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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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1 online resource : ;

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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
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AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

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THEFIX TO OUR WATER CRISIS IS COMPLICATED BUT DOABLE PROJECT EDITOR: BETTY WELLS PRESENTATION BY: ERIC RADDATZ SCOTT SLEEPER STORIES BY: ROGER WILLIAMS EVAN WILLIAMS NANCI THEORET Experts: Store it, treat it, move it south | 22 CERP, CEPP, Negron’s solutions | 22 The science of the algae blooms | 17 The uproar: People are anxious and angry | 20 The politics of it all: Promises & plans | How we got here: A timeline | 10 INSIDE Fort Myers Clewiston Belle GladeW CA 1WCA 2 WCA 3Shark River SloughC-43 Reservoir C-44 Resevoir Biscayne Bay Everglades National Park Big Cypress National Preserve Lake Okeechobee Florida BayWest Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Naples MiamiSt. Lucie River and estuaryFor thousands of years the north and south forks of the St. Lucie River rose or fell with seasonal rains, nourishing the wetlands and bearing no direct connection with either Lake Okeechobee in the west, or the Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean in the east. But late in the 19th century settlers began scraping out channels for navigation, ” ood control and water supply purposes, ultimately connecting the lake and the Atlantic along a 37-mile canal and profoundly altering the hydrology of the region. Proposed private land purchasesSenator Joe Negrons $2.4 billion proposal targets two agricultural parcels amounting to about 60,000 acres south and southwest of Lake Okeechobee for storing 120 billion gallons of water that would lessen discharges into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee estuaries and help restore water ” ows south to nourish the Everglades National Park. Water Conservation Areas (WCAs)South Floridas three WCAs are vast tracts of remnant Everglades sawgrass that together span 846,387 acres. They serve multiple purposes, including ” ood control, water supply and habitat for plants and animals. InflowOutflowPhosphorous uptake by ” oating plants Algae and periphyton phosphorus uptake Stormwater containing phosphorus enters the STA. Water with less phosphorus exits the STA. Uptake by emergent plants like cat tails and sawgrass Phosphorus uptake by submerged aquatic vegetationStormwater Treatment Areas: Green technologyŽ fitration-systemSTAs are constructed wetlands that remove and store nutrients and phosphorous through plant growth and the accumulation of dead plant material in a layer of sediment. Water then ” ows into the traditionally nutrient-poor Everglades system that suits and supports its needs. Restoring the natural flow to the Everglades ridge and slough landscape The predominant character of the traditional Everglades river of grassŽ was a peat-based ridge and slough landscape. Its features stretched south into the Shark River Slough from what are now the public-lands Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) known simply as 1, 2 and 3. The traditional landscape is severely degrading, becoming uniform and less directional. Scientists say it can be saved only by re-establishing appropriate water ” ow and direction. They note that the engineering and technology exists, waiting only to be joined by the political will.Central Everglades Planning ProjectCEPP is the next increment of CERP. It focuses on restoring a more natural ” ow into and through the central and southern Everglades by Increasing storage, removing canals and levees and retaining water within Everglades National Park both to prevent ” ooding in Broward or Miami-Dade Counties, and to help recharge the Biscayne Aquifer. That shallow aquifer provides the only source of drinking water for several million residents and visitors on the southeast coast.RidgeThe generally submerged ridges that separate sloughs are dominated by sawgrass.SloughThe open water sloughs are characterized by submerged and ” oating vegetation, including periphyton mats. Fl ow direct ionSouth Florida Water Management District border (includes 16 counties, the largest of “ ve Florida water management districts) Everglades Agricultural Area The Central and Southern Florida Project for Flood Control and Other Purposes (C&SF Project) of 1948 designed a 700,000 acre area of the northern Everglades, mostly south of Lake Okeechobee, to be managed for agriculture. Now the major crop of the EAA is sugarcane, grown across some 440,000 acres, but winter vegetables are also grown here. SOURCES: SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, U.S. ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS, NOAAMuskgrass Phosphorus storage in sediment Caloosahatchee River and estuarySince the late 1800s the river channel was straightened, deepened, and connected toLake Okeechobee, resulting in a loss of 76 river bends and 8.2 miles of length. One element of CERP is the addition of the C-43 West Basin Storage Reservoir which has a capacity of 170,000 acre-feet. Located south of the river and west of the Ortona Locks, it would store water to reduce damaging lake discharges in the wet season and enhance ” ows in the dry season.OrlandoKissimmee River and BasinOnce meandering for 103 miles through central Florida, the Kissimmee has undergone major changes. The C-38 canal was created to channel ” ow south to Lake Okeechobee. Since the Kissimmee River Restoration Project began in 1999, continuous water ” ow has been re-established to 24 miles of the river and by 2019 will return ” ow to 43 miles, restoring about 40 square miles of river/” oodplain ecosystem.Water storage: North vs. SouthSigni“ cantly greater water storage north, south, east and west of Lake Okeechobee is deemed crucial to Everglades restoration, to drinking water supplies for millions who rely on the Biscayne Aquifer or the lake, and to the healthy control of freshwater releases down the estuaries, according to a 2015 study by the University of Floridas Water Institute. But where and when to store the water, and with whose money, has now become a matter of heated debate and parochial interests. Some advocacy groups and political leaders insist water storage begin as soon as possible south of the lake in farm country. Some farm owners, agricultural businesses and other political leaders insist water storage begin immediately north of lake. Lake OkeechobeeThe 730-square-mile lake is the second largest lake in the lower 48 states. In 1926 and 1928 thousands were killed in ” oods when hurricanes overwhelmed the lake. The Herbert Hoover Dike was built by 1937 and expanded to its current structure by the 1960s. Its steward, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, marks a safe water level at 15.5 feet.Restoring the EvergladesThe Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, or CERP, is designed to repair damage to the natural ” ow of water from Orlando south to Florida Bay, saving the Everglades. The project is scheduled to be completed after 2030. On September 15 the U.S. Senate passed a $10 billion water bill that included $1.9 billion for Everglades restoration. The money, if rati“ ed by the House and signed by the president, would help start one of several CERP plans „ the Central Everglades Planning Project, or CEPP. Orlando Herbert Hoover Dike Clewiston Belle Glade Pahokee OkeechobeeRunoff Runoff Harmful Algal bloomsHABs occur when nutrient overloads of phosphorous, nitrogen and carbon help grow colonies that can poison sea grasses, “ sh, shell“ sh, marine mammals, birds and humans using fresh, brackish or saltwater lakes, estuaries and bays. The pollutants come from such sources as lawn fertilizer and aging water treatment plants in cities, thousands of leaking septic tanks in suburban and rural communities, and cow and crop farm operations.Cyanobacteria or blue-green algaeLow oxygen dead zone TS THE YEAR OF WATER IN FLORIDA. TS THE YEAR OF WATER IN FLORIDA. Unprecedented winter floods swept into Lake Unprecedented winter floods swept into Lake Okeechobee from the north, cascading into the Okeechobee from the north, cascading into the delicate estuaries on Floridas east and west coasts, delicate estuaries on Floridas east and west coasts, cooking up the worst summer algae blooms and fish cooking up the worst summer algae blooms and fish kills in memory. kills in memory. It was international news. Vacationers stayed It was international news. Vacationers stayed away. All businesses touched by tourism reeled away. All businesses touched by tourism reeled from revenue losses. from revenue losses. A fever pitch of frustration resulted in scores of A fever pitch of frustration resulted in scores of ISEE FIX, A11 X BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.com www.FloridaWeekly.com INSIDE LESLIE LILLY A2 OPINION A4PETS A6SOCIETY A8, B8-9, 12 BUSINESS A28MOVING ON UP A29REAL ESTATE A30ARTS B1 COLLECTORS B2EVENTS B4-6PUZZLES B11CUISINE B14-15 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store. PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 The DishThere’s nothing fishy about Limoncello’s new digs. B14 XBehind the WheelThere’s much to love in the new BMW X1. A25 X Burt’s back!Actor will appear for screening of “Hooper” at Rosarian. A7 X Green markets openWest Palm Beach, Gardens and other markets return. B1 XWEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016Vol. VI, No. 50  FREE

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Dr. Malek and our team heal for stroke patient Terry Tipple. At St. Marys Medical Center, our Comprehensive Stroke Center employs some of the most advanced life-saving stroke technologies including vascular catheterization, so our team can heal patients like Terry without wasting precious time. To hear Terrys story visit www.stmarysmc.com/our-stories/terrys-avm-story.Schedule a potentially life-saving Stroke Screening by calling 561-882-9100 or visit StMarysMC.com The Comprehensive Stroke Center at St. Marys Medical Center.We heal for you. StMarysMC.com We heal for Terry. Terry T ipple … Str oke Survivor 2015Ali R. Malek, MDMedical Director, SMMC Comprehensive Stroke Center8 Years COMMENTARYWhat? Only half?When I heard Hillary Clintons remark that half of Trumps supporters qualify for inclusion in a basket of deplorables,Ž my immediate reaction was, What!? Only half!?Ž Trumps ego is so epic, it is hard to believe he is only half-way successful at anything he does „ even if its just Hill-arys assessment of his success in recruit-ing supporters from the alt-right.Ž The alt-rightŽ is the term used to describe the loose confederation of extremists who support Trump. It includes xenophobes, anti-Semites and white nationalists. These radicals have always been present but held in abeyance at democracys table. They have found their champion in Donald Trump. He has legitimized their racial hatred, stoked their credibility and given them a voice and place of influence in his cam-paign. This unholy alliance of racial hatred with national ambition is one match short of incitement to violence. Its the new nor-mal in American politics. It takes a world-class con artist to pull this off. Only Trump could so popularize his brand of bigotry that his supporters wear Hillarys label of deplorablesŽ with pride. Sure, Hillary came up with the concept, but Trump owns the intellectual property rights. He courts the darkest of the dark side of the right wing. They serve as his personal militia. When provoked, he dog whistles them out of the shadows. Protestor at a rally? Punch em in the face. Trash talk from Hillary? Disarm her and take a shot. Trump supporters embolden his use of threats and intimidation on the campaign trail. His allusions to assassination are just a punchline to his sick-making, Second Amendment jokes. They laugh like hell when he tickles their funny bone with his casual incitements to violence. This is, after all, what makes them deplorables.Ž Despite conservative outrage, I think Hillary probably undercounted the closet haters among Trumps supporters overall. At the very least, the political road rage of some of his devotees puts them on the edge of the unthinkable. These are people who believe Stand Your GroundŽ is how arguments are won. When they say poli-tics is a contact sport, some Trump follow-ers tend to mean it literally. Yes, Hillary committed a Mitt Romney,Ž the political shorthand for something a politician says he/she will live to regret. Romneys namesake gaffe? He said 47 per-cent of Obama supporters are moochers, addicted to government handouts. This time, the Democrats pounced. They cried foul, defending the takers,Ž too, as hard, working, decent Americans. Hillarys sin? She lumped too many Trump believers in the basket with those ugly, hateful people, who, deep down, want to bury a hatchet in someones face. Trump supporters are decent, hardworking Amer-icans. They want America to be great again and safe from terrorism. They do not share or endorse Trumps racist, bigoted views. And maybe he isnt really any of those things anyway. Some conservatives may be forgiven for their star-spangled naivet. They are what I call Trump virgins, who are like teenag-ers who engage in unprotected sex and think their only risk is becoming a little bit pregnant. Those who excuse Trumps bigotry are really making excuses for themselves. They put his outrageous words into their mouths and go through verbal contor-tions to remove their moral inhibitions to saying them, too. They give his bombast a wash of acceptability, making up ratio-nalizations, issuing denials, venturing re-interpretations, or telling pants on fireŽ falsehoods. Then there are the Republicans who may privately despise Trump, but sup-port him anyway. They believe if Trump becomes president they will ride the tiger and hold him accountable. So respected, credible conservatives are repeating with a straight face Trumps bald-face lies. It was Hillary all along who originated and deserves the blame for the birther move-ment.Ž Other nondeplorables defend Trump by citing all the reasons they hate Hillary. They really like the idea of a rogue in the White House who promises, if elected, to blow up Washington and remake America as a white peoples version of Disneyland. In a letter to the editor of The Palm Beach Post, a Trump supporter wrote, I am not deplorable, just smart enough to know who has the best interests of my country at heart.Ž Here it was, the very essence of Trumps con: Persuading voters he has Americas best interests at heart „ this from a man who has lived his entire life focused only on his own self-interests, exploiting with-out shame, the hopes, fears, dreams, and vulnerabilities of his marks. Their wants and needs are only a means to his end. He crushes and throws away people no longer of value to him like yesterdays trash. If elected, Trump wont change his stripes. He believes he is Americas one true savior. Only he can make things right. Our Constitution was designed to protect and defend our democracy from a despot who harbors such a dangerously grand conceit. If the unthinkable happens, and Trump becomes president, Americans had best pray to God the Founding Fathers got it right. Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian. Her professional career spans more than 25 years leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and Appalachia. She writes frequently on issues of politics, public policy and philanthropy, earning national recognition for her leadership in the charitable sector. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly@florida weekly.com and read past blog posts on Tumblr at llilly15.Tumblr.com leslie LILLYllilly@floridaweekly.com

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Hands-Only Adult CPR Class Tuesday, October 18 @ 6:30-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach GardensEective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center sponsors a monthly CPR class for the community, held at the Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue. Local EMS will give a hands-only, adult CPR demonstration and go over Automated External De“brillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Reservations are required. Uncovering the Truth About Breast Cancer Sumithra Vattigunta, MD Oncologist Thursday, October 6 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, join Dr. Sumithra Vattigunta-Gopal, an oncologist on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, for an informative lecture on the latest in breast cancer research, treatment and prevention. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. Space is limited. OCTOBER Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.comFOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL855.387.5864 Heart Attack Risk Assessment (blood pressure, BMI, glucose and cholesterol) Wednesday, October 12 @ 8-11am Osteoporosis Screenings Thursday, October 20 @ 9am-1pm Take steps toward being heart healthy! Visit PBGMC.com/pledge to Receive a FREE Cookbook! FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGS COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center 3360 Burns Road What you Need to Know About AFib Simie Platt, MD Cardiac Electrophysiologist Thursday, October 20 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4Atrial “brillation is the most common type of heart arrhythmia. Join Dr. Simie Platt, a cardiac electrophysiologist on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, for an educational lecture on AFib risk factors, symptoms and treatment options available at the hospital. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. Space is limited.

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER PublisherBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsLeslie Lilly Roger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Jan Norris Mary Thurwachter Katie Deits Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Alisa Bowman Amy Grau Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Kathy Pierotti Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Sales and Marketing ExecutivesLisette Ariaslarias@floridaweekly.comAlyssa Liplesalipless@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez Circulation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Headley Darlington Clarissa Jimenez Giovanny Marcelin Brent Charles Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 n Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state ption s: ailed subscription .95 in-county $52.95 5 st ta in5 70 647 647 .6 4.6 .64 04 04 b he we e web th y y. ekl ekly ee ee o o cri cri sc b ptions: y y nty nty te te a at ate tate -st -sta OPINIONThey say never look back Never look back. Thats poor advice, but its poor advice perfectly tailored to fit a nation that sometimes pushes pragma-tism, profit and comfort to their foolish extremes. Dont ever look back, pal. Not only because something might be gaining on you, as Satchel Paige wisely pointed out, but because it just isnt practical. Its a waste of time and you wont make any money looking back. You have work to do so get your rear in gear.We live in the present and were going to the future, right? No. Wrong. Dead wrong.In large part, were going to where weve been „ unless we learn to pay attention to where weve been then go somewhere better. Besides, I happen to like looking back. The strangest things happen. One day you discover youre looking forward by looking back. Why just last week I was looking back down the long tunnel of time when sud-denly I spotted him: Donald by God Trump. Hed adopted the masterful dis-guise of a medicine show carnival barker. I recognized the man right off the bat, of course, by his hair and his smirk. Anybody would. He was standing on the back of a wagon in Biloxi wooing the eager „ the anxious, the frightened, the devout, the angry and self-righteous and those with warts and curved spines. Good people, most of them, just a little too eager for the world to be kinder to them, for the world to make more sense, for the world to be less complicated and a lot more comfort-able. He sounded a lot like a character out of Ann Andersons 2000 history, Snake Oil, Hustlers and Hambones: the American Medicine Show.Ž The book describes the kinds of places the Trumps of the world worked between about 1850 and 1930. And the kinds of things they said. In Mr. Trumps case the shtick has changed only slightly, which is part of why I like listening to the man. Carnival barkers are fun and full of promise, as this passage from Snake OilŽ suggests:How much is your health worth, ladies and gentlemen? Its priceless, isnt it?Well my friends, one half-dollar is all it takes to put you in the pink. Thats right, ladies and gents, for 50 pennies, Natures True Remedy will succeed where doc-tors have failed. Only Nature can heal, and I have nature right here in this little bottle. My secret formula, from Gods own laboratory, the Earth itself, will cure rheumatism, cancer, diabetes, baldness, bad breath and curvature of the spine.Ž Sure it will. Always has. Not only that, but itll cure terrorism and illegal immi-gration and ISIS and Chinese trade deals and godlessness and even get you a job, probably kicking immigrant butts and laughing at uppity little ladies who want to go to the White House as President Little Lady, not as First (Little) Lady. And its even cheaper than 50 pennies.All it takes for this miracle cure, ladies and gents, is a single vote for the Trump, free of charge and courtesy of the Ameri-can republic. Trust me. You vote for the snake oil cure and youll get it. Now its true that Mr. Trump has never claimed to have lived at historys cross-roads, unlike Gen. George S. Patton Jr., for example. The general, with absolutely no understanding of the Buddhist reasoning that celebrates reincarnation, seemed con-vinced that hed fought with Hannibal against the Romans 2,000 years ago, and with Napoleon in his European conquests 215 years ago, and all before leading the American Third Army into battle against the Germans in World War II. He must have been pretty damn tired by the time he got to 1944 and 45. But Mr. Trump doesnt have to make such a claim. The minute I saw him sell-ing snake oil off the back of the wagon, I knew hed been at some of historys cross-roads, too: Selling pigs bones as relics of the saints, or wood slivers presented as portions of the True Cross (the one Jesus got hung up on), in Europe in the Middle Ages. He sold gin in the 172 0s from thousands of door-front shops to Londoners who had never before encountered hard liquor, and who died by the thousands, their bod-ies collected each morning on carts by grave diggers and street cleaners. He sold leeches to 18thand 19th-century societies that believed blood-letting „ or blood sucking in the case of the leeches „ was a way to cure terrible diseases nobody understood by removing bad blood from the corpus animus. Mr. Trump is a champion of bloodletting from the American corpus animus. Remove that bad blood, now, he advises. Leech it out right smack dab here in the 21st century. In the home of the free and the land of the brave, Now Mr. Trump proposes to leech out the bad-blood M&Ms „ the Muslims and Mexicans. The countrys going to be great again, ladies and gents. Not just great again, but safe again. Trust him. And if you believe that, I have „ not a bridge in Nevada, not a refrigerator on the North Pole, not a cure for all cancers on the oncology ward of the Mayo clinic „ no. Instead, I have a truckload of snake oil for you, Payable On Delivery. Your vote Nov. 8 for the snake oil. Starting Nov. 9. Q A big, beautiful black swanIf you arent seriously contemplating the biggest black swan event in American elec-toral history, you arent paying attention.Fifteen months ago, Donald Trump was a reality-TV star with a spotty business record and a weird penchant for proclaim-ing that he was on the verge of running for president. Now, hes perhaps a few big breaks and a couple of sterling debate per-formances away from being elected 45th president of the United States.Trump has no experience in elected office and, unlike past nonpoliticians elected president, hasnt won a major war. He perhaps knows less about public affairs than the average congressman. He has repeatedly advertised his thin-skinned vindictiveness and is trampling on basic political norms. No major political party has ever nominated anyone like this. Trump now has a legitimate shot at winning the general election because he got the lucky draw of at least the sec-ond-worst presidential nominee in recent memory and, pending how she fares over the next two months, perhaps the worst. All it took for Trump to wipe away most of Hillary Clintons lead was act-ing like a somewhat normal presidential candidate. Have a meeting with a foreign leader. Give some policy speeches. Read from a teleprompter at rallies. Use his NPR voice when appropriate. None of this required strategic genius, only a decision not to throw away the election with repeated episodes of self-indulgent stupidity. Democrats should be feeling a creeping sense of panic: Q They are trying to win with a candidat e who is loathed and distrust ed and has few redeeming qualities. As Yuval Levin, editor of the journal National Affairs, points out, corrupt and dishonest politicians are often entertaining, and dull politicians are usually earnest and honest. Hillary manages to be both boring and corrupt. Q No one can be certain that her health is w hat the campaign says it is. Even if nothing else ails her, if Clinton has anoth-er episode in public like the one on Sept. 11, the bottom might fall out. Q President Obama probably cant close Hillarys enthusiasm gap. Obama is an adept campaigner, but there is no evidence he ever successfully transferred enthusi-asm for himself to another candidate. Q If the kitchen sink hasnt killed off Trump, what else is there? The Clinton campaign has already used his great-est hits of most offensive statements in countless TV ads. If none of this has sunk Trump, whats left? Q A compelling Trump debate performanc e could chang e perceptions of his suitability to be commander in chief. Hill-ary is trouncing Trump on this attribute by a 2-to-1 margin. If Trump shows up and seems plausible during the biggest moment of the campaign, he could vastly improve his standing on this basic ques-tion of readiness.All this said, Hillary probably still has an advantage. She has a campaign and Trump doesnt, and that must count for something. Demographics favor her. But if Trump can hoist himself over the bar of acceptability, he might give the voting public enough permission to make this the change elec-tion it is naturally inclined to be.A Trump victory may not be likely, but it isnt far-fetched. And no, stranger things havent happened. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 A5 DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor | Clinic Director Get Back in the Game Full Physical Therapy Facility Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY AUTO ACCIDENT? School Physical Camp Physic al, Sports Ph ysical $20 GIFT CERTIFICATEThis certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 10/06/2016.$150VALUE COMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTICEXAMINATION & CONSULTATION PAPA CHIROPRACTIC & PHYSICAL THERAPY XXX1BQB$IJSPDPNt 25 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS DR. ALESSANDRA COL"NChiropractor PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598 PORT ST. LUCIE9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300 JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458561.744.7373 4 4 5 5 6 6 CAPEHART PHOTOStarting at left and going around the table: Chandni Smith, mom; Elsa Nunes, GL Homes’ human resources manager; Jasmine Atwaters, mom; Maria Menendez, GL Homes’ CFO; Diana Stanley, Lord’s Place CEO; Suzanna Williams, mom; Sarah Alsofrom, GL Homes’ community relations director; Ashanta Futch, mom;Deirdre Cunningham, mom; Courtney Hogan, mom Carol Duncanson, GL Homes’ VP of human resources; and LaChiquita Moore, mom.GL Homes treats moms from The Lord’s Place to dinner outGL Homes made a commitment to support organizations that aid the homeless in Palm Beach County. One of the nonprofits it supports is The Lords Place. GL recently treated mothers from The Lords Place to a Moms Night Out at Table 26 in West Palm Beach. In 2015, The Lords Place provided supportive housing to 337 homeless men, women and children. Also, 96 formerly homeless individuals gained employment through its job training and education programs. For more information, visit thelords place.org. Q Palm Beach Treasures e Best of the Over 20,000 Sq.Ft Fine Furnishing | Designer Clothing | Estate Jewelry www.DejaVuDesignCenter.com4084 PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens just east of I95 on PGA Blvd behind the Shell Station Why Buy Newƒƒ.Call DejaVuŽ 561-225-1950 WE PAY 80% COMMISSION ON LOUIS VUITTON, CHANEL AND BERKIN HANDBAGS. COME CHECK OUT OURNEW ARRIVALS!!!! SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Complete Care in One State-of-the-Art Facility‡ &RQYHQLHQW3DOP%HDFK*DUGHQV/RFDWLRQ ‡ ,PSODQWDQG&RVPHWLF'HQWLVWU\ ‡ *HQHUDODQG5HVWRUDWLYH'HQWLVWU\ ‡ )XOO\(TXLSSHGZLWKWKH/DWHVW7HFKQRORJ\ ‡ '&76FDQVDQG'LJLWDO;UD\V ‡ ,9DQG2UDO6HGDWLRQ&HUWLILHG ‡ 7HHWK1H[W'D\ ‡ =LUFRQLD,PSODQW%ULGJH PGA dentistry.com 7KHSDWLHQWDQGDQ\RWKHUSHUVRQUHVSRQVLEOHIRUSD\PHQWKDVDULJKWWRUHIXVHWRSD\FDQFHOSD\PHQWRUEHUHLPEXUVHGIRUDQ\RWKHUVHUYLFHH[DPLQDWLRQRUWUHDWPHQWWKDWLVSHUIRUPHGDV DUHVXOWRIDQGZLWKLQKRXUV RIUHVSRQGLQJWRWKHDGYHUWLVHPHQWIRUWKHIUHHGLVFR XQWHGIHHRUUHGXFHGIHHVHUYLFHH[DPLQDWLRQRUWUHDW PHQW&RPSUHKHQVLYH([DPLQDWLRQ')XOO0RXWK'LJLWDO ;UD\' Tim After Tim Before “ I’ve always been unhappy with my smile, but I was too nervous to have the work done. With the IV sedation, I never felt a thing and the results are amazing.” – Tim PGA Advanced Dentistry provides patients with leading-edge procedures in cosmetic, implant, and restorative dentistry, so you can have the s mile you’ve always dreamed of. Dr. Jay Ajmo, D.D.S., DABOI LVRQHRI6RXWK)ORULGDVOHDGLQJ GHQWLVWVWUHDWLQJSDWLHQWVZLWKWKHKLJKHVWOHYHORIFDUHVLQFH'U$MPRLVRQHRIRQO\GHQWLVWVZRUOGZLGHWRKROGD'LSOR PDWH &HUWLILFDWLRQZLWKWKH$PHULFDQ%RDUGRI2UDO,PSODQWRORJ\ Trust your smile to an expert. For your Complimentary Consultation or second opinion, call 561.627.8666. ,QFOXGHV1R&KDUJH)XOO0RXWK;UD\ )DLUZD\'ULYH6XLWH | 3DOP%HDFK*DUGHQV)/ Are You Suffering from Failing and Missing Teeth, or Wearing Dentures? PET TALESPaws on the trail: Seven hikes to enjoy with your dog BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTONUniversal UclickFor most places in the country, tourist season is over. The crowds are gone, and the weather is cooler. Beach season has cooled off, and ski season hasnt heated up yet. That means only one thing: Its time to hit the hiking trails „ with your dog, natch. Weve rounded up seven dog-friendly hiking trails across the country, from California to Maine. Let us know your favorites. Q California. Pacific Crest Trail to Eagle Rock. Get a taste of the Pacific Crest Trail on this scenic and easy to moderate hike featuring wildflowers, the occasional coyote and, of course, the Eagle Rock formation. While there are trees and a stream at the beginning, the remainder of the trail is less sheltered, so its best done late fall through spring. It is awesome,Ž says Dawn Celapino of Leash Your Fitness, who does all things outdoors with her dog, Jack. The trail-head is at Agua Caliente Creek bridge near the town of Warner Springs. Q Washington. Spruce Railroad Trail at Olympic National Park is one of the few national park trails open to leashed dogs. The 8-mile round-trip hike, near Port Angeles, is on gently rolling terrain with views of Lake Crescent. Suitable for year-round hiking. Q Colorado. Travois Trail in Jefferson Countys Centennial Cone Open Space Park is a little more than 13 miles, but its not necessary to do the full loop. A 90-minute out and back hike is what Roxanne Hawn likes to do with her border collies Clover and Tori. Its a single-track trail most of the way with some good climbs, but they arent too steep or too long,Ž Ms. Hawn says. You definitely want to keep your dog on leash because there is wildlife in the area.Ž Shes seen deer, elk, rattlesnakes, mountain lions, coyotes and bobcats. Parts of the trail are closed in fall for hunting season and from January through May for elk calving season. Q Arkansas. Dorothy Guertin and her 10-year-old goldendoodle, Elvis, live in quirky Eureka Springs, Ark., in the rug-gedly beautiful Ozark Mountains. When they go hiking, their favorite spot is 1,600-acre Lake Leatherwood City Park, an area thats on the National Register of Historic Places. There are scenic limestone bluffs, a rock quarry, lake views and an abundance of wildlife,Ž Ms. Guertin says. There is nothing bet-ter on a beautiful day than a hike around the lake.Ž Q Georgia. Have you ever thought it would be cool to hike the Appalachian Trail, but know youd never have the time? You dont have to do all of it, and you can bring your dog on most sec-tions of the trail. In Georgia, check out 5.7-mile Appalachian Trail, Jarrard Trail and Slaughter Creek loop, which begins and ends at Lake Winfield Scott. Q Maryland. For nearly 100 years, the C&O Canal through the Potomac River Valley was an important transportation route for coal and other goods. Now its the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Nation-al Historic Park, with a nearly 185-mile towpath from Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Md. The gentle and mostly level trail is dog-friendly and offers stunning scenery and abundant wildlife. Try the 3.2-mile Gold Mine Loop that begins at the Great Falls Tavern Visitor Center. Dogs are not allowed on section A of Billy Goat Trail or on the overlook trail to Great Falls. Q Maine. Acadia National Park encompasses 74 square miles of Mount Desert Island, and its very likely the most dog-friendly national park. Dogs and their people have access to 100 miles of hiking trails and 45 miles of crushed-rock carriage roads. Schooner Head Path offers ocean, forest and mountain views at Schooner Head Overlook. The easy one-way trail runs 5.4 miles to Bar Harbor. Q Pets of the Week>> Enzo a 3-yearold, 44-pound male mixed breed dog, is a happy-go-lucky kind of guy who knows his name and how to sit on command. >> Lana 1-yearold female domestic shorthair cat, was born at the shelter and has stayed in a foster home. She loves to be petted.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches is at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. >> Dodie a 4-yearold neutered male orange tabby, is very affectionate and loves to play (especially in water). >> Pinkie a 3-yearold spayed sandy-colored female tabby, is very friendly, and loves to be held. She gets along with other cats. To adopt or foster a catAdopt A Cat is a freeroaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment. Call 848-4911, Option 5. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, adoptacatfoundation.org. Q Keep dogs leashed on hikes to protect them from wildlife — and vice versa.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 A7 A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in todays market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers dont get what they want for their homes and become disillusioned and worse financially disadvantaged when they put their homes on the mar-ket. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insid-ers have prepared a free special report entitled The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top DollarŽ. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-866-274-7449 and enter 2000. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out how you can get the most money for your home.This report is courtesy of Chasewood Realty, Inc. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contrac t. Copyright 20167 Deadly mistakes that will cost you thousands when you sell your Jupiter homeAdvertorial A Cn H 605 South Olive Avenue • West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 655-3109 • www.andersonshardware.comAVAILABLE THROUGH Learn more at jupitermedphysiciansgroup.com 1210 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458 A Comprehensive Approach to Breast Care Jupiter Medical Center welcomes Lucy M. De La Cruz, MD,fellowship-trained breast surgeon Dr. De La Cruz is the newest member of the Comprehensive Breast Care Program. She is dedicated to providing the highest quality, compassionate care for every patient, leveraging expertise in minimally invasive surgical breast conservation and complex reconstruction techniques. Dr. De La Cruz, with her skills and knowledge, is a welcome addition to the multidisciplinary breast team that creates custom-tailored plans for treating and surviving breast cancer. Highly trained, with an extensive background in research, Dr. De La Cruz completed a fellowship in breast surgical oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also fluent in Spanish, English and Portuguese.To schedule an appointment with Dr. De La Cruz, please call 561-263-4400. Coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus. In New York, coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of New York. Policies may not be available in all states. There may be indirect administrative or other costs. M1863C 7/12 Andrew Spilos | (561) 685-5845 | andrew_spilos@us.a”ac.comRosarian Academy will welcome movie star Burt Reynolds to its stage at the Picotte Fine Arts Center on Oct. 15. The event is a fundraiser for the Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre and will also benefit the theater arts program at Rosarian Academy. Prior to a showing of Mr. Reynolds hit movie Hoop-er,Ž there will be a 30-minute Q&A with questions submitted by the audience. In a recent interview, Mr. Reynolds said he appreciates these opportunities to connect directly with his fans. I never know what ques-tions will be asked. Sometimes I think my fans know more about my life than I do. Anticipation keeps me on my toes.Ž Hooper,Ž an action/comedy film released in 1978, was directed by Mr. Reynolds good friend, the late Hal Needham, and also stars Sally Field, Jan-Michael Vincent, Brian Keith, Rob-ert Klein, James Best and Adam West. The film pays homage to stuntmen and stuntwomen who, at one time, were unrecognized and unappreciated in the movie industry. In September 2015, Mr. Reynolds was honored with the Richard Farnsworth Diamond Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions supporting stunt-men in the film industry. In his acceptance speech he said, ƒ being honored by my fellow stunt-men „ the people I believe deserve much more credit than they have ever been given for making a good movie great „ is one of the highlights of my life.Ž Mr. Reynolds film career includes performances as Lewis Medlock in the film DeliveranceŽ and Bo BanditŽ Darville of Smokey and the BanditŽ fame. The movie will begin at 7:30 p.m. with the Q&A followed by the showing of HooperŽ at 8 p.m. Tickets are $35 and are available at ra.booktix.com. Q Burt Reynolds to appear at Rosarian Academy screeningREYNOLDS SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Because sports injuries are more common than you think.For Health. For Life. Walk-in Urgent Care Available 7 Days a Week: 10 a.m. 10 p.m.nicklauschildrens.org/PalmBeachGardens It’s free! Download our 11310 Legacy Avenue at Legacy Place Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 | 561-624-9188 COURTESY PHOTOS LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law reception to honor alumnus John Whittles, newly elected president of the Palm Beach County Bar Association 1. Jene Williams-Rhoads, Pamela Balaguera, Eunice Baros, John Whittles and Ettie Feistmann 2. Eunice Baros, Carl Domino and Cynthia Pyfrom 3. Ettie Feistmann, John Whittles and Brian Balaguera 4. Hope Baros and Gregg Lerman 5. Joyce Conway and Greg Tendrich 6. Ettie Feistman and Joyce Conway 7. John Whittles and Stephen Mathison 1 2 4 6 7 3 5

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Q 2.8 million years ago: The Florida peninsula emerges from the seas like a slow-rising saltwater crocodile. Q 5,000 years ago: The subtropics and the current water system come fully into being. Glaciers have scraped out a shallow depression Indians will later call Okeechobee. From north of Okeechobee almost 200 miles to Florida Bay, the topography is almost as at as a table. It slopes downward to the south at about an inch per mile. Q 1513: Ponce de Leon and the Europeans rst encounter Florida and the inhospitable Calusa Indians. Q 1800: In the western Everglades, the last of the Calusa Indians along the Caloosa-hatchee River and in Charlotte Harbor have likely vanished forever the extinction of a once-commanding tribe. Q 1845: Florida becomes a state. Federal and state of cials create the rst-ever plans to drain parts of it and control water. Q 1862: The Homestead Act, allowing ranchers and farm-ers to own land if they could produce on it for ve years, will ultimately attract the rst sizeable number of settlers into the northern Everglades region. Q 1883: Hamilton Disston digs the rst canal connecting the Caloosahatchee, and therefore the Gulf of Mexico, with Lake Okeechobee. Q Mid-1920s: The Okeechobee Waterway is dug, connecting Lake O. with the north- owing south fork of the St. Lucie River, which empties into the Atlantic at Stuart. Q 1926 and 1928: Hurricanes overwhelm Lake Okeechobee, killing thousands and creating a demand for a dike that could hold water and protect development south, east and west of the lake. Q 1929-30: President Herbert Hoover orders the Army Corps of Engineers to bring Okeechobee "under control." Work begins. Q 1935: Locks at Moore Haven and Ortona are opened. Q 1935: The U.S. Sugar Corporation begins growing small amounts of sugar cane near Lake Okeechobee. Q 1937: The Herbert Hoover Dike surrounding Lake Okeechobee is n-ished in a footprint of its current form, but work continues into the 1960s. That dike nowadays 143 miles in circumference, 35 feet high and under repair is judged by engineers to be capable of retain-ing a safe water level no higher than 15.5 feet. When the level might or does exceed that, torrents of water are released down the estuaries. In addi-tion, the dike nally and permanently cuts off water sup-plied from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay for the rst time in 5,000 years. Q 1947: Marjory Stoneman Douglas publishes "The Everglades: River of Grass," warning of its losses and po-tential destruction. The book creates a widespread aware-ness of catastrophic environmental damage. Q 1947: President Harry Truman dedi-cates the original Everglades National Park, now about 1.5 million acres, a quarter of the original Everglades. Q 1948: Under President Truman, the 700,000-acre Everglades Agricultural Area is created. The land is mucked out, canals and pump systems installed and larger-scale farming begun south of the lake. The idea is to allow farmers to contrib-ute signi cantly to the food supply of Floridians and the American people. Q 1959-60: During the Cuban revolu-tion, the wealthy Fanjul family, sugar producers, ees Castro to Florida. Here, the U.S. Sugar Corp. is already growing sugar cane in the traditional Everglades near Lake O. The family begins buying land around Lake O. Sparring with Cas-tro, President Ken-nedy orders price supports for sugar cane farmers (U.S. taxpayers make up the difference between the world market price and what sugar growers are paid). Ultimately, price supports build the wealth of the Mott family, owners of U.S. Sugar, and the Fanjul family. The Fanjuls now own Florida Crystals and other enter-prises worldwide. The price supports still exist. Sugar producers are paid roughly twice the cost of sugar on the world market. Q 1962: The Army Corps of Engineers completes work on the Caloosahatchee River, straightening the traditional wind-ing ow-way and creating a direct pipeline a canal from the lake to Charlotte Harbor. Q 1960s: Work and renovations on the expanded Herbert Hoover dike are completed. Q 1972: The federal Clean Water Act is enacted, regulating pollutants discharged into U.S. waters. The Clean Water Act provides the state an oppor-tunity to control and reduce pollution. Q 1980s: Concerned about increasing levels of phosphorous and nitrogen and rising lake levels, of cials restrict the amount of phosphorous that dairy farms can put into their water (the restrictions take effect in 1987). Many in the Kis-simmee River Basin go out of business (the state offers a buyout program). Remaining farmers must retain dirty water in retention ponds and spray elds, cleaning it and recycling it. Q 1992: The last and nal leg of I-75, the greatest single detriment to south owing water besides the dike and the EAA, is completed. The Interstate Highway connects Miami and Naples with the rest of the four-lane I-75 highway system. Q 1992: Money for restoration of the central portion of the Kissimmee Riv-er, 103 miles from Lake Kissimmee to Lake Okeechobee, is authorized by Congress. To date, 43 miles are being restored, creating signi cantly better water conditions in the basin of the northern Everglades. Q 1999-2000: Congress passes the Comprehensive Everglades Restora-tion Plan, known as CERP. The plan is designed to alter the 20th and early 21st century manage-ment of water from near Orlando south to Florida Bay, sav-ing the Everglades. The projected date of completion: after 2030. Q 2004-2005: Red tide, although naturally occurring at least in small measure, explodes along the coasts, killing sh and dampening tourism. Scientists point to nitrogen combined with other nutrients as the cause. Q 2007: In a drought, water managers excavate the lake bottom, removing tons of muck and discover-ing that it contains levels of pesticides, including arsenic, four times higher than the maximum limit for residential land. It is also too toxic for use on commercial or agricultural lands. Q 2008: The Lake O. level is so low during drought that portions of the old lake bottom catch re. Q 2008: Gov. Charlie Crist proposes buy-ing land from the U.S. Sugar Corpora-tion south of the lake to open a ow-way for southbound water through the great EAA barrier. Although U.S. Sugar expresses a willing-ness to sell, the Fanjuls resist the notion energetically. The deal ultimately fails. Q 2010: Gov. Rick Scott is elected gov-ernor. By the follow-ing year he begins laying off many state employees, including almost 200 workers and regulators in the Department of Envi-ronmental Protection and the South Florida Water Management District. Q 2010: Among the unregulated in uences is dry sludge treated human waste sold as fertilizer and mixed with compost to spread on elds in the river basin, a potential huge source of nitrogen not yet fully under-stood or measured. Q 2010 to present: More than 40 miles of the Kis-simmee River Basin being restored to a wetland averaging 1.5 miles in width (it originally averaged three miles), allow-ing water owing from the north to be greatly slowed and thus cleaned before it reaches the lake. Most of the groundwater enter-ing the lake comes down the Kissimmee basin. The work is ongoing, with completion expected by 2019. Plans to store water north of the lake are also moving forward. 1513 1883 1930 1948 1959 2008 2010 1968 Q 5,000 years ago: Th e subtropics and the current water s y stem come full y into being. Glaciers have scraped out a shallow de p ression In d i a n s will l a t e r c all O keechobee. From north o f O keechobee almost 200 m il es to Fl or id a B ay, t h e topograp h y is almost as at as a ta bl e. I t s l opes d ownwar d to t h e sout h at a b out an i nc h per m il e Q 1 800 : I n t h e w estern Everglades, th e l as t o f th e Ca l usa In d i a n s a long the C aloosa h atc h ee Ri ver an d in C harlotte Harbor have likely vanished f o r e v e r th e extinction o f a once c omman di ng tr ib e. Q 1 8 4 5 : F lorida becomes a state. Federal and state o f c i a l s c r ea t e th e rst-ever plans to drain parts of it and co ntr o l w a t e r. Q 1883: H am il ton Disston digs the rst cana l connect i ng the Caloosahatchee, and there f ore the G ulf of Mexico, with Lake O keechobee. Q 1926 and 1 9 2 8 : Hu rri ca n es overw h e l m L a k e O keechobee, killing thousands and creating a demand f o r a d ik e th a t cou l d h o ld water an d p rotect d eve l o p ment sout h east an d west of the lake Q 1935 : L oc k s a t Moore Haven and Ortona are o p ened Q 193 7: Th e He r be rt Hoo v e r Dike surroun di ng L a k e O keechobee is n ished in a f ootprint o f its current f orm, b ut wor k cont i nues i nt o t he 1 960s Tha t dik e nowa d ays 143 m il es i n circum f erence, 35 feet high and under r epair is judged b y eng i neers to b e capable o f retain ing a sa f e water level no higher than 1 5 5 f ee t. Wh e n the level might or d oes excee d t h at, torrents o f water are r eleased down the estuaries. In addi tion, the dike nally an d permanent l y cuts o ff water sup plied f rom Lake O keechobee to F lorida Bay for the rst time in 5,000 y ears. Q 1 947: P res id ent H arry Truman dedi c ates the original E verglades National P ark, now about 1 .5 million acres, a quarter o f the o r i g i na l E verg l a d es. Q 1960s: Work and r enovations on the e xpanded Herbert Hoo v e r d ik e a r e completed. Q 2 008 : The Lake O l e v e l i s so l o w d ur i ng d roug h t t h at p ortions o f the old l a k e b ottom catc h re Q 2 0 1 0 : Gov. Ric k S cott is elected gove rnor. By the followi ng year he begins l aying o ff many state e mployees, including a lm os t 2 00 w o rk e r s a nd regulators in the D epartment of Envir onmental Protection a nd the South Florida W ater Management D istrict. Q 2010 to p resent: Mo r e t ha n 40 miles o f the Kiss i mmee Ri ver B as i n b eing restored to a w etland averaging 1 .5 miles in width (it o r i g i na ll y average d th ree m il es ) a ll owi ng water owing f rom the north to b e greatly slowed a n d th us c l ea n ed b e f ore it reaches t he lake. Most o f the g roundwater enteri ng the lake comes do wn th e Ki ss imm ee b as i n. Th e wor k i s ongo i ng, w i t h c om pl et i on ex p ecte d by 2019. Plans to store water north o f the lake are also m oving f orward. Q 1980s: Co n ce rn ed abou t increasing levels o f ph os ph orous an d ni trogen an d r i s i ng lake levels, of cials res tr ic t t he a m ou nt o f phosphorous that d air y f arms can p ut i nto t h e i r water ( t h e r estr i ct i ons ta k e e ffect in 1987). M an y i n t h e Ki ss i mmee Ri ver B as i n g o out o f business (the state o ff ers a buyout program). R emaining farmers must reta i n di rty water i n retent i on p on d s an d s p ra y elds, cleaning it and recycling it. Q 1962 : Th e A rmy C orps of Engineers com p letes work on the Caloosahatchee R iver, straightening t h e tra di t i ona l w i n d i ng ow-way and creat i ng a di rect p i p eline a canal from the lake to Charlotte Harbor. Q 1 999 -2 000 : Congress passes the Com p rehensive E verg l a d es R estora t i on Pl an, k nown as C ERP. The p lan is d es i gne d to a l ter t h e 20t h an d ear ly 21st cen t ury manage ment o f water f rom n ear O rlando south to Fl or id a B a y savi ng t h e E verg l a d es. Th e pro j ecte d d ate o f completion: a f ter 2030  Someone has to pay for that land. It would have to go through the eminent domain process. In Washington, were in a competition for money for what Sen. Negron is proposing to buy „ and it would begin in CERP funding. It may very well be necessary. And it may be necessary to purchase more land. But I would also ask people to take into account communities in Belle Glade and Clewiston and around the lake. Its not just Big Sugar. Its smaller and associated businesses that would be affected. Those communities are already distressed. No one is talking to them. What about their lives? Ž Republican Marco Rubio of West Miami, U.S. Senator To fix Floridas water system, first the House needs to follow the Senates lead and secure funds for the Central Everglades Planning Project. And we have to use Amendment 1 money „ what a unique opportunity. Now we have hundreds of millions of dollars to buy more land, primarily south of the Lake. We dont have much time to get this right. Were almost past due when you look at the algae, and we have to have more water flowing south to keep salt intrusion out of the aquifer. Once it starts, its very tough to reverse that trend. Ž— Democrat U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy of Jupiter (running for U.S. Senate against Sen. Marco Rubio) EVERGLADES TIMELINE

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A11Q 2012: Under the Scott administration, the budget for the 16-county SFWMD, the largest in Florida and tasked with managing water north, south, east and west of Lake Okeechobee in conjunction with the Army Corps, is cut in half. Q 2013 – 2016: Both east and west of the lake, as well as south into Florida Bay, algae blooms, ooding and destruction of ora and fauna become more evident than ever before, creating a new political challenge for Florida's federal, state and local of- cials. Q 2013-16: The lake level is peri-odically so high the dike could collapse. The Army Corps begins the most massive releases in the history of the lake, including an unprecedented release in January 2016. When the Corps releases fresh water down the Caloosa-hatchee and the St. Lucie, the ora and fauna begin to die in large quanti-ties, media reports point nationally and internationally to the resulting Florida water problem, and businesses on both the east and west coasts suffer. Q 2016: A real estate expert for the South Florida Water Management Dis-trict estimates land south of the lake is now worth about $10,000 per acre; land north of the lake is worth about $5,000 per acre. Q 2016: For the rst time in the history of the central and southern portions of Florida, in every political race from local to regional to state to national elections, including the presidential race, water be-comes a campaign issue. Q August 2016: State Sen. Joe Negron, president-elect of the Senate, proposes that the state and federal government split the cost to buy 60,000 acres south of Lake Okeechobee. Q September 2016: Florida's U.S. Senators, Bill Nelson, a Democrat, and Marco Rubio, a Republican, nally convince the Senate to include $1.9 billion in a water bill for Everglades res-toration. The money will help pay for a suite of jobs known as the Central Everglades Planning Project, just one part of the massive Central Everglades Restoration Project. The dry season is still six weeks away. 2012 2016 TODAY Q 20 1 3 – 20 1 6 : Bo th eas t a n d w es t o f the lake, as well as south into Florida B ay, algae blooms, ooding and destruction o f ora and f auna become m ore ev id ent t han ever before, creat i ng a new p o li t i ca l c h a ll enge f or Florida's f ederal, s tate and local o f cials. Q 2016: A real e state ex p ert for the S outh Florida Water Management Dis tri c t es tim a t es l a n d sou th o f th e l a k e i s n ow worth about $10,000 p er acre; land north of the lake is worth about $5,000 p er acre Q S eptembe r 2016: F l o ri da s U S S enators, Bill N elson, a Democrat, and Marco Rubio, a R e p ublican, nall y co nvin ce th e Se n a t e to include $ 1.9 b illi o n in a w a t e r b ill f or Everglades res toration. The mone y will hel p p a y for a suite o f jobs known as th e Ce ntr a l E verglades Planning P roject, just one p art of the massive Central Everglades R estorat i on P ro j ect Th e d r y season i s still six weeks awa y Q 2 0 1 3 -1 6 : The l ake level is perio dically so high the d ike could collapse. T he Army C orps begins the most mass iv e r e l eases i n the history of the lake, including a n unprecedented r elease in January 2 0 1 6 Wh e n th e C orps releases f resh water down the C aloosa ha t c h ee a n d th e S t. L ucie, the ora and fauna begin to die i n large quantit i es, me di a reports p o i nt nat i ona lly an d i nternat i ona lly to t h e resu l t i ng Fl or id a water p ro bl em, an d b us i nesses on b ot h t h e east an d west c oasts su ff er. new advocacy groups, petitions, rallies and new advocacy groups, petitions, rallies and protests protests Following the heaviest rains ever recorded Following the heaviest rains ever recorded for the month of January „ 10 or more for the month of January „ 10 or more inches above the average 2 inches, in many inches above the average 2 inches, in many places „ releases from the lake into the St. places „ releases from the lake into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers began in Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers began in February. February. When the lake level gets too high, its aging When the lake level gets too high, its aging dike „ which protects nearby communities dike „ which protects nearby communities like Belle Glade, Clewiston and Pahokee „ like Belle Glade, Clewiston and Pahokee „ is in peril of collapsing. The Army Corps of is in peril of collapsing. The Army Corps of Engineers, responsible for the dike, issues Engineers, responsible for the dike, issues the orders to release the water. the orders to release the water. So far this year, 614 billion gallons have So far this year, 614 billion gallons have been released, about double the quantity in been released, about double the quantity in calmer years, making this th calmer years, making this the third worst year since 1963. With much more rain it could become the worst year. Experts, advocates and volunteers of every stripe have waded into the debate about what to do. A 2015 study by scientists at the University of Florida Water Institute calls for a com-prehensive re-engineering of the Everglades system, with action on every side of Lake O. But the pressure from his constituents led State Sen. Joe Negron of Stuart „ the place in Martin County perhaps hit hardest by the inches-thick guacamole algae,Ž as some call it „ to propose a state and federal buyout of 60,000 acres in the lakes traditional south-ern flow way. That land would capture, treat and transfer water into the Everglades. Despite repeated requests over a fourweek period for an interview with Florida Weekly, Sen. Negron declined to answer telephone calls or emails. His plan has prompted a hot debate about whether government should buy or take land from farms or cane fields, or whether water should be first captured and cleaned to the north, before moving it into the lake and south. On the environmental side, Captains for Clean Water, the Everglades Foundation, One Florida, Audubon, Riverwatch, 1000 Friends of Florida, the Florida Oceanograph-ic Society and the many signers of the Now or Neverglades Declaration have shared their voices. They want water stored, treated and transported from south of the lake to Florida Bay, as soon as possible. On the agricultural side, U.S. Sugar, Florida Crystals and numerous farm and lake-area businesses with well-versed town and county politicians have been equally vocal. They want water stored and treated north of the lake. Real estate, tourism, and service-industry voices, perhaps having the most to lose, just want the bad water to be dealt with else-where, but not in the coastal communities where theyve thrived for decades. If Floridians agree on one thing, its this: Floridas hydrological wonder, the vast water system stretching 200 miles south from the Chain-of-Lakes near Orlando to Florida Bay, is in dangerous disrepair. And its getting worse, even with decades of study and local fixes. The ecological, economic and geographic future of Florida „ the single American state most deeply defined and shaped by water „ now hangs in a precarious bal-ance between natural torrents difficult to control and clean, and the 1,000-person-a-day torrent of humanity moving into the Sunshine State, where 20 million residents could become 33 million or more by 2070, demographers say. A saga of errors created this monstrosity,Ž says Nathaniel Reed, chairman emeritus of 1000 Friends of Florida. Hes describing a tale of engineering dating back to the 1880s. Mr. Reed served as assistant secretary of the interior for presidents Nixon and Ford, and worked under several Florida governors, helping to shape water policy. This saga and its solution matters to every single Floridian and future visitor, for a sim-ple reason: Humans require potable water. And if more water cant be stored north and south, then cleaned and delivered into the Everglades, we wont be able to drink or bathe without multi-billion-dollar desalini-zation engineering. If we dont have water in the Everglades, you dont have water in your tap. Were on our own. Were on a peninsula and cant borrow water from another state,Ž explains Shannon Estenoz, director for the U.S. Department of the Interiors Office of Everglades Initiatives. A Florida native, she previously served on the governing board of the South Florida Water Management District. Delivering enough clean groundwater south into the Everglades will guarantee that the shallow Biscayne Aquifer remains fresh „ that saltwater does not destroy it. That Aquifer is the single water source for millions of residents and visitors to Floridas urbanized southeast coast. In addition, Lake Okeechobee itself is the back-up water supply for about 6 million peo-ple living in the region, water managers say. With a national election only weeks away, the politics and hydrology of the Flori-da water problem seems to change almost every day. But if we continue to bandage the problem or do nothing, finally, the system will continue to degrade „ nobody disputes that. And those likely to be stung by the economics of bad water or patchwork solutions will continue to argue the economics. Even in the current form, those numbers are impressive. U.S. Sugar, Florida Crystals and others boast some 14,000 employees and a $2 billion economic impact from farming cane on about 440,000 acres in the 700,000-acre Everglades Agricultural Area south of Lake O. They dont want to surrender that largesse, now. But that doesnt compare to the recreational fishing industry in Florida, which boasts $9.3 billion in economic activity and 123,000 jobs, its advocates say. Or the com-mercial fishing industry which may also depend on clean water fixes and supports more than 67,700 jobs. From the real estate perspective, things are even worse than the numbers suggest: When water clarity increased by just one foot by single-family waterfront homes, property value increased in Lee County by $541 million and in Martin County by $428 million, a report by Florida Realtors found. The 155,000-member trade group released the study last year after monitoring the impact of water clarity on the value and sales of single-family home sales in coastal Lee and Martin between 2010 and 2013. But chief economist Brad OConnor was even more dire, since the study looked only at single-family homes. My feeling is the true economic impact is much, much greater than those numbers,Ž he said. Q FIXFrom page 1 PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATY GALLIWater at Lake Okeechobee shows a thick sludge of algae in this 2015 photo. Weve seen firsthand the effect that the toxic discharges from Lake Okeechobee can have on Floridas waterways and the local communities that depend on them. To solve this problem, we need both shortand long-term solutions, which I have been working toward for many years. Everglades restoration projects such as the Central Everglades Planning Project, which the Senate approved, will help restore the natural flow of water south into the Everglades and reduce the need for massive discharges east and west into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. So getting this project approved ƒ is a significant step forward in our ongoing efforts to restore the Everglades, but to ultimately solve this problem, the state has to start acquiring more land south of Lake Okeechobee. The state needs to use Amendment 1 funds to buy additional land south of the lake to store and cleanse more water before sending it further south into the Everglades. Ž Democrat Bill Nelson of Miami, U.S. Senator

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYINCE JANUARY, ABOUT 8 MILLION residents living south of Lake Okeechobee have watched a unique political moment unfold: Water has become an issue in every single race, and even a nightmare in some dreams. I cant sleep well now „ I lay awake at night worrying about that dike and won-dering what will happen if we have even one big (storm) come over the lake,Ž says Clewiston Mayor Phillip Roland „ and not for the first time. Hes been mayor for years, and he doesnt mind telling people that he sweats it out during every incom-ing tropical storm, wondering if hell have to order an evacuation of his hometown. The year unfolded like this (and its not over). Q Starting in January, unprecedented winter rains flooded the peninsula, lifting the level of Lake Okeechobee and threat-ening the dike. Q The Army Corps of Engineers, with no place to put it either north or south of the lake „ and accountable for both human life and the southern Everglades „ discharged devastating levels of phos-phorous-rich lake water into the estuar-ies, which combined with nitrogen-thick runoff from septic, urban and agricultural environments. Q By spring and summer, massive algae blooms erupted in the lake and the estuar-ies. The problem continues through the rainy season and engineers predict the lake level will reach 16 feet by November „ too high for safety or for the grass beds in the lake to be reached by sunlight. The estuaries are in deep trouble. Q The algae and brown water gained national attention. Tourists stayed away. Beach businesses, tourism agencies and the sport fishing and real estate industries reported plummeting revenues. Q Seemingly overnight, new advocacy groups, like Captains for Clean Water, formed and began intense lobbying. Q In August, Republican State Senator Joe Negron, of Stuart, called for the state and federal governments to buy 60,000 acres of land owned by sugar cane producers south of the lake for water storage and southward release into public lands, a con-troversial $2.4 billion proposal that startled some members of his own party, who dont support the effort, they say. Half would come from Floridas Amendment 1 money secured by voters for environmental needs, he suggested. He said he would likely intro-duce the plan during the 2017 legislative session, which begins in March. Q On Sept. 7, releases from the lake down the Caloosahatchee Basin on the west reached more than 1 million acre feet, and releases to the St. Lucie estuary stood at about a half-million acre feet. If flows exceed the maximum allowable amount for more than a few weeks then salinity drops too low for sea grasses to survive,Ž says John Cassani, an ecologist and public-interest advocate. For three out of every four days so far in 2016, the river has flowed at more than the maximum allowable amount. Its no longer just a bad year, it becomes a very bad year,Ž says River-watch co-director John Capece. Q On Sept. 15, the U.S. Senate passed a $10 billion water bill that included money for Everglades restoration „ $1.9 billion worth. Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio presided over the session that ended in a bipartisan victory championed for years by the states Democratic Sena-tor, Bill Nelson. The sum would help Flo-How 2016 became the year of waterBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.com RICK SOLVESON / COURTESY PHOTOAlgae blooms grew on the Caloosahatchee River near Olga this summer.PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATY GALLIWaters around Lake Okeechobee have been sampled and tested and the results show devastating levels of phosphorous. COURTESY PHOTOThe contrast of colors becomes obvious at the Franklin Locks on the Caloosahatchee River when lake water is discharged.S

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A13 ridians kick off one of several distinct and ongoing plans to fix the Everglades system from north to south „ in this case the Central Everglades Planning Project. In its current schedule, if the U.S. House now ratifies the water bill with money for CEPP, and President Obama signs it into law, a suite of proj-ects using public land south of the Lake to control and clean water flowing south-ward would be undertaken.WAIT. WHY DO WE CARE AGAIN?Floridas water system is broken.But not irreparably.In recent conversations with scientists, farmers, business leaders, politicians and advocates for the various water needs Floridians embrace in the southern half of the peninsula, Florida Weekly discovered a simple truth: Everybody wants to fix it, but few are willing to take on the problem and its cost in a single-generation effort. I asked him, What is the value of the Everglades and what does it do for man-kind?Ž said Floridas Sen. Marco Rubio, describing to Florida Weekly how he convinced a conservative Oklahoma senator, Jim Inhofe, to support a $1.9 billion injection of federal money into Everglades restoration. The Everglades system is a unique national treasure by all accounts, but only Florida is living with its ugly dilemma, a hydra of sorts „ a water serpent with many heads. Nathaniel Reed, chairman emeritus of 1000 Friends of Florida who served as assistant secretary of the interior under Presidents Nixon and Ford and under sev-eral Florida governors to help shape water policy, calls the cur-rent system a saga of errors.Ž Now, so much water flows into Lake Okeechobee from the north, topped off by heavy rains, that if not released it would breach the aging, 143-mile dike. The water is polluted with nutrients from cows and crops. And its cut off from its traditional southward flow „ and from the thirsty public lands that cradle the southern peninsula all the way to Florida Bay „ by a 70-year-old barrier some 20 miles deep called the Everglades Agricul-tural Area. Scraped out, pumped out and kept dry or wet enough to farm, the 700,000-acre EAA is the golden goose of the nations protected sugar producers, including U.S. Sugar (owned primarily by the Mott family of Flint, Mich.); Florida Crystals (owned by the Fanjul family of Palm Beach); and companies such as the Texas-based King Ranch and the Clewiston-based Hilliard Bros., all of w hom add vegetable crops or citrus to their operations. Those corporate entities number among the most powerful water lob-byists in the U.S., profoundly affecting Everglades-region policy and planning, which places them squarely at the center of any story about water. As the second decade of the 21st century winds down, meanwhile, there is too little water flowing southward out of the lake to the Everglades and Florida Bay, and too little storage and cleaning capac-ity to handle much more. But theres plenty of excess water shunted down the estuaries east and west, decimating marine life and the various industries and occupations that depend on it. Imperfect city water systems, unregulated septic fields and the agricultural operations „ now cleaner and more efficient, but leaving legacy pollution dating back decades „ all contribute to the troubled system. Heres the bow on that ungainly box: If it isnt fixed the system could collapse, according to hydrologists and biologists. And that poses a problem not just to the unique flora and fauna of the Everglades, but to any person appreciates a glass of H2O. If it was just about some birds in the Everglades, I could understand the lazy approach,Ž says Mr. Reed. He was born and raised in Florida and lives on Jupiter Island, where the stinking, toxic algae accumulated this summer. Hes not complaining just about his own view of bad water. Underlying the southern Everglades, he explains, is a shallow, clean aquifer that depends on the southward flow of fresh water cou-pled with rain, both to recharge and to resist saltwater intrusion. Its the single water source for millions of humans living on the southeast coast and its future depends on healthier southward water flows, just as the future of the estuaries to its north may depend on those appropriate flows. The conclusion of the Academy of Science, the Water Institute of Florida, of every expert is the same: You will never restore or guarantee water for millions of people if the Biscayne Aquifer goes to salt,Ž explains Mr. Reed. All of those people depend on a very flush aquifer, the Biscayne aquifer. Its shallow, its clean and if that goes to salt, youre talking about desalinization. And it will cost billions.Ž As a result, We cant keep using as much water as we do every day „ all the tourists, all the residents „ and all of it coming out of a shallow aquifer that is now only restored by rainfall because the link to Lake Okeechobee has been cut off.ŽTHE BACK STORY (IN WHICH PRETTY MUCH NO ONE LOOKS GOOD)Everyone seems to understand the problem. But what to do about it, and how fast, is a matter of opinion. The Everglades is a massive ecosystem and projects take a lot of time,Ž says Sen. Rubio. My message two months ago (in Fort Myers and Stuart) was, lets focus on getting this done. One step at a time. Its still the message.Ž That will take too long for many, since restoring the huge and hurting system on the schedule of the now 16-year-old, con-gressionally approved, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan will require another 20 years or so. The timetable on all of this is absolutely ridiculous,Ž says state Rep. Heather Fitzen-hagen, a Republican from Fort Myers who with Stuarts Repub-lican state Sen. Joe Negron has stepped out in front of her party by calling for the state and federal governments to buy land in farm country south of Lake Okeechobee. Think about the resources we were able to marshal to take on the Second World War,Ž she adds, citing political will as the final tool required for a fix. This ravages the economy of Florida and it will be very short sighted if we dont address it now. Guess what? Floridas economy will be going down the toilet. People will find other places to live.Ž For decades, Floridians have behaved like testy siblings, sometimes work-ing together to stave off environmental disaster, and sometimes bickering and fighting over who should do or pay what, and when. In 2000, recognizing that the Everglades were in deep trouble, Congress passed the CERP, but it seemed to slip into political obscurity. In 2004 and 2005, naturally occurring red tide became an unnaturally large behemoth in some estuarine waters, giving notice that the system was going to get worse. In 2008, as the recession set in and agricultural profits fell, then-Gov. Char-lie Crist persuaded the U.S. Sugar Corp. to sell its entire oper-ation to the state, about 180,000 acres, for $1.75 billion. He aimed to open the traditional flow ways south of the lake. With engineering for storage, cleaning and transfer of water, that could have helped save the estuaries, the Biscayne Auquifer, the Everglades and Florida Bay, environmentalists insisted. And it could have rescued the fortunes of a struggling U.S. Sugar, economists said at the time. Who could be against it? It was going to save the Everglades. Its like being against motherhood and apple pie,Ž a for-mer U.S. Sugar comptroller, Ellen Simms, told The New York Times.A chimera of sorts, the complicated deal changed shape as the state and the South Florida Water Management Dis-trict realized they might not have the money. Skeptical questions and politics intervened „ Gov. Crists plan would have allowed the company to withdraw slowly by c ontinuing to farm for years to come, putting restoration on a back burner. Finally, in 2010 the state bought 26,800 acres from U.S. Sugar for $197 million in a deal that came with a 10-year option: The South Florida Water Management District, supported by the taxpayers of 16 counties, has until 2020 to buy some or all of the companys remaining land, at a price to be determined. But company officials are adamant now: We have no intention of getting out of farming,Ž says Malcolm BubbaŽ Wade, a vice president and longtime spokesman for U.S. Sugar, arg uing the implausible notion of sending water south when it isnt clean. You cant just put dirty water in there (and leave it),Ž he added, suggesting that such action would put the Everglades at even greater risk. And if were not there to pump the water out?Ž But the company, along with the cane and crop grower Hilliard Brothers, has pursued big development in land south of Lake Okeechobee, convincing Hendry County officials in 2014 to permit a deal called Sugar Hill: 18,000 homes and com-mercial properties including shopping centers. State agencies required to sign off on the deal balked. The DEPs writ-ten opinion was succinct: (Sugar Hill) sits squarely within the Everglades eco-system, an internationally recognized treasure.Ž Meanwhile, the Hendry County permitting of Sugar Hill may increase the value of U.S. Sugars acreage. Asked to estimate the cost of acreage both north and south of Okeechobee, the chief real estate expert and negotiator for the South Florida Water Management District, Ray Palmer, said land to the north could aver-age about $5,000 an acre, and land south of the lake would price out at $8,000 to $10,000 per acre. From a real estate standpoint it would make more sense to buy land for water storage north of the lake,Ž he noted. Mr. Wade at U.S. Sugar says his land is now worth more than that „ in the $12,000 to $15,000 rangeŽ per acre. To buy 153,000 acres at $12,000 per acre, the Water Management District or the State would have to spend about $1.84 billion. Beginning in the wet season of 2013 „ known as the lost summerŽ along the Indian River Lagoon „ intense rains and explosions of algae from phospho-rous and nitrogen became international news. Produced by old septic systems and development along with runoff from cows and crops, they led to destruction of marine habitats and a loss of robust tourism east and west. Throughout much of that back story „ and through the continuing danger posed to Everglades National Park and Florida Bay „ the science and engineerCosts:>> Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), largest hydrological project ever undertaken in United States: estimated at $16 billion by 2035. >> Hoover Dam, 1935: $750 million in today’s dollars. >> Herbert Hoover Dike, 1937, $165 million. >> Three Gorges Dam in China, $28 billion (had to move a million people). >> Cost of Iraq and Afghanistan wars, $4 trillion to $6 trillion. >> U.S. cost of World War II: estimated at about $4.65 trillion in today’s dollars.Distances and sizes:>>156 miles from Lake O to Florida Bay >> 37 miles from Lake O to Stuart and the Indian River Lagoon >> 83 miles from Lake O to Sanibel and Charlotte Harbor >> 114 miles from Orlando to Lake O. >> Lee County in land area: 785 square miles (over 1200 including water). >> Lake O: 730 square miles >> Palm Beach County: 2,386 square miles >> Everglades National Park: 2,357 square miles RUBIO CRIST NELSON FITZENHAGEN REED COURTESY PHOTOSenators voted Sept. 15 on a massive water bill. It is awaiting action in the House.

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A16 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYing, and even some of the initial work, has been in place to make the fix. Fixing this is an economic, social, political problem now. Its not a sci-entific problem or engineering problem. Weve known the science for years,Ž says Dr. Wendy Graham, a scholar and director of the Water Insti-tute at the University of Florida. The biggest mistake now would be to ignore whats happening „ not to do anything,Ž says her colleague, Dr. Thomas Frazer. The Water Instit utes 2015 study analyzing the broken Everglades system is widely embraced as both accurate and fair in estimating the scope of the problem and pointing to solutions. Advocates from every side of the water storage debate borrowed portions of the report to support their views of progress. As the UF Water Institute study shows, taking land in the EAA to store water is much more complicated and expensive than storing it and cleaning it north of the lake,Ž says Mr. Wade, the U.S. Sugar vice president. So it doesnt make sense to buy more land south of the lake and try to clean water there, when the dirty water is coming from north of the lake.Ž He likens that notion to trying to clean dirty water flowing into a bathtub after its in the tub, and not before it leaves the faucet. And Joe Collins, a vice president to the big agricultural operation, Lykes Broth-ers „ Mr. Collins was also a member and chair of the South Florida Water Manage-ment District governing board „ took to quoting lines he pulled from the report in newspaper editorials, such as this one: A passive EAA flow-way is not the optimal approach for addressing problems of too much water going to the estuaries in the wet season or too little water going to the Everglades in the dry season.Ž On the other hand, the Water Institute report shows that to reduce by over 90 percent or to eliminate the flows to the estuaries, you have to have storage both north and south of the lake,Ž says Jen-nifer Hecker, former director of natural resource policy for the Conservancy of Southwest Florida. A growing chorus of voices has joined her in calling for land buys south of the Lake „ or at least leases from landowners who decide to farm waterŽ „ to add to public lands already there. In fact, both sides are right about the Water Instit utes r eport, although Mr. Wades conclusion that storage south of the lake is senseless is not the conclusion of the report. Our report said, This is a big problem with hydrologic, legal, infrastructure con-straints,Ž Dr. Graham explains. And there is no silver bullet that will solve the problem. Well need storage north, south, east and west and probably more storage in the lake to make it work. None of the projects taken one at a time can solve the problem. Individually they dont show benefit across the system. It will take all the projects to achieve res-toration goals for the estuaries, the lake, and the Everglades.ŽWHY CAN’T WE ALL JUST GET ALONG?Politics is not impartial, and neither is the fierce instinct to defend livelihoods and ways of life. Im not so sure we can afford to ask farmers to do anymore than what weve already asked them to do,Ž says Gary Ritter, of Okeechobee, assistant director of government and community affairs for the Florida Farm Bureau. This entire restoration effort now has been on their backs, and theyve spent hundreds of millions using Best Manage-ment Practices. They arent the polluters now. And they even tax themselves $25 an acre to maintain (clean operations).Ž An Everglades Agricultural Privilege Tax established in 1994 under Gov. Lawton Chiles designed to make agricultural pol-luters help pay for pollution was capped by the 2003 Florida Legislature under Jeb Bush at $25 an acre, the figure Mr. Rit-ter refers to. The $25 per acre cap was extended by Rick Gov. Scott. Hendry County Commissioner Karson Turner suggests through it all, different interests should try to get along, without losing their critical thinking. I think theres been a tremendous calming effect with people saying, Lets stop the blame game. Those guys on Sanibel Island or Jupiter „ they hate us farmers. And we get nowhere by saying its not us, its them and go fix your septic tanks. We have a great plan (the CERP), its taken us generations to get to where we are today, and unfortunately were talking about billions of dollars in tourism and so on „ I grasp that. But I challenge the Lee Convention and Visitors Bureau and the east coast as well. What were your numbers? Are we still doing OK, or is the industry really collaps-ing? I dont know, Im just asking.ŽSWEET GIFTS TO POLITICIANS MAINTAIN BIG SUGAR’S REIGNU.S. Sugar and Florida Crystals have deeply influenced how any water prob-lems might be solved. In the last 22 years, the sugar companies in tandem have contributed $57 million to state politicians, with U.S. Sugar ante-ing up $33.4 million and the Fanjuls kick-ing in $12.4 million both to Democrats and Republicans, The Miami Herald reported in July. But most sugar money goes to Repub-licans, including State Rep. Matt Caldwell, R-79, who has worked energetically in the legislature to support agricultural inter-ests. Accepting a trip three years ago from U.S. Sugar to the companys hunting lodge on the King Ranch in Texas is just how business is done, he says. When we do a Republican fundraiser with Disney they have us come to the park. When its Universal, the same. They like the legislators to come see their thing, so we understand what it is they do,Ž he says. Ive got a relationship so Ive received direct campaign contributions. If you name an ag business „ Lykes Brothers, U.S. Sugar, King Ranch, all the rest, Alico „ those are in the campaign contribution silo.Ž Mr. Caldwell says he can remain impartial.HURRY UP AND WAITChampions of various causes hailed the Comprehensive Everglades Planning Project as significant progress. Sen. Rubio stepped off the Senate floor on Sept. 15 after the vote on funding for it, and in a phone conversation with Florida Weekly said, Its the single biggest Everglades project in over a decade. A suite of dozens of projects that will cumula-tively help us clean water, help with water management, and reduce flows out of Okeechobee. Its taken too long to get to this point, and I voted against some water projects in the past because they didnt include this.Ž In the eyes of his Democratic challenger in Floridas senate race, U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy, Congress adjourns for five weeks at the end of the month, and we have to make sure the funding is in place for these projects. We cant let them get tied up in politics, so the House needs to fol-low the Senates lead. But another part of this is Amendment One money, passed by 75 percent of Flor-idas voters. So we have hundreds of mil-lions of dollars for land acquisition south of the lake, and we have to use that. Im working with Rep. Curt Clawson to create a federal matching program to assist state acquisitions of land.Ž Melissa McKinley, a Palm Beach County commissioner, said, I wish I could be more optimistic this will work its way through the House and land on the presidents desk before the changing of the guards.Ž It shows a recognition of the range of projects were dealing with here. And that we need water projects both north of lake and south of the lake. And that folks beyond Florida recognize the need for Everglades restoration.Ž Neither Sen. Rubio nor Gov. Rick Scott have pushed to recover the Everglades at a pace faster than one step at a time, in part because of cost and in part because sound planning is essential, they say. Gov. Scott, who for four weeks did not respond to repeated requests for an interview with Florida Weekly, has been criticized sharply for firing scientists and regulators in the Department of Environmental Protection and the Water Management Districts: He slashed the budget of the SFWMD almost in half in 2012-13, from more than $1 billion to $567 million. He may also blame the fed-eral government, and not just for refus-ing to give the state emergency status and money during the summer algae blooms, but for moving too sl owly to fund its share of restoration, suggests his press officer, Lauren Schenone. Governor Scott remains committed to protecting all of Floridas natural trea-sures, including the Everglades,Ž she said, following the Senate approval of CEPP. Under Governor Scotts leadership, an historic $880 million water quality plan was created to protect the Everglades, and to date, Florida has invested nearly $2 bil-lion in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. We look forward to any steps the federal government takes to fulfilling their promise to the people and natural treasures of Florida.Ž Although the governor has supported projects that will alter sections of man-made barriers to natural water flow in the Everglades „ under I-75, for example „ and pushed to get reservoir projects underway, he is also under fire for con-tinuing to relax water quality standards. Most recently, his Environmental Regu-lation Commission approved a change in state water stan-dards that will allow an increase in toxins released into water by oil companies and fracking operations. Q MURPHY CALDWELL MCKINLAY SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATY GALLIBad water moving in and out of Lake O devastates the environment. But it can be fixed.FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATIONSick double crested cormorants found in Florida’s waters.COURTESY IMAGEFish died this summer in polluted waters. COURTESY PHOTOSt. Lucie Inlet: Algae-choked water met the Atlantic in midsummer. Fish died by the thousands.YEARFrom page 13GRAHAM

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A17OO MUCH WATER. TOO LITTLE WATER. Weather extremes wreak havoc throughout South Flor-ida, where an antiqued water management system designed decades ago with little regard to the environment connects the Caloosa-hatchee and St. Lucie rivers to Lake Okeechobee. Too much rain like this winters El Nio event means fresh lake water is flushed in 70,000-gallons-per-second torrents east and west, impact-ing habitat along both rivers and the biodiversity of their sea life-sustaining estuaries near the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Too little rain, and lake water is withheld, forcing the 67-mile stretch of Caloosahatchee into water-starved survival mode. Come rain or shine „ hell or high water, some say „ either scenario cre-ates the potential for cyanobacteria, the blue-green algae that this summer swirled like ominous green clouds in the lake, rivers and tributaries down-stream, coating shorelines with goo. The algae are also deadly, capable of producing toxic incarnations that kill off plant and fish life and pose hazards to humans if inhaled or touched. Mankind is pretty much responsible for building the perfect environment for cyanobacteria, fortifying Lake O water with nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen and diverting historical water flow through a series of locks, dams, canals and levees. Instead of water seeping south as nature intended within the original 18,000 square miles Everglades from Orlando to Florida Bay, freshwater is diverted east and west where coves and inlets provide the standing water the bacteria need to thrive. High volume releases reduce the salinity of brackish estuaries, essentially the nurseries for aquatic plants and sea life. Sunlight, sitting water and nutrients create the perfect storm for blue-green algae,Ž says Wayne W. Carmichael, a professor emeritus at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, who has studied cyanotoxins for over 40 years. Cyanobacteria impacts all aspects of water „ fish, invertebrates the fish eat, dominates other algae and limits the food chain. Its a potent toxin. Any ani-mal drinking the water is going to be affected, get ill and may die. It affects everything down the line and up the line to humans.Ž The Army Corps of Engineers is mandated to release Lake Os freshwa-ter into the rivers whenever rising lake levels pose the potential of breach-ing the earthen dike protecting 1 mil-lion people to the south. The water is tainted with phosphorous and nitrogen from agricultural operations, munici-palities and development to the north. In a twist of irony, the very algae scientists attribute to creating the oxy-genated environment for life on Earth some 3.5 billion years ago also is toxic and impacts the water also needed to sustain life. Nature also plays its part. Seagrass beds that succumb to the algae add additional nutrients, allowing it to grow exponentially through photosyn-thesis and to monopolize oxygen. Its deadly kin spawns toxic microcystins that affect the liver and cause skin rashes. Algae was the first oxygen-producing organism on Earth and is largely respon-sible for the air we breathe,Ž says Dr. Carmichael. They adapted and evolved. They flourished and they dominate.Ž The scientist visited Lake Okeechobee in the 1990s, summoned by the South Florida Water Manage-ment District when drought conditions created algal blooms in the lake. I was there to help identify which algae were involved in the water blooms and if they were toxin produc-ers,Ž he says. Back then it was the same cyanobacteria that is present and a problem currently.Ž The only way to control cyanobacteria in Floridas warm sunny climate is to control the nutrients in freshwater. Dr. Carmichael says agriculture, sep-tic tanks and municipal affluent run-offs are largely responsible for feeding harmful algal blooms, or HABs, which technically are toxin-producing bacte-ria that look and act like algae. The water management system eliminated the historic sheet flow north of the lake, where wetlands and marshes once filtered out nutrients from the Kissimmee River and Chain of Lakes near Orlando. Its all part of the same pattern, the result of cultural and natural enrich-ment eutrophication and human activ-ity,Ž says Dr. Carmichael. Its a situa-tion people like to say is getting worse and theres no question HABs are a lot worse. Its coming to a point the nutri-ent input has to be controlled. Even then, its going to take decades to get the water quality back.Ž Phosphorus in Lake O is notoriously high and has been for decades. Right now its anywhere from three to four times higher than targeted levels, according to Dr. Melodie Naja, chief scientist for the Everglades Founda-tion, a nonprofit organization dedi-cated to protecting and restoring the River of Grass. If theres any consolation, were not alone. Blue-green algae blooms have been reported almost every summer along western Lake Erie since 1995. In California, lakes and rivers have tested for high levels of anatoxin-a, a cyano-bacteria toxin that kills dogs and wildlife within 20 to 30 minutes of exposure. Problems with cyanobacteria and HABs exist in freshwater bodies around the continent. Dr. Cartwright has seen it so thick in Africa, stones thrown at the slime layer bounced back. It can get worse,Ž he says. Ive seen it in half a dozen different places. Its affecting more and more water bodies.Ž Residents along Lake Erie took notice this summer when Lake Os woes overshadowed their ongoing problems. Both lakes are large but shallow, however, winter temperatures kill off blooms in the Great Lake. This summer, toxin levels in the St. Lucie Estuary reached 86 parts per billion „ eight times the threshold allowed by the World Health Organization, reported Mark Perry, a native Floridian and executive director of the Florida Oceanographic Society, a Stuart-based nonprofit with a mission of protecting, preserving and restoring the states ocean and coastal ecosystems The algae can be treated chemically and filtered if crucial to the health of a small reservoir or drinking water supply but there are consequences associated with chemical treatments. With something the size of Lake Okeechobee, those methods dont work,Ž says Dr. Carmichael. You have to go back and control the watershed and the nutrients going into it.Ž Since Jan. 1 to date, 614 billion gallons of water have been released from the lake,Ž says Dr. Naja. Thats a stag-gering amount and it impacts the estu-aries, is killing ecosystems and altering the ecology. Theres also an impact on tourism and the economy because of the huge algae blooms.Ž The massive Lake O releases were also attributed to the brown water along portions of Southwest Floridas beaches and killed off oyster and sea-grass beds along the St. Lucie and Indian River Lagoon. The St. Lucie does not need any of this water,Ž says Mr. Perry. We need a third outlet to provide capacity to move a significant amount of water equivalent to the amount moving east and west. In our case were advocating for an order to stop discharges into the St. Lucie and Indian rivers.Ž Since the outbreak of the algae blooms, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection has been issuing daily Lake Okeechobee updates on its website, monitoring salinity con-ditions along both rivers based on optimal conditions for adult oysters. Recent reports showed levels within the fair range at Sanibel and poor at Cape Coral. Complicating the challenges in South Florida is the physical water manage-The complicated science of the fixBY NANCI THEORETntheoret@” oridaweekly.com NASA IMAGEIn early May, an algae bloom grew to cover 85 square kilometers (33 square miles) of Lake Okeechobee. The conditions that gave rise to the bloom persisted into July and were blamed for affecting water quality downstream all the way to the Atlantic Ocean.SEE SCIENCE, 18 X Is it sugars fault? I think sugar has changed to a great degree in how they operate. But the crux of it is, they are able to continue to farm and manage the water in the EAA, and the net result is we now have a barrier that can block a flow of water to go south of the lake. They have made significant adjustments. Im not blaming them, but I am saying, Could you help us, ala Joe Negrons plan, by taking a small but critical part of the land and selling it to us? It could be a release valve. The argument could be made that were spoiled brats on the coasts and we dont care about farmers. I dont think thats it at all. The monies that are being spent and lost as we destroy these estuaries are vastly more than monies that would have to be used in donating or selling land for other than an ag purpose.Ž— Republican State Rep. Heather Fitzenhagen of Fort Myers Weve taken so much out of taxes and agricultural production, 110,000 acres, that I dont see another 60,000 as generating much support among Sen. Negrons colleagues. When hes re-elected this fall, hell be representing Pahokee, one of our agricultural communities. Ive invited him to sit down with leaders in Pahokee and see it through their eyes. We all recognize that something needs to be done to fix water. But in my opinion, we should complete all these other projects before we talk about taking another 60,000 out of production for landowners who are not willing to sell at this time. That land is not for sale. If it was, Id be the first to say, lets buy it.Ž„ Melissa McKinley of Royal Palm Beach, Palm Beach County commissionerT

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A18 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYment system, some parts of it nearly a century old, built by people who are no longer here, who in the greatest leap of their imagination maximized the region at 2 million people, not 7.5 million people,Ž says Florida native Shannon Estenoz, director for the U.S. Department of the Interiors Office of Everglades Initiatives. Were pushing it beyond what it was designed to do to begin with „ push water east and west not knowing whether its going to stop raining in six months.Ž Environmental protection wasnt as valued as it is today,Ž says John Camp-bell, a public affairs specialist with the Corps of Engineers Jacksonville district office. In the late 19th century and early half of the 20th century, nature was something man wanted to conquer. Now 50 to 60 years later, these values have changed and protection of the environment becomes more important. Our current system was not designed as environmentally friendly.Ž Indeed. In the name of growth and progress, our predecessors installed various obstacles inhibiting natural flow, drained Everglades swampland for agriculture use, straightened the Kis-simmee River and bypassed the Caloo-sahatchees historic headwaters from Lake Hicpochee to a manmade canal linking to Lake Okeechobee. If you look on Google Maps, Lake Hicpochee is just a big circle,Ž Mr. Perry says. It overdrained the lake.Ž Corralling Lake O into the 143-mile Herbert Hoover Dike also impeded water flow to Biscayne Bay, the Ten Thousand Islands and Florida Bay, as did construction of the Tamiami Trail through the southern Everglades. The Army Corps of Engineers is in the middle of a $1.5 billion restoration of the dike around the 730-square-mile Lake O, which the International Hur-ricane Research Center ranks as the second-most vulnerable mainland area to hurricanes. The Corps also manages the lake level, releasing water whenever it rises above 15.5 seasonally adjusted feet, cal-culated from 30 years of precipitation and lake water activity data. Optimal lake levels are between 12.5 and 15.5 feet.Plans within a bigger planThe big-picture plan guiding water management in the 16-county South Florida Water Management District is inherently tied into the federal-state Comprehensive Everglades Restora-tion Plan, or CERP, a 68-project puzzle focusing largely on water flow, storage and quality and restoring the River of Grass to the fullest extent humanly pos-sible. Pieces of the project already call for creation of reservoirs expected to divert water from Lake O and ultimately the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. In her role, Ms. Estenoz works with the plans architects, a consortium of agencies and nonprofits. Shes a former member of the SFWMD and has been involved with Everglades restoration since 1996 as the chairwoman of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, established by Congress to facilitate a partnership between federal, state, tribal and local governments. Ms. Estenoz is pleased with the progress to date on CERP and the multi-agency collaboration making it happen „ although its not moving as quickly as some might want. Weve made steady progress over the past two decades,Ž she says. Because of what we saw this winter with El Nino and high water and the other extreme „ the terrible lake fires dur-ing droughts „ it reminds us our job is not done. Im never surprised when the public sees this happening and gets upset. If you have algae in your back-yard, you want it gone. For me, these events are a very sharp reminder we have a lot of work to do.Ž Components of CERP are designed to reverse ecological damage created by the existing water and flood man-agement systems, which Ms. Estenoz describes as broken. It took a long time to build these systems and its going to take a while to reconfigure it. Its a sys-tem ironically designed to throw water away.Ž Right now were wasting 1.7 billion gallons of water a day through discharg-es to the Gulf and the Atlantic Ocean,Ž Mr. Perry says. CERP is unfolding in incremental improvements spread over 30 years, possibly 40. It includes completed com-ponents and a whirlwind of projects currently under construction and some fast-tracked because of the summers excessive releases and algal blooms. Elevating portions of Tamiami Trail has eliminated a water flow choke point but posed a new set of challenges. Theres seepage,Ž Mr. Campbell says. The water still wants to flow south. The state is actively constructing levees and features to better control it.Ž The Corps also is in the process of building water storage in Hendry County; constructing a storm water treatment area, discharge system and a pump station in Martin County; and addressing water in the western Ever-glades near Big Cypress National Pre-serve. Some of these ongoing projects dont get a lot of attention because everyone is looking for the one project that solves everything,Ž says Mitch Hutchcraft, a SFWMD board member since 2013 and vice president of real estate for King Ranch/Consolidated Citrus in Fort Myers. These small projects are in the right locations. The district is restoring natu-ral systems and historic flow where we have the opportunities. We all talk about Yes, we need to restore the Ever-glades, but dont talk about the over 1 million people who live within the boundaries of the Everglades. The por-tions that can bring back the highest quality of water flowing through the River of Grass wont happen unless you can convince 1 million people to move. What we can do is work very hard to get the quality and timing right of the water in the areas that do exist.Ž The public hearing phase is commencing for the Lake Okeechobee Watershed Project, a multi-pronged plan to improve water quality, quantity, timing and distribution of water enter-ing Lake Okeechobee and to reduce high-volume discharges to the Caloosa-hatchee and St. Lucie estuaries. A 2015 study by the University of Florida Water Institute recommended creating hundreds of thousands of acre-feet of water storage north of Lake Okeechobee, where it will provide the fresh water the Caloosahatchee needs during dry season and droughts. The SFWMD already owns thousands of acres north of the lake and is in a holding pattern in accessing 27,000 acres of federally owned lands south of the lake, which Mr. Campbell says would provide minimal storage. Water enters Lake O five to six times faster than its released, according to Mr. Hutchcraft, who grew up in the Fort Myers area. He swam and sailed the Caloosahatchee and remembers epi-sodes of brown waterŽ along the river. Brown water happens almost every year and people think brown equates to toxic. Thats not necessarily true. Even in the late 1880s before the river was connected to Lake O, people were writ-ing about the brown water.Ž Water quality, which the federal government leaves to states to enforce, ideally would be controlled naturally in the Everglades. But ultimately its up to the state Department of Environmental Protection to enforce infractions by property owners leeching phosphorous and nitrogen into the flow ways. Several high-impact CERP components have been advanced as a bundled restoration project to deliver water „ an estimated annual average of 200,000 acre feet „ to public lands south of the Everglades Agricultural Area to Ever-glades National Park and Florida Bay. In the works since 2011, $1.9 billion in funding for the Central Everglades Planning Project, or CEPP, was over-whelmingly approved Sept. 15 by the U.S. Senate as part of the $10 billion Water Resources Development Act. CEPP will also redirect water from the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers and remove 25 miles of canals and levees with the goal of reintroducing historic sheet flow to the south. The bill is expected to receive heavy opposition in the House. CERP is already showing promising environmental benefits since water-slowing bends were restored to the Kissimmee River. Before development, water flowed about a mile every four days, Mr. Perry says. The ecosystem has responded positively and the Kissimmee is bouncing back,Ž says Ms. Estenoz. Its proving to be a sound hypothesis and needs a little help here and there.Ž By slowing the flow, it also allows plants to uptake nutrients, says Campbell. Continued implementation of CERP projects will reduce large Lake O water releases and improve the Everglades health. Big wet years used to happen every 10 years, now its every three years,Ž says Ms. Estenoz. We have to get the water right, make sure its clean, and distribute and move it around in the right way. Timing is a big part.ŽComes now a new plan Regional water storage around Lake Okeechobee has been identified as a crucial piece of overall Everglades res-toration and reducing Lake O releases. But where to store it has become a heat-ed debate, fueled by a recent proposal by Florida Senate president-designate Joe Negron, a Republican from Stuart, the first city the tainted lake water reaches along the St. Lucie. Sen. Negron wants to purchase 60,000 acres of land south of Lake O in the Everglades Agri-cultural Area to provide 120 billion gal-lons of storage. The price tag is about $2.4 billion, a cost the senator hopes can be split between the state and federal governments, as is the standard for CERP projects. The plan was derived from the input of stakeholders representing environ-mental and nonprofit organizations, farmers, city and state officials, scien-tists and hydrologists. The two potential storage areas, identified in big red circles on a map accom-panying Sen. Negrons announcement, include land straddling the Miami and Bolles canals and an area to the south-east adjacent to existing storm water treatment areas, canals, and a shallow basin that captures and stores storm-water runoff until its needed. Some say Sen. Negrons plan is his response to public outcry following algae bursts this summer „ a search for that silver bullet or quick fix to this squeaky wheel, the failing dike constructed decades ago as a stop-gap measure in response also to public outcry. Citizens south of the lake long ago demanded protection from future flooding and hurricanes. Water flow south in the agricultural area has long been part of CERP, just not scheduled for now. Initial work is scheduled to begin in 2020 with design plans finalized six years later. Sen. Negrons proposal to speed up use of EAA land has been well received by many citizen advocates and environ-ment groups. The Everglades Foundations Dr. Naja was one of the scientists modeling the benefits to both rivers and their estuar-ies by comparing CERP north and south reservoirs under existing conditions. Unfinished components of CERP were not factored in. Our goal basically was to answer Sen. Negron and the Legislatures request to reduce discharges to the estuaries and quantify the benefits to the Calo-osahatchee and St. Lucie,Ž she says. Theres a huge amount of freshwater that needs to go somewhere. Building reservoirs south of the lake have much higher benefits to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie.Ž Southern storage could decrease high discharge frequency to the St. Lucie by 37 percent, the Caloosahatchee by 31 percent. Store water to the north and the percentages drop to 3 percent and 9 percent, respectively, she says. The 60,000 acres would also supply precious freshwater to the Ever-glades and Florida Bay, where lingering drought has claimed a 40,000-acre dead zone of seagrass, Dr. Naja says. Once the water is south of the lake, its pretty much gone,Ž says Randy Smith, a spokesperson for the South Florida Water Management District. The Caloosahatchee needs a certain amount of freshwater during the dry season. If we store water north of the lake, we have more flexibility in how we can use it.Ž Lake Okeechobee is the primary backup drinking water source for 6 mil-lion South Floridians. We realized at an early point just how intrinsically the Everglades is linked to the prosperity and sustainabil-ity of the region,Ž says Ms. Estenoz. If we dont have water in the Everglades, you dont have water in your tap. Were on our own. Were on a peninsula and cant borrow water from another state.Ž As outlined in CERPs Lake Okeechobee Watershed Project, north-ern storage would help reduce nutrients entering the lake; storing it south doesnt have the same ecological or water qual-ity benefits. It also notes existing water management systems south of the lake are limited by design capacity, ecosys-tem concerns and enforcement of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. While saying the water management district would consider alternative plans, Mr. Hutchcraft also pointed out that the public is reacting to an anomaly.HUTCHCRAFT COURTESY PHOTOOn May 31, the algae began moving into the Stuart area in Martin County. SCIENCEFrom page 17

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A19Weve had two years of greater than average rainfall but prior to that we were more on the drought side,Ž he says. Theres no denying this years event was significant and had an adverse impact on the lake and estuaries. But we cant abandon 25 years of planning to react to the short term. In the long term, we need a more predictable supply of water.ŽPitting north vs. southOpponents of the Negron plan prefer a wait-and-see approach. Complete the in-progress CERP and planned CEPP projects first and evaluate their impact. Not everyone views these nonprofit foundations and environmentalists as knights in shining armor determined to save the Everglades and the estuaries impacted by Lake O releases. Nor do they think the Negron plan is the answer. They criticize nonprofit organizations for conducting meetings in ritzy resorts and spearheading fundraising machines that generate millions of dollars to rob them of their livelihood. There are so many parts to this conversation and its sad because there has to be a villain and ag is it,Ž says Hendry County Commissioner Karson Turner. If there was no villain, there would be no reason for the existence of these groups and no reason for millions of dol-lars in fundraising.Ž The environmental refrain from the Everglades Foundation and the answer to every Everglades issue is to buy south, buy south,Ž says Judy Sanchez, senior director of corporate communications and public affairs for U.S. Sugar, which owns sugarcane property in Sen. Negrons red circles. Hendry Countys northeast boundary borders a small portion of Lake O yet most of its land lies south of the lake. With a population of just 39,190 …„ many of whom make their living in agri-culture „ the county lacks the resources or manpower to fight for its future. Its also Floridas fourth poorest county with 25 to 26 percent living below the poverty level. Were making sure the trash is picked up, the toilets flush, our dogs arent running the streets and our babies are fed and covered,Ž Mr. Turn-er says. We dont have a diverse eco-nomic portfolio. You remove ag, you remove our existence.Ž A 2012 agricultural census showed Hendry County had 406 farms operating on 495,734 acres and selling products with a market value of nearly $500 mil-lion. More than half of its farms reported $99,999 or less in sales; 113 recorded $1,000 or less. Hendry ranked No. 1 in Florida for acreage devoted to all varieties of orang-es and was second, behind Palm Beach County, for acreage of sugarcane. It also had the states highest sale value for fruits, tree nuts and berries. Sen. Negrons plan sounds sexy, but in all due respect to the incoming senate president, I wish it were that simple,Ž Mr. Turner says. I dont think data sup-ports a shift in focus from the north to the south. Its treating the system not the problem. Its a Band-Aid on a jugular vein.Ž Shortly after Sen. Negrons plan was announced Mr. Turners fellow commis-sioner, Janet Taylor, led 50 residents in protest to the senators Martin County office. All these conversations are happening about us without us,Ž says Mr. Turner. The sad thing for me, is we dont have a louder voice from south of the lake. Our people are focused on existence, covering our bills and working the very land environmentalists and everyone in the state wants to acquire. Ive talked to colleagues in Orange County and Osceola County and theyre not even in these discussions. Theres been an unfair bullseye put on industry south of the lake.Ž Agricultural land in Palm Beach County, also within Sen. Negrons red circles, boasted Floridas top agriculture sales in 2014-15 with 36 percent of its total land, or 460,445 acres, dedicated to farm opera-tions. Total ag sales were estimated at $1.41 billion in 2014-15 with the county leading the nation in the production of sugarcane, sweet corn and sweet bell pep-pers. Its also the states top producer of rice, lettuce, radishes and celery and leads Florida in agricultural wages and salaries with over $316 million.And will it work? Opponents are also questioning the science „ or lack thereof „ behind Sen. Negrons plan. Have you seen it?Ž asks U.S. Sugars Ms. Sanchez. Have you seen any spe-cifics about how this plan is going to do what people say its going to do? All we see are two big red circles.Ž Ms. Sanchezs questions arent sardonic; shes just curious if additional details have been released. Its really hard for U.S. Sugar to comment on the plan because there are no other details,Ž she says. We havent seen any specifics. We havent seen the science behind it.Ž Ms. Sanchez notes the lands identified in the Negron plan are already water-logged at the same time lake water would be released south. The timing just isnt copasetic. We cant see how buying additional land south will help when its wet,Ž she says. To the south of these areas are the states water conservation areas, which have been full to the brim since January. They havent sent any water to the conservation areas because water at Everglades National Park is high. If water is stored south of the lake you dont have the ability to send it farther south because of federally mandated flood levels in the Everglades. If a reservoir dries out, incoming water flushes out all the phosphorous and thats a big no-no going into the Everglades.Ž She also questions why the in-depth and already evaluated science behind CERP and CEPP is being questioned. Those systems provide deeper storage,Ž Ms. Sanchez says. Its like they want to create a diamond-encrusted bucket which would have to be deep, really deep. Theyve discharged 1.6 mil-lion acre feet of water. Unless theres some way to continuously move water south, its going to be a very small and very expensive bucket. Youd still have a 1.3 million discharge which would blow out the estuaries anyway while putting the farming folks out of business.Ž To date, Sen. Negrons proposal doesnt incorporate treatment facilities to reduce nutrient levels before lake water is sent south, although Republican state Rep. Gayle Harrell of Port St. Lucie said it would be part of the plan. Mr. Hutchcraft cautions the plan wont bring the quick solution every-one wants. The district has made it very clear were going to implement CERP and CEPP to the extent they get approved. We are actively building projects. The district has a world-class staff of researchers, Ph.Ds. and an entire water modeling team.Ž Negrons plan would give the Corps additional flexibility,Ž says Mr. Camp-bell. We dont know to what degree or if the federal government will pick up half of the bill. Theres no silver bul-let that doesnt impact several econo-mies.Ž Theres no doubt water flow to the south of Lake O is needed not only to coax back the Everglades but also to recharge its aquifers which supply water to the Miami-Dade metro area. And the megalopolis that is Southeast Florida will forever present a major roadblock in Everglades restoration. As Ms. Sanchez notes, I-95 now skims the southern boundaries with 20-plus miles of suburbia west of I-95. Its not as simple as buy land and send water south. We cant go back to the way Mother Nature intended because we did away with that.Ž South Floridas water woes „ either too much or too little „ will continue to pose uncertainties from year to year, even month to month. Ms. Estenoz was serving on the water management board in 2007 during the worst drought on record at the time. The lake was down to eight feet,Ž she says. Low water is scary. High water is scary. We understand the nexus between a sustainable economy and sustainable ecosystems in Florida. You cant sepa-rate the two. Ive always said As the Everglades goes, so does the region. Ive based my whole career on it.Ž Q ITH VARIOUS OPTIONS AVAILable for potentially reduc-ing Lake Okeechobee dis-charges into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers, the Everglades Foundation is now focusing on water quality, recently announcing the $10 million George Barley Water Prize for inno-vative solutions addressing excess phosphorous in freshwater around the world. Its a partnership with the Knight Foundation, the Ministry of Environmental and Climate Change in Ontario, Canada, and water tech-nology company Xylem. The prize was established to research and find cost-effective technical ways to reduce phospho-rus,Ž says Melodie Naja, the founda-tions chief scientist. Wed like it to have global applications that work as well in Lake Okeechobee and Lake Erie. There are existing tech-nologies to clean up phosphorus but they are expensive or require a huge amount of land. We need something else, something effective and cheap. We cant solve it today or tomorrow but we need to start.Ž Dr. Naja estimates 70 percent of the phosphorous and other algae-stimulating nutrients come from agricultural operations, the other 30 percent from urban development. Charged by the federal government to oversee water qual-ity in Florida, the state Depart-ment of Environmental Protection has developed best management practices for polluters but its not enough, Dr. Naja says. And theyre not enforced.An analysis of the Florida DEPs raw enforcement data by Pub-lic Employees for Environmental Responsibility noted the number of cases opened in 2015 were 81 per-cent below those of 2010, the year before Gov. Rick Scott took office. The group also observed fines col-lected were the lowest in 28 years. For the first time in nearly 30 years, DEP assessed no penalty above $100,000,Ž PEER said in a press release. Pollution pays in Florida because vio-lators often get off scot-free.Ž DEP officials did not address that criticism. Spokeswoman Dee Ann Miller said the DEP works with gov-ernments and stakeholdersŽ to reduce pollution. For example, DEP officers provide implementation assurance visits,Ž to farms to help them use Best Managemen Practices. Water quality may continue to worsen in lieu of the Sept. 13 dismiss-al of challenges brought by several groups opposed to the states new Human Health Toxic Criteria Rule, which would increase the acceptable level of toxins and known carcino-gens into Floridas water. Those challenging the rule can still appeal the decision. Q „ Nanci TheoretWater quality: It’s the $10 million questionSANCHEZ COURTESY PHOTOThe Everglades Foundation is offering a prize for solutions on water quality.COURTESY PHOTOSSigns posted in Martin County advise the public not to enter the water because of algae levels.Rivers, canals and beaches turned green when algae bloomed. W

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A20 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYThe high walls (of the Clewiston Inn cocktail lounge) bear a beauti-ful 360-degree mural of the verdant, incomparable flora and fauna of the Everglades to scale. Will the mural need an update in the years to come? The animals absent, the trees bulldozed and a cane field falling off into the horizon of smoke stacks, perforated with brown irrigation ditches leading seaward.Ž„ Michael Adno, August 2016Perhaps, even in this last hour, in a new relation of usefulness and beauty, the vast, magnificent, subtle and unique region of the Everglades may not be utterly lost.Ž „ Marjory Stoneman Douglas, The Everglades: River of GrassŽITH SO MANY POWERFUL AND often vocal interests involved, finding consensus enough on restoration plans to fund them is one of the primary obstacles to fixing South Flor-idas plumbing and the Everglades. But the polluted discharges in estuaries this winter that gained so much attention could also force positive action. I have to say that its a socialpolitical response thats driving a lot of the urgency because the pollution has been going on a long time but the publics now more aware of it than ever,Ž said Joel Trexler, a marine ecologist and profes-sor at Florida Inter-national University who has studied the Everglades for more than two decades. A comprehensive University of Florida Water Institute study identified solu-tions to Everglades restoration, primar-ily by increasing storage and treatment of water surrounding Lake O by an enormous amount beyond what current plans call for, and then moving more of it south into the Glades. But federal and state money needed to carry out even current plans such as the $1.9 billion Central Everglades Plan-ning Project „ widely regarded as an example of good planning by scientists, representatives of U.S. Sugar and a fish-ing trade group, among others „ is still caught in political gridlock. The Senate passed the Water Resources Develop-ment Act bill that includes CEPP on Sept. 15. The House has yet to vote. In the interim, the coupled humanecological system is continuing to degrade in ways that may not be revers-ible,Ž the UF report reads. It also notes that despite so many smart people working on this prob-lem, they arent planning for future unknowns: (r)esearch indicates clearly that climate change, changes in human demographics, energy costs and land use will affect Floridas future, yet there is little evidence that salient informa-tion is being incorporated into restora-tion project plans.Ž Without action the water problems that grew in intensity this year will worsen, said Stephen Davis, a wetland ecologist with the Everglades Foundation. I think this year is just an example of how bad things could get, so we could see it repeat or even a scenario that might be worse than what we saw this year.Ž Meanwhile, agriculture corporations, small towns and the fishing, tour-ism, and real estate industries offer a glimpse of the socioeconomic quagmire facing politicians and planners as they try to move forward to fund projects.SugarFloridas powerful sugar industry owns land south of Lake O. that could be a key piece of efforts to store and treat water. But unlike years past, they appear unwilling to sell any more of it. Bubba Wade, a senior vice president of corporate strategy and business development with U.S. Sugar, described as the companys environmental expert, said that to even discuss buying sugar land is putting the cart before the horse.Ž He argues that plans such as Sen. Joe Negrons, which calls for buying 60,000 acres south of the lake now, could crimp funding for other necessary projects, and that it should be a priority first to clean up pollution in the northern part of the system. Selling sugar land is the last thing on the list of restoration pri-orities he cares to discuss these days, if it is on his list at all. Thats a change from the companys attitudes in the past decade. U.S. Sugar, Florida Crystals and others boast some 14,000 employees and a $2 billion economic impact from farm-ing cane on about 440,000 acres in the 700,000-acre Everglades Agricultural Area south of Lake O. In 2010, U.S. Sugar sold the state 26,800 acres for restoration for $194 million „ with the option to buy anoth-er 153,000 acres at fair market value by 2020. But since then, the company has balked at selling any more land.The fight is real and interests involved are plentyBY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@” oridaweekly.com Randy Smith of West Palm Beach, spokesman, South Florida Water Management District “We’re examining Sen. Negron’s proposal, but so far there are far more questions than answers.There are two planning projects underway now, one to identify water storage for the Western Everglades, and the very critical study to identify storage north of the lake. The northern storage has much more bene t for the Caloosahatchee than southern storage. If it’s stored north, we have an easy avenue to put water in there during dry season. But the St. Lucie never wants additional water. As far as the St. Lucie is concerned, storage north of the lake is a nice way of keeping water from going into the lake in the rst place.” QQQRepublican State Rep. Gayle Harrell of Stuart“For people living south of the Lake: I do not in my heart of hearts believe buying this land in the EAA will create the havoc they are foreseeing. The state will work closely so everything is done and in place, to assist them. For the land, Legacy Florida uses Amendment 1 money — 25 percent of Amendment One money is now a dedicated source of revenue for everglades restora-tion. It will provide about $200 million per year that will go into Everglades restoration.” QQQJohn Heim of Fort Myers Beach, president of the Southwest Florida Clean Water Movement“Clean water is a human right, and in Florida it must be moved in appropriate amounts into the Everglades.The only solution to all this is to unchain the land south of the lake and cut off the stranglehold the sugar industry has on water going south. The reason you hear, ‘the Everglades are dying,’ or ‘stop the releases down the estuaries’ is because they cut off the natural ow of water south.” Mr. Heim doesn’t insist on the restora-tion of the traditional Everglades — it can’t be done, he says, echoing the opinions of most everyone else on each side of the debate — but he insists that political candidates right up to those seeking the White House recognize how important the issue has become.Though he was removed from a Donald Trump rally in Fort Myers Sept. 19 before it began, he says, “I have nothing against Trump — I’m on the fence, with voting. Both he and Hillary (have sought support) from U.S. Sugar and the Fanjul brothers. We have only one goal. Send the water south, clean. That’s why we’re called the “clean water movement.” QQQRepublican State Rep. Kathleen Passidomo of Naples, a candidate for Senate District 28“The University of Florida published a non-\political and factual study of the water problem (that’s) the most thorough analysis I’ve seen on the issue.The scope of the study and its recommendations are compelling. Researchers concluded that the projects currently approved need to be completed. The current Basin Management Action Plans need to be updated to ensure better water treatment and quality standards. More storage to the north and south of the Lake needs to be identi ed and secured, including looking at the Holey Land and Rotenberger Wildlife Management Areas. Most importantly, there is not just one ‘ x’ for the problem. We must look at the problem comprehen-sively. So what I’m advocating for is sitting down with all the stakeholders, and interested citizens and looking objectively at the issue — without all the agendas and preconceived notions. And together coming up with an updated Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan based on sound science.” QQQDr. Brian LaPointe of Fort Pierce, research professor, Florida Atlantic University’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute“I believe in waste-water treatment. It’s one thing to use septic if you’re way out in the country, but to build cities, high-density urban areas with four or more septic tanks per acre in poor soil conditions at a time when we have rising water issues — that’s a mistake. These elds are inundated in the wet season, there’s fecal contamination, it’s a problem out of sight, out of mind. Now the research is nally shedding light on this problem.” QQQNathaniel Reed of Jupiter Island, chairman emeritus of the 1000 Friends of Florida “A saga of errors has created this monstrosity of a system. But now there’s hope that wisdom will come. I don’t expect wisdom will come to Gov. Scott, but other people are smarter. When you’re talking about potable water, all growth depends on a rich water supply to the Biscayne aquifer, and it can only happen when the lake is connected again to the Everglades. It was one of the most tragic errors every made, disconnecting the lake. The powerhouses of the counties — Palm Beach and Broward, Miami-Dade, Lee and Collier — are the chambers of commerce, the hotel and restaurant own-ers, anybody taking care of tourists, anybody who has a leg in the game. If you don’t have an adequate supply of fresh water, you’re up the creek. They should be clamor-ing to join us. They don’t give a damn about the birds, but they should look at their pocket books.” QQQHendry County Commissioner Karson Turner of LaBelle “Our population is small. We’re the miners in the coal mine and the canaries are alive and well and then everyone says the canaries died.” QQQRepublican State Rep. Matt Caldwell of Lehigh Acres“Everybody agrees with the statement out there from 200 scientists that to restore Florida Bay you have to send water south. From my perspective, and most sci-entists, that’s more than a reservoir, that’s a lot of work. The bridging of Tamiami Trail, changing way we operate the park, the way they deliver water to lower Florida — that’s the big picture and that’s what we’re doing.If we’re looking at Sen. Negron’s proposal as being the solution for the discharges we receive (down the Caloosa-hatchee or the St. Lucie), that’s a separate question. It’s not the same as sending water south for the health of Florida Bay. So their proposal is not the most effective way.” COURTESY PHOTOSClean water activist John Heim of Fort Myers Beach protests regularly and vociferously.LAPOINTE TREXLER TURNER HARRELL HEIM PASSIDOMO MORE VOICES W

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A21 Heres an example of whats happened north of lake: in the mid-1980s, there were about 65 dairy farms there. Now there are only 19. In 1988 and 89, the state had a buyout program. Everybody wanted to point the finger at the dairy industry. There was no science behind that and it almost destroyed the economies of the rural communities over here. Now the 19 dairies are state of the art „ the most modern, nutrient efficient farms in the United States. Those folks have spent millions of dollars on their own constructing facilities in the name of restoration. So in my mind the farmers are doing their part. Its now up to the state and federal government to finish projects they have on line. Ž— Gary Ritter of Okeechobee assistant director of Government and Community Affairs, Florida Farm BureauTAYLOR ANDREWS I think at the time U.S. Sugar had some significant financial issues so I think what they were proposing was a sale that would essentially take them out,Ž said Samuel Poole, a Fort Lau-derdale attorney who represented the interests of Florida Crystals during talks leading up to the deal, and in the mid-to-late 1990s worked toward Everglades restoration as head of the South Florida Water Management District. (I) think that infusion of capital put U.S. Sugar back on its feet and they have since prospered and really have no interest at this point in a transaction that would have them selling the assets. Theyre back in business and seem to be doing well.Ž Mr. Wade said profits in recent years have increased. Some suggest that U.S. Sugar will sell more land to the state at some point, but it is waiting for better prices. With the Hilliard Bros., the company convinced Hendry County officials to permit a 43,313-acre development with residences and retail two years ago. State officials have not approved it. At the same time, pressure to find solutions to Lake O discharges has reached a fever pitch as economical-ly powerful industries such as fishing, tourism and real estate are increasingly hurt by water quality problems. While buying land in sugar country has become a rallying cry for many on the coast, including Sen. Negron, Mr. Poole said attention should be focused on cleaning up drainage north of the lake, for now. In the long run I would see the need for additional storage and treatment south of the lake, but the real crisis for the lake and real priority for the lake has to be the drainage from the north. Thats where all the nutrients (and phosphorus pollution) are coming from.Ž John Cassani, a former water manager and research scientist who is chairman of the Southwest Florida Watershed Council, supports Sen. Negrons plan. But he said people on both sides of the issue have at times overplayed their hand. In a general sense theyre saying buying land south of the lake is the silver bullet and it wont necessarily do that,Ž he said. It wont fix all the prob-lems but it was never meant to solve all the problems.Ž On the other hand, he argues that buying land south of the lake will not crimp funding for other projects as Mr. Wade suggests, but is a key part of them. The state has plenty of money to do this additional storage,Ž said Mr. Cassani, citing a budget surplus and Amendment 1 money. Florida TaxWatch estimates the average surplus each of the last four years has been more than $1.2 billion, but growth in programs such as schools and Medicaid will soak up a lot of it next year. Amendment 1, approved by about 75 percent of voters, requires a third of the tax money collected from documentary stamps that come with every real estate sale in Florida between 2015 and 2035 be set aside and used to buy land and help save water now being polluted and degraded. That will amount to $700 mil-lion to $900 million or more each year. Lake O townsIf sugar companies decide to sell prop-erty for Everglades restoration, Hendry County Commis-sioner Janet Tay-lor worries it could harm local econo-mies in Clewiston, Belle Glade, South Bay and Pahokee that already have some of the highest unemployment rates in the state. With combined populations of about 36,000 and smaller economies, the towns in Hendry, Glades and rural Palm Beach counties have scant political rep-resentation compared to urban areas and rely on agriculture and sugar farm-ing. They are often an afterthought for coastal economies furious about dis-charges from the lake, Ms. Taylor feels. Those residents dont seem to under-stand the Army Corps is forced to dis-charge the water when its too high to protect the lives and property of people who live every day in the shadow of the lakes aging Herbert Hoover Dike. And much of that water that ends up discharged east and west is drain-age from north of the lake, a fact some people south of the lake resent. Theres no shared adversity,Ž said Clewiston Mayor Phillip Roland. In other words, the people of Orlando down to Lake Kissimmee dont give a damn how much it rains or whatever, theyre not going to be flooded, so they dont ever even think about a water problem. I mean it doesnt even cross their minds.Ž In an article published in SRQ Magazine in August, writer Michael Adno observed, These sleepy agricultural towns seem so far removed from the urgent call to action along the coasts. The line of communication between coastal residents dependent upon tour-ism and the states interior based in agriculture uncannily echoes the dispar-ity between state and federal interests.Ž Ms. Taylor is concerned that buying sugar land for water storage would fur-ther damage their struggling economies. She has become a voice for Glades Lives Matter, a group that includes mayors, ministers, farmers and employees „ many of Ms. Taylors extended family work for the sugar industry, she said „ and others who fiercely oppose Sen. Negrons plan. They aim to give a voice to Lake O communities at the divisive table of restoration planning. I have this saying „ If youre not at the table youre on the menu,Ž Ms. Taylor said.Florida RealtorsWhen water clarity increased by just one foot near single-family waterfront homes, property value increased in Lee County by $541 million and in Martin County by $428 million, a report by Florida Realtors found. The trade group boasting 155,000 members last year released the study funded partly by the Everglades Foun-dation. It monitored the impact of water clarity on the value and sales of single-family homes in coastal Lee and Martin counties between 2010 and 2013. Regu-lar Lake O discharge events could have a long-term impact on real estate sales, said the studys author and the groups chief economist, Brad OConnor. This is just the tip of the icebergŽ because it only takes into account single-family homes. My feeling is the true economic impact is much, much greater than those numbers,Ž he said. Look on Google Earth. These communities are completely revolving around the water that surrounds them. Theyre completely dependent on it.Ž The report does not figure in beach closures, commercial real estate or multifamily condo complexes. And it especially does not figure in national media coverage when polluted discharg-es cause unsightly, stinky algal blooms. Mr. OConnor was shocked when the national media actually took a break from Trump-Clinton news to report on the discharges this winter, he admitted. I think its devastating for both these economies „ especially the national attention,Ž he said. Its not good if it keeps getting broadcast and theres no solution. Thats awful for these two places.Ž And not just on the coast. The bad press affects us,Ž said Ramon Iglesias, manager of Roland Martins Marina and Resort in Clew-iston, recalling when a boat club from Bonita Springs canceled its reservation. FishingA Lee County fishing guide, Dan-iel Andrews, has for years witnessed waterways being degraded, describing a labyrinth of oys-ter bars surrounded by grass flats that he grew up fishing as all but gone.Ž I knew fundamentally the solution, but it was never really a cool thing to talk about,Ž he said. Everglades restora-tion doesnt sound very glamorous. But this winter once it got really bad right in the heart of tourist season everybody was mad.Ž Capt. Andrews jumped on the opportunity to get people engaged, co-found-ing Captains for Clean Water, and he is now supporting Sen. Negrons plan. Hes also lost plenty of business. What disturbed me the most are the amount of people who would come down and plan to fish with me for five days or a week and theyd end up leaving after one or two days because the water smelled bad or looked bad,Ž he said. I think were going to feel that next season because of people who were dis-placed and wont return because of it.Ž Recreational fishing in Florida boasts $9.3 billion in economic activity and 123,000 jobs, said Gary Jennings, Keep Florida Fishing manager for the Ameri-can Sportfishing Association, with mil-lions of anglers each year contributing licensing fees and taxes. Hotels, restaurants, marinas, kayak and SUP rentals, fishing guides and tack-le shops have all felt negative impacts from the overabundance of freshwater entering these two marine estuaries,Ž he wrote in an email. Tackle for Less, a neighborhood tackle shop located on Federal High-way in Stuart, is the latest casualty. Catering to a local neighborhood whose anglers fished mostly from shore on the St. Lucie River, business dropped off to almost nothing when the freshwa-ter discharges began. The algal bloom and continued releases shut down fish-ing and forced the owner to close his doors.Ž Q Clewiston Mayor Phillip Roland’s 10-year plan for Everglades restoration “I really think Negron’s plan is the stupidest thing that I’ve read or looked at in a long time,” the outspoken mayor said. But he added a few minutes later, “At least the senator has a plan…”Mr. Roland discussed over the phone how he might carry out Everglades restoration: “You’ve got to have clean water coming from the north, and that’s the reason I think you should build deep, deep water reservoirs, that’s the only way to hold the amount of water that we need. And then you bring that water out into a meandering Kissimmee River and it nally ows into Lake Okeechobee as clean water. But you’ve got to store a year’s worth of water to the north. “Then you have to dredge the lake. The lake has to get cleaned up. It’s got so much muck and silt and cow crap in it and it’s stored out in the bowl of the lake. The lake has to be dredged to ow water through the lake and into the Everglades.” After that he would be willing to talk about storing and treating more water south of Lake O.What’s the time frame on all this?“If you spent no money south of (the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers) and you spent everything north — if you did things together, in other words if you started dredging the lake at the same time you started digging the deep water reservoir to the north of the lake, I think you could accomplish it in 10 years. But you’ve got to cut the permits and the red tape and there’s got to be committed money from the state of Florida and the federal government.” Q

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A22 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYVERGLADES RESTORATION INCLUDES a vast, intricate natural sys-tem with a footprint the size of New Jersey merging with highly technical science and engineering problems merging with deeply divisive politics and business interests merging with a long, con-voluted history. Its like five six-lane highways merging onto the same mega-highway during rush hour, and its also nothing like that at all. It is breathtaking in scope and complexity. But the complexity of restoration plans can also obscure its basic hydro-logic goals, to move more clean water south into the Everglades instead of sending damaging discharges down our estuaries. A simple overarching solu-tion offered by decades of research is summed up in a 2015 University of Florida Water Institute report in one sentence, before it moves on to 140 pages of detailed analysis: The solution is enormous increases in storage and treatment of water both north and south of the lake (Okeechobee).Ž The independent study, prepared for the Florida Senate, found that all current storage and treatment projects in the Comprehensive Everglades Restora-tion Plan (including the Central Ever-glades Planning Project) wont come close to meeting restoration goals. Current plans could reduce discharges down the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee Rivers by less than 55 percent and pro-vide less than 75 percent of dry-season water demands in the Everglades. To reach 90 percent of those goals would require enough land capable of storing and treating at least a million acre-feet of water more than current plans (an acre-foot is equal to one acre of water, one foot deep). The title of the study is, Options to Reduce High Volume Freshwater Flows to the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee Estuaries and Move More Water from Lake Okeechobee to the Southern Ever-glades.Ž Robert Johnson, director of the South Florida Natural Resources Center at Everglades National Park and a hydrolo-gist who has worked on restoration proj-ects here for more than 30 years, also suggests the land could come from all around the lake. Top on his list and the UF reports is land in the 700,000-acre Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Florida has the option from a deal made in 2010 to purchase a parcel owned by U.S. Sugar of all or part of 153,000 acres through 2020. That alone or part of it could pro-vide the land needed south of the lake. I have to say the largest option is in the EAA because from the standpoint of acreage it has the most land,Ž Mr. John-son says. But its not the only option out there.Ž The report also called for vastly increasing storage/treatment facilities in the northern watershed and to the east and west, in the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie River watersheds. Some land, the report says, must come from south of the lake. It names possible U.S. Sugar land, other sellers in the EAA, and state-owned land including Holey Land and Rotenberger Wildlife Man-agement Areas. In restoration plans, an increment of storage requires an increment of treat-ment. They go hand in hand and come in the form of reservoirs of varying depths (storage) and wetlands (treat-ment). The reservoirs are often called flow equalization basins (FEB), and the wetlands that harness natural processes to clean the water, storm water treat-ment areas. Other storage and treat-ment options include wells, and agree-ments with private landowners or agri-cultural easements, to store water on their property. One of the reports authors, acting director of the UF Water Insti-tute Thomas Frazer, said what land and where will include a compromise be-tween issues such as human safety and ecological health, and interests such as agricultural and tourist enterprises, all merging onto this decades-long highway of restora-tion plans. I dont think were quite there as far as a consensus on whats the right configurationŽ of storage and treatment lands, he says. I would say theres consensus on that we need storage and those discussions need to happen. But the decisions are going to be in large part socio-economically based. So there are going to be trade-offs.Ž Moving past the gridlock and choosing land, the report suggests, is key to stopping the polluted discharges harm-Bottom line, the experts say: Store it, treat it, move it southBY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@” oridaweekly.com  Theres a growing awareness that to fix these estuaries, we need more storage and treatment, and more flow south through the EAA. Thats where that water belongs. Right now the EAA is a bottleneck constricting the flow. So its coming out the east and west, which has a devastating impact on both sides of Florida. One in four Floridians drinks water from Everglades supplies and aquifers. Our ability to store water will allow for more recharge. When the original CERP was drafted there was a belief most water in the EAA could be stored underground and recovered. Now we know those recovery wells cannot be used in the same scale as envisioned. As a result were going to need to make up for that with a reservoir in the EAA.Ž— Jennifer Hecker of Port Charlotte, former director of natural resource policy, Conservancy of Southwest FloridaFRAZER JOHNSON E Caloosahatchee River and estuarySince the late 1800s the river channel was straightened, deepened, and connected toLake Okeechobee, resulting in a loss of 76 river bends and 8.2 miles of length. One element of CERP is the addition of the C-43 West Basin Storage Reservoir which has a capacity of 170,000 acre-feet. Located south of the river and west of the Ortona Locks, it would store water to reduce damaging lake discharges in the wet season and enhance ” ows in the dry season.OrlandoKissimmee River and BasinOnce meandering for 103 miles through central Florida, the Kissimmee has undergone major changes. The C-38 canal was created to channel ” ow south to Lake Okeechobee. Since the Kissimmee River Restoration Project began in 1999, continuous water ” ow has been re-established to 24 miles of the river and by 2019 will return ” ow to 43 miles, restoring about 40 square miles of river/” oodplain ecosystem.Water storage: North vs. SouthSigni“ cantly greater water storage north, south, east and west of Lake Okeechobee is deemed crucial to Everglades restoration, to drinking water supplies for millions who rely on the Biscayne Aquifer or the lake, and to the healthy control of freshwater releases down the estuaries, according to a 2015 study by the University of Floridas Water Institute. But where and when to store the water, and with whose money, has now become a matter of heated debate and parochial interests. Some advocacy groups and political leaders insist water storage begin as soon as possible south of the lake in farm country. Some farm owners, agricultural businesses and other political leaders insist water storage begin immediately north of lake. Lake OkeechobeeThe 730-square-mile lake is the second largest lake in the lower 48 states. In 1926 and 1928 thousands were killed in ” oods when hurricanes overwhelmed the lake. The Herbert Hoover Dike was built by 1937 and expanded to its current structure by the 1960s. Its steward, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, marks a safe water level at 15.5 feet. Restoring the EvergladesThe Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, or CERP, is designed to repair damage to the natural ” ow of water from Orlando south to Florida Bay, saving the Everglades. The project is scheduled to be completed after 2030. On September 15 the U.S. Senate passed a $10 billion water bill that included $1.9 billion for Everglades restoration. The money, if rati“ ed by the House and signed by the president, would help start one of several CERP plans „ the Central Everglades Planning Project, or CEPP. Orlando Herbert Hoover Dike Clewiston Belle Glade Pahokee OkeechobeeRunoff Runoff Harmful Algal bloomsHABs occur when nutrient overloads of phosphorous, nitrogen and carbon help grow colonies that can poison sea grasses, “ sh, shell“ sh, marine mammals, birds and humans using fresh, brackish or saltwater lakes, estuaries and bays. The pollutants come from such sources as lawn fertilizer and aging water treatment plants in cities, thousands of leaking septic tanks in suburban and rural communities, and cow and crop farm operations.Cyanobacteria or blue-green algaeLow oxygen dead zone  Whats the worst thing that can happen? If we dont do anything? Population growth, sea level rise, changes in climate and weather „ we have to plan for that. Any action we implement will have consequences elsewhere. Fifty years from now there could be 30 million people or more in Florida. Were going to have to manage water in a way that ensures people are safe and are secure for drinking water. And we have to continue to feed those 30 million people, and 10 billion on the planet. So were going to have to continue to supply water for agriculture. I get that.Ž— Dr. Thomas Frazer of Gainesville acting director, University of Florida Water Institute

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A23 Fort Myers Clewiston Belle GladeWCA 1WCA 2 WCA 3Shark River SloughC-43 Reservoir C-44 Resevoir Biscayne Bay Everglades National Park Big Cypress National Preserve Lake Okeechobee Florida BayWest Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale Naples MiamiSt. Lucie River and estuaryFor thousands of years the north and south forks of the St. Lucie River rose or fell with seasonal rains, nourishing the wetlands and bearing no direct connection with either Lake Okeechobee in the west, or the Indian River Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean in the east. But late in the 19th century settlers began scraping out channels for navigation, ” ood control and water supply purposes, ultimately connecting the lake and the Atlantic along a 37-mile canal and profoundly altering the hydrology of the region. Proposed private land purchasesSenator Joe Negrons $2.4 billion proposal targets two agricultural parcels amounting to about 60,000 acres south and southwest of Lake Okeechobee for storing 120 billion gallons of water that would lessen discharges into the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee estuaries and help restore water ” ows south to nourish the Everglades National Park. Water Conservation Areas (WCAs)South Floridas three WCAs are vast tracts of remnant Everglades sawgrass that together span 846,387 acres. They serve multiple purposes, including ” ood control, water supply and habitat for plants and animals. InflowOutflowPhosphorous uptake by ” oating plants Algae and periphyton phosphorus uptake Stormwater containing phosphorus enters the STA. Water with less phosphorus exits the STA. Uptake by emergent plants like cat tails and sawgrass Phosphorus uptake by submerged aquatic vegetationStormwater Treatment Areas: Green technologyŽ fitration-systemSTAs are constructed wetlands that remove and store nutrients and phosphorous through plant growth and the accumulation of dead plant material in a layer of sediment. Water then ” ows into the traditionally nutrient-poor Everglades system that suits and supports its needs. Restoring the natural flow to the Everglades ridge and slough landscape The predominant character of the traditional Everglades river of grassŽ was a peat-based ridge and slough landscape. Its features stretched south into the Shark River Slough from what are now the public-lands Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) known simply as 1, 2 and 3. The traditional landscape is severely degrading, becoming uniform and less directional. Scientists say it can be saved only by re-establishing appropriate water ” ow and direction. They note that the engineering and technology exists, waiting only to be joined by the political will.Central Everglades Planning ProjectCEPP is the next increment of CERP. It focuses on restoring a more natural ” ow into and through the central and southern Everglades by Increasing storage, removing canals and levees and retaining water within Everglades National Park both to prevent ” ooding in Broward or Miami-Dade Counties, and to help recharge the Biscayne Aquifer. That shallow aquifer provides the only source of drinking water for several million residents and visitors on the southeast coast.RidgeThe generally submerged ridges that separate sloughs are dominated by sawgrass.SloughThe open water sloughs are characterized by submerged and ” oating vegetation, including periphyton mats. Flow directionSouth Florida Water Management District border (includes 16 counties, the largest of “ ve Florida water management districts) Everglades Agricultural Area The Central and Southern Florida Project for Flood Control and Other Purposes (C&SF Project) of 1948 designed a 700,000 acre area of the northern Everglades, mostly south of Lake Okeechobee, to be managed for agriculture. Now the major crop of the EAA is sugarcane, grown across some 440,000 acres, but winter vegetables are also grown here. SOURCES: SOUTH FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT, U.S. ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS, NOAAMuskgrass Phosphorus storage in sediment ing our coastal estuaries and the chronic lack of freshwater that is putting the Everglades and the water supply of more than 8 million South Floridians at risk. The storage and treatment capacity is also needed to hold water back from the Everglades during times when its too wet, such as this year. Unlike the water discharged to the coasts, the water that does end up going south through agri-cultural areas and into the Everglades is now relatively clean, because of efforts by sugar farmers, scientists and others stemming from a federal water-quality lawsuit in 1988. In the Everglades, it is the quantity, not so much quality, that is at issue. The quality issue now comes mostly from north of the lake. The storage and treatment capacity called for in the UF report is also needed to clean up the massive amount of phosphorus pollu-tion that is flowing into the lake from urban development, agriculture, leaky septic systems and other sources. Another key principle of restoration is that more water needs to flow south instead of getting discharged down the rivers. That was the historic flowpath, so if your goal is to restore the Everglades, reconnecting Lake Okeechobee to the Everglades, that is the most important piece, that is the prerequisite piece to restoring the Everglades,Ž said hydrolo-gist Mr. Johnson. I cant argue that sending the water south isnt the high-est priority. Its the thing that has the most benefits.Ž Heres one way that the idea of send-ing the water south can get complicated. Malcolm BubbaŽ Wade Jr. of U.S. Sugar pointed out highlights of the UF report showing that water will never be able to naturally flow south through U.S. Sugar-owned land the way it once did because farming that land has created a shallow basin there. There isnt a thing in South Florida that resembles its natural state,Ž said Mr. Wade, the companys senior vice presi-dent of corporate strategy and develop-ment and a voice for the sugar industry in Everglades restoration projects since the 1988 federal lawsuit. Thats true enough, but creating the storage and treatment lands that the report is recommending does not require reestablishing a natural flow way. It requires re-establishing that his-toric path south through engineering. Nearly all plans on all sides of the lake require engineering that diverges from purely natural history, as Mr. Wade sug-gested. We need to build storage back into South Florida almost as a prosthesis,Ž ecologist Mr. Davis explained in an Everglades Foundation video, to pro-vide the service needed so that we have that water to draw from when its need-ed in places like Everglades National Park and Florida Bay. But also that we have a place to put excess water dur-ing wet years, like this year, and relieve the discharges going to the east and the west.Ž Mr. Wade and others also argue that looking at buying land south of the lake is putting the cart before the horseŽ and that most of the pollution is coming from north of the lake; cleaning that up first should be the focus. Its impossible to flow the water south because the water is too damn dirty coming from the north,Ž said Clewiston Mayor Phillip Roland, argu-ing that all money should be spent to clean up the pollution there before spending even $1 on programs south of the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers. The UF report finds the fact of that pollution coming from the north, along with the impossibility of restoring a large natural flowway, are two of the reasons why large volumes of water storage and treatment in all directions are needed in the first place. We have the technology available now to build that more than a million acre-feet that would provide major fixes for our system, the report concludes. But thats tied up in disagreements over the socio-economic tradeoffs. Q WADE COURTESY PLAN SHOWING CERP PROJECTED FLOW OF WATERSCOTT SLEEPER / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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A24 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WRITERSTying up loose ends of the Atlanta Child MurdersQ Blood CriesŽ by Michael Lister. Pulpwood Press. 266 pages. Hard-cover, $26.99; trade paperback, $16.99. The 10th John Jordan Mystery has the added dis-tinction of being volume two of the series The Atlan-ta YearsŽ subset. Thus it is the sec-ond installment treating John Jor-dans coming of age before he worked as a policeman, prison chaplain and reluctant private detective in panhandle Florida. Like its predecessor Innocent Blood,Ž Blood CriesŽ explores in fic-tional mode the historical Atlanta Child Murders, for which the FBIs records are available online. The arrest and convic-tion of Wayne Williams for two murders left a lot of loose ends regarding the fate of several boys murdered or missing during his reign of terror. These loose ends connect to similar murders and/or abductions that Wil-liams could not have done. They leave Jordan, an 18-year-old depressed, alco-holic divinity school student, with an obsessive sense of duty to bring those children and their families justice and healing. Following Jordan around allows readers to share in the life of a grie ving community, with caring people striving to sup-port one another emo-tionally and spiritually. Jordan has developed an uneasy relationship with the local police, most of who find him likely to get in their way or show them up. Michael Lister keeps his readers aware of the fact that police resources are always strained, and setting priorities is not some-thing that always takes a communitys needs into account. Jordan realizes that finding out what the missing boys in the recent streak of disappearances have in common is at the heart of the case. He discovers that almost all of the six that he is searching for live in the same cor-ner of the city and share sadly similar family situations. He also tries to profile the abductor (possibly also a murderer) from what he has learned from his inde-pendent reading and by thinking things through carefully. But Jordans pursuit of justice is compromised by several things. One of these is his problem with alcohol. Another is his unsettled sense of himself and his direction in life. Yet another is his lack of experience in the world. Develop-mentally, he feels in over his head, even though he is quite intelligent and has sharp instincts. He is driven by his worst fears about the fate of these boys, based on his knowledge of what had happened to others during the Atlanta Child Murders nightmare. He even vis-its Williams in prison to stare him down and pick his warped brain for clues. Mr. Lister adds spice to the story by introduc-ing a brief, passionate affair between Jordan and an attractive woman in her 40s, a woman with gifts of psychic and sexual power. She tries to bring him back from despair „ and she partially suc-ceeds, though other issues overwhelm their relationship. The authors challenge is to make his heros moral compass, determination, compassion and analytical skill believ-able given Jordans youth and relative inexperience. He manages to accom-plish this by having Jordans seniors treat him like a peer and depend on him. During his unofficial investigation, Jordan develops strong suspicions of one person or another who had the means and opportunity to abduct these young victims. Readers can understand his reasoning, but Jordan has gone down false trails. If any of these missing kids is alive, time is running out to find and save them, and thus the suspense builds. Mr. Lister has a talent for nailing down locations, representing them physically, culturally and atmospherically. Readers will feel themselves rooted in distinc-tive, credible environments that inform the meaning of the story. Clearly, the author also has a strong interest in spirituality and spiritual growth. Jordan is drawn to religion, but he is more of an earnest questioner than a person of assured faith. His complex engagement with moral and theological issues adds a unique dimension to this highly attractive and extremely vulner-able character. Though the opening pages stumble a bit, Blood CriesŽ is another piece of the mounting evidence that Mr. Lister is a highly original voice. He keeps build-ing, nonstop it seems, a highly original body of work that explores the limits of popular genres while giving each work a striking literary luster. Q „ Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. LISTER g y n h f phil JASONphiljreviews@gmail.com

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 NEWS A25 To make an appointment, please call (561) 316-8754, or learn more about our partnership atsinaipalmbeach.com 100 years of expertise in a New York minute. Mount Sinai Heart New York now open in Palm Beach. Our team of local doctors in partnership with Jupiter Medical Center ensure patients receive integrated world-class cardiology care in Palm Beach County. A A A d d d v v v a a n n n c c c e e e d d d D D D i i a a g g g n n n o o o s s i i s s s I I I n n t t t e e e r r r v v v e e e n n n t t t i i i o o o n n s s s E x x x p p e r t P P h y s s i i c i a n s s s R R R e e e s s s e e a a a r c c c h h h B B B r r r e e a a a k k k t t t h h h r r r o o o u u u g g h h h s s R R R R e e h h h a a b b b i i l i t t a a t i i o o n n n R R e e e c o o o v v e e r r y y BEHIND THE WHEELA little less BMW makes for a better X1BMW makes great sports cars. And when it comes time to produce a small crossover, it continues to make great sports cars. The vehicle seen here is part of one of the fastest growing segments in the mar-ketplace. It seems more and more folks out there want interior room in a compact size and plenty of luxury added in the mix. Since station wagons dont really qualify as part of the urban swanky set, the compact premium crossover is becoming more and more popular. This is BMWs second attempt at this market. The first-generation X1 felt firmly focused on delivering the companys prom-ise of The Ultimate Driving Machine,Ž resulting in a low-slung car with a sporting chassis and little room for carrying people or cargo. The new car rectifies this by going for the heart of the market. The design is actually shorter than the previous X1, but the new one is taller and better organized, and the lines take advan-tage of this to create an overall impression of a vehicle that wont be confused with a station wagon. The front bumper has a beefy look thats borrowed from its bigger brother X5, and the standard 18-inch wheels give it a brawny appearance even when its parked at the outlet malls. Inside, the X1 really takes advantage of the extra inches of headroom. The previous model felt a little confining thanks to the sporty tapering roof line. A less severe one makes the new model much more accommodating for taller drivers and pas-sengers. Sitting behind the wheel in the new X1 feels similar to the rest of the BMW lineup. The three-spoke steering wheel is sports-car grippy, and a large speedometer and tachometer are the main instruments always in view. Underneath the skin are a lot of components borrowed from Mini. BMW has been in charge of developing those front-wheel, razor-sharp compact cars for 15 years, and now the engineering lessons learned from Mini are underpinning the X1. While true BMW fans will feel its sacrilegious to have a front-wheel drive car with the propeller logo up front, this change to Mini Clubmans more compact platform is another key to the better interior space. Out on the road, the suspension has the tight characteristics of a 3-series sports sedan, and it handles corners with expert Teutonic precision. The taller size is felt in added body roll, but it is still the most back-road friendly one in its class. So the X1 does not betray its sporting BMW roots, and drivers who dont know about this platform difference might not even feel the Mini-sized difference. The X1 only comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged motor. Nothing more is needed, though, because the 228 hp is plenty for darting through traffic, and the eight-speed automatic transmission doesnt have to work hard to find the powerband. Since there is only one motor available, it is best to choose options carefully. The X1 starts at $34,095, and it comes well equipped with features that include dual-zone climate control, AM/FM/CD/XM seven-speaker stereo with Bluetooth, power tailgate, power front seat and very convinc-ing leatherette upholstery. But there also are plenty of optional features „ from sporty appearance packages to self-parking technology „ that can make this a $50K vehicle. At that price point, a lot of larger competitors come into play, includ-ing BMWs own X3. One option that might be worthwhile to the Florida crowd is the all-wheel drive system. It adds $2,000 to the price, but there are some benefits. First, it is actually a little quicker than the front-wheel drive counterpart with no real impact on the fuel economy. Second, the extra traction comes in handy. While it doesnt make it a true off-roading machine, it does make the driver feel more secure going through a sudden rain downpour. The X1 has the fundamentals a BMW should have, such as tight handling and a fun-to-drive feeling. It also has a lot of what the company has actively opposed for years, including only offering an automatic trans-mission and a front-wheel drive bias. But the previous X1 only had mixed results with its no-compromises attitude. The new X1 isnt 100 percent BMW, but its the best BMW for its increasingly popu-lar segment. Q myles KORNBLATTmk@autominded.com

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A26 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Learn more at jupitermed.com/breastcare All breasts are not the same. Neither are all breast centers. 2111 Military Trail, Suite 100 | Jupiter, FL 33458The Margaret W. Niedland Breast Center now offers same-day mammography results.t#PBSEDFSUJGJFESBEJPMPHJTUTXJUI GFMMPXTIJQUSBJOJOHJONBNNPHSBQIZ t5IFNPTUBEWBODFE%TDSFFOJOH BOEEJBHOPTUJDCSFBTUJNBHJOHJOBDPNQBTTJPOBUFBOEUSBORVJMFOWJSPONFOU t1BUJFOUOBWJHBUPSTGPSTVQQPSU t(FOFUJDUFTUJOHGPSDBODFSSJTLt#POFEFOTJUZUFTUJOHt6MUSBTPVOECSFBTUJNBHJOHt.3*XJUITPPUIJOHTJHIUTBOE TPVOETGPSNBYJNVNDPNGPSU t.JOJNBMMZJOWBTJWFCSFBTUCJPQTJFTt1PTJUSPOFNJTTJPONBNNPHSBQIZ1&.n BOEQPTJUSPOFNJTTJPOUPNPHSBQIZ1&5nGPSTUBHJOHPGDBODFSBOENFBTVSJOHUIFFGGFDUJWFOFTTPGUSFBUNFOU To schedule an appointment, call 561-263-4414. HEALTHY LIVING How to get ‘back’ to yourselfWeve all felt it „ that tell-tale twinge in your lower back. It can be a frighten-ing moment. Before you even know whats wrong, you ask yourself, How long will I be out of commission?Ž Luckily, the doc-tors at Jupiter Medical Center are here to help patients through what can be the most debilitating injury. According to the World Health Organization, back pain is one of the leading causes for activity limits and work absence. In fact, back pain is pervasive in the U.S., which is why Jupiter Medical Center has made spine care a top priority with its Anderson Family Orthopedic & Spine Cen-ter of Excellence. As the medical director of spinal surgery, I lead a team of highly trained physi-cians, nurses, physical therapists, and many others to provide the best quality spine care to the region. In Palm Beach County, I see a full spectrum of patients, from young athletes to active seniors. Jupiter Medical Center surgeons are experts at doing com-plex surgery with smaller incisions, more efficient surgeries, and shorter hospital stays with more rapid recovery. Our goal is to get patients back to their regularly scheduled routines as soon as possible. One of the most important ways we can do this is by providing access to the latest procedures. As a fellowship-trained spinal surgeon and board-certified ortho-pedic surgeon from Stanford University, it is my responsibility to keep Jupiter Medical Center on the leading edge of minimally invasive surgery. However, as a Ph.D. sci-entist and biomedical engineer, I am also passionate about technology and technique from imaging to robotics. Our spinal devices and imaging technology are second to none, including our implementation of cone-beam 3D scanning in the operating room with a robotic X-ray machine. Because of the excellence of our team and technology, the spine program at Jupi-ter Medical Center has received certifica-tion from the Joint Commission, one of the nations leading health care accreditation and certification organizations. This is the fourth orthopedic certification the medical center has been awarded. Jupiter Medical Center is the only hospital in the region with Joint Commission certification for replace-ment of hips, knees and shoulders, as well as spine surgery. This is a reflection of a long history and culture of excellence. When assessing an institution, the Joint Commission looks into the quality of patient care and the ways in which the organization functions based on a set of objective standards. The standards are developed based on input from subject matter experts, consumers, government agencies, health care professionals, pro-viders and employers. Accreditation as a hospital and certification for programs by the Joint Commission demonstrates that Jupiter Medical Center has achieved the state-of-the-art standards for providing safe, high-quality care. The Jupiter Medical Center spine program is always seeking new ways to correct various injuries or conditions. Jupiter Medical Center surgeons often see patients who have undergone surgery at a different hospital and have not seen the results they desire. Every surgeon in our program is an expert at revision surgery, with a laser focus on optimizing results and getting patients back to the activities they love. Of course, the ultimate goal is that you never need our services. Our No. 1 tip for patients seeking to avoid back pain and injury is to stay active. Gentle, sustained exercise that can be done more frequently „ at lighter intervals and lower impact „ keeps you more active over the course of a day and the course of a lifetime. We have found that those most at risk are patients attempting to get back to their normal activity after recovering from an injury. Many patients will try to take on too much too quickly. To avoid a flare-up of symp-toms, patients should proceed with caution when returning to activity and seek the care of an experienced physical therapist. At the end of the day, we all have the same goal „ to get you backŽ to your regu-lar daily life as soon as possible. Q „ For more information about the spine program at Jupiter Medical Center, or to make an appointment, call 263-3633 or visit jupitermedorthospine.com. S. Raymond GOLISH MD, Ph.D., MBA Medical Director of Spinal Surgery at Jupiter Medical Center

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 A27 WEIGHT LOSS Made Easy! HAIR LOSS? 561-612-4824 www.youthfulbalance.net10887 N Military Trail, Suite 7, Palm Beach Gardens BIOIDENTICAL HORMORNE Therapy HORMORNES | WEIGHT LOSS | BOTOX/JUVEDERM | B-12 | VITAMINS & SUPPLEMENTS | PLATELET RICH PLASMA | MICRONEEDLING Feel Younger...Live Bettert*NQSPWFT&OFSHZ-FWFMt*NQSPWFT-JCJEPt*NQSPWFT'BU-PTTr.VTDMF5POF.VDI.PSFIdeal ProteinWeight Loss Method"%PDUPSTVQFSWJTFEXFJHIUMPTTQSPHSBNt4USVDUVSFEXFJHIUMPTTXIJMFTVQQPSUJOHNVTDMFNBTTt8FFLMZPOFPOPOFDPBDIJOHrMJGFTUZMFFEVDBUJPOBOEHVJEBODFt1FSTPOBMJ[FEBQQSPBDIUPTFUUJOHXFJHIUMPTTHPBMTCBTFEPOZPVSIFBMUIQSP MF $500 TUUJNFPOMZ4ZSJOHF.VTUQSFTFOU'-8$PVQPO&YQ3FH Juvederm$10 1FS6OJUGPS/FX1BUJFOUT(with ad) Botox HCG Diet Plan Only $65/Weekt'SFF$POTVMUBUJPOBOE&YBNJOBUJPOt'SFF-JGFUJNF/VUSJUJPOBM(VJEBODFt)$(*OKFDUJPOTBOE%JFU "NJOP"DJETBOE4VQQMFNFOUT"EEJUJPOBM.VTU1SFTFOU'-8$PVQPO-JNJUFEUJNFP FS $BMMGPSEFUBJMT Monday Friday 9:00 am 8:00 pm 6DWXUGD\DPSP‡Closed SundayAbacoa Plaza NW Corner of Donald Ross & Military 5440 Military Trail Suite #1 Jupiter, FL 33458 Boca Raton NOW OPEN 95% Or ganic, 100% Gluten Free, Ho r m o r n e F r ee, An ti-bio tic Fr ee, GM O Free, MSG F ree, N o P reserva tives, N o D yes ZZZWERG\ELVWURFRP Pediatric Oncology Support Teams Stronger Than Cancer Young Hero 5K family run/walk has inspired local young people to support their peers. Students from William T. Dwyer High School have put together a team to run in honor of 10-year-old Beckett Papa, the brother of a Dwyer student, also battling leukemia. Young Seth Thornton will be coming to the event as Spider-man to cheer up young survivors. Four-year-old Veta Smart, who is battling leukemia, is this years ambassador for the 5K. She and other local children diagnosed with cancer have found help and hope with POST. From diagnosis to treatment, POST helps local families cope with the dev-astating impact of a childs cancer diag-nosis by offering financial and emo-tional support. The course is flat, fast and lined with superheroes as homage to the brave young heroes fighting for their lives. It ends at home plate inside Roger Dean Stadium. Along the course runners will earn beads of hope, strength, resilience and bravery. There will be a contest for the coolest team name, best superhero costume, best pet costume and best fundraising team. There also is a survivor honor wall/loving memory wall to write mes-sages of hope and inspiration. The family-friendly event will have a Kidz Fun Zone, 100-yard Young Hero dash for kids ages 4-9, and a 10-yard Diaper Dash for kids under 3 years old. Dr. Barbara Abernathy, POST CEO, said, This event is both a celebration of life and a way to help local children fight cancer. We are inviting all cancer survivors to join us.Ž Registration is $40 and $45 on race day, Saturday, Oct. 1. Kids ages 10-17 can register for $15. All proceeds benefit POST to provide more services. POSTs goal is to raise $35,000 to help local kids fight cancer. A bone marrow donor drive will be held in memory of Jupiter mother Nicole Rivera, who recently lost her 10-year battle with leukemia. Be the Match will be on site for cheek swabs. Young survivors will tell their stories of hope and inspiration on Courage Cam. The event begins at 7:30 a.m. Register online at postfl.org/5k. Registra-tion will be from 6:30-7:30 a.m. on race day at Roger Dean Stadium, 4751 Main St., Jupiter. For information, call 882-6336. Q Students to raise money for kids with cancer during 5K SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ HEALTHY LIVING

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BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY Some argue that entrepreneurs suck at relationships. On the contrary, I think most of us are pretty good at them. Many of us begin to realize success because of the nurtured relationships weve built. But as stress builds and businesses evolve, we often allow our relationship skills to diminish. The more we engage in stressful business decisions and debate, the more our relationships suffer. We speed walk through the hallway to our office to avoid a lengthy conversation with the staff because we have back-to-back conference calls starting two min-utes ago. We check emails at the dinner table because no ones really talking right now anyway. We begin to treat all the people in our lives the same. Generic. Passionless. Cold. Soon our spouses, children and employees feel inferior to everything else on our mind. I know because I let myself get like this „ once. As my business grew and I became busier, my time became even scarcer. Enter relationship problems. My insensitivity and newly found failure in relationships became evident. Sud-denly my operations team dreaded meet-ing with me, my wife and I were discon-nected and our kids liked her better than me (ouch). This all dawned on me when I sent my wife a picture of my filet mignon from a business trip in Singapore. She responded with a picture of the mac n cheese and hot dogs she was eat-ing with our kids. Clearly something was off. This reminded me of the value of working on relationships. I began rebuild-ing the relationship with my wife, my kids, my business partners and my team. Whats more, I actually started looking at these relationships as something to be developed and analyzed. I finally real-ized that relationships dont take care of themselves. I now have meaningful, individualized and long-lasting relationships with the people in my life „ because I live for oth-ers. And that, my friends, is the one thing we all need to do every day. Heres how I live for others now.1. Reach out to people. The expression lets get together sometimeŽ has become clich for one reason: little to no follow through. Our Google Calendars get so packed with appointments and conference calls that we forget to include a wildly important component to our day: maintaining existing relationships and creating new ones. Keep a list of your 20 closest friends and 10 people you want to get to know better, and reach out to one of those people a day. Show your friends you care by asking how theyre doing and whats new in their life. Ask the people you want to build relationships with what you can do for them. Genuine focus on the other person shows how committed you are to the relationship. Youll also maintain awareness of whats going on. 2. Be there for others. Do you have a person in your life that you lean on? This is the person you call immediately with-out even thinking about it because theyre consistently there for you. Be that person for others. You can do this by just making time for them. As entrepreneurs, time is the best gift we can give. If someone calls, if a staff member comes into your office, make time for them. Be engaged. Dont cut one meeting short for the upcoming meeting. Just plan better, provide support and counsel. 3. Focus on the value delivered, not taken. Relationships are a two-way street. Imagine how strong a relationship would be if you both approached it self-lessly. Stop thinking about what you can gain from the relationship; instead, focus on what youre bringing to the table. Its not about you. Its about them. If you find yourself drifting off when some-ones talking to you, remind yourself of this and regain focus. Building a relation-ship is about having a real conversation and making a connection. We talk about the importance of relationships all the time. Network, build your collection of business cards, connect with colleagues on LinkedIn and follow people within your niche on Twitter. If were not going to nurture and value these relationships, whats the point? Q „ Matt Stewart is co-founder of College Works Painting, a house-painting company that provides business experience for thousands of college students each year.Long-lasting business relationships depend on putting others firstBY MATT STEWARTSpecial to Florida Weekly “Only a life lived for others is a life worthwhile.” — Albert Einstein A28 | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COMMax Planck-FAU collaboration brings doctoral program to JupiterThe nations first International Max Planck Research School for Brain and Behavior, a renowned doctoral degree program brought to Jupiter via a col-laboration with Florida Atlantic Uni-versity, recently launched for the fall semester, welcoming five students from FAU and 10 other students from around the world. The first class was selected through a competitive process that included in-person interviews at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience and at the University of Bonn, Germany. More than 200 student applications were received for the coveted spots. With this new doctoral program, neuroscience research in South Florida will be elevated to a global platform, one that provides the ideal environment for developing the next generation of scientific leaders,Ž said David Fitzpatrick, scientific director and chief executive officer of MPFI. Having the opportunity to learn from an internation-al team of investigators at the cutting edge of brain research is a fantastic catalyst for high-impact discoveries.Ž Max Plancks IMPRS has been educating doctoral candidates since 2000 in fields ranging from chemistry, physics and technol-ogy, to biology and social scienc-es. MPFI, in collaboration with FAU, the University of Bonn and the Center for Advanced Euro-pean Studies and Research (Bonn, Ger-many), is bringing IMPRS to the United States with a special emphasis on brain and behavior studies. IMPRS for Brain and Behavior students are fully funded Ph.D. positions in neuroscience. Using state-of-the-art technology, they will explore multiple aspects of brain function, includ-ing the neural basis of sensory processing, motor control and learning and memory. This program is an amazing opportunity and some of the best students in the world are coming to Jupiter to study the brain,Ž said Rod Murphey, direc-tor of FAUs Jupiter Life Science Initiative. They will be exposed to the best neuroscientists in the world, mentored by an outstand-ing cadre of faculty on two con-tinents and trained to solve some of the most important basic and clinical problems involving the brain and behavior.Ž To learn more about IMPRS for Brain and Behavior, visit imprs-brain-behav-ior.org/. Q COURTESY PHOTO FAU IMPRS students Ye Sun, Ke Zhang, Kuo-Sheng Lee, Dan Wilson and Monica Risley.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 BUSINESS A29 MOVING ON UPFounded in 1961, the Triangle Club is a vital resource to the local recovery com-munity, providing a safe, secure, sober environment for individuals and fami-lies affected by alcoholism. The clubhouse is maintained for members to meet for 12-step work in privacy and comfort and provides a space for Alcoholics Anon-ymous meetings as well as social and recreational activi-ties. The man in charge is Kirk Jamgotchian, general manager for four years. Each year, 58,000 people attend meetings at the clubhouse, which is also home to Alcoholics Anonymous of Palm Beach County,Ž said Mr. Jamgotchian. Besides hosting meetings and other functions, the club has become a place for newly recovering addicts to work, mostly in the caf in building mainte-nance. But keeping the Triangle Clubs doors open has its challenges. We are spending more than we are earning,Ž Mr. Jamgotchian said. To offset the expenses, the nonprofit will have its second annual Lions of Recovery Fund-raiser at the Palm Beach Zoo on Oct. 7. The zoo event idea was the brainchild of Mr. Jamgotchian and Lavinia Baker, a staunch proponent of the local recovery community. Last years inaugural event far exceeded its goal of $20,000-$30,000 by raising $73,000. Our goal this year is $75,000,Ž Mr. Jamgotchian said. Anybody can go,Ž he said. Therell be tiki torches along the path and animal handlers along the way to the Mayan Ruins. Nonalcoholic drinks and dinner will be served and there wont be any big speeches. Itll just be a nice evening at the zoo.Ž Mr. Jamgotchian, 46, knows how important the club is from personal experience. A former addict, he attend-ed daily meetings at the Triangle Club (triangleclubpbc.org) before he became the club manager. He oversees nearly 22 newly recovered employees who pre-pare Meals on Wheels meals for Palm Beach County. (The Triangle Club has the contract to prepare the meals at its onsite kitchen/catering facility.) Mr. Jamgotchian oversees day-to-day activities, coordinates meeting sched-ules, writes grants on behalf of the club and has implemented innovative programs that benefit the club and its members. He worked as a licensed addictions counselor before he relapsed. When he began using again, he lost his job and good community standing. He came to Florida and when he was 16 days clean and sober, he began a part-time job at the Triangle Club. As a direct result of the opportunity provided him at the Triangle Club, Mr. Jamgotchian was given the chance to work in a recovery environment along-side hundreds of others who attended 12-Step meetings at the club. It not only helped him get his life back on track, it led to the full-time directors job. Its so challenging and exciting to work here,Ž he said. My greatest sat-isfaction comes from being in a posi-tion to help people make positive life changes.Ž Kirk JamgotchianAge: 46 Where I grew up: Anaheim, Calif. Where I live now: West Palm Beach What brought me to Florida: I came for a fresh start with a sun-soaked landscape. Education: M.A. in psychol-ogy from the University of West Geor-gia; B.A. in psychology from UCLA. Licensed marriage and family therapist. Internationally certified alcohol and drug counselor. International certifica-tion and reciprocity consortium. My first job and what it taught me: I worked in an ice cream restaurant in Orange County, Calif. I realized then how good it felt to have a hand in mak-ing people happy. A career highlight: Simply helping to keep the doors open at The Triangle Club throughout the years. The club has served as a wonderful safety net for recovery people in Palm Beach County. What I do in my spare time: Im a drummer for the rock band called SADA. Best advice for someone looking to make it in my field: Do no harm. Look at patience and acceptance as a virtue „ not a coping skill. About mentors: The Triangle Club has an accomplished board of trustees who have been extremely generous with their time and expertise. Advice and assistance has come from them and my parents, Haig and Marcia Jamgotchian. Q Name: Kirk Jamgotchian Title: General manager, Triangle Club City of business: West Palm Beach“My greatest satisfaction comes from being in a position to help people make positive life changes.” — Kirk Jamgotchian, General manager, Triangle ClubBY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@” oridaweekly.com MONEY & INVESTINGHarvard endowment provides a lesson in investingI must admit, I suffer from Harvard envy. Its arguably the best university in the world, and I thought if I could be accepted there, the world would be my oyster. Unfortunately, I didnt have the rsum to have a shot at being accepted as an undergrad, and it was one of two schools to turn me down when I applied to get my MBA. Am I still bitter about that 15 years later? Well, maybe a little. OK, a lot. Which is why I read with a little glee that the world famous Har-vard endowment posted another sub-par performance in the last fiscal year. So what can we learn from Harvards struggle, and how can we apply those lessons to our own investing strategy? At $35.7 billion, the Harvard endowment is by far the largest in the world. The next largest are Yale and Univer-sity of Texas, at around $25 billion each. Harvard uses this significant amount of money to fund everything from new buildings to professors to student aid. The fund contributed $1.7 billion to the universitys yearly operations, providing funding for almost a third of its budget. For years, the Harvard endowment has been the envy of investors everywhere. In 1990, Jack Meyer began his tenure as the CEO of the fund, which at that time had $4.8 billion in its cof-fers. From 1995 to 2005, Mr. Meyer was able to achieve an annualized return of almost 16 percent, dramatically beating the overall markets. By 2005, the endow-ment had grown to almost $26 billion. Because of the success of the endowment, Mr. Meyer and his team began to take home larger and larger paychecks, which upset many on the Harvard faculty as well as the general public. As a result, Harvard demanded that the team accept lower compensation. The dream teamŽ responded by walking out the door. The last several years have seen the Harvard endowment change leadership multiple times and significantly underperform the market. It did not anticipate the financial crisis in the last decade and had losses tied to derivatives and lever-aged positions. But even during the eco-nomic recovery, the fund did a poor job of picking high-return investments. Over the last 10 years, the endowment had an annu-alized return of 5.7 percent, compared to a benchmark 60 percent stock/40 percent bond return of 6.9 percent.And things seem to be getting worse.In the past year, the Harvard endowment has had a 2 percent loss, com-pared to the benchmark market return of positive 5 percent. The fund manag-ers blame poor stock picking as well as losses from natural resource invest-ments including an investment in South America where the region experienced a drought during the crop season. But despite these failures, the endowment leadership continues to lead the industry in one metric: compensation. The new CEO took home more than $13 million. Compare this to MITs endowment manager, who led his schools fund to an 8.3 percent positive return this year yet was only paid $1.6 million. So what are the lessons to be learned here? First, even the so-called smartest investors in the world oftentimes cant beat the market. So if they cant do it, how can an average person with an E-Trade account and Google as her research assistant beat the street?Ž This is why I recommend, for most people, an investment strategy where you buy a diversified mix of asset class funds and leave it alone. Unless you are a Warren Buffett or Jack Meyer, you probably arent going to outperform picking stocks or timing the market. That being said, the second lesson is that if you need help with your invest-ments because you lack the time or expertise to manage them, dont skimp. Would Harvard have been better off paying Mr. Meyer and his team even $10 million more in compensation per year if it would have resulted in a 1 percent better annualized return? Absolutely. So if you find an adviser that you trust and who has your best interests at heart, maybe he or she is worth an extra .5 percent fee compared to an adviser that you can just talk to over the phone who tries to up-sell you products you dont need all of the time. Even if he has a degree from Harvard. Q „ Eric Bretan, the co-owner of Ricks Estate & Jewelry Buyers in Punta Gorda, was a senior derivatives marketer and investment banker for more than 15 years at several global banks. eric BRETANestaterick@gmail.com JAMGOTCHIAN >> What: The Second Annual Lions of Recovery Fundraiser, a reception and dinner, to bene t the Triangle Club >> When: 7-9 p.m. Oct. 7 >> Where: The Palm Beach Zoo and Conservation Society, 301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach >> Cost: $135 >> Info: LionsofRecovery.org or 823-1110

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A30 | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM REAL ESTATE FLORIDA WEEKLY Waterfront luxury at Frenchman’s Creek COURTESY PHOTOS SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThis one-story waterfront villa with pool is on one of the best lots on Rivoli Drive in Frenchmans Creek, a luxury country club community in Palm Beach Gardens. The backyard boasts long views to the south and east across a large lake, and the open floor plan and cathedral ceilings offer maximum light and exposure to the private grounds and 40-foot swimming pool, which is perfect for laps. The master suite is nicely positioned in the back of the home with great views of the pool and lake. Three guest bed-rooms occupy the front of the home and a large kitchen with breakfast area sits just off the formal dining area and huge living room with views to the pool and rear patio area. Frenchmans Creek is a premier gated community of 606 homes on 700 acres with 36 holes of championship golf and a 90,000-square-foot clubhouse that is situated in the center of the community and serves as the hub of daily activity for members and guests. Other amenities include numerous dining venues, 16 Har-Tru tennis courts, a 24,000-square-foot fitness center with spa, resort-style pool, and best of all, a private oceanfront beach club. The 24/7 manned and gated security makes Frenchmans Creek an ideal location with a signature address for the most discriminating buyers. The house, at 13828 Rivoli Drive, is offered at $1,249,000 by Vince Marotta of Marotta Realty. Call (561) 847-5700 or email vmarotta@marottarealty.com. Q

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Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents aliated with Sothebys International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sothebys International Realty, Inc. PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 ROYAL POINCIANA WAY, PALM BEACH, FL 33480 | 561.659.3555 | SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM/PALMBEACH PROUDLY PRESENTS D In H | $1,990,000 | 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, 1 Half Bath | Web: 0076893 90 ft. of Direct Intracoastal waterfrontage with 50 ft. private dock and incredible views throughout. This Florida home offers a beautiful open floor plan great for entertaining and easy living. With four bedrooms, three and baths, chefs kitchen, eat in bar area, private second floor master suite with large walk in closet, garden patio with fountain, waterfront pool, two car garage, and full hous e generator. Kourtney Pulitzer | 561.722.1745 Malloy Realty Group at Premier Brokers International 9123 N. Military Trail Suite 104, Palm Beach Gardens Florida 33418 VIEW FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER BY APPOINTMENT SUNDAY,10/2 FROM 12-5PM CALL 561-876-8135 FOR YOUR PRIVATE VIEWING 13791 BAYCLIFF DRIVE (FRENCHMANS HARBOR) THIS WEBSITE IS ONLY FOR CLIENTS SEEKING AN AWESOME HOME BUYING EXPERIENCE:> MalloyRealtyGroup.comCALL TODAY 561-876-8135 EVERY ONCE IN AWHILE THERE COMES ALONG A PROPERTY THAT HAS IT ALL.... THIS IS IT! NEW CONSTRUCTION WITH EXQUISITE FINISHES, BREATHTAKING VIEWS AS YOU ENTER THE FRONT DOOR OF THE THE INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, OVER 6300 SQUARE FEET UNDER AIR, 4 CAR GARAGE, STUNNING POOL, GATED COMMUNITY, NO EQUITY MEMBERSHIP, CUL-DE-SAC, SHORT BIKE RIDE TO THE BEACH, AND SO MUCH MORE! OFFERED AT $5,929,000.

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Call Today for a Private Showing 561-889-6734 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Featuring the Ritz Carlton Residences, Singer Island Ritz Carlton Residence 1804A Steeped in the sun-splashed sophistication of the Palm Beaches, this beautiful Ritz Carlton Residence immerses you in the laid-back luxury of beachfront living at its best. Join us in viewing this contemporary residence where no expense has been spared in accomplishing a quiet ZenŽ like feeling of comfort. One has commanding views of both the Atlantic Ocean and Intracoastal Waterway from this 18th ” oor ultra-luxury retreat. Over 3,600 square feet of imported Carrera marble ” oors sets the stage for the contemporary furnishings and “ nishes in soft hues of gray and white. Imported wall coverings continue the ” ow of sophistication and grace throughout. Here you will “ nd the luxuries of a modern resort and the privacy of a secluded home. This 3BR/3.5BA residence is being sold fully furnished. $3,685,000 For a private tour, please call Jeannie Walker (561) 889-6734. Ritz Tower Suite 7A 4BR+DEN/5.5BA $8,500,000 Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561-889-6734 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,600,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1502B 3BR/3.5BA $1,999,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,699,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 705B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,599,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1105B 2BR/2.5BA $1,599,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1106B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,185,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 Beach Front 503 3BR/3BA $1,100,000 NEW LISTING Ritz Carlton Residence 306B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,024,900 Martinique WT202 3BR/4.5BA $599,900 Martinique WT103 3BR/4.5BA $575,000

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Kravis Center hosts Community Salute, with performances BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@” oridaweekly.comThe Kravis Centers 25th season begins soon and if you want to get all the details and have a great time doing it, come to the Kravis annual Community Salute Oct. 1. The all-day-long entertainment event offers free admission, a chance to win tick-ets or other prizes, tours of backstage and tons of fun for you and the kids. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. with lite bites, mimosas and coffee in the Dreyfoos Hall lobby, plus live entertainment and guest appearances. At 9 a.m., ticket sales open for the general public for the 2016-2017 Kravis Center season presentations. (Guests who cant attend can order tickets at kravis.org or by phone at 832-7469.) Outside in the amphitheater, find activities hosted by the South Florida Science Center, Palm Beach County Library Sys-tem, and CityPlace. At 10 a.m., the Justin Roberts Trio (The Not Ready for Naptime Players) performs a kid-friendly show, including family favorites from his Gram-my-nominated album, Recess.Ž Ascension 33 Dance Studio, a Belle Glade troupe, displays ballet, hip-hop and contemporary moves at 11:15 a.m. and the Ebony Chorale of the Palm Beaches per-forms traditional African-American spiri-tuals at 12:15 p.m. At 1:15 join the Bahamian parade of drums, cowbells and costumes, the Junkanoon Sensation. The Paris Ballets dancers will demonstrate their skills from 2 to 2:30 p.m. in the Rinker Playhouse, and guests can see highlights of MNM Productions upcom-ing season at 2:45 p.m. The Dancers Space will perform modern dance numbers from its past three seasons and Take Heed The-atre Company performs a fully improvised comedy play based solely on audience input at 4:15 p.m. From 5 to 5:30 p.m. Seans Dance Factory brings high-energy dance and sick choreography to the stage, followed by the HAPPENINGSSEE HAPPENINGS, B7 X SEE DRAMAWORKS, B7 X ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 | SECTION B WWW.FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM Gary Cadwallader believes area audiences want and deserve deeper insights into Palm Beach Dramaworks offerings, so the theater has launched Dramawise „ a series of in-depth, revealing discussions of this seasons productions. I know there are adults here, especially retirees and seniors, who are looking to learn more about the work that were doing here with our plays,Ž Mr. Cadwallader said. The idea was inspired by a seniors program called Road Scholar, in which they travel all over the world learning about art and culture. I thought it would be great to do something like that in our com-munity where we dig deep into our productions, offer-ing greater insights into them and the art that we are doing.Ž Mr. Cadwallader serves as PBDs director of education and community engagement and has created and led classes, master classes and clinics for students ranging from pre-K through college and retirees. He has supervised arts education, arts integration and community engagement programs with Orlando Repertory Theatre and Seaside Music Theatre in Daytona Beach. At Dramaworks, he expects to see about 40 participants in each of five planned programs for PBDs 2016-2017 season including The Night of the IguanaŽ (Oct. 13), TruŽ (Dec. 1), Collected StoriesŽ (Feb. 2), ArcadiaŽ (March 30) and The Cripple of Inish-maanŽ (May 18). This program is geared to those who really enjoy learning more about great writing,Ž he said. Were really excited to initiate it.Ž In the past, the theater offered Knowledge & Nibbles. This program takes things a step further. WELCOME TO FALL „ SOUTH FLORIDA WELCOME TO FALL „ SOUTH FLORIDA style. The snowbirds return, the style. The snowbirds return, the weather shows signs of cooling, weather shows signs of cooling, and the green markets get growing and the green markets get growing again. again. Because of the weather, the marBecause of the weather, the markets are as much a social event, feakets are as much a social event, featuring live music, activities for kids, turing live music, activities for kids, and plenty of foods to take along and plenty of foods to take along while shopping. while shopping. Changes this season come to JupiChanges this season come to Jupiters Harbourside Place, where the ters Harbourside Place, where the Jupiter Green and Artisan Market Jupiter Green and Artisan Market Dramaworks introduces Dramawise series BY STEVEN J. SMITH ssmith@” oridaweekly.com BY JAN NORRIS jnorris@” oridaweekly.com jnorris@” oridaweekly.com GREEN ON Get your Get your CADWALLADER Area markets reopen for fall. SEE SEE GREEN, B10 GREEN, B10 X COURTESY PHOTOSBallet Palm Beach performs “Raising the Barre” on Oct. 1 at the Kravis Center.

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 2051 S. Flagler Drive € West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561-832-5328 € www.ansg.org Gallery Hours Wed Sun, 10 am 4 pm ANSG Members Free, Non-members $10HISTORIC HOME, ARTIST STUDIO AND RARE PALM GARDENS OF ANN WEAVER NORTON r nr The Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens will feature this exquisite exhibition and sale of rare antique engravings and lithographs depicting botanicals, fruit, architectural renderings, and Coats of Arms dating from the 1500s through the 1800s. All are in beautiful handmade frames in mahogany burl wood, gold and silver leaf, tortoise shell, and marquetr y by Giovanni Bello of Florence, Italy. Man y include hand-painted mats. Exceptional opportunity for collectors, interior designers, and antique and art lovers. ON DISPLAY THROUGH OCTOBER 30, 2016 100% of sales bene“t the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens GALLERY TALKS WEDNESDAYS AT 11 AND SUNDAYS AT NOON scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com Wedgwood plates deliver a helping of memories COLLECTORS CORNERBought: Shell Point Villages Community Thrift Store, Miners Shopping Center, 15501 Old McGregor Blvd., No. 2, Fort Myers; (239) 2256529. Paid: $3 The Skinny: If I had to guess, just about everyone of a certain age knew someone who had a set of Wedgwoods Florentine pattern. The pattern, introduced in 1931, was made in an array of colors, but turquoise seems to be the most popular. Theres a lot of handapplied decoration on these dishes, which have heraldic griffins prancing around the rims and an enameled bouquet in their centers. But the enameling aside, I love the extravagance of the 10-inch dinner plates, which are nearly an inch larger than standard dinner plates. That only whets my appetite for more. Q „ Scott Simmons THE FIND: My passion for antiques started when I was young. I remember strolling past Turschwell Antiques, in the Collier Arcade on First Street in downtown Fort Myers, which was packed with elegant treasures from the United States and Europe. Each summer, Mr. and Mrs. Turschwell would travel on buying trips to Europe „ a map in the window charted their travels „ and they would return with glittering crystal, sparkling silver, fine porcelain and extravagant pieces of furniture. The Turschwells were formal but pleasant, and their shop resembled a museum. Then there was Mary Nooe, who exuded kindness. Mary had a shop called Things Unlimited, in a ramshackle house that stood north of Bill Smith Appliances on Fowler Street in Fort Myers. You could tell this house had been a lovely home at one time. It boasted a wide porch, high ceilings and nicely proportioned rooms. Marys shop had a little of this and a lot of that. The wicker chairs on the front porch? Im aging them,Ž she would say, as the sun baked and cracked the paint on the woven furniture. Some pieces „ a large Empire-style chest, for example „ became like old friends because they sat in her shop so long. Other items, such as a large service of Wedgwoods Florentine pattern china, moved quickly. It was in Marys shop that I fell in love with the Florentine pattern. The pattern, introduced in 1931, is encrusted with enameling and hand-applied decorations. Her set of the china included virtually everything one needed to hold a formal dinner party for 16 people „ coffee and teapots, demitasses, bouillon cups, a tureen. I think she had it priced at $650 „ far more than I ever could afford mowing lawns at $3 to $5 a pop. She accepted layaways, but what was a 12-year-old going to do with a set of Wedgwood, anyway? So I waited more than 40 years.I stopped at a Goodwill store in Palm Beach Gardens that had a service for 12, sans cups, for $250, and I bought it. Then we found two more dinner plates in Fort Myers priced at $3 apiece, underscoring how much the market for fine china has dropped. That doesnt matter.The dishes are still just as elegant now as they were in 1975 or so. And I think of Mary when I see the china „ I ate pizza from it just last week and know she would have appreciated that. Mary always encouraged my collecting, first at her store on Fowler, and later when she had moved to a space in the Arcade facing Bay Street in Fort Myers after that earlier store had burned. She died in 1990 at 79, but seemed much younger to me, probably because she always kept busy. Mary and her husband, Roger, always were very kind „ I remember her sending me to their home off McGregor Boulevard to ask Roger to give me a bowtie to wear for my first day on the job as a busboy at Smittys Beef Room in Fort Myers. How utterly like Mary, and not a bad way to be remembered, either. Q A pair of Wedgwood Florentine pattern dinner plates.

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Kravis Center Celebrates 25 Years of Artistic Excellence TICKETS FOR THE 2016-2017 SEASON ON SALE OCTOBER 1 AT 9 AM! Meet Jill and Rich from Legends Radio 100.3 FM and enjoy ticket giveaways, prize drawings, breakfast treats and more! Continue the celebration on October 1 with our 25th Anniversary Community Salute! A day of free events featuring local and area arts organizations. Visit kravis.org/communitysalute for details. FOR THE 2016-2017 SEASON Visit Our Official Website at kravis.orgOR VISIT OUR BOX OFFICE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 AT 9 AM OR CALL 561.832.7469 OR 800.572.8471. 701 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach, FL 33401All programs and artists subject to change.To view the Kravis Centers 2016-2017 Season Brochure online, visit kravis.org/brochure.

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@flori-daweekly.com. THURSDAY9/29 Clematis By Night — 6-9 p.m. Thursdays. Clematis returns to its usual schedule from 6-9 p.m. and features just one band. Free. Info: clematisbynight.net.L-Tribe performs R&B and Top 40 hits — Sept. 29.Discover Watersports Pass on sale — Three attractions bundled together including paddleboarding at the Jupiter Outdoor Center; sunset cruising aboard the Hakuna Matata; and kayaking with Kayak Lake Worth. $50 adults, $38 for kids. ThePalmBeaches.com.“Gutenberg! The Musical!” — Through Oct. 2, Sol Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. An Eve-ning Star Production directed by Ben Sandomir. Tickets: $25 adults, $10 stu-dents. Showtimes: 8 p.m. Thursday, Fri-day, and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Info: 447-8829: eveningstarproductions.org.Photography Invitational 2016 — Through Oct. 14, at the Art Gallery at the Eissey Campus, in PBSCs BB Building, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Info: 207-5015.“The Rothschilds” — Through Oct. 16, The Stage Door Theatre, 8036 W. Sample Road, Margate. From the book by Sherman Yellen. Music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick. Tick-ets: $38-$42. Info: (954) 344-7765; stage-doortheatre.com. FRIDAY9/30 West Palm Beach Antiques Fes-tival — Sept. 30-Oct. 2 (noon to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday) at the South Florida Fairgrounds, West Palm Beach. Hundreds of dealers in antiques, col-lectibles and decorative items. Tickets: $8 adults, $7 seniors, free for young-er than 16. Two-day admission: $12. Also offered: a $25 early-buyer ticket. Discount coupon online at wpbaf.com. (941) 697-7475. Sunset Celebration — 6-9 p.m. Sept. 30, Lake Park Harbor Marina, 105 Lake Shore Drive, off U.S. 1 between Northlake and Blue Heron boulevards, Lake Park. Music by the Caribbean Chillers Beach Trio, a Jimmy Buffett tribute band, food, cash bar, shopping along the Intracoastal Waterway. Free. 881-3353; lakeparkmarina.com.Art Night Out — 6-9 p.m. Sept. 30, along Northwood Road, West Palm Beach. Explore the artists lifestyle with a stroll past galleries, boutiques and res-taurants, as well as arts and craft ven-dors from all over South Florida. Music is eclectic, with live street-side perform-ers. Info: northwoodvillage.com.Wine and Cheese Fest — 6-9 p.m. Sept. 30, Center Court, Palm Beach Out-lets, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard, West Palm Beach. Live music will be playing while patrons enjoy wine from regions of Italy, along with a number of different cheese samples. Tickets are $15, which benefits Little Smiles. palm-beachoutlets.com.Yes! Palm Beaches Shop for Success — Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Palm Beach Outlets, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard, West Palm Beach. A three-day pop-up store, plus a one-night exclusive VIP shopping party featuring designer deals up to 70 percent off. palmbeachoutlets.com. SATURDAY10/1 The West Palm Beach Green Market reopens — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 1, along the West Palm Beach Water-front, 101 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Kicking off its 22nd season, and featuring 82 vendors „ 14 are new „ its your favorite part of your Saturday rou-tine. Live music, unlimited mimosas for $10. wpb.org/events or 82 2-1515. Rumageddon 2016 — 11 a.m. Oct. 1-2, Lake Shore Park, 600 Lake Shore Drive, Lake Park. With music by Mar-shall Tucker Band (Oct. 1) and Molly Hatchet (Oct. 2) and local talent. High-way 1 Band and The Beach Bum Pirate. General admission: $15 (one day) or $25 (two days) in advance; $20 per day at the gate. VIP: $150 per day or $275 two-day pass. Ultra VIP: $275 per day or $500 two-day pass. Info: eventbrite.com/e/rumageddon-music-fest-tick-ets-26501257976. SUNDAY10/2 Annual Garden Tour — 10 a.m.3 p.m. Oct. 2, at six private gardens in Del-ray Beach and Boca Raton landscaped with native plants. Hosted by the Flori-da Native Plant Society. Tickets are $10 for nonmembers, free for FNPS mem-bers and children younger than 13. Tick-ets can be purchased with cash or check at any of the gardens on the day of the tour. For descriptive information about each garden, visit palmbeach.fnpschap-ters.org/calendar/. Info: 247-3677. MONDAY10/3 Get Your Grove On — Oct. 3-8, along NE Second Ave., in Delray Beachs popular Pineapple Grove Arts District. The main event is On the Ave from 5-9 p.m. Oct. 5, when street closures make way for music, art, a fashion show, health, beer tasting, food, crafts for kids. Other highlights include the Recess Run at Old School Square Park from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 3. Play outdoor recess games. A Hispano Latino performance takes place at 7 p.m. Oct. 4. On Oct. 6, its Silent Disco at the Fieldhouse ($15) and Oct. 7, take the self-guided First Friday Art Walk from 6-9 p.m. On Oct. 8, take a guided Art Walk Tour with Tom Flem-ing at 10 a.m. from Old School Square Park, plus live music and art events, sidewalk sales and deals at local busi-nesses. ontheavedelraybeach.com. TUESDAY10/4 The Choral Society of the Palm Beaches — Tryouts for the choir are held from 6:30-7 p.m. Tuesdays, before rehearsals from 7-9 p.m., at First Pres-byterian Church, 4677 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Singers are needed. See director Mark Aliapoulios. 626-9997; choralsocietyofthepalmbeaches.org. LOOKING AHEAD Clematis by Night — 6-9 p.m. Thursdays. Say bye-bye to supersized Clematis by Night. Your favorite free al fresco concert returns to its usual schedule and theyve got your favorite acts on tap. Info: clematisbynight.net. Q Chemradery (Classic/Current Rock) — Oct. 6 “Peter and the Starcatcher” — Oct. 6-16, The William G. Skaff Center, 500 Spencer Drive, West Palm Beach. A play by Rick Elice, with music by Wayne Barker, based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. Tickets: $25, $15 for seniors and students. 255-8362; theatreca.com The John Marshall Everglades Symposium — 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 8, at the Marriott, Downtown West Palm Beach, 1001 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Award-winning author and journalist Michael Grunwald speaks: The Florida Everglades: Piecing the Puzzle Together, What Is Being Done … What You Can Do. Tickets: $30, which includes lunch. $5 parking fee. Tickets: artmarshall.org by Oct. 3. Info: 233-9004. His and Hers Wedding Expo — 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 8, at The Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Wedding must-haves, from fashion cou-turiers to food to musicians and DJs, photographers, pastry chefs, jewelers, make-up artists and wedding planners. Free. 775-7750; thegardensmall.com AT THE COLONY The Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 659-8100 or 655-5430; thecolonypalmbeach.com.Motown Fridays — With Memory Lane performing favorite Soul City/Top 40 hits from the 60s through today. 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.Saturday Late Night with the Dawn Marie Duo — 9:30 a.m.-midnight, music and dancing, plus cameos by Royal Room headliners and other celebrity performers.Royal Room Cabaret — Coming soon. AT DRAMAWORKS Palm Beach Dramaworks at The Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Call 514-4042, Ext. 2; palmbeachdramaworks.org. The 2016-17 season begins Oct. 14 with The Night of the Iguana.Ž AT FAU BOCA FAU, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Fauevents.com FAUs New Distinguished Lecture Series, in the University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton campus. Tick-ets are $25. Parking is free in Garage II. Info: fauevents.com, or 297-6124.Faulkner’s County — 4 p.m. Oct. 5. William Faulkner scholar Taylor Hagood, Ph.D., presents Faulkners fic-tional Yoknapatawpha County. AT FAU JUPITER John D MacArthur Campus, Jupiter. Info: 561-799-8813, kbarre10@fau.eduLifelong Learning Society’s Fall Classes — Register now for one of these classes that take place in the Life-long Learning Society Auditorium. Visit fau.edu/llsjupiter or 799-8547. Dialogue Among Religions — Noon Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31. Lecturer: Paul Mojzes, Ph.D. $34 members, $54 non-members. Anthropological Life Histories: Create Your Own Autobiograph-ical Film” — 9:30 a.m. Oct. 11, 18, 25 and Nov. 1. Lecturer: Jacqueline H. Fewkes, Ph.D.The Literature of Cuban Writer Alejo Carpentier — Noon Oct. 11, 18, 25, and Nov. 1. Lecturer: Betsaida Casa-nova. $30 members, $40 nonmembers. Bridging the Cultural Divide: Anthropological Optimism and Understanding the ‘Other’ — 9:30 a.m. Oct. 20. Lecturer: Jacqueline H. Fewkes, Ph.D. $25 members, $35 non-member. America’s Diplomats — 7 p.m. Oct. 27. A film screening and discussion lead by Jeffrey S. Morton, Ph.D. $15 AT THE GARDENS The Gardens Mall, 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 622-2115 or thegardens-mall.com“His and Hers: A Wedding Expo” — 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 8. Lower Level.ARC Wild Pants Parts‘ — Oct. 21, Grand Court. The Wild Pants Party is a fashion show filled with male business leaders, philanthropists, local celebri-ties and more. Contact Brie Sidman at bsidman@arcpbc.org or call 842-3213. The Gardens Mall Spooky Soi-ree — 5-8 p.m. Oct. 28. Kids young and old are invited to participate in the fun festivities. Enjoy a scary good time with trick-or-treating at participating retail-ers, costume contest, haunted photo opportunities and many more surprises! Plus, special treats for parents. Info: Erin Devlin edevlin@thegardensmall.com or Teresa Dabrowski tdabrowski@thegardensmall.com. AT THE KELSEY The Kelsey Theater, 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 328-7481; thekelseytheater.com.Girls Night Out Male Review — 9-11:30 p.m. Sept. 30. A Las Vegas-style male revue show. Simply Tina, the Tina Turner Experience — 8 p.m. Oct. 1. Dream Steeple Surf Film & Con-cert Fundraiser — 8 p.m. Oct. 7.A Fat Wreck, The Punk-umen-tary — 9 p.m. Oct. 8. Age 18 and older. AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-7469; kravis.org.“The President’s Own” — Oct. 13. The United States Marine Band per-forms favorite Sousa marches, classic band repertoire, and lively solos. The 2016-2017 Kravis On Broadway seven-show series — Tickets are on sale now for shows including The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-TimeŽ (Nov. 15-20); An American in ParisŽ (Dec. 6-11); Dirty Dancing … The Classic Story On StageŽ (Jan. 3-8); Beautiful … The Car-ole King MusicalŽ (Jan. 31-Feb. 5); The Phantom of the OperaŽ (March 23-April 1); Kinky BootsŽ (April 18-23); The Sound Of MusicŽ (May 9-14). Call 832-7469; Kravis.org.The Kravis Centers 25th Anniversary Season „ CALENDAR

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 CALENDAR TOP PICKS #SFL 09.30-10.2 QWest Palm Beach Antiques Festival — Sept. 30-Oct. 2 (noon to 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday) at the South Florida Fairgrounds, West Palm Beach. (941) 697-7475; wpbaf.com QRumageddon 2016 — 11 a.m. Oct. 1-2, Lake Shore Park, 600 Lake Shore Drive, Lake Park. With music by Marshall Tucker Band (Oct. 1) and Molly Hatchet (Oct. 2) and local talent. Info: eventbrite.com/e/rumageddonmusic-fest-tickets-26501257976 10.1-2#PROUDMARY#SEEIT QSimply Tina, the Tina Turner Experience — 8 p.m. Oct. 1, The Kelsey Theater. 328-7481; thekelseytheater.com Q“eyes wide open: camera in hand” — Through Oct. 29, The Lighthouse ArtCenter, Tequesta. 746-3101; LighthouseArts.org Mermaid Theatre of Nova Sco-tia and “Goodnight Moon” and “The Runaway Bunny” — Oct. 8. (Family fare). $12. Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo — Nov. 3. Tickets start at $20.The Aluminum Show — Nov. 5. Tickets start at $20. B – The Underwater Bubble Show — Nov. 6. Tickets start at $15. (Family fare).Basetrack Live — Nov. 10-11. Tickets: $32. Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skil-let Lickers — Nov. 12. Tickets: $35.Ron McCurdy’s Langston Hughes Project: Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz — Nov. 18-19. Lightwire Theater Company: “The Ugly Duckling” and “The Tortoise and the Hare” — Nov. 19. (Family fare). Tickets: $12. “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Rein-deer: The Musical” — Dec. 23. (Family Fare). Tickets start at $20. Mountainfilm on Tour: March 25. (Family fare). Tickets: $5. Tickets for other shows go on sale on Oct. 1. AT THE LIGHTHOUSE Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $10 adults, $5 chil-dren ages 6-18; free for younger than 6. Jupiter Lighthouse participates in the Blue Star Museums program. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting; call for tour times. RSVP required for most events at 747-8380, Ext. 101; jupiterlight-house.org.Notice: The lighthouse will be closed to tours Oct. 3-16 for the annual preser-vation work. Mini-tours will be offered on the lighthouse deck and admission will be half-priced. Twilight Yoga at the Light — 5:45 p.m. Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 and Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28. Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, leads. Hike Through History — 8:30-10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of the month. Minimum age 5, ages 13 and younger need an adult who is at least 18 years old. Future dates: Oct. 1, Nov. 5, Dec. 3.Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids — 10:30-11:15 a.m. monthly beginning in October in the Seminole chickee hut for story time and a craft activity. Ideal for kids ages 8 and young-er. Bring a small beach/picnic mat. Free. Upcoming dates: Oct. 4 and Nov. 1. Res-ervation required. AT MACARTHUR PARK John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive on Singer Island, North Palm Beach. Info: 776-7449; macarthurbeach.org.Speaker Series: Dr. Phil Gravinese: 10 a.m. Oct. 1. Topics of local interest. $5. Jr. Friends Meeting: 11 a.m. Oct. 1. A program is for 6th graders and up that does service project at the park. Info: Veronica Frehm at veronica@macar-thurbeach.orgLearn to Kayak: Noon Oct. 2. A land-based course provides beginners with the skills needed for kayaking. Free with park admission; for reservations, call 624-6952.Nature Photography Workshop: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 8. $35, plus park admis-sion. Beach Cleanup: 9-11 a.m. Oct. 8. Help preserve our waterways. Com-munity service hours for school aged participants. Register with Art at 776-7449, Ext. 109.Cruisin’ Food Fest: Noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 8. No entry fees. Food trucks on site. 624-6950. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. 575-2223. Jupiterthe-atre.org. Single tickets are on sale for these shows: The AudienceŽ (Oct. 23…Nov. 6), Me and My GirlŽ (Nov. 29-Dec. 18), The ProducersŽ (Jan. 129), DisgracedŽ (Feb. 12-26) and GypsyŽ (March 21-April 9). Tickets: $56. Ask about the four-play and the five-play package. Season tickets are $202. .jupi-tertheatre.org; 575-2223. AT THE JCC The Mandel JCC, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Info: 689-7700; jccon-line.com/pbg.Sept. 29: Bridge 2/1: Class, Canasta 101 class, duplicate bridge, Bridge: Inter-mediate Bridge class Sept. 30: Bridge: Advanced Beginners supervised play, duplicate bridge, Rosh Hashanah Dinner at the J.Oct. 2: Muscles and Mimosas: Apples, Honey and Health Oct. 5: Glucose and cholesterol testing, surf and turf fitness, duplicate bridge games mah jongg and canasta Oct. 6: Canasta 101, Bridge: Intermediate Class w/ JR Sanford, Duplicate Bridge Games, Bereavement Support Group Oct. 7: Surf and Turf Fitness, Advanced Beginners Supervised Play with JR San-ford, Duplicate Bridge Games Oct. 10: Advanced beginners supervised play with J.R. Sanford, Timely Topics discussion group, duplicate bridge games, mah jongg and canasta. AT THE IMPROV Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 833-1812; palmbeachimprov.com. Bob Marley — Sept. 29-Oct. 2. $20.Aries Spears — Oct. 6-9. $22.wellRED Comedy Tour: Trae Crowder (The Liberal Redneck), Corey Forrester & Drew Morgan — Oct. 13. $25.Jeff Dye — Oct. 14-16. $20. Ari Shaffir — Oct. 20-22. $22. AT THE FAIRGROUNDS South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 Southern Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 793-0333; southfloridafair.com.Yesteryear Village — Now open year-round. Open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs-day … Saturday. $10 adults, $7 seniors 60+, $7 age 5-11 and free for age 5 and younger. Info: 795-3110 or 793-0333. AT THE SCIENCE CENTER The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Admission: $15 adults, $11 ages 3 to 12, $13 for age 60 and older. Free for members and children younger than 3. Info: 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.com. “Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human BodyŽ „ Through Oct. 2.The STEM Studio’s GEMS Club meets — Oct. 11 from 5-7 p.m., 1209 Main St., Unit No. 112, in Abacoa in Jupiter. The first GEMS Club at the Studio will be held Oct. 11 from 5-7 p.m. Call 818-STEM or visit stemstudiojupi-ter.com. LIVE MUSIC Arts Garage — 180 NE First St., Delray Beach. 450-8367; artsgarage.org.Cafe Boulud: The Lounge —9 p.m. Fridays, in the Brazilian Court Hotel, 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 655-6060; cafeboulud.com/palm-beach.Camelot Yacht Club — Jazz sessions start at 8 p.m. Tuesdays at Camelot Yacht Club, 114 S. Narcissus Ave., West Palm Beach. TCHAA! Band performs. 318-7675.Don Ramon Restaurante Cuba-no & Social Club — Live music Thursdays through Sundays, 7101 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. 547-8704.

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARE.R. Bradley’s — 104 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Inf o: 833 -3520; erbradleys.com.The Funky Biscuit — 303 S.E. Mizner Blvd, Royal Palm Place, Boca Raton. Info: 395-2929 or funkybiscuit.comGuanabanas — 960 N. A1A, Jupiter. Age 21 and older. Info: guanabanas.com. Q The 4th annual Dirty River Reggae Fest — 1 p.m. Oct. 9, Guanabanas. Features eight bands. Free. All ages.The Pelican Caf — 612 U.S. 1, Lake Park. 842-7272; thepelicancafe.com.Q Vocalist Alexandra Lewis and Giovanni Fazio on piano: 6:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Sept. Respectable Street Caf — 518 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-9999; Sub-culture.org/respectables. ONGOING The Ann Norton Sculpture Gar-dens — 2051 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. The garden is undergoing preservation work and will reopen after Labor Day. Admission: $10 adults, $8 seniors and $5 students. Free for mem-bers. Info: 832-5328; ansg.org.Q Botanicals, Antique Engravings and Lithographs — Through Oct. 30. An exhibition and sale of rare, antique engravings and lithographs depicting botanicals, fruit, architectural renderings and Coats of Arms as well as other subjects from the 1500s through the 1800s. Garden hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. $10 adults, $8 seniors 65+, $7 students, free for members and younger than age 5. Artisans On the Ave. — 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 582-3300; arti-sansontheave.com.Q “Sea You Here”: Forty artists were asked to reflect on the wonders of the sea. Q “Sizzling” HOT: More than 40 artists display their work which features the art of using heat in various forms, including hot kiln fused glass, encaustic hot wax, welding, soldering, polymer clay, enameling, pottery and ceramics, and raku. Refreshments. Free. Q “BOXXED IN-BOXXED OUT:” Artisans On the Ave., 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. A show by artists who truly think outside the box. A portion of the sales of art at this show will benefit Make A Wish.Ž Refreshments. Free. 762-8162 or 582-3300APBC Art on Park Gallery — 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 345-2842; art-istsofpalmbeachcounty.com.Q Photography 2016 Exhibit: Through Sept. 30. This grouping of orig-inal unaltered images will satisfy the photographer who likes to strip it down. Includes a solo exhibit by Durga Garcia. The Armory Art Center — 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 832-1776; armoryart.org Q “New & Now: Work by New Faculty Fall 2016Ž will be on display in the East and Greenfield Galleries. An eve-ning of talks by the artists takes place from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 6. The Boca Raton Museum of Art — 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Free for members, students with ID, and age 12 and younger; adults $12; seniors (65+) $10; students (with ID) $5. Info: 392-2500; bocamuseum.org.Exhibition: “String Fever” — Through Oct. 26 at the Burns Road Rec-reation Center Auditorium, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Features Richard Dickhaus string and nail art images. Info: 630-1100. Pbgrec.com/gar-densartGardensArt Exhibition: In Plein Sight — Through Oct. 6, Palm Beach Gardens City Hall Lobby, 10500 North Military Trail. See a collection of oil paintings by artist Janet Onofrey, which depicts local scenes and urbanscapes. Info: 630-1100. Pbgrec.com/gardensartThe Box Gallery — 811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach. 786-521-1199.Q “Florida Flora and Fauna: The River of Grass and BeyondŽ „ Through Oct. 2.The Center for Creative Edu-cation — 425 24th Street, West Palm Beach. 805-9927, Ext. 160; cceflorida.org.Q The third annual ‘Collaboration: African Diaspora’ — Through Oct. 21. The Chocolate Spectrum — 6725 W. Indiantown Road, Suite 38, Jupiter. An artisan chocolate shop that offers chocolate-making and pastry classes for all ages. Info: thechocoloatespectrum.com Q Thursday’s Make and Take Activities: Drop by from 2-5 p.m. when the kitchen is open for dip and decorate cake pops, choose your own toppings chocolate bars, cupcake deco-rating and other activities. You only pay for what you make, usually about $5-$10 per item. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County — 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues-day-Saturday. Info: 471-2901; palmbeach-culture.com.Q “Selections from the Armory Art Center” — Through Oct. 29. Q “Women in the Visual Arts: ARTistic Visions” — Through Oct. 2.The Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter — Leads nature walks. New adventurers are wel-comed. Get info and register at loxfl-trail.org.Q John Prince Park Walk: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 1, 2520 Lake Worth Road, Lake Worth. An hour stroll. 963-9906. Q Hike in Jonathan Dickinson State Park: 8 a.m. Oct. 2, 16450 S.E. Federal Highway, Hobe Sound. A fairly rigorous walk 7 12 miles. Mary at 213-2189. Q Monthly Chapter Meeting: 7 p.m. Oct. 3, Okeeheelee Park Nature Center, 7715 Forest Hill Blvd, West Palm Beach. FTA Loxahatchee Chapter Presi-dent Roy Moore will be discussing the 25th annual Big O Hike. Call Margaret at 324-3543/ Q Trail Maintenance: 8 a.m. Oct. 8. Meet at the Publix shopping center on Indiantown Road west of the Turnpike for a clip-and-walk on the Ocean to Lake Hiking trail along the C-18 canal in Jupi-ter Farms. Call Fred at 779-0273. Harbourside Place — 200 U.S. 1, Jupiter. Info: 935-9533; harboursideplace.com. Q Sip, Shop & Support — 5-7 p.m. Sept. 29. Support Loggerhead Marinelife Center while sampling wines through-out the Shops at Harbourside Place. Cost: $20 donation. Tickets: marinelife.org/harbourside.Q Family Fun Day — 4-10 p.m. Oct. 8. Performances by the Jupiter High School Jazz Band & Dance Team, the Jupiter Dance Academy, the Maltz Jupi-ter Theatre, Red Shoes Roulette and an 80s Tribute Band. Face painting, carni-val games, a magician, a bounce house, a teddy bear clinic, a fire truck, arts & crafts, a silent auction, paddleboard rides, Jupiter Water Taxi rides, and Fletch Log-gerhead, the Marinelife Center mascot. $10 family donation suggested which benefits MyClinic, a not-for-profit, free clinic that provides health services to low-income, uninsured families. Live Music on the Waterfront:Q Sept. 30: Raquel Renner & the Ramblers, 6-10 p.m. Q Jupiter Green & Artisan Market — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, yearround.Q Jupiter Green & Artisan Market Mid-Week — 3-7 p.m. Wednesdays, year-round. The Historical Society of Palm Beach County — Johnson History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-4164; historicalsocietypbc.org.Q For the Love of the Game: Baseball in the Palm Beaches: Highlights of Americas favorite pastime in Palm Beach County. Flagler got the ball rolling to entertain his guests and the sport exploded under the hot South Florida sun. Archival photographs and historical artifacts„some of them dona-tions or loans from our community „ tell the story. Jonathan Dickinson State Park — 16450 S.E. Federal Highway, Hobe Sound. Park entry is a suggested dona-tion of $5. Info: 745-5551 or email friend-sjdsp@gmail.com.Q Canoe or kayak river tours — Every Friday and the last Saturday of the month, from 9:45 a.m. to noon. The tour is free with park admission. Registration in advance is required at 745-5551. The Lighthouse ArtCenter — Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat-urday. Admission is $5 Monday-Friday, free on Saturday and for members and exhibiting artists. Info: 746-3101; Light-houseArts.org. Q “eyes wide open: camera in hand” — Through Oct. 29. Q Third Thursday — 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of the month. Wine and passed hors doeuvres reception and exhibits, concerts, lectures, art demonstrations, live performances and gallery talks. The Mandel Public Library of West Palm Beach — 411 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 868-7701; mycitylibrary.com. Q Free Guitar Lessons — 6-8 p.m. through Nov. 14. Join and jam in the group guitar class with musician Phill Fest. For all levels. Free. Q Pilates —10:30-11:30 a.m. Thursdays. Bring your own mat. By donation.Mark Sivik’s Ento-Insect Adven-tures — Downers Park 16700 E. Downers Drive Loxahatchee. Ento-agri-cultural expeditions to 20 Mile Bend to collect, identify, museum mount and display local Insects, use microscope, field guides, nets and equipment. Reser-vations required. Disabled friendly. $6. Reservations required at 635-3521. Q The Norton Museum of Art — 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-5196 or norton.org.Q “Giverny: Journal of an Unseen Garden” — Through Oct. 30. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre — 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 253-2600; workshop.org.Q The 19th annual Members’ Juried Exhibition — Through Oct. 29. The Palm Beach Zoo & Conser-vation Society — 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 533-0887; palmbeachzoo.org.Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre — 601-7 Sansburys Way, West Palm Beach. Info: westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com/events/. Tickets: 800-345-7000 or tick-etmaster.com. Q Prophets of Rage — Make America Rage Again Tour „ Oct. 2Q Daryl Hall & John Oates — Nov. 6The Village Players of the Palm Beaches — Info: villageplayersofthepalmbeaches.webs.com.QAuditions: 7-9 p.m. Sept. 29, at Performing Arts Academy of Jupiter, 6743 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter, for A Holiday TaleŽ, a play by Mike Harabin. Needed: 3 males and 4 females and 4 adult singers, each performing a solo. Show dates are Dec. 2-3 at the Perform-ing Arts Academy of Jupiter. AREA MARKETS West Palm Beach Green Market — Market returns to the West Palm Beach Waterfront from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 1-April 22. wpb.org/events or 822-1515. Jupiter Green & Artisan Market at Harbourside Place — 3-7 p.m. Wednesdays at Harbourside Place, 200 U.S. 1, Jupiter. Info: 623-5600 or harrys-markets.com.Riviera Beach Marina Village Green & Artisan Market — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays year-round, 200 E. 13th St. at Broadway, Riviera Beach. Info: 623-5600; or visit harrysmarkets.com. The Gardens GreenMarket — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 2-May 7, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. 630-1100; pbgrec.com.Jupiter Green & Artisan Market at Harbourside Place — 10 a.m.2 p.m. Sundays year-round, 200 N. U.S. 1, along the Intracoastal Waterway in Har-bourside Place. Info: 623-5600 or visit harrysmarket.com. Palm Beach Outlets’ Green Mar-ket — 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. every Sunday in Center Court at the Palm Beach Outlets, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach. Dont miss these two upcoming events: The Dress For Success Sale and The Wine and Cheese Fest, both on Sept. 30. 515-4400; palmbeachoutlets.com. Q

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First Choice Antiques N o -61100 GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 Ocean inspired jewelry, apparel, art & gi s.www.oceansallure.com | www.facebook.com/oceansallurejewelry tNFSNBJET!PDFBOTBMMVSFDPNStep into Florida Fall, in style! Lots of new arrivals every week for any occasion. Stay on trend with custom chokers and lariats by Monique Comfo Download our new app to receive $10 o your purchase And pa icipate in our reward program! Lets not forget our hardworking teachers that always get 10% o Stop by today, or shop on-line. Legacy Place 11300 Legacy Ave. #110 1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT'Picower Foundation Arts Education Cen-ter Student Performance Showcase from 5 to 7 p.m. featuring local students. The Symphonic Band of the Palm Beaches 45-minute set includes everything from classical and jazz to marches and Broad-way, beginning at 7 p.m. At 8 p.m., Ballet Palm Beach presents Raising the Barre,Ž a mixture of pieces from the troupe. Closing the show is the talented 350-member childrens choir, The Young Singers of the Palm Beaches. For more information, call 832-7469 or visit Kravis.orgIt’s officially fall; let’s celebrate!Its October and our best weather is yet to come and the city of West Palm Beach is offering come of its best entertain-ment. It also means that the Green Market reopens Oct. 1 for the season, with more than 80 vendors. Clematis by Night continues 6-9 p.m. Thursdays with top-shelf entertainment, including Chemradery performing classic and current rock Oct. 6. Lovely country songbird Emily Brooke performs Oct. 13. Biscuit Miller returns to the stage on Oct. 20, and on Oct. 27, its time for Clematis By Fright, the annual Halloween bash and costume contest. At Octobers free Screen on the Green, its a Star Wars-themed night with a screening of Star Wars: The Force Awak-ens,Ž 8-11 p.m. Oct. 14. BYO blankets and chairs. Sunday on the Waterfront gets funky with B-Side Jones from 4-7 p.m. Oct. 16 at Meyer Amphitheatre, 104 Datura St., West Palm Beach. This is happy music. Bring your own chairs or blankets, pack a picnic or get take-out from one of the local restaurants. The Sunset Lounge Jazz Series continues with Selwyn Birchwood from 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 8. Tickets are $20 for this show, at the door at 609 8th St., West Palm Beach. Birchwood is a dynamic young guitarist whose bluesy, soulful vocals, and tons of personality. The Northwood Village Art Walk, a chance to explore the artists and vendors, shops and boutiques, in this enclave just north of West Palm Beach, takes place on the second Saturday of the month. On Oct. 8, guided tours begin at 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Reservations are required because space is limited. Tours begin at Hennevelts Gallery, 540 Northwood Road. Visit northwoodartwalk.com for information.Cooks! Take the night off! The Northwood Village Food Truck Roll-In is held the third Wednesday of the month from 6 to 10 p.m. in the 500 block of Northwood Road. Youll also find artists and vendors, live music by buskers and plenty to shop for the boutiques and shops in this neighborhood of artists. The Northwood Village Art Night Out takes place the last Friday of each month and this month its on Oct. 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. along Northwood Road, West Palm Beach. Guests stroll down Northwood Road visiting with local art and craft vendors from all over South Florida, shopping at the unique boutiques and browsing gal-leries open late. There also are live street-side artists and musicians. Dont miss Street Art Revolutions Kaleidoscope on the SquareŽ public art display. For more information about any of these events, visit northwoodvillage.com. Q HAPPENINGSFrom page 1Each session will be broken up into an Act 1,Ž IntermissionŽ and Act 2.Ž They will all take place on a Thursday during the run of each play. Participants will be offered prices for each entire session or parts, with discounted prices available for members of the Palm Beach Drama-works Theatre Guild. Act 1, running from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., will begin the day with a discus-sion of the play and playwright in PBDs Perlberg Studio Theater. Participants will receive a study guide and a copy of the script prior to the class. The Inter-mission, from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., is lunch at a downtown West Palm Beach restaurant. Act 2, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., will be another discussion with the plays cast, director and artistic team. Mr. Cadwallader said participants will gain insight into the entire creative pro-cess and contribute to the conversation during a question and answer session. We really want to examine the intricacies and complexities of the play,Ž he said. The difference is in the morning session of Dramawise, the Act 1 part, I will be talking about the play itself „ the themes, the symbolism, the charac-ters „ and in the second part with the actors, director and designer, we really talk about Palm Beach Dramaworks production of the play; how the play has been applied to Dramaworks and how Dramaworks is doing that play.Ž Q DRAMAWORKSFrom page 1 >> What: PBD’s Dramawise Series Schedule >> When: >> Thursday, Oct. 13 — “The Night of the Iguana” >> Thursday, Dec. 1 — “Tru” >> Thursday, Feb. 2 — “Collected Stories” >> Thursday, March 30 — “Arcadia” >> Thursday, May 18 — “The Cripple of Inishmaan” >> Where: Palm Beach Dramaworks is at 201 Clematis St. in West Palm Beach. >> Cost: Guild members pay $40 for Act 1, Intermission and Act 2, $30 for Intermission and Act 2 or $15 for just Act 2. Non-Guild participants pay $50 for Act 1, Intermission and Act 2, $40 for Intermission and Act 2 or $20 for just Act 2. >> Info: Call 514-4042, Ext. 2, or email boxofce@palmbeachdramaworks.org. PUZZLE ANSWERS COURTESY PHOTOSThe Kravis Center’s Dreyfoos Hall (left) will attract a range of acts throughout the season. EVER Y SA TURDA Y OCT -MA Y! 8:30AM TO 2:30PM PET FRIENDLY | FAMILY FRIENDLY | FREE ADMISSION | FREE PARKINGPHONE: 561-670-7473FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKTWITTER: @WPBAFMARKET EMAIL: WPBANTIQUEANDFLEA@GMAIL.COM WPBANTIQUEANDFLEAMARKET.COM GRANDRE-OPENINGOCTOBER 1ST

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY n Downtown a rnrnrrrn nrrn n Downtown at the + 1 ).+ & (%, 0 + # (% ( ($ )1 ')/ # (# !"-# (-"*+ %-r )0 (-)0 ( .+#( n & , # 3+ -1 #( #( % 4 2 2 + # ,# (! -) )/ ., & ),+ ) 0 )+ & + ) + ,( + + 1 ) + n* LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, g SOC I Grand opening of Johan Kriek Tennis Acade 1 2 3 7 8 1 Martina Naratilova, Johan Kriek and Daga Kriek

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 DowntownAtTheGardens.com Over 2400 FREE Parking Spaces and Our Valet is Always FREE! a t the G ardens r nrrn n rn nnn nn Gardens. All tastes for all p eo p le The Blend Bistro The Cheesecake Factory Dirty Martini Fro-Yotopia Grimaldis Coal Brick-Oven Pizzeria ItSugar MJs BistroBar Paris in Town Le Bistro Sloans Ice Cream The Spice & Tea Exchange Texas de Brazil TooJays Yard House Whole Foods Market g o to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include t he names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY I ETY my at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens 1. Johan Kriek 2. James Gelfand and Adrienne Kalinsky 3. Jason Hoffman, Hagit Hoffman, Bruce Hoffman, Dylan Hoffman and Kaylie Bartick 4. Louise Goss, Lorraine Brouillette, Pam Tripp, Tammy Ferguson, DeeAnne Vera, Nancy Moran, Cindy Grizzard and Brittany Steele 5. Brittany Cartwright, Heather Andrews and Alyssa Persaud 6. Maritna Navratilova 7. Beverly Schiff, Eric Jablin, Walter Schiff and Philip Schiff 8. Stephanie Dunn, John Kriek, Martina Navratilova and John Dunn 9. Daga Kriek, Martina Navratilova, John Kriek and Greg Saunders 10. Greg Saunders and Diane Mudd 4 5 6 9 10

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY #JMMZ+PFM &BHMFT &MUPO+PIO .BEPOOB UIFQBMNDPN %PXOMPBEUIF UIFQBMNBQQ561-627-9966 on Sunday mornings and Wednesday afternoons will be run by Harry Welsh. Mr. Welsh had the market under the Indiantown Road bridge next door to Harbourside Place for several years, but this fall will move to the sidewalks around the main courtyard in the water-front shopping/residential complex. It was always in my plan to leave the bridge location,Ž he said. This oppor-tunity opened and so I took it. Well have about 40 vendors, but every week we get new ones. Its a mix of green vendors, produce, specialty foods, some jewelry and fashion vendors, crafts,Ž he said. The Wednesday early evening market (3-7 p.m.) will coincide with the plazas restaurants happy hours and special appetizer offerings, he said „ a symbi-otic draw for guests. Mr. Welsh also runs a new Saturday market in Riviera Beach, on the water-front in the citys new complex. Many of the same vendors selling foods, apparel and arts and crafts in Jupiter sell in Riv-iera Beach, he said. Its good for that area,Ž he said. There are no markets in North Palm Beach or Northwood, so it draws from both areas and from Palm Beach Shores, Singer Island, even Palm Beach.Ž The former host of the Jupiter market, Peter Robinson, is moving his Sun-day market to the grounds at El Sol, Jupiters neighborhood resource center on Military Trail and Indiantown Road. A variety of all-farmer produce sellers and artisan food producers are his core vendors. We can proudly say were the only true farmers markets in Palm Beach County. There are no produce resellers,Ž he said. Asian greens will be provided by farmers Maria and Robert Fong. They used to sell their greens at the West Palm market. They have a small farm out in Wellington,Ž he said. They want to sell direct to their customers again.Ž New at his market this year is a French Alpine cheese seller, La Mon-tagne des Saveurs. The company sells at markets in Manhattan and Paris at Christmastime, so Mr. Robinson is excit-ed to introduce them to South Florida. Returning from a hiatus is Beth Johnson, of Teas, Etc., who will sell prepackaged teas, including Shan Tea „ one of her retail successes. Mr. Robinson, who also runs the Lake Worth Waterfront Farmers Mar-ket, helped start the West Palm Beach GreenMarket, which returns Oct. 1 for its 22nd year to Centennial Square and Fountains, the waterfront park on Fla-gler Drive downtown. Operated by the city of West Palm Beach, the market runs through April 27, with the exception of March 25 „ the Palm Beach Boat Show weekend. More than 82 vendors set up booths selling produce, meats, cheeses, pre-pared foods, artisan foods such as pick-les, jam, sauces, spice mixes and more. Cut flowers, native and edible plants and potted herbs also are sold here. To kick things off, students from the Gaines Park, South Olive, Pleasant City and Coleman Park community centers will participate in a student showcase, selling their own produce on opening day. New this year is Seth Czaplewski, of Lox Farms in Loxahatchee. I have a 10-acre property, with three to four acres cultivated,Ž he said. I grow about 50 types of veggies „ tomatoes, beans, radishes, turnips; 20 types of greens such as salad greens „ arugula, kales, Chinese cabbage; strawberries, and herbs. A little bit of everything.Ž Hes been growing and selling only since December 2015 in Palm Beach County, but has grown elsewhere in Florida for several years. Its definitely different here, he said. People ask me for farming advice. Its very weird growing here. They dont realize you grow in the winter. They plant in the summer and it withers and dies. Its just too hot here.Ž Lox Farms will also offer a CSA box. Its a plan where customers order a shareŽ of the crops, and pay in advance. A box of the harvest is delivered to the market or other areas for pick-up. The Lox Farms box is $30 a week for a full share, or $18 for a half share. Customers can sign up at the market, or go online (loxfarms.com). Florida raw honey produced by Leo Rukin of West Palm Beach, Claudia Helander Garden Design of West Palm Beach, and Pumphouse Coffee Roasters of Jupiter are among the newcomers to the market. Tequesta is not holding its market this season, but in Palm Beach Gardens, the Gardens GreenMarket moves back to the Burns Road location next to the baseball complex for its 15th year. Sum-mertime finds the market at Store Self-Storage on Military Trail under cover, and at half the size. We grow to about 160 vendors in season „ 30 of those are farmers,Ž said Jennifer Nelli, recreation supervisor. This year well have 15 new vendors.Ž Those include booths selling acai bowls, and a handmade toffee maker. But, she said, Our priority is farmers. Were full right now on a waiting list, but well never turn down a farmer. When we say farmers, they must have a farmers or growers permit from the Florida Department of Agriculture. The honey producers must have an api-ary certificate. Were firm on that.Ž Also new this year at the Gardens GreenMarket is a huge pavilion with a gazebo, which will serve as a stage for live entertainment during the market. Bands send in demo tapes to be audi-tionedŽ and approved for the market. We want the music to fit the feel of the market. I dont have to like the style, but it has to fit in with the surroundings. I love the music,Ž Ms. Nelli said. Its my favorite part.Ž Q GREENFrom page 1 The markets>> Jupiter Green and Artisan Market Harbourside Place 200 N. U.S. Highway 1, Jupiter Sunday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., open now year round Wednesday, 3-7 p.m., started Sept. 21; year round 623-5600; harrysmarkets.com>> Riviera Beach Green & Artisan Market at Marina Village 190 E. 13th St., Riviera Beach Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., year-round 623-5600; harrysmarket.com>> Jupiter Farmers Market at El Sol 106 Military Trail, Jupiter Sunday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Nov. 13 to April 28 283-5856; Jupiterfarmersmarket.com>> The Gardens GreenMarket 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens Sunday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Oct. 2 to May 7 630-1100; pbgrec.com>> West Palm Beach GreenMarket 101 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Oct. 1 to May 6 822-1515; wpb.org>> Lake Worth Farmers’ Market Old Bridge Park, 1 S. Ocean Blvd., Lake Worth Saturday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Oct. 15 to April 29 283-5856; lakeworthfarmersmarket.com COURTESY PHOTOThe West Palm Beach GreenMarket continues through May 6. A grand celebration of musical icons, from William Tell and Col. Bogey to Mickey Mouse and Clion Williams Saturday, Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., Eissey Campus eatre Saturday, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., Duncan eatre Classically Speaking SymphonicBand.org Tickets: $18 561-832-3115

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11 PUZZLES By Linda Thistle + Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.Difficulty level: CREATING A MAIL SLOT HOROSCOPESLIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might welcome the emphasis on openness in relation-ships that mark this period. But its a good idea to avoid sharing personal secrets with people you hardly know.SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) There are still some questions that need to be asked and answered before you can feel con-fident enough to make a potentially life-changing decision.SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Some lingering effects from a now largely resolved workplace confrontation could make things difficult for you. Act on this before it becomes serious.CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) You feel youre finally in control of your own life after months of making compromises and con-cessions you never felt comfortable with. Congratulations.AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) No sooner do you decide to pass on one job offer than another suddenly turns up. This one might not have everything youre looking for, but its worth checking out.PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Congratulations. With Jupiters strong influence dominating this week, dont be surprised to get some good news about a troubling finan-cial matter.ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Someone from your past could arrive with welcome news concerning your future. Meanwhile, avoid taking sides in a workplace confrontation until you have more facts to go on.TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A decision about a relationship could have longer-lasting consequences than you might imagine, so be sure of your facts before you act. A trusted friend can help.GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A strained relationship could be restored with more personal contact between the two of you. Letting others act as your go-between only adds to the ongoing estrangement.CANCER (June 21 to July 22) New facts could mean taking a new path toward a goal youve been hop-ing to reach. However, be sure all your questions are answered before you undertake to shift directions.LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is a good week for all you fine Felines to turn your attention to some impor-tant considerations, such as your health, your job situation and the status of important relationships.VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Avoid making a quick decision about a matter that needs more study. Keep your mind open for possibili-ties, even if they dont seem plausible „ at least not yet.BORN THIS WEEK: You are usually kind and loving. But you can be highly critical of those who dont measure up to your high standards. Q W SEE ANSWERS, B7 W SEE ANSWERS, B? ESTATE FURNISHINGS561.845.9688 333 U.S. Highway One, Lake Park Mon-Sat 9:30-5:30 | Sun-12-5(Between Northlake & Blue Heron Blvd)DECORATORS RESOURCE|

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B12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY South Florida Artist Showcase at Bice in Palm Beach 10 1. Jackie Medeiros, Bert Bowden and Linda Butler 2. Kathleen Conlan, Jack Rosen and Nancy Price 3. Leslie Rothwell, Murray Ford and Stephania Conrad 4. Katie Stein and Carmen McGinnis 5. Randi Stein and Steven Stein 6. Nancy Price, John Archer and Skira Watson 7. Richard Simon, Mimi Simon and John Archer 8. Emily McBride, Gisele Weisman and Dorinda Ennis 9. Jean Hutchison and Jerry Kornbluth 10. Melanie Cabot, Thomas Abrose and Thora Abrose 1 2 4 8 6 3 9 5 7

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Do wntown West Palm Beach a new side of n n Art Galleries. Theatres. International Dining. Shopping. Museums. Live Music. Wine Tastings. And More.When you think about memorable places, think Downtown West Palm Beach. Just take a walk and see for yourself!r Keep an e y e out f or Downtown happenings throu g h our social media @DowntownWP B Brought to you by the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority DowntownWPB.com 561.833.8873 20th Annual Members Juried Exhibition NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO O NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO N NO NO NO NO N NO N NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO N NO NO NO N NO NO N NO NO NO N N N NO NO O NO NO NO N N N N NO NO NO NO NO O N O O NO NO NO NO NO O NO NO N N N N N N O N N N N N N N NO N NO NO NO N N NO N N NO O O O O N N N N N N N O O O O O N N N N NO O O O O N N N N O N O O O O O O O O O O N O O O O W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O CT CT CT CT CT CT T CT CT CT CT CT CT CT CT CT C CT CT CT CT CT C CT CT T T T CT T CT CT CT CT CT CT CT CT T CT CT CT CT T T CT CT T T T T CT T T T CT T T T CT CT CT C CT CT C CT CT CT T T C CT T T T T CT CT C T C CT C C T C C C C C C C C C T C C T C C T T T T T C C OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB O OB OB OB OB OB OB OB OB O OB O OB OB OB OB O OB OB O OB OB OB OB OB O OB O OB OB OB OB O OB OB O OB OB B OB OB O OB OB OB OB B OB OB OB B OB OB O B B OB OB OB OB B B OB O O O B B OB O O OB O B B OB OB OB OB O B B B B OB B B B B B O B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B O O B B B B B E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 9 9 2 9 29 29 9 29 29 29 29 2 29 29 2 2 29 2 2 2 29 2 29 29 2 2 29 9 29 2 29 9 2 2 9 2 9 9 Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa P P P Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa P Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa P Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa Pa P Pa Pa P Pa Pa a Pa Pa a Pa Pa Pa P P P Pa Pa P Pa Pa Pa Pa P P a P P Pa P Pa Pa a a a a P P P a a a a a a P Pa P a Pa a a Pa P Pa Pa Pa P P P P P P P P P P P a Pa Pa P P P P P P a a a a P P P P P P P a P lm lm lm lm lm lm l m lm l l lm lm lm lm m lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm lm l l lm lm l lm m l lm lm lm m m m m lm lm lm l m l l lm m m lm lm lm lm lm m lm lm lm l lm lm m m lm lm l m l lm m m m l l l m m l l lm lm l l m lm lm lm lm m m m l l m lm m l l l l l lm l m m l m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B ea ea ea e ea e e e e e ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea e e e e e e ea ea ea ea ea a ea ea e e e e e e e ea ea a ea ea a ea ea e e e e e e ea ea e ea e e e ea ea ea ea ea e ea e e ea ea ea e e ea e ea ea ea a ea e e e a a a e a a a a a ea ea ea a a a a a a a e ea a a a a ea a ea a a a a a ea ea ea ea a ea ea e ea a a ea e ea a ea a a e a a a ea e e e e e a a ea a e e e e e e e e e a ea a a e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e ea e e ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch ch c c c c ch c ch c ch ch ch ch h ch c ch ch ch ch ch ch ch h h ch ch ch ch h h h c h h h ch c ch h h c ch ch c ch h h h c ch ch h h ch c ch c c c c c c c ch ch h h h ch c h h h h ch h h h h h c h h h h P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho o ho ho ho ho ho h ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho h ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho h h ho ho ho h h ho ho ho h ho ho h h h ho ho ho h h ho o ho ho ho h h ho ho ho ho h h h ho h h h h ho h ho ho ho h h ho ho h h o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o h o o o o o h h o o o o o h h h o o o o o to to to to to to to to to to to o o to to to to to to to o to to to to to to to o to to to to to to to to to to to to to to to to t t to to o to to to to to to to to to t t t t to o o to t t o t o o to o o to o to t o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o gr gr gr g gr gr gr gr gr gr gr gr g g g gr gr gr gr gr g gr gr gr gr gr gr gr gr gr gr gr g gr gr gr gr g g g r gr gr gr gr g g gr g gr gr g gr gr r g gr g gr gr gr g 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Clayton Carnes is bouncing around his new restaurant, Cholo Soy Cocina so full of energy he can barely talk. He doesnt sit, but paces, gesturing with his hands as he speaks. Hell need the energy. The tiny spot (eight seats inside; a few on the patio outdoors) tucked into West Palm Beachs Antique Row is going to be slammed, his fans have warned him. He cant keep up with all the social media buzz surrounding the place thats been in the works over the summer. Its a good problem to have. Yeah, we expect them to be lined up at the door,Ž he said. We sat down with him before he opened. The Grand Rapids, Mich., native has traveled throughout Central and South America, settling in a job for a few years in his wifes native Ecuador. All over, hes picked up several of the dishes, spices and techniques hell use here. Its a mix, indicated by the meaning of Cholo Soy: Spanglish for I am cholo (mestizo).Ž Which is why, he says, its not a Mexican restaurant. But tacos? Yeah. I get that, but its really not the Mexican that everyone thinks of when you say tacos. Im not playing into that Mexican restaurant thing. Were more than that, with a lot of influences from other similar cuisines.Ž He and his father built the restaurant themselves. Its been a wild ride,Ž he said. The building is old, and so is the interior construction done by former shop ten-ants. Stuff would just crumble in our hands when we were pulling out walls.Ž He said he essentially had to rebuild the bones of the place, and not just remodel. The setbacks have been frus-trating for him and his fans „ which include dozens of local chef friends gathered at the many charity events Mr. Carnes has done, but the opening is within reach at last. What the fans will be coming for will be his authenticŽ tacos „ and spe-cifically, a signature smoked beef cheek taco. Everything will be house-made, and sourced as locally and sustainably as he can, he says. Most important will be the tortillas made from corn ground on site. If we can get it, itll be from Florida, but for sure, its organic, non-GMO. It might be Anson Mills Just wherever we can get it.Ž A special grinder with water attachment will produce the masa, the coarse meal, used to make the soft taco shells as well as other corn dishes, including corn chips. I dont want to have tortilla chips. These are thick chips, and you taste true corn flavor,Ž he said, comparing them to a Frito. Yes, there will be homemade guacamole. Its so good „ I cant not have it.Ž Hes excited, having discovered a number of things to do with the spent corn kernels left over from grinding, including corn nuts. These are so hard and crunchy, made from the real dried corn kernel „ but theyre SO good with a cold beer.Ž He describes the menu. Well have a big, fat hornado plate. If you go to a market in Guatemala or wherever, they serve you this platter of food. They sell everything in increments for two peo-ple. It will have tacos, fried yucca, spicy plantain chips, mote pillo from Ecua-dor „ pan-fried hominy with achiote, scrambled eggs and scallions.Ž Ceviche, made with whatever looks good to me at the market that day. Fish for the fish tacos „ it might be snapper, skate „ it could be lobster „ what-evers fresh and itll have a light tempura batter.Ž Some of those vegetables hes hoping to pull from the raised-bed garden hes planted out back along the patios edge. I transplanted a bunch of vegetables from my house „ heirloom squash, beans, cilantro, tomatoes.Ž He describes the ordering process that he plans to keep the counter chaos to a minimum. First off: No substitu-tions and no combos. Tacos come in sets of two „ you cannot substitute. So you get two fish or two beef. If you want one of each, you have to order more.Ž Theyll come loaded with his fresh toppings, and if you dont like them, youre out of luck. Order them plain. Were not going to stop a line to pull one of this, take off that. It wont work.Ž There will be only Mr. Carnes and one other cook/helper working in the alley-kitchen „ open to full public view, and you can talk to the chef as he works. I want to have people coming up and asking questions about how its made and what we do. There are no preten-tions here,Ž he said. I want it to be relaxed „ its come as you are.Ž Drinks will run the gamut from a fewŽ beers, including Oskar Blues Beerito a Mexican-style amber lager, Founders All Day IPA some local, to nitro-brewed coffee, kombucha, Jarritos and a few wine-based cocktails. A cashier and maybe a food runnerŽ will be the only other staff. The diner will place an order then get their drink while theyre waiting on the patio. With only eight seats indoors (and a more bistro feel, he calls it) he expects a bit of crowding at first as peo-ple catch on to the flow, but the patio will be a hang-out, he predicts. Overlooking the garden and patio is a two-story mural painted by local urban artist Mark Bulks Its a Madonna, in a Marilyn Monroe style,Ž Mr. Carnes said. He added a nuclear bomb so people might not be so offended.Ž Its a casual street-vibe place, he said. Special ticketed dinner events are planned on Mondays „ the chefs night off. A five-course dinner featuring a guest chef each month is in the works. But thats down the road,Ž he said. Hell also do catering for office parties and such. Right now, he has his hands full just opening Cholo Soy. Im the manager, builder, gardener, chef, accountant. But I just want to cook.Ž Cholo Soy Cocina is at 3715 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Hours are Sunday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Phone 818-2589; cholosoycocina.com Chefs and Farmers Team up for Farmers Market and Brunch Watching a number of chef dinners and contests and fun events locally, Aarons Catering chefs Aaron Menitoff and Troy Sheller hatched a plan to do a chefs collaborative brunch. And they wanted to marry it with a farmers market full of vendors. Farmers Jodi and Darrell Swank of Swanks Specialty Produce in Loxahatchee were the likely choice to host the events. And so it was settled. Dates are being set for the brunches „ two each month beginning Jan. 1. Mr. Menitoff gave the back story: Weve been involved with dinners at Swank and their collaboration events for years. We thought they were unique, so we started a conversation about doing a brunch series.Ž As caterers for the International Polo Club in Wellington, Aarons Catering put on an 80-item brunch spread with six cooking stations at the field during polo season. The polo club was sold and the catering company moved to Wellington National Golf Club where he and Mr. Sheller, of the now-closed Chefs Kitchen and Smokehouse will open two restaurants and a banquet facility. The men have formed the Wellington Hospitality Group to produce these types of eatertainmentŽ events. The farm was a natural once they came up with a chefs brunch idea. We decided to create something else novel that involved entertainment and food. We love the whole farm-to-table movement, and the farmers mar-kets. Were all about regional, local, and organic. And so we decided to mix it all together for a culinary entertainment event.Ž Every week, several area chefs will collaborate to showcase their restau-rants. Well decide if its going to be family-style service or a chefs table. There will be vendors with handmade soaps, jewelry, clothing „ focusing on local businesses. And well have organic food vendors.Ž The chefs will incorporate the foods from the vendors into their dishes. Guests can then get recipe cards, and shop for ingredients on the spot to rec-reate the dishes at home. Alcohol ven-dors will steer cooks to the right wine or beer pairings. Entertainment will round out the brunch-time events, planned for Sun-days and some Saturdays during season. Dates have not been set. Eight of the events are scheduled. Ticket prices are still up in the air but will be in the $100 range, he said, and would cover the meal. Alcohol would be extra and any purchases from the 20 to 30 vendors are separate as well. Vendors are still being considered. For more information, call 792-9292. Q B14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Cholo Soy Cocina cooks up fare from across the Americas jan NORRISjan@jannorris.com PHOTOS BY JAN NORRIS/FLORIDA WEEKLYClayton Carnes will serve food with a variety of Latin American influences at Cholo Soy Cocina, situated along West Palm Beach’s Antique Row.A mural by urban artist Mark Bulks overlooks the garden and patio at Cholo Soy Cocina.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29-OCTOBER 5, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15The Dish: Calamari Fritti The Place: Limoncello, 11603 U.S. 1, North Palm Beach; 622-7200 or limoncel-lopbg.com. The Price: $12.95 The Details: Limoncellos new location a few blocks south of its old one gave a friend and me an excuse to try something new one evening. Inside, the space is elegant and modern. A large bar sits near the entrance. The adjoining dining room was rapidly filling, and this was near the end of September „ traditionally the slowest month of the year for restaurants in South Florida. My friend and I had drinks at the bar and shared a couple of appetizers. The calamari came out on top for us. Tender rings and tentacles of squid lightly breaded and fried until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside. The marinara served on the side was exactly the way the sauce should be „ it literally tasted of the field, with fresh toma-toes. The sauted broccoli rabe and sausage ($12.95) was well prepared with a fennel-packed sausage, but the greens could have used a touch more salt. The same could be said for a side of escarole and beans ($8.95). Those are minor quibbles „ Ill be back. Be sure to sit at the bar „ John will treat you right, with a perfectly mixed cocktail. Q „ Sc ott Simmons C ustomers at Calaveras Cantina just cant seem to get enough of Executive Chef David Watsons flaky duck comfit empanadas ($12.99) topped with cilantro, cotija cheese and avocado ranch dressing or his carnitas ($14.99) with slow-braised pork served with sweet plantains, red rice and farm vegetables, among other menu items. They call it sexy Mexican.ŽChef Watson, who grew up in Jupiter but has long had an interest in South of the Border cooking, specializes in sexy MexicanŽ dishes, a perfect blend of coastal, southern and central Mexican cuisine. Last year, he helped owner Curtis Peery open Calaveras Cantina at Har-bourside Place in Jupiter. The food is fresh, vibrant in color and were very enthusiastic,Ž Chef Watson said. I love the food, the fresh ingredients, the atmosphere, the great crew, great boss and watching everything fall into place,Ž Chef Watson, 33, said. As one might expect, Mexican music plays in the background to get diners in a happy mood. He supervises 20 people in the kitchen.I treat my kitchen (crew) like family,Ž he said. I know what theyre going through because Ive done it all myself.Ž Becoming the restaurants executive chef didnt happen overnight, after all. Chef Watson has been working in the restaurant business since he was 16, washing dishes and busing tables at Duffys. Chef Jack Gardiner took Chef Watson under his wing at Barrymores, where he spent several years sharpening his skills. Chef Watson opened The Cheesecake Factory in Palm Beach Gardens in 2005 and worked there for two years before becoming corporate culinary coordina-tor for Ruby Tuesday for six years. Calaveras Cantina recently launched some new weekly specials and will add a new brunch menu in October. Other themed days include Margarita Mondays, Taco Tuesdays, Guac Down Wednesdays, Thursday Ladies Nights and Friday Night live DJs. Calaveras Cantina also offers more than 100 types of tequila every day. When not working, Chef Watson enjoys fishing and bike riding with his 8-year-old son, Angel. I like to fish whenever I have a chance and carry fishing poles in my car,Ž he said. When I catch something I like, I filet it up and cook it.Ž David WatsonAge: 33 Hometown: Jupiter Restaurant: Calaveras Cantina, 125 Dockside Circle, Jupiter; 320-9661, calav-erascantinas.com. Mission: My plates are my canvas so I want put out great food with my own twist. We work hard to create delicious dishes that our diners will love. Cuisine: Mexican food Training: I have been in the restaurant industry since I was 16, working in many different restaurants to hone my skills. Learning this trade takes a lot of hands-on experience. Choice of footwear: I like to wear Mozo shoes in the kitchen. What advice would you give to an upcoming cook or chef: Absorb everything you can. Keep your head on straight and just grind it out. There is a lot to be done, but you have to learn and mature to be good at your craft and that takes time. Q In the kitchen with...DAVID WATSON, Calaveras Cantina at Harbourside Place,Jupiter BY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@floridaweekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTODavid Watson, executive chef at Calaveras Cantina, worked at a variety of other restau-rants throughout South Florida. FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINEPlaces to the westA trio worth noting3SCOTT’STHREE FOR2 AGLIOLIO FRESH PASTA & WINE BARWellington Country Plaza, 12793 Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington; 798-7770 or agliolio.com Agliolio makes a nod toward fine cuisine with its pairings of fresh pasta and a variety of sauces. We also enjoyed our fork-tender calamari and found the hearty pasta fagioli to be a comfortably satisfying soup. 1 OLI’S FASHION CUISINEOli’s Fashion Cuisine, 10610 Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington; 7922220, olisfashioncuisine.com Ive enjoyed my visits to this restaurant west of the Mall at Wellington Green. It turns out I was in good company. Olis has attracted a variety of celebrity guests „ Bill Clinton, Bill and Melinda Gates, Robert Duvall, Michael Bloom-berg, Bruce Springsteen, Jimmy Buffett, Michael Jordan and rapper turned home renovator Vanilla Ice. Chef-owner Dustin Parfitt says visitors to Olis Fashion Cuisine should try the lobster tacos ($20) and grilled avocado wedges ($14). They are among the most popular menu items. 3 BIMINI TWIST8480 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 784-2660 or mybiminitwist.com Weve enjoyed the tropical vibe of Bimini Twist and its sister restaurants, Kee Grill and CoolA Fishbar, since each opened more than a decade ago. The crab cakes are among the best weve had anywhere „ tender bits of lump crab, no filler. Good and good for you! Our favorite side can be summed up in two words: Spinach Maria, a rich casserole thats perfect with fish or fowl. „ Scott Simmons COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTOLobster tacos are on the must-try list at Oli’s Fashion Cuisine in Wellington.

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