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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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A polo match and a powerful message will highlight a new fundraiser for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Societys Palm Beach Area Chapter on Jan. 4. The honorary chairman of the event will deliver both. Brandon Phillips, a 5-goaler who has hurried horses down the field during countless chukkers, has lined up five other professional players for a three-on-three exhibition match titled Polo for a Purpose. Had the 36-year-old not beat the odds when diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lym-phoma as a teenager, the aspiring athlete never would have suc-ceeded in the sport. At stage four, I was quite near the end,Ž Mr. Phillips said. They gave me a 50-50 shot of survival.Ž The then-14-year-old from King City, Canada, woke up one morning writhing in pain from an ache in his left leg. A cancer-ous tumor had formed around his ureter, grew in size, caused his left kidney to stop working and eventually compressed the lymph nodes near his upper thigh. I had a soccer game the night before, and the next morning, I work up just aching,Ž Mr. Phillips said. I originally thought I was going to lose my leg, lose my kidney, for sure.Ž The date: June 7, 1992. The beginning of a summer filled with ftbol, rugby and Pro player beat lymphoma, will compete in ‘Polo for a Purpose’BY AMY WOODSSpecial to Florida Weekly SEE POLO, A20 X looking to the future locals predict year of hope l l o o k k in g t o t h e f u t u r r e e THE FINAL DAYS OF ANY YEAR ARE A PRECIOUS TIME OF REFLECTION AS we take stock of what we have accomplished and what we have yet to accomplish. In that spirit we asked a variety of cultural, industry and government leaders their thoughts on the coming year. Golfer Jack Nicklaus does not worry.Its been said that worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow; it empties today of its strength. I prefer to focus on and enjoy today,Ž he says. But Ray Graziotto, president of the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County, and president and CEO of the company that owns Loggerhead Marinas, frets that things are out of hand in Washington. There is no leadership, starting with the president. Its like watching children run around on the playground,Ž he says. Regardless of philosophy, one needs hope.Or as philanthropist Roe Green says, Patience for the coming year!!!Ž„ Scott Simmons www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 Vol. IV, No. 12  FREE INSIDE OPINION A4PETS A6HEALTHY LIVING A14 BUSINESS A21 NETWORKING A25REAL ESTATE A26 ARTS B1SANDY DAYS B2 EVENTS B6-9PUZZLES B10SOCIETY A23-24, B13-14DINING B19 NetworkingSee who was out and about in Palm Beach. A25 X Top filmsA look at what’s in store for 2014 at the movies. B1 XHighland journeyThe pipes are calling visitors to Scotland. A22 X PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 AntiquesCommemorative flasks still pour on the value. A31 X Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes and Android App Store. >> A8-9 PHILLIPS f i lmsfr e nzyEscape to the movies this season

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 901 45th S treet, W est P a lm B ea ch Learn more at Palm B each C hildrens .com Children’s Medical CareIs Soaring to New Heights. cardiology & cardiac surgery neurosurgeryemergency trauma care oncology neonatal intensive carelimb reconstruction & lengthening Helping a five year old overcome a battle with cancer. Reconstructing a child’s misshapen leg. Performing heart surgery on a patient who is only 12 hours old. Palm Beach Children’s Hospital has elevated the quality of children’s medical care in South Flori da. Our goal: to provide advanced care that is less invasive, requires less recovery time and alleviates the need for families to travel. Palm Beach Ch ildren’s Hospital helps ensure that children have access to the care they need close to home. More than 170 doctors representing 30 specialties. For your freeKITE, call 5 6 1-84 1-KID S Scan with your smartphones Q R code reade r COMMENTARYCommunities by choiceTraveling around in Palm Beach County gives you a sense of appre-ciation for the extraordinary abundance that characterizes this part of South Florida. The region is a magnet, attract-ing thousands of new residents who set-tle comfortably into the life style of the Palm Beaches. The newcomers flock to high net worth rookeries within some of the wealthiest zip codes in the country. They bring nest eggs to spend on interesting and fun things to do while building their social networks. Philan-thropy is thus a perfect excuse and inspiration for a grand social season, overflowing with a full menu of cause-related, charitable events extending over several months. To see and be seen is a fund-raising accelerant for galas and donor appeals that replenish the budgets of local charities before the summer creep of humidity dampens everyones enthusiasm for recreational philanthropy. It is a challenge for area nonprofits to get on the charitable radar of resi-dents from somewhere else. Migrants are loyal to their former homes, where families were raised, businesses were built, and donations given. That local nonprofits must compete with charities back homeŽ is not just a Palm Beach County phenomenon. The Tampa Bay Times sums it up this way, after looking around in its own part of the state: Its not just about who is „ or isnt „ giv-ing. Its about where the philanthropy is going. Florida charities still see plenty of donations going out of state. Of 41 phil-anthropic gifts by Floridians of $1 mil-lion or more this year, 19 were sent out of state „ perpetuating Floridas chal-lenge of winning the hearts and wallets of rich residents who live here but keep stronger ties elsewhere.Ž The Florida Philanthropic Network agrees: charities have a long way to go to increase the proportion of philan-thropic dollars that remain in the state. According to the association, so far this year, gifts given by Florida donors of at least $1 million or more, a total of $118 million, stayed in Florida; but an addi-tional $84 million in gifts of $1 million or more went outside of the state. In 2012, of 47 gifts by Floridians of $1 million or more, 19 went out of state. The outflow also includes grant dollars awarded by Florida Foundations. In 2009, almost 60 percent of Florida foundation grants went to charities out of state. Increasing the proportion of home-based philan-thropy that sticksŽ locally is an impor-tant issue affecting the sustainability of nonprofits addressing local needs. Transplanted residents have philanthropic capacity but their familiarity with opportunities for giving in Palm Beach County is often limited. Their greater awareness can increase giving to effective charities doing business in the county. This goal captured the imagination of Beverlee Miller and John L. Raymond, of Palm Beach. Together, they founded Extraordinary Charities Inc., a nonprofit with the mis-sion of introducing area philanthropists to deserving and often unrecognized charities in the county, focusing on organizations with annual budgets of less than $3 million. With the support of multiple donors, the organization cre-ated the Directory for Charitable Giv-ing, a publication designed to connect donors with local nonprofits. The group selects nonprofits for inclusion in the directory based on their transparency, sustainability, effective-ness and uniqueness of approach to challenging issues. The first directory published in 2012 profiles 51 nonprof-its. The recently released 2013 version adds another 25 charities to the original group, bringing the total of nonprofits featured to 76. The group distributes the print publication to over 11,000 homes in Palm Beach County with annual household incomes of $500,000 and above. They also distribute copies without charge to CPAs, estate planners and wealth advi-sors serving clients. The groups founders and supporters say greater awareness about the high-lighted charities increases giving; and Mary Hammond, the groups director, writes in the 2013 edition of the directo-ry, that new and recurring contributions to many of the agencies highlighted are evidence of the groups success. In a recent interview with the Miami Herald, Linda Carter, president/CEO of the Community Foundation of Broward observed, More and more people are now realizing this is home, even though theyve come from someplace else.Ž She should know. That Foundation is the beneficiary of an estate gift of $43.9 million from Mary Porter, a native of Pennsylv ania and, prior to her demise, one of the nations top 50 philanthro-pists. Philanthropy is a proven gateway to a connection with place that is trans-formative. Extraordinary Charities Inc. reaches out to PBCs residents-by-choice to build their awareness about opportunities for giving locally. Giving where you live is a sign of recognition you really are at home „ and isnt that where all philanthropy begins? Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian and the past President and CEO of the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties. Her professional career spans more than 25 years in the charitable sector, leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and rural Appalachia. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly15@gmail.com and follow Lilly on Twitter @llilly15. n  C T a n i leslie LILLYllilly15@gmail.com

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2013 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. Publisher Michelle Nogamnoga@floridaweekly.comEditor Betty Wellsbwells@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsScott Simmons Athena Ponushis Tim Norris Jan Norris Mary Jane Fine Loren Gutentag Artis Henderson Linda Lipshutz Roger Williams Nina Cusmano Amy WoodsPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersElliot Taylor Paul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Hannah Arnone Chris AndruskiewiczAccount ExecutivesBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comSales and Marketing AssistantDominique Delkddelk@floridaweekly.comCirculation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Frank Jimenez Chelsea Crawford Headley Darlington Published by Florida Media Group LLC Pason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: FLORIDA WEEKLY 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470  Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state Obama wrongs the Bill of RightsPresident Barack Obama proclaimed Dec. 15 Bill of Rights Day, praising those first 10 amendments to the U.S. Consti-tution as the foundation of American liberty, securing our most fundamental rights „ from the freedom to speak, assemble and practice our faith as we please to the protections that ensure justice under the law.Ž The next day, U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon called Obamas surveillance policies almost OrwellianŽ in a court order finding the National Security Agencys bulk col-lection of Americans telephone meta-data very likely unconstitutional. If that was not enough, the presidents own task force on the issues, the Review Group on Intelligence and Communica-tions Technologies, delivered its report, which the White House released, with 46 recommendations for changes. One adviser to the panel, Sascha Meinrath of the Open Technol-ogy Institute, was skeptical, telling me that intelligence-community insiders, administration officials, comprise the entirety of this five-member group. I do not see how you can do a truly inde-pendent review of surveillance when so many people are tied in.Ž The panel is chaired by former CIA Deputy Director Michael Morrell, and is managed under the auspices of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, run by James Clapper. Clapper is widely considered to have lied in a Senate hearing on this issue. When asked by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., if the NSA collected phone records on millions or hundreds of mil-lions of Americans, Clapper replied, No, sir.Ž Following the Snowden leaks, Clapper admitted to NBC News that his answer was the least untruthfulŽ man-ner to say no. Judge Leons ruling relates to just one of several filed after the June disclo-sures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about the vast, global surveil-lance system vacuuming up personal data from billions of people. A separate federal lawsuit in New York, ACLU v. Clapper, seeks to end the mass surveil-lance completely, and to have all the data collected so far deleted. Anthony Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liber-ties Union, called Edward Snowden a patriot,Ž noting: As a whistle-blower of illegal government activity that was sanctioned and kept secret by the leg-islative, executive and judicial branches of government for years, he undertook great personal risk for the public good. And he has single-handedly reignited a global debate about the extent and nature of government surveillance and our most fundamental rights as indi-viduals.Ž Jay Carney, Obamas press secretary, reiterated the White Houses hard line this week: Mr. Snowden has been accused of leaking classified informa-tion, and he faces felony charges here in the United States.Ž Currently in Russia, halfway through a year of temporary asylum he was granted there, Edward Snowden this week issued a public letter to the people of Brazil, in hopes of gaining permanent asylum there. In the letter, Snowden wrote, Six months ago, I stepped out from the shadows of the United States Governments National Security Agency to stand in front of a journalists camera ... with open eyes, knowing that the decision would cost me family and my home, and would risk my life. I was motivated by a belief that the citizens of the world deserve to understand the system in which they live.Ž He contin-ued: My greatest fear was that no one would listen to my warning. Never have I been so glad to have been so wrong.Ž The world continues to listen to Snowden. As he also said in his open letter, The culture of indiscriminate worldwide surveillance, exposed to public debates and real investigations on every continent, is collapsing.Ž A recent poll suggests at least 55 percent of those questioned consider Snowden a whistle-blower. Despite the polls, CNN anchor Brooke Baldwin blustered about potential amnesty for Snowden: This is a hated man, what would he even do here?Ž Adopted on Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights comprises the first 10 amend-ments to the Constitution. While prais-ing it last week and ticking through our most fundamental rights,Ž President Obama failed to mention the Fourth Amendment. It reads: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon prob-able cause, supported by oath or affir-mation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.Ž Perhaps President Obama, the erstwhile constitutional-law professor, should go back and reread that amend-ment. Q „ Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. „ Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!,Ž a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America. She is the coauthor of The Silenced Majority,Ž a New York Times best-seller. OPINIONA manufactured ADHD epidemic If at any time while reading this article your attention wanders, you may have ADHD. If you pause to check your email sometime during the next three paragraphs, you should consult a doctor. If you fail to read this article all the way to the end, you should get on Adderall, Ritalin or some other drug to treat your condition as soon as possible. This isnt quite the standard for diagnosing attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, but its close. The New York Times ran a long expos on how the drug industry has stoked the diagno-sis and treatment of ADHD that had a revelatory quote from Keith Conners, a doctor who has long advocated for the recognition of the disorder. Conners called the overdiagnosis of ADHD a national disaster of dangerous proportions,Ž telling the Times that the rising number of cases is a concoction to justify the giving out of medication at unprecedented and unjustifiable levels.Ž This isnt bomb-throwing from an outsider, but a critique from the namesake of the Conners ratings scale widely used to evaluate kids for ADHD. There is no doubt that ADHD is a legitimate neurological condition that makes kids (and those around them) miserable, that blights their potential and that can be alleviated by prescrip-tion stimulants like Adderall and Rit-alin. There also is no doubt that diag-nosis and treatment of the disorder has run wildly out of control. According to the forthcoming book The ADHD Explosion,Ž 19 percent of high-school-aged males have received a diagnosis. The numbers differ from state to state. In North Carolina, an astounding 30 percent of boys over age 9 are suppos-edly suffering from ADHD. Overall, 6 percent of children and adolescents in the United States are on drugs to treat ADHD. Its a wonder more kids arent diagnosed with it, given the overlap between the description of the disorder and fail-ings to which we are all prone. The New York Times points out that the American Psychiatric Association cri-teria for ADHD include often has dif-ficulty waiting his or her turnŽ and makes careless mistakes,Ž hardly rare childhood behaviors. The drug companies „ for whom ADHD is a $9 billion-a-year business „ target mothers with alluring ads sug-gesting their children will become little angels through the wonders of risk-free stimulants. Their kids will get better grades, spend more quality time with the family and remember to take out the trash. Who wouldnt want their child thus magically transformed? According to the Times report, the Food and Drug Administration has constantly rebuked the companies for going beyond the evidence in selling visions of childhood Valhalla secured through the right drug. Undertrained primary-care physicians and worried parents default much too often to the diagnosis of ADHD and to the answer of a prescription. The next frontier is adult ADHD, with the promise of a vast new pharmaceutical market made up of people deprived of ADHD diagnoses when they were chil-dren. Some of these diagnoses will be warranted and life-changing, but others will be overreach prompted by vague and dubious symptoms, like inattentive op-ed reading. Sure, you got to the end of this article. But how about the next one? Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. C a n o s S amy GOODMANSpecial to Florida Weekly s o t l m m rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY *Maserati Ghibli base M S R P $65,6 00; Ghibli S Q4 base M S R P $75,7 00. Not including dealer prep and transp ortation. Actual selling price may vary. Ta xes, title, license and registration fees not included. 201 3 Maserati North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Maserati and the Trident logo are registered trademarks of Maserati S.p.A. Maserati urges you to obey all p o sted speed limits. THE NEW MASERATI GHIBLI IS POWERED BY A CHOICE OF TWO ADVANCED V6 ENGINES WITH UP TO 404 HP, EQUIPPED WITH 8-SPEED ZF AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION AND AVAILABLE Q4 INTELLIGENT ALL-WHEEL DRIVE.MASERATI OF PALM BEACH Schedule a test drive: 888.481.9352 | www.maseratiofpalmbeach.com | 3978 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409 THE KEY TO AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE IS QUITE LITERALLY A KEY. THE ABSOLUTE OPPOSITE OF ORDINARY | INTRODUCING THE NEW GHIBLI FROM $65,600 | MASERATIGHIBLI.US >> Toni is a 4-year-old spayed pit bull. She is active and loves to play. She would do best in a home with no children. >> Shadow is a 1-yearold spayed domestic shorthair. She can be quite laid back at times. To adopt:The Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other informa-tion can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. >> Tiny is a spayed female tortoiseshell, approximately 1 year old, with distinctive markings. She’s a small girl, very mellow, and likes her “quiet time” with people. >> Julius is a neutered male orange tabby, 2 to 3 years old. He has soft fur, and gets along well with people and other cats. He would love a new “forever” home.To adopt: Adopt A Cat is a no-kill, free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public Mon-Sat, 12 noon to 6 P.M. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see our website at www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or visit us on Facebook (Adopt A Cat Foundation). For adoption information, call 848-4911 or 848-6903. Pets of the Week Going inside the canine brain BY KIM CAMPBELL THORTONUniversal UclickWe often see news stories of pets who have trekked hundreds of miles to get back home after becoming lost. How do they do it? Science is still try-ing to answer that question. Migratory animals use magnetic fields, scent cues and orientation of the sun, but the navigational ability of dogs and cats has been little studied. Its known, however, that they have mental mapmaking skills, good observational abilities, and fan-tastic senses of smell and hearing, and those capabilities no doubt play a role in allowing them to find home, even from someplace theyve never been. Researchers at Emory University used functional MRI to capture brain images of 13 alert, unrestrained dogs. During the scans, the dogs, who were trained to willingly enter the MRI machine and remain still, watched a person giving hand signals indicating whether the dog would or would not receive a treat. According to the research, published by PLOS One, most of the dogs had a positive response in the caudate region of the brain „ associated with deci-sion-making, motivation and processing emotions „ when signaled that they would receive a hot dog. The research lays the foundation for exploring canine neural biology and cognitive processes.Interspecies video chatIf you miss interacting with Rover or Ruffles when youre at work or on vacation, the PetChatz two-way petcam is for you. The unit, which should be available in early 2014, allows owners to callŽ pets, talk to them and even dispense treats from a hidden compartment. Pets can learn to respond to the ring, but whether they recognize the person on the screen is a matter of conjecture. But Lisa Lavin, a veterinary technician and co-developer of the device, says whats important is the boost to an owners emotional welfare. Dog research has human benefitsA researcher at the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine has identified the gene that causes a condition in Weimaraners known as spinal dysraphism. Its an inherited neural tube defect that causes the dogs to bunny hopŽ with their back legs instead of moving normally. Dr. Noa Safra, whose findings were published in July 2013 in the journal PLoS Genetics, says the disease could be eliminated in the breed once a DNA test for the mutation is developed. The discovery also has benefits for human medicine. University of Iowa pediatricians who collaborated in the study found the same gene to be mutated in children with spina bifida. Q PET TALES

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This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 01/17/2014. $150VALUE $150VALUE Hope you’ve got the keyQ In November, Michael Brown, 19, became the most recent person with poor decision-making skills forced to report to a police station (this, in Col-lege Station, Texas) in the middle of the night to ask that officers please remove the handcuffs he had been playing around with. Following the officers mandatory records check, it was learned that Brown had an arrest warrant for criminal mischief, and following a man-datory search, that he also had two ounces of marijuana in his pocket. Q Can’t possibly be trueQ Twice again, in November, men wrongfully convicted of major, chilling crimes, who were finally freed after serv-ing long sentences, claimed upon release that they were „ somehow „ not bitter. Ryan Ferguson was released in Missouri after serving almost 10 years for a murder he surely knew nothing about (convicted because a prosecutor withheld excul-patory evidence). Derrick Deacon was freed in New York after nearly 25 years „ served because the eyewitness (who finally recanted) had identified Deacon out of fear of retaliation by the Jamaican gang member she actually saw. Q Many men have fallen for underage-sex stings (tricked by NBCs To Catch a PredatorŽ or by law enforce-ment nationwide), but perhaps Cliff Oshman, 64, of Daytona Beach, is the first to have brought his wife and young daughter along to meet the girl he was seducing. Oshman was arrested in Octo-ber, and as usual, the victimŽ did not exist except as the persona of an under-cover cop. Q Dwarfs formerly could volunteer to be playfully treated in American nightclubs, but such venues now appear limited to Europe. A club in the Ger-man coastal town of Cuxhaven might be in trouble following a September incident in which a 42-year-old dwarf accidentally fell off of a podium before engaging in the clubs contest, Lillipu-tian Action,Ž in which customers chase an elusive dwarf. And, Londons Hip-podrome Casino has reportedly run a series of ads seeking dwarfs (maximum height: 4 feet, 9 inches) for a special crew of bouncers and door guards to be unveiled in December. Q PerspectiveQ The daunting problems that faced the launch of the HealthCare.gov website in October were merely symptoms of the federal governments often snail-like pace at integrating digital innovations common to every-day America. A December New York Times report revealed that The Federal Register (the daily journal of the U.S. government) still receives origi-nal content from some agencies on virtually obsolete 3.5-inch floppy disks „ and (because of unamended legal requirements) its work-order authori-zations from some agencies on disks hand-delivered inside the Washington Beltway by courier. Contractors can be frustrated as well since, though they operate with top-of-the-line digital efficiency internally, they must some-times downgrade to interface with their government clients. Q Least-competent criminalsQ A Tucson, Ariz., man apparently escaped a traffic stop in August, but not unscathed. After fleeing to a dead-end street, he climbed out the passenger window, but his foot got caught, and his still-moving cars back tire ran over his sprawled torso. The motorcycle officer was not able to catch the injured man, who staggered off into the neighbor-hood. Q Lucas Burke, 21, and Ethan Keeler, 20, attempting to break into a safe at New Yard Landscaping in Hopkin-ton, N.H., in October, possibly seeking drug money, unwisely chose to use an acetylene torch. Included in the safes contents was a supply of consumer fireworks, and, according to the police report, the resultant explosion blew their bodies apart.Ž Q Vade Bradley, 39, was arrested on arson charges in Hayward, Calif., in August after burning down an apart-ment house carport, totally destroying six vehicles. He was siphoning other peoples gasoline in the carport when he decided to light a cigarette. Q Richard Boudreaux was charged in January with burglarizing Kenneys Seafood (where he previously worked) in Slidell, La., when he became the most recent perp to fail to outflank surveil-lance cameras. He had thought to wear a bucket over his head as he moved through the store „ except he had waited until well inside (within camera range) before actually putting it on. Q An already-distinctive man (367 pounds) was arrested in Everett, Wash., for a December grocery store shoplift-ing because he was also wearing an easily noticed purple sock and over two hours later was still wearing it when police caught up to him and questioned him. Q A 23-year-old woman was arrested in Crestview, Fla., in November for shoplifting a toyŽ from an adult store „ before inquiring about a job there. She had professed her innocence until shown the surveillance video, when she said (according to the police report), Oh, my God. Look at what Im doing. ... Im gonna cry.Ž Q SpongeBob somberpantsHer family wanted U.S. Army Sgt. Kimberly Walker (who was killed in a suspected domestic violence incident in February) to have a burial reflecting her delight at SpongeBob SquarePants and installed a 4-foot-high marker on her grave in the characters likeness (at a cost of $13,000). However, the Spring Grove Cemetery in the familys hometown of Cincinnati ordered it removed in October as inappropriate, and despite family and community pressure, is unyielding. Q NEWS OF THE WEIRDBY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY looking to the future locals predict a year of hope RENA BLADESPresident of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? At the Cultural Council we are looking forward to more than 20,000 sepa-rate cultural events, from music to visual art to dance and his-tory. And, of course, we cant wait to host guests at the Muse Awards on March 13 at the Kravis Center, where we will celebrate the excellence in our cultural community. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? We keep our eye on the stability of our cultural industry and remain concerned that our cultural institutions require larger endowments and reserves. Most of our institutions are less than 30 years old, so theyve had less time than institutions in places like Bos-ton, Cleveland and Philadelphia to grow their endowments. We are optimistic that funding is growing in our area, and we hope that the generous and capable phi-lanthropists who call Palm Beach County home will increase their support over the coming year. Q Any resolutions? If youre making a New Years Resolution, we suggest it in-clude supporting your local arts and cul-tural programs! My resolution? I resolve to wake up each day and relentlessly pur-sue the councils goals to bring arts and culture to all our residents and visitors „ and to exercise more! GREG RICELocal TV personality and lifelong resident of Palm Beach County Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? The last year, really, the last several years, as a whole the economy has been troublesome, with our coun-try digging a big hole that we never thought we would be in. But even with all the problems that occur in Wash-ington, and other places, Im optimistic that 2014 will be a much better year than weve experienced in the past, for the nation and in Florida. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? I do know that we take too many things for granted. This is the time of year people get into a spirit, and stop and reflect on family and friends „ health, jobs and careers. Ive been blessed with a lot of those. And after I lost John (his twin) in 2005, I dont take those things for granted. I make a point to tell those people who are close who are there for me that I appreciate them, and let them know how much they mean to me … nothing is guaranteed. Q Any resolutions? I havent made any. But I hope that the management and staff of the Miami Dolphins have made some. If they need me to come down and give them a good pep talk, Im willing to go right now.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 NEWS A9 GAIL CONIGLIOMayor of Palm Beach Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? We continue to work together to protect our beaches both with a long-term plan and committed funding sources. A healthy coastline protects our properties, and economic and recreational opportunities. Looking forward on the political scene, she would like to see an end to the discord in Washington. My wish for the New Year is that the election cycle and messy issues are resolved gently.ŽRAY GRAZIOTTOPartner, president and chief operating officer of Seven Kings Holdings, which owns Loggerhead Marinas. President of the board of the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County. Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? I think for the most part, Florida is in really good shape. State leadership has kept us in sound fis-cal condition. Our tax structure is still too high, but is com-petitive compared to other populated states in the U.S., es-pecially those in the Northeast. We should be the beneficiaries of that and see contin-ued growth here for the foreseeable future. While we have business in many parts of the state, I am particularly bullish on Palm Beach County. I think there is no better place to do business or to raise a family. I look forward to the continued economic re-covery and to watching my children enjoy their teenage years. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? The federal government, on the other hand, is a real mess. There is no leadership, starting with the president. Its like watching children run around on the playground. Its not a just Democratic or Republican problem. Both the Dems and the GOP are to blame. We have to come together and solve the real structural prob-lems this country is facing. It wont happen unless both sides compromise. Q Any resolutions? I have made the same resolution for three years: continued exercise and healthy eating.JACK NICKLAUSPGA champion and golf course designer Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? I wont have to wait long for that „ Jan. 6 and the BCS Championship Game, and hope-fully a Florida State win and national title. That would be a good way to start the year. (Mr. Nicklaus grandson, Nick OLeary, plays tight end for the Seminoles). From there, I will just let the year play out and enjoy it as it comes. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? No, I am not worried about anything. My health is good; I have a wonderful family, good friends; and I keep very active with my business interests. Its been said that worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow; it empties today of its strength. I prefer to focus on and enjoy today. Q Any resolutions? My resolution is to not make one. Actually, no, I do have one. I would like to continue to get myself in better shape. I guess I got a good jump on the typical New Years resolution, and I have lost 20 pounds. Id like to continue on this path and lose another 10 pounds or so.ROE GREENPhilanthropist and patron of the arts Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? Great art, which includes the-ater, dance and music. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? I worry that the computer will make us lose our imagination, and that theater will become obsolete because everything can be done by machine. I worry that people wont be able to write!STEVE WEAGLEMeteorologist for WPTV-Channel 5 News Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? Im hoping for another unusually quiet hurricane season in 2014. It worked well for us this past summer. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? I fear were in for a winter that feels like summer „ with no end to the warm weather. Q Any resolutions? I usually dont do resolutions. But if I can quit bread for a year, Id be happy.JACK LIGHTONPresident and CEO, Loggerhead Marinelife Center Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? 2014 will mark my firstyear-anniversary at LMC and I am most looking forward to announcing some very excit-ing local and global partner-ships and plans for LMCs fu-ture. These partnerships will be a steppingstone toward accomplishing our vision: to be recognized locally and in-ternationally as the leading authority in sea turtle education, research and re-habilitation. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? As LMC continues to grow, my biggest concern is to ensure our organization keeps a close focus on our history and our roots (LMC founder Eleanor Fletcher and our local commu-nity). I want us to create a balance between our desire to become one of the worlds leading sea turtle and ocean conservation centers, while maintaining our north Palm Beach County charm. Q Any resolutions? Yes! What LMC researchers do on our beaches has always fascinated me. In 2014, I resolve to become trained and certified as a LMC beach nesting technician under the guidance of our research team. ROCCO MANGELOwner, partner of Rocco’s Tacos Q What are you most looking forward to in 2014? The opening of Roc-cos Tacos & Tequila Bar in Brooklyn. Its our first restaurant outside of Florida. Growing up on Long Island, I always hoped to open a res-taurant in my home state. Q Are you worried about anything in the coming year? I worry that people are going to stop liking Mexican food. Q Any resolutions? To drink more tequila and to not curse in front of my young daughter.

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY What more can a doctor aspire to after becoming a renowned surgeon? Possibly the noblest achievement of all, that of Teacher.Ž Dr. Srinivas Kazas commitment to excellent care and innovation is one of the reasons JFK Medical Center has been designated as a Robotic Program of Excellence in General Surgery. We are one of only two programs in the state of Florida and eight in the country. The Epicenter designation is given to the most advanced and experienced robotic surgeons and hospitals who demonstrate the superior outcomes and a passion for teaching. As an Epicenter, JFK acts as a training ground for surgeons across the U.S. to observe and train in robotic surgery with Dr. Kaza.Da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery is especially well-suited for procedures such as general surgery, colorectal, and bariatric procedures. Patients who undergo robotic-assisted surgery usually have less pain, quicker recoveries, smaller scars and return to their normal lives much sooner. Doctor. Surgeon. Teacher. FOR MORE INFORMATION, ASK YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY AT JFK MEDICAL CENTER, VISIT US ONLINE AT JFKMC.COM OR CALL 561-548-4JFK (4535). COMMENTARY Land of opportunityYou hear it all the time: Im ADHD.ŽHes got ADHD.ŽMy daughter has been diagnosed with ADHD.Ž The disorder seems to get diagnosed by doctors the way ducks seem to get shot by duck hunters: just point and shoot, or diag-nose, as the case may be. At up to 100 yards. There goes one! Look, hes flappin his wings. Pointƒ.SqueezeƒADHD!Ž In the case of advertising videos made by drug companies, doctors paid to pedal phar-maceuticals can question a patient and make a diagnosis all in six minutes flat, according to The Selling of Attention Deficit Disorder,Ž a Dec. 14 report in The New York Times. Maybe somebody should sell T-shirts emblazoned with the celebratory letters for this seemingly new and lucrative fashion in illness. The market could be huge. After all, by some estimates about 40 million Americans are now said to have the disorder, which was diagnosed in about 3 to 5 percent of children 50 years ago, and jumped from 7.8 percent in 2003, to 9.5 percent in 2007, to 11 percent of those between the ages of 4 and 17 in 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now, one in seven children are diagnosed with ADHD by the time theyre 18. Can you imagine such a T-shirt market, at $15 a pop? In Palm Beach County alone, 203,550 human beings could be walking around with ADHD, according to these num-bers „ and every last one of them in the market for a stylish fit that would proclaim the most fashionable disorder on the hoof, nowadays. Oh wait, they do sell such T-shirts. Or at least they do to Adam Levine, lead singer for the band Maroon 5, who wears one that says ADHD.Ž But that might be because hes a paid promoter for the pharmaceutical company, Shire, makers of the drug Addenol, which is often prescribed for the disorder. ADHD, by the way, is a synonym for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. I would call that name as truth in advertising. But I would not call the name AdderallŽ truth in advertising. AddenolŽ was coined in 1994 by an entrepreneur named Roger Griggs. Mr. Griggs thought that a weight loss pill might help treat Attention Deficit Disorder, as it was called at the time, so he renamed it. To do so, he took A.D.D., added the suffix all,Ž and ended up with the name Adderall. A.D.D. for all,Ž says The New York Times.Shire, realizing the drugs potential, bought Mr. Griggss company for $186 million and spent millions more to market the pills to doctors.Ž Im only being partly facetious when I say that if youre over 50 or so, you come from a world where ADHA didnt exist. In the eyes of the society then, there was no such thing, or a very little thing. Instead, there was irritability and restlessness and inattention and hyperactive behav-ior „ I think there was hyperactive behavior, or maybe there was just wound-upŽ „ but there was no ADHD. Except in Holland. In Holland, the acronym stands for Alle Dagen Heel Druk, which, as you know, means Very Busy Every Day. But now we have the disorder „ a whole bunch of us have it, apparently. And a whole bunch of us, an entire and well-paid industry, stand ready to treat it. Thirteen board certified psychiatrists in Palm Beach County „ medical doctors specializing in psychiatry „ are listed by Psychology Today as having practices that focus on ADHD, along with roughly 70 more psychologists and psychotherapists or coun-selors whose names and practices appear in a search for ADHD treatment in Palm Beach County. Many more medical doctors also diagnose and treat it with prescription drugs. And nowadays, pharmaceutical companies that have made billions producing those drugs for children are looking to a new and even bigger market: adults never before diagnosed. Adults get diagnosed sometimes after their children are diagnosed, since the disorder is said to be genetic and doctors are begin-ning to diagnose back up the family tree, not down it. Drug companies such as Shire apparently help with this process, by kindly teaching doctors how to recognize ADHD „ some-times by flying them to cushy, high-end resorts where other doctors, who are paid to do so, show them slides and lecture on how to make diagnoses. Which is why Im not writing about ADHD, here. Im writing about advertising, and the slippery distinction between truth in advertising, and misrepresentation. No doubt, ADHD exists. And it can be treated. But the meteoric rise in diagnoses in the United States corresponds with a his-tory of intense and sophisticated advertis-ing by drug companies „ which massively exaggerated the benefits of the drugs, while playing down the sometimes serious side effects. That history led many more doctors to prescribe their medications to many more patients they diagnosed with the disorder. And it led some doctors to claim that the stimulant medicines were no more harmful than aspirin. Such a claim is demonstrably untrue, and its one of the reasons why the pharmaceu-tical company, Shire, makers and sellers of Adderall, agreed to pay $57.7 million in fines for false advertising 10 months ago (Shire ads suggested transformations in the behavior and the success of children into adulthood that no research confirmed). Money lies at the heart of the abuse, if there is abuse „ and I think there is. In 2002, the drug industry showed sales of $1.7 billion for stimulant medication used to treat ADHD. And in 2012 that figure had risen to almost $9 billion, The New York Times reported, using data from a company called IMS Health. Since one billion is equal to 1,000 million, a fine of $57.7 million, which sounds horrific in itself, amounts to not much more than a bee sting. Once again, greed has turned the land of opportunity into an embarrassment of riches. And the strong likelihood is that some people who do not have ADHD are treated for it anyway, with drugs that will do them no favors. Q 2 a b m t n roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Located on the SE corner of US Highway One and PGA Boulevard next to Paris in Town561.799.1878 www.thebackporchstore.com :_Z[nehnl[hnmbjn^pbmaZZbk_hkma^ngbjn^ Voted #1 Best Houseware Store in the Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. Monday Friday 10 5 Saturday 10 2 Closed Sunday Come see our "Cookie Maker" and "Cookie Taster" Holiday Aprons THG is available throughANDERSON’S CLASSIC HARDWAREFine Decorative Hardware and Plumbing Fixtures for the Discriminating Home Owner since 1935 605 South Olive Avenue West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 655-3109 fax (561) 655-3162 www.andersonshardware.com Silver Sailfish Derby set to launch 77th annual tournament SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY In the fast-paced world of competitive billfishing, many tournaments continue to push the envelope in terms of high-stakes payouts and teams go to extreme measures in their preparation, the Silver Sailfish Derby has remained much the same since its inception. Founded in 1935 by the West Palm Beach Fishing Club, or WPBFC, the Sil-ver Sailfish Derby is recognized as the worlds oldest sailfish tournament and continues to attract some of the best sailfish anglers, captains and crews in the sport. Even though six-figure payouts are not a part of the prize structure, the derbys loyal following and continued popularity is a testament to the unique character of the event. The 77th annual Silver Sailfish Derby is set for Jan. 9-11 from the Sailfish Marina on Singer Island. Captains meeting is Jan. 8 at the WPBFC. The 2014 derby is expected to draw approximately 45 boats and 200 anglers who will be vying for some of the most prestigious awards in competitive sail-fishing. Part of what makes the Derby so special is the people involved. Many of the awards are sponsored by families who have been associated with the event for decades. The derbys top awards include the Mrs. Henry R. Rea trophy, the Top Lady Angler in memory of Rose Hampp, and the Louis S. Boski award for Outstanding Angling Achievement. Other prizes include the Top Small Boat, Top Tag Team, daily angler and boat awards, and overall boat and angler awards. The derby has embraced the digital age, featuring a virtual scoreboard allow-ing anyone with an Internet connection to follow the action as it unfolds. The derbys scoreboard will go live just prior to the event and can be found on the WPBFCs website at www.westpalmbeachfishingclub.org. The derby Facebook page also offers event information, updates, stats and photos, www.facebook/silver-sailfishderby. With more than three quarters of a century of angling history, there have been plenty of memorable moments in the derby and many tremendous catches. Perhaps none were more dramatic than the record-setting event in 2012 when 46 boats caught and released an unprec-edented 1,174 sailfish. Derby anglers are hoping for a few cold fronts during this holiday season to help push the fish south so that more pages can be added to the history books. Early registration deadline has ended, so the entry fees are $1,275 per boat (if at least one angler is a WPBFC member) and $1,600 per boat for non-members. Proceeds from the event benefit the many community initiatives of the non-profit West Palm Beach Fishing Club. For addi-tional information on the Silver Sailfish Derby, contact the WPBFC at 832-6780 or register online at www.westpalmbeach-fishingclub.org. Q Rooney’s Golf Foundation Tournament benefits local charities SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY The 12th Annual Rooneys Golf Foundation Charity Tournament recently was held at PGA National to benefit four local charities. A record total of $46,500 was distributed to Autism Project of Palm Beach County, FAU Honors College, Pathways to Independence and Potentia Academy. Local Rooney Family businesses, Palm Beach Kennel Club and Rooneys the Gastropub coordinated the tourna-ment with a committee of volunteers. This years honorary chairs were JD and Tiny from 103.1FM WIRKs morn-ing show. Official sponsors included 1st United Bank and Preferred Air Condi-tioning & Mechanical Inc. Carrier. We enjoyed a beautiful day at the PGA Resort and want to thank our gen-erous sponsors, hard-working commit-tee and volunteers and the many partici-pants and contributors.Ž Alexis Barbish, Patrick Rooney Jr.s assistant, said in a prepared statement. Without them, the tournament would not be possible.Ž The tournament was played on the Champion, Palmer and Fazio Courses at PGA Resort; 240 golfers participat-ed. The event featured Dr. Dunns Instructional class and a deluxe buffet dinner and awards ceremony at the resort. Money also was raised through the tournament raffle, which featured vacation getaways, a flat screen HD TV, golf outings, dinners, sports and concert tickets and more. Rooneys Golf Foundation has donated $442,500 to local Palm Beach County charities since 2001. The money was raised through the golf tournament, 5K and poker events. The 4th Annual Charity Poker Tournament is scheduled for Jan. 18 in the Poker Room at Palm Beach Kennel Club. The 7th Annual RGF 5K will be held on April 19 at Rooneys the Gastropub in Abacoa, and the 13th Annual RGF tour-nament is scheduled for Nov. 7 at PGA National. For more information, call Jessica Davis at 6832222, Ext. 141, or Alexis Barbish at Ext. 146. Q Animal Rescue League Christmas Ball raises $600,000 SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY A receiving line of adorable, adoptable, tail-wagging pets greeted more than 300 guests at the Peggy Adams Animal Rescue Leagues 42nd Annual Christmas Ball on Dec. 5 at Sailfish Club in Palm Beach. The 2013 Christmas Ball was the single largest revenue-generating event in the history of Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, bringing in more than $600,000. Its incredibly powerful to see this record-breaking level of com-mitment from the community to support the critical services Peggy Adams provides to the dogs and cats who need it most,Ž said Pauline Pitt, event chair. These funds will help us provide services for more than 20,000 animals.Ž During the ball, Ms. Pitt announced that the Animal Rescue League was on track to help more than 3,500 pets find forever homes and to perform almost 10,000 spay/neuter surgeries. Board members and distinguished guests included Board President Joanie Van der Grift and husband, Paul, Vice President Nel-lie Benoit, Board Chair Lesly Smith, Vice Chair Jane Grace, Lord Charles Spencer Churchill, Carolina Herre-ra, Laurie and Steven Gottlieb, Vir-ginia Burke, Janet Pleasants, Sandy and Bill Meyer, Nancy Brougher, Cathy and Jack Flagg, Vicky and Sam Hunt, and Emilia and Pepe Fan-jul, among others. Guests had front row seats for the parade of animals, as the four-legged friends marched through the dining room to the tune, How Much is that Doggie in the Window.Ž During the event, Pauline and George Michel adopted Coco, Dan Ponton adopted Avocado and Lydia and Robert Forbes adopted Luna. In addition to animal adoption and spay and neuter services, Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League offers dozens of services, including a vaccine clinic open seven days a week, affordable vaccine pack-ages, pet identification and micro-chipping, and behavior and train-ing courses. Visit www.peggyadams.org for more information as well as additional events and fundraisers to support the league. Q COURTESY PHOTO The Rooney’s Golf Foundation Committee is: front row, Alexis Barbish, Janice Meeks, Sue Buechele, Kaitlyn Decker, Sarah Mears; back row, Patrick Rooney Jr., Duane Meeks, Kyle Henderson, Jessica Davis, John Davis, Beverly Kelly, Diane Reeves. COURTESY PHOTO The team from Absolut Joy toasts victory.

PAGE 13

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A14 WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 GARDENS/JUPITER Tara (not her real name) couldnt listen to her mother bad-mouthing the next-door neighbor to her friends for another minute. Tara had always found this neigh-bor to be friendly and helpful. She couldnt understand why her mother enjoyed mak-ing fun of herƒ Jordan closed his eyes in disgust as his father berated the coach. Jordan was really upset that the coach didnt play him much during the last game, but the last thing he wanted was for his father to make a spectacle of himself in front of the entire teamƒ Samantha prayed her mother wouldnt drink too much at the graduation recep-tion. Her entire class and teachers would be there, and when her mother gets going, she becomes loud and boisterous. She could swear her friends are still talking about the time her mother got loaded and picked a fight with Jennas dadƒ Have you ever stopped yourself just as you were about to open your mouth because you realized your children were in earshot? Have you ever noticed that when you are behaving your worst, your children somehow miraculously appear and see it all? When we are caught up in the moment, we dont always consider that our behav-ior can have a huge impact on our chil-dren, no matter what their age. Our children have strong feelings and are very conscious about how others react to our behavior. They cant help but per-sonalize our actions. If they find our behavior embarrassing, they become self-conscious and ashamed; and may believe that our misbehavior is a negative reflec-tion on them. Most of us start out with the best of inten-tions. Although we have a huge invest-ment in trying to teach our chil-dren right from wrong, we dont always stop to con-sider that they might form their own conclusions by observing what we dont want them to see. Its easy for us to tell our chil-dren what not to do: Dont smoke. Dont drink. Dont lie.Ž We may wish that our children would do what we say, and not pay too much attention to observing what we do. Unfortunately, as we know, it doesnt work out that way. Adolescents, in particular, are extremely sensitive to hypocrisy. When young people recognize that a parent says one thing, and acts another way, it is very disturbing. When they observe their parents behaving poorly, they find themselves questioning every aspect of their present reality. If they have been invested in believing that their parents behave with integrity, they must now recalibrate their perspective. It takes much more effort and discipline to practice what we preach. Knowing right from wrong, and the consequences of breaking rules, is not enough to guar-antee that we will control our impulses and behave well. Demonstrating maturity and self-control will help us teach them to tolerate frustration, inhibit action and to behave appropriately. This is how young people learn problem-solving and com-munication skills and to become account-able for their actions. Daniel Goleman, a world-renowned educator and author writes, There is perhaps no psychological skill more fun-damental than resisting impulse. It is the root of all emotional self-control, since all emotions, by their very nature lead to one or another impulse to act.Ž He has writ-ten extensively about Emotional Intel-ligence,Ž a trait he describes as a set of skills, including control of ones impulses, self-motivation, empathy and social com-petence in interpersonal relationships. Even if youve been remiss in your behavior, its not too late to become a good example. Dont worry that it will seem hypocritical of you to change your behavior mid-stream. You can actually come clean, and let your child know that you are committed to the hard discipline and restraint of making concerted changes. If you were to say, I know I can be hot headed when something really upsets me, but Im working on keeping my cool,Ž you are communicating a powerful mes-sage that you recognize the importance of maintaining appropriate control. When you are in the midst of trying situations, you can even share with your child how frustrated you are; but that you are working hard to find alternative means for dealing with your upsets. We know that our children often put us on a pedestal, expecting us to be better than we are. They count on us to show them the way, and to have a moral compass that they can emulate and follow. The responsibility can be awesome. However, these expectations can nudge us to behave better than we might have otherwise. Q „ This column first ran on Jan. 6, 2011. „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., LCSW, is a psychotherapist serving individuals, couples and families. A Palm Beach Gardens resident, she holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia and trained at the Ackerman Institute for Family Therapy in Manhattan. She can be reached at her Gardens office at 6302827, or online at www.palmbeachfamilytherapy.com. HEALTHY LIVINGIt’s not too late to “do as I do” for your children t out t enwe estto t u s il t o k e. n t that d d o d not n ti on t we y as e snt p ar e mel y c ri sy e ople p arent n d acts another how t ha fi d t b m Jan „ LC se an G de C t F ha at h 2827 bea linda LIPSHUTZllipshutz@floridaweekly.com

PAGE 15

GARDENS/JUPITER WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 A15 Got Download?The iPad App Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. ADVERTISEMENT Ask The Health & Beauty Experts Can Liposuction be used for weight loss? A frequent inquiry from patients seeking liposuction is its effectiveness as a tool for weight loss. Presently, there are a multitude of medical and spa clinics espousing weight loss programs using cookies, coaches and canned meals. Unfortunately, if the desired weight loss is achieved, the patient is still faced with residual loose, hanging, skin that requires excision. Similarly, gastric bypass surgery and the lap band procedures both have the post op problem of loose skin as well. In addition, each requires general anesthesia with its own set of problems. An alternative is the S.L.A.B.S. (Sequential Liposuction And Body Sculpting) procedure developed by the author. Basically it involves doing liposuction under local anesthesia multiple times while following the parameters of the Florida Board of Medicine. By safely removing four liters of fat at each treatment the skin gradually contracts and tightens. Furthermore, there is no problem with electrolyte imbalance, dumping syndrome, respiratory failure or death as has been reported with gastric bypass. Regardless of what program an overweight individual selects to lose weight, if there is not a life change from the standpoint of diet, exercise and attitude, they will be right back to where they started! I like Dr. G’s weight loss philosophy in which the patient is educated and accompanied to the grocery store to learn to read labels, choose the healthiest brand of food and cook in a healthy lifestyle. If you or a loved one is overweight and wants to lower their blood pressure, thwart adult onset diabetes, and get their body back please call for a consultation 561-776-7112. Dr. Douglas Dedo has been serving the South Florida community for over 35 years and is Triple Board certified in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology. Dr. Dedo has held leadership positions in the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the local hospital com-munity as well as the past President of the Palm Beach County Medical Society. He has written 45 articles and chapters for textbooks and medical journals. Dr. Douglas Dedo, Board Certi“ ed Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology.Gardens Cosmetic Center 4060 PGA Blvd. Suite 203Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-626-3223www.gardenscosmeticcenter.com ASK THE COSMETIC SURGEON ASK THE DENTAL EXPERT Number of implants depends on tooth location Question: Can I just get one implant? Answer: Depending on the position of the tooth you are replacing, you can use one implant. If you are restoring multiple teeth or a molar, you may need to consider more than one implant. The number and size of the implants installed will depend on the type of tooth or teeth you are replacing and the strength of the bone at that location. An average implant is about the size of one root. Your lower molars have two big roots and your upper molars have three big roots. Teeth have different size and multiple roots by design. If the bone that supports teeth or implants receives too much stress, the bone will start to disappear. Nature has given teeth different configurations of roots to be able to distribute and spread these forces over a larger area. This helps diminish the impact and protecting the supporting bone. The strongest bone in your jaw is located where your lower front teeth are found. This is why these teeth have small roots. Strong bone can absorb more force, therefore, less root surface is required. Your weakest bone is where your upper molars are positioned. This bone is close to your sinuses and contains lots of air sacks keeping that bone soft. This is why these teeth have three big roots.Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. He’s been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He’s a member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists.Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A., Board Certi“ ed Sedation DentistPGA Center for Advanced Dentistry Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S.,P.A.PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry7100 Fairway Dr. Suite 59Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. 33418x£‡"‡nU*`iˆVœ“ Could You Be at Risk for Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a very common disease that makes bones weak and more likely to break easily. About 9 million Americans have osteoporosis, and the disease causes more than 1.5 million fractures annually, including 547,000 vertebral fractures, 297,000 hip frac-tures and 397,000 wrist fractures. It cannot be cured, but osteoporosis can be detected by a painless test and treated through lifestyle changes and medications. The human bone looks something like a honeycomb, with the body con-stantly depositing new bone and remov-ing old bone. Bone mass usually peaks around age 30, at which time the body starts remov-ing more old bone than forming new bone. A person is diagnosed with osteoporosis when the spaces inside the honeycomb become larger resulting in decreased bone density and strength. Osteoporosis does not cause any symp-toms, and those with the disease usu-ally do not know they have it until they experience a collapsed vertebra or fracture. People at increased risk for developing osteoporosis tend to be those who are women, Caucasian or Asian, over the age of 50, small-boned and who have a family history of the disease. Other risk factors for osteoporosis include regular consumption of alco-hol, smoking and certain medications, including glucocorticoids, long-term use of some anti-seizure drugs, gonad-otropin-releasing hormone drugs for endometriosis, certain cancer treat-ments and excessive use of antacids that contain aluminum. For these people, a bone density test typically is recommended to identify osteoporosis, determine the rate of bone loss, predict risk for broken bones and measure effects of treatment. The test, which does not require any preparation, is similar to having an X-ray but with considerably less expo-sure to radiation. If you think you might be at risk for osteoporosis, the Orthopedic Specialists at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center are here to help. The hospital offers free bone density screenings once a month for women over the age of 45. A bone density test measures the strength and density of your bones as you approach menopause and, when the test is repeated sometime later, can help determine how quickly you are losing bone mass and density. The next free screening is Thursday, Jan. 16, with appointments beginning at 9 a.m., at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. To register, please see www.pbgmc.com or call 625-5070. Treatment for osteoporosis usually focuses on preventing fractures by eat-ing a proper diet, exercising regularly and taking fall precautions. Medications also may be prescribed to reduce bone loss, increase bone den-sity or reduce the risk of fracture. A healthy diet includes eating foods high in calcium and vitamin D, such as dairy products, dark green, leafy vegetables, sardines, tofu, almonds, egg yolks, saltwater fish and liver. People over the age of 50 should get 1,200 mil-ligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 IU (International Units) of vitamin D daily. Weight-bearing exercise can help make bones and muscles stronger and slow down the rate of bone loss. Recommended activities done three to four days a week may include walk-ing, hiking, jogging, playing tennis, climbing stairs or dancing. To reduce the risk of falls, rooms should be kept free of clutter, and carpets and area rugs need to be anchored to the floor. Rubber-soled shoes are suggested for better traction and a cane or walker can help with added stability. Osteoporosis is not an unavoidable part of aging. It can be prevented and treated. Even if you have already been diagnosed with the disease, you can take steps to slow its progression and reduce the risk of falls. For more information about osteoporosis, talk with your doc-tor or see www.pbgmc.com/en-us/ours-ervices/medicalservices/pages/ortho-pedics.aspx. Q X s o a a larry COOMESCEO/Gardens Medical Center

PAGE 16

GARDENS/JUPITER WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 A15 Got Download?The iPad App Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. ADVERTISEMENT Ask The Health & Beauty Experts Can Liposuction be used for weight loss? A frequent inquiry from patients seeking liposuction is its effectiveness as a tool for weight loss. Presently, there are a multitude of medical and spa clinics espousing weight loss programs using cookies, coaches and canned meals. Unfortunately, if the desired weight loss is achieved, the patient is still faced with residual loose, hanging, skin that requires excision. Similarly, gastric bypass surgery and the lap band procedures both have the post op problem of loose skin as well. In addition, each requires general anesthesia with its own set of problems. An alternative is the S.L.A.B.S. (Sequential Liposuction And Body Sculpting) procedure developed by the author. Basically it involves doing liposuction under local anesthesia multiple times while following the parameters of the Florida Board of Medicine. By safely removing four liters of fat at each treatment the skin gradually contracts and tightens. Furthermore, there is no problem with electrolyte imbalance, dumping syndrome, respiratory failure or death as has been reported with gastric bypass. Regardless of what program an overweight individual selects to lose weight, if there is not a life change from the standpoint of diet, exercise and attitude, they will be right back to where they started! I like Dr. G’s weight loss philosophy in which the patient is educated and accompanied to the grocery store to learn to read labels, choose the healthiest brand of food and cook in a healthy lifestyle. If you or a loved one is overweight and wants to lower their blood pressure, thwart adult onset diabetes, and get their body back please call for a consultation 561-776-7112. Dr. Douglas Dedo has been serving the South Florida community for over 35 years and is Triple Board certified in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology. Dr. Dedo has held leadership positions in the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the local hospital com-munity as well as the past President of the Palm Beach County Medical Society. He has written 45 articles and chapters for textbooks and medical journals. Dr. Douglas Dedo, Board Certi“ ed Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology.Gardens Cosmetic Center 4060 PGA Blvd. Suite 203Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-626-3223www.gardenscosmeticcenter.com ASK THE COSMETIC SURGEON ASK THE DENTAL EXPERT Number of implants depends on tooth location Question: Can I just get one implant? Answer: Depending on the position of the tooth you are replacing, you can use one implant. If you are restoring multiple teeth or a molar, you may need to consider more than one implant. The number and size of the implants installed will depend on the type of tooth or teeth you are replacing and the strength of the bone at that location. An average implant is about the size of one root. Your lower molars have two big roots and your upper molars have three big roots. Teeth have different size and multiple roots by design. If the bone that supports teeth or implants receives too much stress, the bone will start to disappear. Nature has given teeth different configurations of roots to be able to distribute and spread these forces over a larger area. This helps diminish the impact and protecting the supporting bone. The strongest bone in your jaw is located where your lower front teeth are found. This is why these teeth have small roots. Strong bone can absorb more force, therefore, less root surface is required. Your weakest bone is where your upper molars are positioned. This bone is close to your sinuses and contains lots of air sacks keeping that bone soft. This is why these teeth have three big roots.Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. He’s been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He’s a member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists.Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A., Board Certi“ ed Sedation DentistPGA Center for Advanced Dentistry Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S.,P.A.PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry7100 Fairway Dr. Suite 59Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. 33418x£‡"‡nU*`iˆVœ“ Could You Be at Risk for Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a very common disease that makes bones weak and more likely to break easily. About 9 million Americans have osteoporosis, and the disease causes more than 1.5 million fractures annually, including 547,000 vertebral fractures, 297,000 hip frac-tures and 397,000 wrist fractures. It cannot be cured, but osteoporosis can be detected by a painless test and treated through lifestyle changes and medications. The human bone looks something like a honeycomb, with the body con-stantly depositing new bone and remov-ing old bone. Bone mass usually peaks around age 30, at which time the body starts remov-ing more old bone than forming new bone. A person is diagnosed with osteoporosis when the spaces inside the honeycomb become larger resulting in decreased bone density and strength. Osteoporosis does not cause any symp-toms, and those with the disease usu-ally do not know they have it until they experience a collapsed vertebra or fracture. People at increased risk for developing osteoporosis tend to be those who are women, Caucasian or Asian, over the age of 50, small-boned and who have a family history of the disease. Other risk factors for osteoporosis include regular consumption of alco-hol, smoking and certain medications, including glucocorticoids, long-term use of some anti-seizure drugs, gonad-otropin-releasing hormone drugs for endometriosis, certain cancer treat-ments and excessive use of antacids that contain aluminum. For these people, a bone density test typically is recommended to identify osteoporosis, determine the rate of bone loss, predict risk for broken bones and measure effects of treatment. The test, which does not require any preparation, is similar to having an X-ray but with considerably less expo-sure to radiation. If you think you might be at risk for osteoporosis, the Orthopedic Specialists at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center are here to help. The hospital offers free bone density screenings once a month for women over the age of 45. A bone density test measures the strength and density of your bones as you approach menopause and, when the test is repeated sometime later, can help determine how quickly you are losing bone mass and density. The next free screening is Thursday, Jan. 16, with appointments beginning at 9 a.m., at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. To register, please see www.pbgmc.com or call 625-5070. Treatment for osteoporosis usually focuses on preventing fractures by eat-ing a proper diet, exercising regularly and taking fall precautions. Medications also may be prescribed to reduce bone loss, increase bone den-sity or reduce the risk of fracture. A healthy diet includes eating foods high in calcium and vitamin D, such as dairy products, dark green, leafy vegetables, sardines, tofu, almonds, egg yolks, saltwater fish and liver. People over the age of 50 should get 1,200 mil-ligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 IU (International Units) of vitamin D daily. Weight-bearing exercise can help make bones and muscles stronger and slow down the rate of bone loss. Recommended activities done three to four days a week may include walk-ing, hiking, jogging, playing tennis, climbing stairs or dancing. To reduce the risk of falls, rooms should be kept free of clutter, and carpets and area rugs need to be anchored to the floor. Rubber-soled shoes are suggested for better traction and a cane or walker can help with added stability. Osteoporosis is not an unavoidable part of aging. It can be prevented and treated. Even if you have already been diagnosed with the disease, you can take steps to slow its progression and reduce the risk of falls. For more information about osteoporosis, talk with your doc-tor or see www.pbgmc.com/en-us/ours-ervices/medicalservices/pages/ortho-pedics.aspx. Q X s o a a larry COOMESCEO/Gardens Medical Center

PAGE 17

GARDENS/JUPITER WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 A15 Got Download?The iPad App Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. ADVERTISEMENT Ask The Health & Beauty Experts Can Liposuction be used for weight loss? A frequent inquiry from patients seeking liposuction is its effectiveness as a tool for weight loss. Presently, there are a multitude of medical and spa clinics espousing weight loss programs using cookies, coaches and canned meals. Unfortunately, if the desired weight loss is achieved, the patient is still faced with residual loose, hanging, skin that requires excision. Similarly, gastric bypass surgery and the lap band procedures both have the post op problem of loose skin as well. In addition, each requires general anesthesia with its own set of problems. An alternative is the S.L.A.B.S. (Sequential Liposuction And Body Sculpting) procedure developed by the author. Basically it involves doing liposuction under local anesthesia multiple times while following the parameters of the Florida Board of Medicine. By safely removing four liters of fat at each treatment the skin gradually contracts and tightens. Furthermore, there is no problem with electrolyte imbalance, dumping syndrome, respiratory failure or death as has been reported with gastric bypass. Regardless of what program an overweight individual selects to lose weight, if there is not a life change from the standpoint of diet, exercise and attitude, they will be right back to where they started! I like Dr. G’s weight loss philosophy in which the patient is educated and accompanied to the grocery store to learn to read labels, choose the healthiest brand of food and cook in a healthy lifestyle. If you or a loved one is overweight and wants to lower their blood pressure, thwart adult onset diabetes, and get their body back please call for a consultation 561-776-7112. Dr. Douglas Dedo has been serving the South Florida community for over 35 years and is Triple Board certified in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology. Dr. Dedo has held leadership positions in the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the local hospital com-munity as well as the past President of the Palm Beach County Medical Society. He has written 45 articles and chapters for textbooks and medical journals. Dr. Douglas Dedo, Board Certi“ ed Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology.Gardens Cosmetic Center 4060 PGA Blvd. Suite 203Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-626-3223www.gardenscosmeticcenter.com ASK THE COSMETIC SURGEON ASK THE DENTAL EXPERT Number of implants depends on tooth location Question: Can I just get one implant? Answer: Depending on the position of the tooth you are replacing, you can use one implant. If you are restoring multiple teeth or a molar, you may need to consider more than one implant. The number and size of the implants installed will depend on the type of tooth or teeth you are replacing and the strength of the bone at that location. An average implant is about the size of one root. Your lower molars have two big roots and your upper molars have three big roots. Teeth have different size and multiple roots by design. If the bone that supports teeth or implants receives too much stress, the bone will start to disappear. Nature has given teeth different configurations of roots to be able to distribute and spread these forces over a larger area. This helps diminish the impact and protecting the supporting bone. The strongest bone in your jaw is located where your lower front teeth are found. This is why these teeth have small roots. Strong bone can absorb more force, therefore, less root surface is required. Your weakest bone is where your upper molars are positioned. This bone is close to your sinuses and contains lots of air sacks keeping that bone soft. This is why these teeth have three big roots.Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. He’s been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He’s a member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists.Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A., Board Certi“ ed Sedation DentistPGA Center for Advanced Dentistry Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S.,P.A.PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry7100 Fairway Dr. Suite 59Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. 33418x£‡"‡nU*`iˆVœ“ Could You Be at Risk for Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a very common disease that makes bones weak and more likely to break easily. About 9 million Americans have osteoporosis, and the disease causes more than 1.5 million fractures annually, including 547,000 vertebral fractures, 297,000 hip frac-tures and 397,000 wrist fractures. It cannot be cured, but osteoporosis can be detected by a painless test and treated through lifestyle changes and medications. The human bone looks something like a honeycomb, with the body con-stantly depositing new bone and remov-ing old bone. Bone mass usually peaks around age 30, at which time the body starts remov-ing more old bone than forming new bone. A person is diagnosed with osteoporosis when the spaces inside the honeycomb become larger resulting in decreased bone density and strength. Osteoporosis does not cause any symp-toms, and those with the disease usu-ally do not know they have it until they experience a collapsed vertebra or fracture. People at increased risk for developing osteoporosis tend to be those who are women, Caucasian or Asian, over the age of 50, small-boned and who have a family history of the disease. Other risk factors for osteoporosis include regular consumption of alco-hol, smoking and certain medications, including glucocorticoids, long-term use of some anti-seizure drugs, gonad-otropin-releasing hormone drugs for endometriosis, certain cancer treat-ments and excessive use of antacids that contain aluminum. For these people, a bone density test typically is recommended to identify osteoporosis, determine the rate of bone loss, predict risk for broken bones and measure effects of treatment. The test, which does not require any preparation, is similar to having an X-ray but with considerably less expo-sure to radiation. If you think you might be at risk for osteoporosis, the Orthopedic Specialists at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center are here to help. The hospital offers free bone density screenings once a month for women over the age of 45. A bone density test measures the strength and density of your bones as you approach menopause and, when the test is repeated sometime later, can help determine how quickly you are losing bone mass and density. The next free screening is Thursday, Jan. 16, with appointments beginning at 9 a.m., at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center. To register, please see www.pbgmc.com or call 625-5070. Treatment for osteoporosis usually focuses on preventing fractures by eat-ing a proper diet, exercising regularly and taking fall precautions. Medications also may be prescribed to reduce bone loss, increase bone den-sity or reduce the risk of fracture. A healthy diet includes eating foods high in calcium and vitamin D, such as dairy products, dark green, leafy vegetables, sardines, tofu, almonds, egg yolks, saltwater fish and liver. People over the age of 50 should get 1,200 mil-ligrams of calcium and 400 to 600 IU (International Units) of vitamin D daily. Weight-bearing exercise can help make bones and muscles stronger and slow down the rate of bone loss. Recommended activities done three to four days a week may include walk-ing, hiking, jogging, playing tennis, climbing stairs or dancing. To reduce the risk of falls, rooms should be kept free of clutter, and carpets and area rugs need to be anchored to the floor. Rubber-soled shoes are suggested for better traction and a cane or walker can help with added stability. Osteoporosis is not an unavoidable part of aging. It can be prevented and treated. Even if you have already been diagnosed with the disease, you can take steps to slow its progression and reduce the risk of falls. For more information about osteoporosis, talk with your doc-tor or see www.pbgmc.com/en-us/ours-ervices/medicalservices/pages/ortho-pedics.aspx. Q X s o a a larry COOMESCEO/Gardens Medical Center

PAGE 18

A18 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Allied Capital & Development of South FloridaHarbourside Place is brought to you by:and in partnership with Accessible by land and sea, private and public docking slips will allow easy entrance to all that Harbourside Place has to offer. A minimum of 24 cultural events, concerts and festivals will take place per year at Harbourside Place, adding to the entertainment value of this unique collection of restaurants, cafs, retailers, galleries and more. Harbourside Place is currently accepting wedding an d event reservations and will host its OFFICIAL GRAND For more information, please call: 561.799.0050 and visit www. harboursideplace.com Now Leasing Restaurant, Retail, Office and Marina D Jupiter Beach at Harbourside Pla A A A l l l l l l l l l i i i e e e e e e d d d d d d C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v v e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f f S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r i i i i i i i i i i i i d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d a a a a a a a a a a a Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha H Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha H Ha Ha H Ha H a H rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb r rb rb rb rb rb rb rb rb r r r ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou ou o ou ou ou ou o ou o u u u ou u u rs rs rs rs rs rs rs rs rs rs r rs r rs rs rs rs r rs rs r rs s rs rs rs r r rs rs r r r s r id id id id id id id id id id d id id id d id id d id i id id id d id id id d d e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl P P Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl P l P ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac ac a ac ac a a a e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e is is is is is is is is is is s i is is is is is s is s b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro ro o ro ro ro r ro o r r ro ro ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug ug u u u u ht ht ht ht ht ht ht h ht ht ht ht ht h ht t t t t t t t t t t t t 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Ac Ac c c Ac Ac Ac Ac Ac Ac Ac Ac c c Ac Ac c c c Ac Ac A Ac Ac A A Ac Ac Ac Ac Ac c Ac Ac Ac A A Ac Ac A Ac c Ac Ac A A A A Ac Ac c A Ac A Ac A c Ac Ac A A A A A A Ac Ac A A A Ac Ac A A A c c Ac Ac A A Ac c A A Ac A A A A c c c c c c A A A A A A c A A A A A A A A Ac c c c A A c c A A A c A c A A c A A A A A A A A A A c A A A A A A A A A A c A A A A A A c A A c c A A A A A A A c ce c c c c c ce ce c c e ce ce ce e ce ce ce ce ce e e c ce c ce c ce e ce e ce c c c ce ce e ce e e c c ce c ce c c c c e ce c e e ce e ce ce ce ce ce c ce e c e e s ss ss ss ss ss ss ss ss ss s ss ss ss ss ss ss ss ss ss ss s ss ss ss ss s ss s ss ss s s s s s s s ss s s s s s s s s ib ib ib ib ib ib ib i i ib ib ib i b ib i ib ib b ib i ib b b b b b ib ib ib ib b ib b b b i ib i b b b b b b i i ib i b b ib i i i ib b b b b ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib b b b b b b b b b ib ib ib ib b b b b b b b i ib ib i b b b b ib ib ib b i ib ib b i b b ib ib b ib b b b ib b b b b b ib b i i b le le le le le le le le le e le le le le e le l l le le le le l l l l l l l e e le le l l le le l e e e e e e le le le le le le le e e e e e e e le le le l e e e le e e e le l e l l le e e l le l e l l l l e e e e e e l l e e l l e e e e l l e e e l l e e e l l l e e e e e by land and sea, private and public dockin g slips will l al al al a al al al l al al al al al al al l l al al al l l al l a al al al al al a l al al al l a al a al al al l l l l al a al a a l a a l a a a a al a a a a a a a a a a a a a l a a a lo l l lo lo lo lo lo lo lo lo o lo o o o lo lo l l lo l lo l lo o lo lo l l lo l l lo lo lo lo lo lo lo l l lo lo lo l l l l l l l l lo o lo l lo lo l l l l l lo l l l lo l l l o lo l l lo l l o o o l o lo l lo o l o o o l l l l l l l l l l l l l o l l o o l l w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea a ea a a e a ea e a ea a e a a ea a a a a a a a a a a s s s s s s s sy sy sy sy sy sy sy sy s s sy sy s s s s s s sy sy s s s s sy s s sy entrance to all that Harbourside Place has to offer. A mi m m m m m mi m m m mi i m mi mi mi m mi i i mi mi mi m i i mi i m mi m m i m m mi mi m m m m m mi m m m m m m m m i mi mi m m m m m i i mi m m m m m i mi m m m m m m m mi mi m m mi m m m m m m mi mi m mi m m m m m mi m m m m m m m m m m m m m m mi mi m m m m mi i m m m m m mi m i mi m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m ni ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni ni i ni ni ni ni ni ni i ni n n m mu mu mu mu mu mu mu mu m m m mu mu mu mu u u mu mu u u u u u mu mu m u u u mu m mu u u mu u m u u mu u u mu u u m mu u u u u u mu u mu m u mu u m m m u m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m of 24 cultural event s, concerts and festivals will take p p p p p p p p p pl pl pl p p p p p p pl pl pl p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p ac a a a a a ac a a a a a a e pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe pe p e pe e pe e e pe e e pe pe e e pe e e p r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r y ye ar at Harbourside Place, addin g to the entertainment v va v va va va va va va va va v va va a va v a a a v a a va v va va a va a va v a va a va a a va va v va va va a a va a a lu lu lu l lu lu lu l lu l l lu lu lu l l l u e e e e e f o of of f of o f of o o f f of o this un iq ue collection of restaurants, cafs, retailers, ga ll eries and more. H arbourside P lace is currently accepting wedding an d event reserv a tions a nd will host its O FFI C I A L G R AN D Fo Fo Fo F Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo Fo o Fo o Fo o o o r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo mo o mo mo mo o o o o mo mo m mo o re r re re re re re re r r re re r r r r r re re re r re r r e i i i i i i i i i i i nf nf nf nf nf nf nf n nf n nf nf f f f f n nf nf nf f f nf f f n n f or or or o or or or or or or or or or or or or or or r or or r o or r r or ma ma ma ma ma m ma ma ma m ma ma a ma ma a ma ma a a ma ma m m m a a a ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti t t t t t ti on on on on on on on o on on on on on on on o on on n on on , , , , , pl pl pl pl p pl pl p pl pl pl pl l pl pl l p p l l ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea e ea a e ea ea ea a se se se se s se se se se se e se se se s se se s c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c al al al al al a al al al l al a a a a a al l l: l: l l: l: l l: l l: l: l : : 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . . . . 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 . . . . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 an an an an n an an an an an an an an an an a a a an an n d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d vi vi v vi vi vi vi vi vi v vi vi si s si si s si si si s si si s si si i t t t t t t t t t t t t w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . . . . h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e . . . . . c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m . . . . Now Leasing Restaurant Retail Office and Marin a Jupi Jupi Jupi Jupi Jupi Jupi Jupi Jupi upi Jup p J J J J ter ter ter ter ter ter ter ter t ter r Beac Beac Beac Beac Beac Beac Beac Beac Bea Bea Bea Bea h at h at h at h at h at h at h at h at a h h a h Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Har Ha Ha H bour bour bour bour bour bour bour bour ur ur bou o bour u u ur r side side side side side side side side side si e e Pla Pla Pla Pla Pla Pla a Pla Pla Pla P P a BY LAND. BY SEA. BY DESIGN. Jupiters New Downtownis on the horizon Wyndham Grand Hotel & Banquet Center Waterfront Amphitheater & 3 Rooftop Plazas Award-winning Chefs & Cuisines Sophisticated Collection of Retailers Class-A Office Suites Cultural Center 31 Marina Slips (leasable and transient) Covered Parking Facilities 24+ Cultural Events per Year NETWORKING Elizabeth Portmess and Julie Criser Christine Corrigan, Jerry Jernigan and Diane Harper Dennis Kanai, Linda Casey and John Bowers Donald Perry, Sheila Schwartz and Jay Matteson Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce monthly breakfast at The Breakers

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 NEWS A19 Grand Opening Fall Waterfront Dining, Entertainment More estined to be the only collection of award-winning restaurants, retailers and entertainment along South Floridas Intracoastal Waterway, Harbourside Place will quickly become the regions most coveted destination. In the true nature of Floridian lifestyle, Harbourside Place will be accessible by land and sea. Private and public dockage will allow easy entrance to all that Jupiters New Downtown has to offer. DFor More Information please call 561.799.0050. see for yourself. watch the video at: www. harboursideplace .com NOW LEASING Restaurant, Retail, Office and Marina. Allied Capital & Development of South Florida and in partnership withHarbourside Place is brought to you by: Jupiter Beach at Harbourside Place LikeŽ us on Facebook.com/FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Eric Sikes, Erin Udell and Andrew Murphy Joel Cohen and Patricia Reybold Steve Lewrence and Doug Rhudy Mark Montgomery, Laura Morse and Brewster Cole Jordan Wiegele, Katherine Hely, Maureen Roberts and Amanda Simon Nancy Maio and Damien Barr Jaimie Goodmen and Bob Goldfarb Sandy Munoz and Elizabeth Rogers

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A20 NEWS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYhis biggest passion „ polo „ tragically transformed into one of hospital stays, chemotherapy sessions and medical tests. Doctors, nurses and sick children replaced coaches, trainers and friendly teammates. I was just mainly pissed off,Ž Mr. Phillips said. It was really going to be my first summer playing tournaments at home and really concentrating on polo. I was more frustrated that everything was going to get messed up.Ž His parents spared their son the grim prognosis, enabling him to stay positive throughout the four-month ordeal. A lot of these things were kept from me, but I never for one second thought I was going to die,Ž Mr. Phillips said. I was in there with kids who had less-severe cancers than I did and were dying off. Every CAT scan I went through, I was visualizing in my mind that the tumor was gone.Ž His perseverance resulted in recovery, remission and, to this day, no sign of relapse. I was trying to stay focused,Ž Mr. Phillips said. Everyone I noticed that was negative would end up dead.Ž Afterward, he never spoke of it. He returned to school and went to prac-tice and hung out with his buddies. His didnt realize he could have died until a teacher posed the question. I guess I could have,Ž Mr. Phillips said. Its Gods test. He wants to see if I can get through this, so screw him, Im going to get through it. When you pass that test, you build on it. Its a hurdle.Ž At 17, he started playing polo professionally in Wellington, where he lives today. Thankful for his new lease on life, he channeled his energy into improving his forehand, backhand and belly shots, never looking back. Today, he plays for KIG at Grand Champions Polo Club. During the course of his 20-year career, he has collected such coveted trophies as the C.V. Whitney Cup and the USPA Piaget Silver Cup. He has reached the finals of the U.S. Open Polo Championship once and has a mission to win it if not next year, someday. Its kind of like the Stanley Cup of polo here,Ž Mr. Phillips said of the match the Argentinian team Zacara won in 2013. He and high-goalers Jeff Blake, Sugar Erskine, Kris Kampsen, Chris Nevins and Nic Roldan volunteered to par-ticipate in Polo for a Purpose to raise awareness about the Leukemia & Lym-phoma Society and money to fight blood cancers. Mr. Phillips, now comfortable sharing his story, wants those fighting their dis-eases to know the importance of staying positive. I think I could really help a lot,Ž he said. I probably should have done this 10 years ago, but I finally got to a point where I didnt mind talking about it. Im very honored to be doing it.Ž The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will include a cham-pagne reception, a silent auction and a luncheon in addition to the exhibition match. I think its important when it comes to nonprofits to have the younger crowd involved,Ž said Ali Sirota, junior chair-woman of the event. We want them to support a cause like this to raise money for an organization that can, hopefully, find a cure for this so our kids dont have to go through it.Ž Ms. Sirotas father, Richard Sirota, chairman of the fundraiser, developed Hodgkins lymphoma in 1985, survived it, had a reoccurrence in 2005 but pulled through again. Its something that is clearly very close to the hearts of both me and my parents,Ž Ms. Sirota said. Polo for a Purpose marks a new event for an organization known mostly for its Team in Training and Light the Night initiatives. Brandon has been here every step of the way for this,Ž said Pam Payne, executive director of the chapter. He is awesome. He is just awesome.Ž Q POLOFrom page 1Government puts a damper on the Christmas spirit There are two times of the year when this column becomes more personal: Christmas and Valentines Day. Christ-mas engenders thoughts of giving to those we love. Valentines Day engen-ders heartfelt thoughts of protecting and providing for those we love. Through the year, the letters from my readers range from their likes/dislikes to corrections and admonishments. These letters are well received by me. I am grateful for those who regularly read my column, hold me to my money and investing task, and take the effort to cogitate, formulate, articulate and communicate their reactions. I am so appreciative for my diverse readership. Most recently, in response to a column that I wrote on the economic dislocation caused by the Obamacare roll out, a reader wrote and debated some elements of my column. Beyond that, I was brought to a pause by some of her well expressed money attitudes. Her core point was that in our giving, daily business transacting and attitudes toward government action, we really do need to think of others and not just ourselves, not just our immediate family and not just the loves of our lives.Here is what she wrote about obesity of the spirit,Ž printed with her permission:When you take more than your share, it causes obesity. Too bad we dont have a visual. It would make all of us check our behavior. I, too, fight these tendencies every day. The rise in health care for my small business began long before Obamacare was a reality. My only real comfort knows my fellow Americans will also have care. My anger is directed to those who would profit excessively to exploit the present situation, and I fear there is really a lot of that going on.ŽSo who is taking more than their fair share? Is it the medical profession; by and large the answer is no; by and large, doc-tors, nurses and hospitals are not being overpaid. In fact, they might be underpaid relative to the service that they provide; the amount of costly education required, the surrender of personal free time in order to fulfill unseen responsibilities: off hours phone calls; hospital on-calls; research and professional studies; and contributions to the community, etc. For my part, I long held a gross generalization that doctors had a cushy life and earned excess profits. And perhaps that was true throughout the 1980s. After eye-opening discussions with doctors, espe-cially a local oncologist who shared his all-consuming schedule that has characterized the entirety of his profession, my perspec-tive changed. Beyond his practice owning him,Ž there are rigors, stresses, business liabilities, never-ending fear of patient law-suits and pressure to remain abreast of medical advancements. The overall cost/benefit in these professions has changed, such that fewer and fewer doctors are graduating from medical school and many are leaving traditional private practice and opting for concierge practices that allow them the time and freedom to pursue a total health solution for patients.So who, in my estimation, suffers from obesity of the spirit? It is unfashionable to label government as exploiting health care for gain, as the current administra-tion wants recognition for trying to do something good for all citizens. However, when governments (supposedly) best intentions are poorly exe-cuted, planned, require extravagant bud-gets and widely acknowledged mistakes are not fixed, it collectively translates into governments obesity of the spirit. Some who are exploiting health care for excess gain include those grossly overpaid (at $350 million plus) to build the Obamacare website and failed to deliver and certain career politicians who passed the (non) Affordable Care Act without having read/comprehended its contents and implications prior to its passage. I often reflect on my deceased fathers generous behavior to loved ones, fellow corporate employees and to the masses of the less fortunate. As a fatherless teen during the Depression, he went to work after high school graduation as a mail runner for Equitable Life (now part of AXA). The head of the legal department took a liking to my father and convinced the Equitable to pay for his night college and law school education at Fordham in NYC. My father was ever indebted and in years ahead, despite many Wall Street law firms continuous offers at substan-tively higher pay, my father was allegiant to Equitable for the entirety of his career. After corporate work hours, he gave free legal services to any widow as he recalled the dire circumstances of his widowed mother and those less fortunate „ no obesity of the spirit there. Not everyone is merry this holiday season; some are without employment, housing, encouragement, dreams, education, etc.If we can still find ways to limit our obesity of the spirit and keep our eyes open to find ways to financially help our fellow man in our everyday life, we might find better solutions than what our already obese government mandates and, so often, is incapable of executing. Unfortunately for some, the recent increased taxation of individuals will most likely curb their gen-erosity and charitable giving. The reality is that there are fewer after-tax dollars and the government grab has a way of squelch-ing many a generous spirit. Q „ Jeannette Showalter, CFA, is a commodities broker with Worldwide Futures Systems. Find her on Facebook at Jeannette Showalter, CFA.„ Trading futures and options on futures and Forex transactions involve substantial risk of loss and may not be suitable for all investors. You should carefully consider whether trading is suitable for you in light of your circumstances, knowledge and financial resources. You may lose all or more of your initial investment. Opinions, market data and recommendations are subject to change at any time. i a o c f O jeannette SHOWALTER CFA showalter@ww fsyst ems.com MONEY & INVESTING >> What: Polo for a Purpose >> When: Jan. 4, 2014 >> Where: International Polo Club Palm Beach, 3667 120th Ave. South, Wellington >> Cost: $100 to $150 >> Info: 616-8682 or lls.org/pb/polo COURTESY PHOTOSPolo for a Purpose chairs are Richard Sirota, Ali Sirota and Lynda Sirota. Richard Sirota sur-vived lymphoma. Polo pro Brandon Phillips was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma when he was 14. He said it had been important to remain positive during his recovery and remission. There is no sign of relapse.

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The Better Business Bureau has some suggestions for Target custom-ers who are concerned that their credit or debit cards may have been compro-mised by the data breach announced by the retailer this morning. First of all, if you used a credit card at Target in the past few weeks, dont panic,Ž advises Carrie Hurt, president and CEO of the Council of Better Busi-ness Bureaus, in a prepared statement. You are not liable for any fraudulent charges on your account, and there are some simple things you can do to make sure your card was not used fraudulently. Target has already issued a warning for consumers and is working with banks and credit card issuers to alert them to which numbers were stolen,Ž Ms. Hurt added. You can expect to hear from your bank if your card infor-mation is identified as having been compromised, and you can always call the customer service number on your card if you have a question.Ž BBB suggests the following advice.For those who shopped at Target with a credit card: € Monitor your credit card statements carefully (go online; dont wait for the paper statement). € If you see a fraudulent charge, report it to your bank or credit card issuer immediately so the charge can be reversed and a new card issued. € Keep receipts in case you need to prove which charges you authorized and which ones you did not. € For those who shopped at Target with a debit card: € Do all of the above as for credit cards, but pay very careful attention to your account, as debit cards do not have the same protections as credit cards and debit transactions withdraw funds directly from your bank account. Contact your bank for more informa-tion, or if you want to pre-emptively request a new debit card or put a secu-rity block on your account. € For EVERYONE, not just those who shopped at Target: € Beware of scammers who will likely use this highly public event to pur-port to be from Target, your bank or your credit card issuer, telling you that your card was compromised and sug-gesting actions to fixŽ the problem. € Check before you click. Phishing emails may attempt to fool you into providing your credit card information or ask you to click on a link or open an attachment, which can download mal-ware designed to steal your identity. € Dont click on any email links or attachments unless you are absolutely certain the sender is authentic. € For all businesses that collect customer information: € Make sure you protect your customers data. If a data breach can hap-pen to a major retailer with significant data security measures in place, it can happen to any business. € Check out BBBs updated online guide Data Security … Made Simpler for free information on how to create a data security plan. NOTE: Target is a BBB Accredited Business and a National Partner of the Council of Better Business Bureaus. For more than 100 years, Better Business Bureau has been helping consumers find businesses, brands and charities they can trust. In 2012, consumers turned to BBB 124 million times for Business Reviews on more than 4.5 million companies and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at bbb.org. The Council of Better Business Bureaus is the umbrella organization for 113 local, independent BBBs across the United States and Canada, as well as home to its national programs on dispute resolution and industry self-regulation.BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH COUNTY COMMERCE WEEK OF DECEMBER 26-JANUARY 1, 2014 A21 What to do if you used a credit card at TargetSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________ On Jan. 9, Palm Beach Outlets will host a Job Fair at Northwood University in West Palm Beach. Retailers will be on hand to interview candidates who are seeking positions ranging from sales associates to man-agement. More than 100 stores will be hiring at the new outlet center. Some of the stores participating in the job fair include, Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH, J.Crew | Crewcuts Factory, Tommy Hilfiger Company Store, Aerosoles, Gap Factory Store, Rawlings Sporting Goods, Destination Maternity and more. Palm Beach Outlets and Northwood University collaborated for the event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on the campus of Northwood University at the Countess de Hoernle Student Life Center, at 2600 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach, 33409. We are pleased to host this important community event on our campus,Ž said Northwood University President Dr. Tom Duncan. As a business university, we are excited to partner with the Palm Beach Outlets Mall as it prepares to add over a thousand new jobs to the West Palm Beach economy.Ž Says Palm Beach Outlets General Manager, Jim Roberts, Palm Beach Out-lets will create over a thousand jobs in the local market. The New Year will bring new opportunity for so many in our community.Ž Located directly off Interstate 95 on Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach Outlets is being developed by a partnership of New England Development and Eastern Real Estate. Redevelopment of the property began in January 2013 and is expected to be completed on schedule for grand opening activities starting Feb. 14. The investment by New England Develop-ment and Eastern Real Estate will make Palm Beach. An estimated 1,500 fulland part-time permanent positions in retail manage-ment and sales are projected to be cre-ated as a result of the redevelopment of Palm Beach Outlets. Q Palm Beach Outlets Announces Job Fair at Northwood UniversitySPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________“You are not liable for any fraudulent charges on your (Target) account, and there are some simple things you can do to make sure your card was not used fraudulently.” — Carrie Hurt, president and CEO of the Council of Better Business Bureaus, in a prepared statement.

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A22 BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY TRAVELEdinburgh boasts rich history, adventure BY ELLA NAYOR AND JEFF CULLenayor@” oridaweekly.com jcull@” oridaweekly.comCharm, intrigue and history fill the days and nights in Edinburgh, Scotland. The capital city of Scotland is a great holiday getaway for those craving a taste of royal living, posh shopping and the hearty conversation of locals. Edin-burgh has it all. Stroll up to the famed Edinburgh Castle at the top of Castle Rock and lin-ger in the quaint shops and pubs located along the Royal Mile. Nibble on tradi-tional Scottish foods such as Haggis and salmon. Sip a fine Scotch while listening to live music and making merry with the locals. Edinburgh is a place for all seasons and moments. Heres a few must gos while in Edinburgh:Edinburgh CastleEach year more than a million visitors trek up the Royal Mile to Edinburgh Castle. The royal residence has been the center of many battles and strife over the centuries. Now visitors get a chance to check out the military fortress „ com-plete with cannons „ built into Castle Rock. Military ceremonies, historical re-enactments are some of the many draws to Edinburgh Castle. And dont forget to bundle up, as the top of Edinburgh Castle can be quite windy. But the breath-taking views of the city and Garden of Princes cannot be missed! Inside the castle pad through the rooms holding the Scot-tish Crown Jewels or visit the Scottish National War Memorial. Royal MileShops, and historic sites detailing the rich history of Scotland can be found along the Royal Mile „ which leads to Edinburgh Castle. The Palace of Holy-roodhouse is the official residence of the Monarch of the United Kingdom. Tours of the sweeping, grounds and gardens as well as the interior palace are available. Learn how the royals really live. Stroll through the majestic dining room and living areas of the palace. After your visit dont forget to pamper yourself with a bit of royal attention and fun at the classy and hip cafes, pubs and shops along the Royal Mile. The Witchery „ an upscale restaurant „ considered to be haunted „ is lively and bewitching with its medieval dcor and atmosphere. Food is sumptu-ous and a sampling of one of their fine Scotches „ a must! Along the way stop and watch a kilt being put together. Kilts and other traditional Scottish apparel and cultural mementos are available „ yes including bagpipes. With so many places to see and things to do, time seems to melt away in Edin-burgh. Pack rainy gear and warm cloth-ing „ as Edinburgh is chilly, windy, rainy and sunny „ usually all at once „ as the locals will joke. And dont forget to enjoy every second of this city steeped in history and lore. Q Cannons defend Edinburgh Castle atop Castle Rock. There has been a royal castle on the rock since the 12th century and it is Scotland’s most visited attraction. The bars come alive at night in Edinburgh with Scottish folk music. The Great Highland Bagpipe dates back to the 15th century. Here, a bagpiper, in traditional garb, plays in the city center. The Royal Mile is the main thoroughfare through the Old Town of Edinburgh. Today it’s a mix of shops, restaurants, pubs and visitor attractions. The Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarch of the United Kingdom. The current queen spends one week there every summer holding court. PHOTOS BY ELLA NAYOR / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 BUSINESS A23PALM BEACH SOCIETY Shop for a Cause, Bloomingdale’s at The Gardens MallLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Mariah Leno and Katherine Galarraga Kelsey McNaughton and Mary Simses Carol Reitz and Dale WrightDebra Tornaben and Ellen HuxleyDunja Calvani, Ellen Huxley, Raphael Corey and Juliana Corey Theresa Middleton and Debra Tornaben Elaine Chirico, Mary Simses and Mary Ellen Pate Debra Tornaben and Mary Simses Marilyn Perlyn and Mary Simses NINA CUSMANO/FLORIDA WEEKLY

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A24 BUSINESS WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYPALM BEACH SOCIETY Cultural Council of Palm Beach County launches exhibition season with photography exhibitLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.George Michel, Pauline MIchel, Alex Dreyfoos and Renate Dreyfoos Roger Latham and Tammi LathamRay Gross, Gabriele Kraus and Tom RadcaKim Sargent, Joan Sargent, Brad Deflin and Diane Kisner Pam Saba, Alex Anderson, Cloe Gibson and Virginia RaittanoGlenn Jergensen, Rena Blades and Alex Dreyfoos Richard Wilson and Mikki Vicoli Ellen Moses, Tony Serratore and Diane Johnson COURTESY PHOTOS \ BRODIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 BUSINESS A25 NETWORKINGConcierge loyalty program cocktail party at 50 Ocean in Delray BeachPAPPHOTO / COURTESY PHOTOSLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Joan Nova, Christine Najac, Stephanie Immelman, Nancy Stewart Stephanie Immelman, Stephen ChrisanthusCathy Jean-Louis, Randee Spencer Mark Diener, Jennifer Hesser Angie Radmer, Martha DiazChristine Najac, Joan NovaAngel Rodriguez, Molly Brown Sheila Schwartz, Jeane Sisson, Ted BuckwaldChristine Metzger, Sally Shorr, Kimberly Ricketts

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SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThis luxury residence offers a wealth of architectural detailing and unsurpassed quality. It is impecca-bly appointed from ceiling to floor in every spacious room. Features include a large lanai with gas fireplace, a sum-mer kitchen overlooking the infinity edge pool and a spa. The private estate at 111 Via Palacio in Mirasol, in Palm Beach Gardens, offers a chefs kitchen with butlers pantry, refrigerated wine room, com-mercial appliances, working island, top-of-the line cabinetry and counter-tops. A formal living room and dining room boasts a stone fireplace with decorator appointments. The office/den is fully paneled. The master suite offers his-and-her separate baths, large walk-in closets and a covered lanai off the suite. The home includes balconies in front and back, a 4-car garage, media room, impact glass and a cen-tral vacuum. A golf equity membership is available. Lang Realty lists the home at $3,650,000. The agent is Carol Falciano, 561-758-5869. Q A GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRYREAL ESTATE www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013 JANUARY 1, 2014 A26 FLORIDA WEEKLY Palatial in Mirasol The office/

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Jupiter | Juno Beach | Port St. Luciereal people.real results.real estate. When you do what you love it shows. Our firm has become one of the fastest-growing real estate firms in the area. Home buyers and sellers have trusted Platinum Properties Realty, Inc. to be their partner. It starts with our people. Our agents care, listen, and know what is needed to get the job done because they love what they do. They approach buying and selling a home as if it was their own. Our agency retains a small and friendly feel, yet offers a professional team, comprehensive range of services, and thorough knowledge of the market. What does this mean to you? Plain and simple we get you results. Contact one of our featured agents today, and ask about the Platinum Properties Advantage Program to sell your home faster and for a higher selling price. Tina Hamor 561.703.7624TinaHamor@comcast.net Lisa Machak 561.951.9514Lisa@LisaMachak.com Margot Matot 561.707.2201 MargotMatot@yahoo.com Jessica DesPlaines 561.202.7061JKDesplaines@gmail.com Rita Boesky 561.596.9977Rita@RitaBoesky.com Don Beyersdorf 561.400.8230Don@DonBeyersdorf.com Matt Abbott 561.352.9608MAbbott@PlatProps.com Sandy Trowbridge 561.758.1055Sandy@SandyTrowbridge.com Thomas Traub 561.876.4568Tom@TomTraub.com Candace McIntosh 561.262.8367Mcintosh5755@bellsouth.net Juliette Miller 561.310.7761JulietteMiller1@gmail.com Dan Millner 561.379.8880Dan@MillnerHomes.com Featured Agents 3BR / 2.5BA MLS# RX-9985643 $399,000 Paloma 2BR / 2BA MLS# RX-9968583 $425,000 The Bluffs 3BR / 2.5BA MLS# RX-9984906 $330,000 Mallory Creek 2BR / 2BA MLS# RX-9966811 $269,000 Jupiter 4BR / 2BA MLS# RX-9982117 $335,000 Jupiter Farms To view all South Florida listings, visit PlatinumHomeSearch.com!

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A28 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 888.684.4375 | LangRealty.com Connect on Google Plus facebook.com/langrealty twitter.com/langrealty blog.langrealty.com youtube.com/langrealtytv Palm Beach Gardens 6271 PGA Blvd. Suite 200 | Palm Beach Gardens | Florida 33418 Jupiter 601 Heritage Dr. Suite 152 | Jupiter | Florida 33458 All reports published December 2013 based on data available at the end of November 2013. All reports presented are based on data supplied by the Realtor Association of The Palm Beaches, Jupiter, Tequesta, Hobe Sound Association of Realtors, St. Lucie Association of Realtors and RMLS (direct members). Neither the Association nor its MLS guarantees or is anyway responsible for its accuracy. Data Maintained by the Association or its MLS may not reflect all real estate activities.Current Inventory in Units2013 YTDColdwell Banker 771 Illustrated Properties 684 Corcoran 314 929 Keyes 455 Fite Shavell 153 Premier Estate Properties 125 Sothebys International 66 Nestler Poletto Sothebys 65 #1in Total Listingsfor Palm Beach County heather PURUCKER BRETZLAFF Buyer and seller must take negotiations seriously for a sale to happen It has been a busy two weeks since the Thanksgiving holiday, which is an excellent sign of what to expect for the upcoming season. In addition to receiving an offer on one of my listings, I have also been working with three buyers. Each one is looking for a different type of property; two of the three are very seri-ous and have been researching the area and narrowing their choices for the past few months. One of my buyers submitted an offer in writing, which unfortunately was not accepted. They became discouraged and wanted to make a verbal offer on anoth-er property before they put anything else in writing, feeling as if they may be wasting time by putting an offer in writing. I strongly advised against a verbal offer, convincing them to put their offer in writ-ing. They did, and after only a few days, we came to terms with the seller. If we had submitted the offer verbally, it may not have been taken seriously and the negotiations would have come to a halt or maybe never even started. As a real estate agent, I have a commitment to guide my clients in the best direction possible for a succes sful o utcome. Submitting a written offer sends a message to the seller that the buyer is serious. After all, if a buyer is serious about submitting an offer, they should be ready to make at least a small commitment, includ-ing signing the Florida FAR BAR contract as an offer. Buyers do not need an earnest money deposit up front, and they do not need to commit to finalizing anything until they have a counter offer or accep-tance. Buyers also can ask for an attorney review if they do not feel comfortable with the language „ ultimately, an offer in writing is far stronger and con-sidered more serious than any verbal offer. In addition to feeling rejected by their first offer and not want-ing to make an offer in writ-ing, the husband was preparing to leave town on business. He would not have access to print the paperwork and get it signed while away. My solution: I faxed the documents to his hotel, and he e-signed via the Internet. The e-signed documents were sent it to his wife for her signatures, and they came back to me within an hour. It was seamless. Next, he was concerned about the deposit. He did not want to send a check in the mail, nor did he have one. That was not a concern at all. Most of the deposits are now wired into the escrow accounts so if the offer is accepted, he would have the opportunity to wire the money on the due date, which is typically three days after the effective date. What if my offer is accepted, I wire the funds, and I cannot make it in time for the inspection?Ž he said. Again, a simple solu-tion. I recommended two inspectors for him to contact, and after he decided which one he felt comfortable with, I scheduled the appointment to meet the inspector. Everything is according to schedule and running smoothly two weeks into the con-tract. It can be a pleasant and reward-ing experience, especially if the negotia-tions begin in the professional manner they should. I dont want to make it sound like buyers are the only people who want to work through a contract verbally. Many times it is another Realtor. When I first began selling existing homes, I submitted an offer on a $3 million home. My buyer was expecting a counter offer and instead of a written offer, the agent wanted to negotiate through a text. I was very surprised and tried to work through it, but it frustrated my buyer and he felt his offer wasnt important enough for a formal counter, so he stopped negotiating and we moved onto another property. As busy as we are all in our daily lives, it is important to remember to use the tools at hand to make the process of selling real estate a personal and professional expe-rience. Anyone can throw out a verbal offer, but it doesnt reso-nate until it can be seen in writ-ing. That is when the experience begins. As a professional, it is crucial that I keep it a good and memorable experience for all involved. Buying a home is one of the most important decisions in peoples lives, and writing a contract should be taken seri-ously. The agent should always make the process easy enough for the client to work through and understand. Submitting an offer on paper and in writing ensures that everyone is on the same page and there are no misunderstandings. It also gives a simple opportunity for the review of all details, or even further review by a real estate attorney. Simply put, verbal offers often do not provide enough detail to be taken seriously. Please do not get me wrong as several verbal offers are made by extremely quali-fied buyers but the sellers often think if they cant take the time to put this on paper, then they are either not serious or not qualified and do not want to waste their time. Buying or selling a home is an extremely serious process and should be treated as such from beginning to end. Q „ Heather Purucker Bretzlaff is a Realtor with the Corcoran Group in Palm Beach. She can be reached at 722-6136.

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Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate b roker. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or reg arding “nancing is from sources deemed reliable, but Corcor an makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property informat ion is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and wi thdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. All dime nsions provided are approximate. To obtain exact dimensions, Corcora n advises you to hire a quali“ed architect or engineer. SOUTH FLORIDA NEW YORK THE HAMPTONS ERIC SAIN 561.758.3959DON TODORICH 561.373.1791 CLIENT ENDORSEMENT: We fell in love with Palm Beach a few years ago and knew that we would eventually make it our home. Todorich & Sain were our choice for representation and we couldnt be more thrilled; continuous market updates, terri“c advice and expert negotiators. We will always remember their care and diligence. Thank you for our piece of paradise.Ž Richard & Janice P.418 31ST STREETJUST REDUCED. Completely renovated 4 BR/2 bath with detached guest house, hardwood ”oors, “replace, double garage, screened porch & oversized lot. $599KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 MIRASOL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUBPopular 4 BR/4.5 bath. Great room ”oor plan with expanded pool area, southern facing yard, french doors, summer kitchen & golf membership. $811KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 SOLD 131 N GOLFVIEW ROAD UNIT 53 BR/3 bath updated Penthouse with Intracoastal & golf views, marble ”oors, wrap-around balcony, private guest suite, open ”oorplan and low HOA fees. $595KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 2660 S OCEAN BLVD #703WPenthouse Floor 3BR/3 bath with triple exposures, Gorgeous water views, two garage spaces, hurricane Impact doors, and a pool cabana. A STEAL! $1.5M Eric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 4720 NORTH FLAGLER DRIVEPrivate Gated Waterfront Estate on 1-acre near Rybovich Marina. Spacious interior w/ open kitchen, luxurious baths, guest house, pool & dock (no “xed bridges). $2.295MEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 100 ARLINGTON ROADRenovated 3BR with tall ceilings, wood & stone ”oors, personal library, impact windows, salt-water pool & garage. Relax and enjoy this boaters paradise. $1.9M Eric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 OLD PALM GOLF & COUNTRY CLUBCustom Estate Home (over 5,000 SF) 5 BR/5.5 bath with library, “replace, 2.5-car garage, pool, exterior water feature and stained cypress on patio. $1.75+MEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 UNDER CONTRACT 214 CHILEAN JPalm Beach Luxury close to the Beach. 2 BR/1.5 bath in quiet enclave with wood ”oors, open kitchen, high ceilings and gorgeous pool area. $540KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 SOLD Our clients are referral-driven because our sales are results-driven.We make buying and selling an ef“cient experience. Consult with us today. 511 32ND STREETDesigned & named Villa GloridaŽ by John Volk, this 3 BR/2 bath home has new plumbing, electric, kitchen & baths. No expense spared. $740KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791

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A30 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH BROKERAGE340 Royal Poinciana Way Suite 337 | Palm Beach, FL 33480 | sothebyshomes.com/palmbeach | 561.659.3555 Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc. CELEBRATED REPUTATION Centuries-old. Globally recognized. Associated with treasured possessions. OLD PALM GOLF CLUB | $6,650,000 | WEB: 0076003Denise Segraves | 561.762.3100JONATHANS LANDING | $2,995,000 | WEB: 0076056Cam Kirkwood | 561.714.6589 OCEANFRONT BEAUTY | $5,300,000 | WEB: 0076055Cam Kirkwood | 561.714.6589PGA VILLAGE WATERFRONT | $1,100,000 | WEB: 0076210Doc Ellingson | 772.229.2929 CALYPSO PALMS | $3,100,000 | WEB: 0075834Doc Ellingson | 772.229.2929 GATED INTRACOASTAL CONDO | $788,000 | WEB: 0076086Cam Kirkwood | 561.714.6589 Consider the benefits of purchasing an existing home When buyers embark on their venture to buy a home, a decision to con-sider is whether to buy new or purchase an existing home. There are benefits to each choice. Buyers of a new home may appreciate more energy-efficient appli-ances, contemporary decor, and that never-been-lived-in-before appeal. Buyers of a home that has been lived in before may value the charm of mature trees that line older neighbor-hood streets and a more desirable loca-tion depending upon their needs and lifestyle. Jerry and Jessica were referred to me by a client to whom I recently sold a luxury home. They were undecided whether they wanted a new spec home, an existing home, of if they wanted to build. I dis-cussed with Jerry and Jessica the ben-efits to consider in making their choice. Jerry and Jessica wanted to explore the options of a previously lived in home first. They were drawn to developed neighborhoods for the sense of an estab-lished community. The lush landscaping and mature trees reminded them of the communities where they had grown up. We discussed the maintenance and repairs that often come with the pur-chase of an existing home. I advised them that in making an offer on an existing property they should make the contract contingent upon inspection by a professional home inspector of their choosing. A thorough inspection by a professional tends to minimize the suprises or unanticipated repairs that can come with buying an existing house. The identification of items in need of repair or replacement can be addressed or reflected in the final purchase price. Well maintained homes may require little improvement; the value in having the inspection may be peace of mind from the inspection and assurance of a professional. Often there will be existing features in a resale property that are unique and a great benefit to the buyer. For example, window treatments, lighting fixtures, built-in cabinetry, security systems, home automation sys-tems and landscaping may be benefits in purchasing an existing home. Existing homes are sometimes located in close proximity to amenities that suit the pur-chaser. They may provide convenient access to schools, dining, and shopping. After viewing several new and older houses, Jerry and Jessica indicated that they would consider remodeling for the right location that best fit their needs. Overall the prices of the existing homes we viewed tended to be less expensive than the newer properties. However, when Jerry and Jessica calculated the cost of adding window treat-ments, light fixtures, built-in cabinets, and landscaping, their decision to con-tinue the search for an existing home was strengthened. They also appreciated the data that I shared with them showing the long and steady appreciation of the houses in the older neighborhoods over the years. Ultimately, Jerry and Jessica decided to make an offer on a home which was built in 2005 and had many of the ele-ments which were important to them, including location, mature landscaping, well maintained streets, and a neighbor-hood that had appreciated over the last eight years. They hired a professional home inspector who provided them with a comprehensive report of the details of the home. The report reflected several minor repairs. The price they were pur-chasing the home at was a good value for the neighborhood and they felt com-fortable the repairs were minor. Jerry and Jessica closed on this home several months ago. They have made a few modifications to fit their needs and are thrilled to be settled in an estab-lished neighborhood. After weighing all the options, the choice of purchasing an existing home in a developed neigh-borhood was the best fit for Jerry and Jessica. Consider all of your options when looking to purchase a house and you will rest assured that you made the best choice. In your exploration you will discover the house, whether existing or new construction, that best fits your needs. Q „ Linda Bright is a real estate professional with Mirasol Realty Operated by Fite Shavell & Associates, lbright@ mirasolrealty.com, 629-4995. linda BRIGHT

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 REAL ESTATE A31 PGA NATL PALM BEACH GARDENS Beautifully remodeled 2/2 condo in Prestigious PGA National. Raised ceilings giving spacious feelings throughout. Stainless steel appliances, new wood and tile ”ooring. New crown molding throughout. Great opportunity to live in one of the most desirable communities in Palm Beach Gardens. $224,900 CALL: FRANK LEO 5616010224 GREENVIEW COVE WELLINGTON Stunning, light and bright 5BR/4.5BA custom built home designed for entertaining inside and out. Surround sound in all main living areas as well as the outdoor patio. Spectacular new kitchen, granite counters, double ovens. This home has it all, must see!!$699,000 CALL: SUSAN WINCH 5615161293 NEW LISTING RIVERBEND TEQUESTA This 2nd ”oor 2BR/2.5BA townhouse is move in ready. Meticulously maintained with new carpet and updated kitchen.$79,900 CALL: HELEN GOLISCH 5613717433 tntHBSEFOT!MBOHSFBMUZDPN www.langrealty.com 1("#PVMFWBSEr4VJUFt1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT )FSJUBHF%Sr4VJUFt+VQJUFS MIRABELLA PALM BEACH GARDENS This very charming Bella model has a private/ yard. Architectural Details and Quality “nishes are presented throughout. The kitchen has been upgraded with stainless appliances, cabinetry and granite. Master Bath has been upgraded. $346,500 CALL: KAREN CARA 5616761655 NEW LISTING NEW LISTING NEW LISTING Upcoming antiques and collectibles events Cresthaven Stamp & Postcard Show „ 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Dec. 28, Holiday Inn Express, 2485 Metrocentre Blvd., West Palm Beach. Shows also are sched-uled for Jan. 25, Feb. 22, March 22, April 26, May 31, June 28, July 26, Aug. 23, Sept. 27, Oct. 25, Nov. 22 and Dec. 27, 2014. Info: 969-3432 or 472-7020. West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market „ Visit the West Palm Beach Green Market, then stroll a block north to this fun street market, open 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays on Narcissus Avenue, north of Banyan Boulevard. For informa-tion, search Facebook or call 670-7473. West Palm Beach Antiques Festival „ See hundreds of dealers in antiques, collectibles and decorative items 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 3, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 4 and 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Jan. 5 at the South Florida Fairgrounds, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $8 adults, $7 seniors, free for under 16. Two-day admission: $12. A $25 early buyer ticket allows admission at 9 a.m. Jan. 3. Discount coupon online at wpbaf.com. Information: 941-697-7475. The Lincoln Road Outdoor Antique & Collectible Market of Miami Beach „ This long-running market is 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Jan. 5 along Miami Beachs Lincoln Road. Its free; antiquecollectiblemarket.com. Kofski Antiques Estate Sale „ The companys estate sales are as much social events as they are sales. Kofskis second sale of the season includes fur-nishings from homes in Palm Beach and The Bears Club. Its set for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 11-12 at 5501 S. Georgia Ave., West Palm Beach. Info: 585-1976. Q KOVEL: ANTIQUESCommemorative flasks were once the perfect gift for barflies BY TERRY KOVELSpecial to Florida Weekly New Years Eve celebrations have long included alcoholic drinks. A toast to the New Year is part of the party, along with music, noisemakers and a New Years wish and kiss. In the early 1900s, bars were the hub of much social activity. Neighborhood folks would eat, drink and talk as they do today, but of course without a sportscast on a nearby TV set. Gifts from the saloon management to regular customers were expected. In the 1880s, a popular gift was a special small glass flask filled with whiskey. Its label read Seasons Greetings,Ž and included the name of the giver „ a hotel, bar or bartender. These holiday bottles are very collectible today. Price is determined by the shape and color of the bottle and the historic interest in the giver. Norman C. Heckler & Co., which operates online bottle auctions, recently sold a c.1900 gift bottle from the Hotel Emrich in Washington, D.C., for $468. It had a label under glass, which added to the value. Q: My grandmother, who was born in the late 1800s, had some pieces of silverware that I now own. I would like to preserve them and display them in a shadow box for my children. Is there something I can put on the silver to keep it from tarnishing? A: Silver that is going to be displayed, not used for eating, can be lacquered to prevent tarnish. It should be cleaned before treating. You can have it lacquered by someone who repairs and restores silver, or you can buy a product meant spe-cifically for silver and do it yourself. This can be a difficult process if the piece has an intricate design. Every bit of the silver must be covered and the lacquer must be applied evenly. Lac-quer will yellow over time and may crack. You can use Renaissance Wax, a micro-crystalline wax, instead of lac-quer, but it will not prevent tarnish for as long. Silver cant be polished once it is lacquered. The lacquer has to be completely removed first. The type of box the silver will be dis-played in also is important. It should have an airtight lid, if possible. Dont display the silver on felt, velvet or wool. Q: I have a dining-room set that includes a French Provincial table with three leaves, a china cabinet with glass doors, six chairs and one armchair. All the chairs have been re-covered. A tag on the bottom of one of the chairs says B.F. Huntley Co.Ž The entire set was purchased at an estate sale in the 1970s. When were these pieces made and what might their value be? Im going to sell them before we remodel. A: B.F. Huntley, an employee of the Oakland Furniture Co., established his own furniture company in Winston-Salem, N.C., 1906. Later he acquired the Oakland Furniture Co. and two other furniture companies. In 1961 B.F. Huntley Furniture Co. merged with the Thomasville Chair Co. and became Thomasville Furniture Industries. Your vintage furniture is worth what comparable new sets sell for today. Q: I have a very old glass plate that my great-grand-mother gave me when I was 10 years old. That was 73 years ago. Its decorated with cigar bands on the back with a mans picture in the center. The back of the dish is cov-ered with a felt-like material glued over the bands and center picture. Can you tell me how old it is and if it has any value? A: Cigar bands, the decorative strips of paper wrapped around cigars, were first made in the 1830s to identify brand names. Cigar bands made from the late 1800s until about 1920 are the most colorful and decorative. Cigar band art,Ž which is sometimes referred to as a form of folk art, was a popular home-made craft in the early 1900s. The bands were used to decorate dishes, coasters, bracelets and other items. Your dish was decorated by gluing the large picture, face down, to the bottom of the dish, then gluing cigar bands face down so they completely covered the rest of the dishs exterior. The bands were then covered with felt so that when the dish is turned upright, the bands can be seen but the back is protected by the felt. Old cigar band dishes are not hard to find. They sell for $10 to hundreds of dollars, depending on age, condition and the tal-ent of the maker. Q „ Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. “A Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, Hotel Emrich, 485 to 489 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C.” is the wording on the label under glass on this holiday gift flask. It once held a half pint of whiskey. The bottle sold for $468 at an online Norman C. Heckler bottle auction. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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For more information on these Great Buys and Next Sea son’s Rentals, email us at Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Beach Front PH 2002 4BR/4.5BA Penthouse with over 4,000 Sq ft. of living space. Upgrades plus poolside Cabana. $2,150,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front PH 1903 3BR/3BA Spectacular views. This unit has 10FT Ceilings, marble ” oors and a private poolside cabana. $ 1,595,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique WT201 2BR/3.5BA Unique completely renovated unit with spectacular large private terrace. A must see! $399,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique WT2304 2BR/3.5BA Amazing Views of ocean & ICW. Coveted SE corner on 23rd ” oor. $585,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique ET1103 2BR/3.5BA One of a kind 11th ” oor ocean front condo with beautiful ocean & in-tracoastal views. Designer built-in furnishings. A must see. $649,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique 1402 Rare 3BR/4BA on coveted SE corner. Breath taking views of ocean & intracoastal. Totally renovated with a contemporary ” air. Water views from every room. $899,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front 703 BEST BUY AT Beach Front 3BR/3BA with spectacular direct ocean and ICW views. Gourmet kitchen. $875,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique ET702 2BR/3.5BA Breathtaking ocean and intracoastal views from this coveted SE corner unit. Marble ” oors, wet bar & two parking spaces. $695,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties UNDER CONTRACT UNDER CONTRACT SOLD Martinique ET304 2BR/3.5BA Coveted SW corner unit. Ocean views, porcelain ” oors throughout Light and bright with neutral tones. $499,000.Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 One Singer 601 3BR/3BA W Penthouse. Spectacular views of the Intracoastal & City. One of only 15 exqui-site residences with gated entrance. Private elevator foyer. $1,600,000.Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Resort 1750 3BR/3.5BA Ocean views from this private residence at the Resort on Singer Island beach front living at its absolute “ nest. Outstanding amenities! $1,299,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Ritz 1704A 3BR/3.5BA Beautiful ocean front fully furnished residence. Professionally decorated with private elevator access. $2,699,000 Jeannie Walker 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING REDUCED Ritz 2502A 3BR/3.5BA Designer ready unit with amazing ocean views and expansive glass balco-nies. Price includes a furnished pool side cabana. $3,945,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Ritz 2003A 3BR/3.5BA One of only a few highly sought after 03Žon the market. Panoramic views of the ocean. Utmost at-tention to detail with numerous upgrades. $3,700,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Ritz 1603A 3BR/3.5BA Model residence designed by interna-tionally known interior designer Charles Allem. Gorgeous views of the Ocean, Intracoastal & PB Island. Fully furnished … turnkey. $3,495,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 561.328.7536 Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist Ritz 1904B 2BR/2.5BA This one-of-a-kind luxury residence has been professionally “ nished to the utmost standard of sophistication. The contemporary design is re” ected with clean simple lines and light colors. A large wrap around balcony with glass railings provide stunning views of the ocean and south to Palm Beach. The gourmet kitchen features Italian cabinetry, granite counters and Miele appliances. The master suite and guest suite have ocean views that are truly second to none. This residence is being sold fully furnished. $1,499,000. For a private tour, please call Jeannie Walker (561) 889-6734. FEATURED RESIDENCE

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Itzhak Perlman may well be the worlds best known fiddler. And on March 6, audiences can hear for themselves when the violin virtuoso opens the 8th Annual Festival of the Arts Boca at Mizner Park Amphitheater, accompanied by Festival Orchestra Boca under the direction of Festival Music Director Constantine Kitso-poulos. He also will appear at the festival on March 9, for the Florida premiere of Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for the Soul,Ž his new pro-gram of traditional Jewish and Klezmer music with celebrated Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot. To see Itzhak Perlman live is a once-in-alifetime experience,Ž Charlie Siemon, chair and co-executive producer of the Festival of the Arts Boca, said in a statement. This will be Mr. Perlmans third return to our Festival where he will perform the Mendelssohn Vio-lin Concerto and also present Eternal Echoes, a musical and cultural treat for everyone.ŽPerlman to open Festival of the Arts Boca COURTESY PHOTO Itzhak Perlman will present the Florida premiere of a new work. SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYSEE FESTIVAL, B5 XARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 FLORIDA WEEKLY B1 Things to Do Tommy Tune plays a New Year’s Eve show at The Colony’s Royal Room. B6-9 XDishing on tacosThe Dish pays a lunch visit to The Pelican Cafe. B15 X Sandy Days, Salty NightsA writer’s art of not being a fan girl. B2 X PHOTOS COURTESY OF WARNER BROS., PARAMOUNT PICTURES, DISNEY PICTURES, FOX SEARCHLIGHT; ILLUSTRATION BY ERIC RADDATZ / FLORDIA W EEKLYf i lmsfr e nzyEscape to the movies this season ONE OF THE GREAT THINGS ABOUT THE HOLIday season is spending time with family and enjoying the spirit of giving and togeth-erness the time of year brings. Conversely, one of the worst things about the holiday season is spending time with your family and having to deflect guilt as well as criti-cisms about weight and relationship status,BY DAN HUDAKFlorida Weekly Film Correspondent SEE FILMS, B4 X IN S IDE SocietySee who was out and about in Palm Beach County. B13-14 X

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY DID YOU KNOW? M › ƒ 60,000 ‘—› ƒ ›ƒ‘ ‘ ƒ› ƒ ¦¦ ›— ¦ ›› ¦ EMPTY BOWLS: A HEART HEART HEART WARMING WARMING WARMING FEBRUARY EVENT SAVE THE DATES: FEBRUARY 14th Bethesda–by-the-Sea FEBRUARY 15th West Palm Beach Great Lawn For more information please visit www. pbcfoodbank.org Join the Palm Beach County Food Bank in our fight ag ainst hunger! SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSHow not to be a fan girlIn Making a Literary Life,Ž author Caroline See wisely suggests that we reach out to the people we respect with a brief note of admiration. Its a small world, she says, and a good idea to have our names on the minds of people wed like to associate with. Though I appreciated many of her suggestions in the book, I found this particular one hard to swallow. Im naturally reserved, and it goes against everything I believe to flatter a stranger. Still, from time to time I force myself to send fan mail. Most has been met with radio silence. Until recently.For years, I followed the essays of a particular writer in The New York Times and after reading his most recent piece I thought, What the hell?Ž Before I could reconsider, I dashed off a note and mailed it to him. In addition to telling the essayist how much I enjoyed his work, I asked if he would share the name of an art-ist residency in France he had recent-ly written about. I never expected to hear back. What a treat when, a few weeks later, I received a response from him in the mail. Only I wasnt home to read it. My roommate told me over the phone that an odd-looking post-card had arrived that day. I cant make out the signature,Ž she said, but its from New York.Ž Read it to me.ŽShe hesitated. Isnt it personal?ŽI doubt it,Ž I said.She read the card to me over the phone. In it the essayist thanked me for the kind comments I made about his writing and he gave me the name of the residency in France. My room-mate reached the last line. Im currently „Ž she paused. I cant read this word. It looks like staying. Im currently staying at„,Ž she read the name of a famous retreat overseas. See you there,Ž she read at the end. See you there? Well, thats certain-ly forward, I thought. I smiled a happy little smile and all my natural reservedness disappeared. I decided to write him back that instant. Scribbling the first line that came to mind, I penned something that struck me in the moment as espe-cially witty: But whos watching your cat??Ž I even included two question marks, because I thought it made me look more casual and fun. The response? Radio silence. When I finally came home from my travels and found the original postcard, the one my roommate had read me over the phone, I immediately saw the mistake. He wasnt staying at the famous retreat overseas. He was applying for it. Which means my second message „ But whos watch-ing your cat??Ž „ had reached him at home, where he presumably was watching his own damn cat. I cringed to think how strange my letter must have seemed out of context. My first instinct was to dash off another note to explain away the weirdness of the cat message, but I knew I was already in too deep. I had crossed the line from respectful admirer to creepy fan girl. All I could do was shake my head. Q h l i r t c artis HENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com

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GARDENS/JUPITER WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 B3 1001 East Indiantown Road, Jupiter FL 33477FOR TICKETS: (561) 575-2223 FOR GROUP SALES: (56 1) 972-6117www.jupitertheatre.org LINKEDIN MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PRESENTS JAN 5 at 8:00PMDUBBED THE “BROADWAY BARITONE EXTRAORDINAIRE! BENEFIT CONCERTBRIAN STOKES MITCHELL SIMPLY BROADWAY THE MESMERIZING ACROBATIC TROUPE K==FGF9E=JA;9K?GLL9D=FLJAN 2 at 7:30PM CAPITOL STEPS DEC 31 at 5PM and 8PM THE ANNUAL “EQUAL OPPORTUNITY OFFENDER” COMEDY SMASH! JAN 3 at 7:30PM A TRIBUTE TO FRANKI VALLI AND THE FOUR SEASONS D=LK@9F?GF CIRQUE ZUMA ZUMA JOAN AND ALLEN BILDNERSPONSORED BY:CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE JANUARY 14 FEBRUARY 2 This poignant and inspiring Tony Awardwinning long-running hit musical follows the audition process of theatre gypsiesŽ as they try to land a job in a Broadway show. MASTERS OFMOTOWN JAN 20 at 7:30PM A CELEBRATION OF THE -(K$.(K9F
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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYas if you were swatting flies in the heat of the summer. Movies conveniently offer a respite from the ups and downs of holiday drama. Better, this is the time of year in which theaters are packed with potential Oscar nominees and other quality fare, meaning theres a lot of good stuff to choose from when you venture out. But what to choose? Let my list be your guide. When appropriate, Ive included an indication of the films Oscar chances „ there are some definite must-sees out there for those who want to watch everything prior to Oscar night, which is March 2 (a week later than usual due to the Winter Olympics). If you need a laughAnchorman 2: The Legend ContinuesŽ might not be as funny as its 2004 predecessor, but in the interest of pure, unabashed silliness, its hard to top. If Will Ferrell and company are too juvenile for you, theres Grudge Match,Ž which pits Rocky vs. Raging Bull, or Sylvester Stallone vs. Robert De Niro, as retired boxers in a rematch 30 years after their last bout. Ive only seen the trailer, but humorous comedic turns from Kevin Hart and Alan Arkin suggest its a movie that doesnt take itself seri-ously and has fun with its characters. To dazzle your eyesGravityŽ is absolutely breathtaking, a film that literally allows us to see the Earth in a way that no one other than astronauts has ever experienced. Its a visual marvel and a true sight to behold. Director Alfonso Cuaron and his team literally created the technology needed to shoot the film and render it in such an authentic way, in much the same way as James Cameron did with Avatar.Ž Although GravityŽ lacks the emotion needed for Oscar wins in most major categories, expect it to garner a number of technical awards, such as cinematog-raphy and visual effects. Back down on Earth „ Middle Earth, to be exact „theres The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug,Ž the second part of director Peter Jacksons obnoxious HobbitŽ tril-ogy. The story is more purposeful and driven this time around, and the visual effects nicely accentuate the storytelling. This is a flick for those times when you just feel like a fun fantasy adventure at the theater.To punish those around youRecommend Out of the FurnaceŽ and/or Homefront,Ž two movies that are equally putrid. Send your worst enemies to either one, or to 47 Ronin,Ž which stars Keanu Reeves as a samurai who sets out to avenge the death of his master. Does that sound like a good movie to you? Didnt think so. The film, which had its release delayed for reshoots, got off to a poor start in Japan and isnt screening for press in the U.S. For a $175 million production, thats not good.To touch your heartThe horrors of slavery arent what many want to think about around the holidays, but the best film of 2013,  12 Years A Slave,Ž is the clear Best Picture, Best Director (Steve McQueen), Best Actor (Chiwetel Ejiofor) and Best Sup-porting Actress (Lupita Nyongo) front-runner and is essential viewing for lovers of American history. Just bring Kleenex and be prepared to be appalled. A few best actress contenders are also in feel-good dramas in theaters now: Emma Thompson plays feisty Mary PoppinsŽ author P.L. Travers in Saving Mr. Banks,Ž and Dame Judi Dench is a mother who longs to reconnect with the son she gave up for adoption years earlier in Philomena.Ž Both are solid dramas that come from a place of good and mean well.To let it all flySometimes you just need to release some steam and let loose. Martin Scorseses The Wolf of Wall StreetŽ is three hours of Leonardo DiCaprio committing various acts of shocking debauchery (Oscar prospects for the film are still TBD), and Ben Still-ers The Secret Life of Walter MittyŽ follows a loner and dreamer whos forced out into the world on a grand adventure. Both Walter Mitty and the film itself have notable issues, but its message is a good one. To get the kids to shut upWith its songs, humor and two „ count em, two „ princesses that little girls will want to be for Halloween next year, Disney Animations FrozenŽ is the best animated film of the year. It will compete with the Japanime film The Wind RisesŽ (opens stateside in February) for the Oscar in the Best Animated Film category. Alternatively, if youve already seen Frozen,Ž theres Walking with Dino-saurs,Ž about a baby dino that saves the day.If you need a great storyThe late 70s hair and costumes, the charismatic performances from Chris-tian Bale, Amy Adams and Jen-nifer Lawrence, and the capti-vating con man story told by director David O. Russell all make American HustleŽ one of the best films of 2013. I predict it will compete headto-head with 12 Years A SlaveŽ in most major categories come Oscar time, so its a definite must-see. If your kids are acting like spoiled brats, this will make them thankful for what they haveThe Book ThiefŽ is a World War II drama set in Germany that has under-performed at the box office with only $16 million thus far. Yes, its depressing, but its also powerful and well made, as its rare to see a survival story of a young girl (played nicely by Sophie Nelisse) from inside Nazi Germany. With few material possessions, death all around her (liter-ally and figuratively) and barely enough food, shes stripped of all she has „ and she still finds more than enough to live and thrive. If nothing else, its a nice message during this materialistic time of year. To see what the future looks likeSpike Jonze, the master of existential works with such films as AdaptationŽ and Being John Malkovich,Ž does it again with Her,Ž a futuristic drama starring Joaquin Phoenix as a depressed schmo who has no idea how to be happy. The good news is that he meets and falls in love with Samantha (voice of Scarlett Johansson), and she treats him well. The bad news (maybe) is that Samantha is only a voice on a computer operating system, but does have a personality of her own. The premise is ingenious and plays out wonderfully, with twists we dont expect and an intriguing commen-tary on what a relationship is and can be. This ones not in theaters until Jan. 10; I put it in my list just to ensure it makes it onto yours. We can expect an Best Original Screenplay nomination for Mr. Jonze, and possibly a actor nod for Mr. Phoenix. For music loversThe Coen Brothers (No Country For Old MenŽ) latest, Inside Llewyn Davis,Ž follows the title character (Oscar Isaac) for a week in 1961 as he sleeps on friends couches and acts like a degener-ate. Llewyn is a folk singer dedicated to his art and frustrated that the world hasnt rewarded him financially for it. Nice supporting turns (and songs) from Carey Mulligan and Justin Timberlake make this a unique experience, but arent enough to get us to actually like Llewyn. Its a flawed film that doesnt live up to the Coen Brothers standards, but because of their name, the brothers have an outside shot at a nomination for Best Original Screenplay.Just when you think your family can’t get any worseAt least youre not the Weston clan in August: Osage County.Ž The alcoholic father (Sam Shepard) disappears because he just cant take it anymore. The pill-popping mother (Meryl Streep) is vicious with her daughters (Julia Rob-erts, Julianne Nicholson, Juliette Lewis), and the poor men (Chris Cooper, Ewan McGregor, Dermot Mulroney, Benedict Cumberbatch) „ who arent exactly peaches themselves „ struggle to hold it all together. A tough but rewarding drama, this one opens locally Jan. 10. Finally, while Christmas stories get all the attention, New Years-themed mov-ies are few and far between. If youre looking for something to properly ring in 2014, here are two great films that feature a pivotal scene centered on New Years: The ApartmentŽ (1960), which stars Jack Lemmon giving the best perfor-mance Ive ever seen (yes, ever) as a corporate underling who allows his bosses to use his apartment to carry on affairs, and When Harry Met Sally,Ž in which Billy Crystals Harry wants the rest of his life to start as soon as possible. Happy Holidays! Q FILMSFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTOOscar Isaac and Justin Timberlake star in The Coen Brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis.”PARAMOUNT PICTURES“Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues”FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES“12 Years A Slave”WALT DISNEY PICTURES“Frozen”COURTESY PHOTOBen Stiller in “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”

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DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 B5 Mr. Perlman joins a roster that includes the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, authors James Fal-lows, Daniel J. Levitin and Doris Kearns Goodwin, musician Arturo Sandoval, actress/playwright Anna Deavere Smith and the tenor trio Forte. Mr. Perlmans premiere of Eternal Echoes,Ž with Cantor Helfgot will include beloved liturgical and traditional works in new arrangements, backed by klezmer musicians and a chamber orchestra. Its so easy for him ƒ its just effortless,Ž Mr. Perlman said in the statement, explaining what led him to pursue his inspired collabo-ration with Israeli-born Cantor Helfgot, chief cantor at Park Avenue East Syna-gogue in New York. The men joined together last year for an album, Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for the Soul.Ž If that performance is a first for Florida, the festival also is doing a first as it offers an early bird special, with tickets at $39 for events at the Amphitheater until Jan. 1 (quantities limited). Prior ticket buyers also have priority access to preferred seating at a 20 percent discount off regular prices, regularly priced up to $125. Festival of the Arts Boca runs March 6-15. Since its inaugural year, the festival has attracted such artists as Mr. Perl-man (three times), the Russian National Orchestra, Yefim Bronfman, Vladimir Jurowski, Sir James and Lady Jeanne Galway, Nina Kotova, Helene Grimaud and Yellowjackets. Other artists have included operatic soprano Renee Fleming (twice), solo-ists from the American Ballet Theater, pianist/composer Conrad Tao, and jazz extraordinaire Eldar Djangirov, the U.S. debut of Milos Karadaglic, a classical guitarist from Montenegro, Ballet His-panico, the Jazz Roots production of Piano Latino (Eddie Palmieri, Michel Camilo and Alfredo Rodriguez and their bands), young stars of the Metropolitan Opera, Jackie Evancho, Time for Three; Valentina Lisitsa; Patti Austin and Tony DeSare; Poncho Sanchez; The Wizard of OzŽ andCasablancaŽ set to orchestra performed by the Boca Raton Sympho-nia and conducted by Constantine Kitso-poulos, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, KODO, Amadeus Leopold, Constantine Kitsopoulos, Boca Raton Symphonia, Cameron Carpenter, Valentina Lisitsa, Peter Oundjian, New World Symphony and Audra McDonald. For more information, call 3688445. To purchase tickets, visit www.festivalboca.com or call 866-571-ARTS. Q FESTIVALFrom page 1 COURTESY PHOTO Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot will join violinist Itzhak Perlman at Festival of the Arts Boca.GOODWIN

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOPlease send calendar listings to calendar editor Janis Fontaine at pbnews@flori-daweekly.com. Thursday, Dec. 26 Q Clematis by Night — Dec. 26: No CBN. Info: clematisbynight.net.Q The Greatest Show On Earth — Through Dec. 29 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Super Circus Holiday with elite athletes, acrobats, aerialists and clowns. Showtimes: 1:30 and 7 p.m. Thursday Dec. 26; 1:3 and 7 p.m. Friday Dec. 27; 11 a.m. and 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday Dec. 28; and 11 a.m. and 3 and 7 p.m. Sunday Dec. 29. Tickets start at $15. Tickets: Tick-etmaster.com and 800-745-3000. Info: ringling.com Saturday, Dec. 28 Q Cresthaven Stamp & Postcard Show — 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Dec. 28, Holiday Inn Express, 2485 Metrocentre Blvd. (off 45th Street), West Palm Beach. Info: 969-3432 or 472-7020. Sunday, Dec. 29 Q Jack Hanna: Into the Wild LIVE — Sunday, Dec. 29, at the Sunrise Theatre, 117 S. Second St., Fort Pierce. Tickets: $29-$35 adults. $20 age 12 and younger. 772-461-4775; www.sunrisethe-atre.com Tuesday, Dec. 31 Q Big Band Blast With the Indian River Pops and the New Gar-dens Band — 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 31, PBSC Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets: $35. Info: 561-207-5900; newgardensband.orgQ Happy “Noon” Year Party — 10:30 a.m. to 12:01 p.m. Dec. 31 at the Schoolhouse Childrens Museum & Learning Center, 129 E. Ocean Ave., Boynton Beach. Celebrate the New Year with a balloon drop, an apple juice toast and a rocket launch. Members: $3. Non-members: $4. Info: 742-6780. Q The Indian River Pops and the New Gardens Band perform — 8 p.m. Dec. 31 at the PBSC Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. A Big Band Blast featur-ing musical memories from big band standards to Phantom of the Opera.Ž Includes party hats, favors and refresh-ments $35. Info: 561-207-5900. At The Arts Garage 180 NE First St. in Delray Beach. Info: 450-6357; artsgarage.org.Q The Hummingbird Wars — Jan. 10-Feb. 2. At The Bamboo Room 15 S. J St., downtown Lake Worth. Info: 585-BLUE; bambooroomblues.com Q JP Soars & The Red Hots — 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 27. $10. Q The Long Run Eagles Tribute — 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 28. $12 in advance, $15 day of show. At The Boca Theatre Located at various venues. Info: 948-2601; brtg.org. Q “Respect: A Musical Journey of Women” — Through Jan. 5. Mizner Park Cultural Arts. Musical by Dorothy Marcic details the journey of women through music. Combining excerpts of 60 songs, womens stories are shared about finding dreams, lost love, rela tionship issues, entering the workforce, gaining independence and more. Tickets: $38. Q “Marilyn: Forever Blonde” — Through Jan. 11. A recreation of what might have been Marilyn Monroes last chance to tell her story in her own words. Conceived by award-winning producer and writer Greg Thompson. Tickets: $25 prior to opening; $30 after opening. At The Borland The Borland Center, Midtown, 4885 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Info: 561-904-3139; www.borlandtheater.comQ Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, Jr. — Friday through Sunday and Jan. 3-5. A KWP production of the classic tale based on the book by Linda Woolverton. Lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice. Directed by Kimberly Rommel-Enright. Music direction by Helen B uttery. Showtimes: 2 and 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 and 7 p.m. Jan. 3 and 4 p.m. Sunday Dec. 29 and Jan. 5. Ticket Price: Adult $27, student $21.60, group 10+ $16.20. At The Colony Hotel The Colony Hotel, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Info:655-5430; www.thecol-onypalmbeach.com.Q The Polo Lounge — Tommy Mitchell, pianist, Thursday and Satur-day evenings; Motown Friday Nights with Memory Lane.In the Royal Room:Q Tommy Tune — Tuesday Dec. 31 and Jan 3-4. Tickets: $350 for New Years Eve; $130 for prix fixe dinner and show, $65 show only in JanuaryQ Steve Tyrell — Jan 7-11, 14-18 & 21-25. Tickets: Tues-Thurs $135 for prix fixe dinner and show, $70 show only; Fri-Sat $150 for prix fixe dinner and show, $85 for show onlyQ Marilyn Maye — Jan 2-31 & Feb 1. Tickets: Tues-Sat $120 for prix fixe din-ner and show, $55 show only.Q John Pizzarelli & Bucky Pizzarelli — Feb 4-8. Tickets: Tues-Thurs $125 for prix fixe dinner and show, $60 show only; Fri-Sat $135 for prix fixe din-ner and show, $70 for show onlyQ Clint Holmes — Feb 11-15. Tickets: Tues-Thurs & Sat $130 for prix fixe din-ner and show, $65 show only; Fri (Val-entines Day) $150 for prix fixe dinner and showQ Regis Philbin — Feb. 18-22. Tickets: Tues-Sat $150 for prix fixe dinner and show Q Amanda McBroom — Feb. 25-28 & March 1. Tickets: Tues-Thurs $125 for prix fixe dinner and show, $60 show only; Fri-Sat $135 for prix fixe dinner and show, $70 for show onlyQ Paulo Szot — March 4-8. Tickets: Tues-Thurs $130 for prix fixe dinner and show, $65 show only; Fri-Sat $140 for prix fixe dinner and show, $75 for show onlyQ Melissa Manchester — March 11-15. Tickets: Tues-Thurs $130 for prix fixe dinner and show, $65 show only; Fri-Sat $140 for prix fixe dinner and show, $75 for show only. At Delray Center for the Arts Delray Beach Center for the Arts, Old School Square at 51 N. Swinton Ave. in Delray Beach. Info: 561-243-7922; delray-centerforthearts.org. Q Free Friday Concerts at the Pavilion — 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec 27. Features The People Upstairs. Free. Food trucks and a cash bar. Bring your own seating. Rum Crew, Jan. 3.Info: 561-243-7922, DelrayArts.orgQ School of Creative Arts Showcase — Through Feb. 2; May 1-Sept. 28. Crest Galleries. Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. A multimedia exhibit showcasing draw-ings, paintings, collage, mixed media and photographs by adult and youth students and instructors.Q Cornell Museum Exhibits — Through Feb. 2. Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Thursday until 8 p.m.; Sunday, 1-4:30 p.m. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission: $8 general; $6 seniors and students with ID; free for ages 10 and under. Palm Beach County residents receive free admission every Thursday. Q “ELVIS: Grace & Grit Exhibition” — This fine art photography exhibition is from the CBS photo archive. The collection of 35 large for-mat, candid and on-air photographs, shot by various CBS Television photog-raphers, documents Elvis before the Las Vegas years „ during his meteoric rise to stardom. Flashback: A Retro Look at the 60s & 70sŽ: Reminisce and enjoy a fun display of music, movie and sports memorabilia on loan from the com-munity.Q Holiday Carousel — Through Jan. 1. Monday through Friday, 5-9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday 1-9 p.m. Old School Square Grounds. Rides: $2. At Delray Playhouse The Delray Beach Playhouse, 950 N.W. Ninth St. in Delray Beach. All tickets $30. Group rates available for 20 or more). Info: 272-1281; delraybeachplay-house.com. Q “You Can’t Take it With You” — Feb. 1-16. Q “The Pajama Game” — March 29-April 13.Q “Doubt” — May 24-June 8 At Dramaworks Palm Beach Dramaworks Don & Ann Brown Theatre is at 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Call 514-4042, Ext. 2, or visit www.palmbeach-dramaworks.com. Q “The Lion in Winter” — Through Dec. 6-Jan. 5. Q “Mr. Broadway: George Abbott” — A presentation by J. Barry Lewis, 2 and 7 p.m. Jan. 7. Tickets: $20Q Knowledge & Nibbles — Meet the director and actors of Old Times,Ž 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 29. Tickets: $25 guild members, $30 non-members.Q “Old Times” — Jan. 31-March 2 Q “First Impressions: Frank Verlizzo” — Interview by J. Barry Lewis, 2 and 7 p.m. Feb. 4. Tickets: $20Q Knowledge & Nibbles — Meet the director and actors of Dividing the Estate,Ž 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. March 26. Tickets: $25 guild members, $30 non-members.Q “Dividing the Estate” — March 28-April 27Q “Author, Author: Israel Horovitz” — Interview by Sheryl Flatow, 2 and 7 p.m. April 1. Tickets: $20Q “Granada’s Poet: Federico Garcia Lorca” — A presentation by Mark Perlberg, 2 and 7 p.m. April 8. Tickets: $20Q Knowledge & Nibbles — Meet the director and actors of Tryst,Ž 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. May 14. Tickets: $25 guild members, $30 non-members. At The Duncan Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State Col-lege, 4200 Congress Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 868-3309; www.palmbeachstate.edu/theatre/duncan-theatre.Q Amernet String Quartet — Jan. 8 At The Eissey Palm Beach State College, 11051 Cam-pus Drive off PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens. Tickets at 207-5900, unless otherwise specified, or www.eisseycam-pustheatre.org.Q An Exhibit of Acrylic Paintings by Pat Heydlauff — Through Jan. 15 in the Eissey Campus Theatre Lobby Gallery. At FAU University Theatre, FAUs Boca Raton campus, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Info: fau.edu. Q Brahms Festival XXIII — Jan. 12 At The Four Arts Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Gallery and box office: 655-7226; www.fourarts.org.Q “Illustrating Words: The Wondrous Fantasy World of Rob-ert L. Forbes, poet and Ronald Searle, artist” — Through summer 2015. On display in the Mary Alice For-tin Childrens Art Gallery.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOQ “Deco Japan: Shaping Art and Culture, 1920-1945” — Through Jan. 10. The exhibition is drawn from The Levenson Collection and is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Va. At The JCC The Mandel JCC, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens; 689-7700. QCurrent Events — Join lively discussions covering the most up-to-date topics including national affairs and for-eign relations as it relates to the United States fro 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Mandel JCC, 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Free for members; $5 guests. QClasses for Kids: Tracies Music Together, Pre-School Superstar Sports, Pre-School Tiny Toes Combo Dance: Ballet, Tap and Jazz, Youth Sports Club, Youth Directors Cut Mixed Media Workshop, Youth Ballet and Jazz, Youth Gymnastics, Pre-School Gymnastics are offered. Call for times. QCamp Shalom Winter Break: Game Day — 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 27 QWinter Pre-School Sports Camp — 9 am-4 p.m. Dec. 30. QPre-school Gymnastics Winter Camp — 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 30-31.QCamp Shalom Winter Break Camp: WOW Factory, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 30, and New Years Eve Party 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 31.QYouth Gymnastics Winter Camp — 9 a.m.-12:30p.m. Dec. 30-31 QWinter Sports Camp Second Week — 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 30 QWinter Camp — 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 2QWinter Sports Camp — 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 2QPre-school Sports Camp — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Jan. 2QGymnastics Winter Camp — 9 am-12:30 p.m. Jan. 2 At The Kravis Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Info: 832-7469; www.kravis.org.Q Forbidden Broadway — Alive and Kicking — 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday Dec. 29-30; 1:30 p.m. Satur-day Dec. 28, 7 and 10 p.m. Tueday, Dec. 31. Rinker Playhouse. Tickets start at $39.Q George Balanchine’s “The Nutcracker” performed by the Miami City Ballet — 7:30 p.m. Thursday Dec. 27; 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Friday Dec. 28, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sun-day Dec. 29; and 1 p.m. Monday Dec. 30. Dreyfood Hall. Tickets start at $25.Q Midtown Men, with stars from the original cast of Jersey Boys — Dec. 31. Q New Year’s Concert 2014: Salute to Vienna — 8 p.m. Jan. 1. Q Neil Sedaka — 8 p.m. Jan. 2. Q Gregg Allman — 8 p.m. Jan. 4 Q Audra McDonald — 8 p.m. Jan. 5. Q Duo Amal — 2 p.m. Jan. 5. Part of the Regional Arts Concert Series. At The Lake Worth Playhouse Lake Worth Playhouse, 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Info: 586-6410; lakeworth-playhouse.org Q New Year’s Eve Party — 8 p.m. Dec. 31. A big band concert, hors doeuvres and a champagne toast. Tick-ets: $26-$35.Q The Stonzek Theatre — 709 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Call the theater for show times. Info: 296-9382; www.lakeworthplayhouse.org. At The Lighthouse Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, Lighthouse Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $9 adults, $5 children ages 6-18; children under 6 and active U.S. military admitted free. Chil-dren must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting, call for tour time. RSVP required for tours, 747-8380, Ext. 101. www.jupiterlighthouse.org.Q Twilight Yoga at the Light — Monday Dec. 30. Meet on back porch of Lighthouse Museum 15 minutes before class time. Yoga with Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, on the Lighthouse deck at sunset! All levels. Beginners welcome. Bring a yoga mat and a flashlight. Dona-tion. Class is weather-dependent (check website.) At Living Room Theaters On the campus of Florida Atlantic Uni-versity in Boca Raton, 777 Glades Road. Call 549-2600 or visit fau.livingroomthe-aters.com.Q Films: Blue is the Warmest Color ; The Great Beauty; Twice Born; You Will Be My Son; The Nutcracker; and Mother of George. At Lynn University Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Per-forming Arts Center is at Lynn Univer-sity, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. Info: 237-9000.Q TAP — The Show „ Jan. 4-5 At The Lyric The Lyric Theatre, 59 S.W. Flagler Ave., downtown Stuart. 772-286-7827; www.lyrictheatre.comQ Pure Zeppelin Experience — Saturday, Dec. 28Q Dance Your Pants Off — Jan. 8 At MacArthur Park John D. MacArthur Beach State Park and Nature Center, 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, North Palm Beach. Info: 624-6952 or www.macarthurbeach.org. Q First Day Hike — 10-11 a.m. Wednesday, January 1. Welcome in the new year with a rejuvenating fam-ily friendly trek through a state park. MacArthur will sponsor a free, ranger-led hike on New Years Day as part of the Americas State Parks First Day Hikes initiative. Info: 561-624-6950. Q Learn to Kayak — 10 a.m. Sunday, January 5. A land-based course of the basics, taught by reps from Adventure Times Kayaks. Free with park admis-sion. Info: 561-624-6952. At The Maltz The Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indi-antown Road, Jupiter. Call 575-2223 or Q visit www.jupitertheatre.org.Capitol Steps, New Year’s Eve — 5 and 8 p.m. Tuesday Dec. 31. Tickets: $50, $60 and $85 for VIP. Q Cirque Zuma Zuma — Jan. 2. African acrobatic troupe.Q “Let’s Hang On” — Tribute to Franki Valli and the Four Seasons „ Jan. 3. Q “Simply Broadway” — Jan. 5. A benefit concert for Brian Stokes Mitch-ell. Q “A Chorus Line” — Jan. 14-Feb. 2. Q “Other Desert Cities” — Feb. 16-March 2.Q “The King and I” — March 18-April 6. At The Mos’Art MosArt Theatre, 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Call 337-OPOD (6763) or visit www.mosarttheatre.com.Q Films: Wadjda;Ž Is the Man Who is Tall Happy?Ž; Class.Ž At PBAU Palm Beach Atlantic University, 901 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. Recit-als take place in the Helen K. Persson Recital Hall in Vera Lea Rinker Hall, 326 Acacia Road, West Palm Beach. For tick-ets: 803-2970 or ticketcentral@pba.edu. At Palm Beach Improv Palm Beach Improv, CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach; 833-1812 or palmbeachimprov.com.Q Ralphie May — Thursday through Sunday, Dec. 27-29. Tickets: $25. Two drink minimum. At The Plaza Theatre The Plaza Theatre, 262 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan; 5881820 or www.theplazatheatre.net.Q My Life on a Diet, with Renee Taylor — Jan. 16-Feb. 9. At The PSL Civic Center Port St. Lucie Civic Center, 9221 S.E. Civic Center Place, Port St. Lucie. 772807-4488; ww.cityofpsl.com/civic/index.htmlQ The Rat Pack — Together Again — Jan. 24. Q PSL Concert Band Performances — Jan. 29, March 19 At The Sunrise Theatre Sunrise Theatre, 117 S. Second St., Fort Pierce. Ticket prices vary. 772-461-4775; www.sunrisetheatre.com“Sleeping Beauty” — Jan. 10 Q “Swan Lake” — Feb. 26 At Markets Q Sailfish Marina Sunset Celebration — 6 p.m. Thursdays. Shop for arts and crafts made by artists from around the country. Sailfish Marina, east of the Intracoastal, just south of Blue Heron Boulevard, Palm Beach Shores; 842-8449.Q Jupiter Green & Artisan Market — 5-9 p.m. Fridays, Riverwalk Events Plaza, 150 S. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Free. Includes baked goods, fresh produce, arts and crafts, jewelry, pet products and more. Vendors welcome. Contact Harry Welsh at (203) 222-3574 or visit www.harrysmarkets.com.Q West Palm Beach GreenMarket — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays at Waterfront Commons, downtown West Palm Beach (through May 31). Includes ven-dors selling the freshest produce, baked goods, plants, home goods and more. Admission is free. Parking is free in the Banyan and Evernia garages during mar-ket hours. Info: wpb.org/greenmarket. Q Abacoa Green Market — 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays at Abacoa Town Center, 1200 Town Center Drive, Jupiter. Info: reggie.chasethesun@gmail.com.Q West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market — 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays on Narcissus Avenue, north of Ban-yan Boulevard. For information, search Facebook or call 670-7473.Q Gardens GreenMarket — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, City Hall Municipal Complex, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Come shop at more than 120 vendors with an abundance of just-picked, orchard-grown goods, a wide selection of seasonal vegetables and fruits, fragrant herbs, honey, and home-made old-fashioned breads, doughnuts, pies, cheeses, sauces and handmade crafts. Leave your pets at home. Visit pbgfl.com/greenmarket or call 630-1100. The meats, sauces, jewelry, Q Palm Beach Green Market & Bazaar — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays (through April 27), Commons Park, 11600 Poinciana Blvd., Royal Palm Beach. Shop some of the areas finest vendors selling fruits and vegetables, fresh flowers and plants. Enjoy artisan foods, baked goods and a unique selec-tion of artists and crafters. www.rpb-greenmarket.com. Q Royal Palm Beach Green Market & Bazaar — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. every Sunday. Commons Park, 11600 Poinciana Blvd. Royal Palm Beach, through April 27. Shop some of the areas finest ven-dors selling fruits and vegetables, fresh flowers and plants. Enjoy artisan foods,

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY FREE Eve n t! December 31, 11am-1p “U Carousel Courtyard Kids countdown the Noon YearŽ with carousel rides, games, face painting and other surprises. Enjoy a kid-friendly toast with 97.9 WRMF personalities, party hats, horns & more. WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GObaked goods and a unique selection of artists and crafters. www.rpbgreenmar-ket.com. Q Tequesta Green Market — 9 a.m.-1 p.m., third Saturday of the month through April 2014 (next market is Dec. 21). Constitution Park, 399 Seabrook Road, Tequesta. All items are fresh from the farm. Provides locally-grown vege-tables, fruits, meat, dairy and other farm products, as well as hand-made items to neighbors in the community. Admission is free. Call Wendy at 768-0476. Ongoing Events Q Adolph & Rose Levis Jewish Community Center — Venues vary. 9801 Donna Klein Blvd., Boca Raton. Last Friday of every month: Utopian Strings (free). Info: 561-852-32 00; www. levisjcc.orgQ American Needlepoint Guild — 10 a.m. every second and fourth Monday (next meeting is Dec. 9), 110 Man-grove Bay Way, Jupiter. Call 747-7104 or email mbusler@comcast.net.Q The Artists of Palm Beach County — Small Works Exhibit at Art on Park, 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Most works will be 12 inches by 12 inches or smaller and will be priced at less than $100. Enjoy drinks and refreshments at the opening reception on Black Friday from 5 to 8 pm. The show runs through Dec. 24. Hours are noon-6 p.m. MondaySaturday, extended hours through the holidays until 8 p.m. Friday and Satur-day nights; 345-2842.Q Aqua Pilates — 10-11 a.m. Tuesdays and 5:15-6:15 p.m. Thursdays at the Palm Beach Gardens Aquatic Complex, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. All equipment provided. Drop-In fee is $6 for residents of Palm Beach Gar-dens and $8 non-residents. Call Brittani Benko at 630-1145.Q Barre Pilates Classes — Ages 16 years and up can participate 6:15-7:05 p.m. Mondays at the Burns Road Rec-reation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Garden. Sign up for a 6-week ses-sion or just pay the drop-in fee per class. For more information or to register, visit www.pbgfl.com/recreationandparks or call 630-1100.Q Bingo — Noon every Thursday at the Moose Lodge, 3600 RCA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Lunch available at 11 a.m. Packs start at $15. $250 games. 626-4417.Q Boca Raton Museum of Art — Through Dec. 29: Nancy Davidson: Leter Buck.Ž Through Dec. 29: Dulce Pinzn: The Real Story of the Super-heroes.Ž Through Jan. 5: Caught on FilmŽ: Photography from the Collection. Hours: Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Wednes-days, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. Admission: Free for members and children 12 and under; adults $8; seniors (65+) $6; students (with ID) $5. Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton (In Mizner Park). 561-392-2500; bocamuseum.org.Q Children’s Research Station — Loggerhead Marinelife Center program is designed to exercise childrens science skills through an experimental lab. 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays. Free. 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280.Q Cultural Council of Palm Beach County — Through Jan. 18, Cultural Council headquarters, 601 Lake Ave., downtown Lake Worth. The Deep and the Shallow: Photographers Explor-ing a Watery WorldŽ features work by award-winning photographers. Silent auction: 6-9 p.m. Dec. 12. Free. Call 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com.Q Deep Water Aerobics — In the Palm Beach Gardens Aquatic Com-plex heated pool, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Classes: 9-10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30-11:30 a.m. Fridays at All equipment provided. Drop-In fee is $4 for residents, $5 for nonresidents. Call Brittani Benko at 630-1145.Q Downtown Live — 7 p.m. Fridays, Downtown at the Gardens Cen-tre Court, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Q Flagler Museum — Through Jan. 5: Man of the Century: The Incompa-rable Legacy of Henry Morrison Fla-gler.Ž Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sat-urday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Through April 19: Lunch in Caf Des Beaux-Arts, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, noon-3 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $40 non-members; $22 members. Museum is housed in Henry Flaglers 1902 Beaux Arts mansion, Whitehall, at 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tickets: members free; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; under 6 free. 655-2833; www.flaglermuseum.us. Q Food Truck Pow Wow — 5-9 p.m. the first Friday of the month (next session Dec. 6), Constitution Park, 399 Seabrook Road, Tequesta. Includes live music; admission is free. Info: tequesta.orgQThe Lake Park Public Library — 529 Park Ave., Lake Park. Super Hero Hour, 3:30 p.m. Thursdays for ages 12 and younger; Adult Writing Critique Group, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays for age 16 and older; Anime, 6-7 p.m. Tues-days for age 12 and older. All events are free. 881-3330.QLe Cercle Francais — Francophiles and Francophones can join for a monthly gathering at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month (next session Dec. 12), in members homes. Call 744-0016.

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iVi“Li£]™“‡£"\>“Uniinœ' Countdown the New Year with the band PWL. Join 97.9 WRMF and enjoy live entertainment, specialty acts, party favors, our amazing balloon drop & more. GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B9 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOQLighthouse ArtCenter — Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Through Feb. 15: Chris Gus-tinŽ and Spotlight on New Talent.Ž Third Thursday meets 5:30-7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of the month. Museum admission: $5 ages 12 and older. Free for younger than 12. Free admission on Saturday. 746-3101 or lighthousearts.org.QLighthouse ArtCenter Midtown Gallery — 4877 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Through Jan. 8: Lighthouse ArtCenter Artists Guilds Midtown Bash.Ž Free admission. For an appointment, call 746-3101.QLoggerhead Marinelife Center — 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach. Kids Story Time at 11:30 a.m. Saturdays; Hatchling Tales at 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesdays. Free. Info: marinelife.org.QLoxahatchee River Environmental Center — Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Story time session 9:30 a.m. Thursdays. 743-7123 or www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter.QJohn D. MacArthur Beach State Park and Nature Center — 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, North Palm Beach. Nature walk, 10-11 a.m. daily. Info: 624-6952; www.macarthurbeach.org.QKorean War Veterans Association meets — The Lt. Richard E. Cronan Chapter #17 meets at 9 a.m. the second Sunday of the month at the Palm Beach County Fire Rescue Station 42, 14276 Hagan Ranch Road, Delray Beach. Open to all veterans who served from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953 at any loca-tion, as well as any veterans who has served in Korea since July 27, 1953. The chapter volunteers at functions includ-ing parades, flag-raisings and funerals. Info: Robert Green at 5611-496-5533 or email bobwinwood@bellsouth.net.QMorikami Museum and Japanese Gardens — 4000 Morikami Park Road in Delray Beach. Through Feb. 23: Contemporary Kogei Styles in Japan.Ž Through Feb. 23: Breaking Boundaries: Contemporary Street Fash-ion in Japan,Ž displaying some of the most popular and imaginative clothing styles made and worn on the streets of Japan today. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Info: 495-0233; morikami.org QThe North Palm Beach Library — 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach. Knit & Crochet, 1-3 p.m. Mon-days; Kids Crafts for ages 5-12, 2 p.m. Fridays. 841-3383, www.npblibrary.org. QNorton Museum of Art — 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Through Jan. 12: New Work/New Directions: Recent Acquisitions of PhotographyŽ and L.A. Stories: Videos from the West Coast.Ž Through Jan. 26: The Four Princely Gentlemen: Plum Blossoms, Orchids, Bamboo, and Chrysanthe-mums.Ž Through Feb. 23: Phyllida Bar-low: HOARD.Ž Through March 23: The Polaroid Years: Instant Photography and Experimentation.Ž Through Aug. 31: Faux Real,Ž by Mickalene Thomas. Art After Dark 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. (Closed on Mondays and major holi-days). Admission: $12 adults, $5 students with a valid ID, and free for members and children age 12 and younger. Half-price admission every Thursday. Special group rates are available. West Palm Beach residents receive free admission every Saturday with proof of residency. Palm Beach County residents receive free admission the first Saturday of each month with proof of residency; 832-5196 or norton.org.QPalm Beach Photographic Centre — In City Center, 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach. Through Jan. 4: Memories from Friends of Palm Beach Photographic Centre.Ž Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Info: 253-2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org.QPalm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society — 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Wings Over WaterŽ Bird Show: 11 a.m. weekdays; 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. weekends. Wild Things ShowŽ: 1 p.m. weekdays; noon weekends. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Tickets: $18.95 adults; $16.95 seniors, $12.95 age 3-12, free for younger than 3. Info: 533-0887; www.palmbeachzoo.org. QThe South Florida Science Center and Aquarium — 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. Science Nights: 6-9 p.m. the last Friday of the month. Members: Adults $5, Children: free; Non-Members: Adults $12, Chil-dren $8 (3 and under free). Planetarium shows and mini-golf are not included in event admission. Titanic: The Artifact ExhibitionŽ: Through April 20. Tickets: $13 adults, $9.50 age 3 to 12; $11.50 for seniors 62 and older. Members and chil-dren younger than 3 are free. 832-1988 or visit www.sfsm.orgQSunday on the Waterfront Concert Series — Free concerts the third Sunday of each month from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Meyer Amphitheatre, downtown West Palm Beach. Info: 822-1515 or wpb.org/sow/. QWick Theatre & Costume Museum — The Broadway Collection is an exhibit of costumes by the most honored and respected designers in the history of the American theater. Tours are led by theater professionals who give the visitor a behind-the-scenesŽ look at the work of iconic designers. The Wick is open for tours, luncheons and high tea events. Tours typically start between 11 and 11:30 a.m. and are available from individual admissions to groups by appointment only. All tours include a guided journey through the collection and lunch. Tour & Luncheon (off-season): $38. 7901 N. Federal High-way, Boca Raton. 995-2333 or thewick.org. Q

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Q CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Dont just wait out that unexpected and unexplained delay in your career move. You could gain added respect if you ask why it happened and what you can do to move things along. Q AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Although your workplace strategies usually are accepted, you could be chal-lenged by someone who isnt so favorably impressed. Be prepared to defend your positions. Q P ISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your friendship circle expands, with new people coming into your life at this time. Welcome them warmly. But dont neglect those cherished longtime personal relation-ships. Q ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Its a good time to take a much-needed break from your recent hectic schedule and spend some time in quieter surroundings. Impor-tant news could arrive early next week. Q TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Taurean traits of reliability and thorough-ness could be well-tested when decision-makers consider your proposals and/or requests. Be prepared to answer some prob-ing questions. Q GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A sudden attack of boredom leaves you with some tasks undone. Its OK to take a short respite. But get back to work by weeks end so that you have time for other projects. Q CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Avoid prejudging a situation just because it looks bad. Facts could emerge that would make your position uncomfortable, to say the least. A relative has interesting news to share with you. Q LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is a good time to begin reassessing some of your recent decisions about your long-range goals to see if they still have merit. Spend more time with loved ones this weekend. Q VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) An unsettled situation at home or on the job early in the week could drain your energy levels, making it difficult to get your work done on schedule. But things improve by midweek. Q LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A temporary setback could give you time to go over your plans to find weak-nesses you might have overlooked before. A romantic getaway with that special person is favored this weekend. Q SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Professional and personal situations benefit once you set a positive tone in getting things off to a good start. Honest dialogue smoothes over any occasional dis-play of balkiness. Q SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A problem with workplace colleagues or family members seems to defy even your sage counsel. But be patient. Your words eventually will lead to a resolu-tion. Q BORN THIS WEEK: You love to search for knowledge and share it with others. You would make an especially fine teacher. Q PUZZLES HOROSCOPES BAD MOVES By Linda Thistle +++ Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: W SEE ANSWERS, B12 W SEE ANSWERS, B12 GET READY TO BE DAZZLED Huge Selection of Faux Custom Florals, Trees and Home AccessoriesOur Goal is to exceed your expectations.... 561-691-5884 CRYSTAL TREE PLAZA64)XZt/PSUI1BMN#FBDI 0QFO.POo4BUoQN

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GARDENS/JUPITER WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 B11 Whether its covering your employees or your family, weve got you under our wing.TO LEARN MORE ABOUT AFLAC, CONTACT: Andrew Spilos (561) 685-5845 andrew_spilos@us.aac.com Coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus. Where Nantucket meets the Florida Keys Enjoy upscale American and Authentic Italian cuisine.Popular Dishes Include: Filet Mignon, Eggs Benedict, Tuscan Pizzas and Paninis, Homemade Lobster Ravioli, Stuffed Veal Chops, Fresh Fish Daily and Homemade Desserts!"#,$,!,#!% Visit our website for menu, directions and operating hours thepelicancafe.com Reservations: 561.842.7272 612 US Hwy. 1, Lake Park, FL 33403 mile south of Northlake Blvd. Chef/Owner/Operators Mark Frangione & Karen Howe Formerly from Greenwich, CT Live Music Monday Nights Dance Party Begins January 6th, 2014 Featuring Hal & Diane 6:30pm 9:30pm >> Jason Belfort started writing the book on which the movie is based while he was in prison. Also, according to investorplace.com, he has only paid off $11.6 million of his $110 million government ne. +++ Is it worth $10? YesMoney, drugs and hookers are a dangerous combination for anyone. When put in the hands of a hotshot young stockbroker without a conscience, they can be deadly. In the case of Jordan Belfort (Leonar-do DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street,Ž he has a mansion, yacht, pri-vate jet, six cars, a steady supply of cocaine and everything else money can buy. Debauchery isnt a habit for him; its a way of life. Jordan is not an easy person to like, but he sure is fun to watch. He doesnt believe in excess, theres no such thing as taking it too farŽ and his hedonism results in antics we enjoy observing. Its the late 80s, so anything goes. Hes a terrible role model in many ways but, man, does the guy know how to have a good time. Right-hand man Donnie (Jonah Hill), whos socially awkward yet just as big a party animal as Jordan, masturbates in pub-lic the first time he sees Jordans future wife Naomi (Margot Robbie), who in all fairness is stunningly gorgeous. Yes men, well-wishers, enablers and moochers surround Jordan and Donnie, but theyre making millions pushing bad stocks, so they dont care. A few people are brutally honest with them: Jordans father Max (Rob Reiner) is a temperamental voice of reason, attorney Manny Riskin (Jon Favreau) gives a few reality checks and, most importantly, FBI agent Patrick Denham (Kyle Chandler) makes it clear hes keeping an eye on Jordan. How did Jordan get this way? His first day on the job he meets Mark (Matthew McConaughey), whom Jordan is impressed to hear earned $1 million last year. Mark takes him to lunch, tells him how the busi-ness really works and how to succeed in it. Mr. McConaughey is an absolute treat in these scenes, oozing sleaze and style, complete with puffy hair and a perpetual grin of self-satisfaction. The only shame is that he doesnt return after teaching these important lessons. Director Martin Scorseses (The DepartedŽ) film is based on a true story, with the screenplay written by Terence Winter from a book of the same name by the real Jordan Belfort. One imagines, given the source, that theres some embellishment in the craziness of the parties and stories depicted here, but so be it „ truth is not imperative for the enjoyment of moviegoers. What is impor-tant, and at least feels authentic, is the roll-ercoaster life Mr. Belfort led and how well his story is told. Mr. Scorsese is on top of his game, seemingly every few minutes finding something new for Jordan to take to an extreme. Because Jordan is out of control for so much of the three-hour movie, we often laugh at his craziness, knowing that ribald boys will be boys. In some ways, the film takes a similar structure to Goodfellas,Ž chroni-cling a lavish life of gran-deur that anyone would want followed by a pre-cipitous fall. The regret in the end is not for sins committed, but rather for not covering tracks better so those sins can continue. Watching Jordan, its as if he saw Michael Douglas Gordon Gekko in Wall StreetŽ (1987) and said, Thats what I wanna to be!Ž Greed is, indeed, good for a while, but in the end, as it often does, avarice becomes his undoing. Mr. Scorsese doesnt lay it on too thick in condemning Jordan for his mis-deeds; doing so would, by extension, throw scorn at the audience for enjoying watch-ing him be so naughty. But the director and longtime editor Thelma Schoonmaker do maintain the proper energy and tempo throughout. The Wolf of Wall StreetŽ is full of shocking moments you will not soon forget and a morality thats nowhere to be found. Its an absolute trip. Q LATEST FILMSThe Wolf of Wall Street i e s a B t dan HUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com CAPSULESAmerican Hustle ++++ (Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper) Con man Irving (Mr. Bale) and his partner Sydney (Ms. Adams) are forced to assist an overzealous FBI agent (Mr. Cooper) in sting operations in late 70s New York. Funny, tense and brilliantly acted, the story keeps you guessing and its a helluva lot of fun. One of the best movies of the year. Rated R.Saving Mr. Banks +++ (Emma Thompson, Tom Hanks, Colin Farrell) Walt Disney (Mr. Hanks) and his creative team endure the difficulties of author P.L. Travers (Ms. Thompson) as they work to adapt Travers Mary Pop-pinsŽ into a movie. The Mary PoppinsŽ pre-production scenes are a trip, especially for those who love that film, but Ms. Trav-ers flashbacks to her childhood with her alcoholic father (Mr. Farrell) weigh the narrative down. Rated PG-13. Q

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B12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY classicalsouth”orida.org Classical Music.Its In Our Nature. Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. Its in your nature. FLORIDA WRITERSFaith and folly vie in mystical murder mysteryQ RitualsŽ by Mary Anna Evans. Poisoned Pen Press. 286 pages. Hard-cover $24.95, Trade Paper $14.95. In her eighth Faye Longchamp Mystery, Mary Anna Evans sets her archaeolo-gist heroine down in a Spiritualist enclave in western New York. Her rather tedious task here is to help professionalize a town museum in fic-tional Rosebower, lending her credentials and industry to assessing the archives and artifacts that have piled up over the years. Fayes scientific training makes her a skeptic regarding the psychic readings industry that flourishes in Rosebower, but shes curious „ as is her recently adopt-ed daughter, 17-year-old Amande, who is assisting her on this assignment. The big mystery is whether or not all this Spiritualist stuff is simply artful quackery „ or is it earnest mass delusion? the immediate mystery, however, has to do with the death of Tilda Armistead, the communitys most prominent practitio-ner of channeling communication with the dead. Soon after performing an eerie sance that Faye attended, Tilda miraculously escaped from her burning home only to expire soon after from smoke inhala-tion. Avery, the fire inspector assigned to investigate, feels that the evidence points to arson and probably murder. Indeed, the door to the room Tilda escaped from had been nailed shut just ahead of the conflagration. But who would mur-der one of the towns most revered citizens? And with what motive? And how in the world did Tilda get out of that room? The cautious, deliberate and determined fire inspector unofficially teams up with Faye, multiplying the investigative brainpower. Ennis LeBecque, in a stumbling and suspicious fashion, cares for his great-aunt Sister Momma, a semi-invalid whose herb and root elixirs are in great demand. Ennis is learning the business and build-ing its online presence. However, he has something at stake that might lead him to doctor his aunts medications in ways harmful to her and to patrons such as Tilda and Tildas sister, Myrna. Tilda, after all, had been the town council leader and a key property owner controlling land on which a shady entrepreneur, Gilbert Marlowe, p lans to build an attractive tourism development. Ennis is looking for part of that action, as is Willow, Tildas son-in-law and assistant to his wife, Dara, who practices the psychic arts in a showy manner that has not been respected by her mother or her Aunt Myrna. If Dara believes that she is her mothers heir, she could have a lot to gain, as could Willow, by inheriting land needed for Marlowes project. If Myrna, already a significant landholder, is the heir, then her life could be in jeopardy. Is it a coinci-dence that her health is deteriorating with alarming speed? Watching events unfold in Rosebower is the novels most intriguing supporting character, Antonia Caruso. Better known in her younger days as the magician Toni the Astonisher, Antonia is prepar-ing an expos of what she believes is fraud in the Spiritualism business. Inter-spersed among the numbered chapters of the novel are delightfully mean-spirited excerpts from her work-in-progress titled Working notes for Pulling the Wool Over Our Eyes: An Unauthorized History of Spiritualism in Rosebower, New York.Ž The author Evans uses this alternate narrator to good purpose. As the main line of the novel progresses, readers become more and more suspicious of even the most selfless and renowned practitioners of the psychic arts. Little tricks of decep-tion are revealed. But Toni the Astonisher „ who is also Antonia the doubter „ becomes less and less interested in bringing harm to the town and its citizens through her expos. She comes to have some sympathy for the Armistead sisters and for those whose lives are touched in positive ways by sin-cere practitioners. Indeed, she recognizes that a bit of showmanship does not turn a believing psychic into a quack. Suspense, atmosphere and intriguing characters all coalesce within an unusual premise to make RitualsŽ and its award-winning author likely candidates for even greater recognition. Q „ Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. phil JASONpkjason@comcast.net l o w a n de lo ac T a D t s h Evans PUZZLE ANSWERS

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B13PALM BEACH SOCIETY Festival of Trees at Ann Norton Sculpture GardensLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Missi Groller, Trent Stephens, Deanna Dunn and Danielle Parenti Kevin Clark and Montana Pritchard Peter Revson and Susan Cummings Daniel Smith, Julia Harris, Gergana Shipley and Melody JonesCynthia Palmieri, Jose Ama and Karyn Lamb Ryan Yeager and Courtney Yeager Becky Nye, Rick Goodwin, Richard Berman and Joseph PubillonesEmily Kirsche, Thelma Kirsche, John Kirsche and Scot Kirschez Hilary Jordan and Dack Patriarca Rona Goldberg and Robert GoldbergVanessa Paulman, Rowna Paulson and Issac Paulson ANDREW SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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B14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYPALM BEACH SOCIETY White Truffle Dinner, Palm Beach Wine Auction Kick-off at TreviniLikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeeklyPalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Jeffery Bland and Jane MitchellCraig Menin and Shelley Menin Mitchell Rubenstein, Laurie Silvers, Hali Utstein and David Silvers Gianni Minervini, Claudia Minervini, Cindy Mandes and Ted Mandes Mariann Tenaglia and Steve Colanero Jeff Sabean and Gina SabeanChristine Rivard and Martin Rivard Steven Gottlieb and Laurie Gottlieb John Kessler and Henni Kessler Carolyn Sloane and Richard Sloane COURTESY PHOTOS / CORBY KAYE’S STUDIO PALM BEACH

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF DECEMBER 26, 2013-JANUARY 1, 2014 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15 Jenny Elfving, Shaina Wizo v and Wendy HendryxFLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE THE DISH Highlights from local menus ELLIOT TAYLOR / FLORIDA WEEKLY Arianna Young, Molly Fried and Sam EndeChelser Reed and Dylan ReedDebra Knotts and Mackenzie KnottsChristina Tosi Tyler Hubbuch and Beth HubbuchMagnolia Lang and V irginia SinickiThe Dish: Chicken tacos The Place: Pelican Cafe, 612 U.S. Highway 1, Lake Park; 842-7272 or pelicancafe.com. The Price: $14.95 The Details: We love visiting Pelican Cafe for its doughnuts. Thats right „ doughnuts. During a recent visit we were treated to a basket of the decadent cake doughnuts that had just the right amount of sweetness. But its not all about doughnuts.Pelican Cafe also is a serious breakfast place, with omelets and Benedicts, pancakes and waffles. The restaurant also offers serious lunch and dinner menus, and it was lunch that drew us to the place for pizzas, fresh fish and these heavenly tacos. The soft tacos were stuffed with tender chicken and crisp lettuce, then topped with avocado and driz-zled with a subtle chipotle-infused sauce. Our server brought us a dish of jalapeo slices to pair with the tacos, as well as a selection of hot sauces. Also worthy of note: those huge sweet onion rings served on the side. They were crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and we were stuffed. Q „ Scott Simmons P .B. Food and Wine Festival, Four SeasonsJOHN SESSA / FLORIDA WEEKL Y

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Enter to win tickets to the 2014 Orange Bowl. A grand prize winner will score four lower level corner tickets to the game and four tailgating tickets … now thats a touchdown! A second place winner will receive two upper level corner tickets. Enter to win so you can cheer your team on to victory in 2014.One entry per person. Must be 18 years or older to enter. Contest ends at 4 p.m. on Dec. 30, 2013 IN THE KNOW. IN THE NOW. Enter at www.facebook.com/” oridaweeklypalmbeach and click on Orange Bowl Game Giveaway WIN TICKETSits on us.

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY REACHING PALM BEACH COUNTY’S MOST AFFLUENT READERS Florida Weekly’s monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living Better living living healthyDecember 2013 Healing Integrative Medicine at Jupiter Medical CenterBody, Mind, Spirit very year, millions of people see a health-care professional for symptoms that diagnostic tests cant explain. In many of these patients, the cause of illness is underlying stress, particu-larly stress that isnt fully recognized. Managing stress „ as well as any health con-dition „ is all about taking charge of your thoughts, emotions and the way you deal with problems. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Pro-gram combines the best of E BY MARK GOCKE, MDBoard Certified, Orthopedic SurgerySEE SPIRIT, C7 X

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Nice and easy does it, part IIWhen planning travel for the elderly keep the old adage, Nice and easy does itŽ in mind. I learned this from experi-ence when traveling with my dad on his occasional pilgrim-ages to Las Vegas. Dad loved playing slot machines and to him, Vegas was the ultimate vaca-tion destination. The problem was that as Dad aged, 60 years of smoking and a nasty bout with tuberculosis (a souvenir of the Korean War) had given him poorly func-tioning lungs and chronic obstructive pul-monary disease. Not to be deterred by his shortness of breath, dad relished a trip to Vegas despite the fact that traveling from Florida to Vegas requires a five-hour flight in an airline cabin pressurized to an altitude of 4,500 feet. (Think of Mile High Stadium in Denver and the visiting teams gasping from the thin air.) Basically, as air rises, gases expand allowing less oxygen per each breath. This, in turn, makes breathing more difficult for people with respiratory concerns. For healthy people this is a minor concern. After a long flight we may feel tired and claim to be jet lagged.Ž Actually, this jet lag may be a mild case of hypoxia (depleted red blood cells) caused by extended time at the high pressurized cabin altitude. After a rest and some time near sea level, breath-ing the more dense air, people with healthy lungs feel better and claim to be over the jet lag. The red blood cells are reenergized by the more dense air at lower altitudes. Flying is a much greater concern for the elderly who may have health related breathing difficulties. This could result in minor respiratory distress or become a major health risk. For my dad, simply taking things nice and easyŽ made all the difference. For those with more advanced medical concerns, it is best to first check with your health care professional. Your doctor may advise you to travel with supplemental oxygen. Just one to three liters of O2 can make all the difference. Most major airlines allow the use of portable oxygen concentra-tors, when accompanied by a prescription signed by a doctor. Many home medical/oxygen suppliers will rent an oxygen con-centrator on a weekly basis. To avoid any problems, make sure to check in advance with the airline for a list of approved equip-ment. It would also be wise to consider the help and assistance of a medical escort, especially if traveling alone or with another elderly person. If one should find themselves in need of a professional medical escort, Air Trek is always more than happy to help. We have a Commercial Airline Medical Escort Service set in place to meet international and long distance transportation needs for those who require or desire assistance onboard a commercial aircraft. Air Trek will take care of everything including booking airline tickets, helping with navigation through crowded airports (especially useful around the holidays), getting one to their desired destination and any additional needs that may arise. Traveling to see family and friends or even a trip to Vegas, may be enjoyed by the elderly, just remember: Preplanning and nice and easyŽ does it. Q „ Dana Carr is an airline transport pilot and serves as director of operations for Air Trek Inc., which is family owned and operated since 1978, and specializes in helping people travel throughout the world. Air ambulance information is available at www. medjets.com. Aircraft charter and luxury travel info is available at www.airtrek.aero.Are you getting too much sleep?Too much sleep? Theres no such thing these days, is there? With todays fast-paced life-style, theres barely enough time to grab enough sleep let alone too much. However, if you sleep eight hours a night or more and still awake less than refreshed, chances are youre getting too much sleep. What you need is not more sleep, its qual-ity sleep. Quality sleep allows us to awake feeling refreshed and full of energy, ready to power through the day. It also allows us to sleep less hours, freeing up more time for us to do the things we want. A lot of people assume that because theyre feeling tired all day or have a midafternoon slump that they need more sleep. Not true! A lot of people believe that because they may have had a couple of late nights, they have to catch up by having extra sleep. Also not true! Sleeping for too long can damage your circadian rhythm. The circa-dian rhythm is your 24-hour clockŽ controlled by a central part of the brain. This clock tells us when we are sleepy by alter-ing the body temperature by a few degrees. When the body temperature is lowered, we feel sleepy. Conversely when it is raised, we feel awake and alert. When we sleep for a longer time, our body temperature does not rise as fast. This is why we feel sleepy and sluggish in the mornings. The more tired we feel, the less physical activity we do. Inactivity keeps the body temperature down so it creates a vicious cycle. Our body doesnt get exposed to sufficient sunlight to lower our melatonin levels, so we stay sleepy throughout the day. The deeper stages of sleep (stages 3 and 4) are the most restorative. This is where the body regenerates. Most of stage 3 and 4 sleep takes place in the first 4 hours of our sleep. The rest of the night is spent in REM (dreaming) sleep and the lighter stages. Stages 3 and 4 are also where the immune system repairs and strengthens itself. It is vital to get this type of quality sleep. A good start is to make sure we get enough activity during the day, this gives us a three-fold benefit. It gets us out into the sunlight, which reduces our melatonin levels, it raises our body temperature so we feel energized and it tires us in a healthy way so we can have more deep sleep. Q C2 healthy living DECEMBER 2013-JANUARY 2014 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY #VSOT3PBEr1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt pbgmc.com UnE-* r-1,r,9U/"/" /-1,r,9U-*",/-rn rU",/"*rn,r Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to enjoy the course, the game, and be the healthiest you can be. Our team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS have trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. If you take care of your game on the course, we will take care of your orthopedic needs off the course.Call 561-625-5070 for a referral to an orthopedic surgeon or visit pbgmc.com. -iˆ}…i œ`->`>` ˆ "…œi`ˆV n >i ',œ>`U*>“i>V…>`iUL}“VVœ“ Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center ORTHOPEDIC CARE Dr. Michael PapaCHIROPRACTOR(561) 744-7373www.papachiro.com Dana CarrAIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT AND DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS FOR AIR TREK INC.(941) 639-7855 www.medjets.com www.airtrek.aero

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com DECEMBER 2013-JANUARY 2014 healthy living C3 Palm Beach1800 Corporate Blvd., N.W.Suite 302Boca Raton, FL 33431561.665.4738 Fort Lauderdale200 East Las Olas Boulevard19th FloorFort Lauderdale, FL 33301954.522.2200 (telephone)954.522.9123 (facsimile)3D technology provides state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment for dental implant surgery I n the past, placing dental implants involved a lot of guesswork. Dentists used to rely on traditional black-and-white X-rays, which displayed only two-dimensional images, inaccurate in size and detail. The dentist could not see the bone, soft tissues or surrounding vital structures beneath the gums, so he would have to approximate the location of surgical implant placement. X-rays are fine for finding decay in teeth, but for dental implant surgery, 3D CT scans are now considered the standard of careŽ in modern dentistry. A CT scan is a volumetric image of your teeth, jaws, and surrounding vital structures. It shows, in high resolution and unparalleled detail, structures not visible with traditional X-rays. 3D CT scans provide both three-dimensional and cross-sec-tion views that are much more accurate than traditional two-dimensional X-rays. These 3D computerized images provide detailed views of the facial structures that enable a qualified dentist to determine the quantity and quality of bone as well as bone density where the implants will be placed. Vital structures such as nerves and sinuses are precisely located to add a great mea-sure of safety not offered with traditional X-rays. With a 3D CT scan, the doctor can properly assess your specific case to deter-mine if youre eligible for dental implants, whether bone grafting is necessary and plan precisely where to place the implants With this information, the dentist can determine the proper treatment approach for each individual patient, including the correct implant type, size and position for optimal implant placement. These scans make implant placement more efficient and predictable while dramatically reducing the time a patient spends in the den-tal chair. Cone beam CT technology emits very small amounts of radi-ation for the CT scan. In fact, the imaging requires less radiation than a traditional X-ray and the cone beam technology emits 80 to 100 times less radiation than a traditional medical grade CT scan of the same area.You are seated in an open area unlike an MRI scan-and the CT scanner moves around your head. The scan will take place in the dentists office and takes only 19 seconds.„ Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He is an active member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists. Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology.He focuses his practice on complete dental restoration, surgical placement of dental implants, cosmetic smile design and sedation dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been serving patients in his Palm Beach Gardens office since 1987. COURTESY IMAGES 3D scans provide detailed views of the facial structures that enable a qualified dentist to determine the quantity and quality of bone as well as bone density. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A.PGA CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY 7100 FAIRWAY DR. SUITE 59 PALM BEACH GARDENS561-627-8666PGADENTISTRY.COM

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P rior to his October 2012 Iron-man, OYM Performance Cen-ter owner Matt Goforth knew he needed to carefully plan for ways to tend to his bodys recovery not just after but also during the race. Coach Matt knew the dangerous effects that NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) can have on an already overactive liver, so he turned to a well-tested product by Hammer Nutrition to complement his integrative medical approach to wellness. Naturally formulated Hammer Tissue Rejuvenator is a gluten-free product. One of its components, turmeric, is a highly effective anti-inflam-matory, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic agent. Turmeric contains curcumin, which Hammer Nutrition indicates has liver protecting and anti-biotic properties as well. During my Ironman race, I kept several capsules of Tis-sue Rejuvenator handy in a pouch. Every two hours, I took a couple along with water,Ž said Matt. The Hammer Tissue Rejuvenator capsules helped Matt manage his pain throughout the Ironman event and the following day in a safe, natu-ral way with minimal detri-mental effects to his liver. Not only did the product help Matt pre-vent tissue and joint injuries, it provided his system with nutrients to reduce sore-ness while pro-moting rapid tissue repair. The product contains several well-known and non-traditional components. Glucosamine sulfate is a raw material found in joint cartilage, ligaments and tendons that helps to promote elasticity of joint movement. It also functions as a mild anti-inflammatory. Like glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate is another important building block for the repair of damaged cartilage, which also promotes lubrication and cushion-ing in the joints. Additionally, Tissue Rejuvenator contains methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), which has been reported to decrease arthritic joint pain, enhance wound healing, and reduce allergic symptoms. Depending on the severity of injury, Matt recommends taking four capsules about once or twice per day with plenty of fluids. If I feel some soreness coming on after a harder training session, then Ill take a capsule or two for prevention purposes to keep from needing any NSAIDS,Ž he said. Tissue Rejuvenators unique blend of various enzymes not only aids in the complete absorption of the nutrient components in the product, but it provides potent anti-inflammatory benefits. Along with tur-meric, additional herbs such as boswellia serrata, Devils Claw and Yucca Root offer anti-viral, anti-fungal and antibacterial health benefits. According to the company, the water-soluble flavonoid known as quercetin that it contains may also act as an anti-histamine. Aside from its patented undenatured Type II Col-lagen (UC-II), which is derived from chicken ster-num cartilage, this product is primarily plant-based. However, it is not recom-mended for clients with shellfish aller-gies even though its glu-cosamine sul-fate is made from the shells rather than the flesh of the ani-mals. Tissue Rejuvenator also contains chondroitin sulfate that is composed of shark cartilage. Stop by the OYM Performance Center today. Owners Julie and Matt Goforth will be happy to introduce you to their complete nutrition line and other integrative medicine products. Theyre ready to discuss any additional questions you might have regarding ways to enhance your overall health and wellness. Q C4 WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 2, 2014 GARDENS/JUPITER 2632 Indiantown Road 9089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37Jupiter Palm Beach Gardens561.744.7373 561.630.9598 XXX1BQB$IJSPDPNt 20 Years in Jupiter & Palm Beach Gardens! WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director Over 20 years in Palm Beach County Get Back in the Game Full Physical Therapy Facility Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY Auto Accident? School Physical, Camp Ph ysical, S ports Physical $ 20 GIFT CERTIFICATECOMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATION This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 01/17/2014. $150VALUE $150VALUE OYM Performance Center offers holistic alternative for tissue rejuvenation Robin Bradley HanselGreen Treehouse Media, LLCwww.oymbike.com(561) 842-2453 ON YOUR MARK PERFORMANCE 819 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY LAKE PARK

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com DECEMBER 2013-JANUARY 2014 healthy living C5 Complete Dentistry in One State -of-the-Art Facility. PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry is where patients from all over South Florida have been seeking outstanding care since 1987.'U-D\$MPRLVXQLTXHO\TXDOLHGDPRQJPRGHUQGD\GHQWLVW EHFDXVHKHVQRWRQO\DQ DFFRPSOLVKHGFRVPHWLFDQGUHVWRUDWLYHGHQWLVWKHVDOVR&HUWLHG'HQW DO,PSODQW6XUJHRQ %RDUG&HUWLHGLQ,96HGDWLRQHis state-of-the-art facility in Palm Beach Gardens is equipped with the most modern technology for optimum treatment and superior patient satisfaction. This unique concept in DGYDQFHGHQWLVWU\RIIHUVSDWLHQWVWKHEHQHWVDQGFRQYHQLHQFHRIKDYLQJ DOOWKHODWHVWIRUPV of dental implant, cosmetic and restorative procedures completed with total comfort in one H[FHSWLRQDORIFH See more atPGAdentistry.comCall 561-627-86663*$1DWLRQDO/$)LWQHVV3OD]D‡3*$%OYGNew Patient Complimentary Consult or 2nd opinion. Before BeforeAfter After“I feel so much younger and healthier after having my smile repaired. “The sedation kept me totally relaxed and comfortable. Dr. Ajmo and his staff were wonderful.” ~Thanks, KarenThe holiday guide to divorce T here is a common belief that the two most difficult situ-ations a person can face are death and divorce. This is not exactly true. It is not uncommon for at least one of the prospective divorces to be wellƒenthused. Some-times both people agree that separating is a logical and healthy thing to do. Regard-less of whether or not you are the one being left, or the one leav-ing, there is one common truth, a new chapter is beginning. With the holidays upon us, particularly New Years Eve, it seems a good time to reflect upon our lives, and make a few resolutions about how to best move forward. In order to gain a bit of perspective Id like to first look back and consider just what this marriage thing is all about. In todays world, the institution of marriage has become a complex amal-gamation of religion, commerce, societal norms, and marketing. This was not always the case. A historical view of western civilization shows us that mar-riage used to be about consolidating power and wealth, specifically real prop-erty, more than it ever was about love. In many cultures in the world arranged marriages are common, and the concept of love more accurately describes the respect and familiarity that is bred from a long and successful union, as opposed to the sympathetic chemical and physical reaction that we expect almost immedi-ately upon meeting a prospective mate. It seems today people are motivated to marry as a result of Hollywood and Madison Avenues glorified spin on love and relationships. Religion is also an enthusiastic proponent of marriage as a preferred lifestyle, and some might argue that the reason for this is to encourage the propagation of future devotees. Whatever ones rea-son to get married in todays world, the specter and reality of divorce cannot be ignored. In order to survive, and in fact prosper, in the face of divorce a key element must be a profound respect for reality. It is no secret that the holidays are especially difficult for those people going through the turmoil of a divorce. You cannot turn on the television dur-ing this time of year without being assaulted by endless programming depicting happy families gathered around a turkey, a tree, or some other Norman Rockwell-esque scene. It is important to remember that these vari-ous vignettes are not real, the people in them are actorsƒacting happy. This is no more representative of real life than the sitcom Glee. The key to survival during the holidays is to step outside your person-al situation and appreciate all that life has to offer. Some specific suggestions which are guaranteed to assist in moving through this time of year are as follows: Q Help others. T here is no end to the amount of good deeds just waiting to be done. You can volunteer at your local homeless shelter, raise money for any number of good causes, and oth-erwise exercise the old adage that it is better to give than receive; Q Give yourself a gift. T here is no better time to treat yourself to some-thing special. This does not have to involve the expenditure of money; it can simply be time off, a trip youve always wanted to take. Sign up for sailing lessons, cooking lessons, rumba lessons; Q Identify and acknowledge those ar ound you whom you love, and who love you. There is no better time to take stock of how lucky you are in the love and support department as opposed to however bad your current situation might seem. The bottom line is that life is short, and positive relationships are precious. Our best times are truly defined by our troubled times. Pick one wonderful thing you can do for someone else, do it, and then pick anotherƒ and youre on your way. Q Kenneth A. Gordon PARTNER AT BRINKLEY MORGAN BOARD CERTIFIED SPECIALIST IN MARITAL AND FAMILY LAW(954) 522-2200brinkleymorgan.com

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C6 WEEK OF DEC. 26, 2013-JAN. 1, 2014 GARDENS/JUPITER TREASURE COAST | PALM BEACH | BROWARD | MIAMI-DADE 877-930-SFRO www. SFROLLC .com (7376) You Don’t Have to Go Far to Find a Cure. At South Florida Radiation Oncology, we believe everyone deserves the “nest healthcare available, and when it comes to cancer care, were committed to providing just that. Using the most sophisticated technologies in the world, our team of cancer care specialists treats cancer effectively and compassionately in virtually any part of the anatomy, even those cancers previously diagnosed as incurable or untreatable.If the unthinkable does strike, dont settle on a course of treatment until youve explored the world-class options available right here at South Florida Radiation Oncology. Get Back to Living Your Life. World-Class Cancer Care Right Here All Varieties of Bicycles Triathlon Recreational Racing Repair Service Group Triathlon Training Personalized Coaching Professional Bike Fittings Accessories and Clothing Transportation Racks Indoor Cycling 819 N Federal Highway, Lake Park 561.842.BIKE (2453)NEWLY EXPANDED SHOWROOM FREE PICKUP & DELIVERYCall for details $2 5 TUNE-UPAdjustments-lube & polish Reg $59 OYMbike.com Confessions of a sweaty yogi: Prescription for yoga I s Yoga exercise, mental stress releaser, or alter-native medicine? The answer is yes.Yoga is considered a mind-body type of complemen-tary and alternative medicine practice. Yoga brings togeth-er physical and mental disciplines to achieve peace-fulness of body and mind, helping you relax and manage stress and anxiety. If youre looking for choices beyond drugs and surgery for a health condition or concern, youre likely finding that traditional western medicine isnt giving you many (or any) options. Yoga „ by which I mean a broad array of tools including asana (yoga poses), pranayama, meditation, etc. „ has been shown in hundreds of sci-entific studies to benefit people with a wide variety of health conditions. Yoga lowers blood pressure, improves lung function, relaxes the nervous sys-tem, cuts cholesterol, boosts immunity and makes you more content, to name just a few documented effects. Perhaps even more important, yoga is a methodology to change dysfunc-tional habits and attitudes into ones that serve you better. Patanjali wrote that the key to success in yoga is regu-lar practice over a long period of time, and this idea is finding support in recent breakthroughs in neuroscience. We now know that the brain is capable of changing itself „ of creating new patterns, new connections between neurons „ and that the more you do something, the stronger those neural pathways become. Yoga has many styles, forms and intensities. Hot vinyasa yoga, in par-ticular, may be a good choice for stress management and increased vitality as well as detox. This style of practice is a third generation of yoga that incor-porates all the therapeutic benefits of the heat with the healing movements of vinyasa. The philosophy of vinyasa yoga is to link movement with breath to form mediation in motion. It is also sequenced to link posture pro-gressions and counter poses to heal the internal body as well. But most people can benefit from any style of yoga „ its all about your personal preferences. The core components of yoga are: Q Poses. Yoga poses, also called postures, are a series of movements designed to increase strength and flexibility. Poses range from lying on the floor while completely relaxed to difficult postures that may have you stretching your physical limits. Poses not only have an external focus but more importantly internal benefits as well.Q Breathing. Controlling your breathing is an important part of yoga. In yoga, breath signifies your vital ener-gy. Yoga teaches that controlling your breathing can help you control your body and quiet your mind.The health benefits of yogaThe potential health benefits of yoga include: Q Stress reduction. A number of studies have shown that yoga can help reduce stress and anxiety. It can also enhance your mood and overall sense of well-being.Q Improved fitness. Practicing yoga can lead to improved balance, flexibil-ity, range of motion and strength. And this means youre less likely to injure yourself in other physical endeavors or in your daily activities.Q Management of chronic conditions. Yoga can help reduce risk factors for chronic diseases, such as heart disease and high blood pressure. Yoga might also help alleviate chronic conditions, such as depression, pain, anxiety and insomnia. It has also been proven to aid in chronic lower back pain. So is yoga right for you? It is if you want to fight stress, get fit and stay healthy. Time to hit the mat and give it a try. Bodhi Hot Yoga is the perfect sanctuary for mind and body transforma-tion. To see more studio information or class times visit our website. Q Jennifer MartinBODHI HOT YOGA 9920 ALT A1A, SUITE 801 PALM BEACH GARDENS(561) 835-1577www.BodhiHotYoga.com

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com DECEMBER 2013-JANUARY 2014 healthy living C7 Assisted Living Facility #9213 € Independent Living € Assisted Living € Skilled Nursing € Premiere Rehabilitation Services All levels of senior care under one roof Love may be all you need, but at Lourdes-Noreen McKeen we offer even more. A staff of professionals devoted to our residents. Three spacious, gracious types of residences that you make all your own. A breathtaking waterfront location overlooking Palm Beach and just steps from dozens of shops and restaurants. Deliciously fresh, healthy menus to restore body and spirit after the gym or an easy walk along shaded Intracoastal promenades. We are a family; your extended family, offering the very best care for seniors by the Carmelite Sisters and their team of skilled professionals since 1960. Served by the Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm 315 South Flagler Drive € West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561.655.8544 € www.lnmr.org Ever wish you owned a jet?Ž We make that dream a reality,without the capital outlay. PRIVATE AIR TRAVEL is what we do, and we are the best. (941) 639-7855 (800) 633-5387 AIR CHARTER: WWW.AIRTREK.AERO AIR AMBULANCE: WWW.MEDJETS.COM s9OURITINERARYYOURSCHEDULEs.O43!SECURITYLINES s$OMESTICOR)NTERNATIONALs#ONCIERGErLEVELATTENTION JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER 1210 S OLD DIXIE HWY. JUPITER FLA. 33458 (561) 747-2234 www.jupitermed.com conventional and integrative therapies, taking a holistic approach to wellness to help patients achieve a healthy mind, body and spirit. We focus on the whole person with the goal of improving qual-ity of life. Integrative Medicine is used as an added form of treatment for many con-ditions, including: € Heart Disease€ Diabetes€ Weight Control€ Management of Symptoms Associ-ated with Cancer Treatment € Back, Neck and Joint Pain € Those Seeking a Healthier Lifestyle Integrative therapies can help patients manage chronic conditions or major medical events, as well as maintain a long term state of well-being. Medical research has shown health benefits from many of these ther-apies, and ongoing clinical trials con-tinue to study the potential benefits. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program includes classes and lectures to the community such as: € Mindful Living Stress Reduction (modeled after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the Univer-sity of Massachusetts Medical Center) is an eight-week course that will teach you new ways to cope with stress and improve your quality of life. € Yoga and Tai Chi can help you relax and reconnect your mind, body and spirit. They are proven to lessen the effects of stress, reduce anxiety and alle-viate pain. € Massage Therapy can help relieve stress and help you achieve a healthier lifestyle. It encourages relax-ation, improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, and improves flexibility and range of motion by relaxing tense mus-cles. € Aquatic Therapy reduces stressful effects of gravity on the body by offer-ing little or no weight bearing to help improve range of motion and function quickly and safely. € Integrative Medicine Lecture Series offers you an opportunity to meet the experts and learn more about a variety of topics, including acupuncture, herbal supplements, nutrition and food therapy, and achieving optimal health and lon-gevity. Acupuncture is also offered at Jupiter Medical Centers Wellness Center by appointment. Acupuncture is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for patients around the world. It is used to treat pain, anxiety, insomnia, head-aches, weight control and more. Treat-ments are customized to each person and their desired results. Its important to remember that these integrative therapies are not meant to replace conventional medi-cine „ but rather work along with it. The goal of integrative medicine is to help patients achieve optimal health, even in situations where they simply dont feel well. Achieve a sound mind, body and spirit with Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program. For more informa-tion, call (561) 263-5775 or visit www.jupitermed.com/IM. Q SPIRITFrom page 1

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Stress Less, Live More Mindful Living A Stress Reduction Program Only that day dawns to which we are awake.… Henry David Thoreau 1 210 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Jupiter, FL 33458 € jupitermed.com/IM Modeled after the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, this comprehensive course is now available at Jupiter Medical Center. Thousands have bene“ tted from this eight-week course in stress reduction. Learn new ways of coping with: t cancer t heart disease t chronic pain t anxiety/depression t autoimmune disease t diabetes t grief t eating disorders t work/family stress t many other conditions For more information, please call Cyndi Drake at (561) 263-5775 Tune in to WJNO 1290AM each Saturday at 10 a.m. for Jupiter Medical Centers Maximum HealthŽ with Dr. Ken Grey, AP, DOM .Mindful Living Program Includes CD and one all-day session. Fee: $350 Location: Jupiter Medical Center, 1000 S. Old Dixie Highway, JupiterMindful Living with Kim LaRue, Certi ed Health Coach, LMT, RYT *OUSPEVDUPSZ$PVSTFhVSTEBZr+BOVBSZrtQNQN 8FEOFTEBZTr+BOVBSZrUP.BSDIrtQNQNMindful Living with Mimi Bailey, RN5VFTEBZTr+BOVBSZrUP.BSDIrtQNQN 3FTFSWBUJPOTBSFSFRVJSFE4QBDFJTMJNJUFEUPQBSUJDJQBOUTQFSTFTTJPO1MFBTF DBMM (561) 263-5775