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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on1038532305
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Vol. VI, No. 35  FREEWEEK OF JUNE 16-22 2016www.FloridaWeekly.com LESLIE LILLY A2OPINION A4PETS A6 HEALTHY LIVING A15 BUSINESS A18MOVING ON UP A19REAL ESTATE A21 ARTS B1 COLLECTIBLES B2 CALENDAR B4-6PUZZLES B13CUISINE B15 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store. INSIDE Moving On UpMaria Hirt has joined Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa. A20 XPulitzer imagesKatie Deits explores Photographic Centre show. B1 XIn the kitchenMeet Stephanie Cohen and Jordan Lerman of Jardin. B15 X Chamber musicFestival looks ahead to 25th season. B10 X BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.comITS A GOOD IDEA, ON PAPER. AND FOR many its a good idea on the ground, one devised more than 25 years ago to bring billions of dollars of foreign money into the U.S. economy, and with it jobs for American workers and carte-blanch green cards for immigrant investors, their spouses and their children under 21. Its called the EB-5 program. The U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services manages the program, which works roughly like this: A foreign national who wishes to live in the U.S. may jump to the head of the immigration line by investing at HILE DAWN STRUGGLES TO POUR ITS first ghostly light through the stubborn shadows of a new March day, Dalton Boney low-ers his long form onto a narrow bench in the open-ended pole barn of the old Babcock Ranch, north of Fort Myers. Hes already bridled and saddled his horse, securing his rope from the pommel in front and tying his rain slicker behind the cantle, in the rear. Slipping a small tin from his jeans pocket, he pushes a pinch of tobacco into his cheek. Then he answers a reporters Skipping the immigration line: EB-5 is expensive, not as easy as it looks.SEE IMMIGRATION, A7 XBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.com SEE GIDDY UP, A10 XWIts all these guys do ... Its all theyve ever wanted to do.Ž „ Elton Langford, Babcock Ranch cattle manager Mothers and calves can look peace-ful until they aren’t. The cowboys are never relaxed.Cowboy life firmly entrenched on Babcock RanchupGiddy VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYMen, horses and dogs, all born to the life, prepare to move cows on Babcock Ranch. From the left, Casey King, Dalton Boney, Elton Langford and Dustyn Whitmir.XX B r a t o w b #WeAreOrlando

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY COMMENTARY Show me the moneyThe announcement by Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett cre-ated quite a stir when it was made back in 2010. The two billionaire fami-lies jointly launched a campaign called the Giving Pledge. Its purpose was to inspire wealthy people like themselves to pony up big bucks for charitable causes. Only two things were required of those seeking membership in this exclusive club: You must be worth at least a billion dollars and you must be willing to give half of it away. The rest is easy. The choice of when to give is left up to those making the pledge. They can write the checks during their life-time, enjoying their giving while they are living, or accomplish the task in the closet-cleaning that occurs on vacating Gods waiting room. Buffett and Gates seem not to want to make too big a deal out of some-thing they reason is relatively uncom-plicated. Pledge participants make a moral rather than contractual commit-ment. The philanthropic principles the pledge embodies are self-reinforcing. The integrity of the signatories is its own guarantee. The pledge is a codicil to a donors legacy for which only they are accountable. They commit to living a life measured not by what they have, but by what they give. Meanwhile, the super rich are enjoying a modern Gilded Age. They can afford the price of admis-sion. Ray Russolillo writes in Private Wealth MattersŽ that using the Forbes list of the Worlds BillionairesŽ pro-vides Buffett and Gates with 1,121 prob-able prospects. They are working it. Says Russolillo, at the most recent count, 154 individuals and/or couples from 16 countries have made the pledge, representing net worth of more than $750 billion. Of this total, 124 are in the U.S. households with a combined net worth of more than $502 billion. Sixty-one of the families holding the bulk of the assets pledged are in just four states (California, New York, Wash-ington and Nevada). Only six of Flor-idas super rich are signed up. Donald Trump, arguably one of Floridas most famous billionaires, is not among them. Trump was asked on NBCs Meet the PressŽ why he had not joined with fellow billionaires in signing the pledge. He replied he was a little bit old-fash-ionedŽ and ... opposed to selling every-thing and giving it away. ƒ I make lots of big contributions. I like that better.Ž Trump is consistent about doing what is good for Trump as a guiding principle. He exploits philanthropic opportunities using the same cynical calculus that is characteristic of his business deals. To wit, the objective of the wolf is to always eat its prey. But recently, Trump fell victim to his own conceit that if he says something, it therefore must be true „ except when it is not or the veracity of his claims is questionable. When Trump went presidential, he polished up his philanthropic creds, claiming to have made $102 million in personal contributions over the past five years to various nonprofits. He headlined a media circus earlier this year when he opted to do a fundraiser for veterans groups instead of partici-pating in a Republican primary debate. At the event, Trump announced he had raised $6 million to contribute to vet-eran groups, which included his own personal donation of $1 million. The Washington Post replied, Show me the money.Ž The paper launched an investigation to verify his public statements. It found none of the $102 million in contribu-tions claimed by Trump were actually made with his own money. The checks were written by the Donald J. Trump Foundation, which bears his name but to which he contributes infrequently. It is in majority funded by third party donors. Why would someone give mil-lions to a private foundation that has somebody elses fingerprints all over it? The Clintons are being asked the same question. On the continuum of giving, Trumps philanthropy consists in majority of charitable foreplay characterized by the absence of actual cash changing hands. They are philanthropic transac-tions that create reciprocity between grantor and grantee, and favorable and tied to Trumps businesses. The Post inventory of this category of foundation grants included 2,900 gratis rounds of golf, 175 hotel stays, 165 meals and 11 spa gift certificates.Ž Call it in-kind booty, cause-related marketing, or a charitable marriage of mutual convenience; but transcendent philanthropy it is not „ unless a billionaires philanthropic life well-lived equals donating rounds of golf to poor people. As for the Trump fundraiser for veterans groups, the check is in the mailŽ defense did not provide cover to explain away, four months after the event, the conflicting accounts Trump and his staff gave of money raised and distributions made. No canceled check verified the personal gift was completed of the $1 million pledged by Trump to veterans. Whats a million dollars to a billionaire? Money for the weekend. Overripe claims of generosity create an odor all their own. When evidenced in philan-thropy, it is called failing to pass the sniff test. Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian. Her professional career spans more than 25 years leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and Appalachia. She writes frequently on issues of politics, public policy and philanthropy, earning national recognition for her leadership in the charitable sector. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly@ floridaweekly.com and read past blog posts on Tumblr at llilly15.Tumblr.com. leslie LILLYllilly@floridaweekly.com Dr. Malek and our team heal for stroke patient Terry Tipple. At St. Marys Medical Center, our Comprehensive Stroke Center employs some of the most advanced life-saving stroke technologies including vascular catheterization, so our team can heal patients like Terry without wasting precious time. To hear Terrys story visit www.stmarysmc.com/our-stories/terrys-avm-story.Schedule a potentially life-saving Stroke Screening by calling 561-882-9100 or visit StMarysMC.com The Comprehensive Stroke Center at St. Marys Medical Center.We heal for you. StMarysMC.com We heal for Terry. Terry T ipple … Str oke Survivor 2015Ali R. Malek, MDMedical Director, SMMC Comprehensive Stroke Center8 Years

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Smoking Cessation Classes Several One-hour Sessions Wednesday, June 22, 29, July 6 & 13 @ 5:30-6:30pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center // Classroom 4Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is teaming up with The Area Health Education Center to provide education on the health eects related to tobacco use, the bene“ts of quitting and what to expect when quitting. A trained Tobacco Cessation Specialist guides participants as they identify triggers and withdrawal symptoms and brainstorms ways to cope with them. Reservations are required. Hands-Only Adult CPR Class Tuesday, July 19 @ 6:30-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue // Station 1 4425 Burns Road, Palm Beach GardensEective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center sponsors a monthly CPR class for the community, held at the Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue. Local EMS will give a hands-only, adult CPR demonstration and go over Automated External De“brillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Reservations are required. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.comFOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL855.387.5864 Heart Attack Risk Assessment (blood pressure, BMI, glucose and cholesterol) Wednesday, July 13 @ 8-11am Osteoporosis Screenings Thursday, July 21 @ 9am-1pm Take steps toward being heart healthy! Visit PBGMC.com/pledge to Receive a FREE Cookbook! FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGS Its Sandal Season Joshua Daly, DPM Thursday, July 7 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center Classroom 4Bunion and hammertoe deformities are common in people of all ages. Unfortunately, many cases may go untreated due to the myths surrounding the correction of these issues. Join Dr. Joshua Daly, for a lecture on new techniques available to help simplify the treatment process, ease recovery and promote positive outcomes. Light dinner and refreshments will be served. JULY COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center 3360 Burns Road

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ContributorsLeslie Lilly Roger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Sallie James Mary Thurwachter Katie Deits Amy Woods Steven J. Smith Andy Spilos Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Alisa Bowman Amy Grau Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Kathy Pierotti Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Sales and Marketing ExecutivesLisette Ariaslarias@floridaweekly.comAlyssa Liplesalipless@floridaweekly.comMarilyn Wilsonmwilson@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez Circulation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Headley Darlington Clarissa Jimenez Giovanny Marcelin Brent Charles Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 n Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state A safe space from ChaucerYale English majors are demanding a safe space from Chaucer. In a petition to the English department, Yale undergraduates declare that a required two-semester seminar on major English poets is a danger to their well-being. Never mind that the offend-ing poets, Shakespeare, Chaucer, Donne, Milton, Wordsworth, et al., are the founda-tional writers in the English language. Its as if chemistry students objected to learn-ing the periodic table. The root of the plaint against the seminar is, of course, the usual PC bean-count-ing, where prodigious talents who have stood the test of time and explore the deepest questions about what it means to be human are found wanting. The petition whines that a year spent around a semi-nar table where the literary contributions of women, people of color, and queer folk are absent actively harms all students, regardless of their identity.Ž This is a variation on the widespread belief on campus that unwelcome speech is tantamount to a physical threat. In this case, the speech happens to be some of the most eloquent words written in the English language. One can only pity the exceedingly fragile sensibility it takes to feel assaulted by, say, Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey.Ž The petitions implicit contention is that the major poets are too circumscribed by their race and gender to speak to todays socially aware students, when, in point of fact, it is the students who are too blink-ered by race and gender to marvel at great works of art. The poet Maya Angelou said in a lecture once that as a child she thought, Shakespeare must be a black girl.Ž It was because, growing up in the Jim Crow South, a victim of unspeakable abuse, Son-net 29 spoke so powerfully to her. Yales petitioners must consider Toni Morrison a traitor to her race and gen-der. She had an argument with a theater director years ago in which she defended Othello,Ž and went on to write a pro-duction based on Desdemona, the plays doomed female character. Or how about Derek Walcott, whom a Yale professor sympathetic to the petitioners suggests adding to the required course? He told The Guardian newspaper a few years ago it would be absurd to say, Dont read Shake-speare because he was white.Ž Anyone reading widely in the English canon will encounter supremely talented female, black and gay writers. In fact, many other Yale courses feature them. But the creative stream began with so-called dead white males. It is because of their genius that their words transcend their time and place, giving us phrases, characters and stories that are still vital today. An official description of the major English poets seminar says the classes seek to create a heightened curiosity about the way language works,Ž as well as a confidence in engaging with historically and formally diverse literary texts.Ž This is a reasonable enough academic goal „ unless the students involved are willfully incapable of curiosity or confidence. There is an easy solution to the dilemma of the aggrieved petitioners: They shouldnt study English, or anything else that might challenge their absurdly small-minded ideological hobbyhorses. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. OPINIONThe very pleasant PeasantvilleAmericans and Floridians, Republicans and Democrats, cowboys and Indians all should now rethink the wealth problem our nation faces, a problem tantamount to dangerous black ice on a winter highway. Its lying out there mostly unseen right in the middle of our road, a deadly detri-ment to the healthy progress of society. The problem is this: Less than 1 percent of Americans hold as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent, economists say. If the rest of us cant join the 1 percent in their clubhouse „ if we peasants cant also drink Armand de Brignac Brut Rose by the six pack like other people drink Budweiser, but at $10,000 a bottle „ then maybe we can convince the rich guys to join us down here in the very pleasant Peasantville, instead. They could come to our club, in other words, instead of us going to theirs. Com-pelling evidence suggests that such a trend has already begun. And we have Donald Trump to thank for it. It started in January when Mr. Trump walked into the Red Arrow Diner in Man-chester, N.H., and ordered lunch. Born into extravagant wealth and accustomed to flying 1-percenter style home to sleep in his own gold-and-marble bedroom after a hard day of campaigning, he had decided to spend the night near the diner. And eat there. The Red Arrow is a nice place if youre a peasant. They serve three squares and des-sert 24-7, starting with a breakfast so big, it takes two plates,Ž according to the menu. But when a billionaire sidles in and slaps his fat rear end into a seat to order a hamburger and fries, anything can happen. And it did. Maybe it was simply that the Donald didnt just order the Dinahmoe BurgerŽ for $10.99, advertised as Two of Our Free-Form, Fresh Ground Beef Burgers, Lettuce, Tomato, Bacon, Cheese and Thousand Island Dressing On a Triple Decker Roll, Served with Fries.Ž Maybe it was the fact that he also threw in a lie. First, he ordered a macaroni-and-cheese ball and a Diet Coke to go with the cheese-burger. Then he began fabricating. He said it was his favorite food. Sure it is, Donny. You grew up eating mac-and-cheese just like us peasants, right? A woman named Jane wasnt having any of it. So before storming out of the Red Arrow in a fit of anger, she confronted the Don. Enjoy your burger, racist!Ž she shouted, referring to Trumps proposed Mexican-border wall and Muslim-restric-tion policies. Sometimes my fellow peasants embarrass me. I think Jane (so reported by The Guardian as the enraged woman) was way too hard on Mr. Trump, even though she was unquestionably correct in her estima-tion of him. Sure, Jane, hes a racist,Ž a poor humble patriot pontificator on the Hate Highway just trying to find a better American way. To be one of us. To be anything other than the rich troglodyte he clearly is. So he knocked on our Peasantville door. He asked if there was one more burger at the inn. For him. Just one. With a mac-and-cheese ball and a Diet Coke. And you treat him this way? But that was then. The Donald survived and went on to some other diners. Miss Katies Diner in Milwaukee, for example, where his choices included meatloaf on the blue plate special, with mashed pota-toes, fresh vegetables and homemade gravy accompanied by soup or salad, or coleslaw and fresh Italian. Im telling you its nice in Peasantville. Others are finding out „ the 1 percent. Somehow, we must be working our peasant magic on these rich guys. They keep trying to join our club. This could save society.Take Francis Rooney, a Neapolitan 1-percenter (that means he lives in Naples) with undergraduate and law degrees from Georgetown University who now aims to step into the rather large shoes of U.S. Rep. Curt Clawson, the Dist. 19 Republican who likely would have been a shoo-in for another term until he announced he was through with Congress, and sticking with his father, who is elderly. Mr. Rooney, says a friend of mine who never gets anything wrong, has donated close to $10 million to presidential cam-paigns, been awarded an ambassador post to The Vatican, lives in a place in Port Royal that could pass as an art museum (never mind the property value), runs a company estimated in the billions of dollars, etc. etc. „ and he just announced his first press event at MELS DINER?????!!!!!?????!!!!!Ž Yep, Mels diner on the southwest coast where you can order Mels Meatloaf, baked fresh daily and served with natural beef gravy ƒ homemade soup and salad (and) your choice of Mels mashed pota-toes, Sun Coast rice pilaf, natural cut Idaho French fries, and seasonal vegetables,Ž all for $9.99. Mr. Rooney will compete for the congressional seat with fellow Republican Chauncey Goss, son of former U.S. Rep. and CIA chief Porter Goss, perhaps a more moderate diner-shiner who has Washing-ton experience as an administrator, and a reputation for trying to clean up water, like Rep. Clawson. But apparently Mr. Rooney is one of us, the peasants. Francis Rooney is a businessman, not a politician,Ž a recent advertisement announces. Rooney is from the construc-tion industry, where hes created thousand of jobs.Ž As a construction man, he probably knows how to swing a hammer. And eat meatloaf from the blue plate special. His ad says he will cut spending, repeal Obama-care, and protect life and our Second Amendment rights. Could he mean the right to be bat-spit crazy, get an assault rifle and shoot up the place if the cooks start kissing or the meat-loaf is bad? Francis Rooney will fight the fights that must be won,Ž the ad concludes. As opposed to the fights that are going to be lost. Like getting a bottle of Armand de Brignac Brut Rose to go with your mac-and-cheese ball. Q b i c t E e f rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 A5 THIS IS WHAT FEELS LIKE AT THEJ B n & S. r rnPINCLUDES: TWO 50 MINUTE SER VICES, SERVICE CHARGE & 20% OFF RETAIL PURCHASES $159 CHOOSE TWO OF THE FOLL OWING AS YOUR TREATMENTS: SWEDISH MASSAGE € CUSTOM FACIAL SOOTHING SUN WRAP € OCEAN BODY SCRUB SPA GUESTS ALSO ENJOY ACCESS TO THE POOL, BEACH AND FITNESS CENTER Offer valid thru 9/30/16. Sunday thru Friday ONLY. Excludes holidays and holiday weekends. 5 NORTH A1A, JUPITER, FLORIDA | RESERVATIONS: 561-745-7177 jupiterbeachresort.com Are you su ering from Auto Accident Pain?Chronic Neck or Low Back Pain? PAPA CHIROPRACTIC & PHYSICAL THERAPY www.PapaChiro.com t Over 25 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598 PORT ST. LUCIE9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300 JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458 561.744.7373 GIFT CERTIFICATE COMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATION $150 VALUE This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 07-21-2016Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY 4 4 6 6 Get back in the game with Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Fishing tourney to benefit kids, young adults SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Place of Hope s inaugural Fish for Hope Kingfish, Dolphin and Wahoo Tournament will benefit more than 265 children and young adults in need. On June 25, teams will be fishing in support of a child in foster care; provid-ing food, clothing, school supplies and other essentials for their team's spon-sored child. Register your team, and the team will receive the name of the child you are supporting. Raise a minimum of $150 for your child on your childs online fundraising page. The team that raises the most will win a grand prize. For more information, contact Place of Hope, 9078 Isaiah Lane, Palm Beach Gardens, 775-7195. Q KidSanctuary buys 5 acres to expand services for kids in foster care SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY KidSanctuary Campus Inc., a nonprofit organization with a mission to help provide safe housing for abused, abandoned and neglected children in foster care, recently acquired an addi-tional 5-acre parcel that adjoins the existing 5.5 acres of land at its campus in West Palm Beach. In 2009, Palm Beach County donated 5 acres of land to KidSanctuary Campus to design a neighborhood-style campus of safe housing for children in foster care who needed a safe home and were not able to be placed in traditional fos-ter care programs due to the extreme levels of abuse and neglect. KidSanctu-ary Campus cleared the heavily wooded land, laid the infrastructure, built and opened three cottages that to date have provided 24-hour care for more than 300 children, complete with full-time licensed houseparents. The J.M. Rubin Cottage for Girls opened in 2012, the Dodero Family Cottage for Girls opened in 2014 and Sams Cottage for Boys opened in 2015. This completed Phase I of the campus. We thank the community for helping KidSanctuary Campus keep children in foster care safe with the opening of the three cottages in Phase I,Ž said Connie Frankino, president and founder, and we invite everyone to join us for the incredible opportunity to be part of a legacy as we complete the campus with Phase II.Ž KidSanctuary Campus is launching Phase II, which includes a fourth cottage to be designated for boys, a two-story, 10,000-square-foot Enrichment Center, and an expansion of the campus design on the newly acquired land. Marlo Massey, executive director, said, The Enrichment Center will become the nucleus of the campus, offering critical services and programs for the children in foster care to meet or exceed developmental and academic standards.Ž Phase II will break ground in late summer and will again enlist the help of the design community and industry leaders, as well as community support from individuals, foundations and cor-porations. To participate in the Phase II Capital Campaign at any level, including naming opportunities, or to learn more about KidSanctuary Campus, contact Ms. Massey at 653-8274 or marlo@kid-sanctuarycampus.org. Q LILA PHOTO / COURTESY PHOTO Marlo Massey, executive director, and Connie Frankino, founder and president. S H BRANDT & ASSOCIATES / COURTESY PHOTO A rendering of the KidSanctuary Enrichment Center. JOHN STILLMAN PHOTOGRAPHY / COURTESY PHOTO Sam’s Cottage for Boys opened in 2015 at KidSanctuary.

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Learn more at jupitermed.com/lung $99 Could Save Your Life If youre a current or former smoker, or have a family history of lung cancer, low-dose CT lung screening at Jupiter Medical Center could help save your life. Some insurance plans now cover the cost. Our health navigator can help you understand your risk and your coverage. If you do not have coverage for screening, Jupiter Medical Center offers a self-pay price of $99.Please call 561-263-4437 to schedule your appointment today.1240 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458 Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, with approximately 90% of cases related to the use of tobacco. This puts smokers at the highest risk. Fortunately, more than 80% of lung cancers can be beaten if detected early using a CT screening.Choose a screening center thats accredited and backed by a comprehensive thoracic and lung program. 5 MinutesThe time it takes to smoke a cigarette.15 MinutesThe time it takes to get a CT scan that could save your life. Love your special pet? Enter our photo contestOur hands-down favorite project every summer at Florida Weekly is the Pet Lovers special edition that features „ what else? „ photographs from you, our readers, of the furry, slithery, slobbery, whiskered, feathered, hoofed, amphibious or other-wise nonhuman companions that help make your lives complete. Its time again to grab your smartphone or camera and click away. Then email your favorite shot (one entry per person, please) to petphotos@floridaweekly.com. Be sure to tell us your full name and phone number, the name of your pet(s) and anything else you think we might want to know about your animal friend(s). Our pet-friendly staff will review the pictures and choose our favorites for publi-cation in our July 21 edition. Well also pick three top pets whose owners will receive gift certificates ($250 for first place, $100 each for second and third) to a local pet supply store. Deadline for email submissions of highresolution jpgs (300 dpi) is 11:59 p.m. Sun-day, July 10. Q Tigress and Stampy won last year’s pet contest for their human, Lauren Peterson. PET TALES Serious play Toys are essential to keeping your cat active and happy BY DR. MARTY BECKER AND GINA SPADAFORIUniversal UclickKeeping kittens and cats busy with toys will help them learn not to play rough with family members. Inside every cat is a lion. Or a tiger. Or a lynx. Or, really, all of these great hunters. And in your cats mind, hes a wild preda-tor, too. In fact, all cats are. They love to lurk and prowl and chase and pounce. An indoor cat doesnt have the opportunity to go after real prey (unless you have mice in your home), but he still has strong hunting instincts. This genetic coding doesnt disappear just because he lives a royal lifestyle in your home and has his meals delivered on the feline equivalent of a silver platter. When a cats need to hunt isnt fulfilled with live action, he turns to the next best thing: feet moving beneath the covers, hands dangling at an owners side, arms, legs, you name it. Instead of letting a kitten believe your body parts are fair game, provide him with toys that will satisfy his urge to hunt as well as save your skin. Its all too easy to accidentally encourage kittens to bite or scratch in play, but this type of aggressive behavior can turn into a big, painful problem as the kitten gets bigger. Never arm wrestleŽ with a young cat, and keep some distance between you through play with toys that dont involve direct contact with the kitten. When kitten teeth or claws touch human skin, screech loudly and immediately walk away. Kittens learn fast that playing rough ends the game, especially when there are other things to play with. Cats like toys they can stalk, chase, pounce on and bite. Turn your home into an indoor hunting ground with perches for watching the outdoor world go by (such as a window-box bird feeder), scratching posts for paw marking and nail maintenance, cat trees for climbing, resting and observing, and an ever-changing assortment of toys, toys, toys. Puzzle toys are particularly good for giving your cat an outlet for his hunting instincts and ensuring that he keeps his sleek, sinewy physique. Wands with feathers or other dangly bits and wind-up or battery-operated toys that move on their own excite a cats chase instinct. Balls inside a track let him paw for prey,Ž just as if he were explor-ing a mouse hole. The fast, erratic motion of laser pointers and flashlights increase a cats ability to think and move quickly. (Direct the beam up and down the stairs to give him a real workout.) And dont forget the classic catnip-filled mice for rolling and rabbit-kicking under the influence. To keep your cat interested in his toys, change them out every few days. If he sees the same ones over and over again, hell get bored and look for something new to play with. Cats being who they are, it will prob-ably be something expensive or fragile that you dont want him to treat as a toy. Those laser pointers, flashlights and wand toys have especially high value to cats because they are just so darn much fun. Bring them out less often than other toys, and limit the amount of time your cat is allowed to play with them. For some cats these toys are addictive, and they will stand in front of the closet where the laser or wand is stored and yowl plaintively until they are brought out. Remember, if you give in even once, you have just taught your cat exactly how to manipulate you. To help soften your cats disappointment when these favorite toys go up, reward him with a treat afterward or give him another favorite toy, like a catnip mouse. The word toyŽ just doesnt seem to Pets of the Week>>Beau is an 8-year-old, 75-pound male Ger-man shepherd that is gentle and calm, but loves to catch a ball or sit and follow a lure. >>Panther is a 6-year-old male domestic shorthair cat that is friendly and sweet, and loves to be petted. He also gets along with other cats.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adopt-able pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. >>Annie is a spayed female calico, about 3 years old. She’s high-spirited and gets along well with humans and other felines. >>Puma is a spayed female tabby, about 3 years old. She gets along well with other cats, and loves people.To adopt or foster a petAdopt A Cat is a free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment. Call 848-4911, Option 5. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, adoptacatfoundation.org. cover how important these items are to our pets, especially an indoor cat. Indulge your pet with the gift of play, and youll both be happier for it. Q

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A7 GIFT CERTIFICATE COMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION AND CONSULTATION $150 VALUE This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 07-21-2016Get back in the game with Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY Are you su ering fromChronic Neck or Low Back Pain? PAPA CHIROPRACTIC & PHYSICAL THERAPY 4 4 5 5 6 6 www.PapaChiro.com t Over 25 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561.630.9598 PORT ST. LUCIE9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300 JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458 561.744.7373 A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in todays market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers dont get what they want for their homes and become disillusioned and worse financially disadvantaged when they put their homes on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dol-lars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled The 9 Step Sys-tem to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top DollarŽ. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-866-274-7449 and enter 2000. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.This report is courtesy of Chasewood Realty, Inc. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contrac t. Copyright 2016 7 costly mistakes to avoid before selling your Jupiter home in 2016 Advertorialleast $1 million in an American business that also creates at least 10 jobs, or by investing at least $500,00 in a business that creates those jobs in a targeted employment area,Ž which means a less prosperous city, county or region. Each state has regional centers „ selfappointed by business interests to pool investor money, but approved, though not regulated or only loosely regulated, by the governments USCIS. Those centers track or collect investment-needy busi-nesses and can point immigrant inves-tors to them. Florida, for example has 85 of the nations nearly 850 regional centers, including a Palm Beach Regional Center (palmbeachregionalcenter.com) that works through counties from Palm Beach to Charlotte; the Florida Equity & Growth Fund Regional Center out of Tampa that targets 23 Florida counties the center defines as the high-tech cor-ridorŽ of the state (eb5florida.com/); and Florida Overseas (also at (eb5florida.com/), a center that specializes in invest-ment opportunities in Targeted Employ-ment Areas statewide in 12 diverse industry clusters,Ž according to its online litera-ture. Numbers provided by the government and compiled and reported by media outlets show that the program jumped from less than 100 EB-5 visas provided 13 years ago to more than 9,000 last year „ 80 percent of those to Chinese investors. In Florida those investments have been good for many, including Anthony Korda, a Neapolitan attorney and partner in the firm KordaBurgess who works with EB-5 investors still. I am an immigrant who came to the U.S. using the EB-5 program,Ž he explained in an email. My family and I are all now U.S. citizens but we were all born in the UK (Great Britain). We invested in a ski resort project in Ver-mont. We love living in the U.S. and knew that we would stay. My family and I decided to become U.S. citizens because we had made our home here and wanted to show our allegiance to our new home country.Ž But the centers, and indeed the entire process managed by USCIS, have come under scrutiny and significant criticism as charges of fraud and poor manage-ment have been aimed at some projects. American front men in Vermont, for example, allegedly took hundreds of millions in money from foreign inves-tors enlisted in EB-5, then failed to create the resort businesses they prom-ised, putting them in civil or criminal hot-water and creating victims of the investors. Mr. Kordas investment there paid off in his green card and the even-tual citizenship of him and his family, but others did not, he says: I was one of the first investors in that project (and) I cannot comment beyond that as far as it affects me personally.Ž The matter is in litigation, he explains.However, a number of investors (there) have been placed in a precarious position as far as their immigration sta-tus is concerned, far beyond the obvious financial implications. This is a serious blow for the EB5 industry, particularly as the Regional Center Program expires in September of this year and will be await-ing renewal.Ž The Department of Homeland Security also was concerned the program could be used by spies from China and Iran. Michael Gibson, an investment adviser and managing director of the Miami-based USA Advisors (USAadvisors.org), a firm that provides specific advice on the EB-5 program and researches oppor-tunities for investors, told The New York Times this month that Brazilian investors moving their money from that troubled country into an Orlando soccer stadi-um whose Brazilian developer sought the support of his wealthy countrymen should be more cautious. If cash flowŽ changes because teams dont win, he said, the investors might lose not only their money, but their visas. Mr. Gibson later described his view of the program to Florida Weekly, this way: This program has increased in popular-ity exponentially every year. But since USCIS is not transparent, we dont know how its being managed. The problem with the entire industry is USCIS. They are completely nontrans-parent in terms of which projects they appr ove, how many jobs they create, and who is behind the capital.Ž That shouldnt dissuade any investors from the program, he added, but it should make them hire investment advisors „ not rely on immigration attorneys or the regional centers alone, for advice. Although the program now limits visas administered to 10,000 per year „ and Obama administration officials have claimed that it provided more than $8.5 billion and more than 35,000 jobs in a five-month period beginning last fall (those numbers are questioned by skep-tics) „ the program should be expanded, Mr. Gibson insists. But only if it becomes transparent. Why would the USCIS not do everything in its power to take steps to reduce the incidence of potential fraud?Ž he asks. I have no idea why they dont release information. They dont even say who are the owners of regional centers. Youd want to know if they had any prior felo-nies, any bad investments, that kind of thing. Up until now foreign investors have relied on immigration attorneys. But theyre just as much in the dark as any-body else. They look at the immigration track record of regional centers, but the funny thing about that is, there is no way to verify if what regional centers claim, is true.Ž Q IMMIGRATIONFrom page 1KORDA Anthony Korda, partner in KordaBurgess PA, of Naples, sat down to offer a personal view of EB-5 to Florida Weekly.Q. Is this program becoming more popular here in the region?A. The success of the program cannot be overstated. It is, if anything, oversubscribed because of the numerical limits on investor visas, which are restricted to 10,000 annually. This includes the investor and all family mem-bers, so that there are approximately 2,500 to 5,000 families depending on size who will become conditional residents. More than 89 percent of all investors are Chinese and so visa wait times were imposed last year to restrict the num-ber of visas that can be issued to Chinese nationals. However, there is a major backlog so that long delays are being experienced. Nevertheless, the program remains successful and there are a large number of EB-5 Regional Centers in Florida. Of 834 total, 85 are in Florida and are attracting investors to a large number of different projects.Ž Q. What is your experience with EB-5?A. I am an immigrant who came to the U.S. using the EB-5 program. My family and I are all now U.S. Citizens but we were all born in the UK (Great Britain). We invested in a ski resort project in Vermont. We love living in the U.S. and knew that we would stay. My family and I decided to become U.S. citi-zens because we had made our home here and wanted to show our allegiance to our new home country.Ž Q. Is the EB-5 program working as efficiently as it should be, in your opinion? A. There is clearly room for improvement and although this is a complex and detailed subject, here are some bullet points: 1. Processing times are too long at 18-24 months.2. Visa wait times are too long.3. More visas need to be made available or each family should count as one.4. More regulation and oversight is required to ensure that projects deliver and are able to repay the investors. 5. The at risk provisions need to be reconsidered so that investors can be repaid once the jobs have been created and sustained for the required period. 6. USCIS should provide more clarity as to the requirements of the program and how they interpret the regulations.Ž Q&A

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYCOURTESY PHOTOS SOCIETY Ruth Petzold photo opening, Palm Beach Gardens City Hall 10 11 12 13 1. Ruth Petzold and Amy Stepper 2. Laura Mari, Pat Rutherford, Ned Rutherford and Jack Rutherford 3. Fred Galan and Ruth Petzold 4. Pascal Lecocq and Francoise Lecocq 5. Merike Saarniit, Elmar Saarniit and Ruth Petzold 6. David Randell and Ruth Petzold 7. Martha Romero, Andy Romero and Ruth Petzold 8. Maurizio Candotti Russo, Amy Tilley and Ruth Petzold 9. Lisa Keeney, Ruth Petzold and Sarah Rahilly 10. Zoe Panarites, Ruth Petzold and Tanya Burnett 11. Ruth Petzold, Nancy Jones and Jerry Campbell 12. Ruth Petzold, James Eckersley, with Benjamin, and Nathalie Eckersley 13. Ruth Petzold and Audrey Eloise Roberts 1 6 9 2 4 7 3 5 8

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A9 LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Summer Rock and Roll concert, Downtown at the Gardens 1. Andy Preston and Tyler Hether 2. Barry Franzblau, Micki Lorelli and Anthony Lorelli 3. Genie Serrano, Joan Sardone and Jennifer Sardone-Shiner 4. Andrew Shumake, Carla Davis and Andrew Musiello 5. Holleigh Mutta and Samii Stuloff 6. Billy D. Lindley 7. Beth Corsi, Angela Pykosz and Teri Reid 8. Jan Rules and Chantal Vargas 9. Lisa Eakes, Matt Eakes and Ella Eakes 10. Oscar Torres, Leony Rodriguez and Lynn Dinger 11. Shaheen Hemsey and Kelly Evans 12. Zoey Schnitzer, David Schnitzer and Trish Schnitzer 13. Tony Lascasas and Tricia Lascasas ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 11 12 13 10

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYquestion about moving cows. Yessir, Ive been doin this most all of my life,Ž he says. The same is true of the men around him, generally in their 20s or 30s: Casey King, Dustyn Whitmir, Clint CatfishŽ Davis, Carl Langford and his cool, capable cousin, Babcock cattle man-ager Elton Langford. The old man of the bunch, Mr. Langford is also a DeSoto County rancher and an elected county commissioner, to boot. He turned 47 in May. An old adage „ the more things change, the more they stay the same „ is no longer true at Babcock. Now, the more things change, the more the things that havent changed become remarkable. For that reason, Florida Weekly has come to see cowboys work cows roughly the way its been done for a century on the Babcock Ranch. Its all these guys do,Ž says Mr. Langford, describing his day riders,Ž men who also manage or work other opera-tions on a busy, rotating basis. Its all theyve ever wanted to do.Ž And its what they hope to keep doing on Babcock, even though major change is imminent. Come July, there will be two ranches stretched across the 91,000 acres of the original Babcock Ranch. One will carry on under the ownership of the state of Florida, which will contract cattle or crop leases with ranchers and farm-ers on parts of the states 73,000 acres, where about 2,000 head of cattle still remain. The other ranch is owned by Kitson & Partners, Palm Beach Gardens-based developer of the planned solar-powered town. There, on roughly half of Syd Kitsons 18,000 acres, Steve Smith and his cow-boys, led by Elton Langford, will run about 1,200 head of cows. A ranch-bred, University of Floridaeducated Gator, Mr. Smith is vice pres-ent and general manager of Babcock Ranch Management LLC, which puts him in charge of the melon and sod fields on Babcock, along with the cow operation. As on the state-owned land, income from cows and crops will pay for the upkeep of the green and wild places that still dominate Babcock. Weve been taking care of the state side along with ours for about 10 years, but we arent going to continue that after July,Ž he notes.Working the ranchBut hell continue to work cows with one foot in the new world and one foot in the old. From early morning on, Mr. Smiths cell phone competes in techno-chirps with warbling Osceola turkeys emerg-ing from their night roosts in the watery cypress heads. Taking calls from feed supply companies or representatives from ranches trying to sell him breeding bulls, he maneuvers the back roads of Babcock in a 4-year-old F-150 pickup with 150,000 miles on the odometer and a rifle behind the seat. Most old-time ranchers carried rifles as tools to dispatch a hopelessly ill cow or a broken-legged horse, some-times a heartbreaking necessity. That, like the hard work of fencebuilding or repair, is all part of ranching here still, where generations of a unique breed „ the now highly endangered and increasingly rare American cowboy „ have greeted each new day relying only on themselves, on good cow dogs, and on hardŽ horses. Such animals are nothing like apple buttŽ equines, as one cowboy once described the legions of well-fed leisure animals that now dot the countryside of the Southwest Florida coast. Good cow ponies can work for hours through inhospitable terrain just like their riders, or hold the line if a rider has to rope a bull. Its not something people or animals learn in workshops or from riding in an arena. It takes years „ generations, even. Dalton Boneys family, theyre four or five generations Cracker, and hes as cowboy as they come,Ž Mr. Lang-ford explains, using the term that tra-ditionally distinguished cowmen here from those in the West: Cracker.Ž It describes a man using a whip to direct unruly bovines. Working with nervous cows from an early age atop a thousand pounds of muscled-up cow pony is how Mr. Boney learned to wheel his horse in a crowded pen, lift his rope suddenly from the saddle like a gunfighter, then spin it and throw it over the top rail of a high board fence in a single smooth motion, nailing a running calf not inside but outside the corral. Did you see that?Ž calls an impressed Mr. Smith. Yes, a reporter saw it. For any who have ever tried such a trick, its talent and art in action. Not many Americans can still perform with such skill outside a rodeo arena. The little creature had escaped only seconds earlier, 150 pounds of panicked sprinter on the hoof. While Mr. Boneys capable horse backs up (without being asked) to hold the rope taut, Casey King quickly dismounts. In almost a single fluid motion he secures his horse and climbs the fence. Then the cowboy seizes the struggling calf, hefting it and walking it back around to a gate. Slip-ping the rope, he returns the animal to the herd and its now very anxious mother.Tools and tricks of the cowboy tradeBut that dramatic moment comes later in the morning when the bawl-ing of cows and calves moved in from months on pasture reaches a near din „ when a storm of flies hover above their backs and the silent dogs wheel cease-lessly on the flanks and ends of the herd, cutting off breakouts and runaways with remarkable authority. Back at the barn before full daylight, the cowboys prepare for such work by retrieving blankets, saddles and bridles from the bone-dry saddle room, a stan-dard on every traditional ranch. There are jokes and light banter as they saddle up. None wears tight-fitting designer jeans or duded-up gear „ just sweat-stained Stetsons, loose shirts and working jeans over half-dollar-sized spurs fitted to boots with layered heels that will hold a stirrup in tight turns or sudden stops. Each man slides a blanket onto the back of his pony, hefts the saddle up over the left side „ the same side he will mount on „ then reaches under the horse to catch the cinch strap. He belts it and pulls it tight, not once but twice, making sure the animal isnt holding a bellyful of air before knot-ting it down. Should air be expelled, the horses belly might shrink, leaving the cinch strap and saddle dangerously loose and GIDDY UPFrom page 1 PHOTOS BY VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYAfter working about 80 cows and their new calves out of a cypress head, Babcock cowboys herd them into an arrangement of sorting corrals or holding pens. Dalton Boney can ride, rope, judge the value of a calf, build or repair fence and do anything else required of a cowboy. Few can still claim those skills.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A11 THE OLD FASHIONED BARBERSHOP 9270 W. Indiantown Road C5, J upiter, FL 33478twww.jupiterbarbershop.com Coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus. In New York, coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of New York. Policies may not be available in all states. There may be indirect administrative or other costs. M1863C 7/12 Andrew Spilos | (561) 685-5845 | andrew_spilos@us.a”ac.com SHUTTERLUBRICATION & SERVICE, INC.LICENSED U 20120 B ONDED & INSUREDHURRICANE SEASON IS HERE! BE PREPARED 561.745.8956ACCORDIONWINDOWSINCGMAIL.COM 30YEARS EXPERIENCESERVICE AND REPAIRS / ///////////////// ///////////////// / PHOTOS BY VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYDustyn Whitmir is called “the baby of the bunch.” But, like all the cowboys on Babcock Ranch, he’s tough and cheerful.likely to slide, a potential detriment to a cowboys continuing good health. On this day and with three exceptional cow dogs, the men will work about 80 cows and their new calves out of a cypress head, herding them across open pasture and into an arrangement of sorting corrals or holding pens. Mr. Langford and Mr. Smith will then use their experience and knowledge of each animals genetics to make some quick decisions: which little heifers will be future mothers on Babcock; which males, if any, might be kept as herd bulls for breeding; which males will become steers before the morning is out (and thus good table beef down the line a year or two). Theyll be ear-tagged, branded with the traditional Babcock Crescent B if theyre picked to become part of the permanent herd, castrated if necessary, and given shots by these cowboys, all before being released with their moth-ers back to pasture. Crackers once ran stringy, tough little cows directly descended from Spanish imports through the palmetto scrub or the cypress and pine flatwoods, here-abouts. In those days, building a fence was against the law. Those animals rarely reached weights of more than 400 to 500 pounds. The Babcock folks still maintain about 70 head of those Cracker cows just to remember their roots, and for visitors to admire, Mr. Smith says. But now we are mostly Brangus (a Brahma-Angus cross) with some Braford (Brahma and Hereford),Ž he explains. When they reach a certain weight, maybe 600 pounds, theyll be sold either through private treaty, as they call an in-person deal for a bunch, or through video auction. Then theyll be shipped out in possum-belly trucks that can hold a hun-dred or so head to feedlots in Texas or the Midwest, where they can reach weights of more than 1,200 pounds before slaughter. Its easier to truck the cows to the feed in countryside where feed grains grow prolifically nearby (not Florida) than it is to bring feed to the cows. Its a matter of weight ratios: it takes 4 or 5 pounds of grain to put a pound of weight on a fattening animal.Dogs and horsesBut none of it can be done without cowboys, men who have a significant investment in the life, both personally and economically. Laziness is not included in the gear they bring to the job. Instead, these men come equipped with toughness, savvy, a short string of well-trained cow ponies, a couple of cow dogs bred to the life, and cheer in all weathers. Most raise and train their own horses, and each can be worth many thousands of dollars and years of investment, explains Mr. Langford. Twos a plenty; most guys try to have two good horses seasoned or broke, and a couple theyre training. These guys only sell one once they get one going and get a good colt coming behind. You cant keep em all. If theyre not wore out, you get a horse you rode since hes 2, and when hes getting to be 8 or 9 he should be good and broke by then.Ž The dogs are equally as important, and beloved by their owners. Rangy in appearance, they dont look like much riding in the horse trailers cowboys have to maintain to move their animals from job to job. But theyre indispensible in terrain such as Babcocks „ bril-liant as tacticians and team members in the field. A good dog can be worth thousands of dollars, cowboys say. And they cant do it forever „ maybe until theyre 6 or 7 „ because its not just hard but sometimes harrowing work. Its in the bloodline just like them horses,Ž explains Mr. Langford. These dogs have been raised for years and years and years. My grandfather had dogs, my uncle, my dad „ you cross your dogs with those from different guys you work with, you cross the bloodlines. These dogs are not papered, but they have (distinct) bloodlines. Its just stuff we know. We keep up with it.Ž Bred to the work, younger dogs learn from older ones, and they learn pretty quickly. Dangers include not just angry cows but rattlesnakes or even alliga-tors, especially since cow dogs will take quickly to water in a pond or creek after hard work. When cowboys spot alligators longer than about 4 feet in water bodies near cow pastures, therefore, theyll have the big reptiles captured and moved, Mr. Smith explains. Its all in a life „ the cowboy life. Q

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Garden of Life Sun Run 5K Challenge at PGA National 1. Brian Ray, Brad Davis, Julie Applebaum, Bailey Griffin, and Richard Fleming 2. Carl Deaton, Joseph Gray and Dustin Lampros 3. Ryan Gilbert, Carlene Davis and Connie Griffith 4. Christina Mull and Jason Calman 5. Heather Leffler, Jasmine Walker, Renata Schwedhelm and Shonda Smith 6. Denise Ruiz and Jeniffer Samaniego 7. Dalton Pollard, Barron Pollard and Skyler Pollard 8. Harry Rittel, Julie Rittel, Lily Rittel and Cliff Rittel 9. Mark Davis, Bailey Griffin, Richard Fleming, Jackie Applebaum and Brad Davis 10. Kimberly McCoy, Wanda Acevevo, Carmen Miranda and Cherrice Bethel 11. Jim Wening, Madeline Lenke and Krissi Nevell 12. Diane Lesko Pollard and Lisa Leon 13. Bobby Poe and Lisa Gallo ANDY SPILOS l ie y a v i s C W a S S a l la i ly v is ANDYSPILOS e A pp lebaum, Baile y Griffin, a nd Dustin Lampro s s and Connie Griffith C alman W alker Renat a S mit h a maniego a rd and y Ri tte l s Matt Percey, Alison Percy and Beau Percy 1 2 6 3 9 7 4 8 5 10 12 13 11

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A13 Learn more at jupitermedurgentcare.com or call 561-263-7010. Jupiter Medical Center is dedicated to providing you and your family with affordable, quality medical care. The professional staff at our Urgent Care centers will see you without an appointment in just a few minutes … and most insurance plans are accepted!Walk-ins welcome, or schedule an appointment at jupitermedurgentcare.com. Choose Urgent Care...from the hospital you trust!In addition to treating minor emergencies and illnesses, we offer: t'MVTIPUT t %JHJUBM9SBZT t &,(T t -BCTFSWJDFT Hours: Mon. … Sat., 8 a.m. … 8 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m. … 5 p.m. Jupiter: 1335 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter Next to Harmony Animal HospitalTwo convenient locations: Abacoa: 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64, Jupiter Next to McDonalds in the Abacoa Shopping Center SOCIETY Clicking In event at Seasons 52 in Palm Beach GardensLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com.ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Marilyn Murray Willison, Sonia Coop and Heather Lockett Barbara Shafer, David Click and Lisette Arias David Click, Huntley Miller, Charles Chillingworth, Christopher Chillingworth and Bob Goldfarb Margaret Luce, Cynthia McCallister, Marcia Pollard and Renee Plevy Jamie Gonzalez and Ildiko Bach Christopher Chillingworth, Julia Nell, Traci Chmiel and Walter Smith Lani Click

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A14 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYFWC commission to consider four options on future bear huntsAfter receiving input from the general public and stakehold-ers, the Florida Fish and Wildlife staff released four options that com-missioners will con-sider on how to best move forward with controlling Floridas growing bear popula-tion, estimated to have swelled across Florida over the past 10 years. The four options range from holding a bear hunt with the identical framework as last year to no bear hunting in Florida at all. The staff recommendation is for a more conservative and accountable hunt beginning in 2016. Floridians can visit MyFWC.com/bear to learn more about each option and provide input and feedback on each specific proposal. The biologists and staff at FWC value all of the input weve received throughout the development of our comprehensive bear management program and we hope more Floridians will continue to provide input on the best way to manage Floridas growing bear population. We look forward to continuing to have a transparent, accountable process where everyone has their voices heard on this critical topic,Ž said FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley. We look forward to presenting this information to the commission at our June meeting, and we invite all those interested to provide feedback on options that weve prepared for the commissions consideration. Our focus will continue to be how to balance whats best for Floridas growing bear population with the safety of Florida families and our visitors.Ž Option one would prescribe a bear hunt in 2016 with identical framework to the hunt held in 2015, but with updat-ed hunt objectives. Option two is a limited hunt option allowing FWC to hold an even more conservative bear hunt in 2016 utiliz-ing the data and information collected including the latest bear population sci-ence. This option also puts more restrictions on hunters who choose to partici-pate. Option three would be to postpone any bear hunt in 2016 by creating a zero-hunt objective, but the commis-sion could consider a 2017 bear hunt at a later date. Option four would be for the commission to repeal bear hunt rules and not allow bear hunting in Florida in future years. The commission will consider all of these options, as well as the staff rec-ommendation in its entirety for a more conservative bear hunt on June 22 at its meeting in Eastpoint, in North Florida. The public can provide input on all of the options at MyFWC.com/bear. The FWC welcomes public input at all commission meetings. The meeting will be streamed live on the Florida Channel. Q h o ld n d e u nt wo rk sp e c t a g b ear SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ Florida still leads the nation in saltwater fishing revenueFlorida remains No. 1 in the nation in revenue and jobs supported by rec-reational saltwater fishing. The data, released by NOAA Fisheries, measures the economic impact of commercial and recreational saltwater fishing activities and fishing-related industries across the nation. According to the report, which covers the most recent data up to 2014, Florida is number one in the nation in jobs supported by the recreational salt-water fishing industry at 114,898. Florida also is among the top in the nation when it comes to dollars and jobs generated by the commercial fish-ing industry. According to the report, Floridas commercial seafood industry is third in the nation in numbers of jobs supported with 92,858 jobs in 2014. Florida is also second in the nation when it comes to highest sales, income and value-added impacts from the com-mercial industry with 18.3 billion in sales impacts. The state is also number one in the nation when it comes to sales, income and value added dollars. The recreational saltwater fishing industry contributed more than $7.9 billion to the states economy in 2014. Florida also is No. 1 in number of trips taken by anglers at nearly 25 million. Floridas freshwater fisheries also supports another 14,000 jobs and has an additional $1.7 billion economic impact. Learn more about the NOAA report at st.nmfs.noaa.gov. To find fishing sites, identify recreational species and find fishing tips, see takemefishing.org. Q SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ Park services specialist Art Carton, ranger Rob Matriscino, and director of education Veronica Frehm received the Award of Valor at the Florida state parks recent 2015 Division Award Win-ners meeting. They received the award for risking their lives to save two drown-ing visitors caught in a rip current at MacArthur Beach State Park last spring. We are extremely proud of and grateful for our award winners,Ž says Cheryl Houghtelin, executive director of the Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park. Thanks to the skills and quick thinking of our MacBeach heroes, the two visitors were brought safely back to shore.Ž Also at the 2015 Division Award Winners meeting, park services specialist Lu Dodson was present-ed with the Joe Ken-ner Award for Inter-preter of the Year. As park services specialist, Ms. Dod-son is responsible for the interpretation and operation of the Nature Center, is the volunteer coordinator, oversees animal care and helps with the Natural Science Education program, teaching more than 50 students daily in the parks outdoor classroom.Ž Ms. Dodsons hard work and dedication to the Park Service was not only recognized at the meeting, but she recently received a promotion to assis-tant park manager at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park. We will miss Lu and her amazing work ethic, but we are happy for her and know she will make a great assistant park manager,Ž Ms. Houghtelin said. John D. MacArthur Beach State Park is situated on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Lake Worth Lagoon. Q Three MacArthur Beach heroes receive Award of ValorSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________COURTESY PHOTORob Matriscino, Veronica Frehm and Art Carton received the Award of Valor after rescuing visitors caught in a rip current at MacArthur park.DODSON The Skaggs family has given a new $2 million gift to support exceptional students in The Scripps Research Institute graduate program. I would like to thank members of the Skaggs family for their remark-able generosity, which has had a transformative effect on this institu-tion,Ž said TSRI CEO Peter Schultz. This new endowment, which brings the familys total gifts to TSRI to approximately $131 million, will help us continue to recruit the best stu-dents for advanced training at the intersection of biology and chemistry. In so doing, the gift also benefits our faculty, whose research programs will be enhanced by the efforts of these outstanding fellows.Ž The new gift was made through the Skaggs familys foundation, The ALSAM Foundation. Beginning this fall, one exceptional member of the entering class will be selected by the TSRI admissions committee to be designated as a Skaggs Fellow. The Skaggs Fellows first-year stipend will be paid from the new endowment funds. In addition, in subsequent years of study, the stu-dent will receive a research supple-ment of up to $5,000. For more information on TSRIs graduate program, which is consis-tently ranked among the top 10 in the nation in its fields of chemistry and biology, see scripps.edu. Q Skaggs family gives $2 million for Scripps programSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A15 HEALTHY LIVING Genetic markers for depression may predict exercise benefit UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDAA University of Florida study has found that specific genetic markers that put people at risk for depression also predict who might benefit from exer-cise. The researchers found that men who were carriers of two specific genes had the most significant response to exercise. The results suggest physical activity as part of a treatment plan „ exercise as moderate as walking „ could help the carriers of these genes. I want to better understand who could benefit most from physical activ-ity. Id like to take the same approach to exercise that we take to medication, which is to have a personalized medicine approach,Ž said Vonetta Dotson, Ph.D., the studys first author and an assis-tant professor in the College of Public Health and Health Professions. If we show through systematic research that exercise has a good chance of helping a patient because of their particular char-acteristics, I think that might help with patients motivation to exercise.Ž The results came from a small pilot study, so more research needs to be done before this work can be translated into clinical practice. But in the future, its possible that blood or saliva could be tested to determine if a person could benefit from physical activity to lower depressive symptoms. The study used data gathered in the Lifestyle Interventions and Indepen-dence for Elders, or LIFE, pilot study. During the LIFE pilot study, 396 seden-tary older adults were separated into two groups: those who received health education classes and those who were given moderate physical activity classes for 12 months. A subsequent paper published from the LIFE pilot study found that exercise did not significantly affect depression symptoms across the whole group, but that changed when the research team tunneled down into the data. When we looked at subgroups, we ended up finding significant response to exercise in men who were carriers of a specific gene.Ž Ms. Dotson said. To assess the participants response to exercise, they took a test called the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, a screening test for depression and depressive disorders, at the beginning of the LIFE studys inter-vention. They took the test again after the interventions ended, at 12 months. The scale assesses four factors, includ-ing symptoms of sadness and fearful-ness, symptoms such as loss of appetite and concentration difficulties, and a diminished capacity to experience pleasure or perceived difficulties in social relationships. The participants also underwent genetic testing before the interven-tion, and the researchers tested three genes: the brain-derived neurotrophic, or BDNF, gene, a serotonin transporter gene and a gene called apolipoprotein E. The researchers found the greatest decrease in symptoms such as loss of appetite and concentration difficulties in men who carried the BDNF genet-ic variation that predisposed them to depression. They also saw an increase in the capacity to experience pleasure in men who exercised regularly who carried specific variations of the serotonin transporter gene. Ms. Dotson said the study provides evidence that physical activity could be explored as an intervention for depres-sion, but warns that this study was not done in people whose symptoms were severe enough to be formally diagnosed with clinical depression. She said its also important to understand the benefits of exercise because of the impact medications may have on the brains of older adults. Im trying to understand how exercise versus antidepressants affect the brain,Ž she said. The next step for me is to understand from a brain standpoint who is going to benefit and how exer-cise is going to be beneficial in addition to or as an alternative to medication.Ž Q Diet may improve function, reverse brain damageAttempting challenging puzzles and reading up on the theory of relativity arent the only ways to keep your brain at its finest. The right diet also can do wonders, improving the brains function and even help-ing to reverse brain damage. Meanwhile, the opposite also is true. Poor diet choices not only hurt the waistline, but have a nega-tive effect on the brain. When it comes to the brain, sugar is public enemy No. 1,Ž says Daniel Amen, M.D., a clinical neuroscientist and brain imaging expert who also is the founder of Amen Clin-ics, which treat patients at six locations around the country. Sugar is pro-inflammatory, increases erratic brain-cell firings and is addic-tive, says Dr. Amen, author of The New York Times bestseller Change Your Brain, Change Your Life.Ž He doesnt hold back his disdain. Sugar is insidious, sort of like heroin,Ž he says. It will make you want it over and over again. Its like dat-ing the bad boys. You fall in love with something that beats you up.Ž Sugar has company on Dr. Amens list of unfriendly brain foods, including a few surprises, such as corn, which has one of the worst fatty-acid profiles of any vegetable. Others on the avoid-at-all-costs list include artificial dyes, especially red dye; foods with trans fats, such as cookies, cakes and pie crusts; and low-fiber foods, which include many fast-food choices. Fortunately, there are also great food options that can heal the brain and even help reverse brain damage, Dr. Amen says. Those include: € Healthy fats. Surprisingly, fat is not the enemy. Thats because there are good fatsŽ and bad fats.Ž Some exam-ples of good fats are olives, sunflower seeds and flaxseed. Dr. Amen also points out that 60 percent of the solid weight of the brain is fat. So if someone calls you a fathead, you should thank them,Ž he says. € Fish. Salmon, halibut, sardines, mackerel and other fish are loaded with healthy oils and healthy fat. People who eat grilled or baked fish once a week have more gray matter in their brain,Ž Dr. Amen says. You may not want gray in your hair, but gray in your brain is awesome.Ž € Avocados. This nutrient-dense fruit is loaded with healthy Omega 3 fatty acids, which build brain-cell mem-branes, reduce brain inflammation and promote new brain-cell formation. € Raw nuts. Go easy on the amount because they pack a lot of calories, but raw nuts are very healthy for the brain. € Chocolate. Heres another surprise. Chocolate also has been shown to decrease cravings and increase blood flow to the brain. Its what usually is added to chocolate „ sugar and dairy products „ that makes it bad. € Colorful vegetables. Green is great, but with vegetables you can branch out into such choices as yellow squash, purple carrots and orange bell peppers. You want things that are high in fiber, that are colorful, that are really medi-cine for your brain,Ž Dr. Amen says. Anytime you prepare to eat something, dont just think about the pounds you might put on,Ž Dr. Amen says. Ask yourself: Is this good for my brain or is it bad for my brain?Ž Q „ Daniel Amen is a clinical neuroscientist and brain imaging expert who heads Amen Clinics, which are located in Orange County, California, Atlanta, San Francisco, New York City, Washington, D.C., and the Seattle area. He has written numerous books, including The Amen Solution: The Secret to Being Thinner, Smarter, HappierŽ and Change Your Brain, Change Your Life.Ž AMEN SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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A16 NEWS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Northern Palm Beach County Chamber leadership awards dinner, PGA National 1. Angela Reynolds, Juan Carlos Fanjul, Emily Pantelides, Kristina Pantelides and Barbara Shafer 2. Dave Markarian, Tammy O’Rourke and Gary Lesser 3. Katy Zobel, Bonnie Sampler, Katherine Deal and Marissa Korth 4. Don Wilber, Kathy Anderson, Sally Byrd, Scott Powers and Laura King 5. Travis Conway, Christa Jones, Cary Stamp, Anna Poulian, Edna Runner, Maria Marino and Diana Garzon 6. Michael Link, Wendy Link, Bradley Link and Chris Link 7. Monte Lambert, Pam Sartory, Stacy Bauer and Mike Bauer 8. Nat Nason, Beth Kigel and Marylou Nason 9. Lori McWilliams and Abby Brennan 10. Scott Angelo and Amy Angelo 11. Barbara Rogoff and Denise Mariani 12. Sharon Quercioli, Chip Armstrong and Nancy Mobberly 13. Roni Schneider, Michael Steinger, Robert Simeone and Vivian Simeone 14. Tamra FitzGerald, Paul Jamieson and Shana Sheptak 1 4 6 9 7 8 2 3 5 10 11 12 13 14

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 NEWS A17 ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Central Palm Beach County Chamber gala at International Polo Club in Wellington 1 4 7 8 9 2 5 3 6 1. Alexandra Ghiragossian, Guido Ghiragossian, Christine Strich and Marc Strich 2. Mallory Miedma, Barbara Miedema, Donia Roberts and Kara Roberts 3. Carmine Priore III, Mary Lou Bedfor, Sam Ferreri and Thomas Bean 4. Julie Menitoff and Aaron Menitoff 5. Ricardo Mitchell, Candy Mitchell, Clara Medina, Armando Medina, Carmen Arcelo and Daniel Arcelo 6. Terii Bazley and Marla Weaver 7. Andrea Borroughs and Steve Borroughs 8. Jeff Robles and Ricardo Mitchell 9. John Kime and Julie Kime 10. Mary Lou Bedford and Jess Santamaria 11. Earl Bryant, Maria Vallejo and Joe Gibbons 12. Ellen Smith, David Cattaneo and Valentina Cattaneo 13. Darell Bowen, Sherry Bowen, Marie Priore and Carmine Priore 14. Greg Etimos, Sheryl Simon and Angel Alicea 15. Thomas Bean, Ramona Bean, Eileen Eggen and Mark Eggen 10 13 14 15 11 12

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Juno Beach Branch 14051 US Highway One, Juno Beach, FL 33408 (561) 630-4521 JBh Bh 14051USHihOJBhFL33408(561)6304521 Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCOBANK*PMI Private Mortgage Insurance. Lender paid Private Mortgage Insurance on loans over 89.5% Loan-to-value. Please not e: We re serve the right to alter or withdraw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. www.TrustcoBank.com No Points, No Borrower Paid PMI*, No Tax Escrow Required and Low Closing Costs! e Home of Low Cost Mortgages Visitors to Palm Beach County increased by 10 percent to 6.9 million in 2015; airport traffic rose 6.6 percent in February, compared to 2015 BY GLENN MILLERFlorida Weekly CorrespondentFLORIDIANS WERENT IMAGINING IT over the winter if they thought airports, restaurants and highways were crowded. Very crowded.Record numbers were reported across the state, from the number of visitors to Palm Beach County to the throngs of passengers coursing through two Southwest Florida airports.Southwest Florida International Airport witnessed 1,269,961 passengers troop through its airways and concourses in March. Thats an increase of 7.5 percent over the number that used the airport in March of 2015.Astonishing growth,Ž said Bob Ball, executive director of the Lee County Port Authority. The total is roughly equal to the combined populations of Lee, Collier and Charlotte counties, which clock in at about 1,231,000, according to U.S. Census estimates from July 1, 2015. Thats not all. Airport traffic is up yearto-date 8 percent from the same period last year, according to a Southwest Florida International report. Palm Beach County also was hopping in the past year. Like its Southwest Florida counterparts, passenger traffic increased at the Palm Beach International Airport. It grew 6.6 per-cent in February 2016 compared to the same month in 2015, jumping from 583,770 in 2015 to 622,187 this year. The same trend held for the year counting from February of 2015 to February 2016. The increase was 6.3 for the year, from 5,953,709 for the year ending in 2015 and 6,331,653 for the year ending this February. Additional passenger traffic helped the countys tourism numbers. Although tour-ism statistics for the first quarter of 2016 were not available as Florida Weekly prepared this story, the numbers for 2015 were released in February. A record of 6.9 million visitors came to the county last year, according to Discover the Palm Beaches, the tourism and market-ing corporation for Palm Beach County. That was a 10 percent increase over 2014. Which dramatically surpassed all our previous forecasts,Ž Jorge Pesquera, the president and CEO of Discover the Palm SEE AIRPORTS, A19 X Travel soars“Astonishing growth.” — Bob Ball, executive director of the Lee County Port Authority.BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH COUNTY COMMERCE A18 WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016

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MOVING ON UP“I’ve got an office overlooking palm trees and I feel like the luckiest girl in the world.” — Maria Hirt, director of sales and marketing, Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa Name: Maria Hirt Title: Director of sales and marketing, Eau Palm Beach Resort & SpaCity of business: Manalapan BY MARY THURWACHTERmthurwachter@” oridaweekly.comMaria Hirt liked what she saw when applying for her job as director of sales and marketing, Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, but something said during an interview there earlier this year really added frosting to the cake. They told me (before releasing the news to the public) about winning five diamonds from Forbes,Ž Ms. Hirt said. I know how hard it is to get that. I know what an accomplishment that is.Ž A seasoned pro in marketing luxury resorts „ particularly with the Four Seasons brand, where she worked in Lanai, Las Vegas, Atlanta, Palm Beach and most recently in Austin, Texas „ Ms. Hirt and her husband, Brian Eaton, who also is in the hotel business, have a home in Delray Beach. Before they bought their house, Ms. Hirt lived at the 309-room Eau Palm Beach for a while, and, while she enjoys their new digs, leaving her room at Eau, she said, felt like the saddest day of my life.Ž But not to worry. She still has space at the luxury seaside resort. Ive got an office overlooking palm trees and I feel like the luckiest girl in the world,Ž she said. Born in Lima, Peru, Ms. Hirt grew up in Atlanta, but her family frequently vacationed in Florida and she always loved being in the Sunshine State. Tak-ing the executive job at Eau, she said felt like coming home.Ž She had worked as director of sales and marketing at the Four Seasons Palm Beach, just two miles north of Eau, from 2002 to 2007, and previously held a sales position there. But now her focus is on Eau.I see many great opportunities here,Ž she said. This is a perfect job for me. I love to brainstorm. I love coming up with ideas.Ž Ms. Hirt said she couldnt imagine doing any other line of work. I love people in hospitality,Ž she said. You have to love people. I look forward to creating special moments, goosebump moments for guests while continuing to raise the bar and estab-lishing Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa as a premier resort destination.Ž Where I grew up: Born in Lima, Peru; raised in Atlanta. Where I live now: Delray Beach. Education: Bachelors degree in psychology from Valdosta State University. What brought me to Florida: I grew up coming to Florida for holidays and summers. My family had a second home in Pompano Beach. It has always felt like home and I have so many wonderful memories here. Most recently, I decided that after living in several places, it was time to come back home and be closer to my family, who now live in Palm Beach. My first job and what it taught me: I started my hotel career with Marriott in operational roles and it taught me that the hotel business is my passion. I cant imagine doing anything else. I love creating great experiences for the guests. My first job was the front desk, where I loved being able to welcome guests and make their stay special. A career highlight: I think I have had several, but the one I am most excited about is the fact that I am back in a city that I love doing what I love. I have had some great experiences in marketing several locations and look forward to coming back to Palm Beach with new experiences. This was my first director of sales and marketing role 14 years ago. What I do when Im not working: Golf, shopping, paddle boarding, travel-ing and hiking. I am also a history buff and used to work for an archaeologist. I have a love for greyhounds and have rescued four „ and am getting ready to make that five! Best advice for someone looking to make it in my field: Take care of your staff and they will take care of your customers.About mentors: I have been very lucky to have had many mentors that have taught me different things throughout my career. I feel very lucky to have worked with many inspiring leaders, great hote-liers and genuine individuals that helped mentor me. I have tried to pay it forward by mentoring and developing others. Q GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 BUSINESS A19Beaches, said in a February news release. Mr. Pesquera added that 2015 was the fifth consecutive year of record-break-ing tourism.Ž Records toppled on both coasts.The Punta Gorda Airport reported that 91,101 people traveled through its gates in April. Thats a 31 percent increase over April of 2015. That 91,101 total is more than five times Punta Gordas estimated population of 17,000 flocking through the airport in a month. How much of a change is this airline traffic for Punta Gorda?Eight years ago we didnt have airline service,Ž airport director Gary Quill said. The airport has one carrier, Allegiant Air, connecting Punta Gorda to 30 small-er cities, places such as Allentown, Pa., Grand Rapids, Mich., and Toledo, Ohio. The addition of Allegiant has helped boost tourism in Charlotte County and linked it directly to numerous markets. Lorah Steiner, the director of the Charlotte Harbor Visitor & Convention Bureau, said she expects Allegiant to soon add to its Punta Gorda list of connections with Cin-cinnati and Rockford, Ill. While Southwest Florida International Airport typically experiences a dip in traf-fic over the summer, Ms. Steiner said July is one of the busiest months at the Punta Gorda Airport because of residents flying north to escape the heat. Charlotte County enjoyed a good winter and Ms. Steiner expects to have more good tourism news to report soon. I think well see a good summer,Ž Ms. Steiner said. While the Lee and Charlotte county airports were reporting booming passenger traffic, that same metric doesnt apply at the Naples Airport. And thats for a simple reason. The Naples Airport is devoted almost entirely to general aviation. Its only commercial service is through Elite Airways, which just began operating out of the airport in February. Although Southwest Floridas two primary commercial aviation airports record-ed record numbers recently, tourism num-bers were down slightly on the west coast this past season. Tourism officials in Lee, Collier and Charlotte pointed out that although down slightly the statistics are being compared to record-breaking visitor totals in recent winters. The number of visitors staying in Lee County hotels this past season was down 6.7 percent over 2015, declining from 776,164 to 724,071, according to a report from the Lee County Visitor & Conven-tion Bureau. The number staying with friends was down 2.4 percent, dipping from 621,792 to 606,576. Thats something of a mixed bag,Ž said Tamara Pigott, executive director of the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau. It can be deceiving.Ž Although down from last year it was still a good season, Ms. Pigott believes. There was also a corresponding dip in estimated spending from $1.16 billion to $1.13 billion. The visitors who came, though, have money to spend. The average household income of visitors to Lee County is $101,200. Its even higher in Collier County, according to Jack Wert, the executive director of the Naples, Marco Island, Everglades Convention and Visitors Bureau. He pegged the average household income for Collier County visi-tors at over $150,000.Ž Mr. Werts office reported a similar dip in visitors to what was reported in Lee. In March, despite increased traffic at the airport, people staying in what the Collier County report terms commercial lodg-ingsŽ fell 2.1 percent from last year. How is it possible that the number of passengers flowing through airports is up but tourism visitors are down? Mr. Wert offered a simple explanation.A lot of business travelers and our own residents using that airport,Ž Mr. Wert said. Hes not allowing the 2016 statistics showing a slight dip to ruffle his demean-or. It would have been difficult to dupli-cate or exceed 2015. It was the best season on record,Ž Mr. Wert said. He added that although the number of visitors dipped slightly, spending is still up.Ž The Collier County tourism report noted that direct expenditures by visitors both year-to-year and comparing March of 2016 to March of 2015 were up. In the first three months of 2015, Collier County visitors spent roughly $490 million. This year that number inched up to a little more than $495.6 million. Thats up virtually 1.5 percent. The same was true for March, which saw the spending increase this year to $313.4 million from $309 million last year, a bump of 1.5 per-cent. The restaurants were full,Ž Mr. Wert said. Tourism officials throughout Southwest Florida attributed the dip to a number of factors such as a mild winter up North, a rainy winter here and releases from Lake Okeechobee that sullied the Caloo-sahatchee, estuaries and other bodies of water. The early part of the year was a little rocky,Ž Ms. Pigott, said. Tourists and residents alike endured an extraordinarily wet January that may have kept some potential visitors away. Fort Myers received a January record 12.98 inches of rain. The normal January rainfall in Fort Myers is 1.93 inches. A positive trend for Southwest Florida tourism continues to be international travel. Were getting the benefit of a lot of Europeans,Ž Mr. Ball said. Nearly 35,000 Germans and nearly 35,000 from the United Kingdom visited Lee County over the winter, according to the visitor profile dated May 12. In March alone, Collier County had 32,040 European visitors, an increase of 4.5 percent from 30,672 in 2015. The airports and tourism, the beaches, golf courses, attractions, warm winter weather and airplanes have an economic connection. Mr. Ball pointed out that the airport is an important part of Southwest Floridas economy. The economy couldnt stand alone with tourism and home building,Ž Mr. Ball said. Southwest Floridas passenger growth is detailed on the airports website. In March 2006, 997,869 passengers traveled through the airport. In 1996, it was 600,771. So the March number has more than doubled in 20 years. What we call the new terminal is now 10 years old,Ž Mr. Ball said, referring to the facility that opened in 2006. Mr. Ball said airport officials are rethinking their plans to accommodate more passenger traffic. Were pulling the throttle back on runway projects,Ž Mr. Ball said. Next up might be, he said, a $50 million new control tower. Increasing the number of gates from 28 to 35 is a possibility. That would be good news for tourism officials. The airport is integral to our efforts,Ž Ms. Pigott said. The same is true in Collier County where 72.7 percent of its visitors flew to Florida and of those 66.2 percent flew into Southwest Florida International. More than a tenth (11.9 percent) visited Collier County after flying into Miami Interna-tional Airport. If the traffic patterns of recent years hold true in 2016, June, July, August and September will see fewer than 500,000 passengers per month at Southwest Flor-ida International. Then, come October, the crowds will start returning again, by the hundreds of thousands. Q AIRPORTFrom page 18 COURTESY PHOTOSouthwest Florida International Airport wit-nessed 1,269,961 passengers troop through its airways and concourses in March. COURTESY PHOTOMaria Hirt recently joined Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa.

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A20 BUSINESS WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Vincent Cuomo’s networking event for Children’s Services Council, PGA National 1. Philicia Douglas, Rachel Trimble, Benn Willcox, David Mack, Ellen Pincus, Kristina Viola and Bob Goldfarb 2. Alex LeClainche, Jennifer Behnke and Christian LeClainche 3. Courtney Siders and Vincent Cuomo 4. Benn Willcox, Brandy Guthrie and Mark Martin 5. Susan Kaplan, Nico Blitzer and Brittany Cabrerra 6. Barbara Shafer, Michael Papa and Alyssa Liples 7. Lisa Fossett, Jamie Courbanou and Samantha Meyers 8. Mandy Buchanan, Patrice Gimenez and Tracee Wagner 9. Monique Heinz and Nico Blitzer 10. Greg Etimos, Alexis Archer, Alyssa Liples and Linda Delozian Ivell 11. Kristina Viola, Vic Melillo and Ellen Pincus 12. Jonathan Wald, Vincent Cuomo, Mark Greenberg, Carl Wald and Eric Hermann ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 2 7 5 3 8 4 9 6 10 11 12

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REAL ESTATE FLORIDA WEEKLY A GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 A21 Endless views from Sailfish PointCOURTESY PHOTOS SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYIdeally located in the prestigious private island sanctuary of Sailfish Point, this palatial oceanfront estate is nestled on the secluded southern tip of the community where the St. Lucie Inlet meets the Atlantic Ocean. Offering pan-oramic oceanfront views wrapped by miles of pristine private beaches, this luxurious estate home has five en suite bedrooms, 8 baths, a library, a wine/safe room, and a 2-car garage. Lush tropical landscaping abounds the entire perimeter of the property. The brand-new state-of-the-art kitchen hallmarks a crowning five-star La Cornue Cha-teau range/oven/hood handmade and imported from France, along with leath-er finished granite countertops. The pice de rsistance awaits you with the addition of a 750-bottle count, plus 120 magnums, temperature-controlled wine cellar tucked behind a hidden door, not to mention the custom elevator. A newly placed stone driveway and front entrance welcome you to this magnificent island retreat. The 2-car garage has been recently upgraded with custom cabinets, garage heating and cooling and a ceiling fan system. The mahogany front door opens to the beautifully appointed foyer leading into the formal living and dining areas. A spectacular shell chandelier and gas fireplace set a welcoming yet elegant atmosphere. To the right of the foyer is the homes library, which is lined with custom bookcases. Passing the formal living and dining areas youll come to the southern point of the house, where the completely renovated kitchen and informal family dining and living areas lead with pan-oramic oceanfront views to the patio and pool areas. Chestnut wood beams adorn the family room ceiling. In addition, surround sound, flat-screened TV and a remote controlled gas fireplace add to the casu-al elegance of the informal living room. Floor-to-ceiling windows and French doors open to the oceanfront pool and spa providing for the ultimate relaxation and casual lifestyle in your very own tropical oasis. This oneof-a-kind little piece of para-dise showcases an oceanfront 20-foot by 40-foot pool rede-signed and re-finished with black glass peb-bles and all func-tions can be con-trolled by a cell phone app. The newly expanded deck and patio areas complete with a cabana bath are perfect for outdoor relaxation and entertainment. Just steps away from the back yard, the turquoise waters of the Atlantic Ocean soothe your soul. The grand master suite, on the second floor, offers stunning views of the Intracoastal and Atlantic Ocean, a pri-vate balcony and his and her closets and bathrooms. His bath is appointed with forest green marble counter tops and a large steam shower with mahogany accents. Her bath is complete with custom marble, rainfall showerheads and a Jacuzzi tub. The additional four en suite bedrooms each have private baths and sitting areas pro-viding luxurious comfort for you and your guests. This rare offering provides all the peace and tranquility of private, island living with the security of being in the Sailfish Point community. Having been selected as one of the Best of the BestŽ in Residential Developments by the Luxury Coastal Lifestyle magazine Ocean Home, the extraordinary resort style community of Sailfish Point offers fine dining, a beautifully renovated clubhouse with ocean front pool, a state of the art health club and spa, 24-hour manned security, eight Har-Tru tennis courts, a Jack Nicklaus Signature golf course and a 77-slip yacht club marina able to accommodate both luxurious yachts and the finest sport fishing ves-sels. This tropical private island awaits only 15 minutes away from the Stuart Airport. Lang Realty has this Sailfish Point home offered at $6,500,000. The agent is Cam Kirkwood, (561) 714-6589, c.kirkwood@langrealty.com. Q in your very own

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ELLIMAN SOUTH FLORIDA 16 OFFICES IN SOUTH FLORIDA

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 REAL ESTATE A23 The Art of Living Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. PALM BEACH BROKERAGE340 Royal Poinciana Way, Suite 337 | Palm Beach, FL 33480561.659.3555 | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach OCEAN TRAIL DIR ECT OCEAN TRAIL Spectacular ocean and city views from this desirable end unit in Ocean Trail in Jupiter. Watch the sun rise over the water in the morning and set over the mainland in the evening. This 10th oor corner apartment features 3 separate balconies, a large master bedroom, a separate guest suite with a private bath and a spacious eat-in kitchen. $450,000 | WEB: 0076938 | MARY BUCK | 561.301.7442 STUNNING PIEDTERREFully renovated and stunning pied-a terre on high oor with northern exposure and panoramic views of Palm Beach and some intracoastal. Contemporary design features glass walls, Bizazza tile nishes, unique xtures, sound system, hardwood oors, glamorous kitchen and intriguing lighting choices. This architectural gem will wow you when you open the door. White glove, Resort style residence.$649,000 | WEB: 0076681 | MARYANN CHOPP | 561.351.1277 KOVEL: ANTIQUESChinese koi vases believed to bring good luck to a home BY TERRY KOVBEL AND KIM KOVEL Part of the fun of collecting is learning something extra about the history of the piece. This fish-shaped vase was sold at a Cowan auction in December 2015. It was described as a hand-paint-ed porcelain Chinese Export vase in the shape of a fish in water amid lotus blos-soms.Ž It is 16 inches high. The condi-tion description mentions some minor paint loss and damage to the fins. Fish have special meaning to the Chinese, so a search for the story led to an extra explanation of the vase. The color and shape of the fish identifies it as a koi, a variety of carp. The breed originated in China and was named about 500 B.C. Chinese invaders took the fish with them to Japan, and by the early 1800s, Japanese farmers bred the koi as pets and for food in winter. But there is more to koi history. Legend says a school of koi swam upstream to get to the top of the Dragon GateŽ mountain. Most of the fish turned back at the waterfall but one reached the top, and the gods rewarded it by turning it into a dragon. It is now thought to be the image of power, strength, perseverance, lon gevity, good fortune and a fulfilled destiny. Putting the vase in a home brings all these traits. And it adds beauty while displayed on a table. Q: Ive heard that 1950s-60s furniture is now collectible. We have a coffee table stamped Declaration by DrexelŽ on the bottom. It also has numbers and 3/61.Ž There is a circle of 12 inlaid wood dots in the middle of the top. The top is 60 inches by 22 inches and the table is about 15 inches high. What is it worth? A: Midcentury modern is collectible now. It seems people want what their grandparents had, not what they grew up with. The Declaration line of Drex-el was designed by Kipp Stewart and Stewart McDougall, popular California designers. Drexel Furniture Co. was founded in Drexel, N.C., in 1903. Drexel is now part of the Heritage Home Group in High Point, N.C., and the brand is called Drexel Heritage. The numbers indicate your walnut table with rose-wood inlay was made in March 1961. Some dealers in midcentury modern pieces price this table at over $1,000, but one sold at auction a few years ago for $275 and its been offered online for less. Q: I have an E.T. doll made by Kamar International Inc. The tag says its made of acrylic fiber and crushed walnut shells. The skin is peeling a little. How can I preserve it? I keep it covered with tissue paper and plastic. A: Proper storage is imperative. Acids in tissue paper and gases given off by plastic will cause the material to deteriorate. Dont use ordinary tis-sue paper or plastic to store your doll. Wrap the doll in acid-free tissue paper, unbleached muslin, or a 100 percent cotton white sheet or pillowcase that has been washed. Store it in an acid-free box, not an airtight container, and keep it in a dark place not subject to temperature extremes or excess humidity. Q: I have a rectangular pressed glass holder about 3 inches high, 2 inches wide, and 2 inches deep. It has embossed decorations on three sides and crosshatches on the back. What was it used for? A: Glass holders like yours are sometimes sold as toothpick holders and sometimes as match holders. Tooth-picks and matches were common household items in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Decorative toothpicks were pretty enough to use on the dining room table. Matches were needed to light the fire in the kitchen st ove, so a match holder was usually kept in the kitchen. Q: I bought some stainless steel flatware at a house sale and would like to know more about it. It has a flat finish and horizontal grooved lines on the han-dles. There is black inside the grooves, but its worn off on most pieces. The pieces are marked Dansk Designs Ger-manyŽ around an emblem that has four swimming ducks on it. When were these made? A: Dansk is an American company started by Ted and Martha Nieren-berg in 1954. The couple asked Danish designer Jens Quistgaard to design a line of flatware they could sell in the U.S. Your flatware is Variation VI, which was first made in 1957 and was made in Germany, Denmark and Finland. Quist-gaard designed other flatware patterns as well dinnerware, serving pieces, and other items for Dansk. After several changes in ownership, Dansk became part of Lenox in 2009. Tip: Dont repaint a metal doll head no matter how worn. Painting destroys the collector value. Q „ Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly) King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.The attractive fish vase is a carrier of many good traits and brings luck to the household. This koi vase sold for $861.

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Sign up today for the Singer Island Market Update www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com LUXURY RENTALS available... Ritz Carlton, Resort, Oasi s 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties The Resort Marriott 1004 1BR/1.5BA $299,000 Martinique WT604 2BR/3.5BA $599,000 Martinique ET503 2BR/3.5BA $530,000 The Resort 1251 3BR/3.5BA $7,800 Beach Front 1603 3BR/3BA $1,250,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1106B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,185,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,125,000 Oasis 19A 3BR/3.5BA $7,900 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,225,000 Ritz Tower Suite 7A 4BR/5.5BA $8,500,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,780,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2401A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,750,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1804A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,685,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,395,000 The Resort-Marriott 1651 3BR/3.5BA $1,499,999 Ritz Carlton Residence 705B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,650,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1805B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,699,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,500,000 Oceans Edge 1401 4BR/4.5BA $2,800,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,699,000 The Resort-Marriott 1251 3BR/3.5BA $1,399,999 Ritz Carlton Residence 306B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,024,900 Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist UNDER CONTRACT The Resort 1651 3BR/3.5BA $7,900 Ritz Carlton Residence 1904A 3BR/3.5BA+DEN $13,500 Ritz Carlton Residence 1502B 3BR/3.5BA+DEN $8,500

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Four Arts lecture explores evolution of art BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@” oridaweekly.comReserve your seat now for Joan Liptons lunch-and-learn illustrated talk, Major Art Movements Across the Cen-turies, on June 28 at the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach. This two-part lecture with a lunch break in the middle begins promptly at 11 a.m. At 1 p.m., the group breaks for a lunch of sandwich wraps, salad, chips and drinks. The two-hour afternoon lec-ture begins at 2 p.m. Ms. Lipton is an independent lecturer and art historian, a popular name on Four Arts Campus on the Lake learn-ing series. She has an M.A. from Hunter College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City of New York, with a specialization in 19th and 20th century art. A gifted storyteller, Lipton speaks fluently about the artists of the Renaissance as well as the con-tributions of the greatest painters of the 20th century. Ms. Liptons lectures will shine a light on the painting and sculpture of the major art movements, beginning with classical antiquity and ending with Romanticism. She embellishes her talk with photographs of important works from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Frick Museum. If you go: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. June 28, in Four Arts Hall in the Dixon Education Building at the Society of the Four Arts, Palm Beach. The session is $60. Reserva-tions are required. A second class in the series will be held July 19. Call 805-8562 or emailcampus@fourarts.org. For more info, visit fourarts.org.Summer Solstice at Wine SceneDespite happening a couple of days before the astronomical event its cel-ebrating, youve got to give the Wine Scene, 501 Fern St., West Palm Beach, points for enthusiasm. Its Summer Solstice party in the Graffiti Garden takes place at 7 p.m. June 18, and its being billed as a summer night celebration featuring cool & refreshing seasonal wines & tapas to pair.Ž But the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, actually takes place at 6:34 p.m. June 20, you say. Does it matter? The Wine Scenes chefs and mixologists have put together best-of-showŽ food and drink menus highlighting fresh summer beverages and light summer plates. Entertainment is jazz by the Mark Doyle Trio. So we dont care what it celebrates. ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE B1 WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 HAPPENINGSGinger Reiter, creator of Both Sides of a Famous Love Affair: The Jackie Mason Musical,Ž quit her job as an English teach-er at Wellington High School in 2014 to focus full time on producing the show, which was inspired by her 10-year affair with the comic. The relationship resulted in a daughter, Sheba, whom Mr. Mason acknowledged only after Ms. Reiter launched a success-ful paternity suit against him. Sheba was 1 year old when I tried to get him to acknowledge her,Ž Ms. Reiter said. I was informed he had just opened his one-man show on Broadway and couldnt be saddled with a child and a girlfriend, so I sued him. It took three years to win the lawsuit, because he kept battling taking the blood test.Ž Ms. Reiters show, which features Sheba Mason, will play two performances, June 18-19 at the Lake Worth Playhouse. The story begins at a Miami deli in 1977 where Jackie Mason spots Ms. Reiter „ played by Ms. Mason „ and a decade-long romance begins. I was very young when I met Jackie,Ž Jackie Mason musical comes to Lake WorthSEE HAPPENINGS, B7 X SEE MUSICAL, B14 X LILA PHOTO / COURTESY PHOTOGinger Reitner (right) has written a musical about her relationship with comedian Jackie Mason, which stars their daughter, Sheba (left).COURTESY PHOTOJoan Lipton Prized picsBY KATIE DEITSFlorida Weekly Correspondent Pulitzer photographs and backstories tug at heartstringsPREPARE TO STEP ON AN EMOTIONAL ROLLercoaster of sorrow, tragedy and occa-sionally joy when you enter the doors of the Palm Beach Photo-graphic Centre exhibit of Pulitzer Prize-win-ning photographers. On the right of the gallery is a life-size photo of a fireman gently carrying the blood-soaked, limp body of a toddler from the Oklahoma bombing site. ZUMA Press photogra-pher Charles Porter IV won the 1996 Pulitzer for that shot that tears at every parents heart.SEE PRIZED, B14 X YANNIS BEHRAKIS / REUTERS VIA ZUMA PRESSAn Afghan migrant jumps off an overcrowded raft onto a beach at the Greek island of Lesbos. Dallas Kinney’s portrait of Lillie Mae Brown was part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning package for The Palm Beach Post.REVIEW BY STEVEN J. SMITHssmith@” oridaweekly.com

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Weve got you covered this Summer at STORE Self Storage! STAY COOL t COVERED BREEZEWAY t RAIN OR SHINE Every Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Produce t Flowers t Plants t Breads t Seafood Bakery Items t Cheeses t Sauces t and Much More561.630.1146 t pbg.com11010 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 Just north of PGA Blvd. on Military Trail I love to use sterling silver and silver plate, even. Dont get me wrong: High-quality stainless steel flatware is a pleasure to behold. But even the cheapest silver plate rings like a bell when you ping it. Still, its a pain because you always have to keep it polished if you use it, right? Wrong!When we broke up my grandmothers house, there was a dinner fork from Grandmas old everyday service of 1847 Rogers Bros. She had given the set to my sister but had kept a fork to use when beating eggs and such „ it was a heavy piece. It was blackened with tarnish from sitting in the drawer for so long. My mom washed it and started carrying it with her lunch every day to work. After a week or so of use, that fork shone like new „ she probably didnt even toweldry the piece each day, either. When shabby became chic about 15 years ago, people began selling mixed sets of vintage flatware „ theyd assemble a set with a spoon from this set, a fork from that and so on, and it was fun. I love collecting old flatware because you never know what you will find. Victorians had especially interesting pieces „ aspic servers, pickle forks, sardine servers and such „ so its easy to build a cool collection. So heres a tip: Dig through those bins. Dont worry that something is covered in tarnish „ some dealers tell me thats how you know theres still plenty of silver on a piece because only the silver turns black with tarnish. Watch for pitting, where the silver has worn away to expose the base metal. You can do as my mom did, and watch the piece clean itself with use over time. Or you can clean gently with silver paste or cream „ even toothpaste works in a pinch. Dont use any of those dip cleaners „ theyre too harsh and will strip away the patina. But whatever you do, enjoy! Q scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com COLLECTORS CORNERIt’s easy to keep silver shining; just don’t overclean it LOOK WHAT I FOUNDFound: Antiques and Memories, 1788 Fowler St., Fort Myers; (239) 226-1992 or antiquesandmemories.net. Cost: $3. The Skinny: The fork Im holding first was made in 1904, and the pattern probably wasnt made long after World War I ended in 1918, as styles became more streamlined. But what a glorious pattern it is, with its knots of vines and bunches of grapes surrounding the edges of the handles. This box of silver plate flatware had lots of interesting pieces in it. Unfortunately, the pieces had been cleaned a bit too well „ notice theres no patina, or tarnish, between the grapes or delineating the veins of the grape leaves. Some of that will return with use. Meantime, Ill stick a fork in this.Im done. Q „ Scott Simmons ”‹–‡–‘…‘––ƒ–••‹‘•7 Ž‘”‹†ƒ™‡‡Ž›…‘1847 Rogers Bros. Vintage pattern forks THE FIND: COURTESY PHOTOThis fork, in the 1847 Rogers Bros. Vintage pattern, first was made in 1904. SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLYFork in Strickland’s Medallion pattern dates from 1867. It still retains its patina.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B3 $GXOWVSULQWOHQJWKWULDWKORQ Sunday, Sept. 11 6ZLPPLOH‡%LNHPLOHV‡5XQ.RQEHDXWLIXO&DSW LYD,V ODQG &KLOGUHQVWULDWKORQ DJHJURXSV Saturday, Sept. 10 Info and registration at www.captivatri.org Thanks to our sponsoring partners: www.gearedup.biz 25*$1,=('%<6287+:(67)/25,'$(9(176,1& $SRUWLRQRIWKHHYHQWSURFHHGVJRWREHQHW &RPPXQLW\&RRSHUDWLYHV6FKRRO%DFNSDFN 3URJUDPWRJKWKXQJHULQ/HH&RXQW\ Call for a Free Kitchen Design Consultation561-562-9241 LUXCRAFT CABINETRY LUXCRAFT CABINETRY 30%OFF For A Limited Time! CABARET Q&A Singer Spencer Day is known as much for his original songs as he is for his interpretations of standards by George Gershwin and others. His hit song Till You Come to MeŽ reached the No. 1 spot on Billboards Contemporary Jazz charts. His recent album DaybreakŽ debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes Jazz Chart and reflects Days roots in the Great American Songbook, with a contemporary, upbeat twist that has become his signature sound. He has played venues as varied as Birdland in New York, the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, Feinsteins at the Nikko in San Francisco, Jazz Alley in Seattle, the Pacific Rim Jazz Festival in Manila, the Kennedy Center in Wash-ington, D.C., Tanglewood Music Center in Boston, and on national television on The Late, Late ShowŽ with Craig Ferguson. He returns this month to the The Colony Hotels Royal Room in Palm Beach. Whats on your program this summer? It will be a pretty eclectic set list as usual. Audiences can expect to hear standards by Gershwin and beyond and modern pop songs with a few new originals sprinkled in as well. My main priority is making sure the song is good and fits the show. How do you prepare for a show?I try to do at least a 10-minute meditation before every show. This really helps me get grounded. Any rituals?Before every show, I always talk to myself in the mirror right before I go on stage. I try to say affirming things that resonate with the little kid inside. It might sound trite, but it really helps me. Do you sing every day?Absolutely. In one form or another I am always making music. How do Florida audiences compare to audiences up North? I would say generally Florida audiences seem a little more relaxed. How could they not be? What is special about the Royal Room? There are many things that are special about the Royal Room, but I would say the intimacy is at the top of the list. It is so special to be in a cozy room where you can really connect with each and every listener. Finally, how do you spend your days in Florida? Well, I am coming from the west coast where the ocean is always chilly, so a warm ocean is still very exotic and exciting to me. Most likely you will find me swimming in the balmy Atlantic or exploring all the amazing architecture here in Palm Beach. I cant wait! Spencer Day plans Gershwin and more at Royal RoomSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ Spencer Day>> When: June 17-18 and June 24-25 >> Where: The Colony Hotel’s Royal Room, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach >> Cost: Dinner and show $120 per person. Show only, $60. Tax, gratuity and alcoholic beverage not included. >> Info: 659-8100 or theroyalroom.com COURTESY PHOTOSinger Spencer Day’s most recent album is titled “Daybreak.” PUZZLE ANSWERS

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@flori-daweekly.com. THURSDAY6/16 Girls Glam Night Out — 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 16, at iBar at PGA National Resort & Spa, 400 Avenue of the Ameri-cas, Palm Beach Gardens. Glam up like the goddess you really are and eat, drink and enjoy pampering services from the Spa and Salon at PGA National. Shop for accessories, health and beauty products, and fashion. Prizes, raffles, goody bags. Free. Info: 227-2548 for more informa-tion.Clematis By Night, Supersized — 6-10 p.m. Thursdays. An hour longer in the summer and featuring two bands. Free. Info: clematisbynight.net.Q June 16: The Daniel Keith Band (country). Casey Raines opens (coun-try). Stephen Sondheim’s “Putting It Together” — Through June 19, Stage Door Theatre, 8036 Sample Road, Mar-gate. Tickets: $38-$42; $16 students. Show times: 2 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. (954) 344-7765; stagedoortheatre.com. The Soul of Motor City – Through July 19 at Stage Door Theatre, 8036 Sam-ple Road, Margate. Conceived, direct-ed, and choreographed by Kevin Black. Tickets: $38-$42; $16 students. Info: 954-344-7765; stagedoortheatre.com. FRIDAY6/17 Hurricane Awareness Event — 11 a.m.2 p.m. June 17, Storm of 28 Memo-rial Park, 924 25th St., West Palm Beach. First responders and experts from FPL, the American Red Cross, and the WPB Fire Department will speak about storm safety including storm supplies, home preparations, evacuation routes, emer-gency contacts and shelter information. Hosted by the Storm of 28 Memo-rial Park Coalition. Free. Info: wpb.org/Meetings-Events“The Complete Works of Wil-liam Shakespeare (abridged) [revised]” — June 17-26, Sol Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. This wacky, condensed version of Shakespeares masterpieces by Adam Long, Daniel Singer, and Jess Winfield, is like nothing youve seen and nothing The Bard ever imagined. An Evening Star Productions production. Perfor-mances: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: $15 adults, $10 students. Info: 447-8829; eveningstar-productions.org.Exhibit: “Created by The Hands of Man” — Opening reception 6-9 p.m. June 17, Artisans on the Avenue, 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. The artists, who work in different mediums, include Herbert Weintraub, E.J. Morales, Rob-ert Hunter, Carl M. Schneider, How-ard Fleischer and Robert Ben Kline. Free. Refreshments. Info: 582-3300; ArtisansOnTheAve.com. SATURDAY6/18 The Florida State of Solar: Awakening the Sleeping Giant — 10 a.m. to noon June 18, Jupiter Branch Library, 705 Military Trail, Jupi-ter. Justin Hoysradt will speak about Floridas solar energy market and the legislative and regulatory barriers that keep it from thriving. Info: 233-2600. Juneteenth Celebration — June 18, at Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, Delray Beach. Also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day, it commemo-rates the ending of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865, the end of a long process that began with the Emancipation Proc-lamation in 1863. A celebration featur-ing live music by Grammy-nominated artists, food and interactive art. Info: 279-8883; spadymuseum.com.“Both Sides of a Famous Love Affair: The Jackie Mason Musi-cal” — 8 p.m. June 18 and 2 p.m. June 19, the Lake Worth Playhouses Stonzek Black Box, 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. This story begins in a deli in Miami in 1977 and ends in a high school in Wel-lington in 2014, or thereabouts. Tickets: $35. Info: 845-598-2850; thejackiemason-musical.com. SUNDAY6/19 Maks and Val On Tour: Our Way — June 19, Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. The Chmerkovskiy brothers, both win-ners of the top prize on Dancing with the Stars,Ž team up for their own tour. This is the show they dreamed about when they were growing up. Supported by a cast of fellow professionals. Tickets start at $25. Info: 832-7469; kravis.org. TUESDAY6/21 Spring Symposium: The Devel-oping Brain: Adolescence and Vulnerability to Drug Abuse and Mental Illness — 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. June 21, at Nova Southeastern University … Palm Beach Campus … Room 114; 11501 N. Military Trail; Palm Beach Gardens. Presented by Patrick „DeChello, Ph.D., LCSW, MSW, RPH. Sponsored by Han-ley Center Foundation and the South-east Florida Behavioral Health Network and the State of Florida, Department of Children and Families. A second sympo-sium will be held June 22 in Vero Beach. Info: 841-1215; hanleycenterfoundation.org/symposium.The Full Moon Party — 5-10 p.m. June 21, Pelican Caf, 612 U.S. 1, Lake Park. Music by the Switzer Trio and the duo Dawn Marie & Giovanni. All raffle proceeds (tickets are $5) benefit Canine Companions For Independence. Hosted by Legends Radio. No cover. Reservations recommended for dinner at 842-7272. LOOKING AHEAD Clematis by Night — 6-10 p.m. Thursdays. An hour longer in the sum-mer and featuring two bands. Free. Info: clematisbynight.net.Q June 23 — Making Faces (rock/ reggae/funk). Yardij opens (alternative rock).Q June 30 — Chemradery (poprock/soul). Sierra Band opens (classic/current rock). AT THE COLONY The Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 659-8100 or 655-5430; thecolonypalmbeach.com.Motown Fridays with Memory Lane performing everyones favorite Soul City/Top 40 hits from the 60s through today. 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.Saturday Late Night with the Dawn Marie Duo — 9:30 a.m.-midnight, music and dancing, plus cameos by Royal Room headliners and other celebrity performers.Royal Room Cabaret: The Colo-ny’s new Young Stars Summer Residency Program — See many of Manhattans hottest rising cabaret stars every weekend until Labor Day. $120 per person for prix fixe dinner and show; $60 for show only.Spencer Day — June 17-18 and June 24-25Ariana Savalas — July 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23 and 29-30. AT DRAMAWORKS Palm Beach Dramaworks at The Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Info: 514-4042, Ext. 2; palmbeachdramaworks.com.Knowledge & Nibbles — 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. June 29. Have lunch at Tin Fish, then head to the theater and meet the director and actors of 1776.Ž Cost: Guild members, $30 lunch and program, $15 program only. Non-Guild members, $40, lunch and program; $20, program only.“1776” — Opens July 1. AT FAU BOCA Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton campus, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Info: fau.edu/eventsFAU’s 201 Festival Repertory Theatre — Performances take place in the University Theatre and Studio One Theatre at FAUs Boca Raton cam-pus, 777 Glades Road. 800-564-9539; fauevents.com.Q Noel Coward’s “Hay Fever” — Through June 26.Q “Once Upon a Mattress” — July 9-31.Q Big Band Concert — July 16 and 17.Q Piano Gala — July 23. AT FOUR ARTS The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Gallery and box office: 655-7226; fourarts.org.Keep Calm and Color On — 1:30 p.m. every Thursday until Aug. 25 in the King Library. Join the adult coloring craze. Materials provided. Info: email kinglibrary@fourarts.orgLecture and Lunch: Classical Cuisine series — 12:30 p.m. June 23, July 21 and Aug. 11, hosted by the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach. Experience a Renaissance of Classical CuisineŽ in this series where you dine at a local restaurant where youll hear the chefs discuss this resurgence and pay tribute to the legacy of Auguste Escoffi-er (1846-1935), a famous French chef, restaurateur and writer. After, a threecourse lunch will be served. Tickets: $75 per event. Reservations are required. Call 805-8562.June 23: Chef/Owner Jean-Pierre Leverrier, Chez Jean-Pierre Bistro.July 21: Executive Chef Gianluca Branca, Trevini.Aug. 11: Executive Chef Javier Sanchez, Renatos. AT THE KRAVIS Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-7469; kravis.org.The 2016-2017 Kravis On Broadway seven-show series — Tickets go on sale to the public at 10 a.m. June 17. Shows include: The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-TimeŽ (Nov. 15-20); An American in ParisŽ (Dec. 6-11); Dirty Dancing … The Classic Story On StageŽ (Jan. 3-8); Beautiful … The Carole King Musi-calŽ (Jan. 31-Feb. 5); The Phantom of the OperaŽ (March 23-April 1); Kinky BootsŽ (April 18-23); The Sound Of MusicŽ (May 9-14). Call 832-7469; Kra-vis.org.Maks and Val On Tour: Our Way — June 19. The Chmerkovskiy brothers team up for their own tour. This is the show they dreamed about when they were growing up. Supported by a cast of fellow professionals. Tickets start at $25. AT THE LIGHTHOUSE Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $10 adults, $5 chil-dren ages 6-18; free for younger than 6. Jupiter Lighthouse participates in the Blue Star Museums program. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting; call for tour times. RSVP required for most events at 747-8380, Ext. 101; jupiterlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tour — Wednesday, June 22, 29. Time varies by sunset. $15 members, $20 nonmembers. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour — 7:30 p.m. June 20 and July 19 and 7:15 p.m. Aug. 18. $15 members, $20 non-members.Hike Through History — 8:30-10:30 a.m. the first Saturday of the month. A 2-mile trek through the topography and natural history of Jupiters National Conservation Lands historic site. Mini-mum age 5, ages 13 and younger must be accompanied by an adult that is at least 18 years old. Future dates: July 2, Aug. 6, Sept. 3, Oct. 1, Nov. 5, Dec. 3.Twilight Yoga at the Light — 7-8 p.m. June 20, 27.Lighthouse Story Time & Crafts for Kids — 10:30-11:15 a.m. monthly in the Seminole chickee hut for story time and a craft activity. Ideal for kids ages 8 and younger. Bring a small beach/picnic mat. Free. AT LOGGERHEAD Loggerhead Marinelife Center „ 14200 N. U.S. 1, Juno Beach. Info: 627-8280; marinelife.org.Guided Turtle Walks — 8:40 p.m. to midnight Wednesday through Satur-day in June and July. You must be able to walk a half-mile. Children must be at least 8 years old. Doors close at 9 p.m. Advance registration is required. $12 members, $17 nonmembers. $20 for walk-ins if space is available. Public Guided Tour — 2-3 p.m. every Monday and Friday (June 17, 20, 24 and 27.) Led by educational docents who will answer questions. Tickets are $7 for adults, $5 for age 3-12, and free for younger than 3. No reservations required. Sign-in at the Guest Services desk in the main lobby. CALENDAR

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 CALENDAR TOP PICKS #SFL 06.17 06.19 #DON'TMISS #EATING SCENE QStephen Sondheim’s “Putting It Together” — Through June 19, Stage Door Theatre, Margate; (954) 344-7765; stagedoortheatre.com Q Lecture and Lunch: Classical Cuisine series — 12:30 p.m. June 23 with Jean-Pierre Leverrier, Chez Jean-Pierre Bistro; 805-8562 QMaks and Val On Tour: Our Way — June 19, Kravis Center; 832-7469 or kravis.org Q“Created by The Hands of Man” — Opening reception 6-9 p.m. June 17, Artisans on the Avenue, 630 Lake Ave., Lake Worth; 582-3300 or ArtisansOnTheave.com Sunday Public Guided Tour — Noon-1 p.m. Sunday, June 19 and 26. Tickets: $7 adults, $5 for age 3-12. Free for kids younger than 3. No pre-regis-tration required. Sign-in at the Guest Services desk in the main lobby.Dr. Logger Show — 2-2:30 p.m. Sunday, June 19 and 26. An interactive show appropriate for all ages by the educational ambassador of sea turtles. Free. No registration needed.The 5th Annual Run 4 the Sea — 6:15-9:30 a.m. June 18, Juno Beach. $35 race registration fee for adults and $10 registration for kids | Free for spec-tators. Run along the scenic Atlantic Ocean on A1A to celebrate the commu-nitys commitment to the conservation of endangered sea turtles. Also features a one-mile fun run for children (at 8:15 a.m.) and a four-mile run for adults (at 7 a.m.). Hang around for the post-race celebration with music and break-fast. Check-in opens at 6:15 a.m. Info: marinelife.org/run. AT MACARTHUR PARK John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive on Singer Island, North Palm Beach. Info: 776-7449; macarthurbeach.org.Sea Turtle Talk & Walk — Register now for Walks take place Monday, Wednesday and Friday except July 4 through July 29. Members call 776-7449, Ext. 102. Nonmember registration takes place online at macarthurbeach.org. Tickets are $10 and are nonrefundable. Educational Reef Program — 10 a.m. June 18 and 25. Learn about the fish and other inhabitants of our near shore reef through a presentation and discus-sion. Snorkel afterward. Free with park admission. Info: 624-6952. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. 575-2223. Jupiterthe-atre.org CONSERVATORY PRODUCTIONS: “Seussical” — June 24-25. Dr. Seusss best-loved characters come to life in this production by student thespians in grades 6 -12. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Tick-ets: $25 adults, $20 children.“Disney’s Little Mermaid, Jr.” — July 29-30. Kids in grades 3-5 perform this fan-favorite fairy tale. AT MOUNTS Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Mili-tary Trail, West Palm Beach. Info: 233-1737; mounts.org.Tropical Fruit Festival — 10 a.m. … 3 p.m. June 25. Fruit tastings, lectures, demonstrations, live music and a plant sale. $5 members; $10 nonmembers. Hosted by the Palm Beach Chapter of the Rare Fruit Council International. AT THE IMPROV Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 833-1812; palmbeachimprov.com. Lavell Crawford — June 16-18.John Heffron — June 23-26.Drew Lynch — June 30-July 3. AT THE FAIRGROUNDS South Florida Fairgrounds, 9067 South-ern Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 793-0333; southfloridafair.com.Yesteryear Village — Now open year-round, travel back in time to Old Florida when schools were located in one small building and houses did not have running water. At this living his-tory park where interpreters share their stories about life prior to 1940 when many people raised their own livestock and gardens. Open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs-day … Saturday. $10 adults, $7 seniors 60+, $7 age 5-11 and free for age 5 and younger. Info: 795-3110 or 793-0333.The Pam Beach Summer Boat Show — June 24-26. Nearly 100,000 square feet of powerboats up to 40 feet, including center consoles, walk-arounds, cruisers, deck boats, pontoons, bass, per-sonal water craft and accessories. AT THE SCIENCE MUSEUM The South Florida Science Museum, 4801 Dreher Park Road, West Palm Beach. Admission: $15 adults, $11 ages 3 to 12, $13 for age 60 and older. Free for members and children younger than 3. Info: 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.com. “Grossology: The (Impolite) Sci-ence of the Human Body” — Through Oct. 10. A 5,000-square-feet inter-active exhibition based on Sylvia Branzeis best-selling book, the exhibition educates kids ages 6 to 14 about the gross stuff the body produces. Includes Nigel Nose-It-AllŽ who explains why people have runny noses, allergies and sneeze and Tour Du NoseŽ takes guests on a tour through a 10-foot-tall nose replica. Burp ManŽ drinks from a three-foot-tall soda can pumped by visitors and explains burps. Click IckŽ has nine different activities, including explor-atory labs, puzzles, games and more. LIVE MUSIC The Bamboo Room — 25 S. J St., Lake Worth. Info: 585-2583; bam-booroommusic.com. The Funky Biscuit — 303 SE Mizner Blvd., Royal Palm Place, Boca Raton. Info: 465-3946; funkybiscuit.com.Downtown at the Gardens — 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Info: downtownatthe-gardens.com.Q2016 Rock ‘N’ Roll Summer concert series. Friday nights 7-10 p.m. in Center Court.Guanabanas — 960 N. A1A, Jupiter. Age 21 and older. Info: guanabanas.com. Respectable Street Caf — 518 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-9999; Sub-culture.org/respectables.Palm Beach Hibiscus Bed & Breakfast’s Backyard Bar — 213 S. Rosemary Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 833-8171; palmbeachhibiscus.com.Arts Garage — 180 NE First St., Delray Beach. Info: 450-8367; artsgarage.orgCafe Boulud: The Lounge — 9 p.m. Fridays, in the Brazilian Court Hotel, 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach. Vocalist Raquel Williams performs an eclectic mix of American, Latin and Caribbean songs. Info: 655-6060; cafe-boulud.com/palmbeachDeep Blu Seafood Grille at Har-bourside Place — 119 Dockside Circle, Jupiter. Philippe Harari performs from 6:30-9 p.m. Wednesday and Satur-day. 273-6680. E.R. Bradley’s — 104 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Inf o: 833 -3520; erbradleys.com.O-Bo Restaurant Wine Bar — 7 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 422 Northwood Road, West Palm Beach. Live jazz and blues by Michael Boone. Info: 366-1185.Paris in Town Le Bistro — 6-9 p.m. Fridays, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave, Suite 4101, Palm Beach Gardens. Frank Cerabino plays French favorites on his accordion. Info: 622-1616; parisintown.com.The Tin Fish — 118 S. Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 223-2497; tin-fishclematis.com. ONGOING The Ann Norton Sculpture Gar-dens — 2051 S. Flagler Drive, West

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPalm Beach. Admission: $10 adults, $8 seniors and $5 students. Free for mem-bers. Info: 832-5328; ansg.org.The Armory Art Center — 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-1776; armoryart.org.Q 2D Student Summer Show — Through July 9APBC Art on Park Gallery — 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 689-2530; 345-2842; artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com.Q The Celestial 2016 Exhibit Images of the Heavens — Through June 30. Q Still Life 2016 Exhibit: Works Depicting Posed Objects — July 5-Aug. 12. Reception 5-8 p.m. July 8, afterparty at The Brewhouse Gallery, 720 Park Ave., Lake Park. Juried by the Art on Park Gallery Management Com-mittee. The Boca Raton Museum of Art — 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. Free for members, students with ID, and age 12 and younger; adults $12; seniors (65+) $10; students (with ID) $5. Info: 392-2500; bocamuseum.org.Q “Arnold Newman: Masterclass” — Through July 3. Q “Jane Benson: Two Videos” — Through July 3.Q “Charles McGill: Front Line, Back Nine” — Through July 3. Q “Bob Colacello: In and Out with Andy” — Through July 3.The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County — 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 471-2901; palmbeach-culture.com.QSpecial Jazz Concert Honoring Ella Fitzgerald — 7:30-9:30 p.m. June 25, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth. This tribute features international jazz vocalist and recording artist Yvette Norwood-Tiger and her Jazz Ensemble, pianist and musical director Rick Moore of the Jupiter Jazz Society, contra bass player Burt Boice, and drummer Jose Roman. Trumpet player Michael Mack-ey, a senior at Dreyfoos School of the Arts, is the groups special guest soloist. Tickets: $20. Info: 471-2901.Q “Resurrection of Innocence,” by Jeff Whyman — Through July in the new Project Space.Q Exhibition: Palm Beach County artists — Through July 30. Includes four Palm Beach County artists: Birds are Nice, Katelyn Spinelli, Nicole Gal-luccio, and the Viridis. Info: 472-3341 or email dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com.The Flagler Museum — One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 age 13-17 with adult; $3 age 6-12 with adult; free for younger than 6. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us.Harbourside Place — 200 U.S. 1, Jupiter. Info: 935-9533; harboursideplace.com. QSunshine in the Summertime — 9 a.m.-noon Monday-Saturday, through Aug. 13. Interactive splash pads, free games at the waterfront amphi-theater, including bubbles, hula hoops, water activities, building blocks. QOBEO Society’s Weekend Commute „ 7:45 a.m. June 25, Blueline Surf & Paddle, Jupiter. Paddle to Harbourside for yoga. Info: obeosociety.com QLive Music on the Waterfront — 6-10 p.m. June 17. Steel Pony performs. QSunset Puppy Social — 7-8:30 p.m. June 17. Meet at Blueline Surf & Paddle at 6:45 p.m. to paddle with your pooch to Pucci & Catana. Cost: $25. Res-ervations required. Info: 744-7474. QSummer Sidewalk Sale — June 18. Happy hour specials at Bravo! Cuci-na Italiana, Calaveras Cantina, deep blu seafood & grille, Tommy Bahama Res-taurant & Bar, The Woods Jupiter or Too Bizaare.QLive Music on the Waterfront — 6-10 p.m. June 18. White Acres performs. The Historical Society of Palm Beach County — Johnson History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-4164; historicalsocietypbc.org.Q “By Land and Sea: Florida in the American Civil War” — Through July 2. Commemorates the Sesquicentennial of the resolution of the War of Secession from 1861-1865. Learn Florida and Palm Beach Countys role in the conflict and the nations reconstruction.Q “ArtCalusa” — Through Aug. 27, in the third floor courtroom gallery. A colorful exhibit that introduces our pre-historic neighbors in Southwest Florida. Jonathan Dickinson State Park — 16450 SE Federal Highway, Hobe Sound. Park entry is a suggested dona-tion of $5. Info: 745-5551 or email friend-sjdsp@gmail.com.The Lighthouse ArtCenter — Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday ($10, free for members and exhibiting artists) and free on Sat-urday and Sunday. Info: 746-3101; Light-houseArts.org. Q The Art of Association — Through Aug. 11Q Third Thursday — 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of the month. Wine and passed hors doeuvres reception and exhibits, concerts, lectures, art demonstrations, live performances and gallery talks. $10; free for younger than 12. Free admission on Saturday.The Norton Museum of Art — The Norton will be closed through July 4, and will re-open July 5, free to the public. At 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-5196 or norton.org.The Palm Beach Photographic Centre — 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 253-2600; workshop.org.Q “Pulitzer Back Stories” — Through Aug. 6. Also features special events, lectures and panel discussions by Pulitzer Prize winners. See work-shop.org for details.Q Call for entries: The 19th annual Members Juried Exhibition is open for submissions. The deadline is June 25. The exhibition takes place Aug. 27-Oct. 29. Opening reception: 6-8 p.m. Aug. 26. See workshop.org for details. The Palm Beach Gardens His-torical Society Enrichment Pro-grams — Programs are held at Christ Fellowship Church on Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens at 7 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month. Info: 622-6156 or 626-0235; PBGHistoricalSo-ciety.org.Q A Day at Palm Beach Kennel Club — June 18.The Palm Beach Zoo & Conser-vation Society — 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 533-0887; palmbeachzoo. org.Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre —601-7 Sansbury Way, West Palm Beach. Info: westpalmbeachamphitheatre.com/events/. Tickets: 800-345-7000 or tick-etmaster.com. QKeith Urban — June 18. QSteely Dan & Steve Winwood — June 29. AREA GREEN MARKETS Lake Worth High School Flea Market — 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, under the Interstate 95 over-pass on Lake Worth Road. This market has been meeting in the same location for years. Info: 439-1539. Delray Beach’s Summer Green-Market — 9 a.m.-noon every Saturday through the summer, in the eastern half of the parking lot at the Delray Beach Tennis Center, 201 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Info: 276-7511; delraycra.org/greenmarket. The Palm Beach Gardens GreenMarket — Market is at its summer home, at STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage, 11010 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. The market will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sun-days through Sept. 25. Fresh produce, breads, seafood, cheeses, sauces, honey and handmade crafts under the large breezeway, plus a few outdoor vendors with plants and flowers, as well as covered seating to cool off with a cold drink. Rain or shine. Info: 630-1100, or email recinfo@pbgfl.com. QJupiter Green & Artisan Market at Riverwalk Event Plaza — 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays, 150 S. U.S. 1, under Indiantown Bridge, Jupiter. This year-round market is set along the Intracoastal Waterway. Find produce, specialty food products, apparel, acces-sories, jewelry, arts and crafts, plus entertainment and special activities. Pet friendly. Vendors welcome. Info: 203-222-3574; harrysmarkets.com. jupiter-greenmarket.com. QThe Green Market at Palm Beach Outlets — 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach. Arts and crafts, fresh flow-ers, homemade foods, organic produce. Info: 515-4400; palmbeachoutlets.com. Q

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CALLing all Pet Lovers!Florida Weekly Celebrates Your Pets! DOGS, CATS, HAMSTERS, HORSES, EXOTIC OR WHAT EVER YOUR PETS MAY BE Our sta chose thre winers of ur cntes and w e put al the bst phots in our par. First Plac $250 Senond & Third Plac $10 Gif Certi“cae to Favrite P Store Each one mbdies th spirt and pure love tha rnimrls oer so wilngy. Submit your pt ho t phots@”ridawekly.cm by Sunday, July 10th by 1:59pm. Pleas includ your fl name, pt name, phone umbr and rdres. t r Palm Beach Gardens & Jupiter/West Palm & Palm Beach ££n*œiˆ>“,`]-'ˆi£U*>“i>V…>`i]{£Ux£™{{Visit online at www.FloridaWeekly.com We are The Plantation Shu er Expe s. DnDDqDDDDDDqDDD D DURABILITY JUST GOT BETTER LOOKING. Why choose our shu ers?Exceptional craftsmanship and long-lasting “ nishes.Versatile selection of wood, hybrid materials and polysatin compound constructionManufactured in South Florida Made To Take The HeatŽFastest Quality Production & Installation in the Industry Schedule Your Free In-Home Consultation! Call 561.292.2745 shu erup.com Beat The Heat Special Save Up To 20% GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7Tickets are $50 in advance at Eventbrite.com or at the door if they last. Ask about the Wine Scenes summer solstice deals on wine. For more information, call 632-4906. Summer lunch at the Mandel libraryFor some kids, summer vacation carries a little sting. Not sunburn. Hunger. Kids who depend on the school system for breakfast and lunch and even some-times an afternoon snack or an early din-ner dont all get those meals when school isnt in session. Some schools offer food service, but there are still pockets that arent being reached. To help out, the Mandel Public Library will now be a Summer BreakSpot, offer-ing a summer food service program for kids and teens younger than 18. Theyll be serving lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. in Kidspace on the third floor. The pro-gram started June 13 and will run through Aug. 5. Kids dont have to attend school in Palm Beach County to get freelunch. The Mandel Public Library of West Palm Beach is at 411 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Call 868-7703 or visit wpbc-itylibrary.org.Photo Centre needs your help One of the biggest contributions that the Palm Beach Photographic Centre makes to the community „ and there are many „ is its annual FOTOcamp for kids ages 10-17. Hundreds of kids have learned a treasured hobby „ and some even found a profession „ learning from the pros to take pictures at FOTOcamp. The camps run in three two-week sessions June, July and August, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Kids learn everything from the basics of photography to the fine points of using a computer technology to edit and publish photos. Theyve got the kids signed up. Now they need a few volunteers. Its not a long commitment. Its only six weeks, if you volunteer the whole time. If you like creative kids thirsty to learn and you like taking pictures, and you have some spare time to help out the instructors and work with the kids, your help is needed. Knowledge of photography and Adobe is a plus. FOTOcamp volunteers are required to complete and submit an affi-davit of good moral character and pass a background screening. If working with kids isnt your thing, dont worry. The center also has other volunteer opportunities. Its currently looking for a receptionist who has a high school diploma and good verbal and written communication skills. It also needs general volunteers to help out as needed. These volunteers can set their own hours. If youre interested in helping, email the Palm Beach Photographic Centre at volunteers@workshop.org. Or call 253-2600. Q HAPPENINGSFrom page 1

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY FRIDAY NIGHTS THIS SUMMER • 7-10PM, DOW N S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H T T T T T T T T T T T T T 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d d d d d d s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! AUG U 1 DowntownAtTheGardens.comOver 2400 FREE Parking Spaces and Our Valet is Always FREE! T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K ! ! ! ! ! ! ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Ice cream social at Hilton Garden Inn, Palm Beach GardensJason DelGrosso, RV Mathews and Ellie Wyatt Nathan Goldin, Tyler Aronson and Gianni Rademacher Cooper Wilson, Bryce Jackson and Cameron O’Stewart Tonya Mathews, David Banner, Jennifer O’Stewart and Robyn Jackson Jennifer Goldin, Pam Figoras, Lori Rodriguez and Michele Wil-son Nikki Rodriguez and Colton SchwarzNicholas Banner, Blake Mathews and Tyson Figoras

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 N TOWN PARK T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H T T T 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E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y A A A A A A N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E UST 1 9TH Sponsored By: <))? Saturdays FREE Carousel and Train Rides Every Saturday this Summer, 11am-1pm DowntownAtTheGardens.com Free Carousel and Train Rides Every Wednesday 11am-1pm Sponsored by: ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. Email them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY The Blow Zone’s Be Blown Away, Harbourside PlaceDanielle Quintero, Lauren Hills, Diana Muscari and Mary Reyes Donna Molinaro, Denise Marino and Denise Mariani Amy Morris and Cassie WaitkusKris Traubel, Laura Zele and Michelle LaraCarrie Capalbo and Andrea Jimenez Donna Lewis, Lisa Marie, Carrie Capalbo and Chayanne Figueroa Barbara Shafer, Laura Zele and Tanya Loringan

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B10 WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 FLORIDA WEEKLY Dinner & Dancing Featuring “ The Switzer Trio ” with Jill & Rich Switzer Performing and the Fabulous Duet of Dawn Marie & Giovanni J[T4: hVRUN\X^]QXO[RcN\ -BRLTN]\)NJLQ 100% of Raffle Proceeds Benefit Canine Companions For Indepence. Tuesday, June 21st 5pm-10pm ]QNYNURLJWLJONnLXV rCA6`bnr:JTN>J[T4: hVRUN\X^]QXO
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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 B11 1201 US HIGHWAY ONE, NORTH PALM BEACH, FL 33408 5616261616 | B AROLOPALMBEACH.COM CHOICE OF FIRST COURSEINSALATA DI CAESAR Romaine, Housemade Caesar Dressing or HOUSE MADE SOUP OF THE DAY Made Fresh DailyCHOICE OF MAIN COURSEORECCHIETTE CON SALSICCIA & RAPINI Ear Shaped Pasta, Ground Mild Italian Sausage, Broccoli Rabe, Extra Virgin Olive Oil & Garlic LINGUINI AL LIMONE Fresh Pasta, Meyers Lemon & Touch of Cream PAPPARDELLE AL PORCINI House Made Ribbon Pasta, Porcini Mushrooms, Touch of Cream & Drizzled Truffle Oil FETTUCCINE BOLOGNESE RAGU Fresh Ground Meats, Aromatic Vegetables and Herbs, Red Wine, Tomatoes & Homemade Fettuccini Pasta GNOCCHI BAROLO Hand Rolled Gnocchi, Pancetta, Shallots, Wild Mushrooms, Tomato Sauce & Fresh Basil LIGUINE ALLE VONGOLE Baby Clams, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Garlic, Fresh Parsley & White Wine SOLE FRANCESE Sauteed Filets of Sole, White Wine, Lemon, Capers & Parsley EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA Eggplant, Mozzarella, Tomato Sauce & Fresh Basil CHICKEN or VEAL PARMIGIANA Sauteed Breaded Breast of Chicken or Veal, Home Made Tomato Sauce & Mozzarella BRONZINO FUOCO ARROSTO Mediterranean Sea Bass, Fire Roasted with Roasted Garlic White Wine & Fresh Minth Broth VEAL MARSALA, PIZZAIOLA or PICCATA Veal Scaloppini, Your Choice of StyleDESSERT OF THE DAYChefs Selection of House Made Desserts Order Must Be Submitted by 6pm No Sharing or Substitutions PRIX FIXE DINNER32.95 Includes a Complimentary Glass of Wine THREE COURSE PREFIX DINNER $35.00Monday thru Sunday 5:00 pm-10:00 pm OR25% COUPON OFF DINNER ENTREEgo to taboorestaurant.com to Print your 25% COUPONReservations suggested.OPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30 AM 10:00 PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30 AM TO 3:00 PM HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4 TO 7 561.835.3500 221 Worth Ave. Palm Beach, FL Robyn Marie Lamp, who grew up in Lake Worth and now lives in Royal Palm Beach, will star as Romaine Patterson, the heroine of Not in My Town,Ž the musical drama about the murder of Matthew Shepard to be performed by West Palm Beach-based startup com-pany Opera Fusion Inc. Romaine was thrust into the spotlight, and she was brave enough to speak up, to pursue a message of love and acceptance,Ž Ms. Lamp, a soprano, said in a statement. Ms. Lamp has been watching online video of Ms. Patter-son to prepare for her part in Not In My TownŽ as well as reading Ms. Pat-tersons book, The Whole World Was Watching: Living in the Light of Matthew Shepard.Ž Its a little scary for me to portray somebody whos alive and whos going to see me per-form,Ž Ms. Lamp said, because most roles portray someone either fictional or from centuries past. The role comes on the heels of her recent win in the Lois Alba Aria Com-petition, held by the Soma International Foundation at St. Thomas University in Houston. Ms. Lamp has also sung with the Sarasota Opera, Opera del West, LSU Opera, Newburyport Choral Society, Delray Beach Chorale and other groups. In addition to her music career, she works as a pre-school administrator in Palm Beach County and as a lifeguard and swim teacher during summers. Not in My Town,Ž written by Fort Lauderdale composer and librettist Michael W. Ross, is the story of the events surrounding the 1998 murder of Mr. Shepard, a gay Wyoming college student who was beaten and left tied to a fence, and the positive developments in its aftermath. It is so imperative that works like Not In My Town be shared to ensure that people understand the real impact of bias crimes in America,Ž Ms. Pat-terson said in the statement. Matthew wanted to live his life helping oth-ers. We must all learn from Matthews story, and strive to be more kind to one another. I am honored to be a part of Not In My Town because the fine arts serve as a strong and beautiful tool for education.Ž Opera Fusion will present portions of Not in My TownŽ on Friday, June 17, at the Sunshine Cathedral in Fort Lau-derdale as part of the Wilton Manors Stonewall Festival. The entire show will premiere Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 24 and 25, at Florida Atlantic Univer-sitys University Theatre in Boca Raton. The premiere will be the culmination of FAUs celebration of International Peace Week 2016. Ms. Patterson, Mr. Shepards best friend and the leading role in the show, now lives in New Jersey and will attend the gala preview in Fort Lauderdale. She and Ms. Lamp havent met, but that will happen „ for the first time „ at Sunshine Cathedral. A radio personality and LGBTQA activist, Ms. Patterson organized coun-ter-protests „ with peaceful protesters clad in angel-wing costumes „ after the Westboro Baptist Church and the late Rev. Fred Phelps began showing up at Mr. Shepards funeral and the subse-quent trial of his killers. In addition to selections from Not in My Town,Ž Opera Fusion singers will perform many popular opera songs after an intermission on June 17. Among those, Ms. Lamp will sing Mariettas Lied,Ž from the German opera Die tote Stadt,Ž by Erich Korngold. She sang that and Dich, teur Halle,Ž from the German opera Tannhuser,Ž by Richard Wag-ner, at the Lois Alba Aria Competition for the win. Performance begins at 8 p.m. June 17 at The Walter Lawrence & Stephen Lewis Performing Arts Center at Sunshine Cathedral, 1480 SW Ninth Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets: General admission, $38; VIP seating, $100. Includes dinner and open bar, performance and meet-and-greet the artists. Available at opera-fusion.org. Q Royal Palm resident to portray heroine in Matthew Shepard musical drama COURTESY PHOTOTenor Ryan Townsend of Coral Gables, soprano Robyn Marie Lamp of Royal Palm Beach, and conductor/music director Gordon Roberts of Hollywood rehearse recently for “Not In My Town,” a musical drama about the hate-crime murder of gay Wyoming college student Matthew Shepard, and the positive events that happened in its aftermath. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________SHEPARD PATTERSON

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B12 WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 FLORIDA WEEKLY 2000 PGA Blvd., Suite A3140, Palm Beach GardensSW corner of PGA Blvd & US Hwy 1 { City Centre Plaza rr{www.saraskitchenpalmbeachgardens.com Mon-Fri: 7 ƒ -2:45 { Sat-Sun: 7 ƒ -1:45 SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH tEKt,s''s>E[^^d CAGE FREE LARGE EGGSE},}Œu}v}ŒvŸ]}Ÿ{9sPšŒ]v& Palm Beach 221 Royal Poinciana Way 561.832.0992www.TestasRestaurants.com | Sunset Menu 3-6pm | Open daily from 7:30am-10:00pm, Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner | Full Bar Testa’s T esta’s PALM BEACH Since 1921 Recipient of THE QUINTESSENTIAL PALM BEACH AWARD from the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce celebrating our 95th anniversary SUMMER AT TESTA’S SUMMERAT TESTA’S Complete Lunch and Dinner Menus Available Includes: Appetizer, Entr e & Dessert$20.16 & $30.16 As well as our regular menu thru end of October! e JEM Research Institute561-968-2933www.JEMRI.net A local clinical research study is enrollingnow. Qualify and you will receive.t*OWFTUJHBUJPOBMNFEJDBUJPOPSQMBDFCPGPSVQUPXFFLTt4UVEZSFMBUFEDBSFGSPNBMPDBMEPDUPS3FJNCVSTFNFOUNBZCFQSPWJEFEGPSUSBWFMBOEPUIFSFYQFOTFTSFMBUFEUPQBSUJDJQBUJPO Have LOW BACK PAIN? LATEST FILMS‘Now You See Me 2’ +++ Is it worth $10? YesMorgan Freeman is in Now You See Me 2,Ž and because everyone loves his voice, the film opens and closes with him narrating the same phrase: Seeing is believing, but is it truth? Depends on your perspective.Ž The quote taps into the challenges and pleasures of movies (such as this one) that are based on deception: The viewer knows he cant trust what hes seeing, and that theres an ulterior motive, secret deal and/or hidden moti-vation behind everything that appears on screen. Part of the fun is the guess-ing game of figuring out what theyre scheming; the other part comes from the ingenuity and wowŽ factor with what they pull off. Set 18 months after the first movie Now You See MeŽ (2013), this sequel starts with Four Horsemen magicians Merritt (Woody Harrelson), Daniel (Jesse Eisenberg) and Jack (Dave Fran-co) laying low and taking orders from their leader, FBI Agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo). Theyre soon joined by the perky and energetic Lula (Lizzy Caplan, a newcomer to the series). Their big comeback doesnt go as planned, howeer, and they wake up in Macau, China. Their kidnapper, the pre-sumed dead Walter (Daniel Radcliffe), forces them to steal a powerful com-puter chip that will enable him to tap into any electronic device in the world. Nothing more needs to be revealed about the plot; let it suffice to say that Mr. Freeman, Michael Caine, Mr. Har-relson doing a Matthew McConaughey impression and the entire city of Lon-don play major roles. Director Jon Chus (G.I. Joe: RetaliationŽ) challenge is in executing the trickery in a fun way that keeps us engaged and doesnt seem completely ridiculous when explained at films end. In this he has succeeded. Whats interesting is that the heistŽ elements „ stealing an object, breaking into a building, impersonating others „ are more engaging than the magicŽ bits, and heres why: We understand the heists and how theyre done, and we can reasonably fantasize about pulling off something similar ourselves. The magic, however, isnt always explained „ How does Daniel disappear into a sidewalk? And how does Lula make a bird fly out of a guys pants? „ so sometimes were forced to suspend disbelief when the curious among us (like me) would really like to know how they do that. As a whole, though, Now You See Me 2Ž is clever and enjoyable, with the fact that its largely far-fetched and unrealistic a large part of its charm. Do yourself a favor and dont even bother trying to figure it out. Just smile and go along for the ride. Q dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> Isla Fisher was one of the Four Horsemen in the rst lm; her character doesn't appear here for reasons explained early on. In reality, she didn't return because she was pregnant. FILM CAPSULESMaggie’s Plan +++ (Greta Gerwig, Ethan Hawke, Julianne Moore) Maggie (Ms. Gerwig) falls in love with and marries John (Mr. Hawke), only to realize she made a horrible mistake and needs to reunite him with his ex-wife (Ms. Moore). Its a clever premise with enough laughs and brutal honesty to make it solid entertainment. Rated R. Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping +++ (Andy Samberg, Sarah Silverman, Imogen Poots) Pop star Conner4Real (Mr. Samberg) strikes out with his sec-ond solo album, sending his life and career into a tailspin. Its a laugh riot from start to finish that dares to satirize pop culture and the idol worship of celebrities. Rated R.X-Men: Apocalypse ++ (James McAvoy, Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar Isaac) Prof. X (Mr. McAvoy) and Mystique (Ms. Lawrence) lead the X-Men against the worlds first and most powerful mutant, Apocalypse (Mr. Isaac). The villain is boring, and the ample visual effects dont make up for the flawed story. Rated PG-13.Alice Through The Looking Glass ++ (Mia Wasikowska, Sacha Baron Cohen, Johnny Depp) Alice (Ms. Wasikowska) returns to Wonderland and travels back in time to save the Mad Matters (Mr. Depp) family. The visuals are impres-sive, but the performances and story feel overdone. Rated PG.Neighbors 2 ++ 1/2 (Seth Rogen, Rose Byrne, Zac Efron) After living next to Teddys (Mr. Efron) fraternity in NeighborsŽ (2014), Mac (Mr. Rogen) and Kelly (Ms. Byrne) now must deal with a sorority (led by Chloe Grace Moretzs Shelby) moving in next door. Its not as funny as the original, and its strong feminist message doesnt quite fit with the absurd comedy. Still, its humorous enough to warrant a mod-erate recommendation. Rated R. Q

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF JUNE 16-22, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B13 FRUQHGEHHI‡SDVWUDPL WXUNH\RIIWKHIUDPH EULVNHW‡VPRNHG VK SLWDVZUDSV KRPHPDGHVRXSV EUHDNIDVWRPHOHWV SDQFDNHV‡EOLQW]HV JOXWHQIUHHEUHDGV &(/(%5$7,1*