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

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TAKE ME TO Be prepared for an emergency. For your FREE rst aid kit, call 855.831.2803 CuisineThe Dish checks out the onion soup at E.R. Bradleys. B11 OPINION A4 PETS A6 HEALTHY LIVING A14-17 BUSINESS A19 INVESTING A19 AUTOMOTIVE A21 REAL ESTATE A23 ARTS B1 COLLECTING B2 CALENDAR B4-5 PUZZLES B9 CUISINE B11 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store.www.FloridaWeekly.com CollectingPainted orange blossom plate from about 1900 found. B2 Going nativeNo hiking required for Photographic Centres look at Florida landscapes. B1 Behind the WheelSay goodbye to the BMW 6-series convertible. A21 SEE SHARKS, A9 SEE MONEY, A8 Some people arent happy about land-based shark fishing, but not the anglers themselves, apparently theyre growing in number along Floridas coasts as the sport grows in popularity. As a result, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has organized a series of public workshops around the state beginning in Fort Myers on Thursday, July 19, inviting opinions from all our stakeholders, said Amanda Nalley, FWC spokeswoman. Those who cant attend may submit comments to MyFWC.com/Saltwatercomments. The workshops are designed to solicit public opinion before the FWC takes action later in the year to protect the interests of both humans and sharks with new regulations. We have a lot of people who feel strongly that shark fishing from shore might be causing safety issues for swimmers and we have others who want to protect the (various species of) sharks, and yet others who love the sport because you dont need a boat. We dont want to pass regulations that would cause Dont short-shrift the sharksBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@ oridaweekly.com HE STATE OF FLORIDA IS HOLDING more than $1 billion for people who forgot about it, gave up on it or never even knew about it. All you have to do is ask the state to give it back. There is no cost to claim your property, regardless of the amount, and no time limit on how long the state will hold it for you. We believe probably 1 in 5 Floridians has an unclaimed property account, said Jon Moore, press secretary for the Florida Department of Financial BY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@ oridaweekly.com GETYOURTMONEYFlorida is holding more than $1 billion and wants individuals and businesses to claim their funds. INSIDE: How to claim, collect money youre owed. A9 Land-based shark fishing is growing more popular on Floridas coasts. Vol. VIII, No. 38 FREEWEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY *To receive this discount, you must make a reservation ONLINE at: www.agorakitchenwpb.com. Offer available for a limited time only. Join Us for...Belly Dancing Shows and Live Music Fridays & Saturdays starting at 7pm! Agora Kitchens Consecutive Year as the Restaurant on TripAdvisor! 3r Cele atin Numbe On To Show Our Appreciation, Come In and Receive15% Off!* 2505 N. Dixie Hwy., West Palm Beach, FL 33407 561.651.7474www.agorakitchenwpb.com roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com COMMENTARYThe 10th museAs President Donald Trump recovers in the warm embrace of Russian friends from his stumbling visit last week to the cradlemaker of our history Great Britain let me praise him for his extraordinary contributions to art. I first realized my earlier failure to recognize his genius when an artist northwest of London carved out 215 yards worth of letters in a farmers grain field visible from the presidents helicopter, and probably from space. Written in Russian, the giant logo proclaimed, F#!+ TRUMP. At that point I was forced to admit my own blindness and negligence for the last year-and-a-half. Too many flower-waving, love-thyneighbor loudmouths like me criticize Mr. Trump in print without also acknowledging his effort to resurrect the history and tradition of elegant insults, often poetic art forms in the Western world. Flinging creative barbs should be more roundly feted by all of us who have grown lackluster at the skill an art celebrated by such extraordinary giants of the past as Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde, Theodore Roosevelt and H.L. Mencken. True, Mr. Trump has shown no particular interest in any other art. As the novelist Dave Eggers pointed out in a New York Times opinion last month, The White House has been, and is likely to remain, home to the first presidency in American history that is almost completely devoid of culture. In the 17 months that Donald Trump has been in office, he has hosted only a few artists of any kind. One was the gun fetishist Ted Nugent. Another was Kid Rock. They went together (and with Sarah Palin). Neither performed. All other presidents Republican or Democrat have hosted steady streams of singers, writers, musicians, painters, poets, dancers, actors and cinematographers. The president does appear to enjoy periodic eruptions of martial fervor from the United States Marine Corps Band, but not much else. Marine musicians can play or shoot, strip, clean and play or shoot again both their M-4 rifles and their trombones or trumpets at the same time, one in each hand no doubt while running five miles in their combat boots at a comfortable 6-per pace, carrying 60-pound packs and humming the Marine Corps Hymn under their breaths to avoid boredom. Thats probably fun to watch and listen to for a few minutes, maybe once a year. But it would be nice to have a broader perspective when it comes to art. Thats why Im so pleased with this president. In the classical tradition of the nine Greek muses who inspired literature, the arts, history and science, Mr. Trump has single-handedly inspired creative insults, an art historically feared and reviled in oppressive societies. He also appears to have resurrected the dead. H.L. Mencken (1880-1956), for example, noted about Mr. Trump and us that on some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their hearts desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron. And Teddy Roosevelt (1858-1919), No. 26, who would have had little sympathy for Mr. Trumps bone spurs in the face of military service that so many less fortunate sons (and daughters) have to endure, may have been talking not just about President McKinley (No. 25), but also about No. 45 when he suggested the man has no more backbone than a chocolate clair. Mark Twain (1835-1910), too, was probably referring not just to Congress and such leaders as Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. Paul Ryan, but also to President Trump, when he pointed out, Fleas can be taught nearly anything that (No. 45) can. With prescient foresight, Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) noted in his understated but scathing way, Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go. Clearly, he could see the president coming. And probably going. When it comes to insults, Mr. Trump himself is a Division III contender, only: He calls people liars, idiots, he says shes a slob, disgusting, or hes a lowenergy person (Jeb Bush), or shes a lowIQ individual (Maxine Waters). Thats pretty run-of-the-mill stuff, but hes a muse, not a poet. The muses themselves generally dont come up with much more than cotton candy, if anything at all. Thats not their job. But they inspire the greatest talents of a generation or a culture, and Mr. Trump has begun to do that on his own here and in Europe. When it comes to put-downs, I always nod first to Scotland the Brave. The Scottish are blunt to the point of laconic, fierce and unrepentant. They can deliver invective like a highcaliber bullet delivers impact, but not without a muse to rile them in this case, Mr. Trump, who is also a target. Let me leave you with just a few models of such insults at their best, inscribed in social media by individual Scots aimed at Mr. Trump (thank you again, sir, for your service) after he completely misunderstood and mischaracterized the Scottish position on BREXIT, Great Britains withdrawal from the European Union, almost effortlessly insulting a proud and die-hard people. You Bawbag. You mangled apricot hellbeast. You spoon. You clueless numpty. You bloviating flesh bag. You weapons-grade plum. You weasel-headed f#!+nugget. You touped f#!+nugget. You witless f*#!+ing cocksplat. You tit. You absolute f*#!+ing donut. You Gobshite. You utter and complete eejit. You incomprehensible jizztrumpet. You cockwomble. And finally, You tiny-fingered, cheetofaced, ferret-wearing shitgibbon. Pure poetry. Lang may their lumbs reek, with those of all artists, whether inspired by the 10th muse or any of the other nine.

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsRoger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Larry Bush Mary Thurwachter Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Gail V. Haines Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.com Production Manager Alisa Bowmanabowman@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Digital Advertising ManagerGina Richeygina.richey@floridaweekly.com Sales and Marketing ExecutiveMaurice Bryantmaurice.bryant@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez CirculationJean Louis Giovanny Marcelin Evelyn Talbot Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 Fax: 561.904.6456 Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $34.95 in-county $53.95 in-state $60.95 out-of-stateSubscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2018 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. OPINIONAcronym creation tacticsFor those who thought acronym was a city in Ohio, it is not. According to my handy dandy online dictionary, an acronym is a word formed from the initial letters or groups of letters of words in a set phrase or series of words and pronounced as a separate word, as in WAC from Womens Army Corps or OPEC from Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Or MAGA, as in Make America Great Again, the Donald Trump campaign slogan splattered across red baseball hats worn by millions of Americans, mostly white, mostly intolerant, who have bought into the Trumpsters garbage that America should return to the glory days where their rigid biases oppressed everyone else. Actually, the Trump cabal is already hard at work on his re-election effort, and that means a new slogan for 2020, something that captures the regressive spirit of his first term and, more importantly, fits on a red baseball hat. In case you were wondering, the caps are red because thats what Vladimir Putin wants. Thats totally false, of course, entirely made-up, fake news. Putin couldnt care less about such paraphernalia or such minute details. Hes more of a big-picture guy when it comes to controlling the 2020 election, just like he was in 2016. Those details will be left to the American wordsmiths, who are already toying with Keep America Great. There are a few legal problems with that one (when are there not a few legal problems?), and there is some uneasiness over whether its such a great idea to have a slogan that will shorten to KAG. Of course, it certainly would be better than Grow America Greater, or Heighten Americas Greatness. Imagine how much fun wed all have with GAG or HAG. All the Trump wrecking crew has accomplished thus far is antagonizing just about every nation that has been woven over generations into the tapestry of commerce agreements that govern the way we buy and sell each others products. Without a doubt, the United States frequently has been taken advantage of as these tangled rules and regulations have evolved, and without a doubt, Americans sometimes take a bath. But you know what they say about babies and bathwater. Thus far, when it comes to trade, our current chief executive seems Hellbent to Annihilate the Very Orderliness of Civilization (HAVOC). In the process hes Antagonizing Real Simply Everyone. Except for his base; those in this country who have been left behind by changes over the decades are particularly receptive to the oppressive nostalgia of Make America Great Again. The trick for Republicans will be to sustain their resentments so that theyll continue to turn out at the polls in numbers exceeding those on the other side who are infuriated at the entire Trump experience. Given our attention spans, it will be a battle of the slogans. Continue Americas Trends against those who are Disgusted Over Grossness. It could be a CAT and DOG battle but it could end with a whimper. It would not be the first time the Trump resisters stayed home on Election Day, intimidated to Wallow Uninspired Scared and Submissive, in other words, a WUSS. Bob Franken is an Emmy Awardwinning reporter who covered Washington for more than 20 years with CNN.Dont cry for Angela MerkelAngela Merkel is, her supporters like to gloat, the leader of the free world. Just dont ask her to spend as if she is. Donald Trump has made the German chancellor one of his favorite rhetorical targets, especially over Germanys anemic defense expenditures. This has led to worries about the future of the transAtlantic alliance, and reflexive support for Merkel among the American political elite. Trump shouldnt openly mock Merkel, or suggest that there have been annual dues to NATO that Germany has failed to pay. Trump tends to view foreign countries like contractors trying to scam him in a development deal. This scants history, geo-strategy and the national pride of other countries as usual, Trump would benefit from at least a gesture toward statesmanship. Yet Germanys defense spending, or lack thereof, is a disgrace. One would think the country would have been embarrassed onto a different trajectory after German troops Panzergrenadierbataillon 371, to be exact had to use broomsticks instead of guns in a NATO exercise in 2014. But Germany evidently doesnt embarrass easily. NATO countries, after a long vacation from history after the end of the Cold War, agreed at a summit in Wales in 2014 to spend 2 percent of their gross domestic product on defense annually within 10 years. It is the biggest economy in Europe and fourth largest in the world that is the serious laggard. Germany spends all of 1.2 percent of GDP on defense. As Elisabeth Braw points out in Foreign Policy magazine, its military is short on tents and winter clothes, most of its tanks arent battle-ready and it has a shortfall of about 20,000 officers and NCOs. It is promising to get to 1.5 percent GDP ... by 2025 (when a Trump second term would be ending). Merkel is happy to browbeat other EU countries over their fiscal and migrant commitments, but please dont bother her to spend on her own defense. The old saw is that NATO exists to keep the Soviet Union out, the Americans in, and the Germans down. But the last item, given the deep streak of pacifism in postwar German politics, is no longer apt. The EU, not military conquest, is now Germanys tool for European influence. Germany still has a gauzy view of what matters. Its foreign minister has argued that its development aid should count against its goal for military spending, fundamentally confusing soft and hard power. Needless to say, if Vladimir Putin is tempted to challenge NATO somewhere on its periphery, hes not going to be dissuaded by Germanys foreign-aid budget or its openness to Middle Eastern migrants. Its not clear how seriously Germany takes the Russian threat (although it sent some troops to Lithuania last year). Germany has been supportive of the proposed Russian pipeline, Nord Stream 2, that would make Europe more dependent on Russian natural gas and bypass Ukraine. Its Trump, the alleged tool of Putin, who has been complaining bitterly about the project. With Putin looming to the East, NATO remains a vital tool of Western power. Its not an imposition to ask that Germany act like it. Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly bob FRANKENKing Features

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 A5 www.PapaChiro.com 28 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens!PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458561.744.7373 This certicate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certicate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 8/2/2018.$150VALUE CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATIONCOMPLIMENTARY We accept most insurance providers including: School, Camp or Sports Physical$20 DR. ALESSANDRA COLN Chiropractor Se Habla Espaol DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director AUTO ACCIDENT TREATMENT CENTERWe provide spinal decompression treatments!Will see auto accident suerers same day!FULL PHYSICAL THERAPY FACILITYTreat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by:Bulging/Herniated Discs Degenerative Disc Disease Facet Syndrome Failed Back SurgeryAll without the use of drugs, injections or surgery! Christmas in July returns to Roger Dean BY AMY WOODSawoods@ oridaweekly.comBaby, its hot outside. South Floridians might have visions of cooler climes dancing in their heads, but the mercury has hovered near 90 degrees for most of the month. The temperature will stay sticky when the Palm Beach Cardinals take on the St. Lucie Mets at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium for Christmas in July, even as Santa Claus arrives to the wondering eyes of fans. Christmas in July, a special promotional night expected to draw 2,000plus fans to the field, brings a winter wonderland to the middle of summer. Festively decorated trees, colorfully wrapped presents and twinkling holiday lights provided by Christmas Etc. will yield a yuletide tone in the concourse area. They are going to provide us with anything and everything to help make the ballpark feel and look like Christmas Eve, s aid Sarah Campbell, the stadiums marketing and promotions manager. Were excited about that. Eggnog spiked with Code Rum from Treasure Coast Spirits will deliver a cup of cheer at the concession stand, and everyone is encouraged to participate in the ugly-sweater competition. It doesnt have to be a sweater, Ms. Campbell said. Its July. Its a little hot to wear one. The three contestants with the funniest and most creative tops will win a prize during the game. In between innings, children can get in on the snowball fight, compliments of Bahama Bucks. They have these pre-packaged snowballs, Ms. Campbell said. We put the kids on the field and let them pelt each other. The Cardinals coaches and players have tropically-themed green-and-red jerseys to wear that night, all 30 of which will be autographed and auctioned online. Bidding begins at $70. The proceeds will help purchase toys for The Salvation Army that will be distributed to needy children in December. Not only are the benefits from the autographed jerseys going to The Salvation Army, they will have the bell there for those who wish to make monetary donations, Ms. Campbell said. Maj. Pierre Smith and Capt. Brandon Mason, representing the organizations Palm Beach County branch, will man the red kettle. It wouldnt be Christmas without a red kettle from The Salvation Army, said Chase Scott, the charitys spokesman. Theyll be there ringing the bell and adding to the spirit. Money raised will go toward services that include after-school programs, early-reading development, assistance for jobless veterans, feeding the hungry and housing the homeless, as well as disaster-relief efforts. A lot of people, they know the red kettle, but they may not know the extent of what we do, Mr. Scott said. We have a compendium of services designed to strengthen the community. He said it was a natural fit to team up with the stadium for the event because The Salvation Army is so closely associated with the holidays. The stadium is really a generous partner, Mr. Scott said. They do outreach with organizations in the community frequently. We just kind of decided to work together. Mike Bauer, the stadiums general manager, said last years inaugural Christmas in July was a success and expects the second installment to be full of family fun. Theres a lot of smiles thats how we can gauge people are having a good time, Mr. Bauer said. Its just a nice day at the ballpark and something to enhance the experience here. Paws for Compassion pet therapy mission involves cross-state bicycle ride July 25Paws for Compassion member Jay Hamm and his dogs, Chibby Choo and K-Poppy, will start a cross-Florida ride July 25 to raise awareness for the lack of and the need for pet therapy. They will also raise money that will help Paws for Compassion carry out its work. The crew of Paws for Compassion is a nonprofit using pet therapy to help people improve their lives. Members visit hospitals, assisted living facilities, schools and shut-ins. They are working to increase the number of pet therapy visits at facilities in Pahokee, Clewiston, La Belle and along the center of the state. To make a donation, visit www. pawsforcompassion.com or Instagrams pawsforcompassion or Facebooks www. facebook.com/chibby.choo For more information, contact: Mr. Hamm at 561-768-1066 or via email at gatortail5@gmail.com >> What: Christmas in July >>Time: 4:30 p.m. doors open, 5:30 p.m. rst pitch >>Date: July 21 >>Where: Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter >>Cost: $7 to $9, free for children ages 2 and younger >>Info: rogerdeanchervoletstadium.com / pbcardinals.milbauctions.com

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then t he patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing to the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n a dmi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for olde r adults to and consiste ncy of ca especially h ard on pe tia who do m uch be familiar car egiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up thei favor of a Flor cohort of Boo hit their eigh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out wh not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e care? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ... PET TALESPet-friendly vacay BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTONAndrews McMeel SyndicationWhether your plans this year include a vacation or a staycation, theres no reason to leave your dog out of the fun. Dogfriendly spots abound across the United States and include botanical gardens, breweries, festivals, hikes, museums and more. No matter where youre located, theres a good chance youll be within driving distance of at least one of these activities. Assume that dogs must be leashed unless informed otherwise. Check AirBnB, FlipKey and VRBO for pet-friendly rentals. Barkansas is filled with natural wonders for dogs and their humans to explore, including Lake Wilson Park south of Fayetteville and Lake Ouachita Vista Trail near Mount Ida. For a more manicured experience, visit Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs or the 1886 Crescent Hotel and Spa in Eureka Springs, with 15 acres of gardens and hiking trails. In Little Rock, you and your dog can take self-guided tours of the Arkansas River Trail, Arkansas State Capitol Grounds and Arkansas Civil Rights Heritage Walk.Its hard to find a place in California that isnt dog-friendly. In Laguna Beach, enjoy outdoor dining at Brussels Bistro or Watermarc. In summer, take your dog to Lagunas beaches before 8 a.m. or after 6 p.m. The rest of the year, leashed dogs can play all day. In Santa Barbara, visit the botanical gardens or the Sunday art sale and walk.Visiting Chicago? Sign up for Mercurys 90-minute Canine Cruise, a floating history and architecture tour of the city with dog-friendly highlights such as the oldest fire hydrant in the city and the park with the most squirrels. Departs Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 7. In Kentucky, Shaker Village and Kentucky Horse Park are two top attractions that allow leashed dogs. Shaker Village has pet-friendly trails and overnight rooms. At KHP, pets are allowed on the grounds, in the museum lobby and at restaurant outdoor seating. Maine attraction? In Bar Harbor, you and your dog can cruise Frenchman Bay on the Margaret Todd schooner (go midday for fewer people) or explore Acadia National Park. If youre summering in Nantucket, take Fido on a private charter with Endeavor Sailing Excursions or take him kayaking at Francis Street Beach. Afterward, kick back with a brew at dog-friendly Cisco Brewers. Dogs cant appreciate the art inside Kansas City, Missouris, Nelson-Atkins Museum or Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, but they are allowed on the grounds, dotted with sculptures. In St. Louis, look for a paw print logo at shops and restaurants to identify those that are dog-friendly. Enjoy Yappy Hour at Anheuser-Busch Biergarten every day the outdoor garden is open. Asheville, North Carolina, is home to the majestic Biltmore Estate on 220 acres. Explore the grounds with your dog, then settle him in the on-site kennel while you tour the house. In Wilmington, start your morning at Java Dog Coffee House and finish the day with dinner on the deck at The George restaurant on the Riverwalk. Hit the water with your dog in Bend, Oregon, where you can float the Deschutes River by kayak, paddleboard or other craft that holds your dog. Other dog-friendly activities include riding the Mount Bachelor Pine Marten chairlift up to hiking trails. In Portland, visit the world-famous Rose Garden or sign up for a Portland Food Cart Tour. Dine at Tin Shed Garden Cafe, where your dog gets fed, too. In Oklahoma, dogs are welcome at Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve, a 3,700-acre working ranch in Bartlesville with bison, elk, longhorn cattle and more. Leashed dogs can attend shows at Northern Sky Theater in Fish Creek, Wisconsin, presenting family-friendly musicals under the stars through August. Dont see your city or state here? Future features will focus on pet-friendly breweries and wineries and winter destinations, whether youre looking for warm or cold weather. Bark voyage! Pets of the Week>> TJ is a 3-year-old, 65-pound male mixed breed dog that is fairly independent and enjoys spending most of his time outside. >> Chester is a 3-yearold male cat that is friendly with all kinds of people and animals, including children, other cats and even dogs.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at www.hspb.org. For adoption information, call 561-686-6656. >> Butters is a white female kitten with a unique orange and white ringed tail and orange patches on her head. She plays hard and hugs tight. >> Princess is a longhaired beauty who has a plume of a tail. She is a happy girl who purrs loudly and loves people and other cats.To adopt or foster a catAdopt A Cat is a freeroaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment (call 561-848-4911, Option 3). For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or on Facebook, Adopt A Cat Foundation. Well-behaved dogs are popular customers at many restaurants. Sues Tech Kitchen cooks up event for Downtown at the GardensThe family-friendly, tech-infused Sues Tech Kitchen is coming to Palm Beach Gardens. Conceptualized by Randi Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media, and designed by a team of tech experts, engineers, and scientists, Sues Tech Kitchen features technologies from all corners of the modern imagination, empowering kids and adults to engage with tomorrows technologies. Guests can expect interactive edible experiences for all ages that encourage healthy relationships with technology and inspire kids to embrace STEM skills in a fun and collaborative snack-hack concept. When Randi explained her new tech concept to me, I couldnt wait to bring it to Downtown at the Gardens, ShopCore Properties President and CEO Luke Petherbridge said in a statement. We are committed to bringing innovative and educational experiences to our centers and are thrilled to be partnering with Sues Tech Kitchen. As a parent, I understand the importance of introducing children to the world of technology, and I am pleased to be able to bring this opportunity to Palm Beach Gardens and the surrounding communities. Experiences will include fan favorites, such as 3D Printed SMores, Coding With Candy and a Subzero Stand teaching the science of liquid nitrogen, as well as brand new features, such as RoboKitchen, Drone Drops, and more. To further enhance the STEM-infused experience, Sues Tech Kitchen will continue to celebrate local tech luminaries as part of their ongoing effort to promote nationwide innovation. Zuckerberg Media and Sues Tech Kitchen inventors and leaders will be on-hand to greet audiences and discuss the future of tech with local STEM enthusiasts. I am so excited to participate in the Sues Tech Kitchen event in Palm Beach Gardens, Ms. Zuckerberg said in the statement. Making sure kids and families have access to the tools they need to explore STEM education has always been a driving force for us, and as we continue our stops, were developing more interactive stations that are exciting our guests and teaching them critical skills at the same time. STK launched its first BETA taste in 2017 in Chattanoogas Tomorrow Building, and continued with its Holiday SpecTECHular pop-up in New York City, which included guest lecturers, new stations and more for kids and adults to enjoy. Ms. Zuckerberg will attend the event on Friday, July 20, to celebrate the launch of the three-day pop-up. For hours of operation, special information, pricing, updates and reservations please visit www.suestechkitchen.com. Sues Tech Kitchen will be below the Cobb Theatre, next to Downtown Hot Yoga, at Downtown at the Gardens, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. Its open 9 a.m.-9 p.m. July 20-21 and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. July 22. Admission is $8 per person (ages 2 and under free). Tickets available at www.suestechkitchen.com. KATHIE TAM PHOTOGRAPHYKids try an interactive event during Sues Tech Kitchens visit to Austin.

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYServices and the Division of Unclaimed Property. There are more than 14 million claimable accounts in Florida, Mr. Moore said, going all the way back to 1961. Many people have multiple accounts. The money being held comes from old paychecks, dormant bank accounts, utility deposits, life insurance policies, mutual funds, stocks, the proceeds from safe deposit boxes and more. They range from as little as 1 cent to $2.9 million. The average amount of accounts in South Florida counties is between $273 and $300. In Southwest Floridas Lee, Charlotte and Collier counties, there is about $106 million in unclaimed property in 388,280 accounts, show state records obtained by Florida Weekly. In Palm Beach County, one of Floridas most populous, there is $197 million in unclaimed funds in 654,987 accounts. One of them belongs to Donald Trump in the amount of $354.69 for old miscellaneous checks from Federal Express associated with 1094 South Ocean Blvd. in West Palm Beach, a property that President Trump purchased in 1993. Trump International Golf Club has accounts worth $100 and $36, respectively, and The Trump Institute has accounts worth $448.07 and $184.25. President Trump and the White House press office did not respond to a request for comment. If theyre famous, if theyre not, it makes no difference to us, Mr. Moore said. Were just trying to get as much back to as many people as possible. Among Palm Beach Countys largest accounts, Richard Kunkel has an unclaimed $519,374.25 from an Individual Retirement Account, or IRA. In Lee County, the single largest account belongs to Joseph Nicotra and Nancy Nicotra for $419,129.51 from unclaimed mutual fund shares. In Charlotte County, Donald OConnor has a $250,000 account from life insurance policy benefits. The state had more than $17,000 in an account for Charlotte County resident Robert Irwin from his Publix stock shares. Mr. Irwin died in 2014, said his son, Robert G. Irwin, 66, who lives at the same address as his father and works part-time at Walmart. Mr. Irwin said he had been contacted by the state with a letter about the money in the last few years at some point but has never owned a computer or had an email address and didnt understand how to collect it. I didnt know what to do about it, he said. Im really not into computers. Florida Weekly helped him start the claim process but found out that the money was already on the way. Thank you for letting me know, Mr. Irwin said. Mr. Irwins father had left the stock shares half to his son, and half to his wife. Since his wife had just passed away this year, her half was to go instead to his wifes power of attorney. The power of attorney had already successfully claimed the money for herself and for Mr. Irwin, who had forgotten that he had signed documents confirming that. The checks were sent out on July 10 to Mr. Irwins address, the state said. In Collier County, Betty Louring has a $240,266.91 account from a pension. These account holders could not be reached by Florida Weekly for comment. Three others with large accounts in South Florida, worth upward of $100,000, were reached by phone. Each declined to comment on the record primarily, they said, because they feel it is a private money matter. Each also said they were only now in the process of collecting their money from the state. One of the accounts appeared to be related to a life insurance policy from someone who died more than a decade ago. One account holder said her attorney was in the process of collecting the account from the state. Private investigators, CPAs and attorneys may contact account holders or heirs and offer to recover the money for a fee of 20 percent of the account or a maximum of $1,000, but thats not necessary. You can claim the money on your own free of charge at FLTreasureHunt.gov. Theres no attorney required when you go to collect funds that are out there in your name, its just a matter of proof of ID, said Alecia D. Collins, communications coordinator with the Florida Department of Financial Services. So if theres someone out there saying we can find money for you for a fee, its really free, you can do it yourself. The state records did not show MONEYFrom page 1 Property by county>> Lee County: $58 million unclaimed Average $273 212,784 accounts >> Collier County: $31 million unclaimed Average $270 115,113 accounts >> Charlotte County: $17 million unclaimed Average $288 60,383 accounts >> Palm Beach County: $197 million unclaimed Average $300 654,987 accounts >> Number of claims paid and money returned to Florida residents and businesses FY 13-14 352,947 $239,784,107 FY 14-15 395,094 $252,956,792 FY 15-16 454,386 $271,824,223 FY 16-17 513,505 $313,411,800 Florida is one of the few states, I dont want to say the only state, that really engages in a proactive, aggressive outreach program when it comes to returning unclaimed property. Jon Moore, press secretary for the Florida Department of Financial Services and the Division of Unclaimed PropertyEVAN WILLIAMS / FLORIDA WEEKLYIt is estimated that 1 in 5 Floridians has unclaimed cash. Visiting the website FLTreasureHunt.gov lets you know instantly if you are one of them.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 NEWS A9accounts worth less than $25. For instance, Peter Zwieg has an account worth that much from an old insurance premium refund associated with an address in Fort Myers. About 5 percent of all accounts in Florida are worth more than $500. In addition to cash, the state holds tangible property such as watches, jewelry and coins from abandoned safe deposit boxes. Floridas total unclaimed property amount has remained at more than $1 billion for years even though the state says it constantly seeks out people to return their money and returned a record amount last year. In the fiscal year ending in 2017, Florida returned $313.4 million in unclaimed cash to residents and businesses, $41.6 million more than the year before. Banks, counties, utility companies and other entities are required to report property deemed abandoned to the state after, usually, one to five years. Florida is one of the few states, I dont want to say the only state, that really engages in a proactive, aggressive outreach program when it comes to returning unclaimed property, Mr. Moore said. Florida uses a number of strategies to contact account holders, including sending out hundreds of thousands of letters to addresses if it appears the account holder still lives there, through phone banks, on TV, and notifications online when people renew car tags. But even if they notify a person that he or she has funds, Mr. Moore said, that person must come forward to claim them before they can be released. Even if we think weve got the right person, at the right place, at the right address, we cant just send a check, he said. If an account has not been claimed after five years, it is deposited into the State School Trust Fund that is used as part of a general fund to provide teacher salaries, instructional material and other public-school needs. However, that doesnt mean people can no longer claim that account. It is available for someone to come forward and claim money in perpetuity, no matter how long it takes. There is no statute of limitations, Mr. Moore said. I also had an account, my final paycheck as a server at Steak & Ale in Fort Myers (now closed), for $36.22. The state notified me about it online when I renewed my car tags in April and it only took a few minutes to fill out a claim form with my identification. A few weeks later my check from more than a decade ago arrived in the mail. However, the state has up to 90 days after it receives a complete claim package to determine if you are the rightful owner. Some accounts, such as a life insurance policy, also require additional paper work to establish you are the owner records such as a death certificate. The last thing we would want to do is return someones unclaimed property to the wrong person, Mr. Moore said. FAQs>> How do I nd out if the state is holding my unclaimed property? Go to FLTreasureHunt.gov and search your name or that of your business in the database, then follow the instructions to establish your identity. >> How do I prove the account belongs to me? Each claim form will detail what documentation is required to verify your ownership of the property. Having the same name as that on an account does not establish entitlement there are many people who share the same name. >> What types of identi cation are accepted? Claimants must provide a copy of their drivers license or another form of government-issued photographic identi cation. If your identi cation does not re ect your current address, include other documentation (such as a current utility bill, etc.) re ecting your current mailing address in addition to your ID and proof of ownership. >> How long does it take to get my money? The state is allotted up to 90 days from the date it receives your complete claim package to make a decision. Claims are often processed sooner. >> What if the original owner of the property is deceased? Proof of ownership must still be established with documentation as detailed on your claim form. In addition, you must provide a certi ed death certi cate for the owner, along with identi cation and signed claim forms for all heirs of the owner (or for the personal representative if the estate remains open.) >> Does the state pay interest on claims? No. EVAN WILLIAMS / FLORIDA WEEKLYRobert G. Irwin views information on a reporters computer at his home in Charlotte County. Mr. Irwins late father had more than $17,000 in unclaimed Publix stock shares.them not to fish, Ms. Nalley added. Using heavy tackle and wire leaders with a steel hook almost the size of a handball, fishers are wrestling hammerheads, bull sharks, lemon sharks, nurse sharks, sand sharks, black-tip sharks and others onto beaches east and west, though some species are prohibited by state law even from being landed. The main issue here is that shore-based shark fishing has really grown in popularity over the last 10 years, and social media has played a role. People want to share pictures, suggested Dr. Bob Hueter, director of the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory based in Sarasota. You dont need a boat, its a fairly inexpensive hobby, and its a lot of fun people turn it into an allnight affair on the beach and have a good time. That part is great, he said. But there are other parts. From what Ive seen, most shark fishers are interested in healthy animals. Theyre not trying to kill sharks. Its catch and release, Dr. Hueter explained. The problem has been, their handling practices are poor. People dont know it. They release animals after mishandling them, the animals stagger off, and the people dont realize these sharks are dying. Too often where people have been shark fishing, dead sharks wash up on the beaches a day or two later, he said. Hammerheads in particular are of great concern because theyre not equipped physiologically to survive the experience of a capture.They have small gills and a small mouth so when theyre restrained, or slowed down, its hard for them to pass enough water over the gills to blow off CO2 and to get oxygen, Dr. Hueter said. Lactic acid builds up fast, and they dont make it through the process. They pass the point of no return quickly. Thats especially true of the really big great hammerheads. In addition to such concerns, some people are increasingly anxious about drawing sharks nearer to beaches frequented by swimmers. They see shark fishing as shark chumming; some point to increases in shark bites over the last few years as a consequence, although the FWC has said data does not suggest that. Melbourne Beach Mayor Jim Simmons pointed out to FWC commissioners in a public meeting in April that divers cannot feed sharks and people cannot feed alligators, by law, but sports enthusiasts can blood-bait or fish for sharks where swimmers are present, a practice that should be ended. Melbourne Beach lies in Brevard County, part of 70 miles of the Space Coast where the greatest number of shark attacks on humans in the United States have taken place, where riptides are especially dangerous, and where the rate of lightning strikes of people is the highest or one of the highest in Florida. Dr. Hueter, meanwhile, has called on FWC commissioners to do some things that are best practices. It could be through an aggressive education campaign, or it could be through regulations, such as requiring heavier tackle and circle hooks, not J hooks, to help prevent gut-hooking. That will be the choice of FWC comissioners, he concluded. But whatever they do after the public workshops are complete, I hope they move rapidly. HUETER People dont know it. They release animals after mishandling them, the animals stagger off, and the people dont realize these sharks are dying. Dr. Bob Hueter, director of the Center for Shark Research at Mote Marine Laboratory FWC workshops>> Fort Myers: 6 p.m. July 19, Joseph P. DAlessandro Of ce Complex, 2295 Victoria Ave. >> West Palm Beach: 6 p.m., Aug. 28, County Department of Planning, Zoning & Building, the Vista Center, 2300 N. Jog Rd. >> Others: Panama City, Pensacola, South Daytona, Jacksonville, Melbourne Beach, Miami, Key Colony Beach. >> See MyFWC.com/Fishing for more information. Workshops end Aug. 30. Best practices for shark shers>> Dont ever take a shark out of the water if its small, dont lift it into the air. Keep it in the shallows, keep its gills wet, and release it ASAP. >> Use heavy tackle, not light tackle. You wont ght as long, but the sh will survive with more energy. >> Use circle hooks, not J hooks, to minimize gut-hooking the shark. They wont swallow them, but if they do, they have a better chance of coming back out. >> Report tags. From Rhode Island to Florida, agencies such as Mote Marine are tagging sharks to study them. If you see a tag, write down its number and report it. Advice of Dr. Bob Hueter, director of the Center for Shark Research, Mote Marine Laboratory, SarasotaProtected>> Florida Statute 68B-44.008: Prohibited Species, Prohibition of Harvest, Landing and Sale. No person shall harvest, possess, land, purchase, sell or exchange any or any part of these species: Atlantic angel shark, Basking shark, Bigeye sand tiger, Bigeye sixgill shark, Bigeye thresher, Bignose shark, Caribbean reef shark, Caribbean sharpnose shark, Dusky shark, Galapagos shark, Great hammerhead, Lemon shark, Long n mako, Narrowtooth shark, Night shark, Sandbar shark, Sandtiger, Scalloped hammerhead, Sevengill shark, Silky shark, Sixgill shark, Smalltail shark, Smooth hammerhead, Tiger shark, Whale shark, White shark.SHARKSFrom page 1

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Opening night, Palm Beach Chamber Music Festival, PBAUGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com.Michael Forte and David Hinds Ray Carter and Dave McIntosh Bud Broda, Kate Kuhner and John Revson David Waller and Ursula McNeil Susan Bergeron, Rene Reder, Jeff Adkins and Mei Mei Luo Michael Ellert, Beth Larsen and Erika Yamada Audrey Halperin, Lily Rovin and Sandra Thompson Roberta Rust and Giorgi Chkhikvadze Carol Clippard and Janet Clippard Jan Hoyt and Harvey Hoyt Barbara Dittmer and Pete Dittmer

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYREACHING PALM BEACH COUNTYS MOST AFFLUENT READERS Florida Weeklys monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living Better Fl or id a W ee kl y s mont hl y g u id e to L oo ki n g FlidLiiB t t living livinghealthyJULY 2018PALM BEACH GARDENS MEDICAL CENTER _______________________________ As we age, our risk of falling and being injured increases. After age 65, your risk of falling is about one in four. Among older Americans, falls are the number one cause of death from injury. These falls may result in broken bones or other injuries that lead to declining health, isolation and a loss of independence. Aging brings many physical changes including slowed reaction times and a decreased sense of balance. Many medications, including diuretics, sedatives and high blood pressure medications can alter your sense of balance. Health conditions that affect older adults such as cataracts, glaucoma, stroke, Parkinsons disease, congestive heart failure, heart arrhythmias, emphysema, arthritis and nerve damage can increase your risk of falls due to pain or inactivity. Some home hazards can also contribute to an increased risk of falling, such as loose slippers, rugs on the floor, poor lighting at night and slippery surfaces.Exercise helps While your risk of falling increases with age, you can take steps to help prevent falls. First, talk with your doctor. You may need to have your vision as well as your balance and movement checked. Your prescription medications may need to be changed. Many can reduce their risk of falls by exercising, improving their balance and implementing safety measures at home. One of the best exercises to help prevent falls is walking. You should walk a recommended, two or more days a week to avoid getting rusty. Water or pool exercises also can help prevent falls. Improving your balance To improve your balance and coordination, practice standing on one leg for short periods. You can hold onto a chair while youre doing this to help keep your balance. Stretching also helps make it easier to move around, leg extensions are a good activity to keep your legs active. You also might consider taking Tai Chi classes. This ancient Chinese discipline involves slow, dancelike movements that help relax and strengthen muscles and joints. One study indicated that Tai Chi may help reduce your risk of falls by up to 45 percent.About the Senior Care ER For the elderly, an ER visit can be a daunting experience. Here at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, we recognize the need to accommodate our aging population, which is why the Senior Care Emergency Room was created. The goal is to make seniors feel more at home in the inviting new space. The four-bed room features enhanced lighting, larger, more visible clocks and warm colored walls. All of these additions are meant to ease patients who are visually and/or hearing-impaired and designed to make them feel as comfortable as possible while receiving their care. We partnered with NICHE (Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders), a national program to improve care for older hospitalized adults. The nurses and ER physicians at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center received dedicated elderly care training, which included outcome improvement focusing on fall prevention for the elderly. NICHE is dedicated to providing gerontology care that encourages function, autonomy and dignity. If youre ever severely injured or critically ill, youll receive the care you need as quickly as possible at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. Youll have access to all the care you need, all in one place. Our emergency team includes emergency specialists, paramedics, medical technicians and specially trained doctors and nurses. Use our online registration tool, and check in to the ER online. Go to www. pbgmc.com/inquicker. Keeping active can help reduce risk of falling for elderly BHAGWANDIN JUPITER MEDICAL SPECIALISTS _______________________________ A new study has recently identified an association between the onset of diabetes after age 50 as a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer. More than 1 million Americans are diagnosed with adult-onset (Type 2) diabetes annually. It is known that there is a two-fold higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer among patients with diabetes. In fact, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, more than half, 52.3 percent, of patients who developed pancreatic cancer also were diagnosed with diabetes within the preceding 3 years. This epidemiologic study examined the incidence of pancreatic cancer and diabetes in over 50,000 African-American and Latino participants. This population has the highest incidence of pancreatic cancer. Were learning that patients with recent-onset diabetes actually have a significantly greater risk of pancreatic cancer than those with long-term diabetes, said Dr. Shanel Bhagwandin. Dr. Bhagwandin is a distinguished cancer surgeon at Jupiter Medical Center that treats pancreatic cancer. As a surgical oncologist, he also focuses on gastrointestinal cancers such as those of the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, stomach, intestines and peritoneum. He surgically removes uncommon tumors such as sarcomas, GISTs and adrenal cancers. Through the hospitals affiliation with Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, Dr. Bhagwandin is in South Florida to fulfill a remarkable need for our cancer patients. He is one of only seven board certified specialists in all of Florida and the only one in Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River counties. The majority of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer actually present at a late stage when the disease is already advanced. The five-year survival is poor only about 8 percent. Dr. Bhagwandin explains that pancreatic cancer is an aggressive, yet silent, cancer, with roughly 1 in 5 patients eligible to undergo an operation to remove the cancer. He expressed that its important to note that identifying those patients who are high risk early on could potentially save their lives. Typically, cancer confined to the pancreas can be operated on with great success. Every year, 55,000 people in the United States are affected with pancreatic cancer. The majority are diagnosed when the cancer has already spread to other major organs. The pancreas is a digestive organ that produces hormones, such as insulin and glucagon, to control our bodys use of glucose (sugar). Cancer can present as fatigue, weight loss, loss of appetite, abdominal pain and jaundice. Other risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, obesity and family history. In fact, smoking attributes for one-third of patients with pancreatic cancer. There are currently no screening tests or official guidelines that we can use to detect pancreatic cancer early, says Dr. Bhagwandin. But that isnt stopping his efforts to improve the care for his cancer patients. With the growth of the surgical oncology program development in South Florida, Dr. Bhagwandin has been appointed as the medical director for GI-Surgical Oncology at Jupiter Medical Center as of July 1, 2018. One of his first initiatives was the implementation of a screening program for high-risk pancreas cyst surveillance at Jupiter Medical Center. Certain cysts detected in the pancreas by computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can develop into cancer over time and identifying them early can predict that risk and allow for a preventative intervention. Dr. Bhagwandin also is an assistant professor in the Division of Surgical Oncology at Mount Sinai, and he is connecting his patients with other cancer surgeons and specialists in New York where they review cases in conjunction with other local oncology experts and figure out the most effective way to treat them. This is a unique multidisciplinary approach that facilitates the management of complex cancer cases for patients who live in South Florida and may be seeking a second opinion. Pancreatic cancer rates are increasing and it will become the 2nd most common cause of cancer related death by 2020, said Dr. Bhagwandin. We need better tools to screen for it and research to help guide strategies that will prevent it or detect it early. One such tool is known as a liquid biopsy: a test that analyzes a persons blood for fragments of DNA that could detect a cancer before signs develop. The technology is currently being used, but the approved indications are still being researched as well as how they will impact patient o utcomes said Dr. Bhagwandin. Once its better understood, this may offer an opportunity to screen high-risk groups, such as adultonset diabetics, for pancreatic cancer. Considering only 20 percent currently are able to be treated with surgical removal, finding the cancer at an early stage is as equally important as having a fellowship-trained cancer surgeon effectively remove it. In addition to multidisciplinary conferences at Jupiter Medical Center, Dr. Bhagwandin also is implementing IBMs Watson to support treatment decisions for patients. Considering every cancer may present at a unique stage with unexpected challenges, patients can consider new approaches and clinical trials based on supporting evidence offered by Watson to personalize cancer care. Patients should know that they are receiving the best possible recommendation and treatment for their cancer we utilize state-of-the-art technology, access to world-class care and surgical expertise to ensure that, he said. Jupiter Medical Specialists 1002 S. Old Dixie Highway, Suite 303, Jupiter, FL 33458. Info: 561-745-7789 or www.jupitermedicalspecialists.com. Recent onset diabetes related to pancreatic cancer

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com JULY 2018 healthy living A15 When you need us. Where you need us.Jupiter Medical Center Urgent CareMinor emergencies Illnesses Flu shots Digital X-rays EKGs Lab services4 Convenient Locations:Jupiter 1335 W. Indiantown Road West of Delaware Blvd., next to Harmony Animal HospitalJupiter 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64 Located in the Abacoa Shopping Center, next to McDonaldsPalm Beach Gardens 3250 PGA Blvd. Glass building at the southeast corner of PGA Blvd. and Fairchild Gardens Avenue(This location offers physical therapy.)West Palm Beach 625 N. Flagler Drive On the west side of the Flagler Memorial Bridge5th Location Opening SoonStuart 2628 SE Federal Hwy. Located in Baron Shoppes, just south of the Regency Square Shopping Center Okeechobee Blvd.Military TrailPGA Blvd. Donald Ross Road Indiantown Road Open daily, including weekends and holidays. Convenient, walk-in service. No appointment necessary! For a virtual consultation, download our app at jupitermed.com/virtual-care. Hours: Monday-Saturday: 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sunday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. To learn more about our urgent care centers and our locations in Palm Beach and Martin counties, visit jupitermedurgentcare.com or call 561-571-8108. Pelvic floor therapy brings relief for incontinence JUPITER MEDICAL CENTERTheres a saying among physical therapists: If you dribble when you giggle, you may need to see a pelvic floor physical therapist. And that about sums up urinary incontinence which can range from occasionally leaking urine when you laugh, cough or sneeze to having a sudden urge to go thats so strong you can barely get to a toilet in time. Its not something adults usually discuss in polite company, but like most ailments, suffering in silence doesnt make it go away. When you consider the many ordinary and extraordinary tasks the pelvic floor is responsible for such as urination, childbirth, sexual appreciation, defecation, continence, lifting, sitting, walking and exercise its surprising that this part of the body is not given more attention, said Gail ONeill, a Jupiter Medical Center physical therapist who specializes in pelvic floor rehabilitation. The pelvic floor is a hammock-shaped group of 14 thin muscles located in the bottom of the bony pelvis. The organs in this area include the bladder, uterus or prostate, and rectum. Pelvic floor muscles are intertwined with nerves and connective tissue that supports the SEE THERAPY, A17 COURTESY PHOTOGail ONeill, one of four physical therapists who specialize in pelvic floor rehabilitation at Jupiter Medical Center, uses a model to point out the pelvic floor muscles.

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A16 healthy living JULY 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Dr. Joseph Russo is one of only 385 dentists worldwide to hold an Accreditation by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AAACD). He has extensive experience in helping patients who suffer with severely worn down teeth and TMJ pain. Dr. Russo has also earned certi cation by the Dental Organization for Conscious Sedation (DOCS), allowing him to sedate his patients to a very relaxed and comfortable state during dental treatment. Now you can enjoy the life-changing bene ts of a beautiful smile and a comfortable bite that functions as it was designed to. Before AfterCALL Today 561.575.5599Three Palms CenterPGAdentistryjupiter.comComplete Care in Our State-of-the-Art Facility $250VALUEComplimentary Consultation or 2nd OpinionIncludes Exam & Full-Mouth X-Ray Change your smile, change your life! Smile with confidenceIf you smile with your lips pressed tightly together, worried that IT may not be as appealing as IT can be, we can help.If you are smiling like the person at right, wouldnt it be wonderful to have a warmer, more enchanting attractive smile? Surely, there are lots of things that attract us to one another, clothes (or a lack thereof), stature and posture, someones car, boat or plane, hair, body type and fitness each of these is important. But it is very difficult to find something more appealing than warm eyes and an engaging, exciting smile. Case in point is Christine, a beautiful young lady who was not as lucky as some of us to have straight teeth. Not only could they have been better aligned (as seen in Figure 1), but the color of her natural teeth also left something to be desired. Chris was one of the kindest, warmest people anyone would like to meet, but she felt that her smile was holding her back. When Chris came to see us, she was polite, happy, warm and well-dressed. She felt that she was not living up to her potential and that with some smile-enhancing procedures, that her self-confidence, self-worth and inner personality could be turned loose. The change in Christine was beyond dramatic, like changing the understudy of a play into the star. She was the main attraction, the one with whom you wanted to speak and spend time. Her personality and her smile are now magnetic, and its as amazing a transformation as a caterpillar becoming a b utterfly. The best part is, its easy to do. We routinely have patients who say they never really felt discomfort at all. At PGA Dentistry Jupiter, we can use an array of medications to allow our patients to be totally comfortable and without fear with Oral Conscious Sedation. In Christines case, her total makeover was achieved in just three visits. After her first visit, Christine left the office in acrylic temporaries. We asked that she wear these temporaries for one week and get input from those close to her spouse, children, siblings, etc. At her second visit, if she wanted any changes, we would do that in her plastic temporaries until she felt that they were perfect. At that point, we took an impression of her modified temporaries and it became the PROTOTYPE for her porcelain teeth. Ten days after that, Christine was in the office and her permanent porcelain restorations were delivered to her in hardly any time at all. If this is the kind of change, upgrade or improvement that you think may be of benefit to you, please call us at PGA Dentistry Jupiter. The world will see you in a totally different, more enchanting, more engaging light. Dr. Joseph RussoPGA Dentistry Jupiter 2151 Alternate A1A South, Suite 1300 Jupiter, FL 33477561-575-5599pgadentistryjupiter.com Christines smile, before (above) and after.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY JULY 2018 A17 Jupiter Medical Specialists welcomes Dr. Shanel Bhagwan din to our medical group. Dr. Bhagwandin is one of few surgical oncologists in Florida trained in a revolutionary procedure called Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC); a technique that combines surgery with chemotherapy delivered directly into the abdomen. Dr. Bhagwandin is the newest faculty member of e Foshay Cancer Center at Jupiter Medical Center and is also an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. He performs surgery for tumors of the liver, bile ducts, gallbladder, pancreas and intestinal tract; inclusive of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum. He is also an expert in the surgical management of sarcomas, GI stromal tumors (GISTs), adrenal masses, neuroendocrine tumors, and melanoma. Dr. Bhagwandin and J upiter Medical Specialists are committed to advancing the eld of surgical oncology by improving patient outcomes and enhancing cancer care through institutional protocols. GENERAL SURGERY SERVICES OF JUPITER MEDICAL SPECIALISTS 1002 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Ste 303, Jupiter, FL 33458 SHANEL BHAGWANDIN, DO, MPHSurgical Oncologist and Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgeon Board-certied, General Surgery Board-certied, Complex General Surgical Oncology Medical Director, Surgical Oncology Network Development e Mount Sinai Hospital Faculty, Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology e Icahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiProviding World Class Surgical Oncology Services in Jupiter/Palm Beach JUPITERMEDICALSPECIALISTS.COM 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 | PBGMC.com Call 855.77 3.3693 to register to attend one of our FREE bone density screenings or for a complimentary physician referral.Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to be the healthiest you can be. The team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS has trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. First, its about treating whats causing you pain. Then its about working with you to help get you back to your normal life.Back & Spine Surgery | Total Joint Surgery Sports Medicine | Orthopedic Rehab TURN YOUR BACK ON PAIN abdominal and reproductive organs. Pelvic floor disorders in women are often the result of childbirth, hormonal changes during menopause and problems with the anatomy of the urinary tract. The leading cause in men is an enlarged prostate and/or prostate surgery. Aging and changes in the nervous system also can be a factor. Jupiter resident James Chapman experienced urinary incontinence after having a prostatectomy to treat an enlarged, cancerous prostate. His surgeon referred him to Jupiter Medical Center for pelvic floor therapy. With a prostate, there are certain muscle groups that help you be continent, Mr. Chapman said. When the prostate is removed, all you have remaining is the bladder to maintain continence. Pelvic floor therapy helped me identify which of my muscles I needed to exercise and strengthen to take over the duties of the muscles that I lost as a result of surgery. Although women dont have to worry about prostate surgery, they have their own set of issues that can lead to incontinence. Gaynor Morrison was referred to Jupiter Medical Center for pelvic floor therapy after a series of events forced her to have surgery. An exercise enthusiast, Ms. Morrison initially injured her pelvic floor after improperly lifting weights, and a subsequent cycling accident exacerbated the problem. She had surgery to rebuild her pelvic floor, as well as a hysterectomy due to uterine prolapse. Her doctor referred her to Jupiter Medical Center for pelvic floor therapy. It was life-changing I dont have this urge to go, or incontinence, that I was having before, Ms. Morrison said. And my pelvic floor, which I exercise every day, is stronger than its ever been. When I cough, I dont urinate or pee. My sexual experiences are different. I have control over how I feel because I have more control over some of the muscles down there. Jupiter Medical Center therapists work with patients and their physician to develop a treatment plan to help men, women and adolescents regain their well-being and quality of life. Urinary incontinence is just one of numerous problems pelvic floor therapists treat. They have advanced training to evaluate and treat pelvic pain; pain and dysfunction in pregnancy; pain during intercourse; bladder pain; fecal/bowel incontinence; constipation; persistent low back and pelvic joint pain, and more. Treatment options may include biofeedback; electrical stimulation; manual therapy; habit and activity modification; vaginal weights therapy; home exercise instruction and more. Jupiter Medical Center provides pelvic floor therapy at the Cary Grossman Health & Wellness Center, 1004 S. Old Dixie Highway in Jupiter, and in Palm Beach Gardens at its outpatient therapy center on the second floor of Jupiter Medical Center Urgent Care, 3250 PGA Blvd. For more information, call 561263-5775 or visit www.jupitermed.com/ pelvic-health.THERAPYFrom page 15

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A18 NEWS WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYShakespeare by the Seas Antony + Cleopatra, Carlin Park 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 1. Kim Volante, Riko Crowell, Genia Baker, Patricia Etienne, Sam Etienne, Jasmine Etienne and Kirsten Alvarez 2. Jackie Kunst, Joybella and Justin Kunst 3. Kristy Hoot and David Hoot 4. Alex Cook, Tom Keller and Mary Keller 5. Kelly Fanelli and Tim Johnson 6. Kermit Christman, Elizabeth Dashiell and Daniel Gordon 7. Teri Neil and Luka Bertoli 8. Elizabeth Dashiell, Stephen Hedger, Kelly Lee Hussey, Victoria Anderson and Zack Myers 9. Diane Curley and Jo Ronk Lorianne Murrary, Dave Murrary and Irma Murrary

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MONEY & INVESTINGWill tariffs bury U.S. soybean crop?Having lived in metropolitan areas for most of my life, I have no direct experience with farming, but I imagine it is a difficult and unpredictable life. It seems one must have an expertise in everything from crop biology to fertilizer chemistry to modern farming technology. And then the farmer must battle natural forces such as weather and disease. So it must be very demoralizing today when a man-made force outside of farmers control has pushed the prices of many crops like soybeans to a 10-year low. What is this force and how will it affect the farming economics now and in the future? When Republican candidate Trump campaigned on a platform of equalizing the playing field in the international trade arena, Im sure most in the farming community couldnt anticipate that this issue would greatly affect their livelihoods. After all, the trade debate focused on things like high tech products, steel and trade secrets. And, unsurprisingly, President Trump imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum being imported into the U.S. in one of his first actions dealing with unfair trade practices. Unfortunately for farmers, the use of tariffs did not stop there. The U.S. government imposed further tariffs on many Chinese goods entering our country and the Chinese responded in kind. One of the tariffs it imposed on U.S. goods was a 25 percent surcharge on soybeans. For many farmers, soybeans are a major cash crop. It is the second largest crop produced in the U.S., behind corn, and is used for human consumption as well as feed for livestock. It is a major export the U.S. produces about 32 percent of the worlds soybeans. China is the number one buyer of U.S. soybeans. About one-third of the U.S. crop is exported to China. Even before the Chinese imposed a tariff on soybeans, farmers were already struggling in their export markets due to the strong dollar. A strong dollar makes U.S. goods more expensive for foreign customers who need to pay for U.S. goods with a weaker currency. With the additional 25 percent tax and higher transportation costs as a result of highericBRETANestaterick@gmail.com OFFICE FLOWMAINTAINING THESDefusing workplace interruptions can lead to maximum efficiencyOMETIMES IT SEEMS LIKE THE workplace is designed to keep you doing anything besides, well ... working. If youre a manager, this is a serious problem because everything at work hinges on your ability to effectively lead your team. Still, distractions abound in most offices, from buzzing phones to watercooler chit-chat to the endless lure of surfing the web. With all this chaos, its difficult to achieve the intense state of concentration known as flow, where employees of all levels do their best work. Flow is a state of mind that oc-SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________SEE INVEST, A20 Flow is a state of mind that occurs when all your conscious thought is focused on what you are doing. Julian Birkinshaw, co-author of Mind Tools for Managers: 100 Ways to Be a Better BossBUSINESS PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 | A19 WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM SEE FLOW, A20

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er oil prices, U.S. soybeans are being priced out of the global market. Analysts believe that international demand for U.S. crops could drop 20 percent to 40 percent. It should be no surprise, then, that the prices for soybeans and other crops have fallen dramatically. Today the price of a bushel of soybeans is at around $8.50 per bushel. This compares to about $10 a bushel in 2016 and $14 a bushel in 2012. This downward trend must be so discouraging to farmers as the macro trends around the world favor higher soybean prices and solid farming economics. Meat consumption around the world is rising as developing nations become richer, which should increase the demand for soybeans as feed. Increasing land prices and low interest rates are also beneficial to farmers. Going forward, in the near term, crop prices will be closely tied to tariff and trade negotiations along with the strength of the dollar. However, if these are resolved, the long-term health of the farming industry does look promising, especially as new technologies make farmers more efficient. But with crop prices currently so low and land prices so high, how many farmers will sell their farms today, thus setting us up for a lack of foodstuffs in the future? Eric Bretan, the co-owner of Ricks Estate & Jewelry Buyers in Punta Gorda, was a senior derivatives marketer and investment banker for more than 15 years at several global banks. A20 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY curs when all your conscious thought is focused on what you are doing, says Julian Birkinshaw, co-author along with James Manktelow of Mind Tools for Managers: 100 Ways to Be a Better Boss. Unfortunately, Mr. Birkinshaw adds, in the modern workplace, flow can be difficult to achieve and maintain. As a result, you are a less productive manager and stay stressed out at work. Weeding out typical office distractions and interruptions, however, can help improve your focus so that you get more done and become a more effective manager. Mind Tools for Managers identifies 100 skills a manager can master to become a better leader. They were identified in a survey of 15,242 managers and professionals worldwide. The research was conducted by Mr. Manktelow and Mr. Birkinshaw. The authors provide practical advice for each of these skills one of which is the ability to stay focused and direct the reader to the MindTools website for a deeper dive into specific skill-building articles, worksheets, videos and more. Even if youre one of the many managers struggling to maintain focus at work, you can achieve a state of flow which was first described in detail by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi by managing or eliminating the distractions that pull you out of concentration. Here are some of the most common distractions managers and employees typically face at work, and how to deal with them. FLOW BREAKER NO. 1: The relentless presence of personal technology Smartphones and now smartwatches have blurred the line between personal and professional communication. We can receive work emails and calls on the same device as private Facebook comments, Instagram photos and an array of other personal information. The good news is that you and your colleagues can effectively manage this challenge yourselves. When focusing on a particular piece of work, choose to put away your phones for a certain amount of time. That way you can devote your attention entirely to the project at hand. FLOW BREAKER NO. 2: Email, email and more email Many emails in your inbox are probably not particularly important, and yet you may feel you must look at them when they arrive. Instead, try these tactics: Schedule checking time. Turn off the alert that appears on your computer screen when you receive an email, and check and respond to messages at set times instead. This helps you manage your coworkers, managers and customers expectations about how and when you will reply to them. Choose lowproductivity times. There are likely certain times of the day when you do your best work, like first thing in the morning or maybe late at night. Schedule email check-ins for your lessproductive times and save your peak hours for high-value work. Turn emails into actions. If you need more than a few minutes to read an email, add it to your to-do list. FLOW BREAKER NO. 3: Social media and web browsing Both are major productivity killers. Trouble is, organizations can no longer block peoples access to websites that arent work-related. So its up to you to use social media and the rest of the web responsibly. If it is acceptable within your organization, use a brief personal browsing session as a reward for an hour or two of high quality, focused work. FLOW BREAKER NO. 4: Nervejangling phone calls The ring of a phone often prompts an intense need to answer, even when youre in deep concentration. To minimize this source of distraction for you and your team, consider arranging a rotation so that team members can take calls for one another. Also be sure to let friends and family know that you will be available for calls only at lunchtime or in the evening. FLOW BREAKER NO. 5: Distractions in your work environment Rather than trying to ignore such distractions as strong cooking smells or loud colleagues, get away from the problem. Set yourself up in an empty meeting room to regain your focus. Or wear noise-canceling headphones or play white noise to blank out anything that would otherwise grab your attention. FLOW BREAKER NO. 6: Confusion due to overwhelming workload Always try to have a manageable to-do list, because having one thats too long can lead to procrastination, as you wonder which task to tackle next. Each day, commit to accomplishing the two most important tasks on your list, and put the rest on hold until tomorrow. In our study we found that 79.5 percent of managers view prioritizing tasks effectively as one of the most important planning and time management skills, Mr. Manktelow says. It is so important. FLOW BREAKER NO. 7: Other people Colleagues visiting your desk can be a big source of distraction, but youre also a manager who wants to be available for your team members. If you dont want to be disturbed at times when you need to focus on a task, consider either working at home or in a conference room. If you have your own office, close the door and tell your team you need to be left alone to concentrate for a while. FLOW BREAKER NO. 8: Shortfalls in your own well-being It takes a lot of mental and physical energy to juggle your priorities, manage visitors and have the discipline to control your use of technology. So its vital that you take care of yourself. Get plenty of sleep and make sure you drink enough water, as dehydration can make you feel tired and impact your thinking. Energize yourself by getting some fresh air and taking a brisk walk during the day to energize you. And avoid heavy lunches and sugarladen snacks, as they can lead to a slump in concentration later in the day. Its easier than ever to lose track of what you should be doing at work, but you can still take steps to avoid distractions and improve flow, Mr. Birkinshaw concludes. Learning to better manage these flow breakers is a valuable skill that can be practiced and sharpened over time. And when you can achieve flow more easily, you will not only become a better manager, but youll set a great example for your team as well. James Manktelow is the founder and CEO of www.mindtools.com. Julian Birkinshaw is the deputy dean for programs at London Business School. FLOWFrom page 19INVESTFrom page 19 COURTESY PHOTOOther people interrupting you can be as distracting as electronic devices.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A21 BEHIND THE WHEELBMW 6-Series convertible: Say goodbye to the buttressThe car on this page is an endangered species. In fact, its already extinct. Anyone who goes on the BMW website wont find it listed anymore. But the 6-series convertible is absolutely worth an epilogue. First, this drop top is still available brand new at many dealerships. Its sort of like BMWs little secret. BMW discontinued the coupe version last year, and now it is quietly closing the books on the topless model. So BMW is offering some deeper discounts than normally associated with the brand. The 640i starts out at $87,695, and the more powerful 650i begins at $99,295. Even with some nice markdowns, neither will be considered cheap. But when convertibles are on sale, Floridians take notice.Also, the 6-Series ragtop has an interesting sense of style. With the folding roof in place, the flat rear window facilitates a flying buttress rear that is a beloved styling element in the car community. Thats why everyone from Chevrolet to Ferrari has also used it. The flat glass rear window is useful in more ways, too. It can be lowered independently of the roof, and with all the other windows down, theres a convertible level of breeze blowing through the cabin while still keeping the UV protection of the top. Plus, the back glass can be raised when the car is open to the world, creating a handy wind deflector. No matter if the top is up or down, the interior is very much a driver-oriented environment. The gearshift, infotainment, and ride controls dominate the center console. Its so focused on the driver that the front passenger almost feels privileged BMW allowed him/her to share the middle armrest. This is typical of the performance-minded German brand. Still, the 6-Series feels a bit practical with a larger rear seat space than any of the other convertibles in the lineup. Those who need to carry more people in premium comfort have likely looked at the Mercedes E and S-Class drop tops, which straddle the 6-series in price. Its the focus on the driver that also gives the 6-Series its magic. Our 650i test car has a 4.4-liter twin turbo V8 producing 445 horsepower. It doesnt have a raw and raucous delivery like a roadster. Instead, the engine feels like theres an endless well of power that can continually call up as much as the driver needs well into illegal speeds. This is the essence of a terrific grand touring motor. The suspension is much like a sports car with road-hugging components and tight steering. Its forgiving enough so that passengers wont complain, but its obviously built to keep the driver happier than anyone else. BMW is not done with the 6-Series. Although it has traditionally been about coupes and convertibles, the nomenclature lives on in the 6-Series Gran Coupe and Gran Turismo that are fourand five-door machines, respectively. BMW seems to see these as coupe-like vehicles that can fit into the model sequence, but they are really just borrowing the sporty legacy in a more practical package. The death of the true 6-Series doesnt mean the end of convertibles at BMW. There are currently three drop tops in smaller model designations that are continuing. Also, BMW just started production of the new 8-series this month. Its marginally smaller than the 6-Series, and so the company is signaling the upgrade in number is less about size and more about sporting ability. The 8-Series will only be a coupe when it arrives on our shores in the fall. A convertible is expected, but it has not been publically debuted. That means theres a time gap between the end of the 6-series and the new (and pricier) 8-Series drop top. Its also expected not to have the classic flying buttress design or the nifty flat glass rear window. So, its time to say goodbye to the BMW 6-series convertible. The ragtop is unique, powerful and at the moment, a little cheaper. mylesKORNBLATTmk@autominded.com melissaORTIZForeign Affairs European Automotive shop THE EXTRA MILEProperly plan your summer road tripWherever the road takes you, we want to make sure your car gets you there and the last thing you want to see when youre halfway to your summer vacation destination is the check engine light on your cars dashboard. We all look forward to our time off and our road trips or weekend getaways. Theres nothing like the sense of excitement we get when we choose our destination, make our hotel reservations and plan out our trip. We dont want to bring the problems that we may encounter in our normal lives with us on our vacation. Car trouble is obviously one of those problems and if we spend even a single afternoon dealing with the headache of repairing our car, it puts a major crimp in that whole experience. And hotels rarely refund the deposit we plunk down when we discover our car wont get us there. Thats why we at Foreign Affairs European Automotive Shop have prepared a special $99 Summer Road Trip Special that helps our customers save money on dashed plans caused by car trouble and remain worry-free during their summer break. Its basically a diagnostic test in which we make sure you wont see that check engine light come on, while we also inspect your battery strength, oil, coolant and other fluid levels, filters, windshield wipers, lights, brakes and tires as well. Heres what we do. Starting with the battery, we inspect its condition as well as its terminals, then test it to see how strong its charge is. If it needs replacing, we of course will do that for an added charge. As for the oil, we inspect its condition and determine whether it needs changing or is good to go. The same goes for the coolant and other fluids topping everything off as needed, while we also check for system leaks. We also remove and inspect the engines air filter and the cabin filter, to make sure theyre in good shape for your trip. Then we take a look at your windshield wipers and make sure theyre in drivable condition. Theres nothing worse than being completely blind on the highway if your wipers are worn and not doing their job in a rainstorm. Next, we inspect your headlights, brake lights and turn signals. Then its on to the brakes, where we check the brake pads and rotors. We look at both to make sure theyre not worn down too low and recommend replacement, if necessary. Finally, we make sure your tires are properly inflated and in drivable condition. That involves checking tire pressure, observing tread wear and balancing them, if necessary. At Foreign Affairs European Automotive Shop, we try to educate everyone men and women alike on how to stay on top of potential car troubles before they get worse. Just like taking care of your own health, you need to take preventative measures with your car so you dont have to come in and spend a small fortune on a repair that could have been headed off by a timely act of deterrence. When you know more about whats going on with your car, you can be better prepared to stop trouble before it starts. We dedicate ourselves to making our customers service experience welcoming and accommodating. The moment they walk into our repair shop, they feel theyre in good hands. We check in their car in a thorough, upfront, transparent way. We serve them an espresso or a cappuccino on a clean, white coffee tray and a snack on the side. Theres also a clean, fresh aroma one detects upon entering our place of business that makes them feel welcome and theyre in a tidy, orderly, comfortable, inviting environment like theyre at home. Thats why they keep coming back. So before you set off on your upcoming summer trip, take a little time to be good to your car. It could mean the difference between the vacation dream youll always remember and a nightmare youll prefer to forget. Foreign Affairs European Automotive Shop is at 1681 N. Military Trail in West Palm Beach. For more information, call 561-478-9999 or log on to www. foreignaffairsauto.com.

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Juno Beach Branch 14051 US Highway One, Juno Beach, FL 33408 (561) 630-4521 JBhBh 14051USHihOJBhFL33408(561)6304521 Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCOBANK*PMI Private Mortgage Insurance. Lender paid Private Mortgage Insurance on loans over 89.5% Loan-to-value. Please note: We reserve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. NMLS #474376. www.TrustcoBank.comNo Points, No Borrower Paid PMI*, No Tax Escrow Required and Low Closing Costs! e Home of Low Cost Mortgages A22 |WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM REAL ESTATEPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYCome enjoy the spectacular views of the Atlantic Ocean! Stunning direct southeast exposure, oceanfront residence located in an intimate 48-unit boutique building. Looking for exclusive oceanfront living and minimal maintenance? Paradise awaits you with these unbelievable oceanfront views. The fifth stack in Ocean Club offers direct southeast exposure with a threebedroom, two-bath, 1,696-square-foot layout. It has complete impact glass and offers resort-style living at its finest, with a large pool, renovated clubroom, pool table, BBQ area, ping-pong, gym and renovated guest bathrooms and sauna. All this is close distance to Harbourside, featuring restaurants and entertainment. A luxury master suite features an extended sitting area overlooking the ocean, as well as direct ocean views from the master and second bedrooms. The unit also includes a very large air-conditioned storage space and one underground parking space as well as one deeded parking space outside. Do not miss out on this amazing opportunity Lang Realty is offering in Jupiter at $825,000. The agent is Jeff Molner. 201-919-7969, jmolner45@gmail. com for more information and to set up your private showing today. Join the Club Ocean ClubCOURTESY PHOTOS

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE A23 ON THE LINKS larryBUSHlbush@floridaweekly.com The golfing community lost seven special people in recent weeks: Jane Bastanchury Booth, representing the best in womens amateur golf during the 1960s and 1970s; Doug Ford, a former PGA and Masters champion; Hubert Green, past winner of the U.S. Open and PGA; Lewis Evans Keller Sr., who was credited with salvaging Americas first golf course; Carol Mann, at 6-foot-3 one of tallest players ever on the LPGA tour; short game guru Phil Rodgers; and Peter Thompson, the godfather of golf in Australia. In no particular order: Mr. Ford, a native of West Haven, Conn., died in mid-May at the age of 95. The son of a golf professional, he had three uncles, two sons and one grandson who also were, or are, golf pros. A daughter, Pam is an assistant state attorney in West Palm Beach. Living in Delray Beach in his later years, the elder Doug and his two sons, Doug Jr. and Mike, owned and operated Lacuna Country Club on Lantana Road. A halfdozen years ago, they sold out to Thomas Welz, who also owns the Florida Club near Stuart. Mr. Welz renamed the course Atlantic National. The father of Doug Sr. was named Michael Fortunato, but changed his last name to Ford because, as legend has it, the Italians in New York could only get jobs in golf as caddies. The club pros were all Scots, English and Irish. He decided to Anglicize his name and eventually moved the family to Upper Manhattan, where he owned and operated an indoor driving range. As a youngster, Doug Sr. excelled in baseball and pool as well as golf. The New York Yankees reportedly were interested in him as a third baseman. He worked in local pool halls to earn extra money and later said playing pool made him a better putter because of the feel for the angles it gave him. Doug Sr. served in the Coast Guard during World War II and returned home and became one of the New York areas best amateurs. He turned pro in 1949 at the age of 27 and won for the first time three years later at the Jacksonville Open. Doug Sr. beat Dr. Cary Middlecoff in the 36-hole finals of the 5 PGA by 4 and 3 at Meadowbrook Country Club in Detroit. Two years later, he closed on 65-282 to outscore Sam Snead by three shots at Augusta National. Doug Sr. was the PGA of Americas Player of the Year in 1955 played on four Ryder Cup teams and won on tour for the 19th and final time in the 1963 Canadian Open. He was inducted into the PGA Golf Professional Hall of Fame in 1975 and the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2007. Ms. Mann, who preferred to say she was 5 feet and 15 inches tall, not 6-3, died May 20 at the age of 77 in her home at The Woodlands, Texas. A native of Buffalo, N.Y., she won 38 times on the LPGA tour including two major championships, the 1964 Womens Western Open and the U.S. Womens Open a year later that helped push womens golf into the television era. She won 10 times in 1968, eight more in 9. Ms. Mann also was recognized for what she did for golf, and especially the LPGA, off the course. Before walking away from competition in 1981, she served as the associations president from 1973 to 1976 and steered the LPGA into the modern era by hiring the tours first commissioner, Ray Volpe, who put together the tours first $1 million season in 1975. She remained involved even after she quit playing, both as a television analyst and a consultant in various aspects of the game. Ms. Mann was inducted into the LPGA Tour Hall of Fame in 1977 and in 2008 was the recipient of the PGA of Americas First Lady of Golf Award. Mr. Keller, a part-time resident of Palm Beach and White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., for many years, died May 25 at the age of 95. He operated several successful businesses out of Palm Beach and was a member of both Seminole GC and the Everglades Club as well as several prestigious clubs in New York and Virginia. In 1959 Mr. Keller purchased property called Oakhurst near White Sulphur Springs and developed a successful thoroughbred breeding farm. The property had been the site of Americas first golf course and with the help of Mr. Snead, a native son of West Virginia, and golf course architect Bob Cupp rebuilt Oakhurst Links, which originally had been established in 1884. From 1994 through 2010, Oakhurst Links was open for play with hickory stick clubs and gutta percha balls. Mr. Green, a former Florida State University player, still lived in his native Birmingham, Ala., and held his own in an era dominated by Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson, Lee Trevino and Seve Ballesteros Mr. Green won the 1977 U.S. Open in 1977 at Southern Hills and the PGA at Cherry Hills. From 1971 through 2002, Mr. Green won 19 times on the PGA Tour and four senior tour titles, collecting official earnings in excess of $8 million. He was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2007. During the final round of the U.S. Open at Southern Hills, the club r ec ei ved a chilling call that claimed Green would be shot if he reached the 15th tee. He was notified by the USGA, declined the opportunity to withdraw, played through and won, beating Lou Graham by one stroke. Mr. Green died in mid-June of throat cancer at the age of 71. Mr. Thomson was one of the stars in the early years of the PGA Tour Champions, winning nine times in 1985 after claiming victory in his first start in the Senior PGA Championship, in December, 1984, on the Champion course at PGA National. But he was already recognized as a great player after he won the British Open three years in a row and four times in five years, in 1954-55-56-58, adding a fifth in 1965. He won 84 professional titles around the world, captained the International team in the Presidents Cup several times and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1988. He was 88 when he died of Parkinsons disease in June at his home in Melbourne, Australia. Mrs. Booth, a native Californian, had lived in West Palm Beach since 1999 with husband Mike and their daughter Kellee. She played and captained six U.S. teams in international competitions and won everything there was to win except the U.S. Womens Amateur but never turned pro. She earned several Halls of Fame inductions and served on several USGA committees. She died June 23 at the age of 70. Mr. Rodgers, a five-time winner on the PGA Tour who became one of the games top instructors, died at his home near San Diego on June 26 at the age of 80 after a long battle with leukemia. When Jack Nicklaus career seemed to be slipping in the late 1960s, it was Mr. Rodgers who got The Bears short game back in sync and Mr. Nicklaus went on to win 10 of his 18 major championships between the 1971 PGA at the old PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens and 1986 Masters. Doug Ford Carol Mann Lewis Keller Hubert Green Peter Thomson Jane Booth Phil Rodgers all proving that golfers come in all shapes and sizes, and that there are many ways to be involved in the game other than being a great player. A final farewell to seven golfing greatsWe remember golfers Doug Ford, Carol Mann, Lewis Keller, Hubert Green, Peter Thomson, Jane Booth and Phil Rodgers. Singer Island Oceanfront Tower 2BR/2BA Great Rental Investment $334,900Jimmie & Judy McAdams Realtors) 561-385-1450 Jimmie | 561-358-0716Emails: Jimmie@singerislandlifestyles.com | judy@singerislandlifestyles.com S in g er Island O f Visit us online for all available properties! www.singerislandlifestyles.com Our team will help you start living the Singer Island Lifestyle that you so deserve! 40% o any order of $1000 or more. 30% o any order of $700 or more. On any complete Closet, Garage or Home Oce. Not valid with any other oer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. 40% OPlusFree Installation

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Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Featured House Of The WeekRitz Carlton Residence 2101AWhen only the best will do! Professionally decorated through Interiors by Steven G, a Miami design rm that embodies luxury aro und the world. A private sanctuary encompassing 3 beautifully appointed bedrooms with ensuite baths. The master bedroom and living area overlook the Atlantic Ocea n. Over 3,000 SF packed with special features, lighting and furnishings that exceed expectations. Extra spaces include a family/ofce and den right off the kitchen. The kitchen is appointed with gas wolf range/stove and other top shelf appliances. The Ritz Carlton on-site valet and concierge welcome guests to the array of services available. Two beautiful pools include towel and restaurant service to pamper each resident while they bask in the Florida sunshine. Just minutes from shopping and dining, cultural activitiesit is all here, come enjoy the lifestyle. This residence is being offered at $ 3,150,000. For a private tour, please call Jeannie Walker (561) 889-6734. Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561-889-6734 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,999,000 Oasis Singer Island 17A3BR/3.5BA $2,695,000 Oasis Singer Island 18A 3BR/3.5BA $2,385,000Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,999 The Resort 20503BR/3BA $1,799,000Ritz Carlton Residence 1105B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,499,000 Water Club 1504-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,349,000 Water Club 1603-S2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,299,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1106B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,149,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B2BR+DEN/2.5BA $949,000Martinique WT8042BR/3.5BA $649,900 Ritz Carlton Residence 1502B3BR/3.5BA $1,999,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,300,000 UNDER CONTRACTThe Resort 16503BR/3.5BA $1,699,000 SOLD Ritz Carlton Tower Suite 7A4BR+DEN/5.5BA $8,495,000 NEW LISTING

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BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@ oridaweekly.comPalm Beach Opera doesnt want you to forget about opera during the offseason. The nonprofit is so dedicated to producing live opera for residents and visitors to the Palm Beaches that it has planned a series of three Summer Opera Nights to bring opera to a public place. These community outreach shows, set for 6-10 p.m. July 27, Aug. 24 and Sept. 28 at Elizabeth Avenue Station, will each have a different theme and will include live operatic performances by singers from PBO, plus drinks, games and interactive experiences. Tickets, which include one drink, are $10 for adults, $5 for students. Admission is free for opera lovers younger than age 12. Purchase tickets online at www.pbopera.org or call the box office at 561-833-7888. Tickets also will be available at the door. For more information, visit www.pbopera. org/events/operanights. This also is a great reason to check out Elizabeth Avenue Station, at 1500C Elizabeth Ave., in the Warehouse District of West Palm Beach. The space, south of Okeechobee Boulevard and west of Parker Avenue, is home to hip vendors that include Article 80, Avenue Pottery, Chelsea Lane & Co., Drift & Dwell, Gather & Seek, Grease & Glory, Unicorns Love Sugar Moonbeams, Urban Vintage and the Wild Lily. For more information, visit www. thestationwpb.com.Calling all mini-golfers The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium hosts the Conservation Cup Mini Golf Classic from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 21, on the centers Gary Nicklausand Jim Fazio-designed miniature golf course. Proceeds will benefit youth science programs and exhibits at the Science Center. The $50 entry fee for teams of two includes a chance at the $1,500 cash prize, a cookout on the course and admission to the Science Centers summer exhibit Travel Adventure featuring Lego bricks. The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium is at 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. Get tickets and tee times at www.sfsciencecenter.org/ConservationCupMini or call Kristina Holt at 561-370-7740. HAPPENINGSARTS & ENTERTAINMENTPALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM SEE HAPPENINGS, B8 Opera plans nights of arias at Elizabeth Ave.Reynolds returns in one-man showHes South Floridas own movie star. And Burt Reynolds plans to offer hometown audiences a look into his life as a one-time matinee idol at 7:30 p.m. July 26 at the Eissey Campus Theatre. During An Evening with Burt Reynolds, the actor will answer questions from the audience, speak about his career and show film clips from some of his 200plus movies, including Hooper, Boogie Nights, Deliverance, Longest Yard, Cannonball Run and Smokey and the Bandit. His most recent film, The Last Movie Star, was released last year. Proceeds will benefit The Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre. The institute, which recently moved into its new home in North Palm Beach, offers classes in acting, improvisation, stage and screen writing and film-making, as well as lectures by experts in the film industry. The Eissey Campus Theatre is at Palm Beach State College, 1101 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets, priced at $45 and up, are available at www.legendsradio.com and at the Eissey Campus Theatre Box Office, 561-207-5900. SEE NATIVE, B8 FLORIDA WEEKLY FILE PHOTOBurt Reynolds smiles during a masterclass last year at his institute for theater training. He will present a one-man show July 26. Mary Catello poses with her #metoo installation, Stand Up SPEAK OUT, which features papier-mch figures of sexual assault victims. Its part of the Armory Art Center Experience at CityPlace. | SECTION B NOHIKING NOHIKING REQUIREDFOR REQUIREDFOR PHOTOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHIC CENTRESLOOK CENTRESLOOK ATFLORIDA ATFLORIDA LANDSCAPES LANDSCAPESGoingnativeB BY ROBYN ROBERTSFlorida Weekly Correspondenteauty is all around us, and whether you live in Florida yearround or youre just visiting, the Sunshine State flourishes with gorgeous landscapes. The Florida Native Plant Society partnered with the Palm Beach Photographic Centre to identify photographers who are focused on spotlighting the native landscape found in Florida. According to the Palm Beach Photographic Center, the exhibit, Renewal: Going Native, reveals Inset: Blazing star provides the perfect perch for a male scarlet skimmer in this image by Christina Evans.

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CASUAL DINING AND ATTIRE ON WORTH AVENUETHREE COURSE PRIX-FIXE DINNER $39.00Monday thru Sunday 5:00PM TO 9:00PM TABOORESTAURANT.COM FOR MENU JUNE THRU OCTOBEROPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30AM TO 10:00PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30AM TO 3:00PMHAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4 TO 7561.835.3500RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED 221 Worth Ave., Palm Beach, FL Purchase tickets online at www.pbcmf.org or by calling 561.547.1070 Featuring works by Schubert, Vivaldi, Dvorak, Mendelssohn, de Falla, Sarasate, Piazzolla, Menotti and more. Flute: Karen FullerPalm Beach Opera Orchestra, Miami City Ballet, The Symphonia Boca Raton, Atlantic Classical OrchestraOboe: Erika YamadaThe Symphonia Boca Raton, Atlantic Classical OrchestraClarinet: Michael FortePalm Beach Opera Orchestra, Southwest Florida Symphony, The Symphonia Boca RatonBassoon: Michael EllertPalm Beach Opera Orchestra, Miami City Ballet, Southwest Florida Symphony, The Symphonia Boca RatonViolin: Dina KosticPalm Beach Opera Orchestra, NuDeco Ensemble, The Symphonia Boca Raton, Atlantic Classical OrchestraViolin: Mei Mei LuoMiami City Ballet, Delray String QuartetViola: Rene RederAlabama SymphonyCello: Susan BergeronNaples PhilharmonicBass: Janet ClippardMiami City Ballet, Atlantic Classical Orchestra Join us for the 27th Season of Floridas Classic July Sizzle.Each week, an all new program. Each venue, a unique playing space. For complete Festival information, visit us at www.pbcmf.org FRIDAY, JULY 6, 13, 20, 27 AT 7:30 PMPERSSON RECITAL HALL, PALM BEACH ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY, WEST PALM BEACHSATURDAY JULY 7, 14, 21, 28 AT 7:30 PM1st PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 717 PROSPERITY FARMS RD, NORTH PALM BEACHSUNDAY JULY 8, 15, 22, 29 AT 2:00 PMCREST THEATRE, OLD SCHOOL SQUARE, DELRAY BEACH COLLECTORS CORNER scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com My mom never should have told Aunt Cleo she liked candied orange peel. But she did. You never could underestimate Aunt Cleos ability for networking and her love of good food. So the next thing she knew, my mom was inundated with the skins of hundreds of citrus fruit from across Pahokee and Canal Point. She spent her days and nights candying those orange peels into a bittersweet confection that no doubt made Cleo proud. It was easy logic for Cleo to use everything. After all, she had come of age in rural Florida and South Georgia in the 1920s, where farmers literally used everything but the squeal, rendering fat from the hogs they butchered, feathers and down from the chickens they killed and candy from the peels of the oranges they juiced. And so it goes. Citrus production is dwindling in Florida the Florida Department of Citrus reported citrus production in Florida could drop as much as 82 percent by 2026, thanks in part to citrus greening, and the simple fact that former groves are giving way to housing and other construction. When I was a boy, wed ride down from Fort Myers to Estero with my mother and grandmother as they took my great-grandmother to Marshall Groves to sample juice and buy souvenirs for her neighbors back home in Indiana. The building was like a barn, if I recall, but the orange juice was cool and sweet. As lovely as that was, it did not compare to Central Florida Clermont, Haines City (home to the Donald Duck orange juice plant) and other cities. I remember the drive through the center of the state, up U.S. 27, which cut through hills and valleys that were white with orange blossoms. The perfume was intoxicating. The last time I drove that highway, I was struck by how all the orange groves had been replaced by housing developments. So much for the sweet scents of yore. Thats nothing new. I grew up in a Fort Myers neighborhood called Rainbow Groves, which once had been home to a large stand of orange and grapefruit trees along the Caloosahatchee River. By the 1950s, when Michigan Homes began building our neighborhood of California ranch-style houses, many of the trees that had been planted in the 1920s were nearing their final harvests. It was amazing to see our neighbors orange trees yield fruit, despite having Bought: Goodwill, 13500 Plantation Road, Fort Myers; 239-768-3701. Paid: 99 cents The Skinny: You can almost smell the orange blossoms painted on this plate, which was made around 1900. The design is signed C. Wrl, and the plate is marked M.Z. Austria, for the Moritz Zdekauer firm. It was a custom piece imported by the H. & W.B. Drew Company, a Jacksonville printing firm known for its stationery. Moritz Zdekauer changed names in 1909 and H. & W.B. Drew Company, founded in 1855, now is known as Drew & Wells. Most painted plates sell in the $20 range, if they sell at all. While its not as pricey as the Greenleaf & Crosby orange china that was created at the same time for Henry Flagler and the other high-rollers of turn-ofthe-century Florida, Id still expect to see it priced in the $100 range. One thing is for sure: It whets the appetite for more. THE FIND:An early 20th-century orange blossom plateIs anything sweeter than orange blossoms and a memory or two?rotted trunks that had been reinforced with concrete and rebar. There were two orange trees in our backyard. My mother still remembers her first winter in our house, as the wind whipped the branches of one of our Parson Brown orange trees, rapping the Florida room window with vigor. She stepped outside, clippers in hand, until she saw there was a lone blossom at the end of the offending branch. She left it. The oranges werent pretty, but for decades, the trees continued to give us the sweet, juicy fruit for which the Parson Brown is known. The last tree finally withered away, and its trunk is encapsulated in the dendrobium orchids that had clung to its branches. I think the trunk still stands like a tombstone to the memories of sweet, sticky orange juice, and I take comfort in knowing the memories remain just as sweet.

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Return to Southwest Florida this fall for the 5th annual Island Hopper Songwriter Fest. Catch dozens of free shows and acclaimed singer-songwriters at intimate venues across Captiva Island, Fort Myers Beach and Downtown Fort Myers. Sept. 21Sept. 30 | Find more at IslandHopperFest.com | #IslandHopperFest

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@floridaweekly.com.THURSDAY7/19High Gloss 2018: The Art of Fashion and Design! Through Aug. 10, The Box Gallery, 811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach. An exhibition of fine art photography, wearable art, and lifestyle accessories honoring Barbara Hulanicki. Special Screening of Beyond BIBA: A Portrait of Barbara Hulanicki at 7 p.m. July 21. Free but RSVP requested at www.eventbrite.com.Clematis by Night Live music, food and drinks, vendors. www.clematisbynight.net. July 19: Opener: Ryan Montgomery. Headliner: Kate Keys Band (Variety/ Rock).Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival July 19-22, Carlin Park, Jupiter. Antony + Cleopatra. The great bard, al fresco. Free. www.pbshakespeare.org. FRIDAY7/20Sues Tech Kitchen Sneak Peek 9 a.m.-9 p.m. July 20-21 and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. July 22, Downtown at the Gardens, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. Discover the treats, attractions and tech toys offered at this kitchen where cooking allows kids to explore STEM-focused learning with projects like 3D Printed SMores and Coding with Candy. STK creator Randi Zuckerberg will be on site on July 20. Admission is $8, free for age 2 and younger. www.suestechkitchen.com.Too Hot to Handle Art Show and Sale opening reception 6-9 p.m. July 20, Artisans On The Ave, 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. This mixed media show and sale brings the best local artists out into the hot Florida sun to show off their treasures. On display through July 31. 561-762-8162.Glam Bam Burlesque 8 p.m. and midnight July 20, Voltaire, 526 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. The Southwest Florida-based burlesque troupe specializes in classic and neo-classic burlesque the art of striptease and the old-school bump and grind. Age 21 and older. $8. www.ticketfly.com.The Palm Beach Chamber Music Festival July 20-22 and 27-29: Friday programs at 7:30 p.m. at Helen K. Persson Recital Hall, Palm Beach Atlantic University, 326 Acacia Road, West Palm Beach. Saturday programs at 7:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 717 Prosperity Farms Road, North Palm Beach. Sunday programs at 2 p.m., the Crest Theatre, Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. Tickets: $25. www.pbcmf.org, call 561-547-1070 or email information@pbcmf.org. Program 3 July 20-22: From Sea to Shining Sea, with works by Menotti, Ewazen, Lewinter and Dvorak. Program 4 July 27-29: Summer Serenade, with works by Ibert, Addison and Schubert. SATURDAY7/21Orchid Trilogy, Part 3: Training Your Eye: Orchid Pests & Diseases at 10 a.m. July 21, Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 S. Military Trail, West Palm Beach. Instructor Sandi Jones of Broward Orchid Supply teaches newcomers to orchids about these plants. $40 members, $45 nonmembers. Register online at www. mounts.org/events or call 561-233-1757.Noche Latina July 21, Guanabanas, 960 N. A1A, Jupiter. Electric Piquete and Grammy-nominated Xperimento perform Latin funk and Latin reggae. No cover. 561747-8878; www.Guanabanas.com.SUNDAY7/22Run and Roll Group Runs 6 a.m. July 22, 410 Evernia St., West Palm Beach. They provide 3 hydration stations, where you can run from 4 to 24 miles. For all levels. 561-650-1200 or visit www.runandroll.com.MONDAY7/23Judicial Candidate Forum 6-9 p.m. July 23, Palm Beach Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Meet and hear from candidates prior to the Florida primary election on Aug. 28. Free. Hosted by the League of Women Voters of Palm Beach County. Info: www.lwvpbc.org.TUESDAY7/24Path To Colleges Mentor Open House 6 p.m. July 24, Lake Worth Beach Club, 1 Seventh Ave. N., Lake Worth. Learn how you may guide and inspire a high-achieving, financially disadvantaged student on the path to college. Info: 561907-7679; www.pathtocollege.org.LOOKING AHEAD6x6 Art Exhibition & Sale 6-8 p.m. July 26, Cornell Art Museum at Old School Square, 51 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. The fifth annual event features 400 donated 6x6-inch works in a variety of media by artists from around the country. You can preview the works during July leading up to the sale. www. oldschoolsquare.org Clematis by Night 6-9 p.m. Thursday, West Palm Beach Waterfront, West Palm Beach. Music, food, drink, vendors and a sunset. Info: www.clematisbynight.net. July 26: L-Tribe peforms R&B/Top 40. An Evening with Burt Reynolds July 26, Eissey Campus Theatre, 11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. One night only with South Floridas favorite native son. Bandit will share private stories as well as personal insights. Hell show film clips from the 200 movies he made, and answer questions from the audience. Arrive early to hear pre-event music and see sponsor displays. Tickets are $45 to $500 available at www.legendsradio.com or 561-207-5900.AT CORAL SKY Coral Sky Amphitheatre, 601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. 561-7958883; www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre. com or www.livenation.com Chicago / REO Speedwagon July 20 Dave Matthews Band July 27-28 AT DRAMAWORKSPalm Beach Dramaworks, Ann & Don Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. 561-514-4042, Ext. 1; www. pbdramaworks.org.Woody Guthries American Song Through Aug. 5. AT THE GARDENSThe Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-775-7750; www.thegardensmall.comNamaste at The Gardens: Visit the Pop-Up Zen Lounge for a series of wellness events through July 21. Free, but RSVP at 561-775-7750 or email Kaci at khanner@thegardensmall.com Live painting by Keri Baynham Every Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. To the Rhythm 9 a.m. July 21 in Grand Court. With Katie Jackson of Golds Gym.Big Summer Fun Activities: For ages 3-10 Wednesdays at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.: Let the Games Begin! July 25. Award-winning, sing-along-play-along entertainers Janet Marie and mArchibald.AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-832-7469; www.kravis.org.I Love You, Youre Perfect, Now Change July 26-Aug. 12. An MNM Theatre Company productionAT THE LIGHTHOUSEJupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Lighthouse Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. 561-747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tours August. Weather permitting. Spectacular sunset views and an inside look at the nuts & bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. Tour time: 75 minutes. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. RSVP required. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour 7 p.m. July 26 and 7:30 p.m. July 27. See the moon rise over the lighthouse. $20 members, $25 nonmembers. Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids 10:30 a.m. the first Tuesday of the month. For ages 8 and younger. Bring a mat to sit on. Free, but reservations are required. Next meeting: August.Twilight Yoga at the Light 6-7 p.m. July 23, and 30. By donation. Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, leads. Hike Through History 8:30-10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of the month. Discover the topography and natural history of Jupiters National Conservation Lands historic site on this 2-mile trek. Free, but RSVP required. Next hike: August.Lighthouse Book Club 6-7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month. Join the museum staff in book discussions on all things Florida. The complete book list is available online. Donation requested. RSVP. Next club: August. Outreach Speaker Series: Trapper Nelson 2-3 p.m. July 27, at the Jupiter Library. Vince Trapper Nelson came to Jupiter in the early 1930s, established a permanent camp on the upper Loxahatchee River, turned it into Trappers Zoo & Jungle Gardens and became a local legend. Museum Historian Josh Liller will speak about Nelson on the 50th anniversary of his mysterious death. Free, but reservations are needed because space is limited. Social Media Bootcamp 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30. Learn the best ways to use social media for personal and professional use. Rajeeyah GiGi Madinah will lead this five-week program. $60 with a special Lighthouse discount. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-575-2223; www. jupitertheatre.org.The Wizard of Oz, Young Peoples Edition July 27-28. Featuring students in grades 3-5.AT THE PLAYHOUSEThe Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 561-586-6410; www.lakeworthplayhouse.org.Flashdance: The Musical Through July 22AT THE IMPROVPalm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 561-833-1812; www.palmbeachimprov.comJosh Wolf July 19-21DC Young FLY July 22The Nick & Trey Show July 26JP Sears Getting Woke AF July 27-28The Comic Whisperer Show July 29AT THE BALLPARK Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter. 561-775-1818; www.rogerdeanchevroletstadium.comThe Jupiter Hammerheads and the Palm Beach Cardinals are lighting up the diamond with fast-paced baseball action through Sept. 2. Special promotion nights: Dog Days July 28, Aug. 25. Fidos ticket is $5 which benefits local pet charities. Christmas in July 5:30 p.m. July 21ONGOING APBC Art on Park Gallery 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 561-345-2842; www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com. Class: Acrylic painting with Irma Friedman 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. Learn your own personal style. Reservations required. Fee. 561-632-6401. Classes from Marsha Bhagwansingh 9:30-11:30 a.m. Saturdays. Classes in drawing, painting and calligraphy. Reservations required. Fee. 561-507-4527.The Armory Art Center 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-8321776; www.armoryart.org. Transformation Printmaking & Photographs: Through July 27. Featuring student and instructor work by Spence Townsend, printmaking instructor, and his students, and Photo Salon coordinator Barry Schein and participants.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 TOP PICKS #SFL Flashdance, the Musical Through July 22, Lake Worth Playhouse. www.lakeworthplayhouse.org or 561-586-6410 Woody Guthries American Song Through Aug. 5, Palm Beach Dramaworks. 561-514-4042, Ext. 1; www. pbdramaworks.org #CLASSICAL #WOODY The Palm Beach Chamber Music Festival July 20-22 at various locations. Tickets: $25. www.pbcmf.org, call 561-547-1070 or email information@pbcmf.org #WHATAFEELING Connections Jewelry and Ceramics: Aug. 3-17. Featured student and instructor work by Maria Tritico and Lisa Johnson, jewelry instructors and their students and Mark Walnock, ceramic instructor and his students.Artisans On The Ave Gallery 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. 561-762-8162; Too Hot to Handle Show Through July 31. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. July 20. CityPlace 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. 561-366-1000; www. cityplace.com Live music 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday July 20: Ryan Montgomery with Juna N Joey July 21: Bryant Del Toro & Co July 27: Lauren Echo July 28: Sweet Justice Sunday Yoga at the Culture Lab: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sunday. A Vinyasa yoga class. By donation. Register at www. cityplace.com/events/culturelabyoga. Assemblage: An Organically Grown Exhibition: Noon to 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. $5 Ticket Tuesdays at AMC Theaters CityPlace AMC Stubs members (its free to join) entitle you to $5 tickets on Tuesdays. With the $5 Cameo Combo get a savory popcorn and Coca-Cola, its a cheap date day or night at $10. Walking Art Tour 3-5 p.m. Saturday. Explore the art installations and murals created by artists from around the globe on this 90-minute guided walking tour. The tour ends with refreshments and appetizers at Hilton West Palm Beach. Tickets at eventbrite.com Feeding South Florida Food Drive Through Sept. 30. Donate three nonperishable food items at Guest Services and get four hours of free parking in one of the CityPlace garages. At Armory Art Experience at CityPlace Stand Up SPEAK OUT exhibition July 19-22 and July 26-29, Armory Art Experience at CityPlace, West Palm Beach. Wine Down with Art 5:30-7 p.m. July 20. A still life painting art class with Spence Townsend, which includes two glasses of wine. Register at 561-8321776 or www.armoryart.orgThe Cultural Council of Palm Beach County 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdaySaturday. Info: 561-471-2901; www.palmbeachculture.com. Places/Spaces: The Architectural Photography of Kim Sargent Through July 28. Educators and Artists Through Aug. 18. Work in various mediums by 40 past and present faculty of the Dreyfoos School of the Arts in West Palm Beach. VSA Florida Palm Beach County Captured: A Drawing and Photography Exhibition Through Aug. 18Downtown at the Gardens 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. 561-340-1600; www. downtownatthegardens.com. Summer concerts: 7-9 p.m. Free. July 20: In The Light Of Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin July 27: Completley Unchained: Van HalenThe Flagler Museum One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; younger than 6 free. 561-655-2833; www.flaglermuseum. us. Special Events: Grandparents Day Sept. 9 The Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter Leads nature walks. New adventurers are welcomed. Get info and register at www. loxfltrail.org. Okeeheelee Park Walk 7:30 a.m. July 21, Okeeheelee Park South, 7500 Forest Hill Blvd, West Palm Beach. Meet at the new boat launch parking lot.77233-1837 Yamato Scrub Natural Area 7:30 a.m. July 22, 701 Clint Moore Road, Boca Raton. Alan Collins at 561586-0486. Hike On The Apoxee Wilderness Trail 8 a.m. July 28, 3125 North Jog Road, West Palm Beach. Meet at the trailhead. Nine-mile minimum. Call Joe at 561-859-1954.The Historical Society of Palm Beach County and The Richard And Pat Johnson History Museum 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. 561-832-4164; www.hspbc.org Exhibition: Beaches, Creatures and Cowboys: Florida Movie Posters Through July 28 The Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free the first Saturday of the month and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 561-746-3101; www.LighthouseArts.org. Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead Through Aug. 11.The Palm Beach Photographic Centre 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 561-253-2600; www.workshop.org. Renewal: Going Native Through Aug. 4. An exhibition of 100 photographs of native plants and wildlife. The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every day. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 561-533-0887; www.palmbeachzoo.org Zoo Camp Through Aug. 10. Safari Nights Aug. 3The Society of the Four Arts 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Call 561-6557227; www.fourarts.org.Summer Chef Series: Trevini 12:30 p.m. July 26. $75. Reservations. The South Florida Fairgrounds 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. 561-793-0333; www.southfloridafair.com Repticon: West Palm Beach Reptile & Exotic Animal Show July 20-22. Palm Beach Summer Beer Fest July 21.The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Info: 561-832-1988; www.sfsciencecenter.org. AREA MARKETSSinger Island Green & Artisan Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Singer Islands Ocean Walk, 2401 Ocean Ave. along scenic A1A. Pet and kid friendly. www.singerislandgreenmarket.com.Lake Worth High School Flea Market 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, year-round, under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. Info: 561-439-1539.Delray Beachs Summer GreenMarket 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays, through July 28, Delray Beach Tennis Center. For the summer, a smaller market moves to the Tennis Center from the winter location in Old School Square Park, 96 NE Second Ave. 561-276-7511; www.delraycra.org/greenmarket.Palm Beach Gardens Summer GreenMarket Through Sept. 30, at its breezy, undercover summer location at STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage, 11010 N. Military Trail in Palm Beach Gardens. Hours: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays. Fresh produce, pastries, coffee, seafood, flowers, cheeses, spices, handmade crafts. No pets. 561-630-1100; pbgrec. com/greenmarket. Jupiter Farmers Market at El Sol 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, yearround, 106 Military Trail, Jupiter. 561-2835856; www.Jupiterfarmersmarket.com.Waterfront Market at Harbourside Place 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays along the waterfront. Fresh produce, specialty foods, flowers and plants and local art. Yoga class at 10 a.m. Live music at noon. Free parking during the market. Pet friendly. harboursideplace.comTiki Market 4-7 p.m. Sunday at the Rivera Beach Marina, 190 E. 13th St., West Palm Beach. Food and Caribbean merchandise. Vendors wanted. 561-844-3408. Rust Market 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month in the parking area at Kelsey Vintage, 748B Park Ave., Lake Park. Vendors of vintage and collectible items and decor, clothing, jewelry, artisan pieces, and more. Brunch, beer and mimosas available from Brick N Barrel. Free parking. Next market: July 21. www.kelseyvintage.com CALENDAR #DONTMISS Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival July 19-22, Carlin Park, Jupiter. Antony + Cleopatra. Free. www.pbshakespeare.org

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYGAIL V. HAINES / FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. SOCIETYPirate & Princess Night at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 GAI L V. HA 8 GAI LVHA 9 1. Harriet Armstrong and Skylar Crownover 2. Bill Holland, Josiah Holland, KatieBell Holland, Tracy Holland and Matthew Holland 3. Emily Naval, Brayden Naval and George Naval 4. Philip Klement and Marcus Klement 5. Mike Boyer, Amanda Kriberney, Talen Endres, Josh Endres, April Endres, Robin Kriberney, Killian Endres and Randy Kriberney 6. Brooklyn Donovan and Samantha Donovan 7. Gwen Healy, Olivia Healy, Elle Healy and Rick Healy 8. Juan Lopez, Judy Martyak, Kaylin Basset, Stephanie Duesing and Keaton Davis 9. Emma LaPaglia, Ashley LaPaglia, Piper LaPaglia and Scott Large 10. Aisa Richardson, Elsa and Polora Myrick 11. Ellice Martinez, Scoopie,and Lily MartinezJennifer Bronner and Jillian Bronner

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Over 20,000 Sq.Ft. Fine Furnishing | Art & Antiques | Estate JewelryDESIGN SERVICES AVAILABLE561-225-1950Monday through Saturday 10am to 6pm and Sundays 12 to 4pm eres Always Something New at Dj Vu e in Palm Beach!Best Finds Join us Just East of I95 on PGA Blvd behind the Shell Station Grand Auction To Benet It Only T akes One Womens Chamber of CommerceAuction Preview Party ursday, July 26th 4:30-7:30pmhors doeuvre, live entertainmentLive AuctionSaturday, July 28th 12:00-4:00pm at DejaVu Art Gallery 4078 PGA Blvd Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410Featuring estate jewelry, couture clothing, mid-century modern, art, collectibles & more. Event is FREE but guests are requested to bring school supplies for Palm Beach County children returning to school. LATEST FILMSLeave No TraceIs it worth $10? YesAt the start of Leave No Trace, Will (Ben Foster) and his 13-year-old daughter Tom (Thomasin McKenzie) peacefully co-exist in their home near Portland, Ore. Shes home-schooled and academically advanced for her age, knows how to cook and provide for herself and seems genuinely happy. To many, this is what a well-adjusted, admittedly socially awkward teenager should look like. The problem, according to social services, is that Tom and her dad live in a tent in the woods, illegally occupying public land. When Will is arrested their situation changes drastically, which prompts two thoughts: 1) Why is anyone telling anyone else how to raise their healthy and happy child? And 2) The system is rescuing a child who doesnt need rescuing. If Will and Tom choose and want to live like this, why not leave them alone? Director Debra Graniks film is neither as dramatic as this makes it sound nor as intent on social commentary as you might think. Its a bit minimalist, actually, which is okay because it hooks us from the start as its characters wordlessly, symbiotically work together. Reports indicate that in pre-production, Foster sat with Granik and together they removed 40 percent of the dialog in order that the audience would see and infer, rather than be told, what it needs to know. The result allows the father-daughter bond to appear even stronger given all thats unspoken yet shared between them, which earns our empathy. It also allows viewers to capture more of Fosters eyes, face and body language; its a credit to his performance that we understand how hes feeling, and usually what hes thinking, each step of the way. On a similar note, McKenzie is a revelation here, also expressing quite a bit with little overt emotion. If the film catches on, it will make her a star. If theres a shortcoming in the script, which Granik (Winters Bone) cowrote with Anne Rossellini and is based on the novel My Abandonment by Peter Rock, its that Wills background is underdeveloped. Aside from a quick line about his military service and his wife/Toms mother, we learn little about why he chooses to raise his daughter this way. Because the film prompts us to root for them to live undisturbed, its a question that should be answered. Thankfully, this doesnt detract from the narratives intrigue. Loving and never inappropriate, the father-daughter relationship here might remind some moviegoers of Captain Fantastic (for which Viggo Mortensen was a Best Actor nominee in 2016), although that film reveled in its eccentricity while Leave No Trace wants no part of such quirks. The closest it gets comes as Tom meets a boy her age and develops an interest in rabbits. One day she stays out too late, and her father doesnt have a phone, so she couldnt call to tell him shes okay. A lesser movie, one less confident in its convictions, would have surrounded the scenario with immense drama in order to maximize/manipulate audience engagement. Instead, Granik keeps the story simple and understated, and in doing so ensures it remains realistic, truthful and honest from start to finish. Kudos to Granik and company for knowing what type of movie Leave No Trace is, and how to tell it best. dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> Eagle Fern Park and Squaw Mountain Ranch in Oregon were used for the forest scenes. FILM CAPSULESSkyscraper (Dwayne Johnson, Neve Campbell, Pablo Schreiber) A security expert (Johnson) must save his wife (Cam pbell) and kids from a fire on the 96th floor of the tallest building in the world. Its a clear riff on Die Hard and The Towering Inferno, but its entertaining enough to be worth a look. Rated PG-13.American Animals (Evan Peters, Blake Jenner, Barry Keoghan) Four college students steal rare books from a university library in 2004. Watching these normal guys plan and execute a heist, and wrestle with their consciences along the way, is a fascinating expos of otherwise good people doing a bad thing. Rated R.Incredibles 2 (Voices of Craig T. Nelson, Holly Hunter, Samuel L. Jackson) When Elastigirl (Hunter) is given an assignment, Mr. Incredible (Nelson) has to stay home with the kids in this sequel to Pixars 2004 hit. This is the 20th Pixar movie and its not among the studios best, but it is quite satisfying. Rated PG.Oceans 8 (Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway) Debbie Ocean (Bullock) and her team plan to steal a $150 million necklace during the Met Gala in New York City. A spinoff of the male-dominated Oceans 11 movies, this female-led dramedy lacks the wit, clarity and ingenuity to keep us interested. Rated PG-13. FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 B7

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLYCommunity clean-up Looking for a way to spend your Saturday morning that helps the community? A Howard Park Community Cleanup is planned from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. July 21 at Howard Park, 1302 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. This clean-up was suggested by local high school students who convinced the City of West Palm Beach and the Parks and Recreation Department to work with them. Student volunteers will be raking leaves, removing litter, pulling weeds, and getting to know the neighbors, but they still need additional muscle. If you can help, register online at www.howardparkoutreach.org or call Jeslyn Stanislawski at 561-804-4938. Additional clean-ups are planned in September and November. FLAT: An exhibition opensThe H/OURS Collective, a newly formed collaborative of emerging artists, will open its first exhibition, FLAT, with a reception from 6 to 10 p.m. July 20 at the Fritz Gallery in West Palm Beach. FLAT is an avant-garde, video-based exhibition featuring works that include Fringe Dream by Sebastian BrunoHarris, a confrontational piece that mentally challenges the viewer, and Katelyn Spinellis Single Use, You (2018), which questions point of view. Michael Bucuzzo, as an extension of the artist collective Surrealux, and Cristina Kolozsvary-Kiss create a piece that requires viewer participation. The exhibition, which is on display through July 27, was curated by Andrew Considine, J. Rachel Gustafson, and Amber Tutwiler. A $5 donation is requested to attend the opening. The Fritz Gallery is upstairs at 1608 S. Dixie Highway in West Palm Beach. For more information, visit www.hourscollective. org or call 561 -352-1925. Fiber art on displayMary Catello, a fiber artist and an instructor with Armory Art Center, will exhibit her #metoo installation, Stand Up SPEAK OUT, which features papier-mch figures of sexual assault victims five adult females and one child designed to show that abuse happens across cultures, regardless of age, race or social status. Her exhibition is part of the Armory Art Center Experience at CityPlace, a collaboration that brings art out of the center and into a specially-created space at CityPlace. The Armory offers demonstrations, workshops and exhibits, and in addition to opening Catellos exhibit, the Armory will host its first Wine Down with Art from 5:30 to 7 p.m. July 20. The inaugural class is a stilllife painting class taught by Armorys 2D department director, Spence Townsend. The fee, $25, includes painting supplies and two glasses of wine. CityPlace is at 700 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach, and the Armory space is located adjacent to Sloans Ice Cream and across from Starbucks. Call the Armory to register at 561-832-1776.Dont-miss finale The Summer in Paradise Grand Finale and Fairy Tale Playhouse Auction takes place from 6 to 10 p.m. July 26 at the West Palm Beach Waterfront, Flagler Drive at Clematis Street. Music, food and a free sunset but the big draw is the Fairy Tale Playhouses, which will be auctioned for charity to benefit 15 local nonprofits. Info: www.wpb.org or call 561-8222222. itself to be a celebration of the natural beauty of Floridas indigenous plants and the wildlife they support and the goal of the exhibit is for the viewer to experience the joy and aliveness of the native landscape. The exhibit, currently on display through Aug. 4, features 18 photographers who have submitted 100 images captured in many locations around Florida. The variety of the photographs is as vast as the landscape, ranging from detailed micro-closeups in wild areas to stunning compositions of private gardens. The photographers who participated in this exhibit are Kevin Barry, Donna Bollenbach, Richard Brownscombe, Christina Evans, George Gann, Roger Hammer, Kirsten Hines, Craig Huegel, Teri Jabour, Mary Keim, Susan Kolterman, Susan Lerner, Don Marchetto, Chuck McCartney, Rufino Osorio, Rebecca Sabac, Loret Setters and Peg Urban. Along with viewing outstanding photography, gallery visitors will be able to learn more about the native plants showcased in the exhibit. Because South Florida is one of the few places in the United States where tropical and subtropical plants intermingle, it is one of the most biologically diverse regions in North America, possessing roughly 1,400 species of native plants. On a title card next to each photograph, there is detailed information about the plant, including the location where the photo was taken and interesting facts to educate the viewer. However, dont be fooled this show is much more than just pretty pictures of animals and plants. Visitors to this show can expect to have their senses stirred by the great detail and extreme color fidelity that these photographs bring to life: Tracys Sundew (Drosera tracyi) focuses on what could visually pass as a lifeform from another planet, but the information card reveals a grisly secret. The detailed image is of a carnivorous plant that digests bugs by absorbing nutrients through its sticky leaves. The bright-green-tentacle-like leaf would most likely be missed by passersby, but photographer Christina Evans captured each deadly droplet destined to capture insects with her close-up image. Rosy Camphorweed (Pluchea Baccharis), by photographer Mary Keim, illustrates a blissful moment in which a colorful bee fly has landed on a flower for a daytime snack. The golden hairs of the insect are made discernible by the fast shutter speed of the camera, which froze the scene for viewers to enjoy. The gold body of the bee fly is dramatically juxtaposed against the soft, vibrant and delicate flower, creating an inviting and impressive view of Florida nature. A Blazing Star (Liatris Spp.), by Christina Evans, details a scarlet skimmer dragonfly midflight, the picture captured in the photographers garden in Pinellas County. The bright orange of the dragonfly, an Asian breed introduced to Florida in the 1970s, is breathtaking next to the green and pink of the flower where it is eating. A sight unknown to most people who encounter them, the dragonflys wings are clearly seen in this photo, revealing the delicate lace pattern in its wings. But insects arent the only attraction at this show. A gray catbird, fellow wintertime resident visiting for the season, is featured in Kirsten Hines American Beautyberry and Catbird. These catbirds are drawn to the vibrant purple fruit provided by the beautyberry plant. In this piece, Ms. Hines demonstrates her mastery by utilizing a diagonal composition and shallow depth of field with focus on the subject, giving the photograph a real sense of seclusion providing a very special view not generally obtainable by the naked human eye. Renewal: Going Native also serves as a celebration of the city of West Palm Beachs recent landscape revision to reward the use of native plants in landscaping. Visitors to the exhibition can catch an enhanced, insider view to these wonderful plants and several of the creatures who also enjoy and depend on them. HAPPENINGSFrom page 1NATIVEFrom page 1 >> What: Renewal: Going Native >> When: Through Aug. 4. Open Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. >> Where: Palm Beach Photographic Center, 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. >> Cost: Free. >> Info: Call 561-253-2600 or visit www. workshop.org: PUZZLE ANSWERS COURTESY PHOTOSRosy Camphorweed attracted this colorful pollinator bee fly and Mary Keim captured the image in Split Oak Forest Wildlife. A Gray Catbird is perched on American beautyberry in Kirsten Hines backyard garden photograph. Christina Evans photograph shows the sticky glue droplets on Tracys Sundew, which traps unwary insects.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 S I L K T R E E S & F L O R A L A R R A N G E M E N T STIRED OF LOOKING AT YOUR OLD AND DUSTY FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS? BRING THEM IN FOR A CLEANING AND REARRANGEMENT FOR A TOTAL NEW LOOK! 30%OFFENTIRE STORE L L L L L L L L L L L L O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Dont Miss Out! CRYSTAL TREE PLAZA PUZZLESENTERING CONNECTICUT HOROSCOPESCANCER (June 21 to July 22) You feel quite content enjoying all the comforts of home right now. But the urge to travel grows stronger, and by weeks end, you could begin packing your bags.LEO (July 23 to August 22) A hectic period begins to ease up, but that doesnt mean the Fine Feline can do much catnapping these days. You need to finish those old tasks and prepare for new ones. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Expect to get some good news about your financial situation by weeks end. But it could still be too early to rush out with a long shopping list of things to buy. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your management skills make an impression on some workplace VIPs who might be looking for someone like you to take on an upcoming project. Good luck. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Meeting a former adversary might be unsettling at first. But time has softened hard feelings, and you could be on the brink of starting a new relationship. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A troubling situation close to home might cause you to change your travel plans. But getting all the facts before you act might cause you to reconsider. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You might be quite alone right now in deciding to support a major workplace shift. But others will join you as new information supports your bold move. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A former co-worker returns with news that could persuade you to reassess recently made plans. Be sure to consult with a trusted colleague before you act. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your motives behind a recent decision could be called into question by a rival. But once you present the facts, all doubts will be resolved. Enjoy an arts-rich weekend. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With new facts to work with, you should feel more confident in moving ahead. But continue to do so at an unhurried pace so you can spot details you might otherwise miss. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Taking on that new workplace project could be one of your smarter career moves. Expect a surprising show of support from someone who had always been a critic. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might feel youre too busy to undertake a new responsibility. But check it out before making any decisions. What you learn could persuade you to change your mind. BORN THIS WEEK: While you love being the center of attention, your generous heart allows you to share the attention with others. SEE ANSWERS, B8 SEE ANSWERS, B8 By Linda Thistle SUDOKUDifficulty level: Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. 4O7 Northwood Rd. | West Palm Beach, FL 334O7 | 561.847.4O85 www.huttonnorthwood.com Palm Beach Illustrated Best New Restaurant Nominee!FOODFORFOODIES!Live Music Friday, Saturday and Sunday Daily Happy Hour!Valet Parking AvailableMon-Thurs 4-9 | Fri-Sat 4-10 Sunday Brunch 11-4 Sunday Dinner 4-9

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 www.FloridaWeekly.com PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETYPlace of Hopes Fish for Hope, Sailfish Marina 1. Amyleigh Atwater, Dale Henry and Todd Mowery 2. Faith Schwack, Kelly Brosseau, Putnam Kling and Marissa Batista 3. Charles Bender, Nicole Bessette, Charles Bender, Brian Grove and Michelle Grande 4. Brady Atwater, Todd Mowrey and Stephen Heiman 5. Jim Coryell and Kayla Coryell 6. Jason Doyle, Bob Bell and Robby Bell 7. Tom Gaines and Liz Gaines 8. Robin Vundy, Rebecca Giacobba, Lori Beale and Carol Munzenrider 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8Florida Weekly welcomes submissions for the Society pages from charity galas and fundraising events, club meetings and other to-dos around town. We need 300-dpi photographs of groups of two or more people, facing the camera and identi ed by rst and last names. Questions? Email society@ oridaweekly.com. COCKTAILS & PARADISE alexKOWTUNalex@monkeyinparadise.com, Instagram: @successful Who knew vodka was good for your skin?I recently read an article on msn.com that caught my eye. The article made a case that consuming vodka has health, skin care and social benefits. Most of us have heard that an occasional glass of red wine is healthy, but who has heard anything about vodka being healthy? After reading the article, I decided to take things into my own hands and find some experts in order to see if there were positive attributes to drinking vodka. My first interview was with Jack Bairamian, MD. Getting a respected physicians opinion on the health benefits of drinking vodka was a must. He confirmed that vodka can increase blood-flow and circulation in your body which can prevent clots, strokes and other heart diseases. He also said vodka can help lower your cholesterol and, for those watching their weight, its also generally considered a lower-calorie alcohol. The calories come when vodka is mixed with juices and sodas containing sugar. Unlike beer or wine, a shot of vodka can actually reduce blood sugar levels. This is most effective when consumed on the rocks, mixed with water or soda water. This fact is very important to consumers who suffer from diabetes and closely monitor their sugar intake levels. Dr. Bairamian said, All of this is correct, but only applies when consumed in moderation. How about vodka and skincare? I reached out to Crystal Casey, aesthetician and owner of Signature Luxe Aesthetics in Boca Raton, to find out. According to the msn.com article, vodka acts as a natural astringent or toner, and because of its disinfectant properties, can deep-clean your pores in ways gentler washes just cant. The vodka should be diluted 50/50 with water prior to using facially. Itll also tighten the skin on your face and can treat acne breakouts with its drying and antitoxin properties. But it can have a dehydrating effect, which you should be mindful of if you have particularly dry or sensitive skin. Ms. Casey confirmed all of this and that there are even more skin care uses for vodka than just the above. When vodka is mixed with distilled water and rosemary oil, it can be used as a mist that eliminates irritation and redness, she said. In conclusion, the experts state that vodka has health benefits and skin care benefits. But the most important part about all of this is, only in moderation. Drink responsibly. Where Nantucket meets the Florida KeysEnjoy upscale American and Authentic Italian cuisine.Private Parties & Catering Available W h N t k t t t h F l id K Reservations: 561.842.7272612 US Hwy. 1, Lake Park, FL 33403 Entire Dinner Check$29 plus tax & gratuity Includes: Soup or Salad, Entree, Dessert & Coffee Offers cannot be combined with other specials or coupons.

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PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JULY 19-25, 2018 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11The Dish: French Onion Crock The Place: E.R. Bradleys Saloon, 104 E. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. 561-833-3520. The Price: $8 The Details: E.R. Bradleys is not the first place I would have thought of for onion soup, especially with a great French restaurant, Pistache, just around the corner. But its menu listing, with caramelized sweet onions, beef au jus, crostini and melted gruyere cheese, sounded too tempting a dish to pass up. The crock was loaded with onions and rich beef broth. Wed have liked the crostini to have been crispier, but the decadent layer of gruyere cheese that topped the soup made it all worthwhile. Other fare, including a French dip sandwich and salads were ample in portion and well prepared. Sc ott Simmons, s simmons@florida weekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus Places for Lake Worth dining A trio worth noting3JANSTHREE FOR2 JEWELL BISTRO830 N. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth. www.thejewell.menu. The eclectic menus created by Dak Kerprich are worthy of the nearcult following he has garnered in his restaurants, most recently from Pizzeria Oceano in Lantana. Hes back with another chalkboard menu in the tiny space that used to be Zapata Mexican whatever he likes thats fresh. But, look for a pasta of the day (e.g. mushrooms, lemons, herbs), a seafood of the day (e.g. snowy grouper), and a variety of fresh appetizers. Old World dishes potato babka or pierogi, and todays roasted cauliflower. Dont miss Miss Marshas mango pie. No phone, cash only and no substitutions, usually.1 C.W.S. BAR + KITCHEN522 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth. 561-318-5637; www.cwslw.com. Relax on a sofa inside, or hang out in the garden at this downtown establishment, which has become a popular hot spot along Lake Worths other main drag, Lucerne Avenue. C.W.S. has an extensive wine and whisky list, as well as a menu that includes a Damn Good Burger, with a signature meat blend, and the C.W.S. Yard Bird, a smoked, citrus-brined chicken.3 HACHI ASIAN CUISINE & GRILL809 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. 561-582-5800; www.hachiasiancuisinegrill.com. If youve never had Korean barbecue, or bulgogi, or a proper papaya salad, you must give this a try. Though it has Japanese, including sushi, noodle bowls and a delicious tuna bowl, and theres traditional Thai pad Thai is of note, and so is the Panang curry its Korean food that stands out. We love the little charcoal grills they bring out for the beef, but its homemade kim chi we cant get enough of. Service is friendly, too a big plus. Jan Norris, jnorris@floridaweekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE COURTESY PHOTO You can hang out at bars inside (above) or out at C.W.S. Bar + Kitchen in Lake Worth.Its always a trial opening a restaurant in South Florida in summertime. People told me, Youre going to struggle, said Carlos Mendez, owner of the new Tapeo in downtown West Palm Beach. But weve been very busy. Weve been welcomed the response has been warm and inviting. The Spanish tapas restaurant took the former Tinfish space on Clematis Street. Mr. Mendez, owner, is a veteran of Spanish restaurants in northern New Jersey, where he most recently managed Sayola. Born in northern Spain, he knows the food as a heritage cuisine. He wants Tapeo to be authentic Spanish because, he said, Everybody is doing tapas. Mexican, Italian everybody has their version. A lot of modern tapas. Nobody is doing authentic. We want to bring the culture of this food thats over 200 years old. He laughs as he says someone asked him what kind of restaurant it is. Spanish, I said. They said, Oh. So tacos. Tapas, small plates in Spanish, represent a type of bar food that becomes a meal when added up. Tapeo is the word for a tapas crawl, or dine-around. Diners in Spain move along among the tapas bars ordering a plate here and there, and drinking, to stretch out an evening of food and socialize at the same time. We felt West Palm Beach needed this type of food, and thats what were hearing from our guests, that weve needed an original tapas menu, he said. Dishes like shrimp in garlic sauce, patatas bravas with a mayonnaise for dipping, Iberico ham, Spanish cheeses and olives, and the potato omelet known to tapas lovers are on the menu. Beef empanada theyre a best seller. And shrimp and green sauce with parsley, garlic and a little clam juice, thats another one that sells best, he said. Tapeo is making paella to order with Spanish bomba rice and saffron. Customers must wait at least 30 minutes for its preparation as its made fresh, he said. Monday and Tuesday nights for a summer special, any of the paellas is $19.95 (regularly 29.95), and Sangria is half-price to pair with it. Everything is made in house. Sangria, ice creams, all the desserts we dont buy anything, he said. My chef is Portuguese and his background is in pastry. He worked in France for a while, as well as in Portugal and Spain. He got upset when I brought a cake into the restaurant. I had to explain it was for an employees birthday. He yelled at me, Dont bring that bleep in here! Mr. Mendez is in the restaurant from 8 a.m. to close. Its dedication and a passion that must go along with owning a restaurant, he said. Its not really about the money. Ive been in the restaurant business since I was 14 years old. If you ask me, Ill tell you that you dont go into the business to make money. You do it because you love it. I love it. Tapeo, 118 S. Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Phone 561-514-0811; www.tapeotapas.com. Open 8 a.m.-11 p.m. MondayThursday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday-Sunday.In brief Congratulations to the relatively new West Palm Beach Brewery & Wine Vault. In the recent 2018 Open Beer Championship in Oxford, Ohio., homebrewers and commercial b reweries entered to win in a number of categories. WPB Brewery took home the gold for its Dreamers Lager, and a bronze for its Unfashionable Brown Ale. Another area brewery also won Copperpoint Brewing in Boynton Beach won a silver medal for its A-10 Hop Hog Amber. It was awarded two bronzes: one each for its Cold Brew Coffee Lager, and WTF (Wheres the Filter) IPA. Kapow! Noodle Bar has its first birthday in West Palm Beach Saturday, and its throwing its own birthday party. From 4 p.m. to midnight, get in on Japanese drummers performing, passed hors doeuvres and more. A new Sunday brunch is on tap at Bistro 1001 in the West Palm Beach Marriott. A new chef there is putting out paella, among other brunch offerings, and pouring bottomless sparkling wine or mimosas. Cost is $24. Go to www.bistro1001.com for the details. janNORRISjan@jannorris.com Tapeo brings tapas to former Tinfish spaceCOURTESY PHOTO Tapeo specializes in tapas, or small plates, inspired by dishes from northern Spain. SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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BauerFinancial is a registered trademark. 7308 0718 CommunityCONNECTIONS 1309 N Flagler Dr | West Palm Beach | GoodSamaritanMC.com RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED, CALL844.790.7315Treatment Options for HerniasThursday, July 26 @ 12pm-1pmGood Samaritan Medical Center Daniel Higgins, MD, General and Robotic SurgeryPlease join us for a presentation by Dr. Higgins to learn more about the history of hernias, why we get them, and how to treat them with robotic surgery. A light lunch and refreshments will be served.JULY LECTURE: FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com OCTOBER 21How did you first get into business?I spent five years practicing corporate securities law for a major Philadelphia firm. I wanted to do something more creative that had a greater impact on people. I left law in the early 1980s to found one of the nations first Assisted Living communities. This new alternative was a rebellion against the long entrenched medical/ institutional model of care for the elderly. It was wildly successful and families flocked to us. I spent about 15 years refining the concept, developing other communities and advocating around the country for this model. When Wall Street entered the industry in the late 1990s and it became more corporatized, I sold my facilities and retired to Boca Raton. However, when my parents reached their mid80s and required assistance, they wanted no part of a nursing home or assisted living facility. They wanted to stay in their home. Thats the reason I started Visiting Angels in Palm Beach Gardens. I thought, What could be less institutional than home care? What are some recent trends youve seen in your industry?Were seeing a proliferation of web based companies that purport to find care workers for customers, often skirting the Florida regulations. But they dont do the background checking, face to face interviewing and quality assurance that local companies can provide. Were also seeing some of the hospital systems create their own home care companies to vertically integrate their operations. This is a positive trend and can lead to improved accountability for outcomes if it is done right. What lessons did you learn from the great recession?Dont do anything rash. These things are cyclical.What is your vision for the future of your business?I see us continuing to refine our ability to adapt to the unique needs and preferences of each client. As philosophies of senior care evolve, I predict that nursing homes will nearly disappear as venues for extended care, and many more services and activities will be brought into the home to allow seniors to age in place in a familiar residential environment. Better integration and coordination of home care with the clients other health care providers will help. We hope to be part of that trend. What new products or services will you introduce in the next year?We will be focusing more on education for caregivers as well as for families. Understanding the impact of the limitations that come with advanced age is key to providing excellent service. This is especially true for helping people with Alzheimers Disease, Parkinsons and similar conditions. Specialized teams to target specific conditions is one new approach. We also hope to introduce new technologies as an option now that they have become more refined. For example, we are in discussions with a company to provide non-intrusive monitoring systems that track patterns of movement in the home and then detect departures from the pattern to generate safety alerts. Weve also developed a niche practice in helping people of all ages with recovery after surgery. What are some of the challenges you face this year?Without a doubt the biggest new challenge for all home care companies is adjusting to the radical new labor law changes adopted by the Department of Labor. Forty years of established law has been virtually erased by an administrative decree through the elimination of the Companionship exemption. Overtime regulations make it more challenging for older adults to have continuity and consistency of caregivers. This is especially hard on people with dementia who do much better when a single, familiar caregiver can be with them most of the time.What are your thoughts on the South Florida economy?For businesses that serve the elderly, there will be steady growth in the near term. Deteriorating weather patterns in the Northeast and Midwest are leading seniors to stay longer in Florida or give up their northern homes in favor of a Florida residence. When the cohort of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) hit their eighties and begin to require assistance, there will be an overwhelming explosion in the senior care economy in South Florida. Thats less than a decade off, and we need to start planning now to be able to meet the need. What do you look for in recruiting talent?Character, Compassion and Passion are the big three for me. A candidate can have all the technical skill and experience possible, but if they are missing any of those three fundamental qualities, I have no interest. Figuring out who really has those qualities is not easy. Whats the most important business lesson youve learned?Never sacrifice your core ethical principles for profit. Always put your clients welfare above your financial interest. In the long run, that will bring you financial success. This is just a corollary of Aristotles theory of Virtue.What do you enjoy most about the job? People. And the opportunity to be creative. What would people be surprised to know about you?When I was a kid, I got into lots of trouble for doing flips off of every elevated surface I could find. I ended up lettering in Gymnastics in college. I did my last back flip at age 50 and Im still temptedWhat could be less institutional than home care?Irving P. SeldinVisiting Angels WHO AM I?NAME: Irving P. Seldin TITLE AND COMPANY: President & Principal Visiting Angels YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: 6 YEARS IN COUNTY: 18 NATURE OF BUSINESS: Private Home Health Care EDUCATION: Law Degree: University of Michigan Masters Degree: University of Michigan Undergraduate Degree: University of Pittsburgh HOMETOWN: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ER 21 are propart of will you on edu cafor fami ct of the dvanced lent serfor helps D isease, ditio ns. s pecific roa ch. We w tech noloth ey have r example, h a comp any monito rtterns of and then the patt ern s. Wev e also cti ce in help with recov ery he challenges the bigge st ll ho me care ing t o the r adihanges adop ted of Lab or. Forty law has been n admi nistrative elimina tion of th mption. Ove rti more challenging for older adults to and consistency of ca especially hard on pe tia who do much be familiar caregiver c most of the time. What are your thou Florida economy? For businesses there will be ste term. Deteriora in the Northeas ing seniors to s or give up t hei favor of a F lor cohort of Bo o hit their ei gh assistance, th ing explosio my in South decade off, ning now t What do y Charac are the b can hav experie missing qualiti out w not e Wha son N pri cli in y c t e c are? cipal f of ve rsity an ia 8 OCTOBER 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY What is the most significant change youve seen in your industry over the last year?When Bernie Madoff came through a decade ago, most nonprofits in Palm Beach County were impacted in some way. Family foundations, individuals and corporations could no longer support those who were doing really important work. Donors became more laser focused with their gifts and nonprofits became even more transparent. Each year, this becomes more and more important in a good way. Quantum House has always been committed to making sure that the minute a supporter crosses the threshold, they know exactly where their gift and their time are having an impact to care for the families that we serve. Name the top three elements or practices that have been absolutely critical in the success of your business? Staying true to our mission, integrity and outstanding stewardship are the three practices that have been absolutely critical to our success. Each day we welcome children and families who are facing some of their most difficult days. We have cared for thousands of families in need over the past 15 years and each guest has been given much more than just lodging. They receive a huge embrace from the community and the peace of mind that they will get through a terrible time with support and care.What are things youd like to change about your industry now? Your organization or business?I would love to change the perception that a nonprofit is not a real business. When businesses are brought to the table to discuss important economic and impact issues, seldom will you see a representative from the nonprofit world as a part of that group. The reality is that we have budgets just like any business with the normal anticipated expenses of payroll, utilities, insurance, supplies and more. Within the context of your current marketing/ promotional strategy, how do you differentiate your company from your competitors?Many folks dont know about hospital hospitality houses until they need one. And, as the only house like this between Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, we continue to make certain that anyone who needs a place to stay to be nearby while their child receives care, has the opportunity to do so. Creative marketing and strategies to get our message to the community and pediatric medical services are a top priority. What will you base your success on for 2018? Success in 2017 is operating with 30 guest suites providing lodging and love to hundreds more families, and providing opportunities for the community to join in on our journey by preparing meals, organizing arts and crafts, playing golf, reading stories, sharing their pets and all of their talents with the families who call Quantum House home. Because we are not exclusive to any illness or injury, we can welcome so many. How is social media impacting your industry or business this year? Whats in store for 2018?While I understand and appreciate the importance of social media, I just dont think you can beat the value of relationships. I hope that being able to pick up the phone or meeting for coffee will never be replaced. Social media allows Quantum House to share the message that the families we care for are just like you. Each of us has a child in our lives, a son or daughter, niece or nephew, a child of a friend, so each of us might need a place like Quantum House. What do you truly love about working here in Palm Beach County? For many, living in Palm Beach County is the prize for having lived a good life. We are the fortunate ones who are already here. Also, this is a very generous community. Folks here know that giving back and participating in making this a better place to live is just part of the deal. How do you find inspiration in todays business climate? My inspiration is the families who stay with us at Quantum House. These folks and their precious children are going through some pretty dark days. Seeing their challenges, their strength, their smiles and their tears can put everything into perspective. Helping children and families during difficult timesRoberta (Robi) JurneyCEO, Quantum House WHO AM I?NAME: Roberta (Robi) Jurney TITLE AND COMPANY: CEO, Quantum House YEARS WITH THE COMPANY: As a volunteer 20 years; as staff 9 years YEARS IN SOUTH FLORIDA: Pretty much my whole life NATURE OF BUSINESS: Nonprofit hospital hospitality house EDUCATION: BA Communication Arts; Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala. HOMETOWN: Palm Beach CountyRoberta (Robi) Jurney Current Market Trends in Various Industries Along with Economic Predictions for 2019 in a Candid Q&A Format. For Advertising Opportunities Contact Your Account Executive at 561.904.6470 PUBLICATION DATE: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2018ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2018 AT 12PMLooking to learn economic insights from the areas top CEOs, Directors and Business Owners?THEN READ...

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