Citation
Florida weekly

Material Information

Title:
Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
Publisher:
Florida Media Group, LLC
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
Classification:
AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Boat show set to sail into West PalmBoat shows cruise into several Florida seaside cities every year and David Galante has sold boats at many of them. For the past five years, Mr. Galante, a yacht broker and COO of Miami-based G-Marine, has been an exhibitor at the Palm Beach Inter-national Boat Show on the waterfront in downtown West Palm Beach. Its a show he looks forward to each year. The West Palm Beach community does not come down to Miami for boat shows,Ž he said. We get very good leads there (the Palm Beach show). We find a good quality of buyer on the docks. You find yacht own-ers walking the dog looking for something new.Ž Boat sales may have slipped during the SEE BOAT, A8 X CHRISTOPHER HALLORAN / SHUTTERSTOCK TRUMP How media How media led the pack in led the pack in underestimating underestimating him. him. INSIDE: INSIDE: What they are saying. A10BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@” oridaweekly.com WHEN ASSESSING THE NEWS WHEN ASSESSING THE NEWS medias role in the 2016 presimedias role in the 2016 presidential election (and especially dential election (and especially when it comes to its coverage when it comes to its coverage of the improbof the improbable but undeable but undeniable Repubniable Republican frontlican frontrunner, Donrunner, Donald J. Trump), it requires no ald J. Trump), it requires no great stretch to conclude that great stretch to conclude that rarely have so many been so rarely have so many been so wrong, so consistently, about wrong, so consistently, about so much. so much. Scrutiny of the Republican Scrutiny of the Republican battle has, understandably, battle has, understandably, overshadowed the Democratic overshadowed the Democratic race between Hillary Clinton race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Delegateand Bernie Sanders. Delegateselection rules established by selection rules established by the Democratic National Comthe Democratic National Committee skew heavily in mittee skew heavily in Ms. Ms. SEE SEE TRUMP, A10 TRUMP, A10 X BY MARY THURWACHTERFlorida Weekly Correspondent RISINGELECTION ANALYSIS Vol. VI, No. 22  FREEWEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016www.FloridaWeekly.com OPINION A4PETS A6 BUSINESS A21BEHIND THE WHEEL A23 REAL ESTATE A27 KOVELS A30ARTS B1 COLLECTIBLES B2 CALENDAR B4-6PUZZLES B10FILM B11CUISINE B27 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store. INSIDE SocietyStyling at polo and other events. 12 pages inside XTop second bananaAnthony Laciura will appear with Palm Beach Opera. B1 XThe DishHeaded to the Old Key Lime House? Try the shrimp. B27 X Palm Beach Opera B1 X Seeing purpleA ride in the new Dodge Challenger R/T. A23 XSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Palm Beach International Boat Show will draw thousands to the city’s waterfront.

PAGE 2

A2 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY COMMENTARYHouse of cards Political classŽ is a term in common usage nowadays to describe the political elitesŽ who make themselves a career as professional politicians. An Italian came up with the moniker decades ago as a concept in politi-cal science. Back then, it referred to a hard-core group of individuals who devoured politics as if nutrition for the soul, and made it their lifes calling as participants and activists in the busi-ness of politics. They devoted themselves to the process of public policymaking, seeking positions of influence and power in legislative chambers or the halls of government as elected officials, policy wonks or bureaucrats. The expertise they acquired through practice made them unusually equipped for wielding power as a political class unto them-selves. Being a member of the political class also meant ascendance into the ruling class, an often-unstated objective of their political aspirations. More often than not, commitment to lifelong pub-lic service was defended as a legitimate means to make a difference in the world, and ones pursuit of influence and power was a necessity of ones cause. Thus, being described as a member of the political class was not always an accusation of nefarious wrongdoing or the kiss of death in a heated elec-toral contest. Historically, incumbency was considered a plus, not a minus, if ones accomplishments had genuine and defensible merit. But this campaign season, that has all changed. Grass-roots populists are in full-throated rebellion against estab-lishmentŽ politicians. At their most radical, conservative voters appear fully prepared to throw the baby out with the bathwater, indulging in a fit of breathtaking recklessness to elect the ultimate anti-politician as president, the likes of which the country has never seen. Donald Trump is the front-running presidential candidate who personifies this dystopian descent into electoral suicide. He is one of several outsid-ersŽ touting their lack of experience in governance as their most important credential for the job. Even Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio claim to be establish-ment virgins, though both belong to the nations most prestigious political clubhouse, the U.S. Senate. No one knows where this elaborate non sequitur will end, but few think anyplace good. We are in unprecedent-ed territory. An article in The Huffington Post by Robert Kuttner reasons why. He writes, The hollowing out of democracy is reflected in the loss of confidence in public institutions, in the fact that big money has been crowding out citizen participation. ƒ Meanwhile, ordinary people feel more and more alienated from both the economy and the system of government.Ž In Kuttners words, we are in constitutional crisis „ one party destroying the ability of the government to govern, combined with a crisis of our democ-racy at a time when we need govern-ment to act.Ž He blames the Republican leadership and the majority of the partys presiden-tial candidates, noting that from the day Obama took office they refused to con-cede to the legitimacy of his presidency. Bad faith in politics is a serpent in democracys bosom, relying on the tactics of obstruction and a scorched-earth policy to impede any progress on critical issues. It has now come to the conservative majority denying even a hearing to consider any Supreme Court nominee proposed by President Obama. It would be bad enough if only Americans were privy to this egregious behavior. But the countrys unambigu-ous descent into reality-show politics is being globally televised „ an embar-rassing brawl, complete with looney tunes, that assaults the dignity of the presidency, the gravity of the electoral choice, the intellectual capacity of our leadership, and the democratic values at the countrys core. To make things worse, the 24/7 news cycle cannot get enough of the vulgar and ridiculous to exploit, failing miser-ably in the debates and the news cover-age to give the voters of this country the respect and the due diligence they deserve of candidates running for the highest office in the land. It is an insult to the intelligence and manners of anyone who proclaims themselves a responsible citizen and an adult mem-ber of a civil society. All said and done, these are strange times. Truth is now undeniably strang-er than fiction. We are heading to some kind of monumental train wreck. Whats a body to do? Me? I am changing channels and tuning in on the fourth season of House of Cards.Ž It is a Netflix series on cable that premiered in 2013. It features all our most cynical, off-the-wall theories about how things really work in Wash-ington. It plays deliciously into our suspicion that Capitol Hill is a cesspool tainting the best and dominated by the worst of the political class. Its theme is uncomfortably familiar, a tale of Shakespearean proportions about the corruption and manipulation of our democracy by devious, Machi-avellian personalities obsessed with power. But sad to say, real-life politics has gotten so bizarre, sometimes I cant be sure if I am watching House of CardsŽ or just the reality show that is the 2016 presidential campaign. Now that is scary. Q leslie LILLYllilly@floridaweekly.com AWARDWINNING ComprehensiveStroke Center A HIGHER LEVEL OF STROKE CARE Find out more information about our award-winning services. Register for a FREE Stroke Screening by calling 561-882-9100 901 45th St • West Palm Beach, FL 33407 | StMarysMC.com Members ofTenet Healths

PAGE 3

Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center | 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.comFOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL855.387.5864 Heart Attack Risk Assessment (blood pressure, BMI, glucose and cholesterol) Wednesday, March 9 @ 8-11am Osteoporosis Screenings Thursday, March 17 @ 9am-1pm Take steps toward being heart healthy! Visit PBGMC.com/pledge to Receive a FREE Cookbook! FREE COMMUNITY SCREENINGS MARCH COMMUNITY EVENTS & LECTURES Minimally Invasive Approach to Help Treat Prostate Cancer Fred Muhletaler, MD Robotic Surgeon and Urologist Thursday, March 17 @ 6-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center Classroom 4Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. Join Dr. Fred Muhletaler, a robotic surgeon and urologist on the medical sta at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, for a lecture on a new minimally invasive treatment option that is designed to help patients suering from prostate cancer. Light refreshments will be served. Hands-Only Adult CPR Class Tuesday, March 15 @ 6:30-7pm Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Station 1Eective bystander CPR given immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or even triple a victims chance of survival. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has teamed up with Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue to provide free monthly CPR classes for the community. Classes will be held at Fire Station 1. Local EMS will give a hands-only, adult CPR demonstration and go over Automated External De“brillator (AED) use. Participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills using CPR manikins. Reservations are required. All screenings held at: Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center

PAGE 4

A4 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Group PublisherMichael Hearnmhearn@floridaweekly.comEditor Scott Simmonsssimmons@floridaweekly.com Leslie Lilly Roger Williams Evan Williams Janis Fontaine Amy Woods Katie Deits Mary Thurwachter Steven J. Smith Linda Lipshutz Sallie James Ron HayesPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersChris Andruskiewicz Hannah Arnone Alisa Bowman Amy Grau Paul Heinrich Linda Iskra Kathy Pierotti Meg Roloff Scott Sleeper Sales and Marketing ExecutivesLisette Ariaslarias@floridaweekly.comChelsea Kate Isaacschelsea.isaacs@floridaweekly.comAlyssa Liplesalipless@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantBetsy Jimenez Circulation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Headley Darlington Clarissa Jimenez Giovanny Marcelin Brent Charles Published by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470  Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state The end of Reagan nostalgia?If theres anything we thought we knew about the GOP, it is that it is the party of Reagan. Paying obeisance to Ronald Reagan „ his memory, his accomplishments, his policies „ has long been the price of entry to Republican presidential poli-tics. Yet here comes Donald Trump, who gives no indication of caring the slightest about Reagans legacy, and he has rampaged to front-runner status anyway. It is like Trump set out to kick down the door of the House of Reagan and the structure teetered to the brink of collapse, more decrepit than anyone had noticed. What Trump has discovered is that many conservatives arent as attached to conservative policies as they seemed; that labels dont mean much to voters; that you can bring new people into the Republican coalition instead of play-ing by the old rules; and that at least a significant plurality of primary voters dont care whether you bend your knee to the memory of Ronald Reagan. Meanwhile, Trumps rivals are „ for understandable reasons „ beholden to a Reagan nostalgia that has long been prevalent on the right. Their Reagan references stir the hearts of the old faithful (like me). But with every passing year, they become a little less relevant to everyone else. It isnt why they are losing, but Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio have been fight-ing back against Trump with messages that run in well-worn ruts. Its always a shining city on a hill. And morning again in America. Such is the hold that the morning-again theme has on the Republican imagination that, bizarrely, Rubio ran a Morning Again in Amer-icaŽ ad „ about how bad things are in the country. Is it too much to ask that Republican politicians come up with some of their own lines? Conservatives need to realize that all of America is not the CPAC ballroom. To save Reaganism, conservatives must broaden and deepen our understanding of Reagan. As writer Dan McLaughlin notes, Reagan didnt go around on the stump pledging fealty to conserva-tive ideals, but rather explaining why his ideas would work in practice and why they were common-sense positions in line with what the voters already believed in.Ž A new, updated version of this approach is imperative, given the new voters identified by Donald Trump and the blue-collar discontent that he has made impossible to ignore. Like Reagan did, conservatives must adopt policies that address the problems of today „ and sell them not as the artifacts of an ideological orthodoxy, but as practical solutions. They must reject Trump and his grotesque distortions of conserva-tism, while paying heed to his voters. At a CPAC speech in 1977, Reagan talked about broadening the party: If we are to attract more working men and women of this country, we will do so not by simply making room for them, but by making certain they have a say in what goes on in the party.Ž That has to be the attitude of the GOP and of the non-Trump presidential candidates. If they dont understand that out of self-interest or basic political horse sense, well, theres always another compelling reason: It is what Ronald Reagan would do. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONThe new godsA retired Navy captain who began a 30-year career in World War II wrote to me the other day to dress me down. He criticized my notion that the country is still great. He insisted we are not „ which is why Donald Trump is right in urging us to Make America Great Again,Ž he said. Consider that this nation started based on Christianity and the glory of God, and went from a wilderness to the greatest nation on earth in less than 300 years,Ž Capt. William E. Nowers told me. This nation was founded on three documents, the Dec-laration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bible.Ž The last time we were great, the captain suggested, was about 1950. He may know many things I dont, but history is not one of them. The Founding Fathers may or may not have been Christian „ Thomas Jefferson was a Deist „ but they built the country not as a Christian nation but as a nation that requires a separation of church (any church) and state. Why?James Madison put it this way: ƒ to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe in blood for centuries.Ž President Madison warned Americans not to give way to a strong bias towards the old error, that without some sort of alli-ance or coalition between Govt. & Religion neither can be duly supported.Ž Thomas Jefferson praised his countrymen when they declared that their legis-lature should make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, thus building a wall of separation between Church & State.Ž George Washington was more blunt: The government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion,Ž he said. But were we great in the 1950s?Sometimes „ in 1954, for example, when the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. the Topeka Board of Education that schools could not be segregated. We were also great in 1783, when Gen. Washington refused the offer of senior commanders to make him king; or 1863, when Abraham Lincoln signed the Eman-cipation Proclamation freeing the slaves; or 1906, when Theodore Roosevelt created five national parks, 150 national forests and other public treasures with the American Antiquities Act; or 1918, when Woodrow Wilson finally put an end to World War I; or 1933, when Franklin Roosevelt kicked off the New Deal and got starving people fed and working; or 1945, when Capt. Nowers and his generation won World War II; or 1964, when the U.S. Congress passed the Civil Rights Act; or 1969, when the country put Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon; or Christmas Day, 1991, when we helped the Soviet Union dissolve without military force; or 2001, when we endured with grace and courage an attack on our shores from a shadowy enemy; or 2008 and 2012, when the country broke with its stained heritage of race and a mostly white electorate chose a black president „ not because he was black, but because voters saw him as the best man. We were great then, and well be great again. But in 1950, the nation was segregated by race. Schools, neighborhoods, buses, res-taurants, libraries, drinking fountains, bath-rooms, sides of the street or downtowns after sunset „ all of it could be off limits to blacks. We had not yet emerged from a post-Civil War century of American apartheid (more than 4,000 documented lynchings occurred in the United States between 1882 and 1968.) In 1950, Sen. Joseph McCarthy, who lied about his Marine Corps combat service in World War II, began his campaign of fear, slander and hatred that destroyed many lives, ended many careers, inhibited free speech everywhere, and created a mockery of the whole damn democracy in the middle of the Cold War. In 1950, the Civil Rights Act was still 14 years away. Women had won the right to vote only 30 years earlier, but not the right to work any job they wanted, or receive equal pay at any job they held, or be treated equally in any court of law they entered. In 1950, it was illegal for blacks and whites to marry „ even though nothing about it is mentioned in the Bible, any more than homosexuality is mentioned in the Bible. Homosexuals could be (and were) fired from jobs, physically beaten or even killed in 1950. The captain mentioned a couple of other things too, as signs of our decline from greatness: he cited abortion and too much regulation of business as gifts of the new Gods.Ž I hope he was equally as vocal in resisting the old gods, the ones who tolerated and condoned lynching, segregation, McCarthy-ism, the deaths and dismemberments of young women who sought illegal abortions (a federal ban on birth control, such as it was, had been lifted only 12 years earlier); and anti-Semitism, to name a few. When it comes to regulation of businesses by governmentŽ „ of which the captain is a part if he votes and accepts retirement checks from his stellar Navy career „ the point is arguable. Government regulation at times has slowed or stopped monopolies, forced car manufacturers and banks and coal-mining companies and steel plants and toy produc-ers and the makers of weapons or aircraft for the Navy and other services to clean up their acts and do it right; the government has forced food producers to identify whats in the food; it has required producers of legal drugs such as tobacco and alcohol to identify health risks to buyers, and not to sell to minors; and its forced developers to protect fragile lands and endangered spe-cies that would otherwise be relegated only to a future in photographs. Has government ever overregulated businesses, inhibiting growth and stymieing personal opportunity? Sure. The new gods arent perfect, any more than the old gods were. But they havent closed the door on greatness, either. Q roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

PAGE 5

It takes the community It takes the Community FoundationEndowment funds at the Community Foundation create a permanent annual income stream for an organization and grow over time. Individual donors can also give directly to the fund today or through their will, helping their favorite nonpro“t strengthen their future.The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties has protected and grown charitable assets for more than 40 years. Let us connect you to your favorite cause. Photo: Rich Anderson, Executive Director/ CEO at Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Palm Beach :[YVUNUVUWYV[ZHYL]P[HS[V[OLOLHS[OVMV\YJVTT\UP[`,_LJ\[P] LKPYLJ[VY 9PJO(UKLYZVURUV^Z7LNN`(KHTZ(UPTHS9LZJ\L3LHN\LZLUKV^TLU[M\UK H[[OL*VTT\UP[`-V\UKH[PVUOLSWZZ\Z[HPU[OLPYTPZZPVUVMJHYPUNMV Y and protecting animals forever. to strengthen V\YUVUWYV[Z Visit yourcommunityfoundation.org [VSLHYUTVYLHIV\[[OLWV^LYVMLUKV^TLU[

PAGE 6

A6 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY PET TALESSpring blooms can be beautiful, but deadly to pets BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTONUniversal UclickLilies have been associated with rebirth and renewal for mil-lennia. Ancient Romans believed that lilies sprang up when the goddess Juno spilled milk while she was nursing the baby Her-cules. Lilies also represent the renewal symbolized by Easter. For cat lovers, though, lilies mean just the opposite. Every part of them „ pollen, flowers, leaves, stems, even the water in which theyre placed „ is deadly to felines. What is it about lilies that make them so toxic to cats? That is the million-dollar question,Ž says Dr. Tina Wismer, a veterinary toxi-cology specialist who is medical direc-tor of the American Society for the Pre-vention of Cruelty to Animals Animal Poison Control Center. There was a researcher at Michigan State who was looking into the toxic component. He was able to find that it is throughout the plant, but couldnt quite characterize it.Ž When it comes to toxicity, cats are special „ in a bad way. They are unique-ly susceptible to certain plants, medica-tions and other substances. Dogs, for instance, may simply get a little stomach upset if they eat lily flowers, but cats can develop kidney failure if not treated within the first 18 hours after ingestion. They need intravenous fluids for 48 hours to help flush the toxins from the body. Cats treated after the 18-hour time frame dont do as well and may even die. The toxin kills off some of the cells that line the urine tubules in the kid-neys, so that debris from the dead cells plugs up the kidneys,Ž Dr. Wismer says. As long as you keep the fluids going and keep that debris from building up, then we have a good prognosis.Ž How does lily toxicity occur? A typical call APCC receives at this time of year involves a man sending flowers to a woman. In the bouquet many times are gorgeous stargazer lilies, and these are highly toxic to cats,Ž Dr. Wismer says. The owner gets home, finds that the cat has chewed on the bouquet and for a couple of days the cat gets to spend time in the hospital.Ž If you have lilies in your home or yard „ which we dont recommend „ signs of trouble you may notice include pollen on your cats face, vomiting and pieces of the plant in the vomit. The kidneys start shutting down after the first 12 to 24 hours. At first, that causes increased thirst and urination, but within two to three days, cats stop mak-ing urine. Dogs have their own issues with different plants. While cats usually prefer to nibble on foliage and flowers, dogs may go all the way to the other end of the plant. Bulbs such as daffodils, hyacinths and tulips are toxic to them. If your dog likes to helpŽ you gar-den, he can be at risk if he digs up and eats the bulbs of those flowers. The petals cause only mild stomach upset in dogs and cats, but the bulb itself can cause bloody vomiting, bloody diarrhea and low blood pressure. Certain dog breeds can be more at risk. One breed in particular gets into trouble from eating bulbs. Labradors keep us in business here at poison control,Ž Dr. Wismer says. Dogs who dig up bulbs may be attracted by the bone meal that some garden-ers place beneath the bulb to help nour-ish it. Dogs eat the bulb on their way to the bone meal. If youre going to plant bulbs in areas that your dogs have access to, dont use bone meal,Ž Dr. Wismer says. Want to send a cat-loving friend a bouquet? Ask the florist to send one thats pet-safe. That way you dont end up in the, er, doghouse. Q Pets of the Week>> Shelby is a 2-yearold, 56-pound male mixed breed dog that is very lively and needs lots of exercise. He loves to go for a walk.>> Krystal is a 3-year-old female domestic shorthair cat that is big into head-butts and purring.To adopt or foster a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656.>> Rusty is a neutered male orange tabby with short hair and beautiful markings. He is about 6 years old. He loves people, and really enjoys being petted.>> Joey is a neutered male black domestic shorthair, with ecks of grey. He enjoys hanging out with people, and gets along well with other cats.To adopt or foster a petAdopt A Cat is a free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public by appointment. Call 848-4911, Option 5. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, adoptacatfoundation.org. Learn more at jupitermedurgentcare.com or call 561-263-7010. Jupiter Medical Center is dedicated to providing you and your family with affordable, quality medical care. The professional staff at our Urgent Care centers will see you without an appointment in just a few minutes … and most insurance plans are accepted!Just walk in. No appointment necessary. Choose Urgent Care...from the hospital you trust!In addition to treating minor emergencies and illnesses, we offer: t'MVTIPUT t %JHJUBM9SBZT t &,(T t -BCTFSWJDFT Hours: Mon. … Sat., 8 a.m. … 8 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m. … 5 p.m. Jupiter: 1335 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter Next to Harmony Animal HospitalTwo convenient locations: Abacoa: 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64, Jupiter Next to McDonalds in the Abacoa Shopping Center

PAGE 7

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 A7 DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director Get Back in the Game Full Physical Therapy Facility Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY AUTO ACCIDENT? S chool Ph ysical Camp Ph ysic al S por ts Physical $20 GIFT CERTIFICATE This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 03/31/2016. $150VALUE COMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTICEXAMINATION & CONSULTATION JUPITER2632 Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33458 561.744.7373 PAPA CHIROPRACTIC & PHYSICAL THERAPY PALM BEACH GARDENS 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 561.630.9598 XXX1BQB$IJSPDPNt 20 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS PORT ST. LUCIE 9109 South US Hwy One Port St. Lucie, FL 34952772.337.1300 FAU Lifelong Learning Society to present lecture series in Jupiter SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Florida Atlantic Universitys Lifelong Learn-ing Society will present a lecture series by the FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute begin-ning at 10 a.m. Thursday, March 24, in the Lifelong Learning Society complex, 5353 Parkside Drive, at FAUs John D. MacArthur Cam-pus in Jupiter. This is the first lecture series that the Lifelong Learning Society in Jupiter and Harbor Branch Oceanograph-ic Institute are partnering on,Ž Josette Valenza, director of the Lifelong Learning Society, said in a statement. It will be a great opportunity for members of this community to learn about the instit utes r esearch and c onservation projects.Ž This lecture series will feature four professors: Q From the Arctics to the Tropics „ Marine Mam-mals,Ž with Gregory OCorry-Crowe, 10 a.m. Thursday, March 24; Q Medicines from the Deep: Exploring the Oceans in Search of New Medicines,Ž with Amy E. Wright, 10 a.m. Thursday, March 31; Q South Floridas Coast-al Environ-ment: Its Health and Projected Future,Ž with Brian E. Lapointe, 10 a.m. Thursday, April 7; Q Ocean Entrees „ Sea-food and Sea Vegetables,Ž with Megan Davis, 10 a.m. Thursday, April 14. For more information about the FAU Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute Lecture Series, call 799-8547 or visit fau.edu/llsjupiter. Q WRIGHTLAPOINTE O’CORRY-CROWEDAVIS

PAGE 8

A8 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 11310 Legacy Avenue in Legacy PlacePalm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 | 561-624-9188Because sore throats are never convenient.nicklauschildrens.org/PalmBeachGardensIt’s free! Download our For Health. For Life. Walk-in Urgent Care Available 7 Days a Week: 10 a.m. 10 p.m. economic downturn, he said, but are up now. In fact, Mr. Galante, who has enjoyed the water as a skier, sailor, fish-erman and yachts-man over the years, will only be bringing four boats to the 31st Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show (March 17-20) this year because sales were so good at the Miami Show he has a smaller inventory. He will bring a 110 Astondoa Century GLX, what he calls his crown jewel,Ž but it has already been sold. Those who simply must have one like it are not out of luck, however. If someone is inter-ested,Ž Mr. Galante said, we can design it to the taste of the owner.Ž Price tag for the yacht „ great for socializing on the sea with its outdoor deck, indoor lounge, two oversized sofas, a generous sundeck and a swim platform „ is a cool $10 million. Besides Mr. Galantes watercraft, show-goers will find more than $1.2 bil-lion worth of boats, yachts and accesso-ries from marine manufacturers around the world. In addition, the show features hundreds of boats, including 8-foot inflatables, power boats, fishing boats, center consoles, bow riders, personal watercraft and superyachts more than 150 feet long. A superyacht was sold at last years show. Marielle Sologuren, a spokesman for the boat show, has been working the event for six years. A Florida native born in Fort Lauderdale, Ms. Sologuren calls the West Palm Beach show her favorite. The company she works for, Show Management, also manages and produces boat shows in Fort Lauderdale, Miami, St. Petersburg and Sarasota. The show is owned and sponsored by the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County. Its the nicest location,Ž she said of the show. Clematis is a good draw, there are good places to eat, it has very open easy parking and, in six years, weve never had bad weather.Ž Her favorite attraction is AquaZone, a 40,000-gallon inflatable pool in which people can kayak, stand-up paddleboard or watch someone soar above the water in a Water Jet Pack. Other popular show features include the free IGFA kids fishing clinics and sportfishing seminars. Another crowd pleaser is CruiserPort, a display of long-range cruisers and trawlers ranging in lengths from 35 to 90 feet and educational seminars aimed at long-term cruising enthusiasts. Many people arent aware, Ms. Sologuren said, that they can come by boat and tie up for free at the Come-by-Boat docks south of the in-water displays. This show has become known as the place where a yacht owner or buyer can quickly fly into town, come to the show, and compare an amazing selection of superyachts side by side,Ž said Andrew Doole, executive vice president and COO of Show Management. There are very few places in the world where this is possible. The shows ease of access and walkability, along with some great local attractions, make this a highly desirable yacht shopping destination.Ž Those who arent interested in buying but just want to see some fabulous boats and enjoy the waterfront event are wel-come, too, of course. Q BOATSFrom page 1 >> What: 31st Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show >> When: March 17-20 >> Where: Along Flagler Drive in downtown West Palm Beach. Show entrances are at Evernia Street/Flagler Drive (waterfront) and North Clematis Street/Flagler Drive (waterfront). >> Tickets: $21 for adults, $11 for children 6-15. Free for kids under 6. >> Info: 954-764-7642 or 800-940-7642 or at ShowManagement.com. COURTESY PHOTOVisitors to the Palm Beach International Boat Show will see more than $1.2 billion in vessels and accessories along the West Palm Beach waterfront. Vessels and supplies will be on sale at the boat show.GALANTE

PAGE 9

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 NEWS A9 Learn more at jupitermed.com/breastcare 1004 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Suite 201 l Jupiter, FL 33458 A Comprehensive Approach to Breast Care Jupiter Medical Center welcomes Nancy J. Taft, MD, FACS,the only fellowship-trained breast surgeon in northern Palm Beach County. As medical director of our Comprehensive Breast Care Program, Dr. Taft leads the multidisciplinary team as they create custom-tailored plans for treating and surviving breast cancer. She is dedicated to working with her colleagues to provide the highest quality, compassionate care for every patient, leveraging expertise in minimally invasive surgical breast conservation and complex reconstruction techniques.Highly trained, Dr. Taft completed a fellowship in breast surgical oncology at Chicagos Northwestern University School of Medicine … one of the countrys premier breast care centers … where she received one year of additional specialty training in breast cancer treatment.To schedule an appointment with Dr. Taft, please call 561-741-5642. HEALTHY LIVINGAddiction to pain meds requires rapid treatmentThe party was crowded and lively. Jill saw that the powder room was in use, so she headed to the master bedroom. She knew the hostess, Eve, a g ood friend, wouldnt mind if Jill were to use the master bathroom. However, once inside, Jill was on a mission. She began to rummage through cabinets, looking for the prescription bottles. Jill knew that Eve had been suffering from back pain so there was a good possibility she would have pain medications. Sure enough, there was a bottle of Percocet. Jill slipped several pills into her purse. She doubted Eve would notice, and if she did, shed NEVER suspect that Jill was the culprit. Three years ago, Jill had pulled her shoulder and had been in excruciating pain. Dr. K. had prescribed medications to relieve the pain. That was the beginning. Jill now found herself overly preoccupied about having enough pills to get through the day and shed begun to up the dosage on her own. Over the course of the past three years, Jill found herself resorting to worrisome behaviors. Shed lied to Dr. K. on multiple occasions, exaggerating her pain, claiming she needed increased dosages of her medications, or else that shed lost her prescription and needed a refill. On a handful of occasions, Jill had made appointments at new physicians offices, complaining of pain but down-playing what had previously been prescribed. Lately, Jill didnt recognize herself. She had become defensive and short-tempered. Shed begun to avoid social occasions, because she knew she looked exhausted and frail. She hated the sense she got that others knew something was terribly wrong. And, although, Jill knew on some level that her opiate use had escalated to alarming levels, she was not ready to admit she had a problem she couldnt handle. Jill was too ashamed to discuss this issue.Although the story above is fictionalized, the number of individuals like Jill, whose lives are over-powered by the seri-ous misuse of pain medications is growing alarmingly. According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control, 44 people in the U.S. die every day from overdose of prescription painkillers. Drs. Timothy Wilens and John Kelly, psychiatrists from the Massachusetts Gen-eral Hospital, who specialize in the treat-ment of addictions, recently spoke at the MGH Leadership Council for Psychiatry in Palm Beach about these disturbing national trends. As the doctors pointed out: When taken as prescribed, opioids can be a safe intervention for managing pain. But, because opioids are prescribed regularly by their doctors, the public often is unaware of the potential perils. Its important to note that a certain segment of the population has a genetic predisposition to become dependent on opioids, and to eventually become addict-ed. Dependence often is accompanied by tolerance, or the need to take higher doses of a medication to get the same effect. They may then seek to further intensify this experience by taking the drug in ways other than those prescribed. An alarming number of these individuals may ultimately transition to abusing illegal substances, most notably, heroin. According to the CDC, people who are dependent on pre-scription opioids are 40 times more likely to abuse or become dependent on heroin. Although the particulars may vary among individuals, many experts believe that a persons genetic make-up will be the major factor in a persons susceptibil-ity to becoming addicted to drugs. How-ever, there are also other factors „ includ-ing a persons emotional make-up (how they handle upsetting feelings), family and social background „ that would explain why some people are able to modestly use pain medications following surgery or an injury, but others become addicted. What is particularly worrisome is that repeated use of opioids may have a concerning impact on the portion of the human brain that controls ones judgment and decision-making. Add to that, the con-stant preoccupation with taking more and more drugs, and we find an individual who has tremendous difficulty just get-ting through the day on a functional level. Those who are addicted to opioids may begin to behave is ways they would never have believed themselves capable of „ i.e., lying or stealing from loved ones or engag-ing in criminal acts. The withdrawal process can be quite severe if opioids are abruptly reduced or stopped, (with pain, nausea, chills, hyper-tension, tachycardia and/or seizures). Because many of those who are addict-ed know the withdrawal process will be unpleasant, there is often a fear and reluc-tance to commit to the process of recovery. Very few addicted people are able to tackle the recovery battle without medical interventions. However, there are many professionals who can sensitively and skill-fully help people through the process. Detoxification is only the first stage in the process. Medical and addiction profes-sionals have researched the most success-ful strategies for rehabilitation and treat-ment. The interventions are multipronged. Its not uncommon for the general public to become disdainful and to believe its simply a matter of willpower to give up drugs. But, Drs. Wilens and Kelly will attest that its an uphill battle for those truly addicted to completely give up opioids „ and not to relapse. If you, or someone you care about is struggling in the throes of addiction, there are effective resources to call upon. Time is of the essence. Q „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., LCSW, is a psychotherapist in Palm Beach Gardens, serving individuals, couples and families. She holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia and trained at the Ackerman Institute for the Family in Manhattan. She can be reached in her office at 630-2827, online at: palmbeachfamilytherapy.com, or on Twitter @LindaLipshutz. linda LIPSHUTZllipshutz@floridaweekly.com

PAGE 10

Clintons favor, and while Mr. Sanders Clintons favor, and while Mr. Sanders has enjoyed unanticipated and hardhas enjoyed unanticipated and hardearned moments of success, his weakearned moments of success, his weakness with crucial core constituencies ness with crucial core constituencies of the Democratic Party, principally of the Democratic Party, principally minorities, is fatal. minorities, is fatal. Barring a cataclysm „ in the form of Barring a cataclysm „ in the form of debilitating illness, Bill Clinton veering debilitating illness, Bill Clinton veering totally off the rails or an indictment of totally off the rails or an indictment of HRC by the federal government for her HRC by the federal government for her cavalier handling of sensitive emails „ cavalier handling of sensitive emails „ she is the nominee. End of story. she is the nominee. End of story. On the Republican side, Mr. Trumps On the Republican side, Mr. Trumps surgically precise emasculation of Jeb surgically precise emasculation of Jeb Bush spawned a wide-open race, one of Bush spawned a wide-open race, one of the most competitive and hard-fought the most competitive and hard-fought in decades. As with ancient Greek drain decades. As with ancient Greek dramatists, journalists worship conflict and matists, journalists worship conflict and while the GOP race lacks many things while the GOP race lacks many things „ decorum, good taste, agreeable per„ decorum, good taste, agreeable personalities and substance spring readily sonalities and substance spring readily to mind „ conflict is not among them. to mind „ conflict is not among them. The failure of the news media in its The failure of the news media in its reporting of the Republican bar fight reporting of the Republican bar fight lies not so much in its lust for a good lies not so much in its lust for a good story but rather in its unseemly eagerstory but rather in its unseemly eagerness to chase the candidates down the ness to chase the candidates down the rabbit hole of vulgarity and vacuity. rabbit hole of vulgarity and vacuity. Television ratings, Twitter feeds, the Television ratings, Twitter feeds, the number of Internet clicksŽ on stories number of Internet clicksŽ on stories and the feverish pursuit of deliciously and the feverish pursuit of deliciously salacious sound bites drive campaign salacious sound bites drive campaign coverage in 2016. coverage in 2016. Throw all of that into one big media Throw all of that into one big media stew and you end up with a 69-year-old stew and you end up with a 69-year-old spray-tanned dumpling crowing on a spray-tanned dumpling crowing on a debate stage that his elderly manhood debate stage that his elderly manhood matches his bank account. matches his bank account. In todays media world, it doesnt get In todays media world, it doesnt get much better than that. much better than that. The Chicago Tribune The Chicago Tribune in 1948 commitin 1948 committed what is arguably the greatest sinted what is arguably the greatest single media blunder in American history gle media blunder in American history when it published a 90-point banner when it published a 90-point banner headline that unequivocally and erroheadline that unequivocally and erroneously declared: DEWEY DEFEATS neously declared: DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN. As bad as that gaffe was „ TRUMAN. As bad as that gaffe was „ and it was a whopper „ it was a oneand it was a whopper „ it was a oneshot screw-up by a single newspaper. shot screw-up by a single newspaper. What we are witnessing 68 years What we are witnessing 68 years later, however, is a widespread, syslater, however, is a widespread, systemic media meltdown that involves a temic media meltdown that involves a TRUMPFrom page 1 “Donald Trump is Actually Running for President. God Help Us All.” — how The Huffington Post headlined its story when he announced his candidacy on June 16 of last yearCHRISTOPHER HALLORAN / SHUTTERSTOCK On the Republican side, Donald Trump’s surgically precise emasculation of Jeb Bush has spawned a wide-open race, one of the most competitive and hard-fought in decades. The media’s enthrallment with everything Donald Trump has been observed internationally and reported on with skepticism, humor and sometimes bad taste. di hki ih dt ib d tt d COURTESY PHOTOPresident Harry S. Truman, shortly after being elected president, smiles as he holds up a copy of the Chicago Tribune issue proclaiming his electoral defeat. A10 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY

PAGE 11

continuing stream of editorial misjudgcontinuing stream of editorial misjudgments, hasty conclusions, shoddy analyments, hasty conclusions, shoddy analysis and decisions relating to tone and sis and decisions relating to tone and coverage that are based on financial, not coverage that are based on financial, not journalistic, considerations. Mr. Trump journalistic, considerations. Mr. Trump is the main beneficiary of this outbreak is the main beneficiary of this outbreak of reportorial malpractice, which has of reportorial malpractice, which has resulted in a surfeit of chiefly superficial resulted in a surfeit of chiefly superficial and largely uncritical stories about him and largely uncritical stories about him and his campaign. and his campaign. The blustering billionaire was disThe blustering billionaire was dismissed early on by pundits and reportmissed early on by pundits and reporters as a cretinous braggart who would ers as a cretinous braggart who would streak across the political firmament streak across the political firmament like a blazing comet that was destined like a blazing comet that was destined to spontaneously combust. to spontaneously combust. Donald Trump Is Actually Running Donald Trump Is Actually Running For President. God Help Us All,Ž was For President. God Help Us All,Ž was how The Huffington Post headlined its how The Huffington Post headlined its story when he announced his candidacy story when he announced his candidacy on June 16 of last year. The Post thought on June 16 of last year. The Post thought so little of Mr. Trumps aspirations that so little of Mr. Trumps aspirations that for a time it ran all news of his campaign for a time it ran all news of his campaign in its entertainmentŽ section. in its entertainmentŽ section. The headline in The headline in The New York Times, The New York Times, while more refined, was equally dismiswhile more refined, was equally dismissive: Donald Trump, Pushing Someone sive: Donald Trump, Pushing Someone Rich, Offers Himself.Ž In the accompaRich, Offers Himself.Ž In the accompanying story, nying story, The Times The Times wrote: It seems wrote: It seems remote that Republicans, stung in 2012 remote that Republicans, stung in 2012 by the caricature of their nominee, Mitt by the caricature of their nominee, Mitt Romney, as a pampered and politically Romney, as a pampered and politically tone-deaf financier, would rebound by tone-deaf financier, would rebound by nominating a real estate magnate who nominating a real estate magnate who has published books with titles such has published books with titles such as, Think Like a Billionaire and Midas as, Think Like a Billionaire and Midas Touch: Why Some Entrepreneurs Get Touch: Why Some Entrepreneurs Get Rich „ And Why Most Dont.Ž Rich „ And Why Most Dont.Ž As the campaign rolled along, the As the campaign rolled along, the lordly lordly Times Times was shocked „ shocked! was shocked „ shocked! I tell you „ to discover that in the stillI tell you „ to discover that in the stillsuffering heartland, Mr. Trumps brand suffering heartland, Mr. Trumps brand of if I can do it, you can do itŽ self-help of if I can do it, you can do itŽ self-help pabulum was enormously appealing pabulum was enormously appealing to millions of Americans who struggle to millions of Americans who struggle paycheck-to-paycheck. paycheck-to-paycheck. The Washington Post The Washington Post noted in its noted in its story on Mr. Trumps campaign rollstory on Mr. Trumps campaign rollout that he had signaled presidential out that he had signaled presidential aspirations in the past but that many aspirations in the past but that many observers viewed his earlier electoral observers viewed his earlier electoral flirtations as mere attempts to increase flirtations as mere attempts to increase his media exposure.Ž his media exposure.Ž USA Today USA Today wasted no time when it wasted no time when it reported that its hard to find a political reported that its hard to find a political analyst who sees Trump as a credible analyst who sees Trump as a credible contender for the Republican nominacontender for the Republican nomination.Ž tion.Ž The pooh-poohing was by no means The pooh-poohing was by no means confined to traditionally liberal media confined to traditionally liberal media types. Powerful conservative commentypes. Powerful conservative commentators, including Charles Krauthammer, tators, including Charles Krauthammer, George Will and Bill Kristol, voiced George Will and Bill Kristol, voiced unconcealed disdain for Mr. Trumps unconcealed disdain for Mr. Trumps Oval Office ambitions. Oval Office ambitions. While liberals might be expected to While liberals might be expected to have misunderstood Trumps appeal, have misunderstood Trumps appeal, they have not done worse than Republithey have not done worse than Republicans,Ž The New Yorker pointed out last cans,Ž The New Yorker pointed out last month with a healthy dose of irony. month with a healthy dose of irony. Very few of the initial stories addressVery few of the initial stories addressing Mr. Trumps candidacy probed ing Mr. Trumps candidacy probed beyond the prevailing narrative, namely beyond the prevailing narrative, namely that he is an egomaniacal businessman that he is an egomaniacal businessman who has little to say and says it badly. who has little to say and says it badly. It was as if Mr. Trumps glaring defiIt was as if Mr. Trumps glaring deficiencies were so self-evident and so ciencies were so self-evident and so disqualifying that serious scrutiny of his disqualifying that serious scrutiny of his business affairs and personal life was business affairs and personal life was unnecessary. unnecessary. The oddest thing took place, though, The oddest thing took place, though, not long after Mr. Trump jumped into not long after Mr. Trump jumped into the race. The same columnists, reportthe race. The same columnists, reporters, editors, news directors and televiers, editors, news directors and television anchors who mocked him turned sion anchors who mocked him turned around and decided to allot thousands around and decided to allot thousands and thousands of words and untold and thousands of words and untold hours of airtime to a candidate they had hours of airtime to a candidate they had previously assured us was unworthy of previously assured us was unworthy of serious consideration. It proved to be a discombobulating convergence in a discombobulating convergence in which utter contempt rode piggywhich utt er contempt rode piggyback with unrestrained fascination. back with unrestrained fascination. CNN, Fox News and MSNBC CNN, Fox News and MSNBC jumped on the Trump Express early jumped on the Trump Express early and often, interrupting regularly and often, interrupting regularly scheduled programming to air live scheduled programming to air live updates on whatever the orangeupdates on whatever the orangehaired political impresario was up to haired political impresario was up to at that particular moment. The fact at that particular moment. The fact that he usually was up to that he usually was up to nothing of great consequence nothing of great consequence mattered not; Donald Trump mattered not; Donald Trump was boffo at the box office. was boffo at the box office. The atmosphere was The atmosphere was decidedly sideshow, and Mr. decidedly sideshow, and Mr. Trump „ a reality-show Trump „ a reality-show star who understands the star who understands the power of television far betpower of television far better than those who run the ter than those who run the news channels „ became news channels „ became the bearded lady of the airthe bearded lady of the airwaves, a curiosity who was waves, a curiosity who was at once revolting yet noneat once revolting yet nonetheless compelling. theless compelling. If a media outlet dared If a media outlet dared to offend him (and Mr. to offend him (and Mr. Trump has an amazingly Trump has an amazingly low threshold when it low threshold when it comes to criticism), he not comes to criticism), he not only fought back with a vengeance, he routinely threatened to threatened to impose what impose what he considered to be the ultimate punhe considered to be the ultimate punishment „ no access whatsoever to the ishment „ no access whatsoever to the Great Man himself. This bullying flumGreat Man himself. This bullying flummoxed Fox News, in particular, plunging moxed Fox News, in particular, plunging the network into cycles of faux outrage the network into cycles of faux outrage that were inevitably followed by snivthat were inevitably followed by sniveling attempts to curry favor with the eling attempts to curry favor with the capricious candidate. capricious candidate. (It would be a gross remission if it (It would be a gross remission if it were not noted that Fox deserves high were not noted that Fox deserves high marks for its debates, which have been marks for its debates, which have been skillfully produced and remarkably inciskillfully produced and remarkably incisive. It has outshone its competitors, by sive. It has outshone its competitors, by a wide margin, in this arena. Sadly, the a wide margin, in this arena. Sadly, the yeomans work turned in by Bret Baier, yeomans work turned in by Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly and Chris Wallace always Megyn Kelly and Chris Wallace always will be overshadowed by the shameless will be overshadowed by the shameless toadying of Bill OReilly, Sean Hannity toadying of Bill OReilly, Sean Hannity and the truly god-awful trio who foul and the truly god-awful trio who foul the airwaves each morning on Fox & the airwaves each morning on Fox & Friends.Ž) Friends.Ž) Upon reflection, it is painfully and Upon reflection, it is painfully and embarrassingly apparent that the high priests and priestesses of American mass communications were exquisitely snookered by the very man they had led us to believe was nothing more than a privileged boob with a taste for Louis XVI-style revelry. Based on this TWITTER.COM / REALDONALDTRUMP He announced to the world his candidacy via Twitter on June 16, 2015. The news media that initially followed included USA Today saying ‘it’s hard to find a political analyst who sees Trump as a credible contender for the Republican nomination.’ em em p p m m sn sn le th th L e with a with a outinely outinely GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 NEWS A11

PAGE 12

press-created caricature, we expected press-created caricature, we expected to be dealing with the second coming to be dealing with the second coming of P.T. Barnum. As it turns out, what we of P.T. Barnum. As it turns out, what we really have on our hands is Huey Long really have on our hands is Huey Long with billions of dollars in the bank. with billions of dollars in the bank. Trump isnt the first rich guy to run Trump isnt the first rich guy to run for office,Ž Matt Taibbi wrote in a scathfor office,Ž Matt Taibbi wrote in a scathing account of the 2016 campaign that ing account of the 2016 campaign that appeared in appeared in Rolling Stone. Rolling Stone. But he is the But he is the first to realize the weakness in the sysfirst to realize the weakness in the system, which is that the watchdogs in the tem, which is that the watchdogs in the political media cant resist a car wreck. political media cant resist a car wreck. The more he insults the press, the more The more he insults the press, the more they cover him: Hes pulling 33 times as they cover him: Hes pulling 33 times as much coverage on the major networks much coverage on the major networks as his next-closest GOP competitor, and as his next-closest GOP competitor, and twice as much as Hillary (Clinton).Ž twice as much as Hillary (Clinton).Ž As Mr. Trumps candidacy (buoyed by As Mr. Trumps candidacy (buoyed by nonstop media coverage) gained tracnonstop media coverage) gained traction, the egg-faced press refused to tion, the egg-faced press refused to abandon its prevailing narrative of the abandon its prevailing narrative of the kamikaze candidate. This go-downkamikaze candidate. This go-downwith-the-shipŽ mentality on the part of with-the-shipŽ mentality on the part of the news media was highlighted last the news media was highlighted last month by month by The New Yorker. The New Yorker. Trump has been catnip for predictors Trump has been catnip for predictors declaring his imminent political coldeclaring his imminent political collapse,Ž the magazine pointed out. (H)is lapse,Ž the magazine pointed out. (H)is candidacy has reached the beginning of candidacy has reached the beginning of the end, or some other descriptions of the end, or some other descriptions of demise, no fewer than thirty-three times demise, no fewer than thirty-three times in publications that span the ideological in publications that span the ideological spectrum. ƒŽ spectrum. ƒŽ Those Pollyannas who argue the wallThose Pollyannas who argue the wallto-wall coverage accorded Mr. Trump to-wall coverage accorded Mr. Trump is based on high-minded principles is based on high-minded principles should digest the comments made by should digest the comments made by Les Moonves, CEO of CBS Corp. Les Moonves, CEO of CBS Corp. Asked last month at a media and Asked last month at a media and telecom conference to explain his nettelecom conference to explain his networks fixation with all things Trump, works fixation with all things Trump, Mr. Moonves said: Who would have Mr. Moonves said: Who would have thought this circus would come to thought this circus would come to town? It may not be good for America, town? It may not be good for America, but its damn good for CBS. The money but its damn good for CBS. The money is rolling in.Ž is rolling in.Ž Not content to stand only knee-deep Not content to stand only knee-deep in the rhetorical grave he was digging, in the rhetorical grave he was digging, Mr. Moonves cheerily continued to use Mr. Moonves cheerily continued to use his tongue as a shovel: Its a terrible his tongue as a shovel: Its a terrible thing to say, but bring it on, (because) thing to say, but bring it on, (because) for us, Donalds place in this election is for us, Donalds place in this election is a good thing.Ž a good thing.Ž Holy Walter Cronkite! Holy Walter Cronkite! It is a sad and telling reflection of our It is a sad and telling reflection of our age that CBS, formerly the crown jewel age that CBS, formerly the crown jewel of television news and once home to of television news and once home to such broadcasting legends as Edward R. such broadcasting legends as Edward R. Murrow, Eric Sevareid and Mr. Cronkite, Murrow, Eric Sevareid and Mr. Cronkite, is now in the hands of someone who is now in the hands of someone who proudly abdicates his companys public proudly abdicates his companys public trust and is paid more than $50 million trust and is paid more than $50 million annually to do so. annually to do so. To be fair, journalists and their BabTo be fair, journalists and their Babbitt-like CEOs are not alone in dragbitt-like CEOs are not alone in dragging the 2016 presidential race into the ging the 2016 presidential race into the muck. The candidates, their handlers muck. The candidates, their handlers and consultants, the super PACs and the and consultants, the super PACs and the mega-wealthy donors who finance the mega-wealthy donors who finance the entire mess bear the bulk of the blame. entire mess bear the bulk of the blame. Of the GOP candidates still standing, Of the GOP candidates still standing, only Ohio Gov. John Kasich disdains the only Ohio Gov. John Kasich disdains the sewer, which means that during debates sewer, which means that during debates the poor guy wears the beaten-down the poor guy wears the beaten-down look of a designated driver at a raucous look of a designated driver at a raucous bachelor party. bachelor party. Regardless of how the candidates Regardless of how the candidates comport themselves, the case can be comport themselves, the case can be made that purveyors of news and informade that purveyors of news and information, who of course enjoy specifmation, who of course enjoy specific protections under the Constitution ic protections under the Constitution (some of which Mr. Trump seeks to (some of which Mr. Trump seeks to abolish), should be held to a higher abolish), should be held to a higher standard than political hacks who earn standard than political hacks who earn their keep by peddling distortions and their keep by peddling distortions and evasions. evasions. Abetted and enabled by a news media Abetted and enabled by a news media seemingly addicted to sensationalism, seemingly addicted to sensationalism, the 2016 campaign has the 2016 campaign has deteriorated with a deteriorated with a frightening rapidity. frightening rapidity. We are not yet out We are not yet out of the primary seaof the primary season, and the mood son, and the mood already is alarmingly already is alarmingly toxic and poisonous. toxic and poisonous. At this rate, we are in At this rate, we are in for one humdinger for one humdinger of a general elecof a general election, according to tion, according to Dr. Kerwin Swint, Dr. Kerwin Swint, a political scientist a political scientist and the author of the and the author of the immensely readable immensely readable book, Mudslingers: book, Mudslingers: The Twenty-Five The Twenty-Five Dirtiest Political Dirtiest Political Campaigns of All Campaigns of All Time.Ž Time.Ž This could be the This could be the nastiest presidential nastiest presidential election since 1884 election since 1884 (when Democrat (when Democrat Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland defeated Republican defeated Republican James G. Blaine in James G. Blaine in an epic sleaze fest),Ž an epic sleaze fest),Ž Dr. Swint told Dr. Swint told Florida Weekly. Florida Weekly. (The (The 2016) campaign could break the mold. 2016) campaign could break the mold. It has all the makings of a historically It has all the makings of a historically nasty, negative allnasty, negative allout brawl. Based on out brawl. Based on what weve seen up what weve seen up to now, the press will to now, the press will have a field day in have a field day in the general election.Ž the general election.Ž If the news media If the news media breakdown of 2016 breakdown of 2016 seems to have seems to have arrived in a rush, be arrived in a rush, be assured it has not, assured it has not, for what is happening for what is happening now reflects long-standing flaws inhernow reflects long-standing flaws inherent in the way journalists cover presient in the way journalists cover presidential politics and elections. dential politics and elections. The world of big-time political jourThe world of big-time political journalism is small, constricted and geonalism is small, constricted and geographically confined to Washington, graphically confined to Washington, D.C., and New York. The leading pracD.C., and New York. The leading practitioners of this highly titioners of this highly flawed craft „ be they flawed craft „ be they liberal, conservative or liberal, conservative or truly independent „ are truly independent „ are invariably bright, drivinvariably bright, driven, highly competitive, en, highly competitive, ambitious to a fault and ambitious to a fault and generously compengenerously compensated. They also are sated. They also are cliquish, clannish and cliquish, clannish and suspicious of those suspicious of those outside their tight, outside their tight, little circle. little circle. As any moderately As any moderately serious watcher of serious watcher of cable or network cable or network news can attest, the news can attest, the universe of politiuniverse of political punditry and cal punditry and analysis is restrictanalysis is restricted to a few tired ed to a few tired faces „ drawn from print faces „ drawn from print and electronic outlets „ and electronic outlets „ whose opinions and obserwhose opinions and observations are depressingly vations are depressingly predictable. predictable. It is an insular world It is an insular world that fosters a uniformity that fosters a uniformity of thought, which is driven of thought, which is driven more by comfortable familiarmore by comfortable familiarity than by political or social ideology. ity than by political or social ideology. In this environment, sweeping generalIn this environment, sweeping generalizations and lazy analysis are like germs izations and lazy analysis are like germs in a day-care center; they spread quickly in a day-care center; they spread quickly and infect many. and infect many. QQQ QQQ In his groundbreaking book, The In his groundbreaking book, The Boys on the Bus,Ž writer Timothy Crouse Boys on the Bus,Ž writer Timothy Crouse examined the political campaign press examined the political campaign press and its importance in the presidenand its importance in the presidential election of 1972. Mr. Crouse wrote tial election of 1972. Mr. Crouse wrote of the notorious phenomenon called of the notorious phenomenon called pack journalism.Ž Looking back, it is pack journalism.Ž Looking back, it is shocking to see how little has changed shocking to see how little has changed and how pack journalism still thrives and how pack journalism still thrives TRUMPFrom page 1JOSEPH SOHM / SHUTTERSTOCKIn September 2015, Trump was leading the pack but many did not believe the trajectory would continue to rise to the nomination. He stands in the middle alongside (starting far left) Rick Santorum, Lindsay Graham, Rand Paul, George Pataki, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, Carly Fiorina, John Kasich and Chris Christie in California. MOONVES “Who would have thought this circus would come to town? It may not be good for America, but it’s damn good for CBS. The money is rolling in.” — Les Moonves, CEO of CBS Corp.SWINT A12 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY

PAGE 13

more than four decades later. more than four decades later. (Reporters) all fed off the same pool (Reporters) all fed off the same pool report, the same daily handout, the same report, the same daily handout, the same speech by the candidate; the whole pack speech by the candidate; the whole pack was isolated in the same mobile village,Ž was isolated in the same mobile village,Ž Mr. Crouse observed. After a while, Mr. Crouse observed. After a while, they began to believe the same rumors, they began to believe the same rumors, subscribe to the same subscribe to the same theories, and write theories, and write the same stories.Ž the same stories.Ž This omnipresent This omnipresent isolation from diverisolation from divergent points of views gent points of views helps to explain why helps to explain why meaningful analymeaningful analysis is in such short sis is in such short supply during presisupply during presidential contests. Its dential contests. Its not that trenchant not that trenchant reporting is totally reporting is totally absent, but unless it originates from cerabsent, but unless it originates from certain spheres, it is likely to go unnoticed. tain spheres, it is likely to go unnoticed. Such was the case last year involving Such was the case last year involving the work of David Cay Johnston. Mr. the work of David Cay Johnston. Mr. Johnston is a reporter of impeccable Johnston is a reporter of impeccable reputation. He won a Pulitzer Prize in reputation. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for Beat Reporting while work2001 for Beat Reporting while working at ing at The New York Times. The New York Times. He has He has followed Mr. Trump closely for nearly followed Mr. Trump closely for nearly three decades and is better versed on three decades and is better versed on his career than anyone assigned regularhis career than anyone assigned regularly to the campaign. Mr. Johnston is not a ly to the campaign. Mr. Johnston is not a part of the political press. He is retired part of the political press. He is retired from The Gray LadyŽ and now teaches from The Gray LadyŽ and now teaches at the Syracuse University College of at the Syracuse University College of Law. He also writes for a variety of Law. He also writes for a variety of forums. So while Mr. Johnston remains forums. So while Mr. Johnston remains an esteemed journalistic presence, he is an esteemed journalistic presence, he is out of the loopŽ in terms of day-to-day out of the loopŽ in terms of day-to-day campaign coverage. campaign coverage. Unlike many of his colleagues in the Unlike many of his colleagues in the political press, Mr. Johnston took Mr. political press, Mr. Johnston took Mr. Trumps candidacy seriously from the Trumps candidacy seriously from the beginning. beginning. Four years ago, when Trump was Four years ago, when Trump was playing with the idea of running for playing with the idea of running for president ... I knew that, in fact, he was president ... I knew that, in fact, he was running for a new (television) contract running for a new (television) contract with NBC,Ž Mr. Johnston said in a telewith NBC,Ž Mr. Johnston said in a telephone interview with phone interview with Florida Weekly. Florida Weekly. But this time around, I recognized that But this time around, I recognized that he was really serious about running, and he was really serious about running, and when he announced, I was one of the when he announced, I was one of the few who said that this is serious, that few who said that this is serious, that he might actually get the nomination. I he might actually get the nomination. I never dismissed this as frivolous.Ž never dismissed this as frivolous.Ž Less than a month after Mr. Trump Less than a month after Mr. Trump declared that he was a candidate, Mr. declared that he was a candidate, Mr. Johnston published a remarkable article Johnston published a remarkable article in The National Memo, an online news in The National Memo, an online news site. The story was titled, 21 Questions site. The story was titled, 21 Questions for Donald Trump.Ž for Donald Trump.Ž I have covered Donald Trump „ off I have covered Donald Trump „ off and on for 27 years „ including breakand on for 27 years „ including breaking the story that in 1990, when he ing the story that in 1990, when he claimed to be worth $3 billion but could claimed to be worth $3 billion but could not pay interest on loans coming due, not pay interest on loans coming due, his bankers put his net worth at minus his bankers put his net worth at minus $295 million,Ž Mr. Johnston wrote. And $295 million,Ž Mr. Johnston wrote. And so I have closely watched what Trump so I have closely watched what Trump does and what government documents does and what government documents reveal about him. reveal about him. Reporters, competing Republican Reporters, competing Republican candidates, and voters would learn a lot candidates, and voters would learn a lot about Trump if they asked him for comabout Trump if they asked him for complete answers to these 21 questions.Ž plete answers to these 21 questions.Ž The questions proposed by Mr. JohnThe questions proposed by Mr. Johnston were sharp-edged, substantive ston were sharp-edged, substantive and fair. They ran the gamut from the and fair. They ran the gamut from the problems involving Trump University problems involving Trump University to the real extent of Mr. Trumps phito the real extent of Mr. Trumps philanthropy to a 1979 bribery investigalanthropy to a 1979 bribery investigation. Above all, they were not questions tion. Above all, they were not questions that attached themselves to Mr. Trumps that attached themselves to Mr. Trumps celebrity. These were queries designed celebrity. These were queries designed to construct a record of conduct, espeto construct a record of conduct, especially in the area of Mr. Trumps busicially in the area of Mr. Trumps business dealings. ness dealings. Here are some samples of Mr. JohnHere are some samples of Mr. Johnstons questions. stons questions. In abolishing the Bonwit Teller buildIn abolishing the Bonwit Teller building to make way for Trump Tower, you ing to make way for Trump Tower, you had no labor troubles, even though only had no labor troubles, even though only about 15 unionists worked at the site about 15 unionists worked at the site alongside 150 Polish men, most of whom alongside 150 Polish men, most of whom entered the country illegally, lacked entered the country illegally, lacked hard hats and slept on the site. How hard hats and slept on the site. How did you manage to avoid labor troubles, did you manage to avoid labor troubles, like picketing and strikes, and job safety like picketing and strikes, and job safety inspections while using mostly noninspections while using mostly nonunion labor at a union worksite „ withunion labor at a union worksite „ without hard hats for the Polish workers?Ž out hard hats for the Polish workers?Ž The one-page financial statement The one-page financial statement handed out at Trump Tower when you handed out at Trump Tower when you announced your candidacy says youve announced your candidacy says youve given away $102 million worth of land. given away $102 million worth of land. Will you supply a list of each of these Will you supply a list of each of these gifts, with the values you assigned to gifts, with the values you assigned to them?Ž them?Ž Trump Tower was built by S&A Trump Tower was built by S&A Concrete, whose owners are Fat Tony Concrete, whose owners are Fat Tony Salerno, head of the Genovese crime Salerno, head of the Genovese crime family, and Paul Big Paul Castellano, family, and Paul Big Paul Castellano, head of the Gambinos, another wellhead of the Gambinos, another wellknown crime family. If you did not know known crime family. If you did not know their ownership what does that tell vottheir ownership what does that tell voters about your management skills?Ž ers about your management skills?Ž You were the first person recomYou were the first person recommended for a casino license by the New mended for a casino license by the New Jersey Attorney Generals Division of Jersey Attorney Generals Division of Gaming Enforcement, which opposed Gaming Enforcement, which opposed all other applicants or was neutral. Later all other applicants or was neutral. Later it came out in official proceedings that it came out in official proceedings that you had persuaded the state to limit its you had persuaded the state to limit its investigation of your background. Why investigation of your background. Why did you ask that the investigation into did you ask that the investigation into your background be limited?Ž your background be limited?Ž There was not a frivolous or unfair There was not a frivolous or unfair question set forth by Mr. Johnston, and, in question set forth by Mr. Johnston, and, in essence, he provided reporters (and politessence, he provided reporters (and political opponents) with a nifty roadmap for ical opponents) with a nifty roadmap for probing Mr. Trumps murky past, which is probing Mr. Trumps murky past, which is pockmarked with questionable financial pockmarked with questionable financial deals and shady associations. deals and shady associations. No one, however, seemed the least bit No one, however, seemed the least bit interested in following Mr. Johnstons interested in following Mr. Johnstons lead. As of late, some of Mr. Trumps lead. As of late, some of Mr. Trumps political opponents have made timid political opponents have made timid inquiries based on Mr. Johnstons work. inquiries based on Mr. Johnstons work. (Ted Cruz brought up Mr. Trumps ties (Ted Cruz brought up Mr. Trumps ties to FatŽ Tony Salerno in an oblique to FatŽ Tony Salerno in an oblique manner, but he failed to follow through manner, but he failed to follow through in any meaningful way.) in any meaningful way.) The fraud case involving Trump UniverThe fraud case involving Trump University is the only item from Mr. Johnstons sity is the only item from Mr. Johnstons list that seems to have captured anyones list that seems to have captured anyones attention for more than a moment. attention for more than a moment. On the campaign trail, political reportOn the campaign trail, political reporters chose to ignore the gift presented ers chose to ignore the gift presented to them by Mr. Johnston, preferring to them by Mr. Johnston, preferring instead to lob softballs to Mr. Trump. instead to lob softballs to Mr. Trump. Consider these representative quesConsider these representative questions that were posed to Mr. Trump at a tions that were posed to Mr. Trump at a press conference held on the evening of press conference held on the evening of the Super Tuesday primaries on March the Super Tuesday primaries on March 1. 1. Question: If Marco Rubio cannot win Question: If Marco Rubio cannot win Florida, is it time for him to get out? Florida, is it time for him to get out? Question: Is immigration negotiable? Question: Is immigration negotiable? Question: Mr. Trump, you call yourQuestion: Mr. Trump, you call yourself a negotiator, a dealmaker. Is this self a negotiator, a dealmaker. Is this campaign just the start of a negotiation campaign just the start of a negotiation for you, taking extreme positions in for you, taking extreme positions in order to move toward the middle? order to move toward the middle? Question: Theres been a lot of presQuestion: Theres been a lot of pressure recently to either support or reject sure recently to either support or reject you within the Republican Party specifyou within the Republican Party specifically. Some strongly worded statements ically. Some strongly worded statements coming out in recent days, including coming out in recent days, including one from the senator from Nebraska, one from the senator from Nebraska, Ben Sasse, said, If Donald Trump ends Ben Sasse, said, If Donald Trump ends up as the Republican nominee, conserup as the Republican nominee, conservatives will need to find a third-party vatives will need to find a third-party option.Ž What do you say? option.Ž What do you say? As the adage from the fight game As the adage from the fight game goes, the reporters that night „ as on goes, the reporters that night „ as on most occasions „ never laid a glove on most occasions „ never laid a glove on Mr. Trump. Mr. Trump. So, what gives? Why is the press So, what gives? Why is the press reluctant to confront the presumptive reluctant to confront the presumptive Republican nominee? Republican nominee? A lot has changed in American jourA lot has changed in American journalism,Ž Mr. Johnston said, The press nalism,Ž Mr. Johnston said, The press has been cowed. There is no other way has been cowed. There is no other way to put it. The press has been cowed by to put it. The press has been cowed by relentless and baseless attacks on its relentless and baseless attacks on its integrity. And there is also the problem integrity. And there is also the problem of access journalism. Quite simply, if of access journalism. Quite simply, if you dont have access (to a candidate), you dont have access (to a candidate), you are cut out; it is difficult to do your you are cut out; it is difficult to do your job. Those who ask withering questions job. Those who ask withering questions lose access.Ž lose access.Ž Eddie Zipperer, a contributor to Eddie Zipperer, a contributor to The The Hill Hill who writes regularly on politics, who writes regularly on politics, thinks that criticism directed toward the thinks that criticism directed toward the campaign press in general and reportcampaign press in general and reporters covering Mr. Trump in particular is ers covering Mr. Trump in particular is overblown and off-base. overblown and off-base. Right now its hip to blame the Right now its hip to blame the media,Ž Mr. Zipperer wrote in an email media,Ž Mr. Zipperer wrote in an email interview. interview. I dont blame the media too much ... I dont blame the media too much ... especially since I misread the Trump especially since I misread the Trump phenomenon myself for a while,Ž Mr. phenomenon myself for a while,Ž Mr. Zipperer said. Brand-new things rarely Zipperer said. Brand-new things rarely happen in national politics. Each step of happen in national politics. Each step of the race, good pundits predict what will the race, good pundits predict what will happen next based on what has haphappen next based on what has happened in the past (bad pundits predict pened in the past (bad pundits predict what will happen next based on what what will happen next based on what they wish would happen). But there they wish would happen). But there has never been a primary like this one, has never been a primary like this one, and there has never been a candidate and there has never been a candidate like Donald Trump. Because of that, the like Donald Trump. Because of that, the old primary election paradigm doesnt old primary election paradigm doesnt work for predicting Trump. Some in work for predicting Trump. Some in the media continue to use the old parathe media continue to use the old paradigm, and they continue to be wrong on digm, and they continue to be wrong on Trump every time.Ž Trump every time.Ž If Mr. Trump secures the nominaIf Mr. Trump secures the nomination, Mr. Zipperer said the news media tion, Mr. Zipperer said the news media should NOT feel they have a responsishould NOT feel they have a responsibility to take him down. Thats not their bility to take him down. Thats not their job. They also should not ignore when job. They also should not ignore when he does newsworthy things.Ž he does ne wsworthy things.Ž Mr. Zipperer said the massive coverMr. Zipperer said the massive coverage Mr. Trump has received is warage Mr. Trump has received is warranted. ranted. Trump and his campaign are the Trump and his campaign are the most newsworthy entities in America most newsworthy entities in America right now, and the media wouldnt be right now, and the media wouldnt be doing their job if they pretended otherdoing their job if they pretended otherwise,Ž he said. wise,Ž he said. (The media coverage of the Repub(The media coverage of the Republican campaign) has been all over the lican campaign) has been all over the place,Ž said Dr. Darryl Paulson, proplace,Ž said Dr. Darryl Paulson, professor emeritus of political science at fessor emeritus of political science at the University of the University of South Florida St. South Florida St. Petersburg. He Petersburg. He was viewed as a TV was viewed as a TV huckster, so why huckster, so why should (the media) should (the media) take him seriously? take him seriously? It was accepted wisIt was accepted wisdom that Trump was dom that Trump was a publicity hound a publicity hound who would fall by who would fall by the wayside.Ž the wayside.Ž Mr. Paulson, a foremost expert on Mr. Paulson, a foremost expert on Republican politics, said the extraordiRepublican politics, said the extraordinary circumstances of the Trump ascennary circumstances of the Trump ascendency left reporters and party operadency left reporters and party operatives struggling to make sense of it all. tives struggling to make sense of it all. How can you prepare for a candidate How can you prepare for a candidate who has never existed in the past?Ž Mr. who has never existed in the past?Ž Mr. Paulson asked. He was someone who Paulson asked. He was someone who had been highly critical of the Repubhad been highly critical of the Republican Party. He had called it the party lican Party. He had called it the party of the crazy right. Who would have of the crazy right. Who would have thought someone like that could get thought someone like that could get (the Republican nomination)? But now (the Republican nomination)? But now here we are, and it looks more and more here we are, and it looks more and more like Trump is unbeatable when it comes like Trump is unbeatable when it comes to winning the Republican nomination.Ž to winning the Republican nomination.Ž For all the squawking about the failFor all the squawking about the failings of the press, the real looming danings of the press, the real looming danger on the horizon is that new techger on the horizon is that new technologies and social media may render nologies and social media may render reporters obsolete. reporters obsolete. With Instagram and Twitter-primed With Instagram and Twitter-primed iPhones, an ever-more-youthful press iPhones, an ever-more-youthful press corps, and a journalistic reward struccorps, and a journalistic reward structure in Washington that often prizes ture in Washington that often prizes speed and scoops over context and speed and scoops over context and thoughtful analysis, campaigns are thoughtful analysis, campaigns are increasingly fearful of reporters who increasingly fearful of reporters who cover them,Ž said a study undertaken by cover them,Ž said a study undertaken by Harvards Shorenstein Center on Media, Harvards Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. Politics and Public Policy. The velocity and shallow nature of The velocity and shallow nature of todays political journalism has rattled todays political journalism has rattled elected officials, candidates and their elected officials, candidates and their advisers in both parties, from the smalladvisers in both parties, from the smallest city hall up to the top levels of the est city hall up to the top levels of the White House,Ž the study said. White House,Ž the study said. Because of this, candidates and poliBecause of this, candidates and politicians are increasingly trying to presticians are increasingly trying to present their messages on their own terms, ent their messages on their own terms, either through sympathetic news outlets either through sympathetic news outlets or their own social media channels,Ž the or their own social media channels,Ž the study went on to say. More and more, study went on to say. More and more, the mainstream political press is being the mainstream political press is being cut out of the election process. ƒŽ cut out of the election process. ƒŽ That study was released in 2013. That study was released in 2013. Things have worsened since then. If the Things have worsened since then. If the presss performance in the presidential presss performance in the presidential race of 2016 seems bad, hold on „ 2020 race of 2016 seems bad, hold on „ 2020 will be here before you know it. will be here before you know it. Q CNN, Fox News and MSNBC jumped on the Trump Express early and often, interrupting regularly scheduled programming to air live updates on whatever the orange-haired political impresario was up to at that particular moment. The fact that he usually was up to nothing of great consequence mattered not; Donald Trump was boffo at the box office.RENA SCHILD / SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTODonald Trump and wife Melania arrive at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner on April 25, 2015, in Washington, D.C. JOHNSTON PAULSON GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 NEWS A13

PAGE 14

A14 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 1. Halina Sledz, Zig Sledz, Mark Foley, Lani Click, Kevin Callahan and Bob Goldfarb 2. Larry Smith, Lani Click and Jim Watson 3. Lani Click and Ken Click 4. Lola de la Borda, Paulette Cooper and Paul Noble 5. Lani Click and Honey Bryan 6. Betsy Munson, Lani Click, Dari Bowman and David Click 7. JoAnne Berkow, Michael Ray Smith and Lani Click 8. Melody Sanger, Jim Gabler and Carmen Bissell 9. Reed Moore, Carmen Bissell and Judith Goodman 10. Ildiko Bach, David Click and Lani Click TOM TRACY / FLORIDA WEEKLY LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Clicking In Forum, with Mark Foley at The Colony, Palm Beach 1 3 6 7 8 9 10 4 5 2

PAGE 15

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 A15 A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in todays market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers dont get what they want for their homes and become disillusioned and worse financially disadvantaged when they put their homes on the mar-ket. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insid-ers have prepared a free special report entitled The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top DollarŽ. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-866-274-7449 and enter 2000. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out how you can get the most money for your home.This report is courtesy of Chasewood Realty, Inc. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contrac t. Copyright 20167 Deadly mistakes that will cost you thousands when you sell your Jupiter homeAdvertorial AVOID PAYING UNNECESSARY TAXES & PENALTIES! Appointments Accepted | Walk-Ins Welcome www.jdtaxresolutions.com | info@jdtaxresolutions.com | 855.271.6744 Jeinny Greenwald and Diana Velasquez 601 Heritage Dr., Suite 121, Jupiter, FL 33458 GET YOUR LIFE BACK. CALL US NOW! qD!.+1* D*+)!D4D!.2%!/qD1/%*!//!/DHD* %2% 1(/ qD+(!D.+,.%!0+./qDD*!./$%,/qD+.,+.0%+*/ qDD!,.!/!*00%+*qD5.+((D!.2%!/qD++''!!,%*#D)((D1/%*!// Life is short. Eat dessert. Make sure you LikeŽ the PGA Commons Facebook page! Post pictures of yourself at PGA Commons and use the hashtag #PGACommons for a chance to win monthly prizes! pgacommons.com Learn more at jupitermed.com/mindfulness 1210 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458 Participants meet once a week from March 24-May 7, 2016. Program includes eight classes and one, all-day retreat.Reservations are required. Space is limited to 30 participants per session. For more information on class fee, or to register, please call 561-660-1 828. Jupiter Medical Center, in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness, is pleased to offer Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). Join us and learn new ways of coping with: t Cancer t Heart Disease t Autoimmune Disease t Diabetes t Chronic Pain t Anxiety/Depression t Work/Family Stress t Many Other Conditions t Grief t Eating Disorders Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Spring 2016 Stress Less, Live More Event to honor winners of Ann Norton philanthropy award SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens plans to honor its supporters. Gardens Conservancy members of the West Palm Beach museum will be hon-ored April 1 at a special Evening in the GardensŽ cocktail reception to present the Ann Norton Philanthropy Award winners. The evening will also introduce author Jack Staub s new coffee table book, Private Gardens of South Florida.Ž The evening, presented by Wilmington Trust, will be chaired by Karyn Lamb, part of the Gardens Conservancy Founders Cir-cle. Katharine and William Rayner will be the honorary chairs. The recipients of the Ann Norton Philanthropy Award will be The Gentlemen of the Garden, presented to Robert Eigelberger, Jonathan Cameron-Hayes and David Miller; Edwina Sandys and Richard Kaplan; and Leslie Rose. A multicategory membership and stewardship program, the Gardens Conservancy supports the preservation and restoration of Ann Nortons art and archives, her home and studio, and horticultural initiatives. The Conservancy is engaged in projects that raise awareness of Ann Nortons art and gardens through ongoing cultur-al and horticultural education via school and community enrichment programs and partnerships. Annual Gardens Conservancy membership is available starting at a $500 donation, and donors receive complimentary admis-sion to the gardens, art openings, an invita-tion to the Conservancys annual event, and discounted tickets to special events. As we enter our third year, we are hopeful that the Gardens Conservancy can bring even more exposure to Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens as well as Ann Nortons story and vision behind her works,Ž Fran-ces Fisher, Gardens Conservancy founding chair, said in a statement. Private Gardens of South FloridaŽ showcases 22 lush landscapes, including nine gardens from Palm Beach. In addition to Mr. Staubs book presentation, the recep-tion will include cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and entertainment. For information, visit ansg.org or call 832-5328. Q COURTESY PHOTO Frances Fisher (left) and Karen Lamb stand with one of Ann Norton’s monumental sculptures.

PAGE 16

A16 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Lauren Gerhardstein and Addison Craig Chel Smith The Winning Team, Orchard Hill The Budweiser Clydesdales Joe-Anna Pinard, Christina Beauboeuf, Joe-Anne Pinard and Gabriella Gabriel Lacey Ibancevic, Mike Ibancevic, Bryan Willoughb SOC I Sunday polo at the International P LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, g o To speak with a Registered Nurse 24/7 or for more information, call 561-548-4JFK (4535) or visit www.jfkmc.com Main Campus: 5301 S. Congress Avenue, Atlantis Palm Beach Gardens: Mainstreet at Midtown, 4797 PGA Boulevard Boynton Beach: Shoppes at Woolbright, 10921 S. Jog RoadWe have three locations to serve you: EMERGENCY CARE SERVICES 24 H OUR ER CARE for adults and kids A TRIP TO THE ER DOESNT HAVE TO BE MADNESS.

PAGE 17

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 NEWS A17 Brynn Bechtold and Kevin Bechtold Marian White Kai Koren, John Wash and Meredith Good Gabe Mear and Mark Ganzi b y and Jessica Willoughby I ETY P olo Club Palm Beach Wellington o to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include t he names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.LILA PHOTOS yo ne inthepi ctu re E mailthem to so cie ty@ ”orid awe ekl yc om LIL A P HOT OS Guy Clark and Nicole DiCocco Learn more at jupitermed.com/bariatrics or call 561-408-6058. 1210 S. Old Dixie Highway l Jupiter, FL 33458In 2004, Alicia was diagnosed with Graves disease, an autoimmune disorder that results in an overactive thyroid. She continued to gain weight over the years, feeling unlike herself and trapped in her own body. She had a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy performed by Dr. Jefferson Vaughan, medical director of Jupiter Medical Centers Institute for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery. Alicia no longer needs her medications and is once again able to enjoy her favorite activities.Jupiter Medical Center offers new hope and the highest quality care to those who struggle with healthy weight management. Contact our accredited center today for a comprehensive, personalized program of services and surgical procedures. Alicia lost 107 pounds, but regained her life at Jupiter Medical Center.Every morning, I wake up full of energy and ready to start my day.Ž … Alicia Landosca

PAGE 18

A18 WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 FLORIDA WEEKLY Coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus. In New York, coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of New York. Policies may not be available in all states. There may be indirect administrative or other costs. M1863C 7/12 Andrew Spilos | (561) 685-5845 | andrew_spilos@us.a”ac.com nr 88579,+7,(1-(897,(+8(408/ (8970,8 7,8/7:09(4+,770,8"97(<),77='5.:79 7,(1-(89>!085995? r,354!0*599( (4*(1,8<09/2:,),77=54+:, #"## ##! r /022,+86(7(.:8%0*/=88508, !5(89,+(7759(4+5:85:8"(2(+<09/7:.:2( (4+/(36(.4,%04(0.7,99, 7,,1()=*,),7.&,+., "/70365*19(027022,+,3545*19(02"(:*, &KLFNHQ:DI HV !5(89,+92(490*"(2354 7022,+(4+/022,+#,70=(10#:4( <09/"(1,0520 (7;,+,.5-(3) 54,=(3 ""!#"## n r !" r nnr 504:8(89,7":4+(=(9754<55+"9,(1",(-55+ rrn-753(395n63 ",7;04.(8,2,*90545-97(+09054(2(4+.5:73,9)7,(1-(89(4 +2: 4*/ 3,4:09,38*(7;04.89(90548(2(+8(4++,*(+,49+,88,798 r r r r $420309,+0358(857255+=(7=8 r r rnr 57357,04-573(90545795)551=5:77,8,7;(905462,(8,*(22rr57;080956,49()2,*53nrnnnnnr 70;(9,6(790,88/5:2+*(225:7 70;(9,0404.;,49 8(4(.,7( 9rr 800-800-2580 www.shipcar.com GUARANTEED PICK UP ON YOUR SCHEDULE THE SNOWBIRD’S FAVORITE SINCE 1980 Guaranteed Prices Celebrating 36 Years SWA Soiree to celebrate recycling with 5K, fashion, free shredding SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY The Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority has planned its annual Soiree from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 2. The event stresses that everyone should do his or her part to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rethink!Ž for a sustainable future. Proceeds from the event will benefit Rebuilding Together of the Palm Beaches and Resource Depot. Run AWAY 5K Trail Run/Walk is planned at 7:30 a.m., rain or shine. More than 200 runners are expected to start with a trail run/walk over 3.1 miles of the Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach Countys Greenway Trail System and Grassy Waters Preserves Owahee Trail. An awards ceremony starts at 9 a.m. There is a 300-runner maximum. Registration is online. Early bird registration is $25 until March 18; race day registration is $35. School groups of four or more are $20 each, and children 12 and under are $15. The Soiree will be held at the SWA Administration Building, 7501 N. Jog Road, West Palm Beach. More than 50 exhibitors from all industries will participate. Four food trucks will offer lunch. In the auditorium, a Recycled Fashions Showcase will feature student designs on the catwalk. Free shredding will be offered at the SWA Landfill, 6890 N. Jog Road, West Palm Beach, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Palm Beach County residents can drop off up to six boxes of personal documents to be shredded for free by Shred Trust. For safety reasons, no participants will be allowed to get out of their cars to watch documents being shredded. New or replacement blue and yellow recy-cling bins will be available for pickup. Drop off home chemicals at the Home Chemical and Recycling Center, 6161 N. Jog Road, during the same hours. Exam-ples of household hazardous wastes are paints; fluorescent light bulbs and CFLs; batteries from cars, boats, power tools and cameras, or those that are recharge-able; boat products, such as flares, deep-cycle batteries, fuels; pesticides; pro-pane tanks; used automotive products, including oils, antifreeze and filters; used cooking oil and electronics. Visit SWA.org/HCRC or call 697-2700 or 866-SWA-INFO. Q

PAGE 19

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 A19 Shop 20 additional stores including T.J. Maxx Nordstrom Rack Lane Bryant and more! Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH | Tommy Hilfiger Company Store Nike Factory Store | Banana Republic Factory Store Chicos Outlet | GAP Factory Store | White House | Black Market LOFT Outlet | Brooks Brothers Factory Store and more I-95 Exit 71 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. PalmBeachOutlets.com SCIENCE meets MUSIC Public Lecture and Concert LECTURE: Alzheimers Disease: New Insights into Causes and Therapies EVA MANDELKOW, PhD Max Planck Research Unit for Structural Molecular Biology at DESY MUSIC: WOOD WIND QUINTET Florida Atlantic University Department of Music DATE: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 TIME: Doors Open at 5:30 pm Lecture Begins at 6:15 pm PLACE: Benjamin Hall 4875 Grandiflora Road Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33418 Free Admission | RSVP Required RSVP at maxplanckflorida.org/smm or 561-972-9027 Dont miss the “nal event of the 2016 series: presentspresented in partnership with Humorist to speak at the Mandel JCC SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYTed Slate, author of the recently published book, My Life and Other Aggravations,Ž will speak at the Mandel Jewish Community Center in Boynton Beach from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, March 24. Mr. Slate is appearing as part of the JCCs Meet the AuthorŽ series and will share high-lights of his career, offer readings from his book and will sign copies at the conclusion of his talk. Starting as a bellhop who ran five-card stud poker games in upstate New York, to spend-ing 31 years with the Washington Bureau of The New York Times and Newsweek in New York City, Mr. Slate resigned from Ne wsweek to become a tour director. Fifteen years later, he wrote a humor column for The Warren Reporter, in Warren County, New Jersey. After five years, he resigned to write My Life and Other Aggravations.Ž He is work-ing on a second book. In his book, Mr. Slate explores such topics as exotic pet ownership, the challenges of texting, drinking calf-blood cock-tails with Masai tribesmen in Africa, hair-loss woes, to-do lists, his ambiguous relationship with Florida and his successful attempt to bribe a New York Yan-kee ticket agent with a colonoscopy. Admission is free to JCC members; nonmembers, $15. The Mandel JCC of Boynton Beach is at 8500 Jog Road, Boynton Beach. For more information, visit jcconline.com. Q SLATE

PAGE 20

A20 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY ADVERTISEMENT ASK THE VEIN EXPERT ASK THE VEIN EXPERT Thomas Ashton, Medical Director, MD, FACPHQuestion: What are my options when considering treatment for varicose and spider veins?There are many options for treatment of venous problems. Recently, technology has replaced many treatment methods with more effective, less painful, and less expensive modalities. By using several advanced techniques, phlebologists today are able to totally avoid such operations as vein stripping and ligation. These procedures are no longer necessary, and have been shown in fact to increase the risk of bleeding, infection, nerve damage, and recurrence. Ultrasound and Laser technologies, combined with training and experience, have essentially revolutionized the correction of venous abnormalities. Sclerotherapy for spider veins however remains the treatment of choice. Although laser treatments are best for large vein disease, skin laser treatments are more painful, more expensive, and less effective than cosmetic scherotherapy. Endovenous Laser Ablation is the treatment of choice for large superficial venous disease. This in-office minimally invasive technique eliminates the source of the problem and has very small recurrence rates. Endovenous ablation can also be accomplished with medication placed directly into the vein using Ultrasound guidance. These procedures require no down time, are more effective, and are covered by Medicare and most insurance plans. If needed, cosmetic sclerotherapy and compression stockings may be recommended. SOME GOOD ADVICE ABOUT VEIN PROBLEMS Thomas Ashtonashtonota@aol.com3365 Burns Rd.,Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-630-6800ASHTONVEINCENTER.COM Learn more at jupitermed.com/breastcare Margaret W. Niedland Breast Center 2111 Military Trail, Suite 100 | Jupiter, FL 33458Niedland Breast Screening Center 11310 Legacy Place, Suite 110 | Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 All breasts are not the same. Neither are all breast centers. To schedule an appointment at one of our two convenient locations, call 561-263-4414.The Margaret W. Niedland Breast Center now offers same-day mammography results.t#PBSEDFSUJGJFESBEJPMPHJTUTXJUI GFMMPXTIJQUSBJOJOHJONBNNPHSBQIZ t5IFNPTUBEWBODFE%TDSFFOJOH BOEEJBHOPTUJDCSFBTUJNBHJOHJOBDPNQBTTJPOBUFBOEUSBORVJMFOWJSPONFOU t1BUJFOUOBWJHBUPSTGPSTVQQPSU t(FOFUJDUFTUJOHGPSDBODFSSJTLt#POFEFOTJUZUFTUJOHt6MUSBTPVOECSFBTUJNBHJOHt.3*XJUITPPUIJOHTJHIUTBOETPVOET GPSNBYJNVNDPNGPSU t.JOJNBMMZJOWBTJWFCSFBTUCJPQTJFT t1PTJUSPOFNJTTJPONBNNPHSBQIZ1&.n BOEQPTJUSPOFNJTTJPOUPNPHSBQIZ1&5n GPSTUBHJOHPGDBODFSBOENFBTVSJOH UIFFGGFDUJWFOFTTPGUSFBUNFOU Doctor: Prejudices must be overcome to explore marijuana’s potentialIts clear that the movement to legalize medical marijuana has picked up steam in recent years, but its less clear how potent a medicine the leafy substance can be. While a growing number of studies have raised the tantalizing possibility that marijuana could provide a cure for can-cer, the medical community at large has been hesitant to make definitive procla-mations, saying more study is needed. But Dr. James W. Forsythe, an oncologist and author of the book Stoned: The Truth About Medical Marijuana and Hemp Oil,Ž is less reluc-tant than others to tout the use of marijuana to treat can-cer. He says the chemical in marijuana, tetrahydrocan-nabinol, or THC, appears to be effective in attacking and killing cancer cells, and the medical community and government should be more aggressive in studying and ultimately proclaiming marijuanas potency as a cancer treatment. Certainly, no medicine should ever be touted as a 100 percent guaranteed cure for cancer or any other disease,Ž Dr. For-sythe says. But I do think there needs to be some official acknowledgment of the ability of THC and other basic ingredi-ents from marijuana to obliterate cancer.Ž Medical marijuana is now legal in 23 states and the District of Columbia, but the federal government still lists it as a Schedule I controlled substance. The federal governments refusal to legalize marijuana has led to numer-ous conditions being placed on research-ers and is deterring scientific study of the medicinal strength of cannabinoids, the natural components in the cannabis plant, according to the American Cancer Society. The society has said federal offi-cials should examine options consistent with federal law for enabling more scien-tific study of marijuana. Despite the restrictions, some research is taking place. For example, stud-ies in mice and rats have shown that cannabinoids may inhibit tumor growth by causing cell death, block-ing cell growth and blocking the development of blood vessels needed by tumors to grow, according to the National Cancer Institute. Laboratory and animal stud-ies have shown that cannabi-noids may be able to kill cancer cells while protecting normal cells. That hasnt been enough to inspire scientists to declare marijuana as an answer to the fight against cancer just yet. More often, marijuana is used to treat the symptoms of cancer, such as pain, or the side effects from chemotherapy, such as nausea and vomiting. Different strains of marijuana are considered the best for attacking different symptoms, Dr. For-sythe says. Those strains come in dozens of varieties and they sport exotic names, such as Blueberry, Tangerine Dream and Morn-ing Star. Dr. Forsythe says a few examples of symptoms and the marijuana strains that can address them include:Q Nausea. Chemotherapy treatments are notorious for leaving patients nau-seous. Some of the marijuana strains effective in controlling nausea are: Afghanica, OG Kush, Sour Diesel and Tangerine Dream. Q Pain. Many strains are said to be able to control pain, including Afghani-ca, Alaskan Thunder, Bay 11, Blueberry, Morning Star and OG Kush. Q Stress and anxiety. Some of the stress and anxiety cancer patients feel can be alleviated with strains such as Afghanica, Blueberry, Jack Herer, Morn-ing Star and Tangerine Dream. Marijuana can be used to treat a number of diseases and ailments,Ž Dr. For-sythe says. Unfortunately, many people are still against the use of marijuana in any form or for any reason. Its important to try to open their minds so that they realize the potential marijuana has to impr ove, and maybe even save, the lives of so many people.Ž Q „ Dr. James W. Forsythe, an integrative medical oncologist, is the author of more than 20 books, including his most recent, Stoned: The Truth About Medical Marijuana and Hemp OilŽ (drforsythe. com). He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Berkeley and earned his medical degree from University of California, San Francisco. Today he operates the Century Wellness Clinic in Reno, Nevada.SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

PAGE 21

Juno Beach Branch 14051 US Highway One, Juno Beach, FL 33408 (561) 630-4521Member FDICEQUAL HOUSINGLENDER RYour Home Town Bank TRUSTCOBANKwww.TrustcoBank.com Mortgage Sale No Application Fee!**No cash value. No Application Fee available for mortgage loans applied for before April 29, 2016. The value of the application fee for loans $15,000 to $550,000 is $299.00 and loans $550,050 to $1,250,000 is $349. **Lender Paid Private Mortgage Insurance on loans over 89.5% Loan-to-Value. Please Note: We reserve the right to alter or withd raw these products or certain features thereof without prior notification. NMLS #474376 Low Closing Costs No Borrower Paid PMI**Up to 89.5% Loan to Value Friendly, Local Service BY REALTOR.COMRecent housing and economic reports predict solid spring home sales, says Jonathan Smoke, realtor.coms chief economist. Mr. Smoke notes the follow-ing signs that suggest an upswing: Jobs: Job creation „ arguably the most important factor in housing demand „ is moving apace,Ž Smoke says. In January, the U.S. created 151,000 jobs; in February, it created 242,000. Unemployment is near 10-year lows. Smoke predicts that the latest employ-ment growth should translate into a 3 percent boost to home sales this year. Home sales: Existing-home sales from January 2015 to January 2016 grew 11 percent. Sales are taking longer close due to new truth-in-lending mortgage rules that took effect last fall, but the pace of sales is growing. New-home sales have also grown solidly year-over-year, and the median price of new homes is declining as more builders offer afford-able homes rather than catering only to the luxury market.Home prices: Prices are moving up and most of that has been attributed to the limited number of homes for sale. At the current pace, theres a four-month supply of homes on the market „ much lower than the norms of six to seven months.This is driving prices higher and encouraging consumers who hope to buy this year to get started as soon as possible,Ž Mr. Smoke says. Mortgage rates: Low mortgage rates are improving homebuyer affordabil-ity „ for now anyway. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged under 3.7 percent in the latest week, which offers buyers nearly 5 percent more buying power than they had at the end of 2015, Mr. Smoke notes. But as Mr. Smoke notes: not everything is rainbows and unicorns. The big-gest negative trend impacting potential demand relates to the January and Febru-ary declines in stock values, which have taken a toll on consumer confidence.Ž Also, a tight inventory of for-sale homes could also limit sales in the spring season. But for buyers who qual-ify, the low mortgage rates may prove a stronger motivator than too-few homes to consider. Q CFPB hopes to expand ‘rural’ designated areasThe U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced that its launching a new application process that could add more ruralŽ areas under its federal con-sumer financial law for mortgage lending. The application process starts March 31.Under new guidelines, the agency will accept applications for areas outside rural counties or census blocks to be considered as rural. If eligible, these areas may be suitable for certain exemp-tions and provisions from some mort-gage lenders under Rural Housing Ser-vice-Single-Family Housing programs. This step will allow the Bureau to consider whether there are smaller institutions that merit a designation as rural lenders but do not qualify under current guidelines,Ž says Richard Cor-dray, CFPBs director. The Bureau is taking quick action to fulfill our respon-sibility to Congress and implement the law.Ž To request a rural designation, applicants must identify the area and provide information to help CFPB evaluate the application under the Helping Expand Lending Practices in Rural Communi-ties Act. The application process is open until Dec. 4, 2017. View CFPBs amendment in its entirety on its website. Q BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH COUNTY COMMERCE A21 WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 Realtor.com prediction: Strong spring housing market

PAGE 22

A22 NEWS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYImpact 100 luncheon, Delray Dunes Golf and Country Club ‘Denim & Diamonds,’ for Boys and Girls Club, International Polo Club, Wellington LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY 1 Susan Duane, Kate Toomey, Dede Mahler and Susan Canada 2 Pat Canard and Connie Dix 3 Bette Coningsby and Joanne McAdams 4. Katie Phillips and Catherine Mouw 5. Carrie Hill and Martha Grimm 6. Nancy Mahler and Carol Steiner SHERRY FERRANTE PHOTOGRAPHY 1 Brandon Phillips, Nic Roldan, Jessica Springsteen, Marc Ganzi, Grant Ganzi and Kris Kampsen 2 Sean Brevak, Marley Overman, James Goad and Georgina Bloomberg 3. Demetreous Holden 4 Jessica Springsteen and Nic Roldan 5 Ric Bradshaw and Dorothy Bradshaw 6 Neil Hirsch and Sara Gehrke COURTESY PHOTOS 1 2 3 5 4 6 1 2 3 6 4 5

PAGE 23

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 BUSINESS A23 BEHIND THE WHEELR/T Scat Pack: A purple people-eater with a practical sideThe American muscle car is alive and well, and the Dodge Challenger R/T with Scat Pack is the proof. One look at this coupe, and it is obvious that the designs main goal is to stir up emotion for the original icon of the 70s. It has the same front overhang that gives the headlights an intimidating furrowedbrow appearance. The sheet metal has the famous kick upŽ behind the door that helps emphasize the power sent to the rear wheels. Even the paint brings up some nostalgic feelings. The color of the car seen here is called Plum Crazy, and it was part of the High ImpactŽ pallet that was available on the original Challenger. Back then Dodge would charge a whop-ping $15-$20 for this upgrade, but today it is free on every retro ride but the most basic model. While the exterior has gone for a wild and performance appearance, the interior reveals a more practical nature. There are not too many large coupes left on the market. That gives the Challeng-er a few more inches of rear headroom and legroom than the other Ameri-can retro coupes „ Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro. The back seat can handle adults without a second thought, although the front buckets might need to scoot up a bit to keep a full carload happy. There have been huge leaps in interior design and technology in the nearly half-century since the original Chal-lenger. But from the drivers seat, the interior retains an interesting lineage to the first car. The original door panels were long pieces of hard plastic, and this car keeps this appearance, but with a much softer touch. The center console and dashboard favored the driver in 1970. Today that focus is still there, and the years of electronic advancement are housed in the center touchscreen. Another hint of progress is that this muscle car starts with the push of a button rather than the turn of a key. But just like the original Challenger, this one feels like waking a beast every time it starts. The Scat Pack is particularly important here because it includes an upgrade to a 485 horsepower 6.4-liter V8 motor. This represents a middle sweet spot in the Challenger lineup. Our test vehicle can be picked up for around $40K „ that includes destina-tion charges and the gas guzzler tax, but not any rebates Dodge is likely offering at the time. Theres a base Challenger that receives fewer aggressive acces-sories and 180 less horsepower for a $12,500 savings. Theres also the SRT Hellcat version that has 707 hp and a near 200 mph top speed, but it is a $65K+ indulgence. There are actually 10 versions of the Challenger available from Dodge, and the Scat Pack seems to offer a good bal-ance of nice driving features without being too extravagant. This model even includes upgrades to Blistine shocks, Brembo disc brakes and Goodyear Eagle RS-A performance tires. Add this to the standard Super Track Pack that includes launch control, and it is a far more sophisticated machine than its 70s style suggests. Even with all this new technology, the latest Challenger does not stray from the all-out brute reputation earned by the original car. With so much torque in the motor, it takes very little effort to turn the tires into expensive lines on the pavement or to power slide through a deserted corner. This is not a tameless wild side, and so owners will get the hang of it within the first week. What might take drivers much more adjustment are the few quirks that come from the retro design. For example, the prohibitively thick c-pillar that helps give the rear its distinctive silhouette also means having to watch traffic more closely before merging. All it will take is one long test drive for individuals to decide if this style is too much of a per-sonal sacrifice. It is with these purposeful faults that this coupe seems to strike the right balance. The appeal of the Dodge Chal-lenger is about outlaw personality and the Scat Pack provides the power to back up this image. Q myles KORNBLATTmk@autominded.com MONEY & INVESTINGInvestors should know the reason when a company buys back stocksIn 2015, many publicly traded companies were facing a big problem „ they were amassing huge amounts of cash. Apple had $178 billion. Microsoft had over $90 billion and Google $64 billion. Drug company Pfizer amassed $53 billion in cash and the list can go on and on. You may be asking yourself how can having a huge amount of cash be a problem? Isnt that like being too goodlooking? Well, as we all know, with inter-est rates at zero, these companies were earning almost no return on this cash and company executives couldnt find enough organic projects to fund or merg-ers and acquisitions targets to put these funds to use. So 2015 turned into the year of the stock buyback for a multitude of publicly traded companies. But what are stock buybacks and are they really good for shareholders? Historically, if a company had excess cash they would return it to its stock-holders mainly in the form of dividends. In fact, most companies were judged by their dividends and how they grew pay-outs to shareholders over time. But over the last couple of decades, the perception of dividends has changed for a few reasons. First, investors today want high-growth, high-return stocks and many feel that a large dividend means that the company isnt using its capital to grow as fast as it might oth-erwise. To these investors, a high-dividendpaying stock is actually a negative because they would rather see a com-pany use its cash to fund high-return projects to boost its net income. Second, no executive ever wants to cut a dividend once it is put in place. So announcing a quarterly payout basically guarantees cash outflows way out into the future and reduces financial flexibility for years to come. And finally, many senior execu-tives today do not feel the benefit of divi-dends because many are not significant shareholders of their company. They are paid with cash and options so cash pay-outs to stockholders do not benefit them. Because of these reasons, executives at many firms have turned to stock buy-backs to return money to shareholders. This entails using company funds to buy stock in the open market and basically retiring it. There are two main benefits for existing shareholders when stock buybacks occur. First, each existing shareholder will own a larger percentage of the com-pany. For example, if you owned 100 shares of XYZ company out of 1,000 shares outstanding, you owned 1/10 of the company. If XYZ then bought back 200 shares, you would then own 1/8 of the company. Second, buybacks boost a companys earnings per share by reduc-ing the denominator of this fraction. If a company earns $1,000,000 and has 1,000,000 shares outstanding, its EPS, or earnings per share, is $1 per share. If the company retires 100,000 shares and has the same earnings, all of a sudden its EPS is $1.11 per share.So for a company executive, stock buybacks are very appealing. Many execu-tives are evaluated based on how well they can grow their companys EPS and a stock buyback can do this without any earning growth. Second, buybacks are generally short-term in nature so they are not saddled with long-term commitments that can hamper them in an economic downturn. And finally, buybacks gener-ally are positive on stock prices, which increase option valuations for executives.But are stock buybacks good for investors? As always, the answer is it depends.Ž If a management team is using a buyback program to mask poor earn-ings growth or a decline in market share, the buyback probably will not be posi-tive for investors in the long run. Or if a company takes on a large debt burden to buy back stock, this may also backfire when interest rates rise or the company has difficulties paying its debt back when it becomes due. On the other hand, buybacks can be more positive than divi-dends because with a dividend, the inves-tor needs to pay tax on that cash imme-diately. With a buyback, that benefit (and tax consequence) will be deferred until the investor sells the stock and realizes a capital gain. In addition, buybacks can be accretive when a company is underval-ued because of something going on in its industry or with its peers. Many compa-nies buy back stock after a drop in stock price to give confidence to its investors that management believes its company is undervalued and it is putting its money where its mouth is.Ž So, in the end, both dividends and stock buybacks benefit shareholders. And if you look at returns on both high-dividend and high stock buyback compa-nies in the long term, both have similar positive returns. I would say, though, that I prefer dividends over stock buybacks as they are more visible and if a company I own is going to return money to shareholders, I would prefer to have those funds in my pocket at the end of the day. But, as always, the devil is in the detail and it is critical to understand why the company you own is returning money to stockholders and what its future pros-pects are. Q „ Eric Bretan, the co-owner of Ricks Estate & Jewelry Buyers in Punta Gorda, was a senior derivatives marketer and investment banker for more than 15 years at several global banks. eric BRETANestaterick@gmail.com

PAGE 24

A24 BUSINESS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Norma Gaspari and Leslie Cook John Kearney, Kristin Kearney and Greg O’Hare Alice Mallon and Julie Berube Olga Rodgers, Greg O’Hare and Liliya Heretsun Rosalyn Gladwin and R.F. ‘Skip’ Gladwin Sam Dunlap, Greg O’Hare and David Katz Norma Wood, Joan Soilleux and Trish Ryno Kelly Dittmyre and Nancy Salatto Deighan Leif Ingebretsen and Kelly Dittmyre LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY The Loxahatchee Guild’s 32nd annual gala, Abacoa Golf Club in Jupiter NETWORKING The O’ Hare Group Strategic Portfolios Luncheon, Trump National, Jupiter COURTESY PHOTOS COURTESY PHOTOS

PAGE 25

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 BUSINESS A25LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.ANDY SPILOS / LA POSADA Carole Satterwaite, Michelle Meyer and Kristie Lenahan Brian Coughter and Danielle DePasquale Lynette Carr and Denis Pierre Clovette Mitchell, Maria Littleworth and Lynn MollicaDavid O’Brien, Lynette Carr, Jeff Welch, James Abbot and Michal Wall Kayleb Bowes and Laurali Bowes Lisa Lambka and Patricia Gordon Lisa Smith and Rick Minichino Amy Seigel, Lili Perez and Crystal Barrios NETWORKING La Posada Networking Event, PGA National Resort and Spa in Palm Beach Gardens

PAGE 26

A26 BUSINESS WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. NETWORKING Jupiter Medical Center launches $300 million campaign 1. Anthony Addesa, Gonzalo Loveday, Joe Taddeo, Liv Vesely, Marty Dytrych, John Couris, Lee Fox and Robert Coward 2. Aileen Alexander, Robert Landis and Pamela Landis 3. Matteo Rosselli, Charlie Gusmano and Karmita Gusmano 4. Sallie Korman and Anthony Addesa 5. Doug Brown, Missy Crisp and Peter Crisp 6. Lee Fox and Robert Coward 7. Cary Stamp, Sharon Stamp, Michelle Loveday and Gonzalo Loveday 8. Karmita Gusmano and Charlie Gusmano 9. Kristina Gostic, Judy Magalhaes, Lee Fox, Sherri Lewman and Lynn Stockford 10. Liv Vesely 11. Gonzalo Loveday 12. John Couris, Liv Vesely and Robert Coward 13. Paul Walczak and Daniel Ghiragossian 1 2 4 6 8 3 5 7 9 10 11 12 13 TRACEY BENSON PHOTOGRAPHY

PAGE 27

SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThis house simply is the finest Ibis Golf and Country Club has to offer. The unique location, at 7310 Winding Bay Lane, provides extra privacy and a breath-taking lake-point setting. This home was designed by Stofft, and no expense was spared with the inte-rior design. Custom built-ins reach to soaring, volume ceilings with fine millwork throughout and special attention in a chefs kitchen. Library walls are covered in chocolate suede and the desk is of Macassar ebony. The home has four bed-rooms, five full baths and two half-baths.It is offered at $1,745,000 by Sothebys International Realty. For more informa-tion, contact Patric ia Mahaney, 561 -3521066 or Patricia.Mahaney@sothebyshomes.com; or JB Edwards, 561-370-4141 or James.Edwards@sothebyshomes.com. Q REAL ESTATE FLORIDA WEEKLY A GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 A27 Home combines luxury, privacy at IbisCOURTESY PHOTOS

PAGE 28

t1#(BSEFOTnt+VQJUFSn www.langrealty.com 1("#PVMFWBSEr4VJUFt1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT]8 *OEJBOUPXO3Er4VJUFt+VQJUFS BAY ESTATES BOYNTON BEACH LEXINGTON GREENPALM BEACH GARDENS RUSTIC LAKES W. PALM BEACH EASTPOINTE CCPALM BEACH GARDENS JUPITER VILLAGEJUPITER MIDTOWNPALM BEACH GARDENS PALM BEACH HOTEL CONDOPB OAK HARBOURJUNO BEACH BALLENISLESPALM BEACH GARDENS PGA NATLPALM BEACH GARDENS BEAR LAKES ESTSWEST PALM BEACH OAKS EASTPALM BEACH GARDENS MONTEREY POINTE PBG EASTPOINTE CCPALM BEACH GARDENS JONATHANS LANDING JUPITER JUPITER VILLAGEJUPITER IBIS GOLF & CCWEST PALM BEACH 3BR/2BA … On water, new A/C and large screened patio in Landsdowne. $265,000DOREEN NYSTROM 56182768812BR/2BA … Renovated Kitchen & baths, 1 CG, Hurricane Shutters, Screened Balcony with Garden View. $230,000SCOTT WARNER 56138509383BR/2.1BA Spectacular property on over 6 acres of private beautiful land. $620,000RENEE FORD 56130981953BR/2BA Stunning home! Move in Ready, beautiful upgrades, light and bright. $296,900NANCY WALIGORA 56141463812BR/2BA … Beautiful home in very desirable community. $130,000 BONNIE BURKE 56137986652BR/2BA2nd floor condo with private balcony. Granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. $225,000VICKI COPANI 56130114632BR/1.1BACome and claim your piece of world famous Palm Beach Island at a great price! $199,500MARLA INEZEDY 56175806634BR/2.1BA … Former builders model on Intracoastal waterway. $549,000DEBBIE NIKOLOS 561-902-81342BR/2.1BA … Exceptional value. New roof, kitchen & master bath. Hot tub (spa) with beautiful view. $389,000JAY AGRAN 56137172243BR/2BA … Come work your design magic in this 1 story CBS home in Barclay Club. $299,000DIANE BRENNER 56181856263BR/2BA … Has loft, cathedral ceilings, new roof, lanai with private yard, & more! $334,000SCOTT WARNER 56138509383BR/2BA … This DiVosta built home has been totally remodeled. $450,000ANN MELENDEZ 56125263433BR/2BA … Desirable 1st floor end unit townhouse in PGA National. $339,500MARC SCHAFLER 56153120043BR/2BA Wonderful floor plan with high ceilings, golf course setting. $314,900NANCY WALIGORA 56141463814BR/4.1BA … Direct Intracoastal custom home on Casseekey Island. $2,495,000CAM KIRKWOOD 56171465893BR/2.1BA … Completely renovated and very spacious with open floor plan! $189,900KATIE RAWNSLEY 561-222-3268Featured Listing3BR/3BA Highly sought Alaina model 3br/3ba + den. Situated on oversized corner lot with amazing water views. The pool, spa, patio floor tiling, screen enclosure, built in barbeque area & awning makes outdoor living a delight. Home is light, bright with many extras. Crown molding, plantation shutters throughout, accordion shutters & built-ins in every closet. Has full-house generator.$575,000 RONA REVIEN 5613137930 Price Reduced! New Listing! New Listing! Under Contractin 34 days! Jupiter Palm Beach Gardens West Palm Beach Delray Beach Manalapan Of“ ce Locations: Boca Raton Port St. Lucie West Boca Raton East Boca Raton Boca West Country Club Boyton Beach at Hunters Run

PAGE 29

FIND OUT TODAY AT PalmBeachCounty.ValuationsToday.com HOMES VALUE? WHAT IS YOUR THIS WEBSITE IS ONLY FOR CLIENTS SEEKING AN AWESOME HOME BUYING EXPERIENCE:> MalloyRealtyGroup.com Malloy Realty Group at KW 2901 PGA Blvd., Suite 100 Palm Beach Gardens Florida 33410 | Call 561.876.8135 330 SUNSET BAY LANE STUNNING SINGLE FAMILY HOME, 3BR, 2 CAR GARAGE PRESTIGIOUS COUNTRY CLUB LIVING AT AN UNBELIEVABLE PRICE. $300,000 BALLENISLES BARGAIN The Art of Living Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Suite 337 | Palm Beach, FL 33480 561.659.3555 | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach THREE STORY VILLA | $895,000 | Web: 0076733 | Kim Raich | 561.718.1216

PAGE 30

A30 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY ILLUSTRATED PROPERTIES IS PLEASED TO WELCOME HOMETHE FOLLOWING AGENTS FOR THE 14TH YEAR, ILLUSTRATED PROPERTIES REMAINS THE #1 MARKET LEADER IN PALM BEACH COUNTY WITH MORE THAN $1.4 BILLION IN SALESDEBBIE ZULOAGA | 561.776.4412 ELISA GORDON | 561.727.6185 Sally Colbert WellingtonI love the continuing education, support staff, & nurturing environment! Shelly Sandler WellingtonI have my own office space! Clay Hyslop DelrayIt’s a family owned business that really supports their agents like family! Kathryn Gillespie ManalapanI get exceptional support in marketing, education, and transaction administration. Ann Gott Hobe SoundThis is the most professional R.E. company in the area! Peggy Doepper DelrayIt feels like I’m home! Bertha Matics CorporateThis is a big company with a family feeling! Rick Doepper DelrayWe’re so impressed with the on-site marketing department! KOVEL: ANTIQUESMr. Peanut costumes highly collectible, and bring sweet auction prices BY TERRY KOVEL AND KIM KOVEL Mr. Peanut is a trademark for Planters Peanuts that has been in use for 100 years. Amedeo Obici and Mario Peruzzi (who later became his brother-in law) started the Planters Nut and Chocolate Co. in 1906 in Penn sylv ania. They made Burgomaster Brand Salted Peanuts sold in bags, a new idea. Soon the nuts also were sold in tin cans and glass jars. The company recognized the need for advertising and branding. In 1916, it ran a contest for a trademark and Anthony Gen-tile, a 10-year-old boy, won with the sketch of a smiling peanut with arms and legs. It was later improved by an artist, and from 1913 to 1961, Mr. Peanut was dressed with a tophat, white spats, black arms and legs, gloves, shoes, an ebony cane and a monocle. For a few years during World War II, he carried a gun and looked like a soldier in a hard helmet. The company still uses Mr. Peanut as a mascot, giveaway and adver-tising symbol. Figurines, tall drugstore scales shaped like Mr. Peanut, costumes, books, dishes, glass jars, toys, charms, puzzles, textiles, salt and pepper shakers, silverware, a sleeping bag and games were made. Today there is a club called Peanut Pals. Mr. Peanut finally changed his clothes in a 2010 update. He now is seen in ads and commercials with an added white shirt, gloves, a black tie, vest, and black legs or pants. One of the biggest Mr. Pea-nuts collectibles is a 1940s costume. The wearers legs and arms poke out the sides of the composition peanut body that fits on the persons body. The person inside has to wear black sleeves, tights, shoes and socks that will show. Mr. Peanuts body has holes for eyes, a nose, mouth and ears to let the person breathe and talk. The head and top hat are taller than the body, making an almost 6-foot figure. One auctioned at a 2015 James Julia auction in Fairfield, Maine, for $474. Mr. Peanut is now also a colorful star in TV commercials with the voice of Robert Downey. To learn more about Mr. Peanut, visit PeanutPals.org for the Peanut Pals Club. It is a group of collectors who have a club, newsletter and annual convention. Q: A friend has 10 Hans Wegner dining room chairs, eight side chairs and two armchairs. They were bought in Denmark in the early 1960s. They are wood with leather seats and backs. There is some crack-ing of the leather. Should the leather be replaced? Will this lower the value of the chairs? A: Hans Wegner (19142007) was a Danish furniture designer best known for his innovative chair designs. He designed over 500 different chairs, as well as hundreds of beds, desks, tables and lighting. Leather chairs should be kept out of the sun, away from heat, and in a room with enough humidity to keep the leather from drying out. Leather should be dusted regularly and can be cleaned with a special leather cleaner or by wiping with a damp cloth and soapy water. If the chair is unusable in its pres-ent condition, your friend should have a professional replace the leather. As long as a professional restoration is done using real leather, it will not lower the value of the chairs significantly. Q: I have a Dionne quintuplets candy dish I think is made of silver. It has the faces of each of the girls when they were babies embossed on the bottom and their names on the rim. Is it worth anything? A: You have a chrome (not silver) cereal bowl made in 1935 as a Quaker Oats premium commemorating the quintuplets first birthday. The Dionne quintuplets were born on May 28, 1934, and were the first set of quintuplets to survive. They became world famous because and were pictured in ads for Quaker Oats and several other products. Thousands of dolls and souvenir items were made picturing the girls at different ages. Emilie died in 1954, Marie in 1970, Yvonne in 2001. Annette and Cecile still live in Cana-da. Some are offered online for $13 to $25. Q: I am hoping you can give me the value of a vintage Polaroid Time-Zero OneStep camera. Also wondering, do you know if film for it is still available? A: In 1972, the Polaroid Corp. introduced its revolutionary SX-70 Land Cam-era. It was a single-lens reflex camera in a folding metal case with leather trim. It used a new kind of film in a cassette with its own battery that instantly developed and produced a print. A later model, the Polaroid OneStep, was made from 1977 to 1980. It used the same SX-70 film pack, but had a nonfolding white plastic body with Polaroids signature rainbow stripe. It was replaced in 1981 with the Time-Zero OneStep. The body was black plastic body with the rainbow stripe and it, too, used the SX-70 film pack. Polaroid stopped making the film for these cameras in 2008, but a group of investors, said to include some former Polaroid employees, organized The Impossible Project and began producing new instant black-and-white and color film in 2010. It is available in online shops. A Polaroid Time-Zero OneStep camera sells today from $35 to $50, but the film is pricey. Tip: Modern bleach can damage 18thcentury and some 19th-century dishes. To clean old dishes, try hydrogen peroxide or bicarbonate of soda. Each removes a dif-ferent type of stain. Q „ The Kovels answer questions mailed to the column. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. Write to Kovels, Florida Weekly, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.This Mr. Peanut is dressed in a composition or fiberglass body with an attached tophat and monocle. It sold for $474 in 2015.

PAGE 31

rr nn n r rr r r With our of“ce in the heart of Palm Beach and 6,000 agents nationwide plus the international scale and scope of Knight Frank Residential, the Douglas Elliman network reaches across 58 countries and 6 continents. GLOBAL CONNECTIONS. LOCAL AGENTS.Your buyers could be down the street or on the other side of the world, but your local Douglas Elliman agents have the tools to “nd them . reach matters.For the full list of Douglas Elliman locations, visit elliman.com/of“ces/”orida

PAGE 32

Sign up today for the Singer Island Market Updatewww.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist 561.889.6734 Enter Tower Suite 7A and experience a world class condominium with panoramic direct oceanfront views. With over 7,440 square feet, every room has a view! Total square footage over 9,179! Tastefully completed in a beautiful array of classically designed “ nishes and furnishings, yet comf ortable and cozy the perfect back drop for an estate on the Ocean! Massive living areas including two living areas, den/of“ ce, formal dining room, custom chefs kitc hen with LEEDS cabinetry, butlers/catering kitchen, bar/beverage area, master bedroom suite with his and her baths, master suite sitting room with morning kitchen, 3 guest bedrooms with ensuite baths, private elevator foyer. Lutron controlled lighting. This residence is being sold fully furnished. $8,500,000. For a private tour, please call Jeannie Walker (561) 889-6734. *)%896)(6)7-()2')6MX^8S[IV7YMXI% Martinique ET1201 2BR/3.5BA $675,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 306B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,024,900 Martinique ET1702 2BR/3BR $875,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,189,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 205B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,225,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2506B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,395,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1206B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,249,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 404B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,399,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 204B 2BR/2,5BA+DEN $1,399,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2104B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,750,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 402B 3BR/3.5BA $1,750,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 2401A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,750,000 Martinique ET503 2BR/3.5BA $575,000 UNDER CONTRACT The Resort-Marriott 1651 3BR/3.5BA $1,499,999 Ritz Carlton Residence 705B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,650,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1105B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,599,000 Ritz Carlton Residence 1805B 2BR+DEN/2.5BA $1,699,000 Martinique WT604 2BR/3.5BA $599,000 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING Ritz Carlton Residence 402A 3BR+DEN/3.5BA $3,780,000 Oceans Edge 1401 4BR/4.5BA $2,800,000 NEW LISTING

PAGE 33

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE B1 WEEK OF MARCH 10-16, 2016 HAPPENINGS BY JANIS FONTAINEpbnews@” oridaweekly.com Outside Mullingar,Ž John Patrick Shanleys romantic comedy, opens March 25 with specially priced pre-views on March 23-24, at the Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Mr. Shanley has a Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a Tony Award for Best Play for his work DoubtŽ and an Oscar for best original screen-play for 1988s Moonstruck.Ž In Outside Mulligar,Ž onstage through April 24, Mr. Shanley taps into his Irish roots in this story line full of twists. A family feud, a secret crush, a painful rejection and stubborn Irish pride pre-vent meant-to-be love from bloom-ing between neighbors Rose-mary Muldoon and Anthony Reilly. The play is directed by J. Barry Lewis, and features four fresh faces. Nick Heth-erington plays Anthony and Kathy McCafferty is his beloved Rosemary. Pa tricia Kilgarriff plays Rosemarys mother, Aoife; and Alex Wipf is Anthonys father, SEE HAPPENINGS, B8 X SEE TURTLEFEST, B7 X The crawl of nature: TurtleFest returns Families can get up close and personal with endangered sea turtles, learn how to protect marine life and enjoy a day of food, music and fun when TurtleFest 2016 kicks off on Saturday, March 19, at Log-gerhead Marinelife Center. Attendance is free. The popular, beachside event „ in its 13th year „ attracts more than 10,000 fes-tival-goers annually and offers a variety of activities ranging from carnival games, gymnastics, rock climbing, live bands and a 40-foot-tall slide with a stunning view of the Atlantic Ocean. Attendees can chat with turtle specialists about endangered species, sample food and watch their children play. Our main focus behind TurtleFest is to let the community know about ocean and sea turtle conservation and why its so important,Ž said Kat Rumbley, market-ing and communications coordinator for the center. Its pretty awesome.Ž The event runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. New this year is a bicycle valet station so guests can ride their bikes to TurtleFest COURTESY PHOTOPalm Beach Dramaworks will produce John Patrick Shanley’s ‘Outside Mullingar.’Dramaworks heads to Ireland in ‘Mullingar’ SEE OPERA, B7 XWith humor, but pride as well, tenor Anthony Laciura refers to many of his roles in a half-cen-tury as a professional opera singer as the second banana.Ž More formally known as the comprimario,Ž another such role is bringing him out of retirement as an opera performer when he appears March 18-19 in the Palm Beach Opera season closer, Richard Strauss Ariadne auf Naxos.ŽBY BILL HIRSCHMANFlorida Weekly Correspondent ‘Boardwalk Empire’ star Anthony Laciura is the Major-Domo in Palm Beach Opera’s ‘Ariadne auf Naxos.’ INEZ FRID / COURTESY PHOTOAnthony Laciura rehearses his role as the Major-Domo in Palm Beach Opera’s production of ‘Ariadne auf Naxos.’ Mr. Laciura in two of the roles from Offen-bach’s ‘The Tales of Hoffman.’Meet one of operas topsecond bananasBY SALLIE JAMESFlorida Weekly Correspondent COURTESY PHOTOTurtleFest will provide plenty of opportunities for kids and adults to have fun.HETHERINGTON KILGARRIF LACIURA WIPF

PAGE 34

B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY A woman was helping her dad clear his house to put it on the market, and it was full. It seemed her late mom was an inveterate shopper. QVC, eBay „ you name it.The place was packed with limitededition collector plates, figurines, bottles and other assorted goodies that had been sold under the notion that they would appreciate in value on the secondary market. Father and daughter thought they were sitting on a potential goldmine. But thats where a little knowledge is dangerous. Just because someone tells you something is a limited edition does not mean that it is rare „ or valuable. In the case of the dozens of dolls Mom had purchased online, most were made in a limited production run of a certain number of days „ they could have turned hundreds of thousands over the course of a month or so. The same can be said for collector plates. She had bought dozens of pretty Royal Doulton plates still in the box. A quick scan of eBay showed they were now being offered at less than $10 apiece, far less than what was paid for them new. The people were disappointed.And heres why their items were worth precious little: All were mass-produced, designed to lure collectors hoping to turn a buck later on. Those so-called collectibles had few individual characteristics that would make them stand out as works of art. And displaying them would have made a room look cl utter ed, simply because the quality was not great to begin with. Had the dolls or plates been something truly limited in scope „ say, dolls in editions of fewer than 100 that had been beautifully handmade in a studio like the one of doll artist R. John Wright „ they may well have appreciated in value on the secondary market. And they would have paid more than $39 or $49 for the items when new „ remember how Beanie Babies soared in price before the market collapsed? A new doll by R. John Wright, a wonderful sculpture of glass or a good limited-edition print may be priced in the thousands. The lesson? Buy what you like and display it proudly, but dont plan to retire on it. Q scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com COLLECTORS CORNERLimited edition may mean limited appeal when selling LOOK WHAT I FOUNDBought: Estate sale, Naples Cost: $35. The Skinny: The Morgantown Glass Works made wonderfully clear, colorful glass in West Virginia from 1900 to 1974, including a line of stemware ordered by Jacqueline Kennedy for the White House. The Golf Ball line dates from about 1939 to 1971. This set of footed sodas is in the companys Stiegel Green color. I have a rainbow of Morgantown glass, which also was made in deeply saturated cobalt blues and ruby reds. Most folks would use these as water goblets, but I find they are the perfect shape for champagne, and Ill raise a glass to that every time. Q „ Scott Simmons ”‹–‡–‘…‘––ƒ–••‹‘•7 Ž‘”‹†ƒ™‡‡Ž›…‘Set of Morgantown Golf Ball footed soda glasses THE FIND:SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYMorgantown Golf Ball footed soda goblets were made between 1939 and 1971 in West Virginia. This color, which tends toward hues of teal, is called Stiegel Green.

PAGE 35

Fresh Flourishing Fla v orfu l Festive Downt o wn W est P alm Beach a new side of Art Galleries. Theatres. International Dining. Shopping. Museums. Live Music. Wine Tastings. And More.When you think about memorable places, think Downtown West Palm Beach. Just take a walk and see for yourself! Palm Beach International Boat Show MARCH 17 20 Downtown Waterfront100 N. Clematis Street Outside Mullingar MARCH 25 APRIL 24 Palm Beach Dramaworks201 Clematis Street Upcoming EventsPalm Beach Book Festival APRIL 1 Palm Beach Dramaworks201 Clematis Street Palm Beach Symphony presents: Monumental Engagement APRIL 10 The Kravis Center of the Performing Arts701 Okeechobee Boulevard SS Normandie: North Atlantics Greatest Goddess Lecture APRIL 13 Historical Society of Palm Beach County300 N. Dixie Highway Sunfest APRIL 27 MAY 1 Downtown Waterfront100 N. Clematis Street Pairings Food and Wine Event MAY 26 Various DowntownWPB Locations Keep an eye out for Downtown happenings through our social media @DowntownWPB Brought to you by the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority DowntownWPB.com 561.833.8873

PAGE 36

B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDARPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@flori-daweekly.com. THURSDAY3.17 Clematis By Night — No Clematis by Night March 17. Go to the Interna-tional Boat Show. “My Son the Waiter: A Jewish Tragedy” — Through March 27, The Palm Beaches Theatre, 262 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan. Actor/comedian Brad Zimmermans inspiring story about the grit and passion required to make it as an artist. Tickets: $40-$65. 844-448-7469; online at MySonTheWaiter.com.“Curtains: A Musical Comedy Murder Mystery” — Through March 27 at the Wick Theatre, 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. Called Robin Hood of the Old WestŽ, this is a Western adaptation of the Robin Hood story thats so bad its laughable. The show won three Tony Awards. Tickets: $75-$80. Info: 995-2333; thewick.org. FRIDAY3.18 Quilts of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow — Palm Beach County Quilters Guild, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 18 and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. March 19, Buildings 9 and 10, South Florida Fairgrounds, West Palm Beach. Cost: $10 for two-day entry; palmbeachquilters.org.Art Boca Raton — March 18-21, International Pavilion at FAUs Research Park, 3450 NW Eighth Ave., Boca Raton. A showcase of contemporary work, modern masters, and emerging art, sculpture, photography, works on paper and installations by 55 regional, national, and international dealers. Florida galler-ies include Vertu Fine Art (Boca Raton); Art Link International (Lake Worth), Art Media (Miami), Latin Art Core (Miami) and White Space (West Palm Beach). Art Clipper is coming from Hel-sinki, and Art Platinum from Singapore. A lecture series is also planned. Hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. Tickets: $20 for one-day passes, $12 students. Multiday passes are $25. Info: artbocaraton.com.The Seventh Annual Peeps Show — 6-10 p.m. March 18, Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery, 15 S. J St., Lake Worth. Celebrity judging as well as a PEEPLES choice. On display through April 6. The top prize is $100 and four $50 prizes from PEEPs. Info: 588-8344; FlamingoClayStudio.org. SATURDAY3.19 Annual Egg Extravaganza — 9 a.m. March 19, Gardens Park, 4301 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Three age groups, 3 years and under, 4-6 years, and 7-10 years. A traditional egg hunt featur-ing prizes, childrens activities and a visit from The Bunny. BYO baskets. 630-1100; pbgrec.com.Battle for the Brick Pickleball Doubles Championship — 10 a.m.3 p.m. March 19, Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. The entry fee is $20 per team. Singles can enter for $10 and be teamed with another single for the tournament. Register online at pbgrec.com or in per-son at the rec center. Info: 630-1100. SUNDAY3.20 Rabbi David G. Dalin speaks — 1 p.m. March 20, Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. From Lin-coln to Obama, the U.S. Presidents rela-tions with the Jewish community will be discussed. Dalin is the co-author of The Presidents of the United States & the Jews. $5. Info: 276-6161, Ext. 204 or email adulted@templesinaipbc.org. Easter Concert: “Requiem” — 4 p.m. March 20, First Presbyterian Church, 482 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Gabriel Faures music performed by the Chancel Choir, professional soloists and a small orchestra with strings and harp. Suggested donation $10. Info: 746-5161, Ext. 10; tequestapres.org.The Palm Beach International Polo — Sundays through April 24, at the International Polo Club Palm Beach, Wellington. A season of challenge cups, qualifier matches and tournaments leading up to the U.S. Open Polo Cham-pionship. 282-5290; internationalpolo-club.com Winter Equestrian Festival — Through April 3 at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wel-lington. See the worlds best riders in both show jumping and dressage in four classes: Olympians, adult amateurs, juniors, and children. 793-5867; equestri-ansport.com. THURSDAY3.24 Clematis By Night — 6-9 p.m. Thursdays on the Palm Stage at the West Palm Beach Waterfront, 101 N. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Live music, vendors, free. Clematisbynight.netMarch 24: Replay (Pop/Dance) with Quick Fix (Pop). March 31: The Goodnicks (Top 40). Mix Keith Urban with the Goo Goo Dolls. Info: thegoodnicks.com.Armory Art Center: Artists-in-Residence Exhibition „ An opening recep-tion will be held 6-8 p.m. March 24 at the Lake Worth Annex, 1121 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth. Features work by Nolan Baumgartner; Tristyn Bustaman-te, Isabel Gouveia, Chad R. Steve, and Izel Vargas. Hours: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-day-Wednesday. Info: 832-1776, Ext. 33. LOOKING AHEAD The ninth annual Rooney’s 5K Run / Walk — 7:30 a.m. March 26, Palm Beach Kennel Club, 1111 N. Con-gress Ave., West Palm Beach. This family fun run will benefit the Westgate/ Belve-dere Homes CRA, the Autism Project of Palm Beach County, Pathways to Inde-pendence and Potentia Academy. Begins at Palm Beach Kennel Club, through the historic Westgate /Belvedere Homes area and the Dennis P. Koehler Pre-serve. Also offers a kids 1 Mile Run/Walk, plus games, awards, breakfast at Rooneys, following the run. Entry Fees: $30 until March 19, $35 until March 25m and $40 on race day. Residents, military and veterans are $15. Students and kids mile $10. Info: 683-2222, ext. 142 or 146; RooneysGolfFoundation.org AT THE COLONY The Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Info: 659-8100 or 655-5430; thecolonypalmbeach.com.Marilyn Maye — Through March 19. Back for her eighth engagement, shes also a record-holder for appearances (76) on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.Ž Miss Maye has performed at New Yorks Copa Cobana, The Living Room, Michaels Pub, The Rainbow Grill, St. Regis, The Metropoli-tan Room, Birdland and 54 Below. AT DRAMAWORKS Palm Beach Dramaworks at The Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Info: 514-4042, Ext. 2; palmbeachdramaworks.com.“Outside Mullingar” — Opens March 25 with specially priced preview March 23-24, at the Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. John Patrick Shanley taps into his Irish roots in a romantic comedy. A family feud, a secret crush, a mask of invincibility, and stubborn pride prevent love from blooming between neighbors. Tickets: $64, preview tickets are $44 and opening night tickets are $79. Student tickets are $10. Info: 514-4042, or visit palmbeachdramaworks.org. AT THE DUNCAN Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State Col-lege, 4200 Congress Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 868-3309; palmbeachstate.edu/the-atre/duncan-theatre.Limn Dance Company — 8 p.m. March 18-19. Tickets: $39. The living legacy of Jos Limn and his mentors, Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman, who revolutionized American dance. The Bronx Wanderers — 8 p.m. March 29. Duncan Theatre.Classical Caf Series: Navah Perlman, piano — 2 p.m. March 30.Pilobolus Dance Theater — 8 p.m. April 1-2. Tickets: $45. This collab-orative company known for its mix of humor, invention, and drama returns to the Duncan stage. AT THE EISSEY Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive off PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens. Tick-ets: 207-5900; eisseycampustheatre.org.Ballet Palm Beach: “Gatsby” — 7:30 p.m. March 19, 4 p.m. March 20. Bal-let Palm Beach presents the premiere of Gatsby,Ž an original ballet interpreting F. Scott Fitzgeralds masterpiece, The Great Gatsby. Tickets: $17-$37 at ballet-palmbeach.org.2016 Arts in the Gardens...The Diamonds — 8 p.m. March 21. A Tribute to the Masters — 8 p.m. March 22. The Symphonias Encore Connoisseur Concert has a program of Beethovens Coriolan Overture, op. 62, Beethovens Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, op. 15, Ives The Unanswered Question and Mendelssohns Symphony No. 4 in A major, op. 90 Italian, conduct-ed by Gerard Schwarz. Arrive at 7 p.m. for a pre-concert conversation with the maestro at 7 p.m. Tickets: $35-$55. Info: 376-3848; thesymphonia.org.Jazz Ensembles & Troubadours — 7:30 p.m. March 23. Features the PBSC music department musicians. Tickets: $10. Young Concert Artists: Cicely Parnas, Cello — 7 p.m. March 24, PBSC Eissey Campus Theatre. $30-$40. Arts in the Gardens: Rhythm in the Night — 8 p.m. March 30, PBSC Eissey Campus Theatre. IN THE BB BUILDING GALLERY: Vicki Siegel & Leora Stewart: Blurring Distinctions — Through March 18. Info: 207-5015. AT THE FLAGLER The Flagler Museum, One Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; younger than 6 free. 655-2833; flaglermuseum.us.“Beauty’s Legacy: Gilded Age Portraits in America” — Through April 17. Features 53 stunning portraits of prominent Gilded Age Americans by the leading painters from America and Europe. The exhibition was organized by the New-York Historical Society from their collection of American art. AT FAU JUPITER Lifelong Learning Society complex at FAUs MacArthur Campus, 5353 Parkside Drive, Jupiter. Tickets for lectures and concerts are $25 members, $35 nonmem-bers. Info: fau.edu/llsjupiter or 799-8547.Lunafest: Films By, For and About Women — 6 p.m. March 24. This traveling film festival showcases six award-winning short films, stories of reflection, hope and humor. Tickets: $20. Info: 799-8547; fau.edu/llsjupiter. AT FOUR ARTS The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Gallery and box office: 655-7226; fourarts.org. EXHIBITS: “Invitation to the Ball: Marjorie Merriweather Post’s Fancy Dress Costumes” — Through April 17. CONCERTS: Musical Pictures: Keyboard Conversations with Jeffrey Sie-gel — 3-5 p.m. March 20.Turtle Island Quartet with Cyrus Chestnut, “Jelly, Rags & Monk” — 8-10 p.m. March 23. BOLSHOI BALLET: Kachaturian’s “Spartacus” — 2-5:15 p.m. March 19. LECTURES: “The World of Raymond Chan-dler: In His Own Words,” with Barry Day — 6-7 p.m. March 21. Four Arts Hall. Free. Reservations required. Dixon Bldg. Florida Voices — 1:30-2:30 p.m. March 23. Ditch of Dreams: The Cross Florida Barge Canal and the Struggle for Floridas Future,Ž by Steven Noll and David Tegeder.Faberg: A Life of Its Own — 2-3:30 p.m. March 26. Rubbing Shoulders by Marc Rosen — 2:30-3:30 p.m. March 31. Four Arts Hall. Dixon Bldg. OKeeffe Lecture Series:Jonathan Galassi, “The Good Old Days: An Editor Looks Back” — March 22.Margaret Hoover, “The Repub-lican Party and the Millennial

PAGE 37

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 CALENDAR TOP PICKS #SFL 03.19-20 03.22-27 #SEETHEMDANCE #LIVINGLEGEND Q Limn Dance Company — 8 p.m. March 18-19, Duncan Theatre; 868-3309. QMarilyn Maye — The cabaret singer performs through March 19 at The Colony’s Royal Room; thecolonypalmbeach.com. Q‘Gatsby’ — Ballet Palm Beach presents the premiere of ‘Gatsby,’ 7:30 p.m. March 19, 4 p.m. March 20. Tickets: $17-$37 at balletpalmbeach.org.Q‘Bullets Over Broadway’ — March 22-27 at the Kravis Center; kravis.org. Generation” — March 29. FRIDAY FILM SERIES: “Mr. Turner” — 2:30, 5:15 and 8 p.m. March 25. AT THE KRAVIS The Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-7469; kravis.org.Capitol Steps: Mock the Vote — March 17-19 and March 22-26; 1:30 p.m. March 19, 20, 23, 26 and 27. Steve Ross in “Ridin’ High … The Music of Porter, Astaire and Coward” — March 18-19.“Ariadne auf Naxos” — By Palm Beach Opera, March 18-20.ArtSmart Lunch & Learn — 11:30 a.m. March 21 in the Cohen Pavilion. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: The Subtle Staying Power of an American Icon.Kravis on Broadway: “Bullets Over Broadway” — March 22-27. Chamber Music Society of Lin-coln Center — March 28. Johnny Mathis, The 60th Anni-versary Concert Tour — March 29. Michael Feinstein: Hooray for Hollywood — March 30. AT THE LIGHTHOUSE Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $10 adults, $5 chil-dren ages 6-18; free for younger than 6. Jupiter Lighthouse participates in the Blue Star Museums program. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting; call for tour times. RSVP required for most events at 747-8380, Ext. 101; jupiterlighthouse.org.Lighthouse Sunset Tour — Time varies by sunset. $15 members, $20 non-members. Lighthouse Moonrise Tour — Time varies by sunset. AT THE LYRIC Lyric Theatre, 59 SW Flagler Ave., downtown Stuart. Info: 772-286-7827; lyrictheatre.com.Pat Donohue — March 17. The Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra — March 18. Robert Navarro and his Latin Jazz Orchestra “A Night at the Palladium” — March 19. Bluebird Productions.Fiesta Mexico-Americana fea-turing Los Lobos — March 21. Assisted Living The Musical — March 23. Starbrite Musical Productions. AT MACARTHUR BEACH John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive on Singer Island, North Palm Beach. Info: 776-7449; macarthurbeach.org.Birding at MacArthur Park — 2 p.m. March 20. A ranger-led educational walk identifying the birds who thrive in the park. Reservations recommended. Bring binoculars or rent them in the gift shop. Free with paid park admission. AT THE MALTZ Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. 575-2223. Jupiterthe-atre.org “Kiss Me, Kate” — Through March 27. Tickets start at $55.Yesterday: A Tribute to the Bea-tles — March 21. Heres a chance to mourn the loss of the Fifth Beatle, George Martin, who passed away March 8. $45 and $55. Brenda Braxton: On Broadway — March 30. Tickets are $30. “Gypsy” audition prep classes: 4:15-5:45 p.m. March 18 and April 1 and 8. $27 per class. Wear dance clothing (no sandals or open-toe shoes).Free audition workshop: A 30-minute workshop from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. March 20. Parents can learn about opportunities available at the theater while kids learn a song in the voice stu-dio and a dance combination in the dance studio. Students are asked to wear dance clothing (no sandals or open-toe shoes). AT THE JCC The Mandel JCC, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Info: 689-7700; jccon-line.com/pbg.March 18: Beginners Bridge Supervised Play. March 20: Brunch & Bridge.March 21: Bridge: Advanced Beginners Supervised Play with J.R.; Canasta 101; Mah Jongg & Canasta Play; Duplicate Bridge; Timely Topics Discussion Group; Mussar: The Way to a Higher Self. March 22: Hebrew: Conversational; Six-handed Canasta; Hebrew for Begin-ners; Mah Jongg 101; Film Talk: The Work of Billy Crystal; Duplicate Bridge; Distinguished Speaker Series: The Duke & Duchess of Windsor.March 23: Advanced Beginners Supervised Play; Play of the Hand with Fred; A Day at the Norton; Duplicate Bridge; Mah Jongg & Canasta Play; Men, Lets Talk.March 24: Canasta 101; Artistic Collaborations Across the Centuries Part II; Duplicate Bridge. IN THE BENTE S. AND DANIEL M. LYONS ART GALLERY: Zachary Rapaport: “Unbound-ed: Bringing Art to Life” — Through March 24. The 18-year-olds exhibit combines engineering with art, and features a kinetic installation. AT MOUNTS Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Mili-tary Trail, West Palm Beach. Info: 233-1737; mounts.orgFlorida’s Medicinal Wildflowers — 6-7:30 p.m. March 23, Auditorium. Joanna Helms, founder of Mama Jos Sunshine Herbals and a member of the American Herbalist Guild, speaks about Floridas medicinal wildflowers and tra-ditional herbalism. $20 for members; $25 for nonmembers. AT PBAU Palm Beach Atlantic University, West Palm Beach. Locations vary. Tickets: 803-2970; ticket_central@pba.edu. Info: pba.edu/performances.A Showcase of Dance — March 20. Pieces choreographed and per-formed by PBA dance students. 2 p.m. $5. Rinker Hall. Frontwave New Music Festival — 7:30 p.m. March 31, April 1-2. New music from PBA student and faculty composers. Rinker Hall. AT THE PLAYHOUSE The Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 586-6410; lake-worthplayhouse.org.

PAGE 38

B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY CALENDAR“Inherit the Wind” — Through March 31. At the Stonzek Theatre — Screening indie and foreign films daily. $9 gen-eral, $7 Monday matinee. AT MOUNTS Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Mili-tary Trail, West Palm Beach. Info: 233-1737; mounts.org.Garden Book Discussion Series — 7-8:30 p.m. April 9, Clayton Hutcheson Complex, Conference Room. The fea-tured book in April will be Silent Spring by Rachel Carson. Free. AT THE IMPROV Palm Beach Improv at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach. Info: 833-1812; palmbeachimprov.com. Rich Guzzi, the Comic Hypno-tist — March 17-20. $20. AT THE SCIENCE CENTER The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. 832-1988; sfsciencecenter.org.Dinosaurs Around the World: The Exhibition — Through April 16. Admission: $16.95 adults, $14.95 seniors age 60 age older, $12.95 for age 3-12, and free for members and younger than age 3. LIVE MUSIC The Bamboo Room — 25 S. J St., Lake Worth. Info: 585-2583; bam-booroommusic.com Respectable Street Caf — 518 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-9999; Sub-culture.org/respectables.Cafe Boulud: The Lounge — 9 p.m. Fridays, in the Brazilian Court Hotel, 301 Australian Ave., Palm Beach. Vocalist Raquel Williams performs an eclectic mix of American, Latin and Caribbean songs. Info: 655-6060; cafe-boulud.com/palmbeachDeep Blu Seafood Grille at Har-bourside Place — 119 Dockside Circle, Jupiter. Philippe Harari performs from 6:30-9 p.m. Wednesday and Satur-day. 273-6680. E.R. Bradley’s — 104 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Inf o: 833 -3520; erbradleys.comMusic on the Plaza — 6-8 p.m. Thursdays through April 28, Maint-street at Midtown; 4801 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Food trucks. Info: Midtownpga.com Paris in Town Le Bistro — 6-9 p.m. Fridays, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave, Suite 4101, Palm Beach Gardens. Frank Cerabino plays French favorites on his accordion. Info: 622-1616; parisin-town.comThe Tin Fish — 118 S. Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Info: 223-2497; tin-fishclematis.com ONGOING The Ann Norton Sculpture Gar-dens — 2051 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Admission: $10 adults, $8 seniors and $5 students. Free for mem-bers. Info: 832-5328; ansg.org.Q Lunch in the Garden — Each Wednesday through Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. EmKo will be offering an artistic al fresco lunch in the garden. Through Tuesday, May 3. The Armory Art Center — 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-1776; armoryart.org.Q2016 Armory Faculty Showcase — March 26-April 15. An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. March 25. Q2016 Armory Student Showcase — March 26-April 15, in Montgomery Hall. An opening reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. March 25.QAdd Some / Take Some: An Abstraction Showcase: Through March 19. Armory Annex, 1121 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth. Hours: 1-5 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. APBC Art on Park Gallery — 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Info: 689-2530. QPortraits 2016 Exhibit — Through March 31. Info: 345-2842.The Atala Chapter of the North American Butterfly Association meets — 7-9 p.m. March 17, at the Pine Jog Environmental Education Center, 6301 Summit Blvd, West Palm Beach. Sandy Koi will speak about imperiled butter flies. Guests welcome. Info: nabapalmbeach.org The Audubon Society of the Everglades — Meets monthly and hosts bird walks. Contact Sue Snyder 627-7829 roysue@bellsouth.net. Info: auduboneverglades.org.QFlamingo Trips — Make reservations now for these carpool caravan trips during March and April into the restricted access Stormwater Treatment Area 2 (STA 2). Tour dates: at 9:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. March 26, April 9 and April 23. Tours last about four hours but may vary. Email: asetripinfo@gmailcom QWild Florida Day Trip — 7:30 a.m. March 19. Info and pre-registration required. Email valleribrauer@gmail.com. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County — 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 471-2901; palmbeach-culture.com.Q“Sibel Kocabasi Solo Exhibition” — Through March 26. Q“Resurrection of Innocence,” by Jeff Whyman — Through July in the new Project Space.Q“Sanders Space: Raheleh Filsoofi/Sibel Kocabasi” — Through March 26. Q2016 Muse Awards — 6 p.m. March 31, in the Cohen Pavilion at the Kravis Center, West Palm Beach. A dinner and awards show with perfor-mances. Tickets: $300 or a table of 10 for $3,000. Info: 471-2901; palmbeachcul-ture.com/eventsh/2016-muse-awards/ The Florida Trail Association Loxahatchee Chapter — Leads nature walks. New adventurers are wel-comed. Get info and register at loxfl-trail.org.QOkeeheelee Park Walk — 7:30 a.m. March 19, 7715 Forest Hill Blvd, West Palm Beach. Daisy Palmer will lead a 4-mile leisure-paced stroll. Call 439-5780 for the meeting place. QHike on the Apoxee Wilderness Trail — March 26, 3125 N. Jog Road, West Palm Beach. A 9-mile mod-erate paced walk. Call Joe at 859-1954. Public/Moderate.QCypress Creek Natural Area Hike — 7:30 a.m. March 27, 10035 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Leisure pace. Call Alan at 586-0486. Harbourside Place — 200 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Info: harboursideplace.com.QAll That Jazz — 7 p.m. March 18. Smooth Jazz at the waterfront amphi-theater featuring Davis & Dow Band. QJohn Seerey Lester Book Signing — Noon-2 p.m. March 19. The Godfather of Wildlife ArtŽ will stop at Native Visions Galleries for a reception and book-signing event. QWags & Whiskers — Noon-2 p.m. March 19. Meet adopt able dogs, cats, puppies and kittens from PBCs Animal Care & Control. Raffles, refreshments, snacks and a portion of sales will benefit ACC. QMaltz Monday — 7 p.m. March 21, at the Wyndham Grand Lobby Lounge. Performances by cast members from Kiss Me, KateŽ and students from the Maltz Jupiter Theatres Conservatory of Performing Arts. The Historical Society of Palm Beach County — Johnson History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach. Free admission. Info: 832-4164; historicalsocietypbc.org.Q“By Land and Sea: Florida in the American Civil War” — Through May 23. Commemorates the Sesquicentennial of the resolution of the War of Secession from 1861-1865. Learn more about Florida and Palm Beach Countys role in the conflict and the nations reconstruction.QChasing Dreams: Baseball and Becoming American – Through March 24. Learn the signifi-cance organized baseball played in the lives of immigrant and minority com-munities. historicalsocietypbc.comQDowntown WPB Architectural Walking Tours — 3:45 p.m. April 1. A free one-hour tour led by architect and historian Rick Gonzalez of REG Archi-tects highlighting historic buildings and notable landmarks. Suggested $5 dona-tion. Reservations required at 832-4164, Ext. 103. The Lighthouse ArtCenter — Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Friday ($10, free for members and exhibiting artists) and free on Sat-urday and Sunday. Info: 746-3101; Light-houseArts.org. Q“Member Show & Sale” — March 17-April 27.QThird Thursday — 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of the month. Wine and passed hors doeuvres reception and exhibits, concerts, lectures, art demonstrations, live performances and gallery talks. $10; free for younger than 12. Free admission on Saturday.The Multilingual Society — 210 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Films, spe-cial events, language classes in French, Spanish and Italian. Info: 228-1688, email nk@multilingualsociety.org or visit multilingualsociety.org.QBreakfast & conversation in French — 9 a.m. March 26, Paris Cafe, 212 S. Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Speakers of all levels are welcomed. QItalian Book Club — 6 p.m. March 28, Multilingual Society, 210 S. Olive Ave, West Palm Beach. Book: MontedidoŽ by Erri De Luca. Guided by Myriam Swennen Ruthenberg, Ph.D. Best for intermediate and advanced level and native speakers. North Palm Beach Library — 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. Info: 841-3383; npblibrary.org.QClass: Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance: Attend 36 art history lectures over 12 weeks at 1 p.m. Tuesdays, through March 29. A filmed series from The Great Courses. Ongo-ing: Knit & Crochet meets at 1 p.m. Mondays. Quilters meet at 10 a.m. Fri-days. Chess meets at 9 a.m. on the first and third Saturday. Coloring for Grown Ups: Bring your own supplies. Meets at 1 p.m. the first Thursday of the month. The Norton Museum of Art —1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-5196 or norton.org.QOngoing: Art After Dark — 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. Lectures, music, films and tours. QEdgar Degas’ Portrait of Mlle. Hortense Valpinon, (circa 1871) — Through May 15. QVincent Van Gogh’s The Poplars at Saint-Rmy, (1889) —Through April 17.Q“Njideka Akunyili Crosby: I Refuse To Be Invisible” —Through April 24.Q“Tiny: Streetwise Revisited – Photographs by Mary Ellen Mark” — Through March 20. QStill/Moving: Photographs and Video Art from the DeWoody Collection — Through May 15. QO’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York — Through May 15.The Palm Beach Zoo & Conser-vation Society — 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, except Thanksgiving and Christmas. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 533-0887; palmbeachzoo.org.QBreakfast with the Bunny — 8-9:15 a.m. and 9:30-10:45 a.m. March 19, 20, and 26. Includes admission to the zoo, hot buffet breakfast, private animal encoun-ters, egg hunt, meet n greet with the Easter Bunny, carousel rides, crafts. Reser-vations required. Members: $26.95 adults; $18.95 age 3-12. Nonmembers: $36.95 adults, $28.95 age 3-12, $7.95 age 2 and younger. QBrew at the Zoo 2016 — 5:30-9 p.m. April 2. Sample the wares of 25 or more craft breweries. Live music. Tickets: $35, $65 VIP, $15 designated drivers. palm-beachzoo.org/b rew-at -the-zoo-2016QStorytime: 10:30 a.m. Saturdays. March 19: Put Me in the Zoo,Ž by Rob-ert Lopshire. March 26: I am a Little AlligatorŽ by Francois Crozat.QRoar & Snore Family Overnight — 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 a.m. March 19. Stay overnight at the zoo. Includes a nocturnal zoo tour, encounter with ani-mal ambassadors, themed activities and crafts, pizza and a continental breakfast. Must be age 6 or older to attend. West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market — In the 200 block of Banyan Boulevard (cross street is Nar-cissus Avenue) in West Palm Beach. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturdays. Parking is free in the city parking lot during show hours. wpbantiqueandfleamarket.com Q

PAGE 39

Anthony Laciura as Pong in Puccini’s ‘Turandot.’ GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7and park them free in a secure area on Ocean Avenue. What makes the festival so special is the opportunity it provides to see endangered sea turtles face-to-face. Festival-goers can visit the facilitys outdoor hospital and view injured or ailing sea turtles that have been hurt by boat strikes, fish hooks or have ingested fishing line and plastic. The center cares for the turtles until they are healthy enough to be released into the wild, or places them in a permanent care facility if their injuries are too debilitating. Ms. Rumbley said it is sobering to learn how many sea turtles sicken and even die from eating bits of plastic that are dis-carded on Floridas beaches. With our hatchlings „ the ones that dont make it „ we did necropsies on them and saw that a lot of the turtles had a lot of plastic in them they couldnt pass,Ž Ms. Rumbley said. Plastic doesnt go away. Its not biodegradable. Its really unfortunate.Ž The Loggerhead Marinelife currently has 15 to 20 endangered sea turtles in its care, including loggerhead and green sea turtles as well as the rare Kemps ridley and hawksbill sea turtles. The setting for TurtleFest 2016 couldnt be more appropriate: Juno Beach is the most densely nested beach for loggerhead sea turtles in the world, with more than 16,000 documented turtle nests last year in a 10-mile stretch of beach, Ms. Rumbley said. That is about a nest every three feet,Ž she said. The Marinelife Center offers turtle walks in June and July, considered peak nesting time for loggerhead turtles. Other activities at TurtleFest 2016 include the World Ocean Pavilion featur-ing educational and fun activities for chil-dren with a focus on ocean conservation; the Grow Up Lagoon with craft activities for youth ages 5 and younger; and a vari-ety of food and beverage vendors offering an array of refreshments. Live music by Mike Mineo, The Samantha Russell Band, EraSmith (an Aeros-mith trib ute), Chain Reaction (a Journey tribute), T he Performing Arts Academy of Jupiter, and The Maltz Jupiter Theatre Conservatory of Performing Arts also will be featured at the event. Q TURTLEFESTFrom page 1 >> What: TurtleFest 2016 >> Where: Loggerhead Marinelife Center, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach, FL >> When: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. March 19 >> Cost: Free >> Info: marinelife.org Mr. Laciura, playing the Major-Domo at the Kravis Center, has forged a long career of comprimario roles around the country, including 860 performances in 59 roles at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. This is the art form I chose,Ž he said with an infectious laugh. Some call him the character tenor, some the second banana. Hes the servant. The clown. But its a very important role because those groups of people carry the plot along. They make sure things are happening. Where would Madama B utterfl y be without Goro the marriage broker?Ž Now in his mid-60s, Mr. Laciura stepped away from regular opera performance in 2008 and cultivated a second career as an opera director and vocal coach, and a third career as a television actor … nota-bly appearing in 48 episodes of HBOs Boardwalk EmpireŽ as Nucky Thomp-sons intensely loyal butler, Eddie Kessler. But his manager got a call recently asking if he wanted to do the speaking-only part that occurs in the first act of Ariadne auf Naxos.Ž The Strauss opera, sung in German with English supertitles, is quirky, told in this iteration in two distinct parts. In the first half, the story begins backstage as an opera group and a comedy troupe learn that they must take the stage togeth-er. In the second half, the audience sees the opera-within-an-opera „ a classic take on a Greek myth „ as the two wildly different groups perform together. Very funny and pompous role,Ž he said from his home in New Jersey, where he teaches singing. He, of course, reveres opera as a high art form, but he thinks it is hardly elitist. Americans still feel it is sort of art for the wealthy or snobs, but, of course, it isnt.Ž But he does balk at productions that pander to modern sensibilities. The bril-liance of the Met was it was a museum you went to (to) see how the opera was meant to be performed according to the composer.Ž As he got older, his voice remained strong but the stamina of the opera sched-ules began to wear at him a bit, so he morphed into a director. His expertise was informed by his long experience as a comprimario: When you do so much character work, you learn everyones part and you get to work with some of greatest directors in the world.Ž In recent years, he has helmed Verdis OtelloŽ with the Vero Beach Opera, Pur-cells Dido and Aeneas,Ž Puccinis La Boheme,Ž Tosca,Ž Madama B utterflyŽ for Phoenix Opera, Verdis RigolettoŽ for Dicapo Opera in New York, Puccinis La Fanciulla del WestŽ at Knoxville Opera and Il Barbiere di SivigliaŽ at Hunter Col-leges Kaye Playhouse in New York City. He missed singing full-time, but he began appearing in plays and small films. I loved being in front of that camera!Ž he said. Joy animates his voice when he speaks of the Boardwalk EmpireŽ gig. The casting director contacted the Met looking for someone bigger-than-life to play the out-sized gangster Big Jim Colismo. But when Mr. Laciura came in, his 5-foot, 7-inch frame didnt match. So he pursued the role of Kessler, a German immigrant. When he showed up to audition, Mr. Laciura walked in the door instantly affect-ing the halting speech of a German migr still learning English, dressed in a three-piece suit with a stickpin and a gold watch, just as Kessler would have done. Imitating the accent, Mr. Laciura repeated his st utt ering approach to the casting people, Im a bit nervous. This is first time Ive auditionedƒ They asked, What part of Germany are you from? and I said, (in his normal voice) the South Bronx.Ž He loved working with such names as Martin Scors-ese, Terrence Winter and the actor playing his boss, Steve Buscemi, but he has to tamp down on his acting style for the camera after a career try-ing to be seen in an audito-rium of 4,000 people. He did well enough to receive two Screen Actors Guild awards for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series. I miss the singing. But what I miss is being on television.Ž Its been a long road. Born in New Orleans, he made his operatic debut as a boy in a small role in Louise,Ž in March 1965, at the New Orleans Opera Asso-ciation, opposite the last performances in this opera by Dorothy Kirsten and Norman Treigle. As an adult, he would give many performances with that com-pany, and would earn music degrees from Loyola University of the South and Tulane University. He made his debut with the Met in the 1982-83 season and appeared scores of times with several performances televised and some recorded on DVD. He appeared with companies in Geneva, Amsterdam, Montreal, Mexico City, Tokyo, San Francis-co, Los Angeles, Chicago, and, especially, Santa Fe. His final appearance at the Met was in The GamblerŽ in 2008. Although still appearing in Boardwalk Empire,Ž he returned to the New Orleans Opera in 2011 to play Emperor Altou in Turandot.Ž After all that experience, he has no illusions about opera being great naturalistic theater, even as some companies try to modernize their productions. You are not going to see the greatest acting in the world,Ž said Mr. Laciura, who has seen fine acting working alongside people like Mr. Buscemi. The greatness of Mozart and the other composers is that no matter what you do externally, if you dont like the production, there are still great voices out there and you can close your eyes, and still enjoy it.Ž Q OPERAFrom page 1 >> What: Palm Beach Opera’s production of Richard Strauss’ “Ariadne auf Naxos.” >> When: March 18-20 >> Where: Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. >> Cost: $25 and up >> Info: 832-7469, kravis.org or pbopera.org. SHUTTERSTOCK PHOTOAnthony Laciura now teaches voice after starring on ‘Boardwalk Empire.’

PAGE 40

B8 WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 FLORIDA WEEKLY FASHIONISTAS! CALLING ALL 561.355.8111 OR CALL OUR WELLINGTON LOCATION AT 561.965.3113 7100 FAIRWAY DRIVE, SUITE 42, PALM BEACH GARDENS (LA FITNESS PLAZA) LADIES BOUTIQUE Y Y Y Y Y O O O O O U U U U U R R R R R E E E E E N N N N N T T T T T I I I I I R R R R R E E E E E P P P P P U U U U U R R R R R C C C C C H H H H H A A A A A S S S S S E E E E E D D D D O O O O N N N N   T T T T M M M M I I I I S S S S S S S S O O O O U U U U T T T T O O O O N N N N LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER ONLY VALID ON REGULAR PRICED ITEMS ‡ EXPIRES 3/31/16 Ocean inspired jewelry, apparel, art & gi s.Legacy Place 11300 Legacy Ave. #110 Palm Beach Gardens FL 33410 www.oceansallure.com! www.facebook.com/oceansallurejewelry tNFSNBJET!PDFBOTBMMVSFDPNAnchors Away!Come and visit our booth in the Palm Beach Boat Show Thursday March 17th … Sunday March 20th For all things nautical and ocean inspired, hand-cra ed jewelry by Monique Comfo Come in soon to see whats ne w, or shop on www .oceansallu re.com As always, bring your furry friends to say hello! Tony. Scenic and lighting design are by Paul Black and sound design is by Steve Shapiro. Costume design is by Leslye Menshouse. Performances are at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, 7 p.m. Sundays, and matinees at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sat-urday and Sunday. Wednesday matinees and Sunday evenings include a post-performance discussion. Tickets are $64 from March 26 to April 24. Preview tickets on March 23 and 24 are $44, and opening night tick-ets on March 25 are $79. Student tickets are $10. To enhance your theater experience, Dramaworks is offering Knowledge & Nibbles on March 24. This is your chance to chat with other fans about theater over lunch, followed by a more intimate talk with the director, actors and designers of the production. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. at Table 26, 1700 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. The program is at 1 p.m. at the theater. Tickets are $30 for guild members and $40 for nonmembers for lunch and the program. Dramaworks also offers a pro-gram only option from 1-2 p.m. Program only tickets are $15 for guild members, and $20 for nonmembers. Dramaworks productions are performed at the Don & Ann Brown The-atre, 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Info: 514-4042, Ext. 2; palmbeachdramaworks.com.Full of glassHabatat Galleries one-person exhibitions of the work of Kelly ODell and Etai Rahmil reveals glass artists at oppo-site ends of the continuum. Ms. ODell was born in Seattle in 1973, raised in Hawaii, and now lives in the Pacific Northwest. Her artistic parents made their living making stained glass, furnace glass, and pressed flowers, but ODell didnt discover her focus until she was in college. Her work explores themes of extinction, preservation, and human impact on the natural world. Using sculpture, I am recreating the endangered, the critically endangered, and the extinct in glass,Ž she wrote. On the B-side, Mr. Rahmil was a late bloomer too. He discovered glass blow-ing in 2009. Based in Oakland, Calif., Mr. Rahmil has a studio in Berkeley, where he focuses on contemporary sculptural interpretations of instruments, masks and antiques. Their work is on display through April at Habatat Galleries is at 513 Clem-atis St., West Palm Beach. For information, call 469-8587; habatatgalleries.com.Don’t miss Art After Dark takes a somewhat somber tone March 17 with its focus on the lives of traumatized youth, the theme of the current exhibition Tiny: Streetwise Revisited … Photographs by Mary Ellen Mark.Ž A screening of the documentary Paper TigersŽ and a panel discussion on the education of traumatized youth will be held as well as music, tours and curator talks, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. March 17, at Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-5196; Norton.org.Art In The Family Tree This exhibition open now in the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens runs through May 15. It features diverse pieces from the lineage of artists in the Phipps and Guest families including works from Susie Phipps Cochran, Rafe Cochran, Hubert Phipps, Michael Phipps and Diana Guest, supporting the theory that talent is genetic. The exhibition will include sculptures, illustrations, drawings and paint-ings and honor Palm Beachs ties to this familys legacy of creativity. Admis-sion is free for members, $10 guests, $8 senior guests 65+, $5 for age 5 and older, and free for younger than 5. The garden is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday at 2051 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. For more information, call 832-5328 or visit ansg.org.Let The Sun Shine In!Tickets are on sale now for Hair,Ž the ultimate rock opera of the 60s. This award winning musical will take you on a psychedelic flashback to the tumultu-ous times whe the country was obsessed with the war in Vietnam, free l ove, the length of mens hair and an especially bitter intergenerational power struggle. The show will run for three previews and 20 performances in the Rinker Play-house at the Kravis Center from May 20 to June 5. Director-choreographer Kimberly Dawn (KD) Smith, who directed MNMs production of A Chorus LineŽ at the Crest Theatre at Old School Square, joins forces with musical director Paul Reekie, who held that role in last sum-mers production of Side By Side By Sondheim.Ž The 20-person cast is being led by Mike Westrich (George Berger), Michael Scott Ross (Claude) and Alexa Baray (Shei-la), Sean A. Dorazio and Nicole Kinzel. Reserved seating tickets are $45 at the Kravis Center box office, by phone at 832-7469, or online at Kravis.org. Q HAPPENINGSFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTOSViolin by Etai Rahmil (left) and sculpture by Kellly O’Dell, both at Habatat Galleries.

PAGE 41

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 B9 Tickets also available throughChoose your seat at the Centers of“cial website kravis.org or call 561-832-7469 or 800-572-8471 Groups: 561-651-4438 or 561-651-4304 Capitol Steps: Mock the Vote Now … March 27Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 7:30 pm Wednesday and Saturday at 1:30 pm BOEQNt4VOEBZBUQN 3JOLFS1MBZIPVTFt5JDLFUT Raucous return: Theyre back with fresh satire and hilarious song parodies!Sponsored by Donald and Linda Silpe Steve Ross inRidin High ... The Music of Porter, Astaire and Coward Friday and Saturday, March 18-19 at 7:30 pm 1FSTTPO)BMMt5JDLFUT Crown prince of cabaret Steve Ross captivates with the classics. Steve Ross sings in the New York cabaret style, playing the piano brilliantly and articulating every rhyme and double entendre.Ž … The Daily Telegraph Regional Arts Concert Series Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Wu Han, Piano Benjamin Beilman, Violin Kristin Lee, Violin Sean Lee, Violin Richard ONeill, Viola Nicholas Canellakis, Cello Monday, March 28 at 2 pm Dreyfoos Hall 5JDLFUTTUBSUBU Dont miss this program of rare gems … from concerto to quartet, classical to romantic … featuring stars of New Yorks Lincoln Center. t.P[BSUt4DIVCFSU t.FOEFMTTPIO Series sponsored by Leonard and Sophie Davis Beyond The Stage: Please join us for a free pre-concert discussion by Sharon McDaniel at 12:45 pm. An Evening withSophia Loren Monday, March 28 at 8 pm %SFZGPPT)BMMt5JDLFUTTUBSUBU An elegant legend is unveiled through intimate chat, “lm clips, Q&A.With support from A Carlin Home Companion: Growing Up With George Thursday through Saturday, March 31-April 2 Thursday and Friday at 7:30 pm Saturday at 1:30 pm and 7:30 pm 3JOLFS1MBZIPVTFt5JDLFUT Funny, poignant, honest … George Carlins daughter on her famous father. AREA GREEN MARKETSBean Scene Sunset Marketplace „ Market is held twice a month at 410 E. Boynton Beach Blvd., about two blocks west of U.S. 1, Boynton Beach. Every other Thursday, find live music, pop-up dinners, craft beer and wine and a selection of all-vegan, often gluten-free and paleo-friendly ingredients and arti-sanal foods. All vegan vendors offering dinner, produce, prepared foods, baked goods, plants, kombucha. Also wellness practitioners, workshops, yoga, cooking demos, and live music. 4-8 p.m. Thurs-days through May 5. Dates: March 17 and 31, April 7 and 21, May 5. Info: 877-1411. Lake Worth High School Flea Market „ 5 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, under the Interstate 95 overpass on Lake Worth Road. This market has been meeting in the same location for years. Info: 439-1539. The Farmers Market Waterside „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays, Old Bridge Park, on the northwest corner of Lake Avenue and State Road A1A, Lake Worth. For-merly called the Lake Worth Farmers Market. Through April 30. Info: 547-3100; lakeworthfarmersmarket.com. The West Palm Beach GreenMarke t „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays on the West Palm Beach Waterfront, down-town West Palm Beach. Nearly 80 local community vendors selling fresh pro-duce, exotic plants and flowers, herbs and spices, baked goods, gourmet and specialty foods, coffee and teas. Also features unlimited mimosas for $10, free kids activities, live music and monthly chef showcases. Pet-friendly. Parking is free in the Banyan and Evernia city garages during market hours. Through May 28. Info: wpb.org/greenmarket. The Delray Beach Green Market „ 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays at Old School Square Park on Northeast Second Ave-nue, a half-block north of Atlantic Ave-nue, in downtown Delray Beach. Since 1996, vendors have offered produce, cit-rus and juice, eggs, raw milk and but-ter, grass-fed and finished Florida beef, poultry, pork and lamb, artisan baked goods, gluten-free, vegan and sugar free products, plus fresh-cut flowers and plants. They also host weekly live musi-cal entertainment. Info: delraycra.org/greenmarket. The Gardens GreenMarket „ 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays at the City Hall Municipal Complex, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Held each Sunday through May 3, the market has more than 120 vendors of fresh goods, seasonal vegetables and fruits, herbs, honey, and homemade breads, pies, cheeses and sauces, plus live entertain-ment. Info: 630-1100; pbgfl.com/green-market. The Village of Royal Palm Beach Green Market and Bazaar „ 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays through April 24, Veterans Park, 1036 Royal Palm Beach Blvd., Royal Palm Beach. Organic fruits and vegetables, herbs, spices, artisan foods, baked goods and honey. There also are foods, pastries and a selec-tion of artists and crafters selling jew-elry, handicrafts and other interesting wares. Info: rpbgreenmarket.com. Acreage Green Market „ 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays at Acreage Community Park, 6701 140th Ave N., Loxahatchee. Produce, vendors, live entertainment. 723-3898; acreagegreenmarket.com. Harbourside Place Farmers Market „ Harbourside Place is at 200 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. More than 50 farmers and food producer vendors from South Flor-ida. Find sweet potatoes, beets, carrots, squash and salad greens. Visitors also will find meat, poultry and fish, flowers and organic eggs, smoothies and baked goods, jams and coffee. The market will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays until April 24. Info: harboursideplace.com Jupiter Green & Artisan Market at Riverwalk Event Plaza „ 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sundays, 150 S. U.S. 1, under Indi-antown Bridge, Jupiter. This year-round market is set along the Intracoastal Waterway. Find produce, specialty food products, apparel, accessories, jewelry, arts and crafts, plus entertainment and special activities. Pet friendly. Vendors welcome. Info: 203-222-3574; harrysmar-kets.com. jupitergreenmarket.com. The Green Market at Palm Beach Outlets „ 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, 1751 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach. Arts and crafts, fresh flowers, homemade foods, organic produce. Info: 515-4400; palmbeachoutlets.com. Q PUZZLE ANSWERS COURTESY PHOTOThe Jupiter Green & Artisan Market is held each Sunday at the Riverwalk Event Plaza, under the Indiantown Road bridge

PAGE 42

B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Eis Eis sey sey Ca Ca mpu mpu s T s T hea hea tre tre at at Pa Pa lm lm Bea Bea ch c Sta te Col leg e TI TI CK CK ET ET S S FR FR OM OM $ $ 1 1 € € ba ba ll ll et et pa pa lm lm be be ac ac h. or g or 5 61 .2 0 7 .5 9 0 0 0 SWAN LAKE ACT II & OTHER WORKSOct 24 € 7:30pm Oct 25 € 4pm NUTCRACKER Nov 27 € 2pm & 7:30pm Nov 28 € 2pm & 7:30pm Nov 29 € 2pm GATSBY Mar 19 € 7:30pm Mar 20 € 4pm CINDERELLA May 7 € 7:30pm May 8 € 4pm 2015/2016 SEASON MARCH 19, 2016 € 7:30PM MARCH 20, 2016 € 4PM A BALLET HOROSCOPES MIXED VEGETABLES By Linda Thistle + Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: W SEE ANSWERS, B9 W SEE ANSWERS, B9 PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Old relationships that seemed to be sinking are buoyant again, and new relationships are benefiting from Cupids loving care. This could be a good time to make a major move. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) With change dominant this week, dont be sur-prised to find new facts emerging that could put another slant on a situation and offer you another choice. Think it through before you decide. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) There could be some lingering problems from a previous matter that involved a decision you felt you had to make. Resolve the situa-tion with your strong Taurean no-nonsense approach. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) The Geminis carefully made plans could be undone by someones unexpected decision. Getting the full story behind that surprise move can help you decide how to deal with the matter. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Recently uncovered information might put a new light on a situation you thought had been resolved. Keep an open mind about possible changes that you might have to consider. LEO (July 23 to August 22) With a potential revision of an old agreement, you cant beat the Big Cat for knowing how to sharpen a clauseŽ to the best advantage. Someone close could have the news youve been waiting for. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Certain issues in the workplace could put you in the middle of a dispute youd rather not deal with. Express your honest feelings before the pressure to take sides builds up. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might feel uneasy disagreeing with someone youve been close to. But your relationship should be able to withstand and even thrive when confronted with your true feelings. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A romantic situation seems to be creating more confusion than you can handle. If so, own up to your feelings. The sooner you do, the better your chances are for working things out. ) SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) With change directing the Archers aim, consider a second look at your plans and see where they might benefit from a revision. A workplace matter is close to a resolution. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) New contacts help you learn some important information about upcoming developments. The week calls for the Sea Goat to be more flexible than usual in a number of matters. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) With both change and uncertainty in your aspect, you might feel less confident in a previous decision. Thats OK. Check it out and see where it could be modified, if necessary.BORN THIS WEEK: While you prefer to tread your own path, youll go out of your way to help someone in need. Q PUZZLES

PAGE 43

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 B11 561.460.1071 | coastalmarketplace@gmail.com 216 Federal Hwy US1 | Lake Park, FL 33403 COASTALMARKET PLACE STUNNING COASTAL THEMED FURNITURE AND DECOR! LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE! Like us on Custom Shiplap walls and Custom Reclaimed Furniture available. NORTH PALM BEACH 1400 OLD DIXIE HWY. 561.845.3250DqDnDqDWEST PALM BEACH 1810 S. DIXIE HWY. 561.249.6000 225 E. INDIANTOWN RD. 561.748.5440 DELRAY BEACH 117 NE 5TH AVE. 561.278.0886EXCENTRICITIES.COM RECEIVE 30% OFF MSRP DDDD nDD MARCH 1-31, 2016.JUPITER OPEN SUNDAY 11:00AM-4:00PM EST. 1986 SYMPHONICBANDOFTHEPALMBEACHESSTARSSHININGBRIGHTLYApril 2, EISSEYCAMPUSTHEATRE, 7:30 P.M.April 9, DUNCANTHEATRE, 7:30 P.M.Tickets: $18 5618323115 www.SymphonicBand.org Shostakovich, John Williams, Vivaldi and more! SCHOLARSHIPCONCERT LATEST FILMS‘Hello, My Name Is Doris’ +++ Is it worth $10? YesSally Field is a national treasure. The two-time Oscar winner (see below) has been a fixture on movie and televi-sion screens since her career began in the 1960s, ranging from her debut as GidgetŽ on TV to her Oscar-nominated turn as Mary Todd Lincoln in LincolnŽ (2012). Yes Sally, we do really like you. She stars in Hello, My Name Is Doris,Ž and as expected, shes a trip. She plays the title charac-ter, an eccentri-cally dressed 60-something whose life has largely passed her by. For years she lived with and cared for her now-deceased mother, all the while hoard-ing insignificant belongings and never marry-ing. Her friends Roz (Tyne Daly, hilarious) and Val (Caroline Aaron) are lov-ing and support-ive, which helps. She works in data entry in New York City. The new guy at work, John (Max Greenfield), is 20-something, attractive and easily likable. Doris devel-ops a crush and „ after attending a self-help seminar full of platitudes like Theres seven days in the week, and someday isnt one of them,Ž and Its Im possible, not ImpossibleŽ „ feels inspired. But its not a professional aspiration, or a personal goal to clean the house or settle issues with her brother (Stephen Root) and his meddlesome wife (Wendi McClendon-Covey). No, Doris inspiration is much bolder than that: Shes going to get John to fall in love with her. Much of what follows in director Michael Showalters film is Doris going out of her way to try to get John to notice her romantically, which includes discov-ering how to cyber-stalk via Facebook with the help of Rozs granddaughter (Isabella Acres). Because of Ms. Fields warmth and innocence, the romantic longing comes across as charming (I doubt wed say the same if it were an older man pursuing a younger woman). Doris daydreams, and the looks she gives Johns girlfriend Brooklyn (Beth Behrs), are priceless, and the perfor-mance strikes just the right note of pity mixed with earnestness, which makes her easy to root for. Though this is a comedy at heart, there are dramatic moments that catch you by sur-prise but work well within the context of the story. You see, at her core Doris is a sad figure, insecure and looking for love that no one in his or her right mind thinks could be recip-rocated. John by no means leads her on, yet shes delusional; one wonders if she ever stopped to think what an actual relation-ship with John would be like, and how theyd work as a couple. She is old enough to be his grandmother, after all. Regardless, because Ms. Field captures our favor early on, we root for Doris, bad decisions and all. Hello, My Name Is DorisŽ is a cute movie, a feel-good lark targeted at an older crowd in the mood for a nice story. Its not all that memorable, but its good for a smile. Q i M o h e w dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> *Sally Field won Best Actress Oscars for “Norma Rae” (1979) and “Places In The Heart” (1984).

PAGE 44

B12 WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 FLORIDA WEEKLY THEATER REVIEWMaltz has joyous take on Porter’s ‘Kiss Me, Kate’ BY BILL HIRSCHMANFlorida Weekly CorrespondentThe Act Two opening of Kiss Me, KateŽ has no reason to be in the show from a narrative standpoint. Too Darn HotŽ is a bunch of performers in the alley behind their theater breaking into dazzling dance and sultry song about the meteorological condi-tions. It has no other excuse for exis-tence than to give the second half of the show a blazing kick-off. I ts a throwback to early days of the musical theater, when a production number was its own justification. But thats precisely the point. The scorching jump off of steamy dancing across the Maltz Jupiter Theatre stage is a wry valentine to the kind of musical comedy that once ruled pop culture. In fact, the Maltzs 2016 production of a 1948 classic is a skilled homage to that Golden Age post-war period of theater when everyone knew which war you were talking about. A mixture of classic musical theater tropes leavened with a sophisticated satirical tone, this musi-cal-within-a-musical-within-a-musical often lets its then-hip veneer slip to expose a lushly romantic soul. The cast led by director Peter Flynn, musical director Helen Gregory and choreographer Marcos Santana invests mostly gorgeous voices and a decidedly comic sensibility into this backstage/onstage tale of veteran thespians trying out a musicalized version of The Tam-ing of the Shrew.Ž Kiss Me, KateŽ is awash in Cole Porters wittiest lyrics and some of the most uninhibitedly romantic music written for the stage. The raft of standards range from the sublime ballad So In LoveŽ to the vaudeville turn Brush Up Youre Shakespeare,Ž which features the great couplet If she says your behavior is heinous / Kick her right in the Coriola-nus." Audiences would have to wait for Stephen Sondheim before they heard such lyrics again. The book by Sam and Bella Spewack is not only well constructed for its time, but wickedly funny and delightfully bawdy as it gleefully skewers the high-strung neurotics who populate theater. The story of Kiss Me, KateŽ focuses on a production of The Taming of the Shrew,Ž a grafting of musical comedy on the Shakespearean tale. Its tempestuous star Lili Vanessi (Sally Wilfert) is a diva whose recent run at Hollywood fizzled and who has returned reluctantly to the stage. The male star, producer and director is the fading matinee idol „ and Lilis ex-husband „ Fred Graham (Peter Reardon), a virile rake who has bet his last dime on this show trying out in Baltimore. Still at marital war, they are only working together because they need each other professionally. Fred tells Lili, You have the worst temper in show business. You bit King Kong and he got rabies.Ž But we know what they will never admit to each other and only acknowledge to themselves in private: They still love each other with an inde-structible ardor. Grahams second lead is the talented singer-dancer-comedienne Lois Lane (the talented singer-dancer-comedienne Shayla Benoit) who is being romanced by the ne-er-do-well dancer Bill Cal-houn (Antuan MagicŽ Raimone). All four are struggling to get the show on in previews even as Lili contemplates marriage to a famous general, and two hoodlums (Danny Rutigliano and John Treacy Egan) try to collect a $10,000 gambling debt to which Calhoun signed Grahams name. Its a warm hoot from the moment the stage manager turns off the ghost light on an empty stage, the onstage/back-stage troupe wanders in individually and they all join in the unifying anthem Another Opnin, Another Show,Ž led by wardrobe mistress Hattie (Allyson Kaye Daniel). Flynn and company ride this joyous groove like a veteran jockey in the Bel-mont Stakes. If the current generation wonders what a well-executed version of this genre looked like 70 years ago, this is a pretty good indication. Wilfert not only has a beautiful soprano trill but an unrestrained bent toward comedy that embraces the faux operetta of Wunderbar,Ž as well as the acerbic I Hate Men,Ž which features the lyric Of all the types I've ever met within our democracy / I hate most the athlete with his manner bold and brassy / He may have hair upon his chest but, sister, so has Lassie.Ž Somehow she makes Lili a likable character despite her furi-ous explosions, perhaps because Wilfert makes it clear that Lili still loves theater and Fred. Like her, Reardon doesnt mind playing up his characters shortcomings as a preening ham with a fragile ego and a devilish grin. Reardon has a fine voice, no finer than when he sings the rue-drenched reprise of So In Love.Ž Every KateŽ is judged, in part, on the quality of the two Goodfellas who get pulled into the show as they protect their investment. Egan and Rutigliano are a dead-perfect Mutt and Jeff who nail characters who are half Shake-spearean clowns and half Abbott and Costello. Their woebegone faces as they Brush Up Your ShakespeareŽ and their decidedly ribald body language are a highlight of the evening. If there is a weakness, its in the actual scenes from Shakespeare. Other than Peter Galman as Baptista, few of these actors do very well with the Bards verbiage. Gregory, who leads a brassy ninepiece band, has coaxed and shaped those vocal performances beautifully. One strange element: Either she or the arrangements or the actors have a showoff predilection for pausing, bend-ing the second to last note in a song in a way Porter never intended, and then blowing it out like an athlete slamming a ball into the stands. The atmosphere is enriched by Jennifer Caprios satirical costume design that encompass the hoods double-breast-ed pinstripe suits, Lilis stylish street wear, the dancers working clothes and the Shakespearean outfits replete with thigh-high boots and motley-colored tights with bulging codpieces. Blessed with a solid production of some of Porters loveliest and funniest work, the Maltzs Kiss Me, KateŽ is worth the drive. Q „ Kiss Me, KateŽ runs through March 27 at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road in Jupiter. Tickets are $55-$80, available at 575-2223 or jupitertheatre.org. „ Bill Hirschman is editor of Florida Theater On Stage. Read him at floridatheateronstage.com.

PAGE 45

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 B13 25 YEARS SERVING DELICIOUS NEW ENGLAND-STYLE COMFORT FOODSAward-winning clam chowder Fresh Maine lobster rolls New England-style pot pies7RAPSs3ANDWICHES3ALADSs3OUPS r\53(WY.ORTH5NIT4EQUESTA&LORIDA FOUR ARTS. FOR EVERYONE. www.fourarts.org 2 FOUR ARTS PLAZA | PALM BEACH, FL Admission is $5. No charge for Four Arts members and children 14 and younger. Call (561) 655-7226 for more information. EXHIBITIONS AT THE SOCIETY OF THE FOUR ARTS On display Saturday, January 23, 2016 to Sunday, April 17, 2016 With the vitality of the 1920s and Marjorie Posts fascinating life as backdrop, this exhibition focuses on the fancy dress balls of the day and the costumes Marjorie wore to them. The exhibit is organized by the Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, Washington D.C. Marjorie dressed as Marie Antoinette for the Beaux Arts Ball,Ž New York City, 1927, Photographed by Gabor Eder, Image Courtesy of Hillwood Estate, Museum, and Gardens Archives POWER & PIETY: SPANISH COLONIAL ART On display Saturday, March 19, 2016 to Sunday, April 17, 2016 A remarkable collection of Spanish Colonial Art from the late 17th to the 19th century makes its exhibition debut at e Society of the Four Arts. e exhibition is drawn from the Coleccin Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and is co-organized by the Museum of Biblical Art, New York and Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia. Juan Pedro Lpez (1724…1787), "Our Lady of Light,Ž ca. 1765, Oil on canvas, 76 x 52 in. Courtesy of the Colleccin Patricia Phelps de Cisneros 5559rn5r5]55r TV REVIEW‘House Of Cards: Season Four’ +++ Is it worth a Netflix streaming sub-scription? YesFor three seasons of House Of Cards,Ž Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) and his wife Claire (Robin Wright) lied, cheated, manipulated and, in Franks case, even murdered to get ahead in the minefield that is Washington, D.C., poli-tics. And yet after all theyve achieved together, the end of sea-son three left a cliffhang-er: Frustrated and dis-enfranchised Claire told Frank she was leaving him. Fade to black. View-ers collectively said oh, noŽ and were desperate for more. We got it with the arrival of season four on Netflix earlier this month. It picks up the day after last season ended with Frank on the campaign trail in New Hampshire. Claire has ventured off to her hometown of Dal-las, ostensibly to visit her mother (Ellen Burstyn). Claires ulterior motive is soon clear: She wants to run for Congress, then governor, and even hires a highly touted campaign strategist (Neve Camp-bell) to make it happen. The problem is the longtime incumbent (Cicely Tyson) plans to endorse her daughter (LisaGay Hamilton) for the congressional seat. Through the first three episodes Frank deals with media rumors that his mar-riage is in trouble as well as links between him and the KKK. Soviet Premier Vik-tor Petrov (Lars Mikkelsen) pops up in episode two to cause more headaches. Meanwhile, Franks opposition in the pri-maries, Heather Dunbar (Elizabeth Mar-vel), looks for any opportunity she can get, Remy (Mahershala Ali) and Jackie (Molly Parker) are still sleeping together and scheming, and disgraced journal-ist Lucas Goodwin (Sebastian Arcelus) looks for a way out of prison to expose the truth about Frank. For his part, Frank has Chief of Staff Doug Stamper (Michael Kelly) on his side and little else. And then episode four happens, which is a total, absolute game changer in ways you cannot possibly see coming. With all these moving pieces its a good thing there are 13 episodes (all are currently available to stream on Netflix) to sort it all out, and that the quality of the storytelling remains top-notch. There are ample surprises and oh no he/she didnt!Ž moments (especially the end of episode three) in the first few epi-sodes, and the acting remains as superb as its always been. The stories, however, are treading deeper: Claires relationship with her mother explains why Claire is the way she is, and Frank and Claires marriage goes from essential allies to bit-ter enemies. They are equals of opposite gender in a patriarchal hierarchy that Claire is no longer will-ing to play along with. Whats more, its surely not a mistake that show runner Beau Wil-limon is putting Frank through the primaries and releasing season four in the midst of real-life Republican and Demo-cratic candidates bat-tling it out in primaries. Whether Mr. Willimon is saying something about the real process or can-didates seems unlikely „ House of CardsŽ has always existed as an alternate reality rather than social commentary „ but it does allow us to imagine whats going on behind the scenes with Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, etc. And darn if just the idea of all the wheelin and dealin doesnt make your head spin. My one complaint about the series is that far too many shots are darkened with unnecessary shadow, including day-time interior shots. It casts a gloom over the proceedings, which might be apropos but more than anything makes the other-wise glossy production an occasionally unpleasant viewing experience. If you havent seen any of the earlier seasons, be sure to watch them first. Franks ascension to the presidency is a sight to behold. In season four, we see if he gets to keep it. This is what bingewatching was created for. Q dan HUDAKpunchdrunkmovies.com >> “House of Cards” is the rst original Net ix production to win an Emmy. Season one earned Emmys for cinematography, casting and directing (David Fincher).

PAGE 46

B14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY DowntownAtTheGardens.com r nn rn 6DWXUGD\VSPX & r r LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, g o SOC I Red Cross Fundraising cocktail p a 1 3 4 5 7 6 2

PAGE 47

Over 2400 FREE Parking Spaces and Our Valet is Always FREE! rr n nrn & HQWUH&RXUWX)5(( 4 2On The Roxx TODAYS rn n DowntownAtTheGardens.com Imagine it all. Then find it at SPRING BREAK GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15 1. Elena Peroulakis, Toni May and Erik Russell 2. Ted Peroulakis, Bobby Mancuso, Catherine Craig and Jay Zeager 3. Evan Turk and Karyn Turk 4. Jo DuBois and Sophia Stone 5. Janet Tatusko and Dada Newton 6. Elena Peroulakis, Sandra Espinal, Ariadna Crespo, Jennifer Timpano, Adair Walters. Dellesa Johnson and Nerissa Edden 7. Dellesa Johnson, Karen Hollaway and Nerissa Edden 8. Lisa Valentine, Stuart Auville and Hannah Sosa 9. Robin Friedman, Dina Schwartz, Bob Goldfarb and Donna Goldfarb 10. Virginia Oatley, Simone Torres and Joni Garman 11. Mary McCourt and Mathew McKegney 12. John Biondi and Cynthia Nalley ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY o to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include t he names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. I ETY a rty at the Marriott in Singer Island 8 9 10 11 12

PAGE 48

B16 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY EASTER ON WORTH AVENUEServing Brunch and Dinner starting at 11:30.Stroll the avenue before and after dinner.Reservations suggested.OPEN 7 DAYS LUNCH & DINNER 11:30 AM 10:00 PM SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:30 AM TO 3:00 PM HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY FROM 4 TO 7 VISIT US AT TABOORESTAURANT.COM 561.835.3500 SOCIETY Kids Sanctuary supporters with Dr. Seuss at The Gardens MallLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. 1 Beth Aden, John Fisher and Gigi Fisher 2 Michel Jacobs, Connie Frankino, Pat DiAngelis and Marlo Massey 3 Rod Seuss and Madeline Fink Seuss 4. Nelly Rhoda and Timothy Harris 5. Jennifer Loiseau and Carla Pisani 6. Clara Egan and Gruchenska Leets 7. Dave Berard, Timothee Lovelock and Josh Cohen LILA PHOTOS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

PAGE 49

Looking for Luxury? Find Palm Beach Illustrated in these Palm Beach County locations:GREENS PHARMACY 151 North County Road, Palm Beach SPRINKLES ICE CREAM 279 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach BARNES & NOBLE 11380 Legacy Avenue, Palm Beach Gardens 10500 Forest Hill Boulevard, Wellington 333 Congress Avenue, Boynton Beach 1400 Glades Road, Boca Raton WHOLE FOODS MARKET 11701 Lake Victoria Drive, Palm Beach Gardens 1845 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard, West Palm Beach 800.308.7346 palmbeachillustrated.com/subscribeNAVID

PAGE 50

B18 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY International Gay Polo Week returns to Wellington SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Gay polo returns to Wellington for four spirited days of pride. Gay Polo Leagues Seventh Annual International Gay Polo Week, set for March 31-April 3 at the International Polo Club Palm Beach in Wellington, will feature tailgate competitions, VIP parties, polo tournament matches, an after-ceremony party and concluding Sunday brunch. The International Gay Polo Tournament is an exciting and action-packed event that celebrates diversity,Ž Jorge Pesquera, president and CEO for Dis-cover The Palm Beaches, said in a state-ment. Were fortunate to have such a world-class event in the Winter Eques-trian Capital of The World. The Inter-national Gay Polo Tournament helps us showcase one of our best in class sports experiences, while reaffirming The Palm Beaches way of life relative to genuine hospitality and inclusiveness.Ž We are very excited about partnering with Discover The Palm Beaches in presenting this one-of-a-kind tourna-ment,Ž Kayla French, director of market-ing and business development for the Palm Beach County Sports Commission, said in the statement. This is a very special event for our community that will create a huge tourism impact.Ž International Gay Polo Week will kick off March 31, with a VIP party for spon-sors and polo players. The fun contin-ues Friday, April 1, at the GPL Polotini Party from 7-10 p.m. at the Mallet Grill, located at the International Polo Club Palm Beach. Hosted by philanthropist Patricia Quick, tickets to the GPL Polo-tini Party are $125 per person and avail-able online at gaypolo.com. On Saturday, April 2, the Seventh Annual International Gay Polo Tour-nament matches will be played at the International Polo Club Palm Beach Isla Carroll Field West. Gates open at 10 a.m. for tailgate setup and at noon for gener-al admission. The first match will start at 1 p.m. followed by the final competi-tion at 3 p.m. During the event, tailgate displays will be judged for the Tailgate Competition Categories Contests. Con-test winners will be announced at the field-side after-party that evening. Tickets are available from $25 per person for general admission and $250 for a VIP individual ticket, which includes gourmet catering, cold refresh-ments and VIP parking. A group tailgate pass can be purchased for $375 and includes general admission for up to six people. A VIP Table Package can also be purchased from $1,300 and includes admission for up to six people, gourmet catering, tableside service, cold refresh-ments and VIP parking. On Sunday, April 3, event-goers are invited to join GPL players for Sunday brunch at 1 p.m. at the Mallet Grill. Brunch will feature cold refreshments, hors doeuvres and other food. Sunday brunch tickets are from $125 per per-son and include admission to the polo match at 3 p.m. For more information on International Gay Polo Week, visit gaypolo.com/the-event. Q LIZ LAMONT IMAGES/PHELPS MEDIA GROUP Jean-Marc Herrouin and Charlie Muldoon play polo. Compass to host PrideFest in Lake Worth SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY The Palm Beaches LGBT community will celebrate PrideFest in Lake Worth from noon to 6 p.m. March 19-20. Orga-nized annually by Compass, one of the largest gay and lesbian community cen-ters in the southeastern United States, the two-day event welcomes nearly 25,000 people and celebrates local com-munity pride. Festivities get underway at 11:30 a.m. March 20 with a parade along Lake Avenue in downtown Lake Worth. The parade continues to Bryant Park, on the Intracoastal Waterway, where there will be live music, a market area with vendors from across the Palm Beaches and food provided by local restaurants. Tickets are $8 in advance or $10 at the gate. For more information on the PrideFest, visit compassglcc.com. Q Its Local.Its Entertaining.Its Mobile. Got Download? Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com The iPad AppSearch Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

PAGE 51

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B19 EVER Y SATURDAY OCT -MAY! 8:30AM T O 2:30PM PET FRIENDLY | FAMILY FRIENDLY | FREE ADMISSION | FREE PARKINGPHONE: 561-670-7473FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOKTWITTER: @WPBAFMARKETEMAIL: WPBANTIQUEANDFLEA@GMAIL.COM WPBANTIQUEANDFLEAMARKET.COMLOCATED AT BANYAN BLVD & NARCISSUS AVE (33401) 2000 PGA Blvd., Suite A3140, Palm Beach GardensSW corner of PGA Blvd & US Hwy 1 { City Centre Plaza rr{www.saraskitchenpalmbeachgardens.com Mon-Fri: 7 ƒ -2:45 { Sat-Sun: 7 ƒ -1:45 SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH tEKt,s''s>E[^^d CAGE FREE LARGE EGGSE},}Œu}v}ŒvŸ]}Ÿ{9sPšŒ]v& FRUQHGEHHI‡SDVWUDPL WXUNH\RIIWKHIUDPH EULVNHW‡VPRNHG VK SLWDVZUDSV KRPHPDGHVRXSV EUHDNIDVWRPHOHWV SDQFDNHV‡EOLQW]HV JOXWHQIUHHEUHDGV &(/(%5$7,1*
PAGE 52

B20 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Tickets: $40 and $30 Available at the eatre Ticket Oce (561) 207-5900 See our website for concert details: www.eisseycampustheatre.org www.cmspb.org Paul Huang Violin Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 7pm Cicely Parnas Cello Thursday, March 24, 2016, 7pm CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF PALM BEACHin cultural partnership with PALM BEACH STATE COLLEGE, EISSEY CAMPUS THEATREpresents“Young Concert Artists track record for spotting the best new talent in classical music is legendary!” — NY Times For Menus & Event Info go to www.hamptonforks.com or follow us on Facebook185 East Indiantown Road, Suite 123 (In the Sea Grape Plaza, Inside Kitchen Works Space)631.276.1197 Concierge Caterers q !(%2!.5DDqD Tastings q Private Paies DELIVERY Gourmet delivered meals made by professional chefs from real, SERIOUSLY SOURCED food.Great for Corporate Events, Business Meetings, Dining In, Dinner Paies, Private Flights, Boating, Weekly Prepared Meals, Specialty Diets, etc. CONCIERGE CATERERS Refined. Innovative. Modern. Hampton Forks Concierge Caterers brings a new standard to old, outdated catering rules and menus. Experience food in a personalized and more authentic way designed to service your every need. qqqqqqqq Proud to Host Cellar & ChefŽ to Benefit Place of Hope Thursday, March 24, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. An exquisite four course wine & food pairing dinner. $65 per person (100% of ticket sales will be donated Place of Hope!) Tickets at www.placeofhope.com/poal/cellarandchef Palm Beach 221 Royal Poinciana Way 561.832.0992www.TestasRestaurants.com | Sunset Menu 3-6pm | Open daily from 7:30am-10:00pm, Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner | Full Bar Testa’s T esta’s PALM BEACH Since 1921 $20 Credit On your check of $65 or more before discount or $15 credit on $40+. Regular Lunch & Dinner menus with this original offer. Thru: 03-31-2016 Recipient of THE QUINTESSENTIAL PALM BEACH AWARD from the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce celebrating our 95th anniversary FLORIDA WRITERSDoc Ford’s deadly assignment brings trouble to his island communityQ Deep BlueŽ by Randy Wayne White. Putnam. 336 pages. Hardcover, $27. Though we rarely see Doc Ford on one of his secret government assignments these days, one has come his way. He must, says his government handler, assassinate a madman who has reached the top of the most wanted ter-rorist list. A recent convert to Islam, Chicagoan David Abdel Cash-mere, aka Maximo Al-Amerikee, has been making a lot of trouble by beheading people with his ruby-handled Persian knife and circulating videos of his slayings. A failed actor, he has now become a star. ISIS calls him its American senior operative and video adviser. Sound a bit over-the-top?Yes, and youll love it. Its surreal and whacky, but darn scary and suspenseful, too. Our hero, now in Randy Wayne Whites 23rd Doc Ford adventure, packs up his tool kit and heads for a swanky resort near the ruins of ancient Tulum, on the Yucatan Peninsula. After some prelim-inary surveillance and study, he meets his supposed contact, an attractive woman named KAT. Somewhat suspi-cious of her behavior, he sends her a message that the mission has been scrubbed and assesses her reaction. From here on, Doc knows theres a game on that involves manip-ulating him, perhaps even substituting his assigned target for another. More than that, he discovers his community on Sanibel Island is in jeopardy. Two unusual occurrences threaten the Dinkins Bay Marina. One is the appearance of Hello Dolly, a great white shark that is at once a source of fear and a possible source of increased or collapsed tourism. The other is the appearance of two drones that, extremely well-designed, do not seem to be under the control of government agencies. Other odd things happen. Some force (or someone) invades and captures Sanibel area cyberspace, taking over computers and other electronic devices in a show of power. Soon enough, readers get to know the main villains. More about David Cashmere is revealed, and a grotesque pair „ an estranged father and son of great intellect, wealth and criminal intent „ comes into play. The father is Winslow Shepherd, whom Doc had seen in the company of KAT (conceivably a traitor or double agent). The son, Julian, is a madman whose derangement and genius far exceed that of the Muslim terrorist. Julian, we discover, wants his drones back. But what are they for? What else does he want? Why does he need to bring Doc grief? Deep BlueŽ is flooded with other fascinating characters, including a Brazilian multimillionaire, a female veterinarian with a sordid past who saves Docs dog and a pint-sized Cuban whose exploits lend some levity to the otherwise somber atmosphere. One of Mr. Whites greatest characters, the strangely wise and often wacky aging hippie named Tomlinson, has a major sub-ordinate role here, while Docs sometimes-girlfriend Hannah Smith (alive and well in the new series of novels that bear her name) has a mere walk-on part. As always in a Doc Ford adventure, seamanship and navigation play major roles. So do all kinds of contemporary tech-nologies (exploited here on both sides of the probability line). Mr. White keeps the techno-speak in bounds so that it does not get in the way of the pace and accessibility of the story line. In fact, for many readers the forays into science (about dogs, boats, biological research, blue holes) will be a significant center of interest. One thing is totally probable, and that is the web of friendship and community feeling at Dinkins Bay. The characters that fill the home territory of this and earlier Doc Ford novels are for the most part people who were once strangers in need of new directions and connections. Some needed to begin new lives. Life and camaraderie at and near the mari-na allowed them to cover their secrets. Deeper relationships allowed them to share, selectively, past misdeeds or fail-ures without fear of betrayal. So when Julian, who has tracked down every misstep in their lives, threatens to release all via the Internet, he would seem to have found Docs point of vulnerability. Mr. White delivers once again the thinking persons thriller his readers have come to expect, along with excellent manage-ment of pacing, settings and characteriza-tion. Its a winner. Q „ Phil Jason, Ph.D., U.S. Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. phil JASONphiljreviews@gmail.com WHITE

PAGE 53

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 B21 4200 Con g ress Av e (I-95 Exit #63, west 1 mile) g r FRIDAY & SATURDAYMARCH 18 & 19, 2016 @ 8PMThe presentation of the Limn Dance Company was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts. n F F rida y & S aturda y A A A A A A A A A A A A A p r il 1 & 2, 2016 @ 8P M SATURDAYAPRIL 16, 2016 @ 8PM WEDNESDAYAPRIL 8, 2016 @ 8PM WEDNESDAYMARCH 30, 2016@ 2PM CONTRACT BRIDGEBLITZKREIG! BY STEVE BECKERWhen a player makes a takeout double of a suit „ as West did in this case „ he announces the values for an open-ing bid and asks his partner to respond in one of the other three suits. However, the responder has the option of passing the double when he has a very strong holding „ three tricks or more „ in the opener s suit. In such a case, he can elect to convert the takeout double into a penalty double by passing. That is exactly what happened here when East decided that one diamond doubled, played by South, was the best contract for his side. It is nearly always right to lead a trump when a one-level takeout double is passed by the responder, and West saw no reason to deviate from that principle. Declarer won Easts nine of diamonds with the king and returned a low heart to dummys king. East took the ace and led the queen of trumps to South's ace. Declarer could now have saved a trick by cashing the club ace, but he not unreasonably con-tinued with the jack of hearts, hoping to secure a heart ruff in dummy. West took the jack with the queen and cashed the king of spades, on which East played the queen. West then continued with a low spade to East's jack. East continued the devastating defense when he drew both of South's remaining trumps and returned the nine of spades. West cashed the A-10 of spades, East discarding his one remaining club, and East won the remaining tricks with his fifth trump and the 10-9 of hearts. So South went down five „ 1,400 points „ as a result of East's propi-tious pass and the subsequent flawless defense. Had West started out by lead-ing the K-A and another spade instead of a trump, South might have held the loss to 500 points. West's trump lead turned out to be worth an additional 800 points. Q Princesses and superheroes share the spotlight at the Schoolhouse Childrens Museum and Learning Center during the annual Princesses & Super Heroes Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 2. Tickets are $3 for museum members in advance and at the door; and $5 for nonmembers in advance and $6 at the door. Guests will enjoy a fun-filled family day of games and activities, ice cream, face painting, crafts and music. Chil-dren can meet their favorite princess and superhero as well as real local heroes „ firefighters and police offi-cers. Also, Princess FionaŽ will join CMT Touring Company at the amphi-theater to perform songs from Shrek the Musical.Ž For more information and tickets, call 742-6780. The Schoolhouse Childrens Museum & Learning Center is housed in one of the first schools in Boynton Beach. It is committed to exposing young children to South Florida history through two floors of hands-on, interactive exhibits, art classes, science experiments, kin-dergarten readiness S.T.E.A.M. work-shops, special events, birthday parties and more. Q Princesses, superheroes take over Schoolhouse Children’s MuseumSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ ALFRED CLAYTON PHOTOGRAPHYThe Schoolhouse Children’s Museum and Learning Center in Boynton Beach will host a day of princesses and heroes April 2.

PAGE 54

B22 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Palm Beach Unites; 1,000 assemble 150,000 meals for local kids Dana Koch, Jessica Koch, Alexis Koch and Olivia Koch 1 2 4 6 8 7 10 9 3 5 1. Thomas Ferro, Charlie Lorentzen and Harrison Fisher 2. Topher Cook and Piper Cook 3. Cricket Cook 4. Juliana Goldberg, Rosie Goldberg and Chris Goldberg and Bruce Gendelman 5. Serge Zenou, Oliver Zenou, and Chloe Zenou 6. Kristi Gannon, Tim Gannon and Bettina Gannon 7. Logan Emmer and Nicholas Lorentzen 8. Brandie Herbst and Paisley Herbst 9. Nelson Lamb and Karyn Lamb 10. Anne Metzger and Bill Metzger CAPEHART PHOTOGRAPHY

PAGE 55

Loggerhead Park u 14200 US Highway One u Juno Beach, FL 33408 u (561) 627.8280 u Marinelife.org/TurtleFest Saturday, March 19, 2016 10:00 am to 6:00 pmLoggerhead Park, Juno Beach(Free Shuttle From FPL in Juno Beach) Marinelife.org/T urtlefest Marinelife.org/T urtlefest LIVE MUSIC FUN ACTIVITIES PNC Kids Zone € Artist Row Food & Beverage € Shopping Sea T urtles € Kids Activities Bik e Valet & So Much More! FrE AmLy -Fu! #TurtleFest2016 Aerosmith Tribute Aerosmith Tribute COMMUNITY PARTNERS: 2016 SPONSORS: IN THE KNOW. IN THE NOW. NEW FOR 2016 SLIDE OVER THE SEA!

PAGE 56

B24 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY 58th Annual American Cancer Society Gala, Mar-a-Lago 1. Jesse Stoll, Shelley Menin, Lori Stoll and Kitty Silverstein 2. Angie Campistrous and Andy Dugard 3. Arlette Gordon and Greg D’ Elia 4. Ellen Berenstein and Michael Dixon 5. Renee Scott and Donald Scott 6. Chip Stahl and Lauren Stoll 7. Janet Levy and Helene Karp 8. Guillaume de Chalambert and Diane de la Begassiere 9. Susan Furman and Bob Holuba 10. Suzanne Tomsich and Bob Tomsich 11. Mario Govic and Ann Marie Govic 12. Dottie Herman and Chris Leavitt 13. Michael Bolton and Marzia Precoda COURTESY PHOTOS 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13

PAGE 57

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B25LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. SOCIETY Palm Beach Opera at the Improv in West Palm Beach 1 Robert Watson, Fleur Barron, Danielle MacMillan, Jason Duika, Jessica Fishenfeld, Spencer Viator, Andrew Bogard and Liana Guberman 2 Joy Parks, Bob Parks, Jessica Fishenfeld, Jerry Rodman and Marilyn Rodman 3 Beth Koven, Laura Fiore, Kathy Lehan, Wynne Rosenkopf, Bernita Jacobs, Jill Grebler and Arlene Olesen 4. Erica Rohreib and Gisela Ramirez 5. Liana Guberman, Timothy Cheung, Fleur Barron, Andrew Bogard and Danielle MacMillan 6. Mike Staehla, Ruth Staehla, Judy Lawghton and Tiberius Dabo 7. Robert Watson, Gerry Lipman, Joan Lipman, Dan Pickney and Carole Pickney 8. Kathy Willow and Marc Willow 9. Jessica Fishenfeld, Abbey Harr, Jennifer Wilson, Zalman Kelber and Danielle MacMillan ANDY SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 2 3 8 9 4 6 5 7

PAGE 58

B26 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY VINOWhat does oak do to wine? Different oaks create different tastesThere are two plants essential to winemaking: the grapevine and the oak tree. Since most wine is either fermented in oak or aged in it, maybe it would be good to know why ƒ and what kind of flavors and sensations we can expect from wine thats been oaked.Ž When you start making wine, youre faced with a ton of decisions: which grapes to plant and where to plant them, when to harvest, what style of wine to make, what kind of container for fermentation and aging. It goes on and on. For the moment, lets forget about the grape stuff and con-centrate on the whole container issue. Thats where all the oak comes in. For fermentation and aging, youll choose either oak barrels or stainless steel tanks, for very specific reasons. Why oak? When the liquid is in contact with oak, the wine softens and soaks up several flavor components. The effects are very different for red wines and whites. Second, the choice of which kind of oak (and how the barrels are made) has a dramatic influence on flavor, color, spoilage and other characteristics. Sometimes, the back label of a wine bottle will carry a statement like aged for 14 months in new American oak.Ž Thats important, because different kinds of oak impart different kinds of flavors, and knowing which is which can help you guess what kind of drinking experience you might be in for. We can conveniently divide the whole oak issue into two „ or maybe four „ parts. You, as a winemaker, will choose either French or American oak, and then decide whether to buy new barrels (at about $1,500 a pop) or ones that have been used once or twice. Used barrels impart less flavor, and theyre cheaper. Depending on how a barrel is made, different types of flavors will be absorbed into the wine. The process of making bar-rels is called cooperage, so if you know anyone named Cooper, chances are that barrel making is what their distant ances-tors did for a living. Barrels are made over heat, which allows the staves to be bent into the proper shapes. When fire is used, the sugars in the wood are caramelized, imparting fla-vors of coffee, chocolate, vanilla, toffee and toasted nuts, among others. Thats why those types of barrels are generally used for big reds such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Zinfandel and Syrah. But when the same types of barrels are used for a white wine like Chardonnay, rich flavors of vanilla and oak itself leach into the wine. In fact, the oakyŽ style of Chard was very much in fashion not long ago. Today, tastes have shifted toward the unoakedŽ style, which delivers more of the pure fruit flavors and the zing of acidity. Many times, the front or back label will tell you whether the wine is unoaked. The major sources for wine barrel oak are France and the U.S. American oak is loose-grained, and the resulting flavors are bolder and more obvious. French oak imparts more subtle flavors. Depending on how much of those oak flavors you want in your wine, you might choose to do the actual fermentation in large oak vats, then transfer the wine into smaller barrels for aging. (The size of the aging barrel also affects flavor, but thats another story). Then youll figure out how long to mature it in the barrel, tasting it from time to time to see how its coming along. Thats my favorite part. Since barrels are so expensive, some winemakers take the cheap route, and get the oak characteristics into their wine by simply throwing oak chips into the vat. I hate it when that happens. Some wines have back labels that actually give you some real information. If you find one, remember that most top-quality red wines benefit from oak, as do white Burgundies and many Chardonnays. Naturally, new oak imparts stronger flavors than oak that has been used a few times. In red wines, look for those over-tones of vanilla, caramel, cl ove, smoke and cinnamon. In whites, you can expect toasted almond, nutmeg, allspice and other yummies. And now ƒ our top picks for this month:Q Kendall Jackson Grand Reserve Chardonnay 2013 „ Nicely balanced between oak and acidity, with a nose of peach and apple. The aromas pay off on the palate. About $20 WW 89 Q Cambria Katherines Vineyard Chardonnay Santa Maria 2013 „ A light touch of oak with elegant aromas and flavors of tropical fruit, including pineap-ple and lemon. Lean and nicely balanced. About $22 WW 89-90 Q Mulderbosch Cabernet Sauvignon Ros 2014 „ This South African offering gives up aromas of lavender and roses, with refreshingly tart flavors of rose petals, pomegranate and strawberry. WW 90Ask the Wine WhispererQ. How much wine comes from an acre of grapevines? „ Randy M., West Palm BeachA. Wine math: An acre of vineyard can produce anywhere from 2 to 13 tons of grapes, depending on how severely the grower limits the yield. The fewer tons, the better the wine. Lets assume that a grower produces 5 tons of grapes per acre. That works out to about 13.5 barrels, or just under 4,000 bottles. It would give you a little under 16,000 glasses of wine. Sample widely. Q jerry GREENFIELDvino@floridaweekly.com Winemakers choose either French or American oak, and then decide whether to buy new barrels, costing about $1,500, or ones that have been used once or twice. Used barrels impart less flavor, and they’re cheaper. Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com THERES A LOT TO LIKE www.facebook.com/FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach

PAGE 59

GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF MARCH 17-23, 2016 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B27The Dish: Half Shrimp Basket The Place: Old Key Lime House, 300 E. Ocean Ave., Lantana; 582-1889 or old-keylimehouse.com. The Price: $11.95 The Details: The Old Key Lime House has to be one of Palm Beach Countys busiest dining spots „ its seemingly packed at just about any hour. Its location along the Intracoastal Waterway in Lantana is just about per-fect for enjoying the views and under-standing why we call this place home. And fortunately the food lives up to the view. Fried shrimp is one of lifes guilty pleasures. The Old Key Lime House does the dish right, serving up a half-dozen shrimp that have been breaded and fried until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside. A fellow diner ordered the crab cakes and found them to be excellent, with juicy lumps of sweet crabmeat and virtu-ally no filler. Q „ Sc ott Simmons FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Chef Ernesto DeBlasi was only 16 years old when he discovered he had a real passion for cooking. I had gotten my first job doing dishes a couple of years earlier and made a habit of watching the line guys, who I thought were really cool,Ž he remem-bered. They were up there getting the food out fast, having fun and really mak-ing great dishes. I used to clean their sta-tions and tried to learn from them when I could. Back in those days, though, they wouldnt show you a lot of their tricks. You really had to figure things out on your own.Ž Chef DeBlasi had an epiphany about 14 years later, while working at Carolines on the Water in Apalachicola. He real-ized he was still excited about getting up every morning to create interesting dishes. It was tough going there, because it was a restaurant that was doing terribly, and I had to turn it over and make a suc-cess of it,Ž he said. But once I got things settled there and got the right crew in there, things started going well and I knew I was in the career I love.Ž Chef DeBlasi points to his brother, Michael, who was a chef at Marinos Ital-ian Restaurant in Hollywood, Fla., as his role model in the culinary arts. He was one of the best chefs I ever worked for,Ž he said. I watched him and the other cooks and got enthralled in the whole cooking thing.Ž From Marinos he traveled around, picking up experience along the way „ working as a sous chef at the Hilton in Cocoa Beach, reuniting with his brother at the Brooklyn Caf in Atlanta (and later at the Olympics), then running a fine dining Italian eatery called Al Dente in Southampton, N.Y. I cooked for Alan Alda and Billy Joel,Ž he said. All the big stars in New York would come out for the summer season. I got to make some really nice food. But I felt the pull to come back to Florida.Ž He worked at Carolines in Apalachicola then came to 32 East in Delray Beach not long after. Three years later, he headed to Caffe Luna Rosa, where he has happily remained for the last 16 years. Inspirations for menu items at Caffe Luna Rosa come from Chef DeBlasis experience as a hands-on chef. The more that you do things that are hands-on, the better you get at it,Ž he said. I read a lot about cooking. I stay away from the food shows, though. Too much drama. I talk to a lot of chefs locally. I do a lot of events in the commu-nities, where I work with them on and off and cultivate ideas with them.Ž In Caffe Luna Rosas casually elegant dining room „ which can seat about 130 people „ Chef DeBlasis favorite menu items center on the pasta dishes. In fact, he even built a glass-encased room within the dining room where diners can see him making the pasta. Our most popular dish is probably the Pappardelle Bolognese ($23), which is a huge seller,Ž he said. And in the meat sauce, we use all grass-fed ground beef, which we also use in our meatballs. I dont know of anyone else whos doing that.Ž Chef Ernesto DeBlasiAge: 46 Original Hometown: Miami Beach Restaurant: Caffe Luna Rosa, 34 S. Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach; 274-9404 or caffelunarosa.com. Mission: To produce the best food with quality ingredients at a fair price. Cuisine: Italian (all regions) Training: 20 years of intense training with top chefs Whats your footwear of choice in the kitchen? Klogs What advice would you give someone who wants to be a restaurateur or chef? ? Dive right into the business. You will soon find out if you like it. You must be passionate about this business to be successful in it. These days a small background in art, business and comput-ers can be of help.Ž Q In the kitchen with...ERNESTO DEBLASI, Caffe Luna Rosa, Delray Beach BY STEVEN J. SMITHssmith@floridaweekly.comTHE DISH: Highlights from local menus SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLY MICHAEL PISARRI / COURTESY PHOTOChef Ernesto DeBlasi has been with Caffe Luna Rosa for 16 years. Places in LantanaA trio worth noting3SCOTT’STHREE FOR1 JERK OCEANO201 E. Ocean Ave., Lantana; jerkoceano.com.Owner Dak Kerprich cooks what he likes, when he likes, and his choices almost always are inspired. He had made a name for himself with his Pizzeria Oceano, and had taken the concept to Delray Beach, with Swell Pizza. In the course of that change, Pizzeria Oceano became Jerk Oceano. But Mr. Kerprichs space in Delray got bought out and hes back again making pizzas and other innovative fare in Lantana „ in fact, some days there may not even be pizza on the menu. Try one of his salads „ he offered lettuce with smoked blue cheese, apple, almonds and celery seeds one Tuesday night „ and go home satisfied. Oh, and bring cash. Jerk Oceano has no phone and accepts no credit cards. 3 MARIO’S OCEAN AVE225 E. Ocean Ave., Lantana; 582-3013.We knew Henry Olminos food back in the 80s, when he owned Marios of Boca at Glades Plaza. He made lighter-than-air garlic rolls, pasta and pizza. Thirty years later, hes still at it. The joint was jumping during our last visit to Marios Ocean Ave. We were glad to see it. And those garlic rolls? We could go for a basket of them right now. „ Scott Simmons 2 RIGGINS CRAB HOUSE607 Ridge Road (just east of Interstate 95), Lantana; 586-3000 or rigginscrabhouse.com. Blue crabs reign supreme here. Looking for Maryland-style soft-shell crabs or crab cakes? Then this is the place. Its been packed since it opened more than 20 years ago „ we cannot remem-ber a time when we didnt have to wait for a table. On a budget? The lunch and early bird menu is one of the areas little bargains, with a crab cake platter at $14.95. Just remember to bring an COURTESY PHOTOCrab of all kinds is king at Riggins Crab House. SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYDine under the stars at Jerk Oceano in Lantana.

PAGE 61

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY REACHING PALM BEACH COUNTY’S MOST AFFLUENT READERS Florida Weekly’s monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living Better living living healthyMARCH 2016Targeted treatment for tumors | C4 Screening caregivers for elders | C5 Change your smile with Teeth Next Day | C7IF A CHILD EATS HEALTHY FOODS, IT CAN stabilize their energy, sharpen their minds and even out their moods. Since childhood obesity continues to be a growing concern in the United States, its important to make sure your child eats healthy snacks as part of a nutritious eating routine. Encouraging your child to make the right choices can be a challenge, but the key is to make snacks tasty and readily available. The following are some tips from Palm Beach Childrens Hospital to help combat childhood obesity.Snack SuggestionsFruits and raw vegetables are ideal snacks for kids because they are both healthy and easy to eat. Sliced kiwi, ber-ries, apples, bananas and grapes make easy finger food and can be served on their own or with honey, caramel or peanut b utter. Y ou also can sneak in SEE EAT RIGHT, C6 XBY TENET FLORIDA_________________________Getting kids to eatrightHealthful snacks help children form proper eating habits.

PAGE 62

C2 healthy living MARCH 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Thousands of people have “gotten the lead out’”, had their circulation re stored and have gotten off of high-blood pressure and diabetic medications. Take a simple and affordab le 3-hour urine test to reveal the tissue burden of lead and 19 other toxic heavy metals. Diabetics had a 50% improvement in Circulation. Affordable Payment Plans Available &}Œ}ŒŒUšZ] (v((š]šZŒ‰Z všZZ}]}( ‰ Œ}š]šZošX Come meet ŒXŒ}}oUDXXU the doctor who treats prof essional athletes and over 3,000 other individuals. Find out if ch elation therapy is right for you. ooš~rX Dr. Linda Kiley561-701-2841DRLINDAKILEY.COM When sex is painful, there are effective treatments M any women come into the office seeking help because of painful intercourse. The complaint may be part of a number of issues involving problems with the bladder, bowel, or vaginal dis-comfort. Many times they will have been treated for infections or other conditions without success. Pain during sex may have a number of causes, and it is not uncommon to see more than one prob-lem leading to the symptom. For menopausal women, low hormone levels take on average four to six years to begin to create significant problems with vaginal dryness and thin-ning of the tissues. This can lead to abnormal bacterial overgrowth in the vagina, which further irritates the deli-cate tissues. Treatment of atrophy and the changed environ-ment is important in addressing this problem. Vaginal estrogens, Osphena or laser therapy (MonaLisaTouch) may be effective to treat this problem. In addition, pelvic muscle spasms can be a significant and fairly common (but nearly unknown) cause of painful sex. Normally, the muscles in the pelvis are silent,Ž and we are unaware of them. However, certain activities or trauma may lead to spasm of these mus-cles, which can cause a myriad of symptoms, from frequent urges to urinate, painful urination, or difficulty urinating, to difficulty with bowel movements and pain with intercourse or lower abdomi-nal pain. Identifying this problem is vital in order to obtain relief. Appropriate treatment is aimed at relieving the muscle spasms through physical therapy and modification of activities. We have many skeptical patients who return from a course of physical therapy with joy after finally obtaining relief from their symptoms. There are other causes of painful intercourse that should be considered and either confirmed or eliminated as possible causes. These conditions include interstitial cystitis, endometriosis, neuropathy, adhesions (scar tissue), and unusual infections, among other less common conditions. When symptoms do not resolve with a simple and straightforward treatment, proper diagnosis is the key to success. Q Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com www.facebook.com/FloridaWeeklyPalmBeachTHERES A LOT TO LIKE

PAGE 63

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com MARCH 2016 healthy living C3 Learn more at jupitermed.com/lung 1240 S. Old Dixie Hwy. l Jupiter, FL 33458Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, with approximately 90% of cases related to the use of tobacco. This puts smokers at the highest risk. Fortunately, more than 80% of lung cancers can be beaten if detected early using a CT screening. $99 Could Save Your Life If youre a current or former smoker, or have a family history of lung cancer, low-dose CT lung screening at Jupiter Medical Center could help save your life. Some insurance plans now cover the cost. Our health navigator can help you understand your risk and your coverage. If you do not have coverage for screening, Jupiter Medical Center offers a self-pay price of $99.Please call 561-263-4437 to schedule your appointment today.Choose a screening center thats accredited and backed by a comprehensive thoracic and lung program. 5 MinutesThe time it takes to smoke a cigarette.15 MinutesThe time it takes to get a CT scan that could save your life. UF research: Fighting cavities could be as easy as taking a pill UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WEEKLY U niversity of Florida Health researchers have identified a new strain of bacteria in the mouth that might keep bad bacteria in check „ and could lead to a way to prevent cavities using probiotics. The researchers say the findings could lead to the development of a supplement that patients could take orally to prevent cavities. While developing an effective oral probiotic will require more research, a possible candidate organism has been identified: a previously unidentified strain of Streptococcus, currently called A12. Robert Burne, Ph.D., associate dean for research and chair of the UF College of Dentistrys department of oral biol-ogy, and dentist Marcelle Nascimento, an associate professor in the UF College of Dentistrys department of restorative dental sciences, published the findings in the journal Applied and Environmen-tal Microbiology. To maintain a healthy mouth, the oral environment must have a rela-tively neutral pH. When it becomes more acidic, cavities or other disorders can develop. Bacteria on the teeth make acid, and acid dissolves the teeth. Its straightfor-ward chemistry,Ž Mr. Burne said. We got interested in what activities keep the pH elevated.Ž Previous research by him, Dr. Nascimento and others found two main compounds „ urea, which everyone secretes in the mouth, and the amino acid arginine „ that break down into ammonia, which helps neutralize acid in the mouth. Mr. Burne and Dr. Nascimento had previously found that both adults and children with few or no cavities were better at breaking down arginine than people with cavities. Researchers knew bacteria were responsible for breaking down these compounds but needed to investigate which bacteria do this best, and how this inhibits cavities. Part of the answer is A12, the Streptococcus strain. Like a probiotic approach to the gut to promote health, what if a pro-biotic formulation could be developed from natural beneficial bacteria from humans who had a very high capacity to break down arginine?Ž Mr. Burne said. You would implant this probiotic in a healthy child or adult who might be at risk for developing cavities. However many times you have to do that „ once in a lifetime or once a week „ the idea is that you could prevent a decline in oral health by populating the patient with natural beneficial organisms.Ž Q

PAGE 64

C4 healthy living MARCH 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYYogurt might protect women from developing high blood pressure AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION W omen who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research pre-sented at the American Heart Associa-tions Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Sci-entific Sessions. No one food is a magic bullet, but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,Ž said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine. I believe this is the largest study of its kind to date to evaluate the specific effects of yogurt on blood pressure,Ž he added. To examine the long-term effects of eating yogurt on high blood pressure in middle-aged adults, researchers ana-lyzed data on participants in two Nurs-es Health Study cohorts (NHS and NHS II) „mostly women between 25-55 years old „ and the Health Professionals Fol-low-up Study „ mostly men between 40-75 years old. During 18 to 30 years of follow-up, researchers documented 74,609 new cases of high blood pressure in the three study groups. After adjusting for other risk factors and diet, they found: Q Women from the two NHS groups who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week (compared with those con-suming one serving per month) had about a 20 percent reduction in the risk of developing high blood pressure, which was statistically significant. Q Men in this study had much lower intakes of yogurt than women and, per-haps as a result, the effects of regular yogurt consumption were weaker. The authors also evaluated whether the effects of consuming larger amounts of yogurt were different among subjects with a healthy overall diet. To do this, subjects were given a score to reflect how closely their diet matched that of a DASH diet „Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension is an eating plan designed to lower blood pressure.The benefit of eating five or more servings of yogurt on the risk of high blood pressure was strongest among those with the highest DASH scores; that is, those who ate more fruits, vegetables, nuts and beans, other low-fat dairy and whole grains. In the pooled analysis, men and women who had a higher DASH score and who consumed yogurt five or more times per week had a 31 percent lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared with those who had the lowest yogurt intakes (one time per week) and the lowest DASH scores. Additionally, researchers noted that several servings of milk and cheese each day also had beneficial effects on blood pressure although the effects of yogurt seemed stronger than other forms of dairy,Ž Mr. Buendia said. Our study shows that daily intake of dairy products, particularly yogurt, low-ers the risk for developing high blood pressure, which is a key risk factor for the development of heart disease and stroke,Ž he said. Researchers had no information on the types of yogurt participants had eaten, he added. It would be interesting to see if popular yogurt types, such as Greek yogurt, had different effects than regular yogurt.ŽIn the future, researchers hope to analyze yogurt intake among different subgroups such as African Americans, who are at higher risk for high blood pressure, he said. Q Targeted treatment for tumors A s an interventional radiologist at Jupiter Medical Center, I strive to provide my patients with the most up-to-date noninvasive procedures available to treat a variety of diseases, including the treatment of cancerous tumors. At Jupiter Medical Center, my colleagues and I are advancing cancer treatment through the use of imaging technology, often in combination with the most cur-rent innovations in oncology. Our goal is to aggressively treat our patients while providing less pain, fewer side effects and a shorter recovery period. While we offer a wide array of radiation therapy and interventional oncol-ogy services, I am pleased to share with you that the minimally invasive and innovative radioembolization pro-cedure, which has been proven to effec-tively treat primary and metastatic tumors of the liver, is now available at our facility. Through this FDA-approved outpatient procedure, tiny radioactive beads are sent to tumors through the blood stream permitting high doses of radiation to be focused directly inside tumors. The goal is to slow the cancer and control disease within the liver. The beads are preferentially taken up by tumor and release radiation that kills cancer cells. This treatment permits a high dose of radiation to be focused directly inside tumors, while healthy tissue nearby typically receives minimal radiation. Radioembolization is used to treat cancer in the liver „ either cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the liver or cancers that arise from the liver itself. Metastatic cancers most commonly treated include colon and neuroendo-crine metastases. There also are significant benefits to radioembolization that include: Q A much more potent dose of radiation than conventional radiation therapy. Q Very short recovery time. Q Procedure usually takes one to two hours to complete and in most cases, patients go home later the same day. Q Localized treatment (only affects the liver) with milder side effects. Q Tumor shrinkage (while it wont cure the cancer, it can shrink tumors and improve quality of life for people with inoperable liver cancer and meta-static disease). Typically, if there is bilateral disease, two treatment sessions are nec-essary to treat one lobe at a time, which minimizes side effects. Radioembolization also is used in coordination with more well-estab-lished cancer treatments, including surgery and chemotherapy. In addi-tion, radioembolization may be used on liver tumors too large for sur-gery to shrink them to allow surgical removal and it can also be a treatment option for cancers in the liver that cannot be removed surgically and are not responsive to chemotherapy. While radioembolization is a new and exciting treatment option, it is not right for every patient. It is gener-ally only considered as treatment for cancers whose spread is limited to the liver, and people with severe liver disease are usually not eligible for radioembolization. All patients undergo detailed evaluation at Jupiter Medi-cal Center before being recommended for the procedure, and also receive close follow-up after the treatment. The treatment is coordinated with the patients other physicians, including physicians outside of Jupiter Medical Center. Radioembolization is just one procedure in our suite of radiation ther-apy and interventional oncology ser-vices at Jupiter Medical Center. Here, patients are carefully evaluated to determine the best treatment option for their specific needs. To learn more about our treatment options and services we have avail-able, please visit: foshaycancercenter.com/interventional-oncology. Q COURTESY PHOTO Lee Fox, MD, MA, chief of radiology at Jupiter Medical Center, with Andrew Hall, MD, in the interventional radiology suite. Andrew M. Hall, MDINTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGIST JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER

PAGE 65

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com MARCH 2016 healthy living C5 € BACK & SPINE SURGERY€ TOTAL JOINT SURGERY€ SPORTS MEDICINE€ ORTHOPEDIC REHAB Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center ORTHOPEDIC CAREPalm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to enjoy the course, the game, and be the healthiest you can be. Our team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS has trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. If you take care of your game on the course, we will take care of your orthopedic needs o the course.Call 561-625-5070 to register to attend one of our FREE Bone Density Screenings or for a complimentary physician referral. Setting the Gold Standard in Orthopedic Care 3360 Burns Road € Palm Beach Gardens € pbgmc.com Tips for screening caregivers for elders O lder adults, espe-cially those with dementia, are vul-nerable to exploitation, abuse and neglect. They are less likely to notice and less able to report miscon-duct. If you leave your loved one alone with a caregiver, you want to make sure that the person does not have a criminal history. Nearly 5,000 older adults were victims of crime in Palm Beach County alone last year. Floridas Adult Protective Services receives more than 220 calls per month for elder abuse and exploita-tion for Palm Beach County. Whether you employ a private caregiver directly or use a home care company, it is critical that the caregiver is screened through a comprehensive criminal background check. Too often, this is either not done at all or the screening procedure used is inadequate. Florida requires all caregivers working through an agency or a registry to complete a Level 2 Background Screen-ing. There is no difference whatsoever between an agency and a registry when it comes to state screening require-ments. No background screening requirements currently apply to private care-givers not working through an agency or registry. Palm Beach County recently adopted an ordinance that would require all caregivers to be licensed and to com-plete a criminal background check simi-lar to the State requirement; but that ordinance has not yet been implemented. Many home care companies rely exclusively on Floridas Level 2 screening process to screen caregivers. The states system provides some mea-sure of protection. Unfortu-nately, the system is far from perfect and misses important databases that may reveal past criminal behavior.Floridas screening process relies on the FBI fingerprint database. The FBI database was intended to store investigative leads for law enforcement „ not as a background screening tool. It is plagued by inconsistencies and gaps. According to the Department of Justice, the FBI data-base is missing important information for about 50 percent of its records. Here are a few shortcomings of the FBI/state fingerprint database: € Some misdemeanor convictions (such as theft and financial exploitation crimes under a certain dollar threshold) may not be included. € Relatively recent criminal misconduct may not show up in the state screening system. € The state screening process is not designed to pick up criminal conduct recorded at the county level or in the Federal District Court databases. The more reliable screening process is a nationwide search that cross-checks verified social security numbers with names, and determines each county in which the applicant lived in the past seven years. Criminal records are then checked in each relevant county and Federal District Court database. In addition, it is prudent to screen caregivers through the Department of Motor Vehicles databases, which may reveal DUI convictions and other reck-less or negligent behavior. All Visiting Angels offices are required to use these more rigorous procedures, and are audited on a regular basis for compliance. Entrusting the welfare of your loved one to a caregiver is serious business. If you are considering using a home care company for your loved one, ask if it performs a criminal background check beyond the standard state FBI screen-ing and ask it to explain exactly what it does. If you directly employ a private caregiver, order a comprehensive back-ground check yourself. There are sev-eral companies that perform these more comprehensive screenings. I recommend checking with the Association of Professional Background Screeners at napbs.com for a list of companies that meet their accreditation standards. If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at 561-328-7611. I will be speaking about dementia at the 2016 Alzheimers Education Confer-ence at the West Palm Beach Conven-tion Center, March 16-17. For informa-tion, call Alzheimers Community Care at 561-683-2700. Q Irv SeldinPRESIDENT, VISITING ANGELS OF THE PALM BEACHES 561-328-7611

PAGE 66

Chelation may be one of the best anti-aging therapiesChelation therapy is a 50-year-old therapy that is well proven to improve cir-culation and remove heavy metals. Two significant studies have now been published in major medical journals. These scientifically backed studies prove that this ther-apy is significant for open-ing circulation and improv-ing, particularly in diabetics, their vascularity. Chelation therapy has been proven to the Food and Drug Administration to be 100 percent safe. Chelation therapy is an intravenous therapy that incorporates the use of a synthetic amino acid called EDTA which is FDA approved for lead removal. Heavy metals, in particularly lead and mercury, are associated with arte-riosclerosis and many other health issues. Chelation therapy is the act of removing heavy metals from the body but additionally, it has been proven on two major studies to improve circula-tion. Many thousands have undergone chelation therapy in the last 50 years with significant results in the majority of cases. A meta-analysis that was per-formed on over 22,000 patients with objective instrument testing showed an average of 92 percent improvement statistically significant improvement. As men-tioned, chelation IV therapy is a 100 percent safe as prov-en to the FDA, in these two studies, when used properly with an experienced physi-cian. This therapy actually is a significant anti-aging therapy because the arter-ies play such an important role in delivering oxygen and fuel to our cells, which are our power houses. By improving arterial elasticity; thus the amount of oxygen and fuel delivered to the cells and moving CO2 away from the cells, we see that this is effectively one of the best anti-aging therapies available. Sir William Osler, the father of modern medicine, stated: You are only as old as your arteries.Ž You should con-sider chelation therapy as an integral part of reducing disease states and improving with increased energy. Q „ Dr. Bruce Dooley received his M.D. from Jefferson Medical (Phila.) and his M.S. from Villanova. He gives training lectures to physicians and the public on Functional or Integrative Medicine. His clinical experience in this field and EDTA chelation therapy spans 25 years and over 4,000 patients. C6 healthy living MARCH 2016 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Our Angels can help your family! OUR CAREGIVERS ARE CAREFULLY SCREENED AND SELECTED FULLY BONDED AND INSURED | TEMPORARY, LONG TERM AND LIVE-IN WE ARE DEVOTED TO ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA CARE 561.328.7611 VisitingAngels.com/PalmBeaches FL Lic # 30211527 fruits and veggies in other forms, such as applesauce, yogurt, frozen fruit bars and smoothies. For vegetables, cut up carrot sticks, broccoli, cucumber, celery or bell peppers and serve with low-fat dip or salad dressing. Alternatively, set out cut veggies like a salad bar and let kids make their own salads. Its also important to incorporate whole grains and low-fat dairy into your childs eating routine. Pita pock-ets, whole-wheat English muffins, cereal, granola and cereal bars, baked chips and crackers are sensible choices, as are low-fat cheeses, frozen yogurt and pudding. Nuts are another good snack, used sparingly. Before you share nuts with other children, be sure none of the other children is allergic. Trail mix, which can include a variety of nuts, seeds, raisins and other dried fruit, is a simple and fun treat.Healthy DrinksBeverages are just as important as the food that children consume. Skip the sug-ary sodas and serve your child a different option such as water, low-fat milk or 100 percent fruit juice. Creative Meal PresentationsYou can encourage your child to snack smart by making food fun. Serve snacks on fun plates, with colorful cups and nap-kins, or cut sandwiches into fun shapes with cookie c utters. Another tip is to give kids choices, but make them all healthy. That way, everyone wins; your child gets to choose his or her snack, and you get the satisfaction of knowing its nutritious. Being prepared is key; make sure your refrigerator is stocked with sensible options.ModerationLast, remember that even if snacks are healthy, they should be eaten in mod-eration. Dont serve snacks too close to mealtimes, and limit them to about 150 calories per serving. With a little planning and creativity, you may soon find that preparing healthy snacks for your children is easier than you think and will provide your child with the healthy and energetic eating routine he or she needs. In addition to helping children maintain a healthy weight, Palm Beach Childrens Hospital has dedicated itself to the overall health and well-being of the communitys youth. The hospitals array of services includes pediatric oncology, a concussion treatment center, pediatric trauma care and a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. For additional infor-mation about the resources available at Palm Beach Childrens Hospital or for a free physician referral, visit palmbeach-childrenshospital.com or call (561) 841-KIDS (5437). Q EAT RIGHTFrom page C1 Dr. Bruce DooleyADVANCED NATURAL MEDICINE 561-744-2724ADVANCEDNATURALMEDICINE.COM

PAGE 67

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com MARCH 2016 healthy living C7 LINDA KILEY, MD, FACOG, FPMRS Board Certi“ed, Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery Urogynecology and Advanced Pelvic Surgery3375 Burns Rd Suite 204, Palm Beach Gardens 33410 | 561-701-2841 | www.DrLindaKiley.com Restore IntimacyFor women who cant or wont use estrogen and have symptoms of vaginal atrophy, theres a new alternative to medication that is quick and painless... Introducing the a revolutionary new laser treatment for vaginal revitalization. Change your smile and change your life with Teeth Next Day A re you are suffering from miss-ing teeth, damaged teeth, fail-ing dental work or ill-fitting dentures? Does your poor dental health keep you from smiling, socializing and enjoying the foods you love? Have you undergone dental work that you keep having to redo every few years or are experienc-ing ongoing dental issues? Stop suffering from the endless cycle of root canals, gum surgery, dental infections, toothless smiles and embar-rassment. Teeth Next Day is a solution designed to give you a brand new smile that looks, feels and functions like your natural teeth in just one day. Imagine coming into our state-of-the art facility designed for Teeth Next Day procedures and leaving the very next day with a brand new smile. Dr. Jay L. Ajmo is a certified implant dentist with over 25 years of experience in cosmetic and restorative dentistry. He is one of only 400 dentists worldwide to hold a Diplomate Certification with the American Board of Oral Implan-tologists and is the exclusive South Flori-da provider of Teeth Next Day. All procedures are performed utilizing the most advanced tools and techniques in modern dentistry including 3D CT Scans for precision implant placement. Dr. Ajmo is supported by his dedicated team in his state-of-the-art facility, designed for the utmost in patient com-fort along with optimum cosmetic and functional results for the restoration of your smile.How it worksThe Teeth Next Day solution uses a zirconia implant bridge as the final prod-uct attached to five or six dental implants. These implants act like the roots of natu-ral teeth and permanently anchor the bridge to the jawbone. The permanent implant bridge used in the Teeth Next Day solution is made from zirconia, the most durable and longest lasting dental material available. Unlike acrylic options that are offered in most dental implant centers, zirconia will never chip, crack or stain. Teeth Next Day replicates the look, feel and function of natural teeth, making it the strongest and most naturally beautiful implant sup-ported smile treatment available in mod-ern dentistry.The latest technologyNot only is the Teeth Next Day solution made from one of the most advanced dental materials available, the procedure utilizes the latest technologies for preci-sion fit and optimum design. Dr. Ajmos team uses 3D CT scans to precisely place your dental implants below the gum line. Each zirconia implant bridge is created using computer-aided design and CAD/CAM milling for a precise fit. Every Teeth Next Day implant bridge is hand-stained to provide the most natural-looking color possible. Each of these innovations makes Teeth Next Day the most state-of-the-art option for the replacement of missing teeth, damaged teeth, failing dental work or ill-fitting dentures. Patients who have undergone Teeth Next Day have transformed their appear-ance and their quality of life. No longer do they hide their toothless smile or struggle to chew a meal. Now, they have regained confidence to smile and eat the foods they love. Are you ready for a comfortable, healthy smile? Change your smile and change your life! Call 561-627-8666 to schedule your com-plimentary consultation. Q Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A.PGA CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY 7100 FAIRWAY DR. SUITE 59 PALM BEACH GARDENS561-627-8666PGADENTISTRY.COM Before After

PAGE 68

“ I’ve always been unhappy with my smile, but I was too nervous to have the work done. With the IV sedation, I never felt a thing and the results are amazing.” – Tim Tim Before Tim After The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a re sult of, and within 72 hours of, responding to the advertisement for the free, di scounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment. Comprehensive Examination (D0150) Full-Mouth Digital X-ray (D0330) Teeth Next Day, offered exclusively at PGA Advanced Dentistry, is a leading-edge dental implant solution designed to give you a brand-new smile that looks, feels, and functions like your natural teeth – in just one day. View our videos on our website to see how PGA Advanced Dentistry is improving lives, one smile at a time. PGA dentistry.comAre You Embarrassed to Smile? Are You Suffering from Failing or Missing Teeth? Trust Your Smile to an Expert! Dr. Jay Ajmo, D.D.S., DABOI is one of South Florida’s leading dentists, treating patients with the highest level of care since 1987. He holds internationally recognized credentials in cosmetic and implant dentistry, and is certified in IV sedation. Dr. Ajmo is one of only 400 dentists worldwide to hold a Diplomate Certification with the American Board of Oral Implantology. Now you can receive all your care with total comfort in one state-of-the-art facility.For your Complimentary Consultation or 2nd Opinion, ca ll 561.627.8666.(Includes No-Charge, Full-Mouth X-ray)7100 Fairway Drive, Suite 59 | Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418