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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
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www.FloridaWeekly.com LESLIE LILLY A2 OPINION A4PETS A6BEHIND THE WHEEL A8 HEALTHY LIVING A21BUSINESS A23REAL ESTATE A26ARTS B1 COLLECT B2EVENTS B6-8PUZZLES B15CUISINE B18-19 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store. PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017Vol. VII, No. 18  FREE Take me out to the ball game — for Spring TrainingSpring Training starts Saturday, and this year, it brings double the fun to baseball lovers in Palm Beach County. Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter, home of the Miami Marlins and the St. Louis Cardinals, has 34 games on the schedule, including a much-anticipated matchup March 18 between the red birds and the New York Mets. Twelve miles south of Jupiter, The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches will see fans flock to the field to watch another pair of home teams „ the Houston Astros and the Washington Nationals. With 31 games in 30 days, the brand-new venue on Haverhill Road in West Palm Beach officially will be broken in by the time the boys of summerŽ head off for Major League Baseballs opening day April 2. Its been so many moving parts, so many people involved,Ž said Brady Bal-lard, The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches SEE BASEBALL, A10 X Water, guns and sanctuary cities are among the many major issues Florida legislators will face in the ...Legislative2017S SESSION IMMIGRATION GUNS WATER MARIJUANA BY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@” oridaweekly.com BY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@” oridaweekly.com TARTING ON MARCH 7, 160 POLITICIANS WHO REPRESENT THE melting-pot interests of more than 20 million Florida residents will meet in Tallahassee. Over the next 60 days, the sole requirement of the Florida Legislature „ 40 state senators and 120 house members „ along with Gov. Rick Scott, is to approve a state budget for the 2017-18 fiscal year. They will also propose thousands of potential new rules and policies. Some of those bills will make it to the floor of the SEE SESSION, A16 XCOURTESY PHOTO ww w. Fl or id aWee kl Who represents you? Our pullout poster includes names, emails and numbers of everyone making decisions for you. A17INSIDE: P O L K LE E C O LL I E R L A K E M I A M I DA D E P A L M B E A C H B R E V A R D O S C E O L A H E ND R Y P A S C O B R O W A R D G L AD E S O R ANG E C I T R U S M A R T I N H I G H L AND S M AN A TE E D E S O T O H A R D E E S T L U C I E C HA R L O TT E S A R A S O T A O K EE C HO B E E H E R NAND O I ND I AN R I V E R POLK LEE COLLIER LAKE MIAMI-DADE PALM BEACH BREVARD OSCEOLA HENDRY PASCO BROWARD GLADES ORANGE CITRUS MARTIN HIGHLANDS MANATEE DESOTO HARDEE ST. LUCIE CHARLOTTE SARASOTA OKEECHOBEE HERNANDO INDIAN RIVERTampa North Port Orlando Cape Coral St. Petersburg Port St. Lucie Lakeland Miami Palm Bay Bartow Davie Sanibel Fort Myers Wildwood Wellington Clearwater Jupiter Melbourne Miramar WestonWest Palm BeachLargo Bonita Springs Winter Haven Sarasota Hialeah Leesburg Plant City Boca Raton Palm Beach Gardens Cocoa Venice Sunrise Bay Lake Naples Fort Pierce Ocoee Oviedo Eustis Grant-Valkaria St. Cloud LaBelle Mascotte Kissimmee Lake Wales Clermont Coral Springs Bradenton Marco Island Punta Gorda Haines City Sebring Sebastian Stuart Auburndale Frostproof Homestead Apopka Delray Beach T arpon Springs Vero Beach ongboat Key Cutler Bay Zephyrhills Avon Park Pahokee Dade City Center Hill Arcadia Belle Glade Fort Meade Clewiston Temple Terrace Wauchula Astatula Fort Myers Beach Okeechobee Lake Placid New Port Richey Jupiter Island Everglades IslamoradaVillageofIslands Moore Haven Highland Park St. Lucie Village 120 55 42 56 34 73 54 33 51 32 50 39 97 53 38 74 35 57 52 104 58 41 37 71 84 28 60 70 44 36 83 65 69 45 64 40 72 68 43 29 93 66 63 48 59 100 49 112 114 47 67 99 61 98 62 113 96 92 46 94 101 30 117 103 115 118 95 109 102 119 116 108 111 107 110 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 105 106 85 86 87 90 91 88 89 82 39 12 15 10 14 17 21 22 32 9 20 16 19 11 13 24 18 37 34 36 38 35 40 33 POLK LEE COLLIER LAKE MIAMI-DADE PALM BEACH BREVARD OSCEOLA HENDRY PASCO BROWARD GLADES ORANGE CITRUS MARTIN HIGHLANDS MANATEE HILLSBOROUGH DESOTO HARDEE ST. LUCIE SUMTER CHARLOTTE SARASOTA OKEECHOBEE PINELLAS HERNANDO INDIAN RIVER SEMINOLE 23 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Florida State Senate Florida House of RepresentativesWho represents you in Tallahassee?Its OK if you havent been paying attention „ if perhaps a few elections have passed you by and maybe youve fallen behind. Names have changed, and youre just not sure anymore who exactly your representative and senator in the Florida Legislature are. It happens to the best of us. This could be the year, however, where you jump back on the wagon, hone in on an issue or two that you want to follow and pay attention to the votes that are being cast in your name. The state makes it easier than ever to track how your operatives in the capital voted and where bills end up. Use our color-coded maps, then follow through with online tools accessible at leg.state.fl.us. Q EAGLE WILLHITE BERMAN TRUJILLO BENACQUISTO SILVERS SLOSBERG PASSIDOMO ROMMEL RADER POWELL FITZENHAGEN GRIMSLEY NEGRON ABRUZZO GRANT DONALDS ROTH CLEMENS CALDWELL RODRIGUES MAGAR STEUBE HAGER District 26Denise Grimsley, Republican850-487-5026 or 863-465-2626 Grimsley.Denise.web@” senate.gov District 23 Greg Steube, Republican850-487-5023 or 941-342-9162 Steube.Greg.web@” senate.gov District 28Kathleen Passidomo, Republican850-487-5028 or 239-417-6205 Passidomo.Kathleen.web@” senate.gov District 27 Lizbeth Benacquisto, Republican850-487-5027 or 239-338-2570 Benacquisto.Lizbeth.web@” senate.gov District 25 Joe Negron, Republican, Senate President 850-487-5025 or 772-219-1665 Negron.Joe.web@” senate.gov District 29 Kevin J. Rader, Democrat 850 487 5029 or 561-443-8170 Rader.Kevin.web@” senate.gov District 30Bobby Powell, Democrat 850-487-5030 or 561-650-6880Powell.Bobby.web@” senate.gov District 31 Jeff Clemens, Democrat 850-487-5031 or 561-540-1140 Clemens.Jeff.web@” senate.gov District 75 Michael Grant, Republican850-717-5075 or 941-613-0914 Michael.Grant@my” oridahouse.gov District 76Ray Wesley Rodrigues Republican, Majority Leader 850-717-5076 or 239-433-6501 Ray.Rodrigues@my” oridahouse.gov District 77 Dane Eagle, Republican 850-717-5077 or 239-772-1291 Dane.Eagle@my” oridahouse.gov District 78Heather Fitzenhagen, Republican850-717-5078 or 239-533-2440 Heather.Fitzenhagen@my” oridahouse.gov District 79 Matt Caldwell, Republican850-717-5079 or 239-694-0161 Matt.Caldwell@my” oridahouse.gov District 80Byron Donalds, Republican 850-717-5080 or 239-417-6270 Byron.Donalds@my” oridahouse.gov District 105 Carlos Trujillo, Republican850-717-5105 or 305-470-5070 Carlos.Trujillo@my” oridahouse.gov District 106Bob Rommel, Republican 850-717-5106 or 239-417-6200 Bob.Rommel@my” oridahouse.gov District 81Joseph Abruzzo, Democrat850-717-5081 or 561-470-2086 Joseph.Abruzzo@my” oridahouse.gov District 82 MaryLynn MLŽ Magar, Republican 772-545-3481 or 850-717-5082 MaryL ynn.Magar@my” oridahouse.gov District 85Rick Roth, Republican850-717-5085 or 561-625-5176 Rick.Roth@my” oridahouse.gov District 86 Matt Willhite, Democrat 850-717-5086 or 561-791-4071 Matt.Willhite@my” oridahouse.gov District 87David Silvers, Democrat 850-717-5087 or 561-357-4824 David.Silvers@my” oridahouse.gov JACQUET District 88Al Jacquet, Democrat 850-717-5088 or 561-650-6486 Al.Jacquet@my” oridahouse.gov District 90 Lori Berman, Democrat850-717-5090 or 561-374-7850 Lori.Berman@my” oridahouse.gov District 89Bill Hager, Republican850-717-5089 or 561-470-6607 Bill.Hager@my-” oridahouse.gov District 91Emily Slosberg, Democrat 850-717-5091 or 561-496-5940 Emily.Slosberg@my” oridahouse.gov New venture afloatCharter yachts come to Lake Park Marina. A23 XChalk it upThe Lake Worth Street Painting Festival hits the pavement. B1 XThe DishFeasting on small plates at Lilo’s in Lake Worth. B19 XSunFestRock, reggae and more are on tap for 35th season. B13 X INSIDE

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY WE HEAL THE WISHFUL. 7…i…iL'“>`L'ˆiœvV…ˆ`…œœ`i>V…Liœ`…iv>“ˆw>ˆ`Žˆ]œ'>>`‡ˆˆ}i`ˆ>ˆVi“i}iVœœ“>`i>`œii…iV…ˆ`iœv*>“i>V…nœ'>`Liœ`r…i>}i`i`ˆV>i`V…ˆ`i…œˆ>ˆ*>“i>V…nœ']iœˆ`i>`>Vi`V>ivœii…ˆ}vœ“LœŽiLœiœi`ˆ>ˆVœVœœ}iˆVi7…iˆVœ“iœœ'V…ˆ`…i>…]V…œœi…i…œˆ>…>Vi>i`'vœ…i“ We heal for them. *South Florida Parenting Magazine 2016Voted Best Pediatric ER and Best Pediatric Hospital in Palm Beach County!* Join our Kids Club for Kids Activities and Healthy Events. 561-841-KIDS € PalmBeachChildrensHospital.com COMMENTARYNevertheless, she persistedIn the preface to the first volume of The History of Woman Suffrage,Ž authors Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Matilda Joslyn Gage explain the object of their undertak-ing. Their purpose, they said, was to leave behind an arsenal of factsŽ for those beginning to educate themselves about the inception and progress of their long agitationŽ to secure womens rights. This was for the benefit of the movements future leaders. The first book in the series of six begins in the 1840s with the agitations nascent stirrings. Four decades had already passed in the interval between the doing and remembering. Stanton and her collaborators felt a sense of urgency. Some who could best recount this history had already succumbed to St. Peters call, their opportunity missed to contribute. The would-be authors were getting long in the tooth. Yet no one was more faithful or better qualified to preserve this history than those engaged in its making. Undertak-ing the task was essential if the books purposes were to be fulfilled. Their ambition to record their story was daunting, complicated by the broad context of the movement itself. The full emancipation of women was its ultimate cause. It was inclusive of but not limited to the achievement of political rights. That made things exceedingly more complicated. It struck at the core of womens oppression. Gender inequality was deeply ingrained in the social, religious and cultural mores of the country. Woman was simply not the spiritual, moral or intellectual equal of man. This tenet expressed itself in an infinite number of ways. To challenge the presumption was to invite an avalanche of scorn, hate and ridicule. Public condescension, shaming and bullying were par for the course. A newspaper editorial in 1848 put it bluntly: A woman is a nobody. A wife is everything. A pretty girl is equal to ten thousand men, and a mother is, next to God, all powerful ƒ ladies ƒ therefore are resolved to maintain their rights as Wives, Belles, Virgins, and Mothers, and not as women.Ž Role assignment of the ladies was systemic and inviolable. Surmising the difficulties ahead, Stanton and her colleagues saw the buzz saw awaiting them. None of the attitudes and beliefs cementing wom-ens inequality could be challenged without challenging them all. But they were determined as well as prag-matic. They believed, in their century, womens suffrage to be the highest priority. It was the gateway through which women could press their future demands. Though prevailing in their lifetime might not be possible, victory was inevitable. The history must be preserved and told, no matter how long the doing or the telling required. Stanton and her colleagues published the first volume of this history in 1881. Five more volumes and another 40 years passed before womens suffrage became a reality in 1921. The sixth and final volume of The History of Woman SuffrageŽ was completed by Ida Husted Harper and published in 1922. Had they listened to the naysayers, Stanton, Anthony and Gage might never have undertaken their task. Dissenting voices within their own ranks coun-seled, It is too early to write the his-tory of this movement; wait until our object is attained; the actors themselves cannot write an impartial history; they have their discords, divisions, personal hostilities, that unfit them for the work.Ž But the objections did not deter Stanton, Anthony and Gage. They took them as evidence of the growing self-asser-tion and individualism in woman.Ž Now, more than 135 years later, the arsenal of factsŽ provided by The History of Womans SuffrageŽ is just as purposeful as Stanton, Anthony and Gage imagined one day it would be. Last month, The Womens March on Washington inspired the largest single day of demonstrations in American history. Naysayers piled on afterward with condescending and critical com-mentary about the march as well as the marchers. It was a dj vu moment, reminiscent of the 19th century. Women and men who did not participate in the march demeaned the women and men who did. The march was a useless and an ineffectual protest. It focused on the wrong issues. It was a mass example of identity politics. The pink pussy hats and the nasty womanŽ moniker, symbols of resistance, were offensive, insulting and stupid. The march was illogical.Ž It protested injustices to women that have not yet occurred. It was a counterfeit protest by people paid to show up. Women should listen more and talk less. What war on women? It recalled another story from The History of Womans Suffrage.Ž In 1913, Alice Paul and the National American Woman Suffrage Association led 5,000 suffragettes up Pennsylv ania Avenue. marchers suffered verbal and physical assaults along the way and thereafter. But still, they marched. The parade was huge for its time. It is now credited by historians for fueling the suffrage movements sprint to the finish line. Despite everything, the women per-sisted and achieved their goal. It is the history lesson Stanton, Anthony and Gage thought never too late for the learning. Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian. Her professional career spans more than 25 years leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and Appalachia. She writes frequently on issues of politics, public policy and philanthropy, earning national recognition for her leadership in the charitable sector. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly@ floridaweekly.com and read past blog posts on Tumblr at llilly15.Tumblr.com. leslie LILLYllilly@floridaweekly.com

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Hands-Only Adult CPR Class Tuesday, March 21 @ 6:30-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach GardensEective bystander CPR given immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple the chance of survival. Join us for a CPR class, held at PBG Fire Rescue. Local EMS give a hands-only CPR demonstration and review AED use Participants practice their new skills on CPR manikins. Reservations are required. Colorectal Cancer Naveen Reddy, MD Gastroenterologist Thursday, March 2 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death when numbers for both men and women are combined. Join Dr. Naveen Reddy, a gastroenterologist on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, for an educational lecture on colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection and diagnosis. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. Registration is required. MARCH Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com Heart Attack Risk Assessment (blood pressure, BMI, glucose and cholesterol) Wednesday, March 8 @ 8-11am Osteoporosis Screenings @ Outpatient Entrance Thursday, March 16 @ 9am-1pm Take steps toward being heart healthy! Visit PBGMC.com/pledge to Receive a FREE Cookbook! FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGS COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center Depression & Cardiac Disease … Mended Hearts Program Tuesday, March 14 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4PBGMC is teaming up with The Mended Hearts Program to provide support for heart disease patients and their families. Members will interact with others through local chapter meetings and special events. A small fee will be collected for member registration. This month, join a neuropsychologist for a lecture on depression and cardiac disease. *$5/year collected solely by the Mended Hearts Program to provide educational materials for members. FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL855.387.5864 Epilepsy Awareness Pedro Hernandez-Frau, MD Neurologist Thursday, March 16 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4In honor of Epilepsy Awareness Day in March, Join Dr. Pedro E. Hernandez-Frau, a neurologist on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, for an educational lecture on epilepsy. Attendees will learn about a new treatment program at the hospital that is designed to help patients suering from seizures and epilepsy regain control of their lives. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. Registration is required. Community Chair Yoga Class Wednesday, March 15 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4PBGMC now oers a FREE senior chair yoga class for the community. The class is taught by the assistant nurse manager of cardiac rehab, who is also a certi“ed yoga instructor. Using the same techniques as traditional yoga, the class is modi“ed to allow for gentle stretching, designed to help strengthen muscles and work on balance. Smoking Cessation Classes Several One-hour Sessions Wednesday, March 1, 8, 22, 29 and April 5 @ 5:30-6:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has teamed up with The Area Health Education Center to provide education on the health eects related to tobacco use, the bene“ts of quitting and what to expect. Participants learn to identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms and brainstorm ways to cope. Reservations are required.

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsLeslie Lilly Roger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Mary Thurwachter Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Alisa Bowman Amy Grau Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Kathy Pierotti Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Sales and Marketing ExecutivesAlyssa Liplesaliples@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez Circulation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Headley Darlington Clarissa Jimenez Giovanny Marcelin Brent Charles Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 n Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state ption s: ailed subscription .95 in-county $52.95 5 st ta in5 70 647 647 .6 4.6 .64 04 04 b he we e web th y y. ekl ekly ee ee o o cri cri sc b ptions: y y nty nty te te a at ate tate -st -sta Trump tweet exposes judiciaryAs you might have heard, Donald Trump tweeted at a judge. The commentariat shuddered at the effrontery of it, and some worried that the foundations of the separation of powers had been shaken. Trumps slam of Judge James Robart was undeniably crude and ill considered, but it wasnt a threat to our republic. In fact, it is a symptom of our distorted and overly sanctified view of the judiciary that a criticism of a judge with a lifetime appointment is greeted with such pearl clutching. It is entirely appropriate that the political branches have their own view of the law and the Constitution, and robustly contest „ and even deny the legitimacy of „ court decisions that they consider erroneous. President Trump will have to go considerably further to come close to Andrew Jackson supposedly saying of a Supreme Court decision protecting the Cherokee Indians in Georgia, John Marshall has made his decision; now let him enforce it.Ž Or to match the wars waged on unconge-nial Supreme Court decisions by Franklin D. Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Lincolns opposition to the Dred Scott decision redounds to his great credit. To say that Republicans werent deferential to the ruling is an understatement for the ages. They alleged a vast conspiracy of Chief Justice Roger Taney and top Demo-crats to commit offenses comparable to the worst villainies of recorded history,Ž in the words of one historian. Everyone would soon enough recognize Dred Scott as a disgrace. At the time, though, supporters of the decision con-sidered it a means to peacefully settle a question tearing the country apart. For his part, Stephen Douglas made an argument that was simple and entirely familiar today: Shut up, the Supreme Court justices have spoken.Ž Lincoln allowed that Dred Scott applied to the particular parties to the case; he refused, though, to accept it as a political rule.Ž This wasnt Lincoln venting dur-ing an idle moment in his bathrobe. He devoted a portion of his first inaugural to developing his argument, and he governed as if the Dred Scott decision didnt exist. Its an odd disconnect that Lincoln is justly considered perhaps the greatest states-man in American history, yet his rejection of judicial supremacy that was so central to his view of our system is roundly ignored. It is certainly true that presidents defying the court willy-nilly would be a formula for chaos. But you see a Lincolnian politi-cal resistance to the court in, for instance, the pro-life movement that wont rest until Roe v. Wade is overturned. The determined opposition to Citizens United is another example, from the left. The fundamental point is that it is not just the executive or Congress that can abuse its power and overstep its bounds. The courts can, too, and no one is obligated to meekly accept their decisions. If the courts in the end throw out the order, despite the black-and-white letter of the law giving him the authority to block aliens in the interest of national security, it will be a usurpatory act. In that scenario, the courts will have done more violence to our constitutional system than a foolish Trump tweet ever could. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONThe 40-year press warOn Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, Donald Trump won the White House in part because the responsible media had given him copious ink, airtime and online coverage in the previous year. They were scrupulous about it, too, as the American system requires of good journalists. They reported what he said and did, what people who supported him or questioned him said or did, and what the consequences were as they discovered consequences. Some of his detractors said the media gave him undue and too much attention. Some of his supporters said the media gave him unfair and too little attention. Reporters gave him a platform because he made so much noise, championed by noisy supporters. When they covered his Twitter grandstanding, for example „ as they should have „ he gained a much broader platform on social media. Thats the nature of good reporting. Its what journalists do no ma tter the o utcome, whether they favor or disfavor the subject. All of us are richer, more secure and a lot stronger as a result, including the rubes who denounce responsible media for ques-tioning and probing Mr. Trumps connec-tions with Russian leaders, to name just one example. Such men and women are like after-dark motorists who disdain headlights because they might spot something unpleasant, something they dont want to see on the way to their party: Bridge Out,Ž or Road Closed,Ž or Bombing Range,Ž perhaps. In American life, responsible reporters are headlights. Their detractors seem to believe if nobody lights up the sign „ or if they simply claim something else entirely „ the bridge wont be out. Mr. Trumps current assault on responsible media is therefore richly ironic, but its nothing new. His response has almost 45 years of precedence as a strategy that often works. After complaining at an impromptu press conference last week about the dishonest media, Democrats, intelligence officials, criminal leakers, Hillary Clinton, environmentalists and judges,Ž as The New York Times fairly summarized it, he added this: Tomorrow, they will say, Donald Trump rants and raves at the press. Im not ranting and raving. Im just telling you. You know, youre dishonest people. But „ Im not ranting and raving. I love this. Im hav-ing a good time doing it.Ž Such charismatic sophistry hearkens back to President Richard Nixon, who resigned his presidency 43 years ago. Mr. Nixon established a strategic precedent to stiff-arm journalists questioning his words and actions: he and his White House offi-cials introduced the mediaŽ as a term for the first time, called them biased liars, and said they represented a small elite who knew or cared nothing about the American people. An elegant offensive strategy, it failed for Mr. Nixon after The Washington Post finally exposed the criminal behaviors of his White House. But it was effectively employed later by Presidents Reagan, Clin-ton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Those leaders all tried to shout down or bully reporters, scare them, cut off their access or avoid them (in the case of White House reporters). They also put on showy television events both carefully scripted and closely controlled, aimed at shaping the news the way they wanted it to appear, not necessar-ily the way it happened. In a response three years ago that probably didnt change much, 38 news orga-nizations beginning with the Society of Professional Journalists complained in a formal letter to President Obama that they were being mistreated „ and by extension, Americans who preferred to know what really happened rather than what the presi-dent wanted them to think happened, were being mistreated. Reporters were blackballed, given interviews after deadlines had passed, and cut off from access to government experts such as those in the Environmental Protection Agency who could talk about real problems with knowledge and data. Meanwhile, Mr. Obama quickly became a skilled navigator of social media. While Ronald Reagans public relations experts learned to stage seemingly natural television scenes of the president appear-ing with cheering people surrounded by American flags „ and no reporters about to ask uncomfortable questions „ Presi-dent Obamas spinners helped him bypass responsible journalists entirely to reach people with tweets, online videos and Facebook posts. That history, widely reported in such journals as The Atlantic, suggests Mr. Trumps response to ethical and objective scrutiny from veteran reporters is entirely predictable. If the strategy of politicians hasnt changed „including state and local politi-cians who sometimes ignore responsible media, as their response to this weeks lead story on Floridas 2017 legislative ses-sion suggests „ the way journalists cover elected or appointed leaders has changed with the values of society. If reporters knew about adulterous affairs conducted by such presidents as Franklin Roosevelt, Eisenhower or Ken-nedy, for example (and they did), they failed to report it. Powerful media champions such as the late Ben Bradlee, the celebrated, long-time editor of The Washington Post who directed reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward when they exposed the crimi-nal behavior of the Nixon White House, used to travel out of Washington into the Virginia hills on weekends to party with the Kennedys, Bobby and John F., among others. Such behavior now would be anathema for the responsible media, discrediting the individuals and their outlets immediately, as it should. Reporters may be friendly, but they are friends of no politicians „ unless theyre not doing the job correctly. That traditional and very necessary relationship between the powerful and the reportorial may be made more obvious by the current president, even if its nothing new. Q roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 A5 Paid for by EDF Action THANK YOU CONGRESSMAN MAST FOR STANDING UP FOR YOUR CONSTITUENTS. Congressman Mast put aside politics and voted to reduce wasted natural gas and cut methane pollution. Thank you for saving taxpayers money and protecting our health. DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director GET BACK IN THE GAME t #6-(*/()&3/*"5&%%*4$4 t %&(&/&3"5*7&%*4$%*4&"4& t '"$&54:/%30.& t '"*-&%#"$,463(&3:WITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY 4 DIP P M 1 I ZTJ DB M r $BNQ 1I Z T JD BM r 4 QP S U T 1 I ZTJ DB M $20 GIFT CERTIFICATE This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 03/30/2017. $150VALUE $0.1-*.&/5"3:$)*3013"$5*$&9".*/"5*0/$0/46-5"5*0/ JUPITER2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458 561.744.7373 PAPA CHIROPRACTIC & PHYSICAL THERAPY PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 561.630.9598 XXX1BQB$IJSPDPNt Over 25 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300'VMM$IJSPQSBDUJDBOE 1IZTJDBM5IFSBQZ'BDJMJUZ Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by 4 4 5 5 6 6 DR. ALESSANDRA COL"NChiropractor Radian donates $15,000 to PBG police foundation scholarship fundRadian Group Inc., a provider of private mortgage insurance, risk manage-ment products and real estate services to financial institutions has donated $15,000 to the Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation. The money will be dedicated to the foundations annual scholarship program and will allow for larger scholarships to recipients. Radians gift is in recognition of its chairman, Herb Wender, who has devot-ed more than 40 years of service to the company. Mr. & Mrs. Wender are residents of Palm Beach Gardens and he recommended the Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation as his charity of choice for the donation. In appreciation of Radians contribution, the foundations scholarship pro-gram will be named as the Herb and Penny Wender Scholarship Fund.Ž We look forward to building on the foundations success and helping to lessen the financial burden of higher education for more Palm Beach Gardens families,Ž said Radian CEO S.A. Ibrahim. This is the fifth consecutive year the police foundation has made schol-arships available to those pursuing a higher education degree. Q

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Complete Care in One State-of-the-Art Facility‡ &RQYHQLHQW3DOP%HDFK*DUGHQV/RFDWLRQ ‡ ,PSODQWDQG&RVPHWLF'HQWLVWU\ ‡ *HQHUDODQG5HVWRUDWLYH'HQWLVWU\ ‡ )XOO\(TXLSSHGZLWKWKH/DWHVW7HFKQRORJ\ ‡ '&76FDQVDQG'LJLWDO;UD\V ‡ ,9DQG2UDO6HGDWLRQ&HUWLILHG ‡ 7HHWK1H[W'D\ ‡ =LUFRQLD,PSODQW%ULGJH PGA dentistry.com 7KHSDWLHQWDQGDQ\RWKHUSHUVRQUHVSRQVLEOHIRUSD\PHQW KDVDULJKWWRUHIXVHWRSD\FDQFHOSD\PHQWRUEHUH LPEXUVHGIRUDQ\RWKHUVHUYLFHH[DPLQDWLRQRUWUHDWPHQW WKDWLVSHUIRUPHGDVDUHVXOWRIDQGZLWKLQKRXUV RIUHVSRQGLQJWRWKHDGYHUWLVHPHQWIRUWKHIUHHGLVFR XQWHGIHHRUUHGXFHGIHHVHUYLFHH[DPLQDWLRQRUWUHDW PHQW&RPSUHKHQVLYH([DPLQDWLRQ')XOO0RXWK'LJLWDO ;UD\' Tim After Tim Before “ I’ve always been unhappy with my smile, but I was too nervous to have the work done. With the IV sedation, I never felt a thing and the results are amazing.” – Tim PGA Advanced Dentistry provides patients with leading-edge procedures in cosmetic, implant, and restorative dentistry, so you can have the s mile you’ve always dreamed of. Dr. Jay Ajmo, D.D.S., DABOI LVRQHRI6RXWK)ORULGDVOHDGLQJ GHQWLVWVWUHDWLQJSDWLHQWVZLWKWKHKLJKHVWOHYHORIFDUHVLQF H 'U$MPRLVRQHRIRQO\GHQWLVWVZRUOGZLGHWRKROGD'LSOR PDWH &HUWLILFDWLRQZLWKWKH$PHULFDQ%RDUGRI2UDO,PSODQWRORJ\ Trust your smile to an expert. For your Complimentary Consultation or second opinion, call 561.627.8666. ,QFOXGHV1R&KDUJH)XOO0RXWK;UD\ )DLUZD\'ULYH6XLWH | 3DOP%HDFK*DUGHQV)/ Are You Suffering from Failing and Missing Teeth, or Wearing Dentures? I can eat anything and they feel so QDWXUDO,WVUHDOO\LPSURYHGP\DSSHDUDQFHDQGERRVWHGP\FRQGHQFH7KDQN\RX'U$MPR -Denise PET TALESAllergic to your pet? BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTONAndrews McMeel SyndicationMy husbands allergies to our dogs were mild until last year. Now he has developed asthma and has a twice-daily routine of medication and an inhaler. Allergies. Theyre the bane of people who love pets but develop a runny nose, itchy throat and watery eyes in their presence „ or worse, coughing, wheez-ing and difficulty breathing. Its one thing to know from childhood that youre allergic to dogs, cats or other animals, but when allergies develop later in life, after youve built a relationship with members of the ani-mal kingdom, its hard to give them up. The good news is that in many cases, you dont have to. Medication and envi-ronmental changes can help you and your pet live comfortably together. Here are some ways to keep allergy symp-toms at bay. Q Bathe your pet frequently. Its not fur or hair that causes allergies, but sali-va, urine and dander (microscopic dead skin cells). These substances contain proteins that cause allergic reactions, and frequent bathing helps to remove them from fur. Our dogs are bathed weekly, and it helps. Some cats take well to baths, believe it or not, but if yours doesnt, at least wipe him down with a damp cloth daily. Q Shower, wash your hair and change your clothes after roughhousing with your dog or cuddling your cat. Q Keep pets off the bed or out of the bedroom entirely. Reducing the pres-ence of allergens in your sleeping area will help to ensure a good nights rest. Instead, enjoy your pets presence while youre both awake. Q Clean often. Use HEPA air purifiers and filtering products. Use a double or microfilter bag in your vacuum. Have a family member wipe down the inside of your car after your pet has been in it, or take it to the car wash. Q Redecorate. If possible, replace carpeting with hard flooring such as wood or tile. Limit floor coverings to machine-washable throw rugs (and use hot water on them). If you must have carpet, choose one with a low pile, and steam-clean it often. Steam-clean furniture as well. Decl utter y our home. Q Avoid being with your pet in small, enclosed areas such as veterinary exam rooms. Veterinarian Kathryn Primm (who is herself allergic to pets) has some clients with allergies who wait in the lobby or outdoors while their pets are being examined. We have alerts on their charts; client allergic to dogs,Ž she says. Q Consider the type and size of pet. Its just common sense that a small dog produces less allergens than a big one, but did you know that female cats pro-duce less allergens than males? If you are adding a pet to your family, these are factors to consider. Be aware that theres no such thing as a hypoallergenic pet. Some animals produce less allergens than others, but it varies by individual. You cant assume that just because a pet has a certain type of coat or is a certain breed that you wont react to him. Q Consult a board-certified allergist. In the bad old days, allergists used to recommend getting rid of pets, but now most of them recognize the importance of the human-animal bond and will help you develop a treatment plan to man-age your symptoms. For many people, immunotherapy (allergy shots) is an effective long-term treatment. They helped Elizabeth Tobey, who as a young child was so allergic she couldnt have pets. I had a series of allergy shots as a kid, and over time have built up some tolerance through exposure,Ž she says. Q Pets of the Week>>Charlie is an 8-year-old, 43-pound beagle that is full of energy and love.>>Ashly is an 8-month-old female cat that has a sweet disposition.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at www.hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. >>Sophie is a brown/ white/black female tabby, about 3 years old. She loves to be petted and brushed and is very friendly with people and other cats.>>Mugen is a male cat, about 2 years old, with white and black patches on his back and over one eye. He is very friendly, sweet and playful. He loves to get pets and belly rubs. To adopt or foster a catAdopt A Cat is a free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment (call 848-4911, Option 3). For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or on Facebook, Adopt A Cat Foundation. For adoption information, call 848-4911, Option 3. Q When your pet licks you or licks himself, you are exposed to allergens.

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SHOP SAVINGS THROUGHOUT THE STORE & AT BEALLSFLORIDA.COM Go to BeallsFlorida.com for hours, locations and the latest deals! Bealls stores & BeallsFlorid a.com are operated by Beall’s Department Stores, Inc. and Beall’s Westgate Corporation.$10bealls buck$ F OR EV ERY $5 0 Y OU SPENDGETReceive $10 Bealls Bucks (February 22-March 2, 2017) when you make a qualifying merc handise purchase of $50 or more (before taxes) in Bealls Department Stores only. Maximum of $120 Bealls Bucks awarded per cu stomer. Bealls Bucks have no cash value and can be redeemed in-store (March 3 & 4, 2017) only at Bealls Department Stores. B ealls Bucks must be presented and surrendered at time of purchase; any remaining balance will be forfeited. B ealls Bucks cannot be earned on purchases of gift ca rds or applied to prior purchases, gift cards, taxes or existing Bealls Florida credi t balances. Bealls Bucks will be applied befor e any percent o total purchase discounts. Oer cannot be earned or combined with Employee discount. OP12 Exclusively at BeallsFlorida.com INTRODUCING A longtime resident of South Florida, Ellen Negley feels a deep connection to her tropical surroundings and draws inspiration from the rich and colorful palette of Florida. Ellen conveys her vision by exploring the impact of color and composition. Her motto is “I see color with my eyes, but paint with my heart and soul.” c o m p o s i t i o n H e r m o t t o i s I s e e color w i th m y e y es, but p a i nt w i t h h t d l ” Inspired by a love for Florida, Art & Sol ™ is a brand that celebrates the Sunshine State through beautiful works of art. Working with artists inspired by destinations, sea life, fun icons and color, this one-of-a-kind art has been applied to a mix of colorful clothing, accessories and home furnishings. my h ear t an d sou l ” y WEDNESDAY-TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22-28, 2017 Coupon valid for one time use on a qualifying merchandise purchase in Beall s Department Stores, by phone at 800-569-9038, on Click & Find kiosks and on BeallsFlorida.com only. Coupon must be presented & sur rendered at time of purchase. Limit one (1) coupon per purchase. Cannot be applied to prior purchases, gift card purchases, existing Bea lls Florida credit balances, taxes, or shipping charges and cannot be used with Employee Discount or any other oer. Dollar-o discounts will b e applied before any percent-o total purchase discounts. Coupon is applied to qualifying items on a prorated basis; returns will be credited a t the return price on your receipt. EXCLUSIONS: C obian, Columbia, Gumbies, Huk’, La Blanca, Levis, Melissa & Doug, Natural Life, Nig ht Ize, Nike, Pelagic, Sakroots, Sawyer, Simply Southern, Southern Fried Cotton’, Under Armour, select premium comfort shoe brands, Bealls Outstandi ng Buys, Bealls Extreme Values and other brands listed at BeallsFlorida.com/ exclusions. Not valid at Bealls Outlet. Bealls stores & BeallsFlorida.com are opera ted by Bealls Department Stores, Inc. and Bealls Westgate Corporation. CP01 Use promo code COLORFUL on BeallsFlorida.coma $ 50 or more purchase$ 10OFF

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Abacoa: .JMJUBSZ5SBJMr4VJUFr+VQJUFSt/FYUUP.D%POBMETJOUIF "CBDPB4IPQQJOH$FOUFS Jupiter: 8*OEJBOUPXO3PBEt/FYUUP)BSNPOZ"OJNBM)PTQJUBM Coming soon: 1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt1("#MWEt"DSPTTGSPN5IF(BSEFOT.BMM When you need us. Where you need us. Jupiter Medical Center Urgent Care 561-571-8108 .JOPSFNFSHFODJFTt*MMOFTTFTt'MVTIPUTt%JHJUBM9SBZT t&,(T -BCTFSWJDFTt1IZTJDBMUIFSBQZ Walk in or schedule an appointment online at jupitermedurgentcare.com. BEHIND THE WHEELThe best of the Florida car season coming soon on Amelia IslandIts car season in Florida. While the rest of the country is still watching out for blizzards and trying to stay indoors, snowbirds and Floridians unite over vintage vehicles. The Boca Raton Concours dElegance „ which several weeks ago offered one of the most relaxed and least crowded environments of all the premium events in the state „ showcased a nice mix of everything from muscle cars to one-of-a-kind European prototypes. Dont despair if you missed it „ the best cars showcased at Boca Raton are often on their test run for the Ame-lia Island Concours dElegance set for March 12. Amelia Island was recognized in 2016 with the International Historic Motoring Awards Best Motoring Event of the Year. Naples held its Cars on 5th event the same day as the Boca concours. While the Ferrari Club of Naples started this, the event is so popular that it had around 400 cars of all makes and mod-els. And because the REVS Institute at the Collier Collection is a world-class museum only a few miles from down-town, theres always something quite unique on display. This year it includes the 1952 Cunningham C-4R roadster „ one of two examples ever made. They were built to take on the best of Europe, and it also cel-ebrates South Florida since it was constructed in West Palm Beach. Even the auction companies acknowledge that this is the time to be in Florida. Mecum holds its annual Kissimmee sale over two weekends in January, Barrett-Jackson comes down to West Palm Beach every April and there are plenty of smaller auctions in between those times. But for those who want to see the rarest vehicles cross the block, nothing beats the Amelia Island auction. Its concours week brings in enough surrounding events and international enthusiasts that select companies like RM, Gooding and Bohnams are able to sell some of the worlds most elegant exotics. These multi-million dollar offerings are so rare that these events feel like their own concours. But our car culture is far more than just that. Cars & Coffee events are becoming the new popular destinations, and it seems every city is sprouting its own monthly show. For those who dont have a local one, they are also not hard to start. Enthusiasts can park their cher-ished wheels usually for free, and it never costs anything to be a spectator. When a Cars & Coffee event is properly put together, it can be one of the best feelings in the car community. This is simply because the whole idea behind it is about being inclusive, without dis-crimination. A 40-year-old AMC Gremlin rusting through its paint can park next to a brand new six-figure Lamborghini. These may seem like they have nothing in common, but both have proud owners who love their vehicles. And thats the only requirement for a good C&C. We all know that not everybody in the family loves vintage vehicles the way we do. So thats why there are also plenty of events to give other members of the family something to do. For example, the Village of North Palm Beach attracts 150 to 200 cars for its annual Hot Cars & Chili. As the name suggests, there is a chili cook-off for those who dont want to stare at vintage metal. Its car show season in Florida. Happy hunting. Q myles KORNBLATTmk@autominded.com

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My American vodka beats the giant imports every day. Try American! Its better.

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY You will have opportunity to work our trade shows. You also will be able to visit ships and attend vendor trainings. Leads provided. Full time in our Florida of“ce, base salary plus commission.Email resumes to david@cruisebrothers.com No phone calls please. Palm Beach Gardens EXPERIENCED TRAVEL AGENT WANTED AS A BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT LEADER FOR YOUR OWN TEAM OF HOME BASED AGENTS b b a a s s e e e s s s a a l l a a a r r y y y p p p l l u u u u s s c c o o m m m m i i s s s s s s s i i i i o o o n n n E E E E m m m m a a a i i i i l l l l r r e e s u m e e s s t t t t o general manager. A lot of coordination went into this.Ž Work continues on the fast-track project that lured the Astros from Osceola County Stadium in Kissimmee and the Nationals from Space Coast Stadium in Viera to the state-of-the-art facility. Predictions call for many of the 6,500 seats to be filled with out-of-towners traveling to see their teams. There are people who make this their annual thing,Ž Mr. Ballard said. For others, its coming down from the North and just getting out of the cold weather, and attending a Spring Train-ing game is part of that.Ž Games generating the most excitement include the inaugural one Feb. 28 between the two resident clubs, as well as March 6 and 7 when the Boston Red Sox are in town and March 19 and 20 with appearance by the New York Yan-kees. Tickets went on sale in November. We definitely saw that rush when they became available,Ž Mr. Ballard said. Were getting great support locally, regionally, from Houston and from snowbirds. Theres a lot of interest.Ž With two ballparks and four teams 15 minutes away from one another, the Grapefruit League on the Gold Coast has become a miniature version of the Cactus League in Arizona, which has 10 stadiums and 15 teams in and around the Phoenix area. Its a big deal, from the economicimpact standpoint and heads in beds and from the size and scope of it,Ž Mr. Ballard said. We hope its all great for the county to have good markets and good talent.Ž Players to watch for this season include Astros shortstop Carlos Cor-rea and second baseman Jose Altuve. The Nationals two right-handers, Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg, are attracting attention on the mound. Car-dinals center fielder Dexter Fowler, who signed a deal with St. Louis after win-ning the World Series as a Chicago Cub, is of interest, as is catcher Yadier Molina, a fan favorite. On the Marlins, all eyes once again will be on heavy-hitter Giancarlo Stanton. Theyre both going to be playoff contenders this year,Ž Roger Dean Sta-dium general manager Mike Bauer said of the Cardinals and the Marlins. The 7,000-seat stadium celebrates its 20th year of baseball with new improvements to mark the milestone. Fans will find shade structures above the stands in the upper rows, providing protection from the sun. It was the No. 1 fan request that weve had at the ballpark forever,Ž Mr. Bauer said. Metal detectors have been installed at the gate as a safety precaution. Theyve been doing it at the bigleague ballparks for the last few years, and we always knew this day was com-ing,Ž Mr. Bauer said. Also new this year are night games March 24 between the Marlins and the Nationals and March 31 between the Marlins and the Detroit Tigers. Those games are always nice because the folks who cant come during the middle of the day because they work can come during the evenings,Ž Mr. Bauer said. Most people are either playing hooky from work or are on vacation.Ž How is Roger Dean Stadium going to fare now that it has a competitor? Were going to find out, right?Ž Mr. Bauer laughed. We think that all boats are going to rise on a good tide, and were all going to have better attendance because of it.Ž Q BASEBALLFrom page 1 >> Ballpark of the Palm Beaches>> When: Feb. 25-March 29 >> Where: 5444 Haverhill Road, West Palm Beach >> Cost: $15-$65 (individual tickets) or $360$1,271 (season tickets) >> Info: (844) 676-2017 or www.ballparkpalmbeaches.com >> Roger Dean Stadium>> When: Feb. 25-April 1 >> Where: Abacoa, 4751 Main St., Jupiter >> Cost: $8-$35 (individual tickets) or $308$752 (season tickets) >> Info: 630-1828 or www.rogerdeanstadium. com inside COURTESY PHOTOBallpark of the Palm Beaches.Roger Dean Stadium aerial.Roger Dean Stadium BALLARD BAUER

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World Renowned Pediatric Orthopedic Care You deserve the best care. PaleyInstitute.org Largest Team of Pediatric Orthopedic Specialists in Palm Beach County Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon Â… Founder & Director David Feldman, MD Pediatric & Adult Orthopedic & Spine Surgeon Craig Robbins, MD Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon Bradley Lamm, DPM, FACFAS Pediatric & Adult Foot & Ankle Surgeon Jason Weisstein, MD, MPH, FACS Pediatric & Adult Joint Replacement & Tumor Surgeon

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A12 WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 FLORIDA WEEKLY Prices are pp, cruise only & based on double occ. Savings based on 12 night sailing and will vary. O er valid on new bookings only. Other restrictions may apply. VISIT US AT THEat Call us at 561-687-3301 Or visit www.atlastravelweb.com8409 N. Military Trail, Suite 106, Palm Beach Gardens Square Lake South Shopping Center 6 6 FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, EVERYONE IN ANY STATEROOM SAVES. Plus, book an ocean view or higher stateroom and evryone gets 2 free perks.* StateroomSavings p/p in each stateroom Free Perks First two guests Free Perks 3rd & 4th guests InsideOcean View or Veranda Concierge Class or AquaClass* Suite Class$50*$100*$150*$200*Upgrade to ocean view to get perks Choose 2*Perks: Classic Beverage Package 1SFQBJE5JQTt6OMJNJUFE8J'Jr and $150 p/p to spend on board.Get all 4 perks* Upgrade to ocean view to get perksNJOJOUFSOFUQBDLBHF$MBTTJD/POBMDPIPMJD beverage package 'SFF%SJOLT'SFF8J'J #PPLJOH8JOEPX'FCrUISV'FCrt4BJMJOH3BOHF .BSr"QSr 2 FREE PERKSplus savings for everyone in your stateroom*Suite guests get 4 free perksand even greater savingsfor everyone in their suite* Visit our Pavillion on the 17th Hole to Register to Win a 7 Day Cruise! Four Arts adds Bronfman, Benson to scheduleThe Society of the Four Arts has added two events to its schedule. Distilled: A Conversation with Charles BronfmanŽ will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 16, and Harry Benson: Shoot FirstŽ will be held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2. While much has been written about Charles Bronfmans father, Sam, a titan of industry, there is no public record of Charles thoughts on his own life, family, career and significant accomplishments in sports and philanthropy. In a new program at The Four Arts, Mr. Bronfman will sit down for a candid conversation with Edward E. Elson, former ambassador to Denmark, in what is sure to be an insightful and inspirational evening with two magnetic personalities. They will discuss the personal stories Mr. Bronfman shares in his new HarperCollins memoir Distilled: A Memoir of Family, Sea-gram, Baseball, and Philanthropy.Ž Mr. Bronfman grew up surrounded by luxury, in a 22-room mansion with a large staff. Via the familys control of the distilling giant Seagram, the Bronfmans dominated the liquor business. By the 1990s the fam-ilys wealth was in the billions, culminating in the $35 billion sale of Seagram to Frances Vivendi, which led to financial and fam-ily disaster. In Distilled,Ž Mr. Bronfman reflects on all of it: his relationship with his parents and his brother, Edgar; working in the family business; landing Canadas first big-league baseball franchise (the Montreal Expos); leading a philanthropic life; pro-moting Canadian identity through Heritage Minutes; and how the Bronfman family splintered over the sale of Seagram. The Four Arts will screen Harry Benson: Shoot FirstŽ at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2. The film charts the career of the renowned photographer who initially rose to fame alongside The Beatles, having been assigned to cover their inaugural trip to the United States in 1964. With unprecedented behind the scenesŽ access, Mr. Benson captured some of the most vibrant and intimate por-traits ever taken of the most popular band in history. In fact, Mr. Bensen was present at some of the most memorable moments of the last 50-plus years, and also expertly cap-tured them with his camera. His extensive portfolio includes iconic images of Winston Churchill, Bobby Fischer, Muhammad Ali, Greta Garbo, Michael Jackson, and the Rob-ert F. Kennedy assassination, and his work has appeared in publications including Life, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker. Now 86, Mr. Benson has no intention of stopping. Q Distilled: A Conversation with Charles Bronfman>> When: 6 p.m. Thursday, March 16 >> Where: The Dixon Education Building at The Society of the Four Arts >> Tickets: No charge, but reservations required >> Info: 805-8562 >> Details: Book signing to follow Harry Benson: Shoot First>> When: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 2 >> Where: The Walter S. Gubelmann Auditorium at The Society of the Four Arts >> Tickets: $5 >> Info : 655-7226 >> Details: Q&A with Harry Benson to follow FIRST U.S. LOCATION: DOWNTOWN AT THE GARDENS COMING SOON: NAPLES // KEY WEST // MIAMI DELRAY // BOCA RATON // FT. LAUDERALE @anticasartoriapb AnticaSartoria.com 561.799.1777 A CLOTHING BOUTIQUE

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 NEWS A13ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Michael Becker, Audrey Becker and Charles Bender LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Place of Hope 2017 Bash at PGA National 1. Front: Christine Charles, Kelly Kennerly and Erin Baugh. Back: Laura Geoghegan, Jane Lesche and Nan O’Leary 2. Candyce Lewis and Ross Lewis 3. Chris Havlicek, Kim Havlicek, Kristen Cashel, Ben Sheehan and Kayla Sheehan 4. Connie Frankino and Cliff Bueche 5. Zeda Kellner, Jennifer Nicholson and Vicky Case 6. Kelly DeSantis and Doug DeSantis 7. Jennifer Goray, Tim Goering, Jackie Breckenridge and Kevin Kelly 8. Kristen Kirby and Sandy Kirby 9. Shannon Anderson and Gina Fazio 10. Reed Stone, Sophia Stone, Susan Christiansen, Wesley Jaynes and Maxwell Christiansen 10 1 4 5 6 2 3 7 Michael Becker Audr ey Becker a n d C h a rl es B e n d er 10 7 9 8

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Like your children, we continue to GROW. Jupiter Medical Center, in partnership with Nicklaus Childrens Hospital, has expanded its pediatric services by offering: t&YQFSJFODFEQFEJBUSJDQIZTJDJBOTUSBJOFEJOFNFSHFODZNFEJDJOFOPXJOPVS&NFSHFODZ3PPN BSPVOEUIFDMPDL t$POUJOVPVTDBSEJBDBOEPYZHFOTBUVSBUJPONPOJUPSJOHJOPV SCFE%F(FPSHF1FEJBUSJD6OJUrXIJDI OPXBMMPXTVTUPDBSFGPSDIJMESFOOFFEJOHBIJHIFSMFWFMPG DBSF t5XPTUBUFPGUIFBSUQFEJBUSJDPQFSBUJOHSPPNTXJUIBWBSJFUZPGTVSHJDBMTFSWJDFTrGSPNPSUIPQFEJD BOEHFOFSBMTVSHFSZGPSDIJMESFOUPFBSrOPTFBOEUISPBUBOEHBTUSPJOUFTUJOBMQSPDFEVSFT t"IJHIMZTLJMMFETVSHJDBMUFBNrJODMVEJOHTJYQFEJBUSJDPSUI PQFEJDBOETQJOFTVSHFPOTrBTXFMMBTB CPBSEDFSUJGJFEQFEJBUSJDBOFTUIFTJPMPHJTU t/BUJPOBMMZBDDSFEJUFEQFEJBUSJDJNBHJOHTFSWJDFTrJODMVEJO H.3*BOETXBMMPXTUVEJFTrXJUIUIFMPXFTU EPTFTPGSBEJBUJPOBWBJMBCMF t$PNJOHTPPOo"EFEJDBUFErFJHIUCFEQFEJBUSJDXJOHJOP VS&NFSHFODZ3PPN Learn more at jupitermed.com/pediatrics or call 561-336-6359. 1210 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458 Caring for Kids24/7

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WHAT PARENTS ARE SAYING ABOUT JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER PEDIATRIC CARE. *B NTP H MB E *E F D JE F E U P C S JO H NZTP O U P + V Q JU F S U I JTU JNF S P NU I F TF D P O E X F X B ML F E JO U P U I F & 3 UPUIFUJN FXFMFGUrXFXFS FUS FBUFEBN B[JOHMZ 5IFEPDUPS TBOEOVS TFTJOUIFQFEJBUS JDVOJUBS F B MMP V U TU B O E JO H Â… Diana H. 0VSMJUUMFHJSMIBEUPHPUPUIF&3BOE UIFOFXDIJMESFOTXJOHJT(03(&064 5IFTUBGGXBTXPOEFSGVMBOEUIF BDDPNNPEBUJPOTXFSFBXFTPNF Â… Julie W. 8F X FSF J O BO E PV U PG UI F & 3 J O BC PV U BO I PV S r BO E J U X BT GBS GS PN B T M PX O J H I U BQ Q SFDJ BUFE UI F E PDUPS M J T UFO J O H UP NF BO E V O E FS T UBO E J O H UI F V S H FO DZ PG NZ E BV H I UFS T NFE J DBM Q S PC M FN S J H I U BX BZ & YDFM M FO U DBS F Â… Debbra W. .Z ZFBS PME E BV H I UFS I BE UPI BWFGPPUT V S H FS Z BO E G SPN U I F U J NF X F X BM LFE J O U I F E PPSr U I F T UBGGXBT BN B[JO H & WFS ZPO FXFJO UFS BDUFE XJUI X B T F Y USF NF MZ TX F F U B OE IF MQGVM 5IF Z NB EF NZ EB VHIUF S GF F M TP D P NGP SUB CMF *U NF B OU UIF XPS ME UPN F Â… Toni B. 4QF OU UIF QB T U UIS F F EB ZT JO UIF QF EJB US JD V O JUUF O E JO H UP N ZH SB O E T P O 5 I F SP P N XB T NP EF S Or CS JHIUr B OE B JS Z 5IF IJHI MF WF M P G T F D V SJUZB O E F YUSF N F MZD B MN B UN P T Q I F SF XF SF SF B T T V SJO H 5 I F F O UJSF T UB GGXB T Q SP GF T T JP O B M B OE S F T QP OT JWF Â… Walter F. 5 I B O L ZP V UP UI F F O UJ SF DSF X GP S C F J O H T P H F O UM F r DB SJ O H r B O E M P WJ O H UP P V S T XF F U C P Zr XI J M F GJ YJ O H I J N V Q XJ UI H SF B U Q SF DJ T J P O 8 F B SF H M B E XF N B E F UI F USJ Q E P XO UP +V Q J UF S .F E J DB M $F O UF S GSP N 4 UV B SU Â… Rachel P.

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A16 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYHouse and Senate for debate, and finally to Gov. Scotts desk for his approval or veto. We checked in with lawmakers who represent us in South Florida and asked them to respond briefly by phone or in writing to questions about where they stand on four major issues they are set to face this year: how to fix our water prob-lem, the rights of gun owners, immigrants in sanctuary cities,Ž medical marijuana, and whom they voted for in the presiden-tial election. We contacted each member of the delegation in Florida Weeklys distribution area a number of times by phone and email, eight senators and 17 house mem-bers whose districts cover all or part of Lee, Charlotte and Collier counties on the southwest coast and Palm Beach Coun-ty on the southeast coast. Many didnt respond to our questions. Here is a brief explanation of our questions followed by what those who did respond, three South Florida senators and five representatives, told us. ` QQQ WATER € Whats the best way to clean up our water? € Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? Because of how South Florida was developed over the last century, it faces one of the worlds largest and most com-plicated engineering problems: Ever-glades restoration, or restoring the his-toric flow of clean water north from near Orlando down into Lake Okeechobee and then south through the Everglades into Florida Bay. As it stands, heavy rains force officials to discharge massive amounts of polluted water from the lake to ensure its aging dike doesnt collapse. The water is pol-luted by phosphorus and nitrogen from urban development, agriculture, leaky septic systems and other sources north of the lake. And instead of following south as it did historically, through land now used mostly to farm sugar, it is discharged to the west and east down the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie riv-ers, causing algal blooms that harm the environment and the economy in coastal communities. In Gov. Scotts $83.5 billion proposed budget for 2017-18, he set aside $225 mil-lion to complete water storage reservoirs that are crucial for Everglades restora-tion, allowing water to be contained and cleaned. But a 2015 University of Florida Water Institute study found that an enor-mous amount of storage beyond what all current plans call for „ including the official Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) „ is needed to the north, south, east and west of Lake Okeechobee to fix our water problem. Environmental groups, Sen. Joe Negron, a District 25 Republican, and others support a $2.4 billion plan to buy about 60,000 acres of land south of Lake Okeechobee. The proposed bills on this project (Senate Bill 10 / House Bill 761) would be paid for in part with up to $1.2 billion in Florida Forever bonds, Amend-ment 1 money that voters approved for environmental needs, and federal dol-lars. That could provide a large chunk of the necessary storage to the south. Sugar companies and their supporters have resisted selling the land, saying it will cost jobs in already struggling com-munities and pointing out that it will not on its own end the polluted discharges. QQQ GUNS € Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? € Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? Sen. Greg Steube has proposed a series of bills that would allow gun owners under concealed carry rules to bring their weapons to college and university cam-puses, inside courthouses, airport pas-senger terminals, legislative and govern-ment meetings, and into career centers. He also proposed new rules (SB 610) that could make businesses that ban guns on their property liable if there is a shooting because people wouldnt be able to fire back. Other proposals (SB 254 / HB 167) seek to ban assault weapons. QQQ SANCTUARY CITIES € Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Immigration policy became a touchstone of the 2016 presidential campaigns. Sen. Aaron Bean, R-Fernandina Beach and Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha have pro-posed bills (SB 786 / HB 697) that would impose financial and other penalties on local governments and agencies that adopt policies that dont fully comply with federal immigration rules. QQQ MARIJUANA € How should Amendment 2 be implemented? In November, voters approved Amendment 2, making medical marijuana legal for a wider array of conditions in Flor-ida. Now lawmakers have the task of implementing it, including marijuana production and distribution in Florida. That could affect how businesses obtain licenses to enter a profitable new indus-try in the state, or not. The Florida Medi-cal Marijuana Act (SB 614) could further open up the marijuana industry here while a competing proposal (SB 406) seeks to limit it, at least at first. QQQ IN ADDITION € What is your single most important goal for the session? € Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? QQQSEN. BOBBY POWELL, D, DISTRICT 30What is the best way to clean up our water? The best way to clean up the water is by making sure that we invest resources into what we also have right now, the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, and also place funding in areas where we can properly clean and restore water so that when it does come out weve established and used the best pro-cesses to make sure that water is as clean as it can be.Ž Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? I think right now everythings on the table.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? Perhaps we allow local municipalities their own rules to say where guns can and cannot go. And I also believe we probably shouldnt have guns in govern-ment buildings or government functions in public places. At this point I dont know of any legislation that I would be 100 percent supportive of, but that could change.Ž Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? No.If theres a mass shooting and someone else grabs a gun and theyre shooting too, if the police come how do they iden-tify the original offending party?Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Noƒ I just believe in doing whats right and I dont think thats the best way to handle immigration issues. However, I think its more of a federal issue.Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? It depends. Ill see that early in the process and right now as a member of the Health Policy Committee, were for-mulating the process so I cant delve too deep into it because its progressive, its changing.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? As you know, national and state politics right now has become hectic and it is incumbent upon those of us in leader-ship to lead by example and to serve our constituents in a manner that provides security, safety, and confidence to them.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? I made sure that I supported the Democratic candidate in every race.Ž Do you have anything else to add?Its important to note that this month is Black History Month and its a date that many people take a chance to look at the state politics and know the historyƒ One of the most important bills weve been able to move so far is our direct file leg-islation, which is a bill that will curb the number of juveniles who are processed in the adult prison system. Florida has been a leader in the nation in terms of sending youth to adult prison and were working diligently in the state Senate and the state House to change that.Ž QQQSEN. GREG STEUBE, R, DISTRICT 23What is the best way to clean up our water? Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? Im open to looking at all the plans and seeing whats best for the state of Florida and moving forwardƒ Personally I dont know where Im at on that specific issue because Im not in a position that Im going to be voting or having an option to see that bill until it gets to the floor.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? I dont support gun control laws; I support law-abiding citizens (having) the ability to carry firearmsƒ more freedom to carry firearms where they feel appro-priate if they have a license.Ž Why do you believe guns should be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, court-houses, airport passenger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? Sen. Steube said people should be able to defend themselves instead of relying on law enforcement to come. Obviously, they cant be everywhere.Ž He pointed out guns are already allowed in theaters unless that private business restricts it, and cited a statistic that concealed-carry license holders are 10 times less likely to commit a crime with their weapon than a law enforce-ment officer. If were 10 times less likely to commit a crime than law enforcement, why is there any reason youre going to prohibit my ability to defend myself and my fam-ily?Ž Sen. Steube said. He attributed the figure to Dr. John R. Lott, an economist, expert on guns and crime, and Fox News columnist. Dr. Lott said that figure is true in Texas, but that the gap in Florida is somewhat smaller.Ž Both groups committed crimes with their guns at exceedingly low rates, according to Dr. Lotts research for his Crime Pre-vention Research Center. Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? I do support Sen. Beans bill, yes.ŽHow should Amendment 2 be implemented? I believe the licenses shouldnt be limited in number and the free market should dictate who could obtain and who should go in business that produces that product. We need to have a strong regu-latory scheme in place that law enforce-ment supports and thats why Ive co-sponsored Sen. (Jeff) Brandess bill (SB 614, Florida Medical Marijuana Act).Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? To make sure that our laws allow people more freedom whether thats in their business or their Second Amend-ment rights, more freedom and more liberty, not the government telling them what they can do with their guns and their business.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Donald Trump, our president. I was a big public supporter for Trump.Ž QQQSEN. KATHLEEN PASSIDOMO, R, DISTRICT 28What is the best way to clean up our water? The issue is very complicated and there is no magic bullet. Theres no sim-ple answer. First of all, I think that we need to go back and look at what the scientists say. And the most recent study that Ive read that I feel is the most com-pelling is the University of Florida 2015 Water Institute study. I take the same position that they are SESSIONFrom page 1 SEE SESSION, A18 X

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 NEWS A17 P O L K LE E C O LL I E R L A K E M I A M I DA D E P A L M B E A C H B R E V A R D O S C E O L A H E ND R Y P A S C O B R O W A R D G L AD E S O R ANG E C I T R U S M A R T I N H I G H L AND S M AN A TE E D E S O T O H A R D E E S T L U C I E C HA R L O TT E S A R A S O T A O K EE C HO B E E H E R NAND O I ND I AN R I V E R POLK LEE COLLIER LAKE MIAMI-DADE PALM BEACH BREVARD OSCEOLA HENDRY PASCO BROWARD GLADES ORANGE CITRUS MARTIN HIGHLANDS MANATEE DESOTO HARDEE ST. LUCIE CHARLOTTE SARASOTA OKEECHOBEE HERNANDO INDIAN RIVERTampa North Port Orlando Cape Coral St. Petersburg Port St. Lucie Lakeland Miami Palm Bay Bartow Davie Sanibel Fort Myers Wildwood Wellington Clearwater Jupiter Melbourne Miramar WestonWest Palm BeachLargo Bonita Springs Winter Haven Sarasota Hialeah Leesburg Plant City Boca Raton Palm Beach Gardens Cocoa Venice Sunrise Bay Lake Naples Fort Pierce Ocoee Oviedo Eustis Grant-Valkaria St. Cloud LaBelle Mascotte Kissimmee Lake Wales Clermont Coral Springs Bradenton Marco Island Punta Gorda Haines City Sebring Sebastian Stuart Auburndale Frostproof Homestead Apopka Delray Beach T arpon Springs Vero Beach ongboat Key Cutler Bay Zephyrhills Avon Park Pahokee Dade City Center Hill Arcadia Belle Glade Fort Meade Clewiston Temple Terrace Wauchula Astatula Fort Myers Beach Okeechobee Lake Placid New Port Richey Jupiter Island Everglades IslamoradaVillageofIslands Moore Haven Highland Park St. Lucie Village 120 55 42 56 34 73 54 33 51 32 50 39 97 53 38 74 35 57 52 104 58 41 37 71 84 28 60 70 44 36 83 65 69 45 64 40 72 68 43 29 93 66 63 48 59 100 49 112 114 47 67 99 61 98 62 113 96 92 46 94 101 30 117 103 115 118 95 109 102 119 116 108 111 107 110 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 105 106 85 86 87 90 91 88 89 82 39 12 15 10 14 17 21 22 32 9 20 16 19 11 13 24 18 37 34 36 38 35 40 33 POLK LEE COLLIER LAKE MIAMI-DADE PALM BEACH BREVARD OSCEOLA HENDRY PASCO BROWARD GLADES ORANGE CITRUS MARTIN HIGHLANDS MANATEE HILLSBOROUGH DESOTO HARDEE ST. LUCIE SUMTER CHARLOTTE SARASOTA OKEECHOBEE PINELLAS HERNANDO INDIAN RIVER SEMINOLE 23 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Florida State Senate Florida House of RepresentativesWho represents you in Tallahassee?Its OK if you havent been paying attention „ if perhaps a few elections have passed you by and maybe youve fallen behind. Names have changed, and youre just not sure anymore who exactly your representative and senator in the Florida Legislature are. It happens to the best of us. This could be the year, however, where you jump back on the wagon, hone in on an issue or two that you want to follow and pay attention to the votes that are being cast in your name. The state makes it easier than ever to track how your operatives in the capital voted and where bills end up. Use our color-coded maps, then follow through with online tools accessible at leg.state.fl.us. Q EAGLE WILLHITE BERMAN TRUJILLO BENACQUISTO SILVERS SLOSBERG PASSIDOMO ROMMEL RADER POWELL FITZENHAGEN GRIMSLEY NEGRON ABRUZZO GRANT DONALDS ROTH CLEMENS CALDWELL RODRIGUES MAGAR STEUBE HAGER District 26Denise Grimsley, Republican850-487-5026 or 863-465-2626 Grimsley.Denise.web@” senate.gov District 23 Greg Steube, Republican850-487-5023 or 941-342-9162 Steube.Greg.web@” senate.gov District 28Kathleen Passidomo, Republican850-487-5028 or 239-417-6205 Passidomo.Kathleen.web@” senate.gov District 27 Lizbeth Benacquisto, Republican850-487-5027 or 239-338-2570 Benacquisto.Lizbeth.web@” senate.gov District 25 Joe Negron, Republican, Senate President 850-487-5025 or 772-219-1665 Negron.Joe.web@” senate.gov District 29 Kevin J. Rader, Democrat 850 487 5029 or 561-443-8170 Rader.Kevin.web@” senate.gov District 30Bobby Powell, Democrat 850-487-5030 or 561-650-6880Powell.Bobby.web@” senate.gov District 31 Jeff Clemens, Democrat 850-487-5031 or 561-540-1140 Clemens.Jeff.web@” senate.gov District 75 Michael Grant, Republican850-717-5075 or 941-613-0914 Michael.Grant@my” oridahouse.gov District 76Ray Wesley Rodrigues Republican, Majority Leader 850-717-5076 or 239-433-6501 Ray.Rodrigues@my” oridahouse.gov District 77 Dane Eagle, Republican 850-717-5077 or 239-772-1291 Dane.Eagle@my” oridahouse.gov District 78Heather Fitzenhagen, Republican850-717-5078 or 239-533-2440 Heather.Fitzenhagen@my” oridahouse.gov District 79 Matt Caldwell, Republican850-717-5079 or 239-694-0161 Matt.Caldwell@my” oridahouse.gov District 80Byron Donalds, Republican 850-717-5080 or 239-417-6270 Byron.Donalds@my” oridahouse.gov District 105 Carlos Trujillo, Republican850-717-5105 or 305-470-5070 Carlos.Trujillo@my” oridahouse.gov District 106Bob Rommel, Republican 850-717-5106 or 239-417-6200 Bob.Rommel@my” oridahouse.gov District 81Joseph Abruzzo, Democrat850-717-5081 or 561-470-2086 Joseph.Abruzzo@my” oridahouse.gov District 82 MaryLynn MLŽ Magar, Republican 772-545-3481 or 850-717-5082 MaryLynn.Magar@my” oridahouse.gov District 85Rick Roth, Republican850-717-5085 or 561-625-5176 Rick.Roth@my” oridahouse.gov District 86 Matt Willhite, Democrat 850-717-5086 or 561-791-4071 Matt.Willhite@my” oridahouse.gov District 87David Silvers, Democrat 850-717-5087 or 561-357-4824 David.Silvers@my” oridahouse.gov JACQUET District 88Al Jacquet, Democrat 850-717-5088 or 561-650-6486 Al.Jacquet@my” oridahouse.gov District 90 Lori Berman, Democrat850-717-5090 or 561-374-7850 Lori.Berman@my” oridahouse.gov District 89Bill Hager, Republican850-717-5089 or 561-470-6607 Bill.Hager@my-” oridahouse.gov District 91Emily Slosberg, Democrat 850-717-5091 or 561-496-5940 Emily.Slosberg@my” oridahouse.gov

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A18 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYtaking and that is that, No. 1, we need to complete the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan that the legislature and the federal government agreed to many years ago. We also need to update the CERP plan based on new technology and new cir-cumstances, new funding sources and the like. You have to take a long view of the problem because it took 100 years to get us into this mess and its not going to take 10 or 15 years to get out of it, and I think part of the problem is theres a mispercep-tion in the public. (That is), if we do one thing, buy U.S. Sugar land, that will solve the problem, but it wont because there are a lot of components to it.Ž Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? I do, because the (2015 UF Water Instit ute) study indicated that additional property is needed for storage south of the lake. Also, north of the lake. And we need to finish the reservoirs east and west of the lake.Ž Sen. Passidomo pointed out a number of options for obtaining land south of the lake that the report suggests including purchasing them from the sugar industry and/or using land the state already owns. And last but not least, but most importantlyƒ my district includes Hendry County, all of the people who rely for their livelihood on farming (sugar cane). Those people in Hendry County need a seat at the table. Their voices need to be heard because while we talk about taking farmland and turning it into water stor-age we will be affecting the livelihood of several thousand people, and we cant operate in a vacuum, and we need to listen to them to hear their concerns in addition to those of the scientists, envi-ronmentalists, and elected officials.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? Should guns be allowed in the following places under con-cealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passenger terminals, legisla-tive meetings, on college and univer-sity campuses, in government meet-ings, and in career centers? So my biggest issue is not the issue of gun control. The issue is the state of Flor-ida has been not very proactive, in fact we are at the bottom of the 50 states insofar as how we handle mental health. To date we have put very little funding and very little emphasis on mental health until last year when the Legislature passed Senate Bill 12, which began the process of overhaul-ing our states mental health system. (It provides) a structure and framework for collaboration among agencies and organi-zations that provide mental health „ but it didnt put any money into itƒ And that would go a long way to addressing the problem of people with problems carrying weapons and wreaking havoc in our state.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? I have voted for a resolution to that effect, and a bill rather in the House last year. I support all the efforts that we have to require local governments and munici-palities to follow the law. And to me if you have a law, no one is above the law, no person, no city and no county.Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? I think of my role as legislator in this arena is to listen to all of the testimony and then help (make) the regulations that are in the best interest of our state. That being said, I am troubled by what I see, a perception „ because I get phone calls from people all the time who actually believe that amendment legalizes mari-juana in the state of Florida, and thats not what it did. I bring it to their attention and tell them, (it legalized marijuana for) medical purposes only. Without excep-tion they laugh and say, oh, I have a head-ache, Im stressed, Im entitled to use it. And frankly that troubles me, whatever intention the drafters of that amendment had. Those people think thats what that amendment did with a wink and a nod.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? My most important goal for me has always been to represent my constituents well.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? I dont want to answer thatƒ The reason I dont want to answer that is I dont want the discussion to be about who I supported in the election. What I want the discussion to be about is, we have a president; hes our president; people who voted for him and people who didnt vote for him should support him and help him to be successful.Ž QQQREP. MICHAEL GRANT, R, DISTRICT 75What is the best way to clean up our water? Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? I havent seen any surveys or documentation that shows that (buying land in the EAA) is actually going to clean up the Lake (Okeechobee). As you know were in a pretty tight budget year, and before I start voting to commit taxpayers dollars to a billion-dollar plus program I want to see some documentation thats actually going to work. (It) might not be the best way to do that; it may be better to make investments north of the Lake so that as it flows south into the Lake that it gets cleaned up. And Id like to find some way of funding that thats not going to have a negative impact on some of the other priorities of the state.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? Thats a pretty broadly worded question. So if by control you mean the effec-tive way to keep guns out of the hands of criminals, then certainly I would support something like that. But if you mean some kind of a restriction on the rights of citizens to carry guns based on their Sec-ond Amendment right, that one would be no.Ž Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? Concealed carry is already permitted in the Capitol. Its not permitted on the floor of the House, obviously because we have the Capitol Police there to maintain order, if you will. I dont see if somebody has a concealed carry per-mit, theyve already gone through back-ground (checks), theyve been licensed and trained to use those guns „ in gener-al, Id say thats fine, they can bring them where they need to bring them.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Yes. I would I think that were a nation of laws and a state of laws, and if theres a law on the books, whether you like it or not, youve got to enforce it. I dont think you can have selective enforcement because an individual or town or political jurisdiction thinks theyre more mighty than the federal government. I think that just leads to chaos, because if its immi-gration today, what will it be tomorrow?Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? Medical marijuana has just been on the scene for three or four years. I dont know if we have enough long-term data from other states to implement these laws and say, This is the best way to do it. I guess I would say, lets be a little restrictive going into it and if that proves not to be the best way forward we can always revise it and loosen those restric-tions.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? My overarching goal as a first term freshman is to learn as much as I can about the system so I can make the best decisions I can make for the citizens of the state of Florida.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Thats a little personal. But I will tell you its not Hillary Clinton.Ž QQQREP. DANE EAGLE, R, DISTRICT 77What is the best way to clean up our water? Everyone wants to see the water clean, especially myself, born and raised down there. The frustration is its not a problem that can be fixed overnightƒ Now were stuck with these Lake (Okeechobee) releases that are hurting our tourism and environment in Southwest Florida. Since the year 2000ƒ Congress enacted an agreement to work on the Comprehen-sive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). That in my opinion is the best path for-ward.Ž Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? Rep. Eagle pointed out the state doesnt have the money up front to pay for a proposed plan to buy land south of the Lake for more water storage, so it would need to issue bonds (backed by a voter approved trust fund to buy such land). Hes not convinced that is a good use of taxpayer money and suggested that land buy plan might also divert attention from other important CERP projects. But he added, Do I agree we need to have some storage south of the Lake? I think, yes, its a matter of where we do it and how.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? I dont. Im actually looking at ways to expand our Second Amendment rights. That in my view is the best way to enhance public safety.Ž Rep. Eagle pointed out that concealedcarry permit holders already go through a background check and training course, and that the vast majority are known to handle their guns responsibly. These are your defenders if you will. These are not the people that are com-mitting these crimes. You would be con-trolling what they would do, not what criminals would do. When you restrict the ability of these concealed permit holders to defend themselves youre just creating more ability for the criminals to wreak havoc.Ž Do you think guns should be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, court-houses, airport passenger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? Yes I do. And again they call these zones gun-free safety zones, which is an oxymoron. They are not free from gunsƒ They are free from guns carried by law-abiding citizens. They are quote unquote gun-free zones but obviously, guns were there. They were being carried by the criminals.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Yes. Im actually co-sponsoring a bill this year that opposes that (sanctuary cit-ies). Its a great concern. Its a concern for our citizens. My job is to ensure my con-stituents and constituents across Florida are protected, and we cannot guarantee that if we dont know who is coming here from other countries. Im sponsoring a bill that would impose sanctions on illegal immigrants who are here and also decide to commit violent crimes.Ž (For instance, a second-degree misdemeanor conviction would be increased to a first-degree misde-meanor if that person is an undocument-ed immigrant). How should Amendment 2 be implemented? Thats everything from growing to dispensing to storage to transportation to tax and regulation. So were at the very early stages of thatƒ We did actu-ally legalize Char lottes We b in 2014 (a single strain of marijuana used to alle-viate seizures) and with that did start to create some of these regulations. So with that we have a limited number of growers throughout the state and ways to dispense that as well. So well be looking at proposing new amendments within those guidelines. We might expand that because obviously weve expanded the number of people (with access to medi-cal marijuana). So wed have to talk about expanding the growers and dispensaries. But I do think it should be done in a lim-ited matter. It is still illegal federally, and it hasnt been thoroughly studied by the FDA. So instead of opening up the door like states like Colorado have done, we need to take baby steps.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? I think the budget. Its our only constitutional duty as the legislature in the state of Florida. And thats one of the main rea-sons I ran for office, to be a responsible steward of the taxpayers dollars.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Donald Trump.Ž QQQREP. MATT CALDWELL, R, DISTRICT 79What is the best way to clean up our water? Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? The easiest way to explain that is to say that every member of the Legislature has already voted to increase storage south of the Lake and they did that by supporting Legacy Florida, the bill we passed last year that funds CERP (the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan), which has southern storage as a piece of itƒ Theres not a conflict really in the Legislature between people who want SESSIONFrom page 14

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to restore the Everglades and folks that dont. Everybody unanimously wants to see the Everglades restored. The pro-posal from the Senate (to buy land south of the Lake, SB 10) is about changing the priority of the projects in the plan.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? The Second Amendment is very clear. Its a personal right to self-defense and the clear o utcome of most gun control legislation is to disarm law-abiding citizens, because criminals are going to ignore the law whatever the crime may be. And thats really the paradigm that I view any proposals regarding the Second Amendment rights issues.Ž Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? I think the thing to keep in mind is concealed-carry permits are citizens in Florida over the age of 21 who have sub-mitted to fingerprint and a background check and have been licensed to carry concealed. The other thing to note based on research conducted in the last several years, law enforcement officers are actu-ally more likely to commit a (gun-relat-ed) crime than concealed-carry permit holdersƒ Theyre both statistically very, very tiny, but that was an amazing statis-tic that sworn officers are actually more likely to commit a crime than concealed-carry holders. (It) really demonstrates how effective that program (concealed-carry permitting) is.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? The immigration question is more complicated than just a simple statement can cover, but the interest of the Legisla-ture is to see uniform application of the law in Florida, and regardless of what issue it is, local governments should be focused on that mission. Thats the way were going to be most successful in hav-ing laws that are enforceable and having a state that is open and welcoming to busi-ness and the people.Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? The legislature has already authorized both Charlo ttes Web and full THC for terminally ill patients and weve built a system for delivering that. This amend-ment significantly expands the disease states and thereby the number of patients eligible for medical marijuana so were going to have to evaluate whether the current system weve built can handle that volume.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? Ive been working on Everglades issues long before I ever ran for office. This will be 13 years now that Ive been a passionate advocate for the Everglades and Im going to continue to focus on that goal and endeavor to work with the sen-ate to make it a reality.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Yeahƒ Evan, come on. Lets just skip that question for today.Ž QQQREP. CARLOS TRUJILLO, R, DISTRICT 105What is the best way to clean up our water? Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? I think the best way to clean up our water is to follow the plan that was set out by the University of Florida study that came out in 2015. We spent as a state hundreds of thousands of dollars to fig-ure out what to do. Theyre the experts. Theyve proposed solutions. We need to put pressure on the federal government to finish building the levees and the dikes around the lakesƒ So I think those are two real solutions that could immediately deliver results.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? In the past Ive voted for campus carry, Ive voted for open carry, and I maintain my position on those two issuesƒ Restricting the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens is some-thing that I do not support.Ž Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theaters, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? Career centers, I dont see any objection to that. In some of the other hostile forums I think there have to be some safety net mechanisms put in place. (Such as a contentious custody hearing, divorce situation), or some of these more real-life issues that people find themselves in, those are ones Id be much more hesitant toward encouraging people to carry fire-arms. But I think on all of these you have to review a case by case basis, its hard to just lump them into one category.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Yesƒ Nobody has a right to circumvent the United States Constitution. The power of immigration is clearly vested in the federal government. Municipalities cant decide which laws to enforce and which to reject. Imagine applying (that) to criminal casesƒ Once we lose the rule of law we lose complete control as a society.Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? I think within the strict letter of the law. Now, were trying to make it some-thing that its not. I think its clearly for medical purposes.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? To pass a balanced budget that reflects the values of Floridians. Its just such a complicated process to figure out where we can be more efficient. My goal is (when the session ends) on May 5, to have a very fair budget that really reflects the value of Floridians.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Donald Trump.Ž QQQREB. BOB ROMMEL, R, DISTRICT 106 What is the best way to clean up our water? Do you support a plan to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area for water storage? Billions of state and federal dollars have already been spent on the Com-prehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, since it was first put forward in the late 1990s. Notably, CERP includes a compre-hensive plan to address all of the Lake O issues both north and south of the lake. I would like to see more discussion and public debate on the plans which are already on the table before we spend billions more on something new which doesnt solve our problem.Ž Do you support new gun control rules and how would they improve public safety? I am a staunch supporter of the Second Amendment. I am also a proud gun owner and have a concealed permit. I do not support new gun control laws, which, in practice, will actually make law abiding citizens less safe by interfering with our constitutional right to defend ourselves from criminal conduct. Instead, we need to be focused on enforcing the existing laws we have on the books.Ž Should guns be allowed in the following places under concealed carry: theatres, courthouses, airport passen-ger terminals, legislative meetings, on college and university campuses, in government meetings, and in career centers? So long as an individual possesses a lawful concealed permit, I support con-cealed carry in all of these locations. Its been well-documented that gun-free zones are a lightning rod for criminal conduct because criminals know that the people in gun-free zones are not armed and cannot defend themselves.Ž Do you support legislation that would crack down on so-called sanc-tuary citiesŽ in Florida, including by imposing financial penalties? Absolutely. In fact, Ive already signed on to co-sponsor House Bill 697 with Rep. Larry Metz, a bill which aims to end sanctuary cities in Florida once and for all.Ž How should Amendment 2 be implemented? As a general matter, I think we need to regulate marijuana like any other phar-macy drug. With that in mind, some of the provisions I would like to see enacted include, but are not limited to: No grow houses near schools or highuse residential or commercial areas. Should be distributed behind the counter in a pharmacy like other prescription drugs, or with a pharmacist present. Prescription from a medical doctor required. Clear labeling system so consumers know what theyre getting. Should be sold in tamper-proof containers/pill bottles, like any other medi-cation. Edibles must be clearly labeled, with warnings in big bold letters, individually wrapped, and sold behind a counter.Ž What is your single most important goal for the session? After just a few short weeks on the job, Im proud to have introduced landmark legislation in the Florida House that will affect millions of Floridians, on topics as diverse as tort reform, Sunshine Law reform, and legislation to tackle the drug overdose and opioid epidemic, which has so many Floridians and our families in its terrible grasp. In the coming weeks, I expect to introduce several other critical pieces of legislation and am looking for-ward to working with my colleagues in the Florida House and Florida Senate to ensure passage of these important bills.Ž Which candidate did you vote for in the presidential election? Donald Trump.Ž Q FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 NEWS A19 Learn more at jupitermed.com/mindfulness 1210 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458Jupiter Medical Center, in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness, is pleased to offer Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). MBSR is proven to be an effective treatment for reducing stress and anxiety related to work, family and finances. Learn to activate and enhance your natural capacity to care for yourself and find greater balance in your life.Participants meet once a week from March 14-May 18, 2017. Program session includes eight classes and one, all-day retreat.Reservations are required. Space is limited to 30 participants per session. For more information on class fee, or to register, please visit jupitermed.com/mindfulness or call 561-660-1828. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Spring 2017 Stress Less,Live More

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The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York ranked 8th nationally for cardiology and heart surgery is here for you with a local practice in Palm Beach. Mount Sinai Heart New York Palm Beach oers comprehensive diagnostic and interventional cardiac care. Our expert physicians and support staff guide you through therapies and preventive lif estyle changes to enhance and maintain your cardiac health. Patients receive care locally in Palm Beach and have access to the leading-edge research and innovative treatment options of the entire Mount Sinai Health System. MOUNT SINAI DOCTORS HERE FOR YOU IN PALM BEACH For an appointment call 561-627-2210 or go to mountsinaidoctors.org/msdpb4

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 NEWS A21 Were you 6DWLV HG with the way your vehicle PDGHLWWR)ORULGD" Get 100% satisfaction on the way back… JXDUDQWHHG 'RQWEHGLVDSSRLQWHGDJDLQ )RU\RXUWULSEDFNQRUWK go The American Way! ‡*8$5$17((' SULFHVZKDWZHVD\LV ZKDW\RXSD\ ‡*8$5$17((' SLFNXSRI\RXUYHKLFOHRQ \RXUVFKHGXOH The snowbird s fav orite since 1980 1-800-800-2580 ‡ ZZZVKLSFDUFRP ) 5 ( ( & $ 5 WAS H 2 1$ // 12 5 7+% 2 8 1' 75 ,3 6 A+ WITH SO MANY CHOICES AVAILABLE, PARents are becoming increasingly savvy when it comes to selecting the best pediatric care for their children. As Palm Beach County continues to grow and develop, pediatric care also must expand and improve. One of the many reasons that Im proud to serve as the chief of pediatrics at Jupiter Medical Center is that the hospital is dedicated to understanding the needs of parents and children and has a true commit-ment to staying ahead of the curve in pediatric care. At Jupiter Medical Cen-ter, we truly value your trust in us and are passionate about restoring your „ and your childrens „ health. To demonstrate what I mean by this, Id like to share a few of the excit-ing developments affecting pediatrics, including emergency care, orthopedic and spine care, and imaging, that have occurred at Jupiter Medical Center over the past few months. The first of these exciting developments is the new around-the-clock availability of pediatric emergency physicians in our emergency room. This has been in place since the first of the year and has already drastically improved access to emergency pediat-ric care for residents in northern Palm Beach County and southern Martin County. Why? Because ambulances carrying children in need of urgent medical atten-tion can now bring their patients to Jupiter Medical Centers ER at any time with the confidence that a pediatric emergency physician will be present to treat them. This means that children in need of late-night emergency care in our region will no longer need to travel to a more distant hospital to receive care. Twenty-four hour pediatric emergency room staffing is only the first step that Jupi-ter Medical Center has taken to improve pediatric emer-gency care for local residents. Thanks in part to money raised by Honda Classic Cares, we also are in the process of work-ing with our part-ners at Nicklaus Childrens Hos-pital to add an additional eight-bed pediatric emergency room wing designed to provide a child-friendly environment comfortable for both children and their families. Additionally, pediatric orthopedic and spine care has also seen a sig-nificant expansion. Over the past year, three new pediatric orthopedic and spine surgeons, Harry Shufflebarger, MD, Ahamed Mohaideen, MD, and Lyall Ashberg, MD, have joined the Jupiter Medical Center staff, bringing the total number of pediatric orthope-dic and spine specialists to six. Along with medical directors Bret Baynham, MD, and Matthew Harris, MD, having this team of skilled surgeons allows Jupiter Medical Center to provide a wide range of pediatric orthopedic and spine procedures. In addition to the new pediatric orthopedic and spine surgeons, the hospitals two state-of-the-art pediatric operating rooms are being used by pediatric general surgeons, otolaryngologists (ENTs) and gastroenterologists along with the pediatric anesthesia team led by board-certified Pediatric Anesthesiologist Caroline Jensen, DO.. Also notable is the addition of continuous cardiac and oxygen saturation monitoring in the 12-room De George Pediatric Unit for children requiring a higher level of care, as well as the availability of nationally accred-ited imaging services for children, including pediatric MRI and swallow studies and the lowest doses of radia-tion available. Top rated in quality, safety, medical excellence and patient satisfaction, Jupiter Medical Center is reimagining the way we care for our communitys health and wellness and this includes our pediatric offerings. The new ER pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, as well as advanced imaging, equipment and operating rooms will help us con-tinue to provide unparalleled pediatric care to our youngest community mem-bers 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for years to come. Jupiter Medical Centers Pediatric Services include: Q Pediatric Primary Care Q Pediatric Inpatient Care Q Pediatric Surgery Services Q Child Life Specialist Q Pediatric Therapy Q Pediatric Imaging Q Diabetes Education Q Pediatric Emergency Services Q „ To learn more about Jupiter Medical Centers pediatric services, visit jupitermed.com/pediatrics or call 263KIDS (5437). HEALTHY LIVING samuel BARSKYChief of Pediatrics, Jupiter Medical Center Jupiter Medical Center offers the pediatric care consumers demand

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A22 NEWS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYCAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHYtext LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Kravis Center’s Palm Beach Wine Auction at Mar-a-Lago Club 1. Christine Rivard and Martin Rivard 2. Bill James,Jill Wachter, and James Meany 3. David Page and Pierre Lurton 4. Bill Lane and Marilyn Lane 5. Gina Sabean and Jeff Sabean 6. Colleen Bracci and Michael Bracci 7. Carolyn Sloane and Richard Sloane 8. Ashley Hoffman and Harriet Hoffman 9. Jerry Golden and Barbara Golden 10. Ed Dudnyk and Jen Dudnyk 11. Craig Menin and Shelley Menin 12. Julie Slack and Nathan Slack 13. Jeffery Bland and Jane Mitchell 14. JoAnna Myers and Stephen Myers 1 8 9 6 7 2 3 12 14 13 11 te te te te te te xt xt xt xt x x Madeline Fink and Roderic Fink 4 5 10

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BUSINESS PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 | A23 WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM BY JAN NORRISFlorida Weekly CorrespondentHow the owners of the new Lake Park business Entertainer Yacht Char-ters met is a sweet second-time-around story. Both Linda Schnabl and Richard Sokol had lost their spouses in their home state of Maryland around the same time. Ms. Schnabl had been friends with Mr. Sokols wife, and after her death, the pair became close. The friendship grew to a business partnership in yacht charters, and soon, romance followed. Life goes on,Ž Mr. Sokol said. He had retired from the Sylvania lighting corporation as a national salesman and with his wife was running a char-ter yacht business around Annapolis, cruising the Severn River. After 16 years of running charters in Maryland, Mr. Sokol and Ms. Schnabl decided to move to Florida, where there are 12 months of sunshine and possible business, rather than a short season of only five or six good monthsŽ up North, he said. Were Couple brings charter yachts to Lake Park Marinabusinessfor CruisingCOURTESY PHOTOThe Entertainer offers excursions from the Lake Park Marina. The 68-foot vessel can accommodate up to 40 people. Linda Schnabl and Richard Sokol.SEE CRUISING, 24 X

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A24 BUSINESS WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Name: Robin Y. Bayless Title: Vice president of marketing for TooJay’s Location: West Palm BeachBY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@” oridaweekly.comRobin Y. Bayless, who grew up in Knoxville, Tenn., says she formulated a plan in eighth grade and has been work-ing it ever since. I learned at a young age what I did well,Ž said Ms. Bayless, vice president of marketing for TooJays. I was a great communicator and a great writer.Ž Those talents led her to a career in marketing, a decision she has never regretted. I knew in eighth grade I wanted to move to Atlanta, so I packed up and did that after college,Ž Ms. Bayless said. I couldnt have picked a better first job. I was an administrative assistant at the Cobb County Chamber of Com-merce, where I learned so much and got to interact with movers and shakers I wouldnt otherwise have met.Ž Before being recruited for the leadership team of TooJays in 2015, Ms. Bay-less was senior director of marketing at McAlisters Deli and Director of Mar-keting at HoneyBaked Ham. Founded in 1981, TooJays has grown to 28 restaurants in Florida, with loca-tions in Palm Beach and Broward coun-ties, the Treasure Coast, the west coast of Florida, the Orlando area, The Vil-lages, the Space Coast and Polk County. Im getting to lead and grow this beloved 36-year-old brand in new and fresh ways,Ž she said. Im proud and excited about what weve done with our brand and with technology and our website design. We have a new Deli-cious Awards Program, where you can earn points, and were ready to launch an online order program and will partner with Delivery Dudes. Im so blessed to do what I love to do. I followed my heart to do what I love and Im good at.Ž Recently, Ms. Bayless joined the board of birectors of the Palm Beach Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, Floridas top nonprofit hos-pitality industry trade association. While she has a hard time deciding what to choose when she dines at TooJays (known for its generous servings of home-made, New York deli favorites), she admits to being partial to pastrami on rye bread. I was a fan before I started working here, but this is the best! And we have some new pastrami eggrolls now that I also enjoy,Ž she said. She enjoyed her 27 years in Atlanta „ and misses friends and co-workers, but she doesnt miss the traffic. Im loving it down here,Ž she said. Robin Y. BaylessAge: 50 Where I grew up: Knoxville, Tenn. Where I live now: West Palm Beach Education: Bachelors degree in communications from the University of Tennessee What brought me to Florida: I was recruited for this role at TooJays Deli. I really liked what this brand had to offer and I have always loved the beach. My first job and what it taught me: I was an administrative assistant at the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce. Take advantage of every opportunity you are given and look for ways to cre-ate some along the way. A career highlight: I am really proud of the work we have completed over the last year and the progress we continue to make at TooJays. We have increased traffic for this beloved 35-year-old brand through fresh product news and innova-tion. We are dedicated to finding ways to connect with new generations of deli fans. Hobbies: I love being on or near the water. Best advice for someone looking to make it in my field: First and most importantly, find what you truly love to do. Then, find people working in those roles and ask many questions. About mentors: I have had so many amazing mentors throughout my career which were people who saw things in me that I couldnt quite see yet. They pushed me outside of my comfort zone at times and gave me a lot of responsi-bility and freedom to learn. I always figured things out on my own. Q MOVING ON UP“I’m so blessed to do what I love to do. I followed my heart to do what I love and I’m good at.” — Robin Y. Bayless, Vice president of marketing for TooJay’s COURTESY PHOTORobin Y. Bayless follows a career path she began formulating in eighth grade. done with the snow.Ž They had both visited Florida numerous times, and liked the southeast coast. We didnt like the hustle and bustle of Fort Lauderdale and Miami,Ž he said. The Palm Beach County area seemed to suit, and after looking at several marinas and possible dock sites, they chose the Lake Park Marina for their two yachts. Both are Hatteras motor yachts. The Entertainer is a 68-foot, 70-ton triple-decker. It can accommodate up to 40 people. Misty, the 55-foot yacht, handles smaller groups up to 12 people. The town has just been great to work with,Ž Ms. Schnabl said, explaining that many marinas dont allow charters to operate from their docks, which nar-rowed their choices. It was centrally located „ between Palm Beach and Jupiter „ thats another reason we liked it,Ž Mr. Sokol said. Plen-ty of parking for cruisers cars helped seal the deal. The couple also contacted Discover Palm Beach „ the countys marketing agency. They were extremely helpful,Ž he said. They told us there was a gap for our type of business, too.Ž Information about the areas demographics, and possible landing sites helped guide their decision as well. In Miami and Broward, there are several yacht entertainment rentals, but not so in Palm Beach County, and especially in the north end. The plan is to attract corporate group outings, family reunions and small wed-ding groups for rehearsal dinners, cer-emonies, or receptions. Theyve done a lot of wedding anniversaries, and second vows and marriages aboard, Ms. Schnabl said. She is a certified wedding planner and can take care of the event, handling all the elements „ catering, DJs, limos, flow-ers and cakes. Mr. Sokol could perform the ceremony as the captain. He has a masters license „ required for a com-mercial vessel. Weve made arrangements with the town and marina for use of the park, and we can pull the boat around to the dock so the wedding party can get dressed aboard. Then the bride can walk down an aisle, have the ceremony in the gaze-bo, then bring the guests back aboard for the reception,Ž she said. The Entertainer is versatile, with three decks. On the flying bridge up top, tables can be set up for a meal with a view during the typical 3-hour cruise. Down in the salon, a buffet is the usual setup, with the outside bar on the deck for drinks and hors doeuvres. On the aft-deck, a few tables can accommo-date a group of eight or so. The teak-lined galley is modern, with new appliances, and a table with bench seating for the crew converts to a prep area for caterers. While its typical for caterers to bring most of the foods already prepared, cooking the full meal aboard is possible, she said. There are three staterooms and three bathrooms to accommodate overnight cruisers, though Ms. Schnabl said most guests prefer to stay at a hotel, using the charter yacht as a shuttle. Already the yachts are booked from Northerners. We just got a call for next week; they had to reschedule because of a heavy snowstorm in Newark,Ž Mr. Sokol said. They are guests at Mar-a-Lago, the couple said, and rebooking them wasnt a hard decision. Three-hour cruises are the norm, though plans are being formed to drop cruisers at Harbourside Place in Jupiter after breakfast aboard, let the boaters shop and have lunch, then return them, with a wine-and-cheese party, or des-sert on the cruise back. It would be an 8-hour trip. Breakfast, tea or brunch cruises for groups or intimate dinners with a few friends with all the bells and whistles can be designed, Ms. Schnabl said. Pos-sibilities are limited by your imagina-tion.Ž And the draw of the boat. We cant get in where there is only 3 feet; we draw, lets say with tides, 7 feet, to be safeŽ Mr. Sokol said. Bridges are another factor. There are five between here and Jupiter, and we go slowly, only 6 to 7 knots.Ž Laws governing liquor aboard also are strict. You cant bring your own alcohol aboard or take it ashore. So whatever is involved stays on the boat and must be consumed aboard,Ž he said. Its state law. Cruises to Bimini or the Bahamas are another plan down the line, but for the most part, he said local waters suit most just fine. Its a protected waterway, so it can be rough outside, but smooth in here,Ž he said. This is a 70-ton ship, so you dont feel a thing. Its smooth and quiet.Ž Both yachts are U.S. Coast Guard certified, and have every safety feature up to the latest code, he said. The inspec-tions are rigorous. It cost me $700 for the permit, and every year, $1,000 to be inspected. I joke that I pay the bills and the Coast Guard tells me how I can use the boat.Ž Theyre still running numbers, to plan one-stop packages for cruisers, but ball-park figures are $125 per person for a 3-hour trip. The Discover (Palm Beach) people told us were in the ballpark, since a round of golf costs $175 „ and thats with no food,Ž he said. But all trips are custom, and priced out including food, time aboard and number of guests, Ms. Schnabl said. The first thing we ask is, Do you have a budget? Well work with you to design the right cruise.Ž Q CRUISINGFrom page 23 The rear deck seating on The Entertainer, which boasts three decks.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 BUSINESS A25ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Economic Forum luncheon, Kravis Center 1. Bruce Lewis and Corey Neering 2. Greta Schulz and Bob Goldfarb 3. J.C. Perrin, Dale Kahle and Fred Roxas 4. Harvey Oyer III, Carey O’Donnell and Paco Gil 5. Gopal Rajegowda, Kelly Fanelli, Michelle Depotter and Dennis Grady 6. John Blades and Karen Marcus 7. Scott Holtz and Julia Murphy 8. Tom Hall and Gopal Rajegowda 9. Steve Essa, Donna Lewis and John Ahrenholz 1 6 4 2 7 3 8 9 5 Abby Brennan, Chip Block and Marcie Tinsley

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WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 A26 | WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COMREAL ESTATE PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY Beach Front boasts luxury, views COURTESY PHOTOS SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYBeach Front, Singer Island, an exclusive, gated community in an island resort setting encompasses a total of just 59 residences. A distinctive, private entrance road along a mangrove-lined lake leads to the porte-cochere, where the concierge greets you. There, you will find a two-story lobby accessible from ground level via elevator or stairs, state-of-the-art fitness center, social activity room with bar and media room. Step outside to the heated beachside swimming pool, spa, barbecue and sit-ting area in a garden setting on the sec-ond-level lanai terrace. An oceanfront boardwalk leads through natural dunes to the beach, where the concierge will set up your beach chairs. Residence 1603 is entered through a private elevator access and foyer. Floor-to-ceiling, energy-saving, tinted win-dows and sliding doors lead the way to large terraces with breathtaking panoramas, accessible from the living room, master bedroom and two bedrooms. The kitchen features granite countertops/backsplashes and designer appli-ances, plus stainless steel double sinks. There are three bedrooms and three bathrooms in the 2,740-square-foot space. The master suite has two large walk-in closets and beautifully appoint-ed baths with marble countertops, spa tub and separate shower with frameless glass door. With ocean to Intracoastal views and a tastefully decorated interior, this resi-dence is move-in ready for those look-ing to get out of the cold northeast winters! Come to 1603 Beach Front and enjoy the beach lifestyle. This beautiful condominium is offered at $1,250,000 by the Walker Real Estate Group … Where Lifestyle Mat-tersŽ, For a private tour, Call Jeannie Walker (561) 889-6734 or visit our web-site www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com. Contact: info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com for any questions. Q

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Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents aliated with Sothebys International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sothebys International Realty, Inc. PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 ROYAL POINCIANA WAY, PALM BEACH, FL 33480 | 561.659.3555 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/PALMBEACH ART OF LIVING MODERN RANCH ESTATE | $5,850,000 | Web: 0077163 | modernranchestate.com Fabulous single story home built on the best 20 acre parcel in Ranch Colony. Indoor and outdoor pools and a spacious open floor plan set this unique modern home apart. Enjoy a peaceful setting, security, and sprawling grounds in the one of a kind gated community of Ranch Colony. This property is also available fully furnished.Todd Peter | 561.281.0031 DIRECT INTRACOASTAL ESTATE: 5 en-suite BR | 9,255 SF | $5.95M 3-STORY TOWNHOME: 3 BR | 2.2 BA | 2,672 SF | $459,9003-Bay Garage, Deep-water Dockage, Separate Guest Quarters, Tropical 109 x 256 Lot, Membership to La Coquille Club Award-Winning Builder. Den, 2-Car Garage, Great Room, Casual Dining. HYPOLUXO ISLAND ALTON KOHLER HOMES PBG DIANA REED | 561.714.5860Call today for more details on these luxury homes. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or regarding financing is from sources deemed reliable, but Corcoran makes no warranty or repre sentation as to the accuracy thereof. All property information is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, ch anged property conditions, and withdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. All dimen sions provided are approximate. NEW WATERFRONT CONSTRUCTION: 4 BR+LOFT | 4 BA | $1.95MInfinity Pool/Spa (iPhone Capable), Elevator, Impact Windows, Gourmet Ki tchen, Large Balcony. TEACH RD PBG CALL JIM TO LIST OR BUY YOUR HOME TODAY!561.246.9910 jimh oridarealtor@gmail.com 570 OCEAN DRIVE e Oceanfront PenthouseUnder contract in 3 daysand sold. $2,400,000 Jim Haneschlager REALTOR ABACOA … 1932 Jeaga Drive. SOLD $615,000JIM BROUGHT THE BUYER! BREAKERS WEST 1102 Sand Dri Way 2480 Living SQ.FT, w/screened-in heated Pool. O ered at $319,000 No club membership required.Call Jim for a private showing.561.246.9910 PROVIDING CLIENTS WITH OUTSTANDING SERVICEŽ

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ART OF LIVING Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents aliated with Sothebys International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sothebys International Realty, Inc. PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 ROYAL POINCIANA WAY, PALM BEACH, FL 33480 | 561.659.3555 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/PALMBEACH MODERN RANCH ESTATE | $5,850,000 | Web: 0077163 | modernranchestate.com Fabulous single story home built on the best 20 acre parcel in Ranch Colony. Indoor and outdoor pools and a spacious open floor plan set this unique modern home apart. Enjoy a peaceful setting, security, and sprawling grounds in the one of a kind gated community of Ranch Colony. This property is also available fully furnished.Todd Peter | 561.281.0031

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7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Featured House Of The Week Beach Front at Singer Island Residence 1603 Enter through a private elevator access and foyer into this 3BR/3BA, 2740SF residence. Floor-to-ceiling, energy-saving, tinted windows and sliding doors lead the way to large terraces with breathtaking panoramas, accessible from the living room, master bedroom and t wo bedrooms. The kitchen features granite countertops/backsplashes and designer appliances; stainless steel double sinks. The master suite has two expansive walk-in closets and beautifully appointed baths with marble countertops, spa tub and separate shower with frameless glass door. Ocean to Intracoastal views with tastefully decorated interior, this residence is move-in ready for those looking to get out of the cold north east winters! Come to 1603 Beach Front and enjoy the beach lifestyle!! This residence is being offered at $1,250,000 Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561-889-6734 Martinique ET1603 2BR/3.5BA $698,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,600,000 Oasis 15B 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $2,599,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,699,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1105B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,599,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 204B 2BR+DEN/2,5BA $1,399,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,299,000 Beach Front 1503 3BR/3BA $1,225,000 UNDER CONTRACT Ritz Carlton Residence 1506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,085,000 Beach Front 503 3BR/3BA $1,100,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 306B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $995,000 Martinique WT202 3BR/4.5BA $549,900 Martinique WT303 3BR/4.5BA $579,000 Martinique WT103 3BR/4.5BA $575,000 Seascape 8 2BR/2BA $450,000 7MKRYTXSHE]JSVXLI7MRKIV-WPERH1EVOIX9THEXI[[[;EPOIV6IEP)WXEXI+VSYTGSQ PRICE ADJUSTMENT NEW LISTING UNDER CONTRACT Ritz Tower Suite 7A 4BR+DEN/5.5BA $7,999,000

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BIJOUX! event set to sparkle at Norton Museum BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@” oridaweekly.comBIJOUX! is one of the Norton Museum of Arts most exciting events, espe-cially if you love jewelry. And who doesnt? Nearly 40 artists from a dozen countries bring their finest pieces to this annual show and sale founded and curated by Donna Schneier and set for March 2-5. This is a unique opportunity to buy the jewelry from the person who made or designed it. The artists work in a wide variety of media „ gold, silver, porcelain, ter-racotta, acrylic, glass, iron, steel and diamonds, and many of the pieces are contemporary in design, but youll also find conservative and avant-garde piec-es. Some artists are new to the show this year, while others are perennials, returning every year. Israeli artist Nirit Dekel has exhibited all six years. Ms. Dekel, a glass artist, says she enjoys BIJOUX! because she gets to meet other artists. Making art is often a solitary process so meeting other people who understand the artists life is a great side benefit of the show. Dekel also said the show has inspired her to create new pieces. Proceeds from the four-day-long event benefit the Museums education and public programs. Tours will be led by independent curator Davira S. Tara-gin at 3 p.m. daily. An artist presentation will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 2. The Norton Museum of Art is at 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. BIJOUX takes place during museum hours, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, and will also be open during Art After Dark from 5 to 9 p.m. March 2. Admission is free. For more information, call 832-5186 or visit www.norton.org.‘Harmony’ reminderDont make plans for Sunday afternoon. The Palm Beach Symphony and Ballet Palm Beach will present a free, outdoor symbiotic performance from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, at the Meyer Amphithe-atre, 104 Datura St., West Palm Beach. HAPPENINGSSEE HAPPENINGS, B4 XARTS & ENTERTAINMENT PALM BEACH FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 | SECTION B WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT TOP: Jessi Queen at work at last year’s Lake WorthStreet Painting Festival.ABOVE: “Superheroes,” by Nate Baranowski and friends. Chalkoneup IF YOURE HEADED TO DOWNTOWN LAKE Worth this weekend (Feb. 24-25) look down. More than 600 artists, including professionals and local students, the stars of the 23rd Annual Lake Worth Street Painting Festival, will transform the otherwise ordinary macadam of Lake and Lucerne avenues between Dixie and Federal highways into a tem-porary outdoor gallery. Created with chalk, the paintings remain until traffic returns to the roads and tires erase the masterpieces or rain washes them away. The Lake Worth festival claims bragging rights as the worlds largest, cover-ing more area than any other festival SEE CHALK, B5 XBY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@” oridaweekly.com Artists ready to hit the pavement for Lake Worth Street Painting Festival PHOTOS BY CRAIG HOUDESHELLOur critic’s Oscar prediction? ‘La La Land’ will soar BY DAN HUDAKFlorida Weekly Movie Criticpunchdrunkmovies.comTheres no #Oscarssowhite controversy at this years Acad-emy Awards, but there is plenty to talk about. Will La La LandŽ walk away with a record number of Oscars? (The record for most wins is 11, shared by three movies: Lord of the Rings: Return of the KingŽ (2003), TitanicŽ (1997), and Ben-HurŽ (1959).) Will Denzel Washington win his third, and Meryl Streep her fourth? Will Matt Damons feud with host Jimmy Kimmel rear its ugly (and hilarious) head? We focus here on only the big sixŽ categories, but those in Oscar pools can expect ZootopiaŽ to win Animated Feature, O.J. Made In AmericaŽ to take Documentary Feature, The Jungle BookŽ to win Visu-al Effects and The SalesmanŽ to take Foreign Language, in part because its Iranian director (Asghar Farhadi) will not be there, and its become a trend to speak out against the government at this years award shows. For Best Picture, the result is a runaway. La La LandŽ tied a record held by All About EveŽ (1950) and Titan-icŽ (1997) with 14 nominations, and SEE OSCAR, B4 X COURTESY PHOTOArtist Nirit Dekel at work.

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY March 21 April 9, 2017 CONSIDERED ONE OF THE BEST AMERICAN MUSICALS OF ALL TIME! scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com Beautifully made glass always wins my heart COLLECTORS CORNERFound: St. Matthews House Thrift Store, 3954 Broadway, Fort Myers; (239) 935-8444. Paid: $15 apiece. The skinny: The Fenton Art Glass Co. made millions of pieces of handwrought glass between 1905 and 2011. Its Crest patterns, with a ribbon of glass around the ruffled edge, were among its most popular lines. These Ruby Snowcrest candy dishes were made in 1979. Theyre marked Fenton „ the company did not start marking its wares until the 1970s. But the quality and detail are consistent with what Fenton produced 80 years before. Q THE FIND: My passion for antiques was fueled early on by my mother, who loved to collect, and both of my grandmothers, who loved to tell stories and preserve objects that were part of family history. My mother loved the 19th century glassware her grandmother had collected and preserved „ pieces by Webb, J.H. Hobbs, Brockunier and Co., Mount Washington and others. Those were part of history. But sometimes, history continued to be made. That was the case with Fenton Glass of Williamstown, W.Va., which turned out beautiful quality interpretations of 19th-century classics. I remember my mother and grandmother bundling my sister, brother and me into the car to make a trek from Fort Myers to Naples back in the early 1970s. At the time, there was no Interstate 75 and no four-lane U.S. 41 „ only old 41, which snaked through Bonita Springs, past the dog track and on toward Naples „ there was a gorgeous antiques shop called Bibelots and Beads that we liked to visit in Old Naples. Invariably, we would stop at the Barn of Glassware on 41 near Bonita Springs. The building was painted red and shaped like a barn and was loaded with the latest from Fenton and L.G. Wright. There, my mom could satisfy her craving for the A pair of Fenton Ruby Snowcrest heart-shaped bowls. SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYFenton Ruby Snowcrest hearts date from 1979. The larger bowl measures about 8 inches.colored glass for the base of an object and milk glass for the ribbon in what the company called its Snowcrests.Ž Some of those color combinations are quite rare „ Im still looking for a piece of Jade Snowcrest to round out my collection „ its jade glass with a milk glass ribbon. The last piece I saw was 15 years ago at the Ortiz Flea Market in Fort Myers. I know Ill find a piece of the jade.But until then, these Ruby Snowcrest bowls have won my heart. Q colorful handmade glass. I g rew up around Fenton glass. My step-grandmother had a beautiful set of Fentons Silver Crest pattern, essentially white milk glass that had a crystal ribbon ruffle around the edge. Those Fenton Crests were inspired by 19th-century glass, which in turn had drawn inspiration from the centuries-old tradition of Venetian glass. Fenton first made its Crests in 1941, and they were an immediate hit. Other color variations followed, and I now have a large collection of Fenton Crests in a rainbow of colors „ aqua, emerald, flame, rose, ebony. During the 1950s, Fenton reversed its glass, using

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B3 Lake Wo hs Newest Thri Boutique Bring this ad to receive 20 % o your next purchaseExcludes items already on sale Donate your gently worn furniture Also visit our Jupiter location at 250 W Indiantown Rd Ste 108 +VQJUFS'-t St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store South 3757 S. Military Trail -BLF8PSUI'-Just North of Lake Worth Rd 561-469-7922XXXTWQEQBMNCFBDIPSH .PO'SJQNt4BUQNSt. Vincent de Paul Salvage Store of West Palm Beach, Inc. Programs Bene ting the Needy in our Community Fed. ID #59-1058446 St Vincent de Paul Thrift Store Lake Worth FOUR ARTS. FOR EVERYONE. www.fourarts.org 2 FOUR ARTS PLAZA | PALM BEACH, FL | 561-655-7226 A SHARED LEGACY: FOLK ART IN AMERICAŽ February 11 through March 26, 2017 The exhibition is drawn from the Barbara L. Gordon Collection and is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia. Image: Attributed to Edward Hicks, American (1780-1849), The Peaceable Kingdom with the Leopard of Serenity, 1835-40, Oil on Canvas, 26 x 29 in., Courtesy of the Barbara L. Gordon Collection. Generously underwritten by CASUAL DINING ON WORTH AVENUE PALM BEACHOPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30 AM 10:00 PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30 AM TO 3:00 PM Happy Hour Everyday 4 to 6:30 Late Happy Hour Mon-Thurs 9 to 11:30 VISIT US AT TABOORESTAURANT.COM 561.835.3500 Party like a pirate: Sea Fest returns to Jupiter Lighthouse BY JANIS FONTAINE pbnews@” oridaweekly.comKids, get your pirate costumes from the closet! The second annual Sea Fest at The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter, takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 26. Kids will want to join the crewŽ at the Pirate Particulars area, where they can learn vital pirate skills like knot-tying and saying Argh!Ž Pirates can meet the Lighthouse Keeper at the keepers tent and join in a special hunt. Entertainment on deck includes a performance by the Jupiter Community High School drama students, Professor Clark the Science Shark and live music by the Porch Jammers. Get a selfie with the Pirates of the Treasure Coast, Miss Mermaid, and the roaming Sea Creatures from ArtStage. The popular costume contests return, so dress your adorable mermaid or boisterous pirate for the challenge. The museum will be open and the Tindall Pioneer Home-stead will have special guests. In the Seminole chickee hut, Native American activities are planned. Vendors and organizations hosting activities and information booths include Ah-tah-thi-ki Museum, Austin-Blu Foundation, Best Version Media, Macaroni Kid/Just Dance Inc, Blue-line Surf and Paddle, Dive In Snorkel-ing Adventure Camp, Blue Water Surf Camp, Bureau of Land Management, Lighthouse ArtCenter, The River Cen-ter, Palm Beach County Ocean Rescue, El Sol Community Center, Macaroni Kid, Kidding Around Yoga, WildBlue-Sea, Jupiter Outdoor Center, PBC Envi-ronmental Resources, Town of Jupiter Recreation, USCG Auxiliary, We Rock The Spectrum, Brooke Linns Bees, Pro-fessor Clark the Science Shark, Papa Chiropractic, Florida Fishing Academy, and 97.9 WRMF. Food truck favorites will offer BBQ chicken, seafood and sushi, burgers and dogs, plus soft-serve ice cream cones, shakes, malts, floats and sundaes. Parking is available at Lighthouse Park; Paradise Park in Tequesta at U.S. Highway 1 and Tequesta Drive (north); and Jettys Restaurant on A1A in Jupiter (south). Mollys Trolleys will run shuttle service from the north and south park-ing areas from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, free for age 18 and younger. Tickets are avail-able online and at the door. Info: 747-8380; www.jupiterlighthouse.org. Q JEN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY The pirate-themed Sea Fest also will bring vendors and organizations to the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse on Feb. 26.

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYmost pundits have it winning anywhere between 8-10 total Oscars, including the big one. La La LandŽ won the BAFTA (British Oscar), Producers Guild and Directors Guild awards, all of which are notable precursors to Oscar glory. Its also a technically impressive, beau-tiful film thats about struggling art-istry, which the Academy has repeat-edly embraced (hence the recent Best Picture wins for The ArtistŽ and Bird-manŽ). Anything other than a La LaŽ victory will be a tremendous upset; if it happens (and it wont), itll be either Hidden Figures,Ž Manchester By The SeaŽ or Moonlight.Ž Nominees Hacksaw Ridge,Ž Hell or High Water,Ž Fences,Ž LionŽ and ArrivalŽ are all good movies, but not strong contenders. Will win: La La Land.Ž Should win: La La Land,Ž as it was my number one movie of 2016. Usually Best Director aligns with Best Picture, and thatll be the case again this year, as La La LandŽ director Damien Chazelle is the heavy favorite to pick up the prize. He won the DGA and BAFTA awards, and his film is beloved by the Academy. Barry Jenkins (MoonlightŽ) is only the fourth black director ever nominated in this category, Mel Gibson (Hacksaw RidgeŽ) received his first nomination of any kind since winning for BraveheartŽ (1996), and Denis Ville-neuve (ArrivalŽ) and Kenneth Lonergan (Manchester By The SeaŽ) are each enjoying their first director nomina-tions. Will win: Damien Chazelle. Should win: Chazelle. Predicting Best Actor is tough. Although Andrew Garfield (Hack-saw RidgeŽ), Viggo Mortensen (Cap-tain FantasticŽ) and Ryan Gosling (La La LandŽ) were great, this is a two-horse race between Denzel Washington (FencesŽ) and Casey Affleck (Man-chester By The SeaŽ). Washington was superb because he went big as a man struggling to come to terms with his life, and the Academy loves showy per-formances. In contrast, Affleck went smallŽ by internalizing much of his characters grief and numbness. Its a hard thing to do, and perhaps even harder to recog-nize and fully appreciate. Washington won the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) award, which is the best indication of what industry people think of the talent nominated. Affleck won BAFTA, arguably in part because Washington wasnt nominated there. Will win: Denzel Washington. Should win: Casey Affleck. Best Supporting Actor is similarly murky. Mahershala Ali won SAG for the critically beloved Moonlight,Ž while Dev Patel took the BAFTA for Lion.Ž But this category could yield the surprise of the evening: Former winner Jeff Bridges is nominated for Hell or High Water,Ž Lucas Hedges was great as a troubled teen in Manchester By The Sea,Ž and Michael Shannon was superb in Nocturnal Animals.Ž When predict-ing this, how risky do you want to be? Safe money is on Ali. Will win: Mehershala Ali. Should win: Lucas Hedges. As for Supporting Actress, all eyes are on Viola Davis (FencesŽ) in one of the best categories of the night. Naomie Harris was phenomenal in Moonlight.Ž Michelle Williams broke our hearts in Manchester By The Sea.Ž Nicole Kid-man was an ideal adoptive mother in Lion.Ž And Octavia Spencer was strong and resilient in Hidden Figures.Ž In the end, though, itll be three-time nominee Davis, whose performance as a woman who puts all her faith into a flawed man is one of the most stirring pieces of acting youll ever see. Will win: Viola Davis. Should win: Viola Davis. Best Actress isnt as strong a category, but is just as easy to predict. This is Emma Stones to lose, and what a treat that will be for La La LandŽ fans. Shes won the major awards leading up to Oscar night, and her competition has mounted little opposition to her momentum. However, Isabelle Huppert gave the best performance amongst the nom-inees as a woman whos raped and plots an unusual course of revenge in Elle.Ž Meryl Streep earned her 20th career nomination for her performance as a lovably terrible opera singer in Florence Foster Jenkins,Ž Ruth Negga excelled as one half of an interracial couple during the civil rights movement in Loving,Ž and Natalie Portman shined bright as former first lady Jackie Ken-nedy in Jackie.Ž Will win : Emma Stone. Should win: Isabelle Huppert. Jimmy Kimmel hosts the 89th Academy Awards Sunday night, Feb. 26, on ABC. Q „ See more of Dan Hudeks film coverage at www.punchdrunkmovies.com. OSCARSFrom page 1 “La La Land” “Fences” Harmony: An Exhibition of the ArtsŽ brings two hours of classical music and dazzling dance to the stage. To kick things off, the Jupiter Middle School Chamber Choir will offer an a cap-pella performance of the national anthem. The Palm Beach Symphony will perform Khachaturians Sabre Dance,Ž Shostakov-ichs Festive OvertureŽ and the first move-ment of Dvoraks Cello ConcertoŽ under the baton of Ramon Tebar, artistic and music director of the Palm Beach Symphony. Cello virtuoso Amit Peled is guest soloist. Ballet Palm Beach will perform The Dying Swan.Ž The symphony will perform music by Saint-Sans and a new ballet cho-reographed to Khachaturians Masquer-ade Waltz created for the event features colorful costumes. The event is free, but this year, theres a VIP experience: $100 includes valet park-ing, a champagne welcome, tent seating, lunch buffet, drinks and desserts. The VIP area opens at 1 p.m. The event takes place near the Waterfront and just steps from the Clematis Street district, so theres plenty to do before and after the show. The show is presented by the West Palm Beach Arts & Entertainment District, which has more than 20 members groups and venues who bring a variety of enter-tainment to West Palm Beach. The show is sponsored in part by the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority. IF YOU GO: Harmony „ 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, Meyer Amphitheatre, 104 Datura St., West Palm Beach. Info, tickets: DowntownWPBArts.com; 833-8873. Just announced The Kravis Center just announced a performance by Trevor Noah, the host of The Daily ShowŽ on Comedy Central, at 8 p.m. June 3. The bi-racial South African comedian, known for his comedy spe-cials, was introduced to American audi-ences in 2013 with his Showtime com-edy special, Trevor Noah: African Amer-ican.Ž Now the guy called the most suc-cessful comedian in South Africa is one of the most popular in the U.S. His ninth comedy special, Afraid of the Dark,Ž is scheduled to air on Netflix in February. In November 2016, he published his first book, Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood,Ž a New York Times bestseller. His reading of the audiobook was Audibles highest rated audiobook of 2016 and is still one of its top titles. Learn more about the funny man in David Paul Meyers award-winning documentary film, You Laugh But Its True,Ž which tells Noahs story about building a career in post-apartheid South Africa. The Kravis Center is at 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets start at $39.50. Info: 832-7469; www.kravis.org. ArtSmart continues The Kravis Centers ArtSmart Lecture Series continues March 7 with A Salute to Great Women Vocalists and Their Per-formances,Ž with speaker Dr. Roni Stein-Loreti. Dr. Stein-Loreti is a musicologist with a doctorate in music history, and is a gradu-ate of the Juilliard School in New York and North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Shell lead a walk through musical history stopping to talk about important artists along the way, like Anita ODay, Maha-lia Jackson, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, Rosemary Clooney, Barbra Streisand and Whitney Houston. The event takes place in the Cohen Pavilion at the Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets are $25. Call 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org. Q HAPPENINGSFrom page 1NOAH

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 B5 of its kind, says artist coordinator and festival founder Maryanne Webber. Over the years, weve grown bigger than we ever envisioned,Ž Mrs. Webber said. We all realized what a winner it was from day one.Ž Street painting can be traced back to 16th-century Italy when itinerant artists would use their chalks to use pavement as a makeshift canvas,Ž Mrs. Webber says. Like then, crowds still gather to watch as fine works of art emerge. The paintings last only until the next rain, but the lively spirit and accessibility of the exhibition captivates new audiences each year and inspires lasting memo-ries.Ž Festival-goers arent the only folks who draw enjoyment from the event. The audience at this festival is very receptive to this art form,Ž said painter Joel Yau of San Rafael, Calif. I enjoy the festivals vibe and artists camaraderie and for a visiting street painter like me, the exceptionally warm hospitality and enthusiastic festival attendees make for a rewarding street painting experience in Lake Worth.Ž Mr. Yau has participated in many street painting festivals across the Unit-ed States, Canada, Europe and Asia, but says the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival always has attracted a large audience that are respectful, apprecia-tive and always eager to chat with the artists about this ephemeral art form we enjoy creating.Ž This will be artist Jennifer Chaparros 14th year at Lake Worths two-day event. The Lake Worth Festival is what introduced me to the medium,Ž Ms. Chaparro, a resident of Hobe Sound, said. My older daughter, Mercedes, and I started doing it for fun, as a way to spend some quality time. She was at Bak Middle School, then Dreyfoos. Then I did it with my younger daughter, Carmen. But they are both off on their own now, so Im working on my own or with other assistants. One is an archi-tect and the other is a painter.Ž This year, Ms. Chaparros artwork will be a large 3D piece „ Rainbow Portal „ that is inspired by the graffiti artist 1010s portal murals. People will be able to stand in the art and take photos,Ž she says. Ms. Chaparro likes the fact that the Lake Worth show is not a competition. The featured artists always push themselves to do amazing work, but it allows us to be more creative,Ž she says. The camaraderie among the artists is also one of the reasons I enjoy it so much. We call it our chalk tribe.Ž Besides the paintings, the festival features live music on the festivals main stage at the Cultural Plaza at Lake Ave-nue and M Street; street painting for kids and Festival Food Courts. Down-town restaurants are ready to accom-modate a variety of culinary tastes and thirsts, too. Artists will begin working Feb. 24, which is a good time for people to visit local restaurants, shops and galleries as organizers prepare for the weekend celebration, Mrs. Webber says. People are asked to leave their pets at home. The festival is not an appropriate venue to bring your canine friend or pet due to the huge crowds and often scorching heat,Ž Mrs. Webber said. The crush on the crowded pavement can be unsafe for them.Ž Proceeds from the event, produced by Street Painting Festival Inc., a nonprofit organization in partnership with the city of Lake Worth, go toward scholarships for graduating Palm Beach County high school students, as well as community projects associated with the arts. Q CHALKFrom page 1 >> What: Lake Worth Street Painting Festival >> When: Starts at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 25-26 >> Where: Lake and Lucerne Avenues between Dixie and Federal Highways >> Cost: Free >> Parking: Available throughout the downtown area. Valet parking is also available. Festival shuttles make routine loops from the Lake Worth Tri-Rail station and the north side of Palm Beach State College, Lake Worth Campus to Lake Worth City Hall in downtown from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. >> Info: www.streetpaintingfestivalinc.org PHOTOS BY CRAIG HOUDESHELLHector Diaz and Ken Mullen, “The Chalk Guys,” with their image of The Beatles. Street Painting Festival artists and attendees fill Lucerne Avenue near K Street in down-town Lake Worth.

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@floridaweekly.com. THURSDAY2/23 Art After Dark — 5-9 p.m. Thursdays at the Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Masterpiece and Movies, with spotlight talks on abstractism, music by Kar-rie Griffiths and Jose Lezcano, plus a screening of Black SwanŽ in association with the kickoff of the Hamptons Inter-national Film Festivals 25th anniversary. Free. 832-5196; www.Norton.org.Clematis by Night — 6-9 p.m. Thursdays. www.clematisbynight.net.Q The Flyers — Feb. 23. This versatile trio can play it all, from blues to rock.Anthony Hernandez Solo Art Exhibition — 7-10 p.m. Feb. 23. See his new collection at Banko Cantina, 114 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Free. Dress code enforced: Casual Chic. www.anthonyhernandezart.com.“Disgraced” — Through Feb. 26, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. Stay after the show for a talk-back in the audience seating chamber with community leaders about the themes of the play. 575-2223; www.jupitertheatre.org.“WaistWatchers The Musical!” — Through March 26, PGA Center for the Arts, 4076 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Book and lyrics by Alan Jacob-son, music by Vince Di Mura. Show times: 2 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Sat-urday and Sunday and 7 p.m. Thurs-day, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 6 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $40-$65. www.waistwatchersthemusical.com; (855) 448-7469. FRIDAY2/24 Eating Disorders: The Latest Information You Need To Know — 2 p.m. Feb. 24, North Palm Beach Library, 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. Free. 841-3383. The St. Lucie County Fair — Feb. 24-March 5, 15601 W. Midway Road at Okeechobee Road, Fort Pierce. 772-464-2910; www.stluciecountyfair.orgNorthwood Village Art Night Out — 6-9 p.m. Feb. 24, Northwood Road, West Palm Beach. Local arts and crafts vendors from all over South Florida, plus shopping at the unique boutiques and galleries open late, and live street-side artists and musicians. www.north-woodvillage.com.Nights at the Museum — 6-9 p.m. Feb. 24, South Florida Science Cen-ter and Aquarium; 4801 Dreher Trail N.; West Palm Beach. Theme: Kabam! Its Chemistry.Ž Live chemical reac-tion demos, interactive science crafts, activities, entertainment, exhibits, and planetarium shows, plus the exhibi-tion Our Body: The Universe Within.Ž $13.95 for adults, $11.95 for seniors, $9.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Mem-bers: $6 adults, free for children. Info: SFScienceCenter.org or 832-1988. SATURDAY2/25 The Hello Kitty Cafe Truck — 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 25, Downtown at the Gardens, 11701 Lake Victoria Gar-dens Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. Parked between Carls Patio and Golf Galaxy, the truck features an array of Hello Kitty sweets and special goodies and a 3-piece Hello Kitty cookie set, apparel and more. downtownatthegardens.comPink Strydes Fashion Show Benefit — 6 p.m. Feb. 25, in the Marketplace at Palm Beach Outlets in the former Sports Authority space (adja-cent to Palm Beach Outlets, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach. The show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets: $35 in advance, $40 at the door and $50 VIP. A portion of the proceeds goes to women battling breast cancer. For tick-ets, call 1-844-STRYDES or visit www.pinkstrydes.orgDowntown Stuart Art Festival — Feb. 25-26, along Osceola Boulevard, downtown Stuart. 746-6615.www.artfes-tival.com.Winter Equestrian Festival — Through April 2 at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center, 3400 Equestrian Club Drive, Wellington. The worlds finest horses and riders com-pete in show jumping and equestrian dressage. On Saturday Night Lights the action starts at 7 p.m. with free Grand Prix equestrian competition, including show jumping, plus food, family-friend-ly activities, and live music. Info: www.pbiec.coth.com; 793-5867; www.eques-triansport.com. SUNDAY2/26 Harmony: An Exhibition of the Arts — 2-4 p.m. Feb. 26, Meyer Amphitheatre, 104 Datura, downtown West Palm Beach. Ballet Palm Beach and the Palm Beach Symphony perform a free show. Info: www.downtownwpb.com/ae-district/ The Indian River POPs with Copeland Davis — 7 p.m. Feb. 26, Eissey Campus Theatre, 11051 Campus Drive in Palm Beach Gardens. The jazz pianist joins the 40-piece orchestra to play pop song favorites from the 1960s and 70s, including Summertime,Ž MacArthur Park,Ž and Eleanor Rigby.Ž Tickets are $25. Call 207-5900. Q The 11th annual International Piano Festival — 7:30 p.m. Feb. 24, featuring the PBA Sympho-ny in the DeSantis Family Chapel, 300 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. 803-2970 or visit www.pba.edu/perfor-mances. Q Palm Beach International Polo Season — Sundays through April 23 at the International Polo Club Palm Beach, Wellington. A season of chal-lenge cups, qualifier matches and tour-naments leading up to the U.S. Open Polo Championship. The best players in the world compete at the USPA 113th U.S. Open Polo Championships. Match-es offer a wide range of viewing options and seating from grandstand viewing, field tailgating, stadium seating, field-side champagne brunch at The Pavilion, and exclusive sponsor boxes. 282-5290; www.internationalpoloclub.com. TUESDAY2/28 The Book Luncheon — 11 a.m. Feb. 28, at the Indian Spring Country Club, Boynton Beach. Martha Hall Kelly will speak about The Lilac Girls,Ž a New York Times bestseller about socialite Caroline Ferriday at her post at the French consulate when Hitlers army invades Poland in September 1939 and then sets its sights on France. Tickets are $50 Literary Society Reader Level; $60 guests. www.JCCOnline.com/book-festival. LOOKING AHEAD Clematis By Night — 6-9 p.m. Thursdays at the West Palm Beach Waterfront, 101 N. Flagler Drive at Clem-atis Street, West Palm Beach. www.clematisbynight.net.Q Impulse — March 2. Q Andrew Morris — March 9.The Okeechobee Music & Art Festival — March 2-5, Sunshine Groves, Okeechobee. Five stages with 80 artists, bands, and DJs. www.okeechobeefest.com Festival of the Arts BOCA — March 2-12, Mizner Park Amphitheater and Mizner Park Cultural Center, Plaza Real, Boca Raton. A 10-day event featur-ing classical music, jazz, art, film and literature. 368-8445; www.festivaloft-heartsboca.org.Rhythmic Circus: Feet Don’t Fail Me Now! — 8 p.m. March 3, in the Pavilion at Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. Big and loud song and dance with a seven-piece brass band, tap and percussive danc-ing marvels, and Heatbox, the human beatbox. $25 adults, $15 students. www.oldschoolsquare.org.Doris Italian Market’s Wine & Food Gala — 8:15-10:15 p.m. March 3, at Doris Italian Market & Bakery in the Shoppes at City Centre, 11239 U.S. 1, North Palm Beach. Guests may sample more than 150 wines, visit the craft beer booth, nibble a buffet of authentic Italian cuisine. Tickets: $34.95; with $10 benefiting Palm Healthcare Foundation. Your ticket also includes a coupon for $10 off any wine purchase at the event. Get advance tickets by email at cus-tomerservice@dorismarket.com or call 954-572-5269.Register now for 22nd Annual Daddy/Daughter Date Night — 6-8 p.m. March 3, Burns Road Recre-ation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Theme: Bop til You Drop.Ž A celebration of the 50s with food and dancing. Leather jackets, poo-dle skirts and bobby socks are encour-aged. Pre-registration is required. $42 for residents, $53 for nonresidents, for dad and one daughter, add $12 for each additional daughter. Register online at pbgrec.com; 630-1100. AT DRAMAWORKS Palm Beach Dramaworks at The Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Call 514-4042, Ext. 2; www.palmbeachdrama-works.org. “Collected Stories” — Through March 5.“Arcadia” — March 31-April 30. AT THE EISSEY Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive off PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens. Tick-ets: 207-5900; www.eisseycampusthe-atre.org.Linda Eder — 8 p.m. Feb. 24. SOLD OUT.Indian River Pops presents Pops with Copeland Davis — 7 p.m. Feb. 26. Tickets: $25, half price for students K-college with I.D. Tuesday Nite Big Band — 7:30 p.m. Feb. 28. The PBSC Music Departments Big Band performance. Single tickets: $15, $5 for students, faculty and staff. $45 for the five-show series. The Peking Acrobats — March 3. Eissey Campus Art Gallery — BB Building. 10Ž „ An Exhibition Orga-nized By Karla Walter and Jacques de Beaufort. A variety of media, methods, and visual approaches. Artists include Rolando Chang Barrero, Amber Dawn Tutwiler, Sarah Knouse, Yury Darash-kevich, and TD Gillispie. Through March 17. AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-7469; www.kravis.org.Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Revue — 8 p.m. March 1. (PEAK). Tickets: $15 and up. Beyond the Stage: A free pre-performance talk by Steven Caras at 6:45 p.m. “Annie” — March 2. Tickets start at $30. Beyond The Stage: Free musical presentation at 7:15 pm in the Dreyfoos Hall lobby featuring the Lake Worth Middle School Chorus.Capitol Steps — March 3-19. Tickets $40.Tony Bennett — March 3.Celtic Woman — 3 and 8 p.m. March 4.Smokey Robinson — 8 p.m. March 5. AT THE LIGHTHOUSE Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $10 adults, $5 chil-dren ages 6-18; free for younger than 6. Jupiter Lighthouse participates in the Blue Star Museums program. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting; call for tour times. RSVP required for most events at 747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupi-terlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tour —March 1, 8, 22, and 29. Time varies. Climb to the top. Reservations are required. Lighthouse Moonrise Tours — March 12. Time varies. View the full moon from the top. Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids — 10:30 a.m. March 7. Story time and a craft for ages 8 and younger. Bring a mat to sit on. Free, but reserva-tions are required. Twilight Yoga at the Light — 6-7 p.m. Feb. 27. Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, leads. Donation. Bring a mat and a flash-light. Lighthouse Book Club — 6-7 p.m. March 1. Join the museum staff in a book discussions on all things Florida. Book for Feb: Pioneer Life In Southeast FloridaŽ by Charles Pierce and/or The Adventures of Charlie Pierce by Harvey Oyer.Ž Book for March: Killing Mister WatsonŽ by Peter Matthiessen. By dona-tion. Reservations: 747-8380, Ext. 101. www.jupiterlighthouse.org. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. Tickets: $56 single tickets. Ask about the four-play and the five-play package. Season tickets are $202. www.jupitertheatre.org; 575-2223. CALENDAR

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 CALENDAR #BOLLYWOOD 2.24 TOP PICKS #SFL Q Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Revue — 8 p.m. March 1 at the Kravis Center; 832-7469 or www.kravis.org Q “Collected Stories” — Through March 5 at Palm Beach Dramaworks; 514-4042, Ext. 2, or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org Q Northwood Village Art Night Out — 6-9 p.m. Feb. 24, Northwood Road, West Palm Beach. www.northwoodvillage.com #SEEIT 2.26 Q Indian River Pops presents Pops with Copeland Davis — 7 p.m. Feb. 26, Eissey Campus Theatre; 207-5900; www.eisseycampustheatre.org “Disgraced” — Through Feb. 26. “Gypsy” — March 21-April 9. AT THE JCC The Mandel JCC, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Info: 689-7700; www.jcconline.com/pbg.Feb. 23: Duplicate bridge; The Lebensohl Convention: Everything You Need to Know; Spend the Day at the J with Joan Lipton; Dr. Joans Winter 2017 Art History Lecture Series; Lets Make Up: A One Act Presentation Feb. 24: Beginners bridge supervised play; duplicate bridgeFeb. 26: From Ponzi to PicassoFeb. 27: Timely Topics Discussion Group; mah jongg & canasta play ses-sions; duplicate bridge; Mussar: The Way of a Higher Self Feb. 28: Duplicate bridge; Understanding Losing Trick Count Intermediate to Advanced Bridge Players; beginners duplicate bridge class; mah jongg 101 AT MOUNTS Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Mili-tary Trail, West Palm Beach. Info: 233-1737; www.mounts.org.Dogs’ Day in the Garden — 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Feb. 26. Free for Mounts members, $5 for nonmembers. AT THE PLAYHOUSE The Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 586-6410; www.lakeworthplayhouse.org.Movies in the Stonzek Theatre:Oscar Nominated Short Films: Through Feb. 23. AT THE IMPROV Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 833-1812; www.palm-beachimprov.com. Sinbad — Feb. 24-26.Pump and Dump — March 1.Michael Blackson — March 3-5. AT THE SCIENCE CENTER The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Admission is $16.95 for adults, $12.95 for children ages 3 to 12 and $14.95 for seniors aged 60 and older. Admission is free for kids younger than age 3 and museum members. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Info: 832-1988; www.sfsciencecenter.org. Our Body: The Universe Within — Through April 23. GEMS Club – 5-7 p.m. Feb. 28. For girls in grades 3-8. Math, science, engi-neering and technology including din-ner and refreshments. $7 registration fee. Theme: Kabam! Its ChemistryŽ and will include a special presenta-tion from a female in the industry in addition to a chemistry based activ-ity and craft. Pre-registration required at www.sfsciencecenter.org/gems. Info: SFScienceCenter.org or 832-1988.Hack Shack Tech Club – Meets the first Thursday of the month for grades 5-8 who like to make, tinker, design, and engineer. Register in advance at www.sfsciencecenter.org/hack-shack-tech-club. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. Next meeting: March 2. AT FOUR ARTS The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Call 655-7227; www.fourarts.org.Film series: The First Monday in MayŽ „ Feb. 24. The Met Opera: Live in HD: Dvoks RusalkaŽ „ Feb. 25.Q Walnut Street Theatre, “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” — Feb. 22. Q Pianist Charlie Albright — Feb. 26. Exhibit: Illustrating Words: The Wondrous Fantasy World of Robert L. Forbes and Ronald SearleŽ „ In the Mary Alice Fortin Childrens Art Gallery.Exhibit: “A Shared Legacy: Folk Art In America” — Through March 26. Esther B. O’Keeffe Speaker Series: Marlene Strauss, “Isa-bella Stewart Gardner: Her Collection and MuseumŽ „ Feb. 28. Florida Voices: Einstein Relatively Simple,Ž with Ira Mark Egdall „ Feb. 22. Talk of Kings Book Discussion: The Killer Angels: The Classic Novel of the Civil War,Ž by Michael Shaara „ Feb. 28 and March 1. “Across the Seas,” with Eliz-abeth Sharland and Robert Spencer — Feb. 24. $10; free for Four Arts Members € Book signing to follow. Reservations and tickets required.“East Meets West: Five Insights from Five World Religions” with Jeffrey Small — March 1. $10; free for Four Arts Members. Reservations and tickets required. LIVE MUSIC Cafe Boulud: The Lounge — 9 p.m. Fridays, in the Brazilian Court Hotel, 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 655-6060; www.cafeboulud.com/palmbeach.Camelot Yacht Club — Jazz sessions start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays at Camelot Yacht Club, 114 S. Narcissus Ave., West Palm Beach. TCHAA! Band performs. 318-7675.The Colony Hotel — 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 659-8100 or 655-5430; www.thecolonypalmbeach.com.Q Motown Fridays with Memory Lane — 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Q Saturday Late Night with the Dawn Marie Duo — 9:30 a.m.-midnight, music and dancing, plus cameos by Royal Room headliners and other celebrity performers.Royal Room Cabaret: The doors open at 6:30 for dinner and the show starts at 8:30 p.m.Q John Pizzarelli — Through Feb. 25. Q Christine Andreas — Feb. 28-March 4. Guanabanas — 960 N. A1A, Jupiter. Age 21 and older. Info: www.guanabanas.com. PGA Commons — 5100 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Info: 630-8630; pgacommons.com.Q Spoto’s Oyster Bar: Acoustic guitarist Sam Meador, 6-9 p.m. Wednes-day, Steve Mathison & Friends, 5:30-8 p.m. Friday. Info: spotos.com; 776-9448. Q The Cooper: Acoustic rocker Joe Birch, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thursday; Andy Taylor, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fridays; blues and classic rock guitarist George Manosis, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, March 17; and bluesman Mark Telesca, 6:30-9:30 p.m. March 18 and April 1. Info: thecooper-restaurant.com, 622-0032.Q Vic & Angelo’s: “Live Music Under the Stars” — Crooner Giovanni Fazio, 6:30-9 p.m. Tuesdays; Dawn Marie, 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Info: vicandangelos.com; 630-9899. ONGOING The Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens — 2051 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Info: 832-5328; www.ansg.org.Q Todd McGrain’s The Lost Bird Project — On display through June 28. Tickets: $15 adults, $10 seniors 65+, $7 for students, free for members and younger than age 5. RSVP to 832-5328. Q RISING: The Mystical World of Sophie Ryder — On display through April 30. Sculptor Sophie Ryder speaks about 16 of her monumental and small-scale works and signs copies of her book, A Life in Sculpture.Ž Tickets: $15 adults, $10 seniors 65+, $7 for students, free for members and younger than age 5. RSVP to 832-5328. Artisans On the Ave. — 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 582-3300; www.artisansontheave.com.Q “Mad Pie Girl” Cynthia Zmetronak — Her work in clay features both serious pottery and whimsi-cal sculpture. APBC Art on Park Gallery — 800

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPark Ave., Lake Park. Info: 345-2842; art-istsofpalmbeachcounty.com.Q SCAPES 2017 Exhibit: Landscapes, Seascapes, Cityscapes, Skyscapes — Opening reception 5-8 p.m. Feb. 24. On display through March 25.Q Art Salon: 6-8 p.m. Feb. 27. Free. Bring one piece of your original, recent art to show and tell. Light refreshments.The Armory Art Center — 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 832-1776; armoryart.org. Q “New & Now: Work by New Faculty Fall 2016Ž „ On display in the East and Greenfield Galleries. Benzaiten Center for Creative Arts — 1105 Second Ave. S., in a historic FEC train depot building, Lake Worth. 310-9371 or 508-7315. www.ben-zaitencenter.org.Q Glasstronomique — March 11. The centers casual gala is its main fundraiser of the year. Live art demon-strations. The Box Gallery — 811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach. (786) 521-1199; www.theboxgallery.info.High Gloss WPB: The Art of Fashion: Exhibition of fine art photography, sculpture, jewelry and couture. The Center for Creative Educa-tion — 425 24th St., West Palm Beach. 805-9927, Ext. 160; www.cceflorida.org.Q “Three Amigos” — Featuring new paintings by Jill Krutick, Florida Artist Hall of Fame Inductee Bruce Helander, Miles Slater and J. Steven Manolis.Contessa Gallery’s Seasonal Satellite — 539 Clematis St. at Rosemary Avenue, downtown West Palm Beach. A two-story, 8,000-square-foot gallery space with a curated collection of works by leading contemporary artists, including Mr. Brainwash, David Drebin, Hijack, Gilles Cenazandotti, and local emerging artist Cayla Birk. Open by appointment. www.contessagallery.com or contact Steve Hartman at 216-956-2825 or via email: art@contessagallery.comThe Cultural Council of Palm Beach County — 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues-day-Saturday. Info: 471-2901; www.palm-beachculture.com.Q Patricia Levey Solo Exhibition — Feb. 25-March 25. Levey is inspired by the sea and animals in her paintings, print making, murals and jewelry. Q “X x X” (10 X 10) Juried Exhibition — Through March 18. See works across several media such as paintings, prints, drawings, photogra-phy, collage, textiles, metal, assemblage, ceramic relief and mixed media, created by 68 professional artists and 32 stu-dents from Palm Beach County schools. The only limitation the artists was given was size: Every artwork is exactly 10-by-10-by-1 inches. The Flagler Museum — One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; younger than 6 free. 655-2833; www.flaglermuseum.us. Q The First World’s Parliament of Religions at Chicago’s 1893 Columbian Exposition — Feb. 26. Eric Ziolkowski speaks. Part of the 2017 Whitehall Lecture Series. Q “Harem: Unveiling the Mystery of Orientalist Art” — Through April 16. The Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter — Leads nature walks. New adventurers are wel-comed. Get info and register at www.loxfltrail.org.Q Hike In Apoxee — Feb. 25, 3125 N. Jog Road, West Palm Beach. Joe Rosen-berg leads a moderate to strenuous 14-mile Hike to the Dam.Ž Bring plenty of water. 859-1954.Q Winding Waters Walk — 7:30 a.m. Feb. 26, Dyer Park, 6161 Haverhill Road N., West Palm Beach. Parking is off Dyer Blvd, about one half mile west of Haverhill Road. Call Alan at 586-0486. Harbourside Place — 200 U.S. 1, Jupiter. Info: 935-9533; www.harbour-sideplace.com. Q Live Music on the Waterfront — 6-10 p.m. in the amphitheater. Q Live Music Sunday on the Waterfront — Noon-4 p.m. Sundays in the amphitheater. Q Tai Chi Class — 9 a.m. Saturdays. Cost: $10.Q AMPed Yoga — 10 a.m. Sundays. An all-levels vinyasa yoga class. $10. Kids yoga class for $5.Q Jupiter Green & Artisan Market — 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays, yearround.The Historical Society of Palm Beach County — Johnson History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-4164; www.historicalsocietypbc.org.Q “For the Love of the Game: Baseball in the Palm Beaches” — Highlights of Americas favorite pastime in Palm Beach County. Archival photographs and historical artifacts tell the story. Q “The Bill of Rights and You” — Through Feb. 28. “Returning to Cuba” — Through April 1. A special exhibition of 14 black-and-white framed photos by Victor Manuel Figueredo of Palm Beach. Jonathan Dickinson State Park — 16450 SE Federal Highway, Hobe Sound. Park entry is a suggested dona-tion of $5. Info: 745-5551 or email friend-sjdsp@gmail.com.Q Canoe or kayak river tours — Every Friday and the last Saturday of the month, from 9:45 a.m. to noon. Rent a canoe or kayak at the parks River Store or bring your own for this leisure-ly guided paddle on the Loxahatchee River. The tour is free with park admis-sion. Registration in advance is required at 745-5551. The Lighthouse ArtCenter — Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat-urday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free on Saturday and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 746-3101; www.LighthouseArts.org. Q “Illuminating the Deep” — Through March 4.Q The Fine Art of Exploration — Features the art of Else Bostlemann. Q Art of Photography Workshop with Cheryl Maeder — 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 25. Members $250; nonmem-bers $300 Sketching a Portrait Workshop with Kevin Feary „ 9 a.m. -4 p.m. Feb. 25-26. Members $400; nonmembers $450. Q Call For Art: The 38th Annual Members Only Exhibition — Deadline March 23. Exhibition Dates: April 1-26 Q The 4th Annual Plein Air Festival — March 7-12. www.pleinairlac. org.Q Third Thursday — 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of the month. Wine and passed hors doeuvres reception and exhibits, concerts, lectures, art demonstrations, live performances and gallery talks. The Mandel Public Library of West Palm Beach — 411 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 868-7701; www.wpbcitylibrary.org. Q Pilates — 10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursdays. Bring your own mat. By donation.Q The Year in Rock Music 1971: A lecture and live concert „ 1-4 p.m. Feb. 25. Jay Goldberg speaks. Free.Q Natural Plant-Based Living for Everyone — 2-3:30 p.m. March 4. Speaker: Andrea Duclos, a natural-living food and travel blogger, speaks. The Multilingual Language & Cultural Society, 210 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: www.multilingualsociety.org or call 228-1688.Q German Conversation Group — 11 a.m. March 18, and April 15, C Street Cafe, 319 Clematis St, West Palm Beach.Q Italian Songs by Franco Corso — 6 p.m. Feb. 27, Pizzeria Thats Amore, 8918 Lantana Road, Suite D, Lake Worth. Reservations are required. RSVP to nk@multilingualsociety.orgThe Norton Museum of Art — 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-5196; www.norton.org.Q Art After Dark — 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. Q Spotlight: Recent Acquisitions: In conjunction with Black History Month featuring work by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Mickalene Thomas, and Willie Cole. Q The sixth annual RAW exhibition: The Recognition of Art by Women exhibition features Austrian artist Svenja Deininger. The Palm Beach Friends (Quak-ers) Meeting — 823 S. A St., Lake Worth. A Joyful Noise Singing Group meets at 1:30 p.m. Mondays. Visitors are welcome. John Palozzi hosts A Course in MiraclesŽ at noon Wednesdays. 585-8060; www.palmbeachquakers.orgUpcoming speakers include: Bible Study with Joel Cook — 9:30 a.m. Feb. 26, followed by worship at 10:30 a.m. and potluck lunch at noon.Palm Beach Gardens City Hall Lobby Gallery — 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Info: 630-1116 or astepper@pbgfl.com.Q “Stimulation Granted” — Through March 2. A GardensArt exhibi-tion of mixed media paintings by artist Carol Staub. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre — 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 253-2600; www.workshop.org. Q “Albert Watson” — Through March 11.Palm Beach Gator Snow Ski Club – Meets at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at the North Palm Beach Country Club, 951 US High-way 1, North Palm Beach. Info: www.gatorsnowskiclub.com. The Palm Beach Zoo & Con-servation Society — 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every day, except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 533-0887; palmbeachzoo.org.Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre —601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. Info: www.westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com/events/. Tickets: (800) 345-7000 or www.ticketmaster.com. March 4: Rib Round Up feat. Randy Houser, Chris Janson and Jon PardiMay 5: Tom Petty and The HeartbreakersMay 16: Jimmy BuffettMay 20: Muse with 30 Seconds to MarsMay 27: Train with OAR and Natasha BedingfieldThe River Center — 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Hours: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. The Loxahatchee River Dis-trict was created more than 30 years ago to monitor and protect the river. Today its a teaching facility and recreation area that offers programs to enrich the community and the river. Call 743-7123; www.loxahatcheeriver.org.Q Safe boating course — 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. March 4. Taught by the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 52. Free but a $10 refundable deposit is required to reserve your seat. Q Volunteers needed — The RC needs enthusiastic, personable volun-teers age 14 and older. Call Megan at 743-7123 or email education@lrecd.org.Q Public Tour and Fish Feeding — 2-3 p.m. Saturdays. A staff member leads a tour of the facility, including a touch tank presentation and feeding. The Taste History Culinary Tours of Historic Palm Beach Coun-ty — Cultural food tastings at familyowned eateries, juice bars, teahouses and pastry shops along with showcasing local art shops, historic buildings and emerging cultural districts. The tour is part bus riding and part walking. All tours start at 11 a.m. Fee: $50-$60. Free for children younger than age 14. Private and team building tours are also avail-able. Reservations required. 638-8277; tastehistoryculinarytours.org. The West Palm Beach Fishing Club 2017 Speakers Series — 7 p.m. Wednesdays, Jan. 25-Oct. 15, at the West Palm Beach Fishing Club, 201 Fifth St., West Palm Beach. 832-6780; www.westpalmbeachfishingclub.orgMarch 1: Rich Vidulich, Pompano Fishing tactics. The West Palm Beach Hilton — 600 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. 231-6000; www.hilton.com.Q Summer Fridays at Galley — Live music beginning at 7:30 p.m. with tapas and craft cocktails. Q Saturday Night Dive-In Movie — The movie starts at 8 p.m., outside, weather permitting. Q

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Order online or call today! 561.833.7888 | PB OPERA .ORG March 10-12 One Weekend Only! Kravis Center for the Performing Arts Sung in Italian with English supertitles projected above the stage. Orchestra tickets start at just $50! Tickets Selling Out Fast! t Phot Phot ot Phot Phot t Phot t t Phot Phot Phot Phot Phot ot hot hot hot t hot hot o Pho Pho Pho ho Pho ho o ho h h h h h h h Ph Ph by o by o by oby o by o by oby o by o by o by o by oby oby o by o by o by y y y y by o by b b o o :Pa Pa :Pa Pa :Pa : Pa : Pa : Pa : Pa Pa : Pa :P : P : : : : : : lmB lmB lm B lm B m B lm B B mB mB lmB lm B lm lm lm lm m m l ch ach each each each h each each h h each each c eac eac e e e e e Ope Ope Ope Ope Ope Ope Ope Ope Ope e Ope Ope p O O O O O O O O O O ra ra ra ra ra ra a a ra ra ra ra a ra ra ra ra a FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 PUZZLE ANSWERS AREA MARKETSRiviera Beach Marina Village Green & Artisan Market „ 5-9 p.m. Wednesdays, 200 E. 13th St. at Broadway, Riviera Beach. Also has a flea market and antiques. Info: 623-5600 or www.harrysmarkets.com. Lake Worth High School Flea Market „ 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. Info: 439-1539. West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market „ 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturdays through May on Narcissus Avenue north of Banyan Boulevard. Free. Info: www.wpbantiqueandfleamarket.com. The West Palm Beach Greenmarket „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays along the West Palm Beach Waterfront, 100 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Park-ing is free in the Banyan and Evernia garages during market hours. Info: www.wpb.org/greenmarket. The Green Market at Wellington „ 9 a.m. Saturdays through April 29 at 12100 Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington, next to the amphitheater. Pet friendly. Info: www.greenmarketatwellington.com. Lake Worth Farmers Market „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays, through April 29, Old Bridge Park, 1 S. Ocean Blvd., Lake Worth. Info: 283-5856; www.lakeworth-farmersmarket.com. Delray Beachs Winter GreenMarket „ 9 a.m.-noon every Saturday at Old School Square Park, 96 NE Second Ave., Delray Beach. Info: 276-7511; www. delraycra.org/greenmarket. The Gardens GreenMarket „ 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, City Hall Municipal Complex, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Live entertainment from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. No pets. Through May 7. 630-1100; www.pbgfl.com. Jupiter Farmers Market at El Sol „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays through April 30, 106 Military Trail, Jupiter. Info: 283-5856; www.Jupiterfarmersmarket.com. Royal Palm Beach Green Market & Bazaar Veterans Park „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, Veterans Park, 1036 Royal Palm Beach Blvd. Royal Palm Beach. Through April 30. Closed Easter weekend. Pet friendly. www.rpbgreenmarket.com. Jupiter Green & Artisan Market at Harbourside Place „ 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays year-round, 200 N. U.S. 1, along the Intracoastal Waterway in Harbourside Place. Pet friendly. New vendors should call 623-5600 or visit www.harrysmarket.com. The Green Market at Palm Beach Outlets „ 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 515-4400; www.palm-beachoutlets.com. Q “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ F F F F F F F F F F F F l l l l l l l l l o o o o o o o o o r r r r r r r r r r i i i i i i i i i i d d d d d d d d d d d a a a a a a a a a a a ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ s s s s s s s s s s L L L L L L L L L L L a a a a a a a a a a a r r r r r r r r r g g g g g g g g g g g e e e e e e e e e e s s s s s s s s s s t t t t t t t t t t M M M M M M M M M M M M o o o o o o o o o n n n n n n n n n n t t t t t t t t t t h h h h h h h h h h h l l l l l l l l l l y y y y y y y y y y y A A A A A A A A A A A n n n n n n n n n n n t t t t t t t t t t i i i i i i i i i i q q q q q q q q q q q u u u u u u u u u e e e e e e e e e e e E E E E E E E E E E E E v v v v v v v v v v e e e e e e e e e e n n n n n n n n n n t t t t t t t t t t ” ” ” ” ” ” ” ” “ “ “ “ “ “ F F F F F F l l l l l l o o o o o o r r r r r r i i i i i i d d d d d d a a a a a a ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ s s s s s s L L L L L L a a a a a a r r r r r r g g g g g g e e e e e e s s s s s s t t t t t t M M M M M M o o o o o o n n n n n n t t t t t t h h h h h h l l l l l l y y y y y y A A A A A A n n n n n n t t t t t t i i i i i i q q q q q q u u u u u u e e e e e e E E E E E E v v v v v v e e e e e e n n n n n n t t t t t t ” ” ” ” ” ” at at at at at at at at t t t t t t t h he he he he he he he at at at at at at t t t t t t he he he he he he S S S S S S S S S S S S o o o o o o o o o o o u u u u u u u u u u u u t t t t t t t t t t t t h h h h h h h h h h h h F F F F F F F F F F F F l l l l l l l l l l l o o o o o o o o o o o r r r r r r r r r r r r i i i i i i i i i i i d d d d d d d d d d d d a a a a a a a a a a a a F F F F F F F F F F F F a a a a a a a a a a a a i i i i i i i i i i i r r r r r r r r r r r r g g g g g g g g g g g g r r r r r r r r r r r o o o o o o o o o o o u u u u u u u u u u u n n n n n n n n n n n n d d d d d d d d d d d d s s s s s s s s s s S S S S S S o o o o o o u u u u u u t t t t t t h h h h h h F F F F F F l l l l l l o o o o o o r r r r r r i i i i i i d d d d d d a a a a a a F F F F F F a a a a a a i i i i i i r r r r r r g g g g g g r r r r r r o o o o o o u u u u u u n n n n n n d d d d d d s s s s s s 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 0 6 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 6 6 S S S S S S S S S S ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou th th th th th th th th th h er er er er er er er er er n n n n n n n n n B Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl B vd d vd vd vd vd vd vd vd vd , , , We We We We We We We We We We W t st st st st st st st st s P P P P P P P P P P al al al al al al al al al al a m m m m m m m m m Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be Be ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac a h h, h, h, h, h, h, h h h 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 4 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 90 90 90 90 90 90 67 67 67 67 67 67 S S S S S S ou ou ou ou ou ou th th th th th th er er er er er er n n n n n n Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl Bl vd vd vd vd vd vd , , , We We We We We We st st st st st st P P P P P P al al al al al al m m m m m m Be Be Be Be Be Be ac ac ac ac ac ac h, h, h, h, h, h, 3 3 3 3 3 3 34 34 34 34 34 34 11 11 11 11 11 11 400dealers! Early Bird VIP Admission &RIDAY-ARCHrs (Ticket good for all 3 days) General Admission &RI-ARCHr3AT-ARCHr 3UN-ARCHrsr3ENIORS Info Call:

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Ring in the weekend Friday nights at Concerts in the Court. A different band each week from pop to rock, country to jazz„loud, live and FREE 6 9PM CENTRE COURT DowntownattheGardens.com 2/24 Sea Rat Pop / Rock HELLO KITTY C Saturday, Februar y Parked between Carls P D The Hello Kitty Cafe Truck will b appearance at Downt o The Hello Kitty C mobile vehicl e that offers a deli c Hello Kitty swee ts goodies to fan s LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t i n SOC I Honda Classic kick-off p 1 2 3 7 8 9

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11 DowntownAtTheGardens.comOver 2400 FREE Parking Spaces and Our Valet is Always FREE! We celebrate Valentine’s Day all February long. So whether a romantic dinner for two, drinks with friends, lunch with workmates, whatever the occasion, Downtown at the Gardens will show your inner foodie some well-deserved love! b Downtown at the Gardens. All tastes for all people. The Blend Bistro The Cheesecake Factory Dirty Martini Fro-Yotopia Grimaldi’s Coal Brick-Oven Pizzeria It’Sugar MJ’s BistroBar Paris in Town Le Bistro Sloans Ice Cream The Spice & Tea Exchange Texas de Brazil TooJay’s Yard House Whole Foods Market C AFE TRUCK y 25th€10am-8pm P atio and Golf Galaxy D owntownAtTheGardens.com b e making its “rst Palm Beach o wn at the Gardens! C afe Truck is a e of cuteness c ious array of ts and special s of all ages! n the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to socie ty@” oridaweekly.com.ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY I ETY arty at The Gardens Mall 1. Giovanni DiStadio and Jack Lighton 2. Kaci Hanner, Alexis Campbell, Erin Devlin, Lindsay Leffler and Liz Harbauer 3. Terry Bomar, Carol Griffiths, Keri Peterson, Hailey Neal, Daniel Schlager, Colette Beland and Cecilia Hudnet 4. Sarah Jane Gates and Erin Devlin 5. Sharon McEnroe, Mary Jo McPhail, Tricia Flejter and Emily Pantelides 6. Kathy Evans, Sheila Connolly, Michael Rutlidge and Joanie Connors 7. Ashley Schultz, Diane McDonald, Lisa Priester, Sue Rathbone and Jack Scheurich 8. Dustin Smith and Peter Gloggner 9. Shana Sheptak, Gracia Sheptak and Peter Sheptak 10. Denise Brestle, Tiffany Frieberg, Jaime Bertolis and Michele Jacobs 4 5 Jane Lesche, Jon Onufer and Christine Charles 6 10

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B12 WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 FLORIDA WEEKLY 2000 PGA Blvd., Suite A3140, Palm Beach GardensSW corner of PGA Blvd & US Hwy 1 { City Centre Plaza rr{www.saraskitchenpalmbeachgardens.com Mon-Fri: 7 ƒ -2:45 { Sat-Sun: 7 ƒ -1:45 SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH tEKt,s''s>E[^^d CAGE FREE LARGE EGGSE},}Œu}v}ŒvŸ]}Ÿ{9sPšŒ]v& EVERY SATURD AY OCT-MAY! 8:30AM T O 2:00PM PHONE: 561-670-7473FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKTWITTER: @WPBAFMARKET EMAIL: WPBANTIQUEANDFLEA@GMAIL.COM WPBANTIQUEANDFLEAMARKET.COM PET FRIENDLY | FAMILY FRIENDLY | FREE ADMISSION | FREE PARKING LATEST FILMS‘Fist Fight’ + Is it worth $10? NoSchools such as the one in Fist FightŽ surely do not exist. If they do, I dont want to know about them. This movie is a crass, unrealistic and, worst of all, unfunny look at a high school that is truly out of this world. In truth, that it is all of the above is not in itself bad, as this is a comedy, which means as long as its funny all is forgiven. But its not funny. In fact, the so-called humorŽ is when the film is the most pathetically inept. Roosevelt High School is not a place you want to send your kids, or worse, be employed. Most of director Richie Keens movie takes place on the last day of school, during which teachers have completely checked out and seniors seem to be trying to get expelled before graduation (alas, there is no mention of graduation). Kids wear T-shirts with expletives, watch porn in the hall, destroy water fountains, vandalize cars, harass the security guard (Kumail Nanjiani), masturbate in the bathroom, etc. In addition to indifferently dealing with unruly behavior, the faculty faces the pressure of having to inter-view to secure their jobs for next year. Essentially everyone, including English teacher Mr. Campbell (Char-lie Day), the guidance counselor (Jil-lian Bell) and the physical education teacher (Tracy Morgan), has stopped trying to enforce school rules. Except one: Mr. Strickland (Ice Cube). He demands respect and discipline. When he speaks, the kids listen. And if they dont, hell destroy their desks with an axe as theyre sitting in them. We know this because he does it. On a day hes supposed to interview to keep his job. Yes, its that kind of movie. When Mr. Campbell and Mr. Strickland are called to the principals (Dean Norris) office to discuss the axe inci-dent, Mr. Campbell blames it on Mr. Strickland. Infuriated, Mr. Strickland challenges Mr. Campbell to a fight after school. So begins an inane, humorless and labored series of events that allow Ice Cube to act angry, Mr. Day to act like a scared sissy and an underused Christina Hendricks to play a sadistic teacher (to decent effect). Said series of events includes: planting drugs, a horse on meth, a little girl singing explicit song lyrics, soliciting a teen for sex, blackmail, extortion, beatings and shameless product placement for Apple. Theres only one comedic bit that works in all 91 minutes of this misfire: After Mr. Campbell is challenged to fight, hes told by others of Mr. Strick-lands past, which is the stuff of urban legend. Everyone has a Mr. Strickland story, it seems. They cant all be true, but if even one of them is true Mr. Campbell knows hes screwed. Among them: Mr. Strickland killed Saddam Husseins two sons, he was a gang enforcer and he plays the piano. Its a clever montage that works well to establish how endangered Mr. Camp-bell is. More originality like this, as opposed to crass easy humor, wouldve made the movie much better. But, as always, I must review the movie I saw, not the movie they could/should have made. And ugh to the movie I saw. Q dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> At one point Ice Cube’s character, Mr. Strickland, says “F---the police,” which is also the name of a 1980s hit song for Ice Cube’s hip-hop group N.W.A. FILM CAPSULESThe LEGO Batman Movie +++ (Voices of Will Arnett, Zach Galifianakis, Jenny Slate) Bruce Wayne/Batman (Mr. Arnett) adopts an orphan (voice of Michael Cera) and fights The Joker (Mr. Galifiana-kis) and other Gotham City villains in this spinoff of The LEGO MovieŽ (2014). Its more than DC Comics characters who come into play (Sauron, Voldemort, etc.), which is part of the fun „ and it is a heckuva lot of fun. Rated PG. The Comedian ++ (Robert De Niro, Leslie Mann, Edie Falco) Struggling stand-up comic Jackie Burke (Mr. De Niro) bickers with his agent (Ms. Falco) and finds a kindred spirit in a woman he meets in a soup kitchen (Ms. Mann). The jokes are hit and miss, the story labors and ultimately, Jackie is too pigheaded to root for. Rated R. A Dog’s Purpose + (Britt Robertson, Dennis Quaid, voice of Josh Gad) The soul of a dog (Mr. Gad) is reincarnated over four lifetimes, touching different humans in the process. It might appeal to kids, but anyone else „ even dog lovers „ will find the manipulative, forced drama tough to stomach. Rated PG. 20th Century Women +++ (Annette Bening, Lucas Jade Zumann, Elle Fanning) In 1979, a single mother (Ms. Bening) asks two female friends (Ms. Fan-ning and Greta Gerwig) to help her 15year-old son (Mr. Zumann) become a man. Ms. Bening leads the stellar ensemble in this wonderful coming-of-age story that sub-limely captures the travails of adolescence and the spirit of the 70s. Dont miss it! Rated R. Q

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 B13 Choose your seat at the Centers of“cial website kravis.org or call 561.832.7469 or 800.572.8471 Group sales: 561.651 .4438 or 561.651.4304 Musical Moments at the KravisCenter! TAJ EXPRESS THE BOLLYWOOD MUSICAL REVUE Wednesday, March 1 at 8 pm %SFZGPPT)BMMt5JDLFUTTUBSUBU Sizzling, sensual, seamless! An intoxicating fusion of swirling color amid bold sounds of India.This PEAK performance is made possible by a grant from the MLDauray Arts Initiative in honor of Leonard and Sophie DavisBeyond the Stage: Join us for a free pre-performance talk by Steven Caras in the Cohen Pavilion at 6:45 pm. HELLO JERRY!THE SONGS OF JERRY HERMANPerformed by Billy Stritch, Klea Blackhurst, Carole J. Bufford and Marissa Mulder Devised and Narrated by Barry Day Saturday and Sunday, February 25-264BUVSEBZBUQNBOEQNt4VOEBZBUQN3JOLFS1MBZIPVTFt5JDLFUTHailing Hello, Dolly! and more … Cabarets top stars captivate in tribute to Broadway composer.Sponsored by Donald and Linda Silpe PABLO VILLEGAS AMERICANO Tuesday, February 28 at 7:30 pm 3JOLFS1MBZIPVTFt5JDLFUTNo ampli“er, just “re: passionate Spanish guitarist needs no electronics for rich, signature sound. ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATERRobert Battle, Artistic Director Masazumi Chaya, Associate Artistic Director Tuesday, February 28 at 8 pm %SFZGPPT)BMMt5JDLFUTTUBSUBU Bold, soulful, beautiful: Explosive modern dance that resonates amid Revelations Sponsored by Alec and Sheila Engelstein Zelda and Allen MasonBeyond the Stage: Join us for a free pre-performance talk by Steven Caras in the Cohen Pavilion at 6:45 pm. :PVOH"SUJTUT4FSJFT IN MO YANG, VIOLINRENANA GUTMAN, PIANOA South Florida Debut Wednesday, March 1 at 7:30 pm 3JOLFS1MBZIPVTFt5JDLFUT Korean violinist hailed as one of the new generations most talented young string virtuosiŽSeries sposored by Harriett M. Eckstein New Art Fund This concert is with support from The Raymond and Bessie Kravis Foundation SunFest turns 35 with lineup that includes Blink-182 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY SunFest turns 35 this year.And the event, set for May 3-7, has come a long way from the jazz festival that drew a few thousand people to downtown West Palm Beachs water-front. Expect a little rock, a little reggae and just about everything in between. National headliners include Blink-182, Weezer, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Widespread Panic, Marshmello, Snoop Dogg, Dirty Heads, Ziggy Marley, Tori Kelly, Flo Rida, Steve Winwood, Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, Breaking Benjamin, 3 Doors Down, X Ambassadors, Fetty Wap featuring Monty, Rachel Platten, Jon Bellion, Tinashe, Kaleo, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, The Strumbellas, The Naked and Famous, Loverboy, Stick Figure, Chris-topher Cross, Marc E. Bassy, Wavves, Night Ranger, Declan McKenna, Filter, Thirdstory, Ambrosia, Taylor Bennett, Lillie Mae, Thomas Wynn & the Believ-ers, Leilani Wolfgramm, Magic City Hippies, Tayla Parx and Ocean Park Standoff. Music lovers will enjoy this years lineup,Ž SunFest Execu-tive Director Paul Jamieson said in a state-ment. We have put together a schedule with all types of music from rock, pop and reggae to hip-hop and EDM. People love music festi-vals because its about the live experi-ence, something you cant get anywhere else. With its location and experiences, SunFest is one of the most unique set-tings to enjoy acts you love and discover new ones.Ž Also scheduled to perform at SunFest are regional and local acts: Alex Di Leo, Chemradery, Joe Galaxy, Luxury of Company, Madame Mayhem, Meresha, NOSLEEPKB, Roanoke, Ryan McKenzie, SunGhosts and YVAD. SunFest will no longer feature a traditional juried art show and will have The Art District, sponsored by Florida Lottery. It will have a new layout, with live artist demonstrations and performances, interactive art installations and goods from more than 60 artists, crafters and vendors. SunFest is partnering with the Arc of Palm Beach County, Armory Arts Center, Dreyfoos School of the Arts, Education Gallery Group and Halo Technologies. The ChillZone will be at Trinity Park and will be designed for grabbing a respite with family and friends. Patrons can relax in the Eagles Nest Outfitters Lotus Lounge, or sample wine from the Dark Horse Wine Container Bar and take part in traditional lawn games such as cornhole and giant Jenga. SunFest will again partner with the Palm Beach Food & Wine Festival to provide some new additions for dining at SunFest. The north and south food areas will be updated and have their own unique brands. The Fueling Station will be in the north end of the venue, by the Clematis Street Gate, and will feature food and drinks. The Diner will be in what was formerly the South Food Court by the JetBlue stage and will offer a 50s themed pop-up diner serving all-American cuisine. There are special SunFest ticket promotions, including a five-day pass that starts at $15 per day. Tickets are avail-able at www.sunfest.com. Bank of America salutes the troops „Military personal can buy a one-day ticket for $37, a discount of $10 off the gate price. This pro-motion is avail-able by verifying service through GovX. Discount ends April 29. Valid for active duty, National Guard, reservists and veterans. To buy online, visit www.sunfest.com/ticket-deals. Friday night discount „ $10 off Friday night ticket. Buy online at www.sunfest.com/ticketdeals (*$10 off gate price.) Deal ends April 29. Youth tickets„ Kids 5 and under are free. Kids 6-12 are $20 in advance, $25 at the gate. Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at www.sunfest.com, at the SunFest store, at 525 Clematis St. in downtown West Palm Beach, or by calling 1-800-SUNFEST. Advance tickets are also sold between April 15 and April 29 at Palm Beach and Martin County Publix Super Markets. Festival tickets are currently at the lowest price and increase twice before for the festival. Current pricing is $35 for one-day pass, $55 for a two-day pass, and $75 for a five-day pass. This special discount period ends March 10. All ticket information can be found online at sunfest.com/get-your-ticket. Q SunFest will draw tens of thousnds of music fans to hear music ranging from pop to rock to reggae and more.

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B14 WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 FLORIDA WEEKLY FRUQHGEHHI‡SDVWUDPL WXUNH\RIIWKHIUDPH EULVNHW‡VPRNHG VK SLWDVZUDSV KRPHPDGHVRXSV EUHDNIDVWRPHOHWV SDQFDNHV‡EOLQW]HV JOXWHQIUHHEUHDGV &(/(%5$7,1*
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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15 PUZZLES By Linda Thistle +++ Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Difficulty level: INTERNAL CAPITAL HOROSCOPESPISCES (February 19 to March 20) Keep a low profile in order to avoid being lured away from the job at hand. Focus on what has to be done, and do it. Therell be time later to enjoy fun with family and friends. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Youre correct to want to help some-one who seems to need assistance. But be careful that he or she isnt pulling the wool over those gorgeous Sheeps eyes. You need more facts. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your Bovine optimism soon will dis-pel the gloom cast by those naysayers and pessimists who still hover close by. Also, that good news you recently received is part of a fuller message to come. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Feeling jealous over a colleagues suc-cess drains the energy you need to meet your own challenges. Wish him or her well, and focus on what you need to do. Results start to show in mid-March. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Youre likely to feel somewhat Crabby these days, so watch what you say, or you could find yourself making lots of apologies. Your mood starts to brighten by the weekend. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your pride might still be hurting from those unflattering remarks someone made about you. But cheer up, youre about to prove once again why youre the Top Cat in whatever you do. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A misunderstanding with a co-worker could become a real problem unless its resolved soon. Allow a third party to come in and assess the situation without pressure or prejudice. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Call a family meeting to discuss the care of a loved one at this difficult time. Be careful not to let yourself be pushed into shouldering the full burden on your own. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) An upcoming decision could open the way to an exciting venture. However, there are some risks you should know about. Ask more questions before making a commitment. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Personal matters need your attention during the earlier part of the week. You can start to shift your focus to your workaday world by mid-week. Friday brings news. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Youve been going at a hectic pace for quite a while. Its time now for some much-needed rest and recreation to recharge those hardwork-ing batteries. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) This is a good time to upgrade your current skills or consider getting into an entirely different training pro-gram so that you can be prepared for new career opportunities. BORN THIS WEEK: You can be a dreamer and a realist. You dream of what you would like to do, and then you face the reality of how to do it. Q SEE ANSWERS, B9 SEE ANSWERS, B9

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B16 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY An Evening with Michael Fabiano, Flagler Museum, Palm Beach 1. Dan Cochran, Paul Goldner, Sandra Goldner and Greg Sutphin 2. Josh Arky, Kasia Borowiec and Samuel Hinko 3. John Purdy and Linda Purdy 4. Ellis Parker and Nancy Parker 5. Brooklyn Snow, Elliot Paige and Jessica Fishenfeld 6. Richard Gaff and Danni Melita 7. Ari Rifkin, Brooklyn Snow and Amber Medkiff 8. Marsha Laufer and Henry Laufer 9. Scott Guziek, Arlene Kaufman and Sandy Baklor 10. Maude Cook and Cameron Neth 11. Roseanne Williams, Susan Domenico and Shari Newman 12. Paul Sieveking and Hallie DuFresne 13. Daniel Biaggi and Mary Montgomery 14. Bram Majtlis, Nick Gold, Giovanni Di Stadio and Jack Lighton 6 7 5 8 4 1 2 3 9 13 14 10 11 12

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B17COURTESY PHOTOS 3 text LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Armory Art Center’s winter fundraiser Purple Reign raised over $ 100,000 in West Palm Beach 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 10 COU RTESY PHO COU RTESYP te te te t te x x x xt xt xt xt t t t xt xt xt x xt x x x x x x x x x x x x xt x x xt x x x x x xt x x x x x x t x x x t t x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x xt t t x x t t t t x xt t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . . . . 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 . . . . . . . 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 . . . 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 . . . . . . . . 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 . . . . . . . . 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 . . 8 8 8 8 . 9 9 . . 1 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Samantha Curry and Wyatt Koch 1. Susanna Gil, Paco Gil, Jason Emmett, Kelsey Emmett, Alex Emmett and Sarah Higgins 2. Jan Willinger, Michael Israel, Linda Silpe and Marie Adler-Kravecas 3. Bob Spiegel and Jan Willinger 4. Candice Meyer and Bill Meyer 5. Carlos Morrison and Rene Morrison 6. Chester Luby and Carol Sherman 7. David Veselsky and Ken Elias 8. Tom Aveni and Dorrie Aveni 9. Ruth Baum and Steve Hartman 10. Jason Laskey and Susan Lloyd 1 3 8 4 6 9 7 5 2 10

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B18 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Lighthouse ArtCenter D’Art for Art raises over $185,000 at Harriet Himmel TheaterLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOS 1. Colette Meyer and Michelle Meyer 2. Chuck Casey, Barbara Kirsch, Peter Gloggner, Laurie Brower, Tricia Trimble 3. Jillian Sander and Manon Sander 4. Larry Schorr, Jenny Schorr, Tricia Trimble and Tom Trimble 5. Pat DeAloia, Bud DeAloia, Marshall McLean and Estela McLean jan NORRISjan@jannorris.com Food truck, craft beer fest headed to outlets CUISINEFood truck events are still going strong, with trucks stepping up to serve more than just pizza, tacos and burgers. Running along with them is the craft beer movement. From noon to 6 p.m. Feb. 25, both trucks and beer will be at the Palm Beach Outlets in West Palm Beach. The first Palm Beach Food Truck and Craft Beer Festival will bring to town 25 food trucks and 50 craft beers, both regional and national. A Massachu-setts company, Food Truck Festivals of America is organizing the event. Janet Prensky spokeswoman for the festival, said the West Palm Beach fest is the first of their season, which takes them around the country. The company first brought the festival to Florida at a Fort Myers park two years ago. Foods and their owners are varied, many of them from South Florida, with some representing brick-and-mortar restaurants. Trucks include One Out of Many, serving Caribbean foods; Main Stop Grill, Miami cuisine; Melted Madness, grilled cheese; Boynton Beachs Hur-ricane Alleys Chowder Truck n Snack Shack, seafood; and Troys BarBeQue, Southern barbecue. Unto These Grills, Native American Cherokee cuisine; Beas Heavenly Wings, Southern cui-sine; Ipeks Wykked Kitchen, Turkish foods; Amys Little Chunks of L ove, healthy desserts, also will be serving. Other trucks will sell hot dogs, burgers, crepes and funnel cakes, sweet and savory waffles, Philly cheesesteaks, Latin foods, Italian foods, sandwiches, salads and frozen drinks. Sixteen craft brews are from Florida, including Barley Mow, Cigar City B rewing, Funky Buddha, Due South Brewing, Holy Mackerel beers, SaltWater B rewery, Broski Cider Works, Twisted Trunk and Tequesta Brewing. From the national distributors, Left Hand Brewing, Ballast Point, Brecken-ridge Brewery, Brewery Ommergang, Terrapin Brewing Co., Uinta Brewing and Ace Cider are among the offerings. Festival admission is $5 online, or $10 at the gate. Kids 12 and under are free. Beer tickets are $6 per beer or four for $20, or a Beer Lovers Ticket online is $18.50, which includes a festival ticket and three beers. Those wanting to get a jump on the fest can go for a $20 VIP ticket. A lim-ited number of tickets allow a 1-hour early entry, unlimited bottled water, a free dessert, and discounted beer tickets at $4 each. Admission does not include the foods, sold separately. FTFA is partnered with The Unicorn Childrens Foundation providing education and opportunities for those with special needs; donations to the group are encouraged at the event. For tickets, information and complete list of participants, visit www.foodtruckfestivalsofamerica.com. In brief Speaking of festivals, one of the Southeasts oldest and largest happens in Plant City each spring. The Florida Strawberry Festival is March 2-12 this year, with dozens of agriculture exhib-its, concerts, rides and crafts, and of course, strawberries sold in all forms. Its noted as a family-friendly event and draws visitors from around the country each year. For tickets and information, visit www.flstrawberryfestival.com. ƒThe Regional is now open for lunch in CityPlace. Chef Lindsay Autry offers up her Southern-slanted cuisine, with a few dishes exclusive to the midday menu. Q COURTESY PHOTOThe Palm Beach Food Truck and Craft Beer Festival will bring 25 food trucks and 50 craft beers to the Palm Beach Outlets. 1 2 3 4 5

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23-MARCH 1, 2017 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B19The Dish: Spicy beef taco The Place: Lilos Streetfood & Bar, 701 Lake Ave., Lake Worth; 518-7880. The Price: $3 The Details: Lilos is one of the best things to happen to downtown Lake Worth, at least foodwise. The small-plates menu means you can pick and choose a variety of fare and not have to stuff yourself on one dish. The taco we tried for our dish was a hearty serving of picadillo beef topped with fresh romaine, tomatoes and a blend of cheeses. The beef was perfectly seasoned and piping hot, providing a nice contrast to the cool, crisp lettuce and grated cheese. Over the course of a half-dozen visits, weve enjoyed fresh tuna pok, such tapas-inspired monta-ditos as the El Dub, a jerk-spiced ground chicken patty served with plantain and pickled mango slaw and the Shrimp Flo Boy, Lilos take on the New Orleans clas-sic po boy, with cornmeal battered shrimp, more of that mango slaw and a hearty dose of red onion. Wash it down with a margarita „ these dont taste like theyre from a mix, either „ and you have a per-fect meal. Q „ Sc ott Simmons BY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@” oridaweekly.com Matthew Sadowski, executive chef at Ironwood Steak & Seafood at PGA National Resort & Spa, said cooking is in his blood. My mother used to say I knew what I wanted to do since I was in a highchair with her in the kitchen trying to help her with whatever she was cooking,Ž he said. The family had an old-style diner in Bal-tic, Conn., called Freds News. It was the heartbeat of the town and everybody stopped in,Ž Chef Sadowski recalled. He started working in the res-taurant when he was 12. If the diner got busy, my dad would come get me off the baseball field and then all my friends would follow.Ž He helped out in any way needed, from clearing tables to mopping floors. His stepdad was the cook and his mom took care of operations. When he was older, Chef Sadowski began cooking in casinos. I loved the fast pace and I experienced a lot,Ž he said. I learned there was so much more to running a kitchen than being a good chef, from managing and recruiting to coaching to fixing equip-ment on the fly. You had to wear many hats.Ž All that knowledge comes in handy today at Ironwood Steak & Seafood, where he has worked for the past year. I was brought on board to elevate the dining experience,Ž he said. He and his team of six cooks had been working hard to prepare for the onslaught of diners during The Honda Classic. Valentines Day was a good test for us,Ž he said. We served a lot of tables and did well.Ž The restaurants signature creations include Black Angus beef dry-aged and cooked to perfection and local cuisine, including fresh snapper and mahi-mahi, roasted beet salad and Chef Sadowskis cream corn with bacon. Before coming to PGA National, Chef Sadowski worked for 25 years in the restaurant business, mostly at casinos and resorts. He managed, opened and remodeled a variety of venues, including production and banquet kitchens and high-volume restaurants. For the past decade, he worked for Seminole Gaming, including five years as executive chef at the Seminole Casino in Coconut Creek. During that time I opened their major expansion, adding an additional three full service restaurants (a dry-aged prime steakhouse, a New York-style deli and an Italian restaurant), along with a quick service poker room and snack bar and an employee dining facility,Ž he said. I also assisted in conceptualizing and completely remodeling their buffet, as well as various bars and lounges.Ž He also served as corporate consulting chef for a new concept called NYY Steak, opening three locations in the New York Yankees baseball stadium, the Seminole Casio in Coconut Creek and in Midtown Manhattan on West 51st Street. People take for granted what goes on in a kitchen,Ž Chef Sadowski said. Its hard work and there is constant demand. Its hot, greasy and you can get burned or cut. Its not for everybody,Ž But it is for Chef Sadowski. Your passion will always shine through in the food that you produce and people will recognize,Ž he said. Matthew SadowskiAge: 44 Original hometown: Baltic, Conn. Restaurant: Ironwood Steak & Seafood, 400 Avenue of Champions, Palm Beach Gardens, 627-4852, pgaresort.com. Open Sunday-Thursday, 5-10: p.m.; Fri-day-Saturday, 5-11 p.m. Mission: To give the best possible experience for each guest every time. Cuisine: Contemporary American Training: No formal culinary school. Started working in the family restaurant as a child. Ive been lucky enough to have some great mentorship over the years. Whats your footwear of choice in the kitchen? Nonslip! I have a few different pairs/styles depending on what Im doing What advice would you give someone who wants to be a restaurateur or chef? Be all in always. Never give up. Youll work harder than you ever thought you possibly could, but the sense of accomplishment youll get in the end-less creative possibilities before you will keep a fire burning inside you that keeps you striving for more each day. Q In the kitchen with...MATTHEW SADOWSKI, Ironwood Steak & Seafood, PGA National Resort & Spa THE DISH: Highlights from local menus SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTOMatthew Sadowski has worked at PGA Na-tional for one year. FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINEPlaces indowntown Lake WorthA trio worth noting3SCOTT’STHREE FOR 2 C.W.S. BAR + KITCHEN522 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth; 318-5637 or www.cwslw.com. C.W.S. is just about always hopping any night of the week. The place has a decent beer list, nice cocktails and an interesting menu, including the cauliflower steak, essentially a grilled slice of cauliflower topped with a mix of greens and dressed with vincotto, a sweet, potent balsamic vinegar. Confit tomatoes add dimension, as does the n utty quinoa served on the side. 1 PARADISO625 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth; 547-2500 or paradisolakeworth.com.Paradiso is a go-to spot for special occasions „ especially since entrees can top $48. But when your options include Half Roasted Duckling with Cassis Sauce, you have to pay the price. The restaurant is Italian, but I am partial to the gazpacho „ thick, rich chilled tomato soup that tastes more of Spain than Italy. And the grilled octopus and squid are fork-tender. 3 COUCO PAZZO915 Lake Ave., Lake Worth; 585-0320 or coucopazzo.com. The name of restaurant means Crazy ChefŽ in Italian. But theres nothing crazy in the consistency of the food „ classic Italian pasta and veal dishes, with a few thin-crust pizzas thrown in for measure, and a cioppino thats sure to whet your appetite for seafood on your next visit. I have friends who order the 14-ounce double pork chops each visit. Couco Pazzo, just west of Dixie Highway, is off the beaten track for downtown dining, but it attracts quite a following during season. „ Scott Simmons COURTESY PHOTOParadiso offers elegant fare in an elegant space in downtown Lake Worth.SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLYThe cauliflower steak at C.W.S.

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WE HEAL THE WISHFUL. We heal for them. PalmBeachChildrensHospital.com EISSEY CAMPUS THEATRE11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida561-207-5905 MARCH 18th, 2017 INSIDE WEST PALM BEACHHosted by Barry OBrienTune in from 6-7pm Wednesdays WE HEAL THE WISHFUL. 7…i…iL'“>`L'ˆiœvV…ˆ`…œœ`i>V…Liœ`…iv>“ˆw>ˆ`Žˆ]œ'>>`‡ˆˆ}i`ˆ>ˆVi“i}iVœœ“>`i>`œii…iV…ˆ`iœv*>“i>V…nœ'>`Liœ`r…i>}i`i`ˆV>i`V…ˆ`i…œˆ>ˆ*>“i>V…nœ']iœˆ`i>`>Vi`V>ivœii…ˆ}vœ“LœŽiLœiœi`ˆ>ˆVœVœœ}iˆVi7…iˆVœ“iœœ'V…ˆ`…i>…]V…œœi…i…œˆ>…>Vi>i`'vœ…i“ We heal for them. *South Florida Parenting Magazine 2016Voted Best Pediatric ER and Best Pediatric Hospital in Palm Beach County!* Join our Kids Club for Kids Activities and Healthy Events. 561-841-KIDS € PalmBeachChildrensHospital.com

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777 Glades Rd, Boca Raton | Box Ofce 561-297-6124 Ticketmaster.com 800 564-9539 For additional venues and info: SouthFloridaSymphony.org or 954-522-8445FAU/KAYE AUDITORIUMMARCH 19 € 5PM AND THE TONY GOES TO... FAU 2017 SUNDAY CONCERTS The Symphony tips our hat to Broadway with a spectacular homage to Tony Award-winning musicals for a night to remember. A Chorus Line, Chicago, Hello Dolly, My Fair Lady, LhnmaIZ\b\Zg]fn\afhk^'Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E Minor Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture Peter Schickele: P.D.Q. Bachs Concerto for Simply Grand Piano and OrchestraJeffrey Biegel, piano APRIL 2 € 5:30PM UNTAMED SPIRIT Its Local.Its Entertaining.Its Mobile. Got Download? Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com The iPad AppSearch Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Florida Weekly turns On Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 We Celebrate Our 10 Year Anniversary! To mark this milestone we are offering reduced rates to thank our many advertisers who have been with us over the years. Advertise your business in this special anniversary issue! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Fort Myers U{œ`-ii]-'ˆi£xUœi]™£U"™"£x Naples/Bonita Springs U™x£/>“ˆ>“ˆ/>ˆ œ…]-'ˆi""U >i]œˆ`>{£nU"™"x£™ Charlotte U£"xrˆ>Li…-ii]-'ˆiU*'>œ`>]œˆ`>™xU™{£"£{"" Palm Beach Gardens/West Palm U££n*œiˆ>“,œ>`]-'ˆi£U*>“i>V…>`i]{£Ux£™{{ CALL YOUR ACC OUNT EXECUTIV E TO DAY

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