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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 Vol. IV, No. 6  FREE INSIDE OPINION A4PETS A6HEALTHY LIVING A24 BUSINESS A26 NETWORKING A28-29REAL ESTATE A31ANTIQUES A34ARTS B1 SANDY DAYS B2EVENTS B6-8PUZZLES B12DINING B19 NetworkingSee who was out and about in Palm Beach County. A28-29 X Singing the bluesBuddy Guy plays a concert at the Kravis Center. B1 XHealthy LivingCheck these new options for joint replacements. C1 X PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 AntiquesCan you spot the difference in enamel finishes? A34 XDownload our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. X w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w ww ww ww ww ww ww w ww w w w ww w ww ww ww ww w w ww ww ww ww ww w w w w w w w ww w ww w w w w w w w ww ww ww w w w w w w w ww ww ww w w ww w w w w w w w w w w w ww ww w w ww w ww w w w w ww ww ww ww ww w w w w w ww w w w w w w w w ww ww w w w w w w ww w w w w w w w ww w w w w w w w w w ww w w w w ww ww ww ww w w w ww ww w w ww ww ww w w w w ww w w w w w w w w ww w w w w w w F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F .F F .F F .F F .F F F F F F F F F l lo lo lo lo l o o o lo lo lo o o o o o lo lo o o o o l l o o o o o o o o lo l l l o o o o o lo l o o o o o o lo lo o o o o o o o o o o o o o lo lo lo o o o o o o o o o lo l o o o o o o o o lo lo o o o lo lo l o o o o o o lo lo o lo o lo lo lo o o o o o o o o ri ri ri ri ri ri ri i ri r r r r r r r r r r r r r r ri r r r ri r r ri i i ri r r r ri ri r r r r r r r i r r r r ri r r ri r r ri r r r r i r r i r r r i i i r r r i i i ri i ri r r ri r r r d da da da da da da d da da d da da da a d da da a da d d da a a a da da d da da a da d d d a a d d d da d d d a a a a a d da d d a a d d d d d d d da da a a a a a d d a a a a a a d d d d d da a a a a a a da da d d a a a a a a da da da d a a a a a da d d da da a a We We W We We We We W We We W We We W W We W W We W We W We W W W W W W W We W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W ek e l y.com W WE EK O F N O VEMBER 14-20 201 3 V o l I V, N o. 6  FR EE E Koch Brother — a profileBY ATHENA PONUSHIS € APONUSHISFLORIDAWEEKLY.COM Billionaire Palm Beach resident Bill Koch on his family, his ambitions and his school WILLIAM BILLŽ KOCH stood in the front of the Venetian Ballroom at The Breakers before 700 listeners all waiting and wishing to hear him speak about his billions, his broth-ers Charles and David, con-versations he must be privy to and all the things he has that only money can buy. The Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce had asked him to talk about energy, but in between his rendering of mankinds move from wood SEE KOCH, A8 X PHOTO BY ANDREW SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Tim Gannon invented that calorie-laden fried delicacy known as Outback Steak-houses Bloomin Onion. If he did nothing else, he would be known for that. But this year, he embarked on a new venture, opening PDQ, a fast-food concept based on the chicken tender, in West Palm Beach. But it was a different P-word that got him started. One of the things that motivated me in this industry and made me successful was my zest and desire to play polo,Ž says Mr. Gannon, CEO of Palm Beach PDQ. The greatest thing about the sport of polo is that it is the oldest team sport in the world. What I learned from polo, I was able to bring to the restaurant business, where Outback entrepreneur finds his culinary “Velcro”BY LOREN GUTENTAGlgutentag@” oridaweekly.com SEE INVESTMENT, A18 XCOURTESY PHOTOTim Gannon stands inside PDQ, his new fast-food concept based on chicken fingers.

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A2 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY 901 45th S treet, W est P a lm B ea ch Learn more at Palm B each C hildrens .com Children’s Medical CareIs Soaring to New Heights. cardiology & cardiac surgery neurosurgeryemergency trauma care oncology neonatal intensive carelimb reconstruction & lengthening Helping a five year old overcome a battle with cancer. Reconstructing a child’s misshapen leg. Performing heart surgery on a patient who is only 12 hours old. Palm Beach Children’s Hospital has elevated the quality of children’s medical care in South Flori da. Our goal: to provide advanced care that is less invasive, requires less recovery time and alleviates the need for families to travel. Palm Beach Ch ildren’s Hospital helps ensure that children have access to the care they need close to home. More than 170 doctors representing 30 specialties. For your freeKITE, call 5 6 1-84 1-KID S Scan with your smartphones Q R code reade r COMMENTARYAn America tale Fall is the time of year when communities take to the great outdoors to cel-ebrate the diversity of art, music and cul-tural traditions found in South Florida. A sampler of a recent weekend included a range of art and cultur-al events. The El Sol Neighborhood Resource Center in Jupiter featured area artists, and crafts and jewelry made by Guatemalan women. The Feast of Little Italy in Abacoa served up authentic Ital-ian fare while channeling your inner crooner; and Art in the Gardens in PGA Downtown hosted 70 artists, each with a robust display of artwork for sale. These casual encounters create a climate of goodwill and a sense of commu-nity that is sometimes elusive in places like Palm Beach County. Here, geography, social and economic status accentuates the separation of res-idents into schools of fish that tend to congregate and swim only together. Add to this diversity, differences of race and language, and community here becomes even more complex. For this reason, art and cultural events are an invitation to escape the channel, inhabit more broad-ly the ocean we swim in, and experience how truly diverse this place has become. Growth in population and changing demographics drive the transformations taking place. The county is a great melt-ing pot of diverse cultures: Latino, Indian, Jewish, African, Greek, Thai, Italian, Jap-anese, Irish, Cuban, Bahamian, Vietnam-ese, Peruvian, Haitian, Creole, and more. Neighborhood enclaves are common of comparatively new migrants „ Haitian, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Mexican; the birthplace of one in four Palm Beach County residents is outside the U.S. Our communities are diverse and, at the end of the day, the majority of us are from somewhere else. No matter where we came from, we transplanted a ships store of memories and cultural tradi-tions into the indigenous mix. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County proclaims the county as Flori-das cultural capital.Ž With the array of art and cultural experiences available to residents on any given day, it could very well be true. The Feast of Little Italy just celebrated its eleventh appearance in Jupiter. This event summons up the flavors and music of immigrants of Italian descent living in communities with historical roots in urban America. Italian immigrants newly arriving in the country established well-known neighborhoods in major cities such as New York, Boston, and Chicago. There are many versions of this story that apply to distinct groups of migrants arriving here from all over the world. In the Italian version, Little ItalyŽ is the center of community where the new migrants flocked together, started a new life, began families, raised their kids, and worked to attain the American Dream. Their story and others like it are central to the narrative describing the immigrants experience of arrival and assimilation into the American main-stream. The mission statement for the Feast of Little Italy reads, ƒ as we stay dedicated to encouraging the impor-tance of family and community, we hope to stay mindful of the hardships that our ancestors endured in migrating to this great country.Ž It is a reminder we should all take to heart. As a nation descendant from and of immigrants, we often suffer from short-term memory loss about how it is to walk in an immigrants shoes. Most of our ancestors came here as foreigners from distant places „ unless you were among the Native Americans already here. As descendants of immi-grants, our antecedents share histori-cally with contemporary migrants the hardships, prejudice, dislike and distrust new arrivals often encounter. It takes many years and several generations to bridge the cultural, racial and ethnic divides that work against the assimila-tion of migrants into the mainstream. We love the idea of Little ItalyŽ or its equivalent now, but back in the day, these ethnic neighborhoods were ghet-tos by another name The Florida State Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is the voice of more than 3 million Hispanics in our state. The group notes on its website that First Focus, a bipartisan childrens advocacy organization, has issued a new report The Cost of Inaction: Why Children Cant Wait for Immigration Reform.Ž The report describes how our broken immigration system is negatively affecting the children of immigrants „ including Florida children and Florida communities. It is time to remember what we too easily seem to forget: On a dark night, in a lonely spot, in a place of suspicion, anyone judged guilty of being different is at risk. The label of alienation used to brand the otherŽ is a form of prejudice that ensnares us all. The celebrations of art and culture that bring our communi-ties together underscore our children deserve and our country can do better. Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian and past president and CEO of the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties. Her professional career spans more than 25 years in the charitable sector, leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and rural Appalachia. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly15@gmail.com and follow Lilly on Twitter @llilly15. h d t i J a leslie LILLYllilly15@gmail.com

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AWARDS INCLUDE: One of Americas 100 Best Hospitals for Stroke Care’by HealthGrades for 2 Years in a Row. (2012-2013) Five-Star Recipient for Coronary Interventional Procedures by HealthGrades for 11 Years in a Row (2003-2013) Five-Star Recipient for Treatment of Heart Failure by HealthGrades for 7 Years in a Row (2007-2013) Recipient of the HealthGrades Stroke Care Excellence Award’for 4 Years in a Row (2010-2013) Ranked Among the Top 5% in the Nation for Treatment of Stroke by HealthGrade for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013) Certified Primary Stroke Center, Joint Commission American Heart Association Get with the Guidelines Gold Plus Award for Stroke, Heart Failure and Resuscitation Chest Pain Center Accreditation from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient CareAnd more EMERGENCY CARE REMEMBER: You have a choice.You can ask the EMS to take you to Palm Beach GardensMedical Center. Be prepared for an emergency. Call 561.625.5070for your FREE First Aid Kit. Setting the Gold Standard in Emergency Care 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com H TAKE ME TO PALM BEACH GARDENS MEDICAL CENTER!Ž

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYElection 2013: A grass-roots resurgenceThe cable news channels wasted no time before crowing over the land-slide re-election victory of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. According to exit polls, Christie won a majority of both women and Latino voters, traditional Democratic voting blocs. The political chattering class is abuzz with Christie as the GOPs great hope to retake the White House in 2016. But they miss a vital and growing undercurrent in U.S. politics: grass-roots movements at the local and state level that are challeng-ing the establishment, and winning. Christie was expected to win, but he needed a major landslide to help him launch a 2016 presidential bid. That is where the special election came in. In June, Sen. Frank Lautenberg died at the age of 89. Christie ordered a special election to be held Oct. 16, three weeks before the general election. This deci-sion cost the taxpayers of New Jersey an estimated $24 million in extra elec-tion costs. He could have let the voters decide the Senate race on the same day they voted for governor and everyone else, saving taxpayers millions. Cory Booker was favored to win Lautenbergs seat. For years, he had been the popular, African-American mayor of Newark and a rising star in the national Democratic Party. The Senate candidates would have been listed on the top of the ballot, since it was a federal office. Booker would like-ly have inspired a greater Democratic turnout on Election Day, and his posi-tion at the top of the ballot would likely have created a tendency for his voters to vote Democratic all the way down the ballot, hurting Christie. Without Booker on the ballot, Christie garnered a more substantial victory. When chal-lenged about the cost, Christie boasted, I dont know what the cost is, and I quite frankly dont care.Ž What Christie and his party might care about are the substantial victo-ries posted this election by progres-sive activists. In his own state, voters endorsed an increase in the minimum wage that Christie vetoed, raising it $1 an hour to $8.25, with annual cost-of-living increases. Across the river in New York City, Bill de Blasio was elected mayor, the first Democratic mayor there in 20 years. The challenges we face have been decades in the making, and the problems we set out to address will not be solved overnight,Ž he said in his vic-tory speech. But make no mistake, the people of this city have chosen a pro-gressive path.Ž He supported Occupy Wall Street, got arrested protesting a hospital closure, and vows to r aise city taxes on its wealthiest residents. De Blasio will start work as mayor along-side a supportive New York City Coun-cil, in what my Democracy Now!Ž colleague Juan Gonzalez has called perhaps its most progressive govern-ment in the past 50 years.Ž Beyond New York and New Jersey, progressive populist movements bore fruit on Election Day. In Colorado, the states voters approved a plan to tax the retail sale of recreational mari-juana, which was legalized statewide last November. The voters of Denver, Boulder and Littleton also approved city sales taxes on marijuana sales, further entrenching the shift from criminalizing pot to mainstreaming it. Three cities in that state also voted on banning hydraulic fracturing, or frack-ing. Fracking is the natural-gas drill-ing process that many believe pollutes groundwater and air, and even causes earthquakes. Voters in Portland, Maine, became the first on the East Coast to approve the legalization of recreational mari-juana. In Washington state, voters approved a sharp increase in the mini-mum wage of most workers at Sea-Tac Airport, and the surrounding hotel industry, to $15 per hour. This is expect-ed to put pressure on the city of Seattle to make a similar increase. These and similar electoral victories grow from long-term grass-roots organizing, which has become all the more vital in the face of a gridlocked federal government. Corporate money still holds massive sway in our elec-toral system; also in Washington state, a popular referendum calling for the labeling of food with GMOs (geneti-cally modified organisms) failed after corporate food and agriculture inter-ests poured in $22 million to oppose it. Politicians respond to pressure. Make me do it,Ž Franklin D. Roos-evelt famously responded to union and civil-rights organizer A. Philip Ran-dolph, who wanted help for African-Americans and working people. Barack Obama has told activists the same. Bill de Blasio promises a progressive pro-gram for New York City, but history suggests that without constant popular pressure, establishment interests will assert their power. Election Day should not be the end of peoples campaigns for change. It simply indicates a door has been opened a crack. As to whether it will be kicked wide open or slammed shut, thats up to grass-roots movements, not the individuals they elect. Q „ Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column.„ Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!,Ž a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America. a l  q c amy GOODMANSpecial to Florida Weekly Henry Waxman made a plea at the end of a House hearing grilling Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The California Democrat asked Republicans to reach across the aisle to work with Democrats to improve Obam-acare. Yes, Henry Waxman, who has made a career of ideological witch hunts and smash-mouth partisanship, wants a cease-fire over Obamacare, or so he says. He was picking up a common liberal theme: Its not fair that Republi-cans continue to oppose the presidents eponymous health-care law and pick at its failures, deceits and irrationalities. If only they were more reasonable, Obam-acare could be tightened up with a few technocratic fixes and go on to its glori-ous destiny. Its a little late to get Republican buyin, though. That would have required serious compromise back in 2009, when Democrats, at the high tide of their power in the Obama era, saw no reason to make any. They insisted on this particular law, at this particular time. They own it. They own every canceled policy, every rate increase, every unintended consequence and every unpopular intended conse-quence. It is theirs, lock, stock and two smoking barrels. But they cant stop whining. They complain that Republicans arent as cooperative as Democrats were when the Medicare Part D prescription-drug plan had a rocky start. This is absurd. The Part D website experienced what could be accurately described as glitch-es,Ž rather than the meltdown of Health-Care.gov. And Democrats supported the basic idea of the prescription-drug ben-efit. They complain that what they really wanted was single-payer, but had to settle for the unsatisfying second-best of Obamacare. Paul Krugman calls the health-care law a clumsy, ugly structure that more or less deals with a problem, but in an inefficient way.Ž The reason they couldnt get single-payer, though, is that there werent enough Democratic votes for it. The White House is loath to give up the falsity about everyone keeping their current insurance. White House aide Valerie Jarrett tweeted that it is a FACT that nothing in #Obamacare forces people out of their health plans.Ž Never mind that the entire architecture of the law is based on forcing people in the individual insurance market out of their existing plans and onto the exchanges. In a health-care speech in Boston, President Barack Obama didnt say anything about how his prior declara-tions had been misleading. Instead, he tweaked his dishonesty for a different positive spin: For the fewer than 5 per-cent of Americans who buy insurance on your own, you will be getting a better deal.Ž Not if they are forced „ as many of them will be „ to buy benefits they dont need at a price they dont want to pay. From the beginning, Obamacare has depended on a political ethic of doing and saying whatever is necessary. The falsehood about people keeping their coverage was essential to selling the legislation. So the president repeated it relentlessly. The president got his law, and its possible more people will be uninsured in 2014 than if it had never passed. Thats on him, no matter how much he and his supporters want to evade responsibility for their own achievement. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. t o i a q s rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONThe Obamacare whiners Publisher Michelle Nogamnoga@floridaweekly.comEditor Betty Wellsbwells@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsScott Simmons Athena Ponushis Tim Norris Jan Norris Mary Jane Fine Loren Gutentag Artis Henderson Linda Lipshutz Roger Williams Nina Cusmano Amy WoodsPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersPaul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Mitzi Turner Hannah Arnone Chris Andruskiewicz Elliot TaylorAccount ExecutivesBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comJohn Linnjlinn@floridaweekly.comCirculation ManagerWillie AdamsCirculationEvelyn Talbot Frank Jimenez Chelsea Crawford Headley Darlington Published by Florida Media Group LLC Pason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: FLORIDA WEEKLY 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470  Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2013 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.

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THEGARDENSMALL.COM SANTAS ARRIVAL DANCE PARTYGRAND COURT | FRIDAY | NOVEMBER 15TH CELEBRATION | 6PM MINGLE WITH SANTA | 6:30PM ITS A JOLLY JIG YOU CANT MISS! JOIN US FOR THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED HOLIDAY DANCE PARTY FEATURING SANTA AND THE DANCING ELVES IN THE GARDENS MALL GRAND COURT. RSVP TO THE INFORMATION DESK, 561.775.7750 FOR ENTRY, PLEASE BRING A NEW UNWRAPPED TOY DONATION TO THE SALVATION ARMY. PHOTOS WITH SANTA BEGIN AT 7PMthe gardens maLL

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A6 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY *Maserati Ghibli base M S R P $65,6 00; Ghibli S Q4 base M S R P $75,7 00. Not including dealer prep and transp ortation. Actual selling price may vary. Ta xes, title, license and registration fees not included. 201 3 Maserati North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Maserati and the Trident logo are registered trademarks of Maserati S.p.A. Maserati urges you to obey all p o sted speed limits. THE NEW MASERATI GHIBLI IS POWERED BY A CHOICE OF TWO ADVANCED V6 ENGINES WITH UP TO 404 HP, EQUIPPED WITH 8-SPEED ZF AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION AND AVAILABLE Q4 INTELLIGENT ALL-WHEEL DRIVE.MASERATI OF PALM BEACH Schedule a test drive: 888.481.9352 | www.maseratiofpalmbeach.com | 3978 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409 THE KEY TO AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE IS QUITE LITERALLY A KEY. THE ABSOLUTE OPPOSITE OF ORDINARY | INTRODUCING THE NEW GHIBLI FROM $65,600 | MASERATIGHIBLI.US PET TALESHoliday hazardsFestive threats to pets include fatty foods, alcohol and open doors DR. TONY JOHNSONfor Universal UclickAs I strolled through the grocery store last month, I noticed that the Christmas decor was already up. In my mind, it was still summer, but apparently the good folks at my local fooditorium wanted to ring in the holidays a tad early this year. Some day, I am certain they will start putting up the tinsel in June. The holiday season is one of togetherness, and pets are increasingly a big part of the holiday festivities. During this otherwise joyous season, a few pet dan-gers are lurking, though. This info will help keep your pet safe during all the fun and avoid expensive trips to the pet ER. Q Food „ The biggest holiday threats to pets come from the same threats to your waistline and chances of you fit-ting into your skinny jeans „ food! The holiday season is all about food (yeah, and love and family and all that other stuff, too), and theres plenty of it to be had: cookies, roast beast, puddings and more cookies. To you, it may just mean another hour on the stair stepper, but to your dog, human food can cause real problems. Vomiting and diarrhea are common side effects from eating too much people food (the medical term we throw about is dietary indiscretionŽ), and in some cases, this can proceed to a more serious condition called pancreatitis. Pancre-atitis is inflammation of the pancreas, the gland that makes digestive enzymes as well as insulin. When the pancre-as becomes inflamed, it releases these enzymes and begins digesting itself. This can be a serious and painful condi-tion that often requires hospitalization. It is probably a good idea to either keep pets confined during any holiday parties, or make sure guests (especially kids) know not to give treats to your pets. Dogs and cats have been known to drag an entire turkey off the coun-ter when the owners back is turned (you know theyve gotta be thinking, SCORE!Ž), so make sure you stay aware of their whereabouts during meal prepa-ration. If you do want to include your pet in the meal and fun, stick to a bit of lean turkey and lowor no-fat veggies (no onions, though, as these can cause anemia in dogs and cats), and skip the gravy, dressing and pecan pie. Sugar-free items that contain xylitol are also toxic to pets. Q Booze „ It is true: Dont get your Doberman drunk during the holidays (or any other time), and dont let any lamp-shade-wearing guests try to give your pug a mug of beer. And no one wants to see a basset with a hangover. Your dog or cats liver is not equipped to process alcohol, and even small amounts can be life-threatening. Put boozy party leftovers well out of reach. That includes whisky-soaked fruitcakes, trifles laced with liqueurs and the rum balls that Aunt Martha sends every year. Q Open doors „ People come and go much more during the holidays than other times of year, and all that traffic can lead to plenty of opportunities for escape. In the ER, we see many pets who made a break for freedom when Uncle Floyd came a-callin with his special tuna surprise. Dogs and cats can dart out the door without anyone even noticing, and theres a whole big world of hurt just waiting for them out there. Ensure that pets are safely put away when you are expecting guests, and make a nightly head count to make sure that all the furry family members are accounted for before turning in for your visions of sugar plums. Heres hoping you have a sane season, and that all family members make it through safely, no matter how many legs they have. Q It’s OK to share small amounts of holiday foods with pets, but avoid fatty or alcohol-laced goodies. >> Benny is a 1-yearold neutered pit bull mix. He is a sweet, well-behaved dog and likes other dogs. >> Ann is a 9-month-old spayed domestic short-hair. She is timid at rst, but is motivated by treats so that's the perfect way to break the ice with her. To adopt:The Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. >> Tweed is a spayed tabby, approximately 18 to 24 months old. She is shy and reserved at rst, but is affectionate when she warms up to people.>> Pepper is a spayed tabby with beautiful orange highlights. She's a petite cat, roughly 7 years old, and she recently lost her home. She loves people, and likes to play.To adopt:Adopt A Cat is a no-kill, free-roaming cat rescue facility at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public Mon-Sat, 12 noon to 6 P.M. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see our website at www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or visit us on Facebook (Adopt A Cat Foundation). For adoption information, call 848-4911 or 848-6903. Pets of the Week

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A7 Ibis golf instructor Martin Hall earns highest private country club ranking SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYIbis Golf & Country Club Director of Golf Instruction Martin Hall was again selected to the Golf Digest 50 Best Teachers in America list. He is 10th on the list and currently the highest-ranked instructor at a pri-vate country club in the state of Florida, according to a pre-pared statement from Ibis. Mr. Hall has been helping golfers at Ibis Golf & Country Club since 1997. The Golf Digest voting panel com-prised 1,200 lead-ing golf instructors nationwide who chose the top 50 teachers, and includ-ed a state-by-state ranking that recognizes 492 instructors. Mr. Hall is no stranger to the top 50 list; he has been on it every year since it began in 2000. Im honored my colleagues have chosen me as a top instructor,Ž said Mr. Hall, in the prepared statement. Golf has been a part of my life for 40 years, and I continue to enjoy sharing my knowledge and experience.Ž Hall has an impressive resume; including coaching Morgan Pressel for 10 years, during which she won the U.S. Amateur and her first major, the Kraft Nabisco in 2007. Two years ago, Martin started host-ing a weekly pro-gram on the Golf Channel entitled School of GolfŽ that continues to this day. He has written two books, has 19 instructional tapes, and has written over 100 instructional articles published in magazines all over the world. In 2008, he was named Teacher of the Year by The PGA of America. Mr. Hall has everything he needs at Ibis; his golf studio is equipped with modern technology including Track-man, Kvest, AMM 3D Motion Analysis, and SAM Putt, the statement said. Mr. Hall said, There is truly no other place Id rather be than on the range teaching at Ibis.Ž Q Leslie Maitland to speak at JCC book luncheon SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Mandel JCC of the Palm Beaches will host its 19th Annual Book Luncheon featuring award-winning author Leslie Maitland on 11 a.m. Nov. 20 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. Ms. Maitland is an award-winning former New York Times national cor-respondent and investigative reporter who specialized in legal affairs and offi-cial corruption. One of Ms. Maitlands most notable accomplishments includes covering breaking stories on the FBIs undercover AbscamŽ inquiry into cor-ruption in Congress. She appears regu-larly on the Diane Rehm ShowŽ on NPR to discuss literature. The luncheon will include a discussion on Ms. Maitlands book, Crossing the Borders of Time.Ž The book is a love story about Ms. Maitlands mother, who was separated from her true love during World War II as her family escaped from France to flee from the Nazis. Ms. Mait-land put her investi-gative skills to work to reunite the couple 50 years later. The Kravis Center is at 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets for the event are $85 for Friends of the JCC, $100 for guests, or $180 (includes an autographed book and preferred seating). The luncheon will be preceded by a book fair in the lobby. RSVP to Lisa Blumberg at LisaB@ JCConline.com or 689-7700. Q Martin Hall MAITLAND SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYFAUs Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, along with the Charles E. Schmidt College of Sciences Depart-ment of Geosciences, will host Jennifer Biddle, Ph.D., for a special lecture titled Microbial Life in the Subsurface: Let-ting the Sequences Tell the Story,Ž at 7 p.m. Nov. 20 in the Johnson Education Center, 5600 U.S. 1 N., in Fort Pierce. The event is free and open to the public. HBOI and the College of Science were one of 30 institutions selected to host the ocean leadership distin-guished lecturer, an honor for which approximately 90 institutions applied. In addition to the lecture, Dr. Biddle will give a seminar for faculty, staff and students at FAUs Boca Raton cam-pus. She also will meet with scientists, research staff, undergraduate, graduate and high school students at HBOI and Boca Raton. Dr. Biddle is an assistant professor at the University of Delaware School of Marine Science and Policy in Lewes, Del. She earned a bachelors degree in biotechnology from Rutgers Univer-sity and a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from the Penn sylvania State University. The Distinguished Lecturer Series brings the scientific explorations and discoveries of the International Ocean Discovery Program (www.iodp.org) and its predecessor programs to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and to the geoscience community in general. For information, call 772-242-2400 or visit www.fau.edu/hboi/community/events.php. Q FAU Harbor Branch to host lecture

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYto coal to oil to natural gas, he gave the crowd little morsels of his life. Do you know why a hurricane is very much equivalent to a marriage in Palm Beach?Ž he asked. Well, in the begin-ning, theres a lot of huffing and puffing and blowing. Then theres dead calm. Then you lose your house.Ž The crowd roared. Bill Koch carried on: Ive had hurricane Joan, hurricane Angela, but Ive still got my house!Ž Thats classic Bill Koch right there. Hes the kind of billionaire the world revels in. He speaks with an uncensored lip and moves from a Lets show them bastards!Ž stance. If youre looking to paint him a villain, youll find the headlines: He sued his family. He thought he bought Thomas Jeffersons wine, then found out those old bottles of Bordeaux were phony and sued the man who sold them to him. Now hes suing Cape Wind, the pro-posed wind farm to power the greater Cape Cod area and, in the words of Bill Koch, make residents pay these damn high prices and look at the damn wind-mills when we could look at a beautiful ocean.Ž Bill Koch danced with alternative energy. Built seven power plants. Benefited from government mandates on selling price. Thank you, government,Ž he says. You gave me enough money to do the Americas Cup, enough money to buy wine, enough money to buy a big house, enough money to build an art collection. You did mighty fine by me, government.Ž As soon as those contracts ran out, he split. He says alternative energy only exists with mandates and subsidies, So lets not count on alternative energy to save us.Ž He finds natural gas pretty bloody interesting.Ž He wouldnt bet on global warming, hogwash. He believes if we want to live lavish lifestyles we need to accept dirty energy. His favorite used to be coal, but its no longer making him money. And Bill Kochs no longer looking for headlines. He says hes looking to make a difference. Thats why he started Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches in West Palm Beach „ an independent college preparatory school founded on project-based learning, where not all stu-dents drive the same car, but all students get a gourmet lunch and MacBook Pro „ and thats where youll find his virtue. Growing up in the public school system of Wichita, Kansas, Bill Koch says, One teacher told me that the reason I have crooked teeth is because my father took oil out of the ground and destroyed Gods natural resources.Ž Hence, his education to being judged by his family name. Bill Kochs father Fred developed a process that turned crude oil into gaso-line. The process proved profitable, as it grew into Koch Industries, one of the largest private companies in the country today. Bill describes his father as a man who started off dirt poor and made his first couple million in his twenties. In those days, back in the 20s and 30s, that was a real accomplishment,Ž Bill says. And he did it with his brain.Ž Bill and his three brothers each inherited hundreds of millions of dollars. Two of his brothers, Charles and David, are synonymous with the Tea Party, if not the stimulant behind it. Their influence seems to steer the behavior of the party so much so, that Democrats have sug-gested that Republicans shut down the government to satisfy the Koch brothers. I sometimes get lumped in with my two brothers, the evil Koch brothers, and some magazines want to do a profile on me simply because of the familiar-ity now with the Koch name,Ž Bill says. After two decades of lawsuits, an epic family feud where Bill accused his broth-ers Charles and David of shortchanging him and their older brother Fred out of the family business, Bill reports: Well, right now Ive got peaceful coexistence with them. And Ive got great friendship with my twin brother (David). Im happy to say it.Ž Beyond that he does not care to say much. Truth be told, he does not want the public to know much about him. I became a semi-public figure and Ive regretted it,Ž he says. Ive had my share of 15 minutes of fame, so I look at it now and say, really what I want to be known for now is good work, the school.Ž He takes a breath and gives a vain confession: But I like being known for having my own peculiar tastes and doing things in my own peculiar way, and sur-prisingly at times, being successful at it. Thats what I like.Ž Ever coy, he fans his eccentricities. Sitting in his penthouse office suite in West Palm Beach as the president and CEO of Oxbow Carbon, Bill Koch, 73, opens up and shows shades of Billy the sailor, Billy the cowboy, Billy the art lover and Billy the son, who seems to be forever trying to please his late father. There in his office, the tough-skinned litigator, like cracked paint, reveals his colors under-neath. He starts to talk about his school and his schooling. He says he cant spell and he thinks hes partially dyslexic. From elementary school to Culver Military Academy to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he says, I learned a hellu-va lot from sports. I didnt learn a damn thing about teamwork in the classroom ƒ but I did learn it on the basketball team.Ž Suddenly, the round table in his office turns into a basketball court. Bill Koch always wanted to play basketball because he was tall, but he was also a bit awkward, so he mostly sat on the bench. His freshman year at MIT, he KOCHFrom page 1 Koch Brother — a profile VANESSA ROGERS / FLORIDA WEEKLYBill Koch describes Oxbridge Academy, the progressive prep school he founded in West Palm Beach, as a place where there’s “no group of cool kids and it’s cool to get good grades.” “I sometimes get lumped in with my two brothers, ‘the evil Koch brothers,’ and some magazines want to do a profile on me simply because of the familiarity now with the Koch name ... Well, right now I’ve got peaceful coexistence with them. And I’ve got gre at friendship with my twin brother (David). I’m happy to say it.” — Bill Koch

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 NEWS A9joined the freshmen basketball team. We were lousy,Ž he says. MIT recruited basketball coach Jack Barry. Mr. Koch moved up to varsity. The Engineers won one game. But fortuity was brewing up fast. Our junior year, we won half our games. Our senior year, we had the longest winning streak of any team in the country and the least points scored against us,Ž Mr. Koch says. It was amaz-ing because none of us except for my twin brother (David) could have made any other varsity team in the country.Ž Even more amazing? Coach Barry taught his team only one play. He said we werent smart enough to learn more than one play. Here we all were MIT students,Ž Mr. Koch chuckles, But he had some logic behind it because you know, all these guys said, Oh, God. We could learn 10 different plays, but then you start thinking about all the plays and you forget to act and forget to perform, youre just thinking.Ž That one play was designed to minimize weakness and maximize strength. Laying the play out on his office table, Mr. Koch taps his table for emphasis: You cant dribble. You get the rebound. TAP. TAP. You cant shoot. You make the pick. TAP. TAP. Dont do anything glamorous. Just do your job. TAP. TAP. TAP. Coach Barry drilled that play into his players. They made all their mistakes in practice, so they wouldnt make them during the game. Then he told us we werent losers, cause we were all used to losing. That we could win. It was a mat-ter of attitude.Ž Digging up this lesson, Mr. Koch smiles. If you go into a game thinking youll win, at least you have a 50/50 chance of winning. If you go in thinking youre going to lose, you will lose. So to me, that was a remarkable education. I learned it by sitting on the damn bench.Ž It was lessons like these that Mr. Koch wanted to pass on through his school, or as he says it in his Kansas twang, Wouldnt that be great to pass on to kids, see?Ž He did not want to teach kids how to take tests. I wanted the school to teach the reality of accomplishment,Ž he says, with stress on reality.Ž He rolls out his thought: Now, I cant teach kids, you ought to accomplish, do what I do. No. You ought to do what you do. Do what you love. But you need the tools and you need the understanding of how things get done in the real world.Ž Mr. Koch tries to play it off like the real reason he started his school was self-ish „ he wanted his children to have the best education, he didnt want to send them away to the best schools, so he built the best school „ but somewhere in the midst of sharing Oxbridge stories and inspirations, he remembers a phone call. Well, there are some (stories) about kids that are very underprivileged that have done very well there.Ž Mr. Koch blows his nose. Theres one kid. He was great. He wanted to get in. He called me up,Ž Mr. Koch coughs, saying that the admissions department was going to get back to him, never did. And he was a friend of my son, so I said,Ž Mr. Koch sneezes and coughs. Pardon me. I said sure, and I called Bob (Bob Parsons, president and CEO of the school) and I said, Bob, would you give this kid a chance?Ž Cough. Cough. Pardon me. And Bob gave him a chance. Interviewed him. Found out hes a terrific football player. Hes a lovely kid. And he works very hard at school. Terrific.Ž With that terrific,Ž Mr. Kochs voice gets shaky. His face turns red. He squish-es up his face. Squeezes his lips shut. His eyes puddle. He cries. Pardon me, I dont mean to get so emotional about this ƒ To give a kid like that a chance is ter-rific I think.Ž He lets out a big exhale, crying and congested. Ah, man. You caught me at a bad moment. Tired. Sick.Ž Big sneeze. The tissue in his hand will not do. Mr. Koch pulls a white handkerchief out of his back pocket, wipes his eyes and his nose with it. Ive got the tail end of this damn bronchitis.Ž Mr. Koch had a month full of honey and lemon. He takes a relief laugh, Huh-huh.Ž He might look sick, but his reasons dont look very self-ish. Two-thirds of the student body at Oxbridge receives financial aid and most of that aid comes out of Bill Kochs pocket. Theres a risk for that,Ž he says. If anything happens to me, which it will sometime, they dont want to be high and dry, so theyve got to broaden their sup-port and not make it Bill Kochs school but make it a community.Ž Scott Benarde, director of communications for the Norton Museum of Art, has a son whos a junior at Oxbridge. Play-ing football and basketball together, his son Michael and Bill Kochs son, Will, became friends. One night after an away game last year, Mr. Benarde remembers his son throw-ing him his helmet and his shoulder pads, then running on the bus with the rest of the team. I was walking through the parking lot. I couldnt find my car. And guess who else just happened to be walking through the parking lot trying to Koch Brother — a profile Twins Bill, right, and David, played for MIT during the 1960-61 season. Bill Koch at MIT in the fall of 1959.COURTESY PHOTOSFamily portrait: Mother Mary, sitting; Bill, David, father Fred, Charles and Fred. SEE KOCH, 10 X

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A10 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Koch Brother — a profile find his car? Bill Koch.Ž Mr. Benarde shouted out: Mr. Koch, your son had a great game. Hes incred-ibly talented.Ž Well, he didnt get it from me,Ž Mr. Koch shot back. We chatted a few minutes, two proud fathers talking about our kids,Ž Mr. Benarde reflects. It was very human-izing. Heres this guy whos in the news all the time, making international news for one thing or another ƒ even with all the other stuff you read about him, hes a loving father, too ƒ I got to see Bill Koch the family man. It was surprising, unex-pected. I dont think Ill ever forget that ƒ I walked off to my car. He walked off to his car,Ž just another father who had gone to watch his boy play ball. Mr. Koch has six children. Four of his children go to Oxbridge. He describes his son Wyatt, 27, as a gentleman. Says he has a line of girls after him, A line of mothers, as well.Ž His daughter Charlotte, 17, has natural strawberry-blonde hair, but she likes to bleach it platinum blonde. This drives Bill crazy. His stepson Liam will turn 17 the third week of November. Hes a star athlete. Played linebacker, run-ning back, punter and kicker at his previous school in Connecticut. His son William, 16, plays basketball and football, that damn sportŽ Bill never wanted at his school because he didnt want to see kids getting hurt. His daughter Robin, 14, would be the girly girl. She knows how to play me perfectly,Ž Bill says. Knows when to give me the cold shoulder and when to be nice.Ž His youngest Kaitlin, 7, goes by the nickname K.K.Ž Shes a real sweetie-pie, full of pep. Im always preaching to them to get along with one another,Ž Mr. Koch says. When I die ƒ there will be nothing for them to fight about like my brothers and I did ƒ Im making sure theres no financial incentive for them to fight ƒ Its kind of a brute force way of doing it,Ž but hes putting their money in trusts, setting up incentives for them to make their own money and leaving them each a house on his compounds in Cape Cod and Colorado so they have a reason to interact with each other as they get older. On the weekends, Bill likes to veg around the houseŽ with his wife Bridget Mary Rooney Koch. She has a Julianne Moore look about her „ fair skin, perfect complexion, perfectly freckled. During their courtship, Bridget took up tennis. Bill had been playing 20 years, but by the end of the summer, she was beating him. He begged her not to take up sailing. Ms. Koch is a rich woman in her own right. Her family owns the Pittsburgh Steelers. Cousins are politicians. Think-ing of her husbands achievements, she jokes that when Bill Koch starts a school, its an instant school: Just add water.Ž Opening in 2011, Oxbridge will celebrate its first graduating class this year. Ms. Koch loves knowing where young K.K. will go to high school. I believe the school will be Bills legacy. I really do. One of his finest accom-plishments,Ž she says. Hes really a kind-hearted man ƒ Hes so generous ƒ Most people dont see that side. They see him as a businessman, the Americas Cup winner, a tough litigator ƒ Hes really a sweet, kind-hearted soul.Ž Back in his office, composing himself, Bill Koch the sailor starts talking about the Americas Cup. A remnant tear, one he didnt wipe away, runs down his left cheek under the frame of his glasses. Bill Koch will never know what it feels like to be dirt poor like his father. Winning the 1992 Americas Cup may be the closest hell ever come to feeling like a self-made man. Mr. Koch says he learned how to separate perception from reality by sitting in MIT classrooms. Racing in the Americas Cup, he lived it. The perception was you had to hire a great yacht designer to win, but most of the yacht designers were artists, not sci-entists. A chemical engineer with three degrees from MIT, including a Ph.D., Bill Koch said: Baloney. Im going to hire scientists.Ž His team looked at aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, minimizing resistance and maximizing lift. They fooled the water and surprised the world. The other perception was you had to hire a super yacht skipper,Ž Mr. Koch rants. And let him sail the boat with the great designer and pick the crew and everything. I looked at it and I said bullshit. The crew is a team. Not one guy can win it for you, but one guy can lose it for you ƒ The team that wins is the one that makes the fewer mistakes ƒ Our strategy was very simple: Get in front of the other guy and stay in between him and the finish line ƒ Everybody thought I was crazy. They called me a n utty chemist from Kansas and a buffoon ƒ But lo and behold, we won.Ž David Rosow served as the executive director of Bill Kochs Americas Cup campaign. Remembering when they won, Mr. Rosow conjures an intoxicating scene: Bill dove into the water, swam to the dock, 200 yards or more, climbed up it, took the Cup and held it over his head,Ž soaking wet in champagne and saltwater. The current president of the Palm Beach Town Council, Mr. Rosow met Bill Koch in 1984 at a bar in Nassau on the racing circuit. Straightaway, he could see Bill Koch was a guy who liked to have a little fun. Considering all the sensational news stories and public assumptions, Mr. Rosow says, People dont know Bill Koch.Ž He remembers his phone ringing one night. It was Bill. He had reached a settlement with his brothers. He wanted Mr. Rosow and his wife to come over for dinner. There were four other people there, I will not disclose who, thats up to Bill, but he was so excited about coming to a conclusion over all of this, his adrenalin was so high that during dinner he liter-ally, and this wasnt one of those nights where we were drinking lots of wine, he was so exhausted, once the adrenalin had left him, he fell asleep at dinner,Ž Mr. Rosow says. He was totally excited and totally exhausted,Ž so pleased to be at peace with his brothers, he fell asleep. As a boy, Bill Koch would watch the wind sweep across the Kansas country-side. Puffs of wind would change the col-ors of the bluestem grass „ brown top, blue stem, green base „ turning rolling hills into undulating waves. Young Bill would pretend he was a sea captain or a pirate on a sea of grass. Thinking of his country beginnings as a sailor, he laughs. When Bill Koch laughs, he lifts his shoulders up to his ears, Huh-huh,Ž like a kid with wrinkles. He carries a pockets a c h xt f d s o ve Br Ju l s ki f re c t oo k y ea r w as ta k e M ri g h t Stee l in g o COURTESY PHOTOSBill Koch holding his son, Wyatt, in Newport, R.I., at the launch of his boat, Matador. In 1963, big-game hunting in Africa with his parents. Left, in San Diego in ’92.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 NEWS A11 Koch Brother — a profile COURTESY PHOTOSTwins Bill, left, and David, at about 3 years old.In Cambridge, Mass., in the late 1960s. Bill Koch winning the 1992 America’s Cup.knife. He wears Western snap-up shirts and has a leather case for his cell phone slung on his belt like a holster. His fasci-nation with the West also trails back to his boyhood, when his father Fred was the largest rancher in the United States. Fred owned somewhere between 3 mil-lion and 4 million acres of ranchland, so even though Bill grew up across the street from the Wichita Country Club, there would be no gallivanting there. Come summertime, Fred sent his boys to work on his ranches. Bill spent five summers on a ranch in Montana. He worked 10-hour days, seven days a week and got paid 50 cents an hour. The only way you got the respect of your working man, your working partner, was you had to work as hard if not harder than he did. I had to work harder because I was the bosss son, so that was terrific for me,Ž Bill says. I fell in love with the West as a result and I like the old code of the West: Stand your ground and help your neighbor, very simple things ƒ If you didnt have help from your neighbor, you wouldnt survive.Ž Bill Koch has since built his own Western town on his property in Colo-rado, staged with five saloons, two brothels, two jailhouses, a church, a schoolhouse and God, I dont know what else.Ž He says his town will never be complete til he dies and his kids are sick of spending money on it. What could be more cowboy than building your own town with saloon doors, brothel relics and jailhouse cells? But would a real cowboy rid-ing off in the distance all by his lonesome ever build such a town? Somewhere in between that space, Bill Koch lives. He has General Custers rifle, the pistol that killed Jesse James, the breastplate Sitting Bull wore at the Battle of the Little Bighorn and the only known photograph of Billy the Kid. He says he doesnt have a favorite cowboy, but must admit: I like Billy, Billy the Kid is an interesting character because a lot of his fighting was done for what he thought was injustice, versus some of these other guys who were just sociopathic killers.Ž He does have a favorite cowboy painting, one that used to hang in his fathers ranch and now hangs in his Palm Beach mansion. The painting shows a cowboy out in the great wide open, stopped on his horse to light his cigarette. When Bill Koch the energy tycoon now looks at it in his cowboy room, hes young again. A boy back on his fathers ranch. Bill Koch lives on that Palm Beach stretch of water and status that some call Billionaires Row. He calls it South Ocean Boulevard. He gives directions to his home like this: Do you know Trumps Mar-A-Lago? I think were about 10 hous-es after his, on the left, going north.Ž Leading a leisurely stroll through his home, he moseys into his dining room. A tall man, he takes big steps, but you dont have to run to keep up with him. Hes considerate of smaller strides. Mr. Koch has decorated his dining room as a nautical ode to the War of 1812. A portrait of his ancestor, Capt. James Lawrence, has been placed to the left of the head of the table. He was a helluva sea captain,Ž Mr. Koch says. But he was too impulsive. He didnt use his head enough ƒ He got pretty full of himself.Ž Now Mr. Koch has him forever staring down his rival, Capt. Philip Broke, whose portrait hangs on the opposite wall. Other dining room paintings play out the showdown between the Shannon and the Chesapeake, illustrating the ships opening fire on one another. Capt. Lawrence was mortally wounded and taken below, where he gave his infamous order: Dont give up the ship!Ž Capt. Broke won the battle, but as he boarded the Chesapeake, he took a musket to the head and was badly wounded. He couldnt write with his right hand, so he wrote a letter to his wife with his left hand,Ž Mr. Koch says. I have the letter. And I have the scarf or the bandage he wrapped around his head „ with the blood stains.Ž Even though Capt. Lawrence was his ancestor, could Mr. Koch resonate with Capt. Broke more? No,Ž he says. Im getting even with him.Ž The way he weaves it, Capt. Brokes family needed money, so they sold his mementos. The descendant of his rival bought them all. For Bill Koch has enough money to get even with ghosts. Hes ranked No. 122 on Forbes latest list of the worlds 400 richest people with a net worth of $3.8 billion. He has three signature works by Monet in his living room and finds it astounding that a painting of a field in France can remind him of a field in Kansas where his father would take him to picnic as a boy. Thats one thing I love about great artists,Ž he says. They have a capacity to communicate an emotion to you thats very personal to you.Ž As much as he likes looking at his art by Dali or Picasso or Modigliani, he likes to see the reactions such works arouse in his guests. Conversely, you can learn a lot about the man by listening to what he sees in his art. Looking at the painting The CoquetteŽ by Alfred Stevens, Mr. Koch says, I get a special kick out of this one, having two teenage daughters. Its a teen-ager looking at herself in the mirror. The person looking back is older and more sophisticated, but theyre both madly in love with each other.Ž Turning to an avant-garde sculpture by Hans (Jean) Arp that some might deem as phallic, Mr. Koch says, I see ET. You just want to hug it.Ž And thats exactly what his daughter Robin used to do, every time she ran into the room, she hugged the sculpture. When Mr. Koch loaned it out to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, They polished it and took all her hand-prints off. Im mad at them.Ž He acquired the guestbook of Marjorie Merriweather Post. Its 12 inches thick and weighs 175 pounds. It holds 3,000 pages with room for 126,500 sig-natures. Back in the entertaining days of Ms. Post, the pages are graced by the names of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney and Joe DiMaggio. But ever since June 2000 when William I. Koch took over the book, most of the signatures have changed to the stick letters of school-children. Just inside his front door, Mr. Koch has a painting of his son Wyatt done by Botero, an artist known for his fat, friendly figures. Wyatt stands on a ship with a toy sailboat in his hand. He was tall and skinny as a boy. In the painting, hes pudgy. He hated this painting,Ž Mr. Koch says. But now that he knows its value, he wants it.Ž Mr. Koch has close to 15,000 bottles of wine in his Palm Beach cellar (he guesses he has 43,000 bottles of wine in total). He barcodes every bottle, catalogues his collection on a computer, so when hes in search of a particular vintage, he can type it into his flat screen and a red dot appears on a map of his cellar, like a video game showing him where to find the treasure, save the princess, drink the nectar. The carved head of Dionysus rests in the center of his cellar. Mosaics inter-sperse the brick walls, which in any other cellar would be purely aesthetic, but in Bill Kochs cellar, the mosaics are real mosaics from Antiquity. Meandering into his saloon, decked out with the heads and hides of big game, Mr. Koch shares a story of his mother Mary, a socialite with spunk who had to shoot her own leopard for her leopard coat. Mr. Koch says that was back in the days before such an ambition would be so horribly incorrect. But hes going back. He steps up to his bar and hands over a letter from his father dated January 22, 1936. He and his brothers found it in his fathers safety deposit box after he died. He starts the letter, My dear boys,Ž and ends with Be good to your mother.Ž In it, he tells his boys hes going to leave them an exorbitant amount of money. He says they can squander it away foolishly, or they can feel the glorious feeling of accomplishment.Ž Bill Koch framed the letter. His father wrote it before Bill was born, but there was no need to ever change it. The part that speaks to him most says, A sound body, a good mind developed by intelligent schooling is all the heritage a boy needs.Ž When Bill Koch looks to his school, he hears his fathers written words. In that letter its as if his father gave him a choice. He could do it wrong or he could do it right. Maybe he built his school to fulfill his fathers wish. Maybe his great-est perception of self will be believing he followed in the words of his father, that in his purest endeavor, he got it right. Q COU RTE S Y PH O T OS B ill Koch winnin g the 1992 America’s Cup u r e w v w h H c s i o s s t s o Ž h a te a pt. ey t o f o c h ics are ui ty. Me a d ec ke h ides s har e Mar y h a d t f or h s a ys be fo b e s h e s H h a n f a t He in bo d  I g b th erewasno

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Koch Brother — a profile TRE GABRIEL WAS ALL SET TO GO TO A PUBlic high school and play football. Then he heard about Oxbridge Academy, this new school everyone kept talking about, but no one seemed to know much about. He went to an open house and was sold on what administrators had to say: If you want something bad enough, you can make it happen here.Ž Tre knew what to expect from a public high school. Oxbridge was the unknown,Ž which made it feel like the infinite. He started a petition for a foot-ball program and the school lived up to its promise. Administrators recruited a coach who had the experience of win-ning three state championships. They put down a football field made out of the same turf as the home of the Buf-falo Bills. They signed a deal with ESPN 106.3 FM to broadcast all of their games. Now when Tre hears his name on the radio, when he talks about standing alone in the backfield, his face lights up like the Friday night lights: If Im ever back there for a punt return or kick return, I just look around and think, Wow, like I did not expect this to hap-pen so fast. Like Im thinking, OK, Im probably never going to play a home game in my high school career, probably never going to be able to compete for a championship in my high school career, but here we are on this NFL-style turf with thousands of fans in the stadium cheering for us and I just look around like, Wow. Every single time Im back there by myself, I just think, Im so blessed.Ž Tre feels like Oxbridge was made for him. He started high school in 2011, the same year Oxbridge opened. Now a junior, he says choosing Oxbridge was the greatest decision he ever made, And I feel proud because I made it myself.Ž At Oxbridge Academy, the smart kids have a legitimate social life and the jocks have a legitimate education. There are no bullies. There are no cliques. No one sits alone at lunch. No one skips class. It feels like a dream school because it does the impossible: It makes you want to go back to high school. Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches, a nonconformist prep school, is the brainchild of William BillŽ Koch. While his brothers made a name for themselves as the bankrollers of the Tea Party, cutting checks to support conser-vative, capitalist causes, Bill Koch built a school thats socially-just: Sixty-five percent of the student body receives financial aid. They all come from dif-ferent worlds, their parents may pray different, their parents may vote dif-ferent, but when theyre at Oxbridge, theyre all on the same page. They eat the same breakfast, they eat the same lunch. They all have a Mac, they all have a chance (All Oxbridge students eat a gourmet breakfast, a gourmet lunch and two snacks a day prepared by Chef Dan Gasperi, former sous chef of Il Bel-lagio. Meat comes from local butchers. Produce comes from farmers markets. The breads baked down the road. And yes, all Oxbridge students are given a MacBook Pro. When they graduate, they get to keep it). Probably the biggest thing, when Im going over to hang out with a friend, I dont know that they come from a multi-million-dollar family until I go to their house,Ž Tre says. You honestly dont know whos rich or whos not until you go outside the school. Its like everyone here is treated equally, and you have some people that come from the lowest side of the spectrum, in terms of money, and from the highest side, but theyre all together and theyre all hanging out, so its a lot different from how America really is.Ž Out of the mouths of babes, Oxbridge transcends the education system and the socioeconomic divisiveness of the country. And it reached such transcen-dental status fast, as the school will celebrate its first graduating class at the end of this school year. But its not just students, teachers and administrators who are complimenting the school. Outside voices are singing Oxbridge praises, as well. Theres a lot of hands-on learning, the interaction between teachers and students is exceptional ƒ Im very pleased with what theyre doing,Ž says Dr. Barbara Hodges, executive director of the Florida Council of Independent Schools. The 21st Century demands we begin to prepare students for their futures with such essential skills as communication, collaboration and cre-ativity. Thats what theyre doing there.Ž A new school candidate for the council, Oxbridge looks to become an accred-ited member in the 2014-15 school year. Dr. Hodges has personally visited the school. She finds Oxbridge inspiring. Says what inspires her most: Theyre growing.Ž The first year I was here, I was like, Why arent there cliques? Why isnt there bullying? ƒ Why doesnt that exist?Ž poses English teacher Amy Jur-skis. I was trying to figure it out ƒ And I think Im realizing that it is because the kids work together all the time and when youre always working in groups and youre always collaborating and thats part of everything you do, then there isnt an other.Ž Oxbridge academic philosophy rests on project-based learning. Not memo-rizing material for a multiple-choice test, but living out the lesson, remembering it, learning it. Athletic Director Craig Sponsky uses a football analogy to lend some perspective: Oxbridge teach-ers are not just drawing on a white board, theyre saying, Lets go out and run this play. And lets run it over and over and over again. History students interviewed World War II veterans on video as part of a project, and have since filed their recordings with the Library of Congress. Science students are leading a major drinking water study in Loxahatchee to raise community awareness on the importance of well-water testing. After reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksŽ (a story of race, pov-erty, science and ethics surrounding the real life woman whose cancer cells changed the medical world), music stu-dents wrote lyrics to a blues song and played their songs for Henriettas grand-children. It seems like were this grand experiment that everyone would love to do, but people really are afraid to try it,Ž says history teacher Dennis Yuzenas. Its like the Oxbridge experiment has proven if you give students the tools, respect, opportunity and good food, they will learn. And if you give teachers the freedom, they will teach. I had one student come up to me ... and said, You fooled us into learning,Ž says Mr. Yuzenas, who fully intends to vote for his students one day. Chemistry teacher Kate Kilian says part of the reason she became a chem-istry teacher was because she hated chemistry in high school. I remem-ber memorizing the periodic table and taking notes all period from some old Einstein-looking man,Ž she says.Bill Koch’s dream school It offers Macs and a chef — with plenty of diversity and financial aid VANESSA ROGERS / FLORIDA WEEKLYBill Koch eats lunch with junior Tre Gabriel and other students in the school’s dining hall. Below, Koch in a chemistry lab with students.BY ATHENA PONUSHISaponushis@” oridaweekly.com

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 NEWS A13 Koch Brother — a profile COURTESY PHOTOSLeft, Koch and his brothers stand in front of a 1951 Buick in the Flint Hills of Kansas.Below, twins David and Bill, right, leave their Wichita home, headed to school, in the 1950s.VANESSA ROGERS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Bill Koch says he founded Oxbridge Academy in 2011 for selfish reasons: He wanted his children to receive a top-notch education In her class, she livens it up. She assigns students to write about macro-molecules, enzymes and antibodies like they are superheroes, giving them super powers, sidekicks and villains, true to their scientific characteristics. Everybody does their homework,Ž she says. Everybody wants to be here ƒ These kids are very lucky to be here, and they know that, just like we do.Ž Ask a random gaggle of students what it means to go to Oxbridge and they will tell you its a blessing, an opportunity, a gift. Ask teach-ers how they came to teach at Oxbridge and they will render the scene as if the skies parted and Oxbridge appeared. Oxbridge President and CEO Bob Parsons says the school allows teachers to teach the way they want to. Mr. Koch recruited Mr. Parsons from the United States Naval Academy. At first, Mr. Parsons refused his offer. He knew he was passionate about college-age students, but he did not know if he could find the same passion for high school students, so he started visiting high schools. What I discovered was, in really simple terms, I think that every child has the opportunity to make good and bad life-changing decisions any time in their life, but I became convinced that more kids make life-changing bad decisions in the ninth grade than any other time, so I realized that I could be passionate about trying to reach kids earlier in their life,Ž Mr. Parson says. I also knew that if I came here I would be working with not just academically elite kids who had already proven themselves at the age of 18, but really just a lot of regular kids. I really believe that all people, all kids, show great promise and great potential for wonderful things and its just a ques-tion of do they have an opportunity to develop their potential and then to actu-ally have a position in the world where they can express themselves.Ž Considering the diversity of the school, Mr. Parsons could share stories of the home life of some of his students or the neighborhoods in which they live, but he would never want a student to feel sin-gled out or embarrassed, so he will not share these stories. One of the stories he does find himself sharing revolves around a popular kid who was having some behavioral issues. His teachers and his coaches sat down with him, trying to show him how he could make better decisions. The boy changed his ways. One day, Mr. Parsons stopped him in the hall to acknowledge his change, to com-pliment him. The boy smiled and said, Im really glad you noticed.Ž Sometimes we dont know how wonderful kids really are and what their capabilities are,Ž says Mr. Parsons. Thats what I love about Oxbridge: We get to see it. You dont have to wait for four years to try to figure out, Well, have they changed? They change right in front of your eyes and its so remarkable, you cant miss it.Ž Q Oxbridge coaches Bill Koch has helped recruitQ Football: Doug Socha, 2011 Sun Sentinel and NIKE coach of the year. Former head football coach at Delrays American Heritage, finishing with a 22-5 record, two state championship appearances and the 2011 state title. Q Basketball: Dwayne D-TrainŽ McClain, picked by the Indiana Pacers in the second round of the 1985 NBA draft. Played guard on Villanovas 1985 NCAA Champion-ship team. Q Baseball: Juan Bustabad, drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the first round of the 1980 amateur draft. Played nine years in the minor leagues for the Red Sox and the Los Angeles Dodgers. Spent more than 20 years as manager and hitting coach for the Dodgers and Florida Marlins. Q Sailing: Joanne and John Kolius. Joanne oversaw the 2004 US Olym-pic Team Trails-Laser/470 Classes, the 2007 Road to Rolex Next Step Clinic and served as a technical measurer for the Europe Dinghy Class at the 1996 Olympic Games in Savannah. Her personal accomplish-ments include winning the Womens North Americans twice and finish-ing Top 10 in North American and World Championships. Husband John earned a silver medal at the 1976 Olympic Games, won two J24 World Championship titles and several US Sailing vic-tories in races such as the Sears Cup, Mallory Cup, Championship of Champions and Team Racing Championship. He has participated in five Americas Cups, serving as coach of Bill Kochs Mighty Mary team in 1995. Q Lacrosse: Stan Ross, led Princeton University to the NCAA national title in the 1997-98 season before coaching the United States Naval Academy, Butler University and the Denver Outlaws pro team. Q Tennis: Fabienne Combe, the top ranked singles and doubles play-er for the Pre Nationale French Ten-nis Team in 1987-1990. Q Volleyball: Katie George, earned a Division I athletic scholar-ship to Mercer University, where she was named Freshman of the Year in the Atlantic Sun Conference, four-time team MVP, four-time player in the Academic All-Conference. She holds the school record in four cat-egories. Q Swimming: David Prutow, led high school teams in New Jersey to win two state championships, nine county titles and 10 confer-ence championships. He retired as the sixth winning-est coach in the states history. „Source: Oxbridge Academy. Not all coaches listed. About Oxbridge>> Student population: Oxbridge had a goal to open with 50 to 75 ninth-grade students. Oxbridge opened in 2011 with 124 students in ninth and tenth grade. Oxbridge has approximately 440 students now, grades 9 through 12. Students came from more than 60 different middle schools. Oxbridge will cap its student body at 570 students. The teacher to student ratio is 15:1. >> Financial aid: Tuition cost $16,000 a year. Sixty- ve percent of Oxbridge families receive nancial aid. Last year Oxbridge gave $1.7 million in nancial aid to 56 percent of the student body. The average grant was $8,000. More than 28 percent of recipients received need-based grants covering at least 90 percent of the cost to attend Oxbridge. Recipients at this level tended to come from families with a total income under $80,000 per year. Oxbridge has found that a family of four may qualify for aid when annual income is less than $140,000. >> Bill Koch’s contributions: Bill Koch has committed $60 million dollars to Oxbridge Academy. He donates $10 to $15 million a year. He has raised roughly $5 million from other contributors, with a goal to make the school "self-suf cient." >> Oxbridge mascot—Thunderwolves : Bill Koch describes the Oxbridge motto as "The kids come rst," so naturally, the kids came up with the mascot. In a brainstorm-ing session of founding students, one group wanted a wolf, another group wanted something storm-related, so they merged the two ideas and came up with the Thun-derwolves, their mascot looking like a wolf biting down on a lightning bone. y V emy Consid e f d

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A14 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY What more can a doctor aspire to after becoming a renowned surgeon? Possibly the noblest achievement of all, that of Teacher.Ž Dr. Srinivas Kazas commitment to excellent care and innovation is one of the reasons JFK Medical Center has been designated as a Robotic Program of Excellence in General Surgery. We are one of only two programs in the state of Florida and eight in the country. The Epicenter designation is given to the most advanced and experienced robotic surgeons and hospitals who demonstrate the superior outcomes and a passion for teaching. As an Epicenter, JFK acts as a training ground for surgeons across the U.S. to observe and train in robotic surgery with Dr. Kaza.Da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery is especially well-suited for procedures such as general surgery, colorectal, and bariatric procedures. Patients who undergo robotic-assisted surgery usually have less pain, quicker recoveries, smaller scars and return to their normal lives much sooner. Doctor. Surgeon. Teacher. FOR MORE INFORMATION, ASK YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY AT JFK MEDICAL CENTER, VISIT US ONLINE AT JFKMC.COM OR CALL 561-548-4JFK (4535). COMMENTARYGet some, baby!Once again, were ripping through the holidays like a big fullback through the front line. We knocked down Halloween (Oct. 31), we blew past Veterans Day (Nov. 11), and were about to butt heads with Thanksgiving and the high holy days of winter. Although all of it falls smack in the middle of football seasonŽ in America „ and Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day all have special football games affixed to them, like big rhinestone rings „ Im not sure if my fullback analogy remains accurate. I dont actually watch a lot of football anymore. Do they still have fullbacks with thighs like tree-trunks and speed like quick-start locomotives? Do they still have three menŽ in the backfield lining up behind a quarterback who hovers like a toilet atten-dant over the big butt ocks of the bulls on the line? All of them used to be kids whose dads fought in World War II, an achievement they were always trying and failing to match on the gridiron, even if the old man really didnt take out 27 enemy machine gun nests with 10 rounds and a .45 in his left hand while smoking an unfiltered, unreconstructed and entirely unrepentant Camel with his right (Sgt. Walter Mitty). Thats a baby boomer vision of football, of course „ a sport I grew up playing. A sport we boomers have really screwed up. So Im trying to make reparations. Instead of tuning in weekends, I go stag-ger across the leafy flats under our big old front-yard oaks like a drunken split end, trying to catch whatever partially deflated pigskin my littlest son throws at me, and spiraling a few in his direction, as well. At 60, I can still run the 40 in about 20 min-utes. And the 100-yard dash? Half a day, which isnt half bad.The forty, the hundred: Those are football distances, designed for boys. Girls or women are mostly left out of that world. The problem with the boomer (male) version of football is this: we thought that what happened on the gridiron was impor-tant, the way that what once happened at Normandy or in the Pacific was important. We misunderstood the game, and we skewed it with the worst of our baby-boomer ambitions: to fight a grand war no matter where, like the old man. To make a hell of a lot of money no matter how, like the old man. To turn what was once merely an organized roughhouse played for an hour or two on a crisp fall afternoon into a corporate system viewed by millions of paying fans „ like the old man would have if he could have. Oh, and to sit in a big easy chair or at least a bleacher seat like the old man, and just watch. How many men actually get off their duffs and play professional football, unlike the old man? I can tell you. Out of roughly 155 million males in the United States, 1,696 receive plump paychecks to play in the NFL dur-ing any given football season, if there are 32 teams, each with 53 players. But a lot of other people make a lot of money when that battalion hits the field, too. Throw in the swollen team staffs and you have somewhere in the 2,000 to 3,000 range. Include all the people who build and maintain the stadiums, market the teams, sell food or team baubles or motel nights or big tailgates on the backs of big vehicles, or work to report games in the media, and now you have a cast of many thousands. On top of that, you can add Division I college play, which is merely money-making prep for the pros gladly supported by well-paid administrators and proud alumni, and conducted under the guise of character-building amateur sport. So now you have tens of thousands of players. I used to love football „ the mere sight of a ball floating toward me across 50 yards of breathless space. The smell of green grass and chill air. The speed and movement. The chance to hit somebody so hard his helmet would fly off and his mother, standing on the other sidelines, would break into tears and tell the ref you were playing too rough. But now the game ticks me off, although I remain perversely attracted to its pag-eantry and execution. Its these coaches, these parents, these crowds, these businessmen who push the boomer version of the sport. Its these pro-fessional players „ a bunch of overpaid, over-stuffed beefcakes, arrogant, swagger-ing and often tattooed like carny barkers. Its this football thing weve become „ this big business that pays a bunch of young men millions of dollars and makes a bunch of older men rich along with them. And its the fact that it all starts here in the neighborhood, with Pop Warner. Football, boomer style, begins not on a sand lot but on carefully manicured little fields laid out from Palm Beach to Port Charlotte, and from the Ten Thousand Islands to Tallahassee. Around those fields gather otherwise thoughtful, considerate adults who buy into a long testosteronal train of expec-tations and etiquette for their children, a train that becomes merely mercenary, starting in college. And maybe even starting in high school, where some teams reportedly recruit players from Pop Warner. But thats not football, thats business, and all of it should mean only one thing: From now on in the United States, no institution or any individual should ever be paid even a single George Washington dollar to support a football program or play the game. And now that I have that settled, and because the Florida State Seminoles still have a shot at making the BCS National Championship game against Alabama „ in the Rose Bowl, in Pasadena, on Jan. 6, starting at 8:30 p.m. ET and televised on ESPN „ I have to go out and throw my kid a couple of passes. You know, to get fired up. To get prepped for the game. To GET SOME, baby. Q o s I g f t roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com

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A16 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY NEWS OF THE WEIRDBY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATEWorth the commuteQ Downtown London residences are known to be staggeringly expen-sive, but media blogger Sam Cookney calculatzed in October just how much. Cookney said he can live in an upscale apartment in Barcelona, Spain, and commute almost every workday to London (700 miles away) for less money than a modest central London rental. (Sixteen commuter days over four weeks a month would run, in pound-dollar equivalents: $2,420 for a West Hampstead rental, $121 council tax, and $188 transit travel card, total-ing $2,730. Barcelona, in euro-dollar equivalents: $938 for a three-bedroom flat with three balconies near tran-sit, no tax, $47 daily round-trip on Ryanair, $32 a day in airport transpor-tation, totaling $2,202 „ a savings of $528 a month.) Plus, he said, sunny Barcelona is on the Mediterranean. (On the other hand, Cookney luckily can work on the plane, for each flight is two hours long.) Q Can’t possibly be trueQ Lawyers for Radu Dogaru, who is on trial in Romania for stealing mas-terpieces last year from the Kunsthal museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands, said the heist was also the museums fault „ for having such unimaginably lax security „ and that if the muse-um did not admit that, Mr. Dogaru would sue. Museum officials said they had tracked some of the works to Mr. Dogarus mother, who is claiming ignorance, and the sons lawyers hope to discount any insurance-company judgments against her by spreading the blame. Q The online retailer Amazon.com maintains a side business of operat-ing massive Internet-capacity cloudŽ farms and contracts out space to some of the worlds largest entities, includ-ing U.S. government agencies. In a case brought to light in October by a U.S. Court of Claims ruling, Amazon had won its bid against IBM for a cloud contract with the CIA, but had gone a step further by actually improving the CIAs system and implementing a better plan. In the bizarre world of government contracts, that created a fairnessŽ problem, as IBM argued that its rights were violated because the specified contract work was no longer exactly what was being done (i.e., the clients work was being done better). IBM lodged a time-consuming protest, but later dropped the suit. Q Update: Perhaps thousands of Baghdad residents have been killed by bomb couriers who had passed through supposedly secure check-points that were equippedŽ with use-less ADE-651 bomb detectors,Ž but the devices were surely to be history following the April fraud conviction of the British scam artist who made $75 million selling them. (American officials had warned Iraqis for years that the ADE-651 was basically a nov-elty golf-ball finder.) However, despite the debunking evidence brought out at trial, Iraqi police continue to use them, according to an October dis-patch in Londons The Independent, with the September death toll at near-ly 1,000 from bombers who passed through checkpoints, past silent ADE-651s. Even Prime Minister al-Maliki vouches that the ADE works up to 60 percentŽ of the time. Q People with issuesQ Matched Pair: Prominent Los Angeles cosmetic surgeon David Mat-lock is himself a finely chiseled speci-men of muscle and zero body fat, but he said that when patient VeronicaŽ came to him in 2007 for vaginal rejuvenationŽ surgery, he instantly fell in love despite her somewhat-pudgy figure. He proposed marriage, she accepted, and with her consent, Dr. Matlock set out not only on the requested procedure but on what he called the Wonder Woman Make-overŽ „ diet, exercise, surgeries, suc-tions and injections, and by August 2013, reported Huffington Post, the sculpted couple were competing in matching bodybuilding contests. (However, Veronicas daughter Isabella, 9, is not on board, remarking, Healthy food doesnt taste good.Ž) Q Least-competent criminalsQ Joshua Goverman, 29, was arrested in Glendale, Ariz., in October for allegedly stealing copper wiring from the back of an air-conditioner truck in a driveway. The thief apparent-ly had trouble pulling on the wires, and police found a human finger at the scene. Despite Mr. Govermans excuse (that he cut his finger during a car repairŽ), the crime-scene fingers print matched Mr. Govermans other fingers prints. Q Strange old worldIn July, several foreign news sites publicized the current Guinness Book record held by Jemal Tkeshelashvili of the Republic of Georgia, who blew up ordinary drugstore hot water bot-tles to the point where they would explode „ using only air from his nose. His record was three within one minute, but perhaps equally impres-sive, he subsequently dazzled Discov-ery Channel viewers by reportedly partially nose-inflating a hot water bottle being held down by a small car. Q

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 NEWS A17 Imagine Having A Choice When It Comes To Your Emergency Care. As a patient, it is important to know that you have a choice when it comes to your immediate medical needs. ER visits are necessary when a medical condition is life or limb-threatening. If a medical condition is not life-threatening, an Urgent Care Center can be a less costly and faster alternative to the ER. Our team of dedicated and highly-skilled healthcare professionals at Jupiter Medical Centers ER and Urgent Care Center are here for all your immediate medical needs. You can walk-in at both of these locations, or schedule an appointment for minor emergencies. The ER at Jupiter Medical Center€ Board-Certi“ ed Emergency Physicians € Highly-Trained & Experienced ER Nurses and ER Medical Technicians € 21 Private Patient Rooms € Joint Commission Accredited Primary Stroke Center € Hospital-Based Comprehensive Emergency Services for a Seamless Patient Experience € Immediate Access to Advanced Radiology Services € Open 24/7t4DIFEVMFBOBQQPJOUNFOUKVQJUFSNFEDPN&3Jupiter Medical Centers Urgent Care Center € Fast & Affordable Walk-In Service € Open Late & on Weekends € Digital X-Ray € Flu Shots € School & Sports Physicals € EKGs € Lab Services € Fast Track Services to Jupiter Medical Centers ER, Advanced Radiology Services or Physician Specialists (if necessary)t4DIFEVMFBOBQQPJOUNFOUCZDBMMJOHn Urgent Care Center 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64, Jupiter, FL 33458 jupitermed.com/urgentcare € (561) 263-7010 Monday to Saturday, 8 a.m. 8 p.m. € Sunday, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. The ER at JMC 1210 S. Old Dixie Highway, Jupiter, FL 33458 jupitermed.com/ER € (561) 263-4460 Ranked by HealthGrades Among the Top 5% in the Nation for Emergency Medicine for 3 Years in a Row (2010-2012)Recipient of the HealthGrades Americas 50 BestŽ AwardTM for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013). Tequesta Terrace hosts holiday pet food drive SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Tequesta Terrace Assisted Living is hosting a pet food drive now through Dec. 23 to provide food to pets of seniors in the community who need assistance feeding their pets. All pet food will go to the Kane Center Coun-cil on Aging of Martin County, Meals on Wheels and Passions for Paws Inc. in Palm Beach County. I spoke with the Kane Center and was told they currently do not have any pet food to give out to seniors who need help feeding their pets,Ž said Karen Kenneth-Schmid, commu-nity outreach coordinator for Tequesta Terrace, in a prepared statement. We are hoping that this food drive will help stock their shelves for many months.Ž The senior living community recently held a Halloween-themed party to raise money to donate to the Kane Center. Several organizations in the community such as Hospice of Palm Beach County, Advocare, Always Best Care Senior Services, Sue Jones Promo-tions, VIP America Home Health Care, Creative Florist, Anchor Home Health Services and The Gardens Court, part-nered with Tequesta Terrace on this project. We are excited we got to work with several organizations in the community to make this fundraiser pos-sible,Ž said Ms. Kenneth-Schmid. We all have a love for seniors and for pets and could not make this fundraiser possible without our sponsors. We do not want to see anyone go hungry, and we are asking the community to do its part and keep donating food to make a difference in the lives of our furry friends.Ž If you are interested in donating items, drop them off at Tequesta Ter-race, 400 N US Highway 1 in Tequesta. For more information, call Karen with Tequesta Terrace at 207-6500 or call Cathy Knowles with the Kane Center at 772-223-7800. Q

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A20 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Question: Kelly, I’m new to the singles scene in South Florida and I haven’t dated in a while. I don’t even know where to begin. Can you make the search easier for me? What do I even say on a date? Answer: This is a common question that I get LQP\RIFHGDLO\0\FOLHQWVDUHHLWKHUQHZto the area, newly single, or too busy to look RQOLQHRULQEDUV0\DGYLFHLVDERXWWKHVDPHregardless of age, occupation or marital status.1. First and foremost, be sure that you are VKLQJLQWKHULJKWSRQG,I\RXDUHJRLQJWREX\DQHZRXWWZRXOG\RXJRWRWKHHDPDUNHWRUZRXOG\RXJRWR%ORRPLQJGDOHV0DF\VRUSaks Fifth Avenue? The answer is obvious for most at least for the men and women that we want to date, right?This should be the basis of dating...i.e. Dating 101. If you look in a bar or online, where the risks resemble Las Vegas casinos, you are putting yourself in GDQJHUQDQFLDOO\emotionally and physically. Half the dating problem is solved if you look in the right spots!2QFH\RXQGDgreat person to date, be ready to show your wonderful side and to learn about him or her. You will get a sense of each other’s communication VW\OHRQWKHUVWdate. &20081,&$7,21,6.(<72$1<+$33<5(/$7,216+,3Find out early on if your communication styles DUHFRPSDWLEOH0\FOLHQWVRIWHQDVNPHIRUWLSVRQZKDWWRVD\RQDUVWGDWH+HUHDUHDIHZRXWRIWKHER[TXHVWLRQV\RXFDQXVHRQyour (new) hot dates that will reveal facets of their personality rather quickly: What kind of humor do you appreciate and/or use in daily conversation? How do you communicate when you are upset, if you do at all? If something is bothering you, how long will it take you to bring it up? How do you feel about being interrupted? Do you interrupt others? What kind of a listener are you, or are you a good listener?These questions can reveal some major character traits, so have some fun! Your date may enjoy the query more than expected. Try this out but only on a good candidate (as mentioned in point 1R$OOVLQJOHVDUHQRWFUHDWHGHTXDOVR,hope you can try this out on a nice person who has relationship potential.3. Lastly, do end the date with gratitude and kindness, whether there is a second date in the future or not. We all have busy lives, and when two people get together for a date, energy, time DQGPRQH\LVLQYHVWHG(YHU\GDWHZLWKDJRRGSHUVRQVKRXOGHQGZHOOZKHWKHURUQRW\RXwant to see each other again. If you want to see each other again, fantastic! Build relationships. %XLOGEULGJHV3D\LWIRUZDUG8QJUDWHIXOQHVVLVDERXWDVXQVH[\DV\RXFDQJHW%HZDUHRIungrateful grouchy people.Showing gratitude and giving thanks to your date, your family, your co-workers or anyone that contributes to your life is a very decent and powerful way to live. The world will give you more to be grateful for, and doors will open up for you daily when you show gratitude for what you have in this life. This is your life, and you are the designer. Kelly Leary is the Co-Founder of Precision Dating. She has 22 years in the dating industry and a master’s degree in psychology. She has EHHQIHDWXUHGRQWKH$%&1HZV7DON5DGLR Palm Beach Post, and Vero Beach 32963 0DJD]LQH6KHSUHVFUHHQVDOORIKHUFOLHQWV UVW&OLHQWVDUHSKRWRJUDSKHGDQGEDFNJURXQG FKHFNHG1RFRPSXWHUQHHGHG+HUFOXE services clientele from age 28 to 78 with some exceptions! For more information, please call '$7(LQWKH3DOP%HDFKHV5693DW www.precisiondating.com. Kelly Leary, M.S.Co-Founder of Precision DatingServing the Palm Beaches, South Florida, and Treasure Coast since 1991561-577-DATE (3283)www.precisiondating.comDating Tips for Singles e SinglesScene SPONSORED CONTENT On a mission: Palm Beach Gardens doctor performs 45 surgeries in Honduras BY AMY WOODSSpecial to Florida WeeklyWhen the vice chief of staff at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center took his vacation this year, he didn't fly off to Europe, cruise down to the Caribbean or tour the vine-yards of Napa and Sonoma. He went to Honduras. Dr. Andrew Seltzer, a surgeon with the Palm Beach Ortho-paedic Institute, embarked on a daring medi-cal mission that involved armed guards, grueling hours and lots of tears. Dr. Seltzer oper-ated on 45 patients in five days. "That was my vacation," he said. "We would get up at 5 a.m. and get back to the hotel like at 6 p.m. It was a lot of surgeries and lot of time." The Light of the World Charities project marked Dr. Seltzer's first volunteer effort with the nonprofit organization, and he said the experience changed his outlook on life."You come back a different person," he said. "We all go in to surgery to help people, but this just refreshed your attitude about helping these people here who have zero access to health-care." Dr. Seltzer belonged to a team of medical professionals that included Dr. Barry Miskin, a general surgeon at Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, Dr. Gene Manko, a gynecological surgeon, Dr. Manko's wife, Linda, a scrub nurse, and Juan Medina, a certi-fied registered nurse anesthetist. The five of them traveled to the city of Comayagua, about 50 miles northwest of Tegucigalpa, the capital. "They all were my mentors," Dr. Seltzer said of the medical-mission vet-erans. "They had all been there before." Dr. Medina has volunteered with Light of the World Charities since 1997 and served as Dr. Seltzer's inspiration. "Every year, he would come back, and he would tell me how he helped these individuals," Dr. Seltzer said. "He would come back and tell me these stories." Now, the 57-year-old Palm Beach Gardens resident has stories of his own „ like the one about the woman attacked by a machete-wielding robber who wanted her gold earrings. "He macheted her face, arms, body, her fingers were cut off, she was left there to bleed to death," Dr. Seltzer said. "Everything is magnified when you go because people don't have access to medical care. By the time we see it, it is usually a very difficult surgery." He had to remove the makeshift rods inserted through her wrists and elbows so she could heal properly. Following the operation, his patient "was smiling ear to ear." "It just brings tears to your eyes," Dr. Seltzer said. His procedure on a farmer who had broken his wrist gave the man the abil-ity return to the fields and work. "He was a farmer, and he couldn't do anything," Dr. Seltzer said. "The day after the surgery, he had his hand up in the air to show everybody he could move it. He was so excited because he could do it. He was going crazy." One of Dr. Seltzer's longer surgeries enabled a woman to walk unassisted again after a serious motor-scooter accident two years before. The external fixator she received at the time cost too much to have it removed. "She was a single mom with four children," he said. "She needed money to take it off. She was destined to have this thing on her leg forever." Dr. Seltzer also operated on a baby with a burned hand, a woman with six fingers and other needy patients with arm and leg ailments. "It's so rewarding when you see the response of the people," he said. "They're so grateful. They're so resil-ient „ the Honduran people." The team „ 29 in all „ operated out of Centro Medico San Benito Jose, a church hospital jointly constructed by Light of the World Charities and the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal. The bus drive to the medical facility took about a half hour, depending on which way the driver went after picking up everybody at the hotel. They said to us, We always have to go a different way in case someone is tracking us and hijacks the bus, Ž Dr. Seltzer said. "I felt very safe with the guards, but you'd have to have them. You don't know what would happen." He said the rewards outweighed the risks and plans to repeat the mission in 2014 to help Light of the World Chari-ties achieve its goal of alleviating "all world suffering one patient at a time" and bringing "the light of love and hope to those in darkness." "And it's true," Dr. Seltzer said of the organization's founding principles. "Every surgery, you feel like you're changing someone's life for the bet-ter." Q Dr. Andrew Seltzer stands with team members Liz Dephillipo (left) and Melinda Burnett. Dr. Andrew Seltzer A woman waits to have her external fixator removed by Dr. Andrew Seltzer.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 NEWS A21 Allied Capital & Development of South FloridaHarbourside Place is brought to you by:and in partnership with Accessible by land and sea, private and public docking slips will allow easy entrance to all that Harbourside Place has to offer. A minimum of 24 cultural events, concerts and festivals will take place per year at Harbourside Place, adding to the entertainment value of this unique collection of restaurants, cafs, retailers, galleries and more. Harbourside Place is currently accepting wedding and event reservations and will host its OFFICIAL GRAND OPENING FALL 2014. For more information, please call: 561.799.0050 and visit www.harboursideplace.com Now Leasing Restaurant, Retail, Of“ce and Marina Slips. estined to be the only location in South Florida that features a carefully crafted selection of dining, shopping and cultural entertainment along the Intracoastal Waterway, Harbourside Place will be more than Jupiters new downtown. This $144 Million development will offer a stunning setting for visitors staying at the Wyndham Grand Jupiter Beach, a 4.5-Star hotel that overlooks the Intracoastal Waterway. DJupiter’s New Downtown Waterfront Dining, Entertainment & More Jupiter Beach at Harbourside Place University report: Consumer confidence takes a dive THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Floridas consumer confidence fell sharply in October to 71, down seven points from September and its lowest level in nearly two years, according to a new University of Florida survey. This is the lowest reading since December 2011 following the last debt ceiling showdown in August of that same year,Ž says Chris McCarty, director of UFs Survey Research Center in the Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Although confidence among Floridians was already declining prior to any indication of a shutdown and debt ceil-ing debate, There is no doubt that con-fidence in September took a hit as we replayed the events of August 2011, the last time the U.S. was precariously close to a default,Ž he adds. Much like the rest of the country, Floridians were not happy with the prospect of defaulting on our national debt and a prolonged shutdown of federal services.Ž All five components used in the index decreased. Respondents overall consen-sus regarding whether they are person-ally better off financially now than a year ago fell three points to 62. Their expec-tations of improved personal finances a year from now was 74, a decline of six points from September. The survey-takers confidence in the U.S. economy over the coming year dropped eight points to 68, as their out-look for the nations economic health over the next five years sank two points to 73. Both components are their lowest level since December 2011. Meanwhile, their view that the present is a good time to buy a big-ticket item, such as a vehicle, fell 11 points to 80. Age mattersSeniors were the surveys most pessimistic respondents. Their ratings fell in all five categories with two showing dramatic declines. Respondents age 60 and over registered a 12-point drop in expectations of U.S. economic condi-tions over the next year and a 20-point drop in perceptions as to whether it is a good time to buy big-ticket items. The older respondents were likely troubled by the prospect of the fed-eral government defaulting on its debts, which would delay Social Security checks and negatively affect the stock market, hurting retirement accounts, Mr. McCarty says.More uneaseAnxiety over the federal shutdown and debt ceiling problems was not the only cause of Octobers confidence decline, however. There was also concern over Florida state revenues. Although a sur-plus is now expected, revenues might be smaller by the beginning of the year if Floridians and tourists decide to spend less, Mr. McCarty adds. Floridians also might see a rise in unemployment in September, especially in the leisure and hospitality sectors, when new statistics, which were delayed by the shut-down, are released next month. The expected decline is due to a pullback in consumer discretionary spend-ing that will show up in retail sales data, which is another indicator with a delayed release date, as the census was part of the shutdown,Ž Mr. McCarty explains. Another sign of growing pessimism is the news that the median price of a single-family home fell in September to $170,000 from a post-recession high of $177,500 in July, according to a Florida Association of Realtors study. The find-ing is significant because it predates the shutdown. Though new housing listings were up over 20 percent compared to those in September of last year, they may reflect an eagerness to sell before mortgage rates increase beyond the reach of some buyers,Ž Mr. McCarty says. He also notes that while the Federal Reserve is unlikely to change course until the new year, it is likely to purchase fewer mortgage-backed securities by the end of the first quarter, which it has been doing in recent months to keep interest rates low. As the holiday season is upon us, we estimate weaker-than-usual sales as the Florida consumer remains pessimistic, particularly since new debates among lawmakers are due in January,Ž he says, adding the effect could be reversed if lawmakers signal agreement on the post-poned debt-ceiling debate sooner.About the surveyConducted Oct. 1-24, the UF study reflects the responses of 411 individu-als, representing a demographic cross-section of Florida. The index used by UF researchers is benchmarked to 1966, which means a value of 100 represents the same level of confidence for that year. The lowest index possible is a 2; the highest is 150. For more information about the October survey, visit www.bebr.ufl.edu/cci. Q

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A22 WEEK OF NOV. 14-20, 2013 GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Dr. Rachel Docekal, chief executive officer of Hanley Center Foundation, has been elected to the Economic Coun-cil of Palm Beach County. Ms. Docekal will be responsible for collaborating with other business professionals to influence economic growth in Palm Beach County. I am pleased to join the Economic Council of Palm Beach County, which has a diverse membership „ allowing an excellent collaboration between the public and private business sectors,Ž Ms. Docekal said in a prepared state-ment. As the leader of a mission-driven nonprofit which is contribut-ing greatly to the Palm Beach County economy, I look forward to assisting the c ouncils mission, which makes a consistent and considerable positive impact on the citizens of Palm Beach County and beyond.Ž Established in 1975, the Economic Council and its members have focused the organization on identifying key pol-icy and issue areas that affect how busi-nesses operate. The council works to guide and shape the economic and civic landscape of Palm Beach County. Ms. Docekal, a development and marketing profes-sional, has experi-ence with nonprofit community-based organizations and has been presented with numerous recognitions. As vice president of External Relations for Caron Treatment Centers and head of Hanley Center Foundation, the nonprofit entity created to support Hanley Centers treatment programs, Ms. Docekal is responsible for capi-tal improvements to the centers main campus in West Palm Beach, board and donor relations, fundraising events and creating fund development strategies. Q Hanley Center Foundation CEO elected to Economic CouncilSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYState Rep. Pat Rooney will be guest speaker at the Palm Beach Gardens His-torical Societys Enrichment Program, set for 7 p.m. Nov. 19 at the societys home at 5312 Northlake Blvd. Rep. Rooney will speak about the history of the Rooney family in Florida. Refreshments will be served. Rep. Rooney serves as state representative in the Florida House, District 85, which covers Palm Beach Gardens, North Palm Beach, Juno Beach, the Acreage and part of West Palm Beach. He is president of the Palm Beach Ken-nel Club and managing director/presi-dent of Rooneys Gastropub. For information, visit www.PBGHistor icalSociety.org, or call Don Kiselewski, society chairman, at 622-6156. Q Rooney to speak at historical societyDOCEKAL SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A23 Get ready to show some sillyƒ For More Info: midtownpga.comSUNDAY, NOV. 24, 2013 11am … 3pmPONY RIDES, PETTING ZOO & MUCH MORE! PLUS Kids will explore, create, tumble and wiggle in activities from the artistic to the sporty, from the musical to the messy. NON PROFIT: SPONSOR: 561.630.61104801 PGA Blvd., PBG, FL 33418 PLENTY OF FREE GARAGE PARKING Follow us: facebook.com/midtownchildrensfestival F R E E E V E N T Palm Beach Gardens doctor first to use absorbable cardiac stent BY AMY WOODSSpecial to Florida WeeklyPalm Beach Gardens Medical Center this month celebrates 30 years of pro-viding cardiac care in the community and one if its top doctors has made the milestone much more momentous. Dr. Neerav Shah, a University of Miami graduate with 10 years' experi-ence as a local cardiologist, performed the hospital's first stent surgery using an absorbable implant. Shah conducted the procedure Oct. 16. The implant, called a bioabsorbable scaffold, represents a new itera-tion of stent technology that targets an increased surgical-success rate, less future artery blockage in patients who opt for it and a reduction in complica-tions caused by metal stents. "It's really the next step in the evolution," Dr. Shah said. "It absorbs and heals, leaving behind nothing. Any time you can fix a problem without leaving anything behind offers you a lot of flex-ibility." The surgery, part of a nationwide trial to collect data on the bioabsorbable scaffold, has put Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center on the map as the coun-ty's sole participant in the Abbott Vas-cular-sponsored program. The medical-equipment maker from Illinois wants FDA approval for its device and needs a field of 2,500 patients from which to cull data. "I think there are four or five hundred or so signed up," Dr. Shah said. The trial involves 200 medical facilities across the country whose doctors will follow their patients for five years. "We've sort of been in the process of setting up for it for about four months," Dr. Shah said. Patient data on the bioabsorbable scaffold goes back three years, when Europe started conducting surgeries with it following rigorous regulatory approval. "The company knew that if they ever wanted to get this product into the U.S., the FDA requires a U.S. study with a U.S. population," Dr. Shah said. "So in the U.S., it's only available through the trials." The benefits of the new stent include reduced risks of artery inflammation and the formation of scar tissue, as well as improved overall vessel health. While the first-generation metal stents in use today have a 96 percent to 98 per-cent success rate, that rate diminishes over time because of the occurrence of metallosis „ an adverse reaction to the titanium compound „ and reste-nosis „ the re-narrowing of an artery. The second-generation medicated, or drug-eluting, stents „ also made of metal „ effectively delay scar-tissue growth around the implant by two years or more, lowering the rate of restenosis. Made of a plastic polymer material, the new stent eventually dissolves in the body. "Technology has gotten better every time," said Dr. Shah, co-primary investi-gator of the trial with Dr. Augusto Villa, who studied at Johns Hopkins Universi-ty School of Medicine in Baltimore and has performed more than 12,000 heart procedures throughout his career. "The theory is, if we can have all the immedi-ate benefits of the metal stent without leaving anything behind, all of the long-term repercussions are gone." Larry Coomes, CEO of Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, said Dr. Shah, Dr. Villa and the rest of the team at the Heart Institute consistently excel at bringing cutting-edge technology to their patients. "For 30 years, Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center has provided the South Florida community with some of the best cardiac care," Mr. Coomes said. "By participating in this trial, we have opened the door to more avenues of opportunity for our patients to live lon-ger, healthier and productive lives." Q COURTESY PHOTOS Dr. Neerav Shah performed Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center’s first stent surgery using an absorbable stent. The bioabsorbable stent absorbs into the artery wall and heals, leaving nothing behind.

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A24 NEWS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY BLOOD DRIVE AT PGA COMMONSPGA Commons Hosts SAVE THE HUMANS BLOOD DRIVE for OneBlood LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /PalmBeachFloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too.Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Tamra FitzGerald Sally Shorr Paul Florentino Cameron Crotts Tim Gersley and Tamra FitzGerald Dominic EastonEnid Atwater Brandon TaylorCOURTESY PHOTOSDon’t shrink away from those who try to divide and conquer your family Laura wasn t imagining it. Her cousin Beth was noticeably aloof at the family wedding. The two women had always been cordial so there was only one possible explanation Laura could come up with. No doubt, Lauras daughter Carolyn had gotten to Beth also, with a trumped up horror story, about how Carolyn had been wronged by her parents, Laura and Harvey. Ever since the two had refused to give Carolyn and her husband Rick a house loanŽ last year, Laura had been on the warpath. It didnt seem to matter that Laura and Harvey had helped out the couple countless times in the past. Nor did it seem to matter that the loans had never turned out to be loans. They had given the couple tens of thousands of dollars and had never been repaid as promised. Laura had been careful throughout to keep her mouth shut about believing the anticipated purchase was well above Carolyn and Ricks means, and that she seriously doubted the couple could maintain this house in the future. Laura had learned the hard way not to voice her opinions about Carolyns choices or lifestyle. Carolyn was systematically trying to instigate trouble for her parents however she could. Would it ever end?Sadly, most of us have experienced the above tactic first hand in our day-to-day lives. This divide and conquerŽ strategy can not only become highly distressing but can also cause irrepa-rable hurt and heartache in families and social groups. Some people fight their battles by seeking to enlist third parties as allies in their missions to punish. There is often a calculated plan to seek alliances to not only raise support, but to poten-tially damage the other peoples well-established relationships. The inno-centŽ third parties become caught in the middle of a stressful drama, and often-times dont even recognize how theyve been used as pawns. Mental health professionals will oftentimes use a term called splittingŽ when discussing certain complicated personality characteristics. However, the term splittingŽ is frequently used by the lay public in a different context as a descriptive term that refers to the deliberate tactic of pitting people against each other (and will be the term referred to in this discussion.) SplittingŽ behavior may be designed as the revengeŽ of choice perpetu-ated by people who may be filled with significant self-doubts and vulnerabili-ties. These splittersŽ may truly believe theyve been treated unfairly. They may further believe that maligning the per-son they are angry at will build them-selves up in a neutral persons eyes. Oftentimes, the splittersŽ have difficul-ties addressing their hurts in a more straightforward manner, and resort to damaging behaviors in a misguided attempt to calm their upsets. They may be so self-absorbed they dont pay much attention or care to the destruction they leave in their wake. For those of us who have had the misfortune of being the victims of split-tingŽ we may, not only feel hurt and angry, but helpless to stop the damage. And, in fact, circumstances are often out of our control. If we attempt to stop the splitterŽ, he/she may be fueled to increase the efforts, believing theyve been further wronged, and theyre justi-fied in upping the ante. The splitters intent is often to unsettle us and pro-voke intense reactions, especially if they become allied to people who have been important to us. It may or may not be helpful to remind ourselves that the splitterŽ may be emotionally troubled, and, further, that those who know us well will prob-ably understand the context of the viru-lent attacks. Its never pleasant to have our familys dirty laundryŽ aired publicly. How-ever, the worst thing to do is shrink away from third parties in embarrass-ment, or to further involve them in the drama by justifying our case with addi-tional details. It may help, though, to acknowledge were aware theyve been brought in the middle of something unpleasant, and we by no means wish to burden them further by asking them to take sides. In some instances, it helps to reach out to the splitterŽ in a positive way, reassuring them of our continued love and support, and our sincere desire to reach a resolution. Understandably, it can be frustrating if these overtures are rebuffed. Its important to remember that no matter how furious WE may be, we should make every attempt to keep our behavior in check. Angry outbursts will only escalate the problems. And, its important, throughout, to keep lines of communication open as best we can. Q „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., LCSW, is a psychotherapist serving individuals, couples and families. A Palm Beach Gardens resident, she holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia and trained at the Ackerman Institute for Family Therapy in Manhattan. She can be reached in her Gardens office at 630-2827, online at www.palmbeachfamilytherapy.com, or on Twitter @LindaLipshutz. HEALTHY LIVING h h l i e linda LIPSHUTZllipshutz@floridaweekly.com

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A25 Got Download?The iPad App Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. ADVERTISEMENT Ask The Health & Beauty Experts Sinuplasty Question: Doctor, I need to have balloon Sinuplasty for my chronic sinus problems, Should I do it now in view of the holidays, or wait until the beginning of 2014?Answer: The decision to have any surgery is a serious matter, even if it is being done under local anesthesia. If I can assume your doctor has adequately treated and counseled you regarding the necessity of surgery, then there are a couple of things to be considered. First, depending upon your insurance policy you need to be aware of your deductible. How much is it and have you met your deductible? If you have only paid a small portion of your deductible it makes no sense for you to have surgery before the end of the year since you will get no credit for what you paid out of pocket and as of Jan.1, it reverts back to zero. However, if you have met the major portion of the amount, you should call and schedule surgery before the end of the year. The second consideration is the time required for recovery and what shape you will be in for company over Thanksgiving and/or Christmas? The treatment of chronic sinusitis used to require general anesthesia and aggressive surgical cutting and scraping. This resulted in a rather prolonged and painful post operative course. With the development of balloon Sinuplasty that is done in the office under local, recovery is one to two days with a significant reduction in pain and the need for post operative pain medicine! Now you will be able to enjoy Thanksgiving and the Christmas holidays while taking advantage of the deductible you met over the past year. For further information call for an appointment at 561-776-7112.Dr. Dedo has been serving the South Florida community for over 35 years and is Triple Board certified in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology. Dr. Dedo has held leadership positions in the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the local hospital community as well as the past President of the Palm Beach County Medical Society. He has written 45 articles and chapters for textbooks and medical journals. Dr. Douglas Dedo, Board Certi“ ed Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology.Gardens Cosmetic Center 4060 PGA Blvd. Suite 203Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-626-3223www.gardenscosmeticcenter.com ASK THE COSMETIC SURGEON ASK THE DENTAL EXPERT Question: My dentist said he could not place my implant at the same time he pulls my tooth. This means I won’t get my per-manent teeth for at least nine months. I have a sister who had her implants placed at the same time as her teeth were removed, allow-ing her to have temporary teeth the same day & permanent teeth in four or five months. She is very happy with her implant treatment. Can you explain the difference. Answer: Every tooth extraction, even in the same patient, can lead to different treat-ment modalities. If removal of a tooth leaves behind a defect in the jaw bone that is larger than the dental implant (a titanium threaded screw), then usually the implant can not be placed at the same time as the failing tooth is extracted. In these cases, bone grafting is necessary first. The bone-graft material stim-ulates your own body to generate new bone growth over three to four months allowing the implant dentist to place a dental implant in firm healthy bone several months later. If the extraction site is narrower than the dental implant, a skilled implant dentist can oftentimes place the dental implant simul-taneously. If there are small gaps between implant and bone, the implant dentist will add bone graft material simultaneously to help stimulate additional bone regeneration as the implant heals. In many of these situations, temporary teeth can be placed the same day, or in some cases the following day. The patient is instructed to remain on a soft diet for sev-eral months. This would allow you to wear temporary teeth while the implants heal and make the new permanent teeth in three to four months. Like so many things in life, implant dentistry is changing rapidly with a variety of new techniques that are proven effective and safe when properly performed by an expert. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A., Cosmetic, Restorative & Implant Dentistry Board Certi“ ed IV Sedation Use of anesthetic sedation dentistry Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S.,P.A.PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry7100 Fairway Dr. Suite 59Palm Beach Gardens, Fl. 33418x£‡"‡nU*`iˆ Vœ“ Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. He’s been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He’s a member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists.Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. How to help your child understand mental illnessAccording to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately one in four American adults suffers from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. S t. Marys Medical Centers Institute for Mental Health offers a range of treatment approaches, all geared to the needs of adults and seniors who are attempting to cope with mental illnesses and other issues including depression, loss and grief, anxiety/panic, alcohol/drug abuse, bipolar disorder, schizo-phrenia, trauma recovery and family conflict. When talking with children about mental illness it may help to make a comparison with a physical illness. For example, when people have a cold, they usually can still do their normal activities and dont get sicker with a more serious condition such as pneumonia. But if people do develop pneumonia, they may have to take medi-cation or go to the hospital. Mental illnesses are like this too. Many people experience feelings of sadness, anxiety or irritability that dont interfere with day-to-day responsibilities. But some-times, these feelings can intensify and may be a sign of a mental illness that needs treatment. Discussions about mental illness should take into account the childs age, maturity level, concerns and needs. Adults need to communicate in a straightforward manner, make sure the child feels safe and secure, and be aware of the childs reactions during the conversation. Pre-school age chil-dren usually need less information and fewer details because their ability to understand tends to be more limited. They often focus on visual signs, such as changes in appearance or behav-ior. School-age children may ask more straightforward questions and want more specific answers. They could be concerned about their safety and that of their family and friends. Teenagers can handle more information and ask even more direct questions. They may be able to better understand mental illness when encouraged to participate in the discussion rather than be lectured. It is important for children to understand that a mental illness is not due to one specific thing. Rather, mental illnesses could be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, too much stress, the brain working in a different way or being upset for an extended period of time resulting in the inability to cope. Children also should know that they did not cause the illness, nor is it the fault of the person with the mental illness. Like many physical illnesses, mental illnesses also take time to get better. Children of parents with mental illnesses are at risk for developing mental illnesses themselves. To help reduce these risks, a family member or adult friend can encourage the child to learn about the illness, provide a stable envi-ronment, seek psychotherapy for the child, foster a positive relationship with the parent, and promote healthy peer relationships. The child also can take part in interests outside the home, such as sporting events or cultural activities that can help them develop personal interests and develop a strong sense of identity and self-worth. To request additional information, schedule a free assessment or refer someone who is in need of mental health or substance abuse treatment, call the Institute for Mental Health at St. Marys Medical Center at 840-6040. Ser-vices include 24-hour, seven-day-a-week assessments, referrals and admissions. Confidential interviews with a mental health professional are conducted to determine what treatment is required. See www.stmarysmc.com for more information. Q a i s m c t h davide CARBONE CEO, St. Marys Medical Center

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A NEW STUDY RELEASED BY BMO PRIVATE Bank to mark National Philanthropy Day on Nov. 15 show s that Floridas affluent residents „ those with an investible income of at least $1 million „ will be donating an average of $6,627 to charities in 2013. The study also found that they will be designating 7 percent of their estates to charitable causes in their wills, providing an opportunity for their contribu-tions to impact non-profit organizations for decades to come. The study is the third in a series by BMO Private Bank examining trends among high net-worth Americans. Other highlights about Floridians include: Q Most wealthy Floridians (94 percent) expect to make at least one chari-table contribution this year. Q Almost one-half (46 percent) are donating more money to charity than they did prior to the onset of the reces-sion five years ago. Thirty-four percent are donating the same amount and only 20 percent are donating less. Q Thirty-nine percent of the states affluent give to political causes „ one of the highest percentages in the country. Q Other preferred causes include health programs and disease research (49 percent), religious institutions (46 per-cent), education (39 percent), childrens charities (37 percent), animal welfare and local community programs (32 percent for each) and the arts (29 percent). Wealthy Floridians have long been recognized as very generous, with sig-nificant contributions to their favorite charities and non-profit institutions,Ž said Michael J. Dyer, CFP and Managing Director, BMO Private Bank in West Palm Beach. Not only do our clients make regular and substantial donations on an annual basis to a multitude of causes, but many have strategies in place for their support to continue through their estate plans.Ž On a national level, the study found:The study found On a national level, the study found: Q Affluent Americans plan on leaving, on average, 7 percent of their estates to charitable causes in their wills. Q Almost all (94 percent) expect to make charitable contributions this year, with an average donation amount of $8,845. Q Half (48 percent) of high-net worth Americans are donating more to charities than they did before the 2008 recession. Forty-one percent reported that they are donating the same amount and only 11 percent are donating less. Q Almost half (49 percent) are giving to religious institutions while 46 percent are donating to health programs and disease research. Other causes include local community programs (36 percent), childrens charities (31 percent), the arts (28 percent) and education programs and animal welfare (27 percent each). Claudia Sangster, director, Philanthropic Services, CTC Consulting | Harris myCFO provides some insight to those seeking to make the most of their charita-ble giving: Rather than giving on an ad-hoc basis, people should consider maxi-mizing the impact of their generosity by working with a financial professional to develop a philanthropic strategy that is part of an overall financial plan. Not only will their giving have a more lasting impact, but it will also enable them to leave a legacy for their family, their com-munity and future generations.Ž BMO Private Bank offers a range of services that include investment advi-sory, trust, banking and financial plan-ning to meet the financial needs of high net-worth clients. BMO Private Bank is a brand name used in the United States by BMO Harris Bank N.A. Member FDIC. Not all prod-ucts and services are available in every state and/or location. The online survey was conducted by Pollara between March 28 and April 11, with a sample of 482 American adults who have $1 million-plus in investable assets (including a sub-sample of 41 Flor-ida residents). The margin of error for a probability sample of this size is 4.5 percent, 19 times out of 20. Q BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH COUNTY COMMERCE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A26 Affluent philanthropic cultureAffluent Floridians giving an average $6,627 to charity this year, study shows DYER SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 BUSINESS A27teamwork is essential.Ž Mr. Gannon, the youngest of six siblings, grew up in Fort Lauderdale, where he says he worked as a paperboy and parked cars to put a shirt on his back. However, at the age of 16, Mr. Gannon was introduced to the sport of polo, a game he says mesmerized him, but also cost a lot of money. Mr. Gannon says that he knew he needed to create some-thing spectacular to play the sport with which he fell in love. I wanted to be like the guy who created Velcro and make a lot of money,Ž he says. I worked hard to make sure that day would come.Ž Mr. Gannon, a 1970 graduate of Florida State University, majored in art his-tory and became a Renaissance spe-cialist. Though he spent most of his undergraduate studies in Italy, when he returned to the states, he says he was disappointed to learn that jobs were limited. While Florida was the only place he knew, Mr. Gannon move to Colorado, where the snow top mountains glis-tened and the weather was far from 90 degrees and sunny. Learning to ski in his free time and cooking at the Aspen Institute consumed his life, and it was then that his passion for the culinary industry sparked and his talent for dis-tinguishing different flavors had begun. We made everything from scratch and I really learned about the quality of food,Ž he says. While working in the culinary industry, I became a flavorist.  Creating flavor and understanding fla-vor was most important.Ž Mr. Gannon continued his culinary exploration at The Four Seasons hotel, Steak and Ale and Al Copelands Cajun Caf in New Orleans. It was in 1988 that he co-founded Outback Steakhouse and created what would be considered his Velcro,Ž otherwise known as the Bloo-min Onion. Bob Basham, Chris Sullivan, Trudy Cooper and I were a team and we each brought different qualities to the table to make Outback Steakhouse success-ful.Ž More than 1,200 Outback Steakhouses later, the Bloomin Onion has generated more than $1 billion in sales, enough to enable Mr. Gannon to become, at age 41, the polo player he had dreamed of being. Mr. Gannon, a chef, a polo player and entrepreneur, has not only received awards for his entrepreneurship, but he also was inducted into the Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame after winning three U.S. Open Polo Championships. Although Mr. Gannons passion for polo had finally become a reality, he says that the culinary industry and serv-ing people quality food was still impor-tant to him. Being in this industry lifts me up and gives me a sense of well-being,Ž he says. That brings him to PDQ.In 2011, Bob Basham, co-founder of Outback Steakhouse and 25-year part-ner to Mr. Gannon and CEO Nick Read-er, perfected the concept of PDQ in Tampa. PDQ, an acronym for People Dedicated to QualityŽ or Pretty Darn QuickŽ emphasizes fresh and quality food served fast. Mr. Gannon says that he quickly embraced the PDQ concept and is not only focusing on expanding throughout South Florida, but also focusing on fla-vor and menu development. PDQ is the type of place where once you order, not only is it in our computer system, but it is already made and ready to go,Ž says Chris Gannon, Mr. Gannons son and active manager at the West Palm Beach location. PDQ offers dine-in seating and a drive-through, as well as catering, which showcases the concept that everything is made from scratch with the best ingredients and flavors. Were serving anywhere from 600 to 900 customers for lunch,Ž says Mr. Gannon. If you ask Mr. Gannon what his favorite choice on the menu is, he says he truly enjoys the fresh apple slices with toffee dip; however, according to his son, the chicken tenders and the crispy turkey are fan favorites. With plans to continue to expand the PDQ concept, Mr. Gannon says that he not only hopes to improve economic development by creating more jobs, but he also says that he feels strongly about community involvement. Mr. Gannon has partnered with WPTVs Impact 5 for Autism, as well as sponsoring The South Florida Sailfish youth baseball team, and The Boys and Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County. I really believe that life is about selfaccomplishment,Ž says Mr. Gannon. Its important to be able to create things like jobs and menu items and to be able to sit down with a team to help you execute your dream.Ž Q INVESTMENTFrom page 1 >> Name: Tim Gannon >> Age: 64 >> Original hometown: Fort Lauderdale >> What is your guilty culinary pleasure? “I love the scrambled eggs and caviar from Chez Jean Pierre. It is wonder-ful, creative and fun. I also love a special peanut butter and jelly sandwich, lobster sandwiches from South Hampton, a fried oyster sandwich. Oh, I like all kinds of things.” >> What advice would you give someone who wants to be a chef or restaura-teur? “Every great restaurant has a perfect balance of the customer’s needs which includes avor, price, taste, and service. Then you have to blend in the employees experience and make them happy by providing a great working environment that is fun and electrifying. You also need to make the economics make sense to the point where you see a return. I think that it is important to tie these elements together to create your formula for success.” States and local governments playing with fiscal fireMention the words fiscal deficitŽ and the U.S. federal government comes to mind. Whilst the U.S. federal deficit is a truly horrific financial worry, there are much more critical fiscal deficits that remain in the shadows: the state and local fiscal deficits. The U.S. government has great capacity to kick the can down the roadŽ for a lot longer than state and local government entities. That is why cities and counties, having reached their dead ends, are now filing bankruptcy. To wit: Detroit, a city which jerry-rigged non-solutions for more than a decade only to find itself with a proposed reorganiza-tion plan that would reduce retirees pen-sions and health-care benefits to 16 cents on the dollar (i.e., a retiree with benefits of $10,000 might be getting $1,600 „ a haircut that few retirees can withstand). The severity of any governmental entitys financial problems is partly assessed by the size of deficit spend-ing and size of outstanding debts, but also by the capacity of the entity to do something to solve the problem, i.e., to reduce its liabilities outside of bank-ruptcy court either through expenditure decrease or taxation increase. The mounting U.S federal debt is now at some $17 trillion, comprised of publicly issued government bonds and indebtedness related to govern-ment obligations (much for the pensions and health care of its governmen-tal employees, including military.) For clarification, the $17 trillion number is not a present value of future obligations. The actual liabilities of the federal gov-ernment „ including Social Security, Medicare and federal employees future retirement benefits „ already exceed $86.8 trillion, or 550 percent of GDPŽ (WSJ, Nov. 28, 2012, Cox and Archer: Why $16 Trillion Only Hints at the True U.S. DebtŽ). Its worth repeating what I wrote in this space back on Sept. 13, 2012: The combined debt of state and local gov-ernments stands at $3 trillion. Their unfunded pension liabilities are another $3 trillion and those numbers do not include the present value of future pay-ments that states will make under Med-icaid „ clearly several more trillion and they do not include mounting public pension costs.Ž The federal government has a lot more options to deal with its deficits and debt burdens than state and local governments. Q State and local governments cannot print money to pay their bills and they do not have a financial institution, such as the Federal Reserve Bank, using unlimited ability to incur liabilities and buy whatever amount of bonds need to be issued to finance the state or local government. Q State and local governments can increase taxation, but not to the point where it causes corporate and personal taxpayer exodus into another state with lower or no taxation. Federal taxation increases cannot be escaped though change in domicile or state for doing business. Q State and local governments have to absorb increases in some federal social programs that were not of their making (e.g., Medicaid was a program created at the federal level but this social program has seen much of its cost downstreamed to the states. States inherit financial messes made in D.C.). Q State and local governments have already done a lot of cost-cutting as it was mandated by the severe drop in property tax revenues from 2009-2012. Governments may have reached their limit in cutting basic state and local services. The federal level has not dealt with cost-cutting or efficiencies. For those reasons, state and local difficulties have potential to be a crisis long before the U.S. federal deficit reaches an even more alarming status. Again, this is how I explained it in this column more than one year ago: Once at those ( defi-cit and debt) limits, municipalities then look to lessen creditor cash payments and the likely candidates are the large, public pension contracts. If negotiations with these and other creditors fail, the municipality might seek legislation man-dating reductions in public pension and health-care benefits. If so, the legislation is generally challenged in the courts.Ž Detroits bankruptcy is likely to be a harbinger of future municipal bankrupt-cies. All eyes are focused on whether Detroits plan to cut public pension and health-care benefits (to be cut to 16 cents on the dollar) will be approved by the court. In laymans termsƒ it is a biggie. In bankruptcy, the judge has to approve a plan for the debt-laden entity. In the case of Detroit, far beyond just downsiz-ing or creating operational efficiencies, the city needs to reduce its liabilities and it needs to settle with its creditors. Cred-itors will get a lot less than what they are owed. About half of Detroits liabilities are retirement benefits. The city has $3.5 billion involving pensions and $5.7 bil-lion in liabilities for healthcare and other retirement benefits. The citys financial consultant, Ken Buckfire, has made it clear to the bank-ruptcy judge that the city plans to pay unsecured creditors, including the citys pensioners, 16 cents on the dollar. There are about 23,500 city retirees.Ž (Detroit pension cuts function of mathematics investment banker,Ž Reuters, Oct. 25, 2013). Investors have been led to believe that there will not be another equity crisis. But can they imagine a municipal bond crisis that spills over into the equity markets? What if Detroit becomes the standard bearer for resolution of munici-pal financial problems? If the reality of the problem had been dealt with by the creditors in years prior, there would not likely be such a tragic ending for so many public servants. Q „ Jeannette Showalter, CFA is a commodities broker with Worldwide Futures Systems. Find her on Facebook at Jeannette Showalter, CFA. „ Trading futures and options on futures and Forex transactions involve substantial risk of loss and may not be suitable for all investors. You should carefully consider whether trading is suitable for you in light of your circumstances, knowledge and financial resources. You may lose all or more of your initial investment. Opinions, market data and recommendations are subject to change at any time. s t c n  e M jeannette SHOWALTER CFA showalter@ww fsyst ems.com

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A28 BUSINESS WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH NETWORKINGCancer Institute opening, JFK Medical Center, West Palm Beach LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /PalmBeachFloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Carlos Garces and Dee JonesGisela Shore, Bill Shore and Frank SingeltonFlora Wu and Xiaodong Wu Gerri DeStefano and Jane Forsythe Luciana Ravazzi and Bruno Sharp Joan Brunswick and Debbie Murphy Georges Hartoum, Gina Melby, Michael Dalhgren and Silvio Garcia Jessica Mannix, William Slomka, Imelda Slomka and Rosie Ramos Mark Rizzi and Madelyn NavaMichael Dalhgren and Shelley Vana Lisa Gardi, Corinne Danielson and Angelique Taylor Vickie Pollard, David Cook, Dee Jones, Sheryl Grant and Alphonso Roan Gabriel Ghanoum, Gina Melby and Georges Hatoum David Cook, Thomas Rhea, Thomas Mestman and Shirley LiuANDREW SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 BUSINESS A29 PALM BEACH NETWORKINGWest Palm Beach Antiques Festival, South Florida FairgroundsMartin Zarcadoolas, Christopher Zarcadoolas and Rayito “Gigi” AndersonAshley Linen and Molly RastrelliDan Hawkins and Susan Hawkins Roy Grillo and Marina Grillo Pierre Ramsaran Sandy Edge and Simone CunhaPatrice Gibson and Raquel Harary Scott Dodge and Kim Dodge Jane FordCOURTESY PHOTOS West Palm Beach Antiques Fest P i e rr e R a m sa r an e l Hara ry S cott Dodge and Kim Dodge LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /PalmBeachFloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.

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Jupiter | Juno Beach | Port St. Luciereal people.real results.real estate. When you do what you love it shows. Our firm has become one of the fastest-growing real estate firms in the area. Home buyers and sellers have trusted Platinum Properties Realty, Inc. to be their partner. It starts with our people. Our agents care, listen, and know what is needed to get the job done because they love what they do. They approach buying and selling a home as if it was their own. Our agency retains a small and friendly feel, yet offers a professional team, comprehensive range of services, and thorough knowledge of the market. What does this mean to you? Plain and simple we get you results. Contact one of our featured agents today, and ask about the Platinum Properties Advantage Program to sell your home faster and for a higher selling price. Tina Hamor 561.703.7624TinaHamor@comcast.net Lisa Machak 561.951.9514Lisa@LisaMachak.com Margot Matot 561.707.2201 MargotMatot@yahoo.com Jessica DesPlaines 561.202.7061JKDesplaines@gmail.com Rita Boesky 561.596.9977Rita@RitaBoesky.com Don Beyersdorf 561.400.8230Don@DonBeyersdorf.com Matt Abbott 561.352.9608MAbbott@PlatProps.com Sandy Trowbridge 561.758.1055Sandy@SandyTrowbridge.com Thomas Traub 561.876.4568Tom@TomTraub.com Candace McIntosh 561.262.8367Mcintosh5755@bellsouth.net Juliette Miller 561.310.7761JulietteMiller1@gmail.com Dan Millner 561.379.8880Dan@MillnerHomes.com Featured Agents 3BR / 2.5BA MLS# RX-9985643 $414,000 Paloma 3BR / 2BA MLS# RX-9958050 $435,000 The Bluffs 3BR / 2.5BA MLS# RX-9984906 $330,000 Mallory Creek 2BR / 2BA MLS# RX-9966811 $288,900 Jupiter 3BR / 2BA RX-9958290 $330,000 Jupiter Farms To view all South Florida listings, visit PlatinumHomeSearch.com!

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SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYTHIS FIVE-BEDROOM, 5-BATHROOM CUSTOM ESTATE is in the Talavera subdivision in Mirasol. Offer-ing stunning views of the golf course and lush natural preserve, this estate at 111 Talavera Place features an abundance of upgrades and custom-designer appointments. It offers two bedrooms and 2 baths, and a large office/entertainment room on the main level, and three bedrooms and two bathrooms, with a spacious loft with oversized balcony, on upper level. The open floor plan features floor-to-ceiling windows, and exquisite front door wood entry with custom iron work. The luxurious mas-ter bedroom features a seating area, dual closets, French doors onto the patio, and tranquil views of the tropical landscaping. The master bathroom includes dual sinks, double water closets, a Jacuzzi tub, and large walk-in shower. The living room features a custom stone fireplace and oval trey ceiling. The gourmet kitchen has a center island, breakfast bar, endless storage, self-closing Luxor cabinetry, a five-burner gas stove top, double ovens, stain-less steel appliances and much more. The family room with French doors opens to the kitchen and breakfast nook and offers spectacular outdoor vistas with a seamless transition to the lushly landscaped outdoor area with large covered lanai and fabulous free form heated pool/spa. The estate is a short distance to Mirasol Country Club. Set within the heart of the Palm Beach-es, this club is surrounded by natural preserves and exquisite lakes. The private, gated enclave offers two championship courses designed by golf legends Tom Fazio and Arthur Hills, superb dining and social offerings, and The Esplanade Sports and Fitness center, a lushly landscaped destination for the best in tennis, fitness, pool, and spa. The Country Club at Mirasol is a mem-ber of the prestigious group of Platinum Clubs of America, and is ranked the 16th best country club community in the entire country. Mirasol is just west of the Florida Turnpike on PGA Boulevard, and is a private, gated com-munity. Fite Shavell & Associates lists the home at $1,950,000. The agent is Linda Bright, 561-629-4995, lbright@fiteshavell.com. Q of the tro pi cal A GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRYREAL ESTATE www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A31 FLORIDA WEEKLY A spacious retreatTalavera in

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A32 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY *Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. Pictures, photographs, features, colors and sizes are approximate for illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. Take your game and your lifesle to the next level. Palm Beach Polo Golf & Country Club e Woodlands at Ibis Golf & Country Club Tesoro Club New Estate Homesfrom the $500s*PORT ST. LUCIE 100,000+ Sq. Ft. Grand Clubhouse 2 Signature-Designed 18 hole championship golf courses by Tom Watson and Arnold Palmer 10 Har-Tru tennis courts 2 croquet courts Elegant feature pool with jacuzzi Fitness Center & Spa 109 S.E. Calmo Circle Port St. Lucie, FL 34984 (877) 949-3068New Estate Homesfrom the $600s*WELLINGTON Two 18-hole championship golf courses 2 practice putting greens Golf house and pro shop 11 polo “elds 10 tennis courts (3 dierent surfaces) Croquet lawns 11199 Polo Club Road Wellington, FL 33414 (855) 647-4247New Estate Homesfrom the $400s*WEST PALM BEACH 3 Championship Nicklaus Designed golf courses 20 Acre golf practice facility 14 Har-Tru hydrogrid tennis courts Heated 25 meter pool and Jacuzzi Fitness facility and spa 4 Restaurants casual & formal “ne dining 8850 Ibis Blvd West Palm Beach, FL 33412 (855) 374-0554 EmeraldHomes.com Real estate opportunities about if you act quicklyI ts amazing how the real estate market has changed so drastically in the past six months. Of course it is all over the news and in every publication. Buyers and sellers are very aware of this fact. We hear it every day „ inventory is down, prices are up and new construction is on the rise. Its exciting to watch the transformation of what has taken place in a short amount of time. More and more I am hearing from my buyers that they are not interested in remodeling. They are interested in like newŽ properties or new construction. I have not heard that in years. New con-struction is apparent everywhere we turn. Townhome communities, single-family home communities, builder spec homes and tear-downs can be seen from Jupiter Island to Boca Raton and beyond. I had the pleasure of viewing two properties recently one that was already remodeled and another that would be per-fect for new construction. My clients from New Jersey have been looking for a home over the past few seasons but havent been quite able to make the commitment. With all the news buzzing about low inventory they had the impression that anything on the market may not be worth purchas-ing and may be old inventoryŽ that has not sold. I assured them this was not the case and the main difference is they can-not wait to make a decision. If they like a home they view, they will need to get serious and make an offer. After they arrived, I wanted to get them excited at the new homes on the market, so we went straight from the air-port, grabbed some coffee and began our search. We started at an open house my associate was holding on Barton Avenue in Palm Beach. It is a beautiful piece of property with a perfect location. The home was originally built in 1926 but completely renovated over the past few years. It was well appointed and appeared to be very well maintained with a price point that was comfortable for my clients, $4.195 mil-lion. As the buzz was taking place inside the home with many brokers viewing it, my clients seemed to become more and more interested. There was something exciting about this property to have so many brokers wanting to view it. It had location, location, location, plus it was move-in ready, a nice size property and lovely outdoor garden areas. I could see the excitement in their demeanor. Next, we viewed another home that would eventually become a tear-down. It was also on a desirable piece of property on a well-known street closer to the North End and priced at $2.5 million. Their excitement was dwindling as we walked through the home because it was clearly not for them long term and needed a lot of remodeling „ just too much to make it what they would want without truly lov-ing the floor plan. Interestingly enough, however, on the same street there was a new home being built. Ironically, the designer of the home is their designer from New Jersey. He allowed them to walk the home while they were in the area to see his work in Palm Beach. Again, their excitement returned. They could envision him help-ing them with their new construction in Palm Beach. We began talking about the possibility of purchasing the home down the street listed at $2.5 million, living in it this season and then tearing it down to build new. Last year, this thought would not have crossed their minds. But today, as we drove through town seeing a lot of exciting activ-ity they were curious to see more of what was happening in the real estate market. Construction is everywhere. Suddenly own-ers and buyers are not hesitant to start the project they have been wanting to the past few years. There were construction crews and subcontractor trucks on one street after another. Now is the time. We finished the day with a great lunch at Nick and Johnnies. As we were leav-ing, we ran into a well-known architect and friend, Michael Perry of MP Design & Architecture. Michael talked about all the upcoming projects he is working on and the urgency of his clients to start their new homes. There are still very marketable and beautiful homes on the market now. The result is that buyers begin to narrow their options in order to make a decision. My clients are still deciding on location, but they are now open to new construction as well as an exist-ing home and they realize they are within a window of opportunity. Q „ Heather Purucker Bretzlaff is a Realtor with the Corcoran Group in Palm Beach. She can be reached at 722-6136. heather PURUCKER BRETZLAFF

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ERIC SAIN 561.758.3959DON TODORICH 561.373.1791 ADAM ROUSSEAUBuyers Specialist 561.758.3959KIMBERLY DENNEYBuyers Specialist 561.512.6627 Equal Housing Opportunity. The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate b roker. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or reg arding “nancing is from sources deemed reliable, but Corcor an makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property informat ion is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and wi thdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. All dime nsions provided are approximate. To obtain exact dimensions, Corcora n advises you to hire a quali“ed architect or engineer. SOUTH FLORIDA NEW YORK THE HAMPTONS TODORICH & SAINExperience you need. Reliability you deserve. Our team can assist with any real estate need. Consider TODORICH & SAIN for all your real estate consultations. Our clients are referral-driven because our sales are results-driven We are a full-time professional TEAM with over 33 years combined experience801 SOUTH OLIVE #1622Views of City Place & lake from this penthouse ”oor condo. High ceilings, marble baths, Rooftop Pool. Never lived in.Ž 3 PRIME Parking Spaces! $279KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 214 CHILEAN JPalm Beach Luxury close to the Beach. 2 BR/1.5 bath in quiet enclave with wood ”oors, open kitchen, high ceilings and gorgeous pool area. $540KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 4720 NORTH FLAGLER DRIVE Magni“cent gated Key West style WATERFRONT 4 BR, 5 bath home on 1 acre of land with 200  dock (no “xed bridges). Beautiful views of Palm Beach & Marinaƒneighboring the new Rybovi ch Super Yacht property. Master suite has covered deck. Detached 1/1 guest house. Professionally land scaped. $2.295M Eric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 418 31ST STREETJUST REDUCED. Completely renovated 4 BR/2 bath with detached guest house, hardwood ”oors, “replace, double garage, screened porch & oversized lot. $599KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 508 SAPODILLACity Place Convenience. This 2 BR/2 bath has tile ”oors throughout, open kitchen, stainless steel appliances, and two garage parking spaces. $249KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 3800 WASHINGTON ROADInterior designer ”air uses Chicago brick & pecky cypress in this spacious condo. High ”oor, day dock, updated amenities. Beautiful ICW views. $249,900Eric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 MIRASOL GOLF & COUNTRY CLUBPopular 4 BR/4.5 bath. Great room ”oor plan with expanded pool area, southern facing yard, french doors, summer kitchen & golf membership. $811KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 WATERFRONT LAKE WORTHExpertly renovated direct ICW 3 BR/2 bath home with open entertaining ”oor plan, luxurious baths, garage, large yard and private beachŽ area. $770KEric Sain 561.758.3959, Don Todorich 561.373.1791 SOLD SOLD SOLD

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A34 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY LIGHTHOUSE COVE TEQUESTA Fully furnished 2/2 condo in beautiful Lighthouse Cove, Tequesta. Resort style amenities include clubhouse, “tness center, tennis court, pool, and business center. Offered as furnished annual or short term rental.$1,200 PER MONTH CALL: HELEN GOLISCH 5613717433 JUPITER FARMS Beautifully landscaped 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath home with so many unique qualities. This home has a private wing with a bathroom and three bedrooms. Sliding glass door to a beautifully remodeled pool and separate hot tub. $349,900 CALL: ELLEN LILLIAN 5618093233 NEW LISTING IBIS GOLF & CC Beautifully decorated 3BR, 3BA condo with golf and double lake views. This great room home offers formal dining and breakfast areas. Premier golf membership is included. $7,500 PER MONTH CALL: RONA REVIEN 5613137930 SEASONAL RENT AL tntHBSEFOT!MBOHSFBMUZDPN www.langrealty.com 1("#PVMFWBSEr4VJUFt1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT )FSJUBHF%Sr4VJUFt+VQJUFS RIVERBEND TEQUESTA Spectacular long golf views from this impeccably maintained townhouse. Fazio designed golf course … no membership required. Light, bright, private end unit available fully furnished and move in ready. $78,500 CALL: HELEN GOLISCH 5613717433 NEW LISTING ANNUAL RENT AL KOVEL: ANTIQUESSpot the differences in enamel finishes BY TERRY AND KIM KOVELSpecial to Florida Weekly The Chinese enameling called cloisonne has been made for centuries. A thin metal wire is bent into shape on a metal vase and soldered into place. Then colored enamels are floated in to fill each space and form the decoration. The word cloisonŽ is French for fenceŽ and is the source of the word cloisonne. But there also was another type of enamel-on-metal object made in China by the 17th century. It is called Peking enamelŽ or Canton enamel.Ž A metal vase was covered with thick enamel, usually white, then fired. Then an artist painted a scene or pattern with colored enamels, and the vase was fired again. These enameled metal pieces were usually made to resemble European designs and most were exported. The quality of the work deteriorated during the next few centuries and this type of enamel is rarely made today. Recognizing cloisonne and its thin metal lines is easy, but Peking enamels closely resemble por-celain. A 5-inch-high Peking enamel tea-pot that held a single cup of water for tea sold in 2012 for $660. It was painted with a Chinese landscape of clouds over a lake but the painting style was European. No doubt it was made for export to Europe or the United States. Q: My brother left me his Brunswick Home Comfort TableŽ that dates from about 1908. I ts a combination billiards table and sofa. The tabletop folds over to form the back of the sofa, which has leather tufted upholstery on the seat and back. A metal label on the table says Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.Ž History and value? A: John Moses Brunswick founded the J.M. Brunswick Manufacturing Co. in Cin-cinnati in 1845. After a couple of merg-ers, the company was renamed Bruns-wick-Balke-Collender Co. in 1884. Today the company, still in business, is named Brunswick Corp. It manufactures a vari-ety of products, including billiards tables and bowling equipment. Your convertible sofa-billiards table was patented in 1910 by Jacob N. McIntire of New York. He assigned the patent to Brunswick, which made your unusual piece of furniture. Its advertised in a 1911 Brunswick catalog as a very popular design especially adapted for use in a den.Ž It sold then for $150 to $175. If yours is in excellent shape, it could sell today for close to $10,000. Q: I have two paddles my mother used to card the cotton she used in making quilts. I think she ordered them from Sears Roebuck in the early 1930s. On the back each one reads, The only Genuine Old Whittemore Patent No. 10, cotton, L.S. Watson & Co., Leicester, Mass.Ž What are they worth today? A: Carding untangles wool or cotton fibres so they can be woven into cloth. Amos Whittemore was granted a patent for a machine that made wool cards in 1797. Leicester, Mass., was a textile cen-ter in the 19th century. Several factories that made cards for textile machines, hand cards and wire for the cards were located there. L.S. Watson & Co. was the largest manufacturer of cards and also made heddle frames and shuttles. Watson was founded in 1842. After Lory Sprague Watson died in 1898, his son took over the business and it became L.S. Watson Manufacturing Co. It was still in busi-ness in the 20th century. Your paddles are worth less than $100 a pair. Q: I inherited six place settings of Normandie pattern Depression glass in irides-cent marigold color. While I have always loved them and display them often, I seldom use them. What about using them for my everyday dishes? I have put sev-eral pieces through multiple cycles in the dishwasher with no obvious bad effects. I havent tested them in the microwave yet and would appreciate any thoughts you have on the safety of that. Im more con-cerned about health effects than damage to the luster. A: Normandie was made from 1933 to 1940 by the Federal Glass Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The pattern was made in amber, pink and crystal, as well as Sunburst, which is the name of your iri-descent color. Normandie was the only iridescent Depression glass made during the 1930s and is sometimes mistakenly listed as a Carnival glass pattern called Bouquet & Lattice.Ž Iridescent glass is made by spraying a molded glass piece with metallic salts and then re-firing it. Since the first microwave ovens werent common until the late 1960s, your dishes werent made to be microwave safe.Ž The metallic salts in the iridescent glaze might cause sparkingŽ in a microwave oven, and that could damage the dishes or the microwave even if it doesnt affect your health. Washing the dishes in the dish-washer eventually will remove the luster. If you enjoy using the dishes regularly, wash them by hand. Tip: Do not store vintage fabrics or clothing in plastic or cardboard boxes. Natural fabrics like linen or cotton need oxygen and cant be in airtight boxes. And white fabrics will yellow if kept in plastic. Q „ Terry and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use. Names, addresses and e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. This copper teapot covered with enamel was made in China in the 19th century. It sold at a 2012 Cowan auction in Cincinnati for $660.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 REAL ESTATE A35 Increase your chances of buying your dream homeIn todays competitive market there are many factors that contribute to the success and failure of purchasing your dream home. When a potential buyer finds an ideal home, there are several steps the agent and buyer can take to increase the likeli-hood of a successful purchase. I recently observed this with my experience with my clients Jeff and Carol. Jeff and Carol made a special trip from New York to find their dream home. A property had just come on the market that I believed fit all of their needs. I was confident that because of low inventory, the many upgrades in the home, the location of the property and the pricing of the home, it would be desirable to many other buyers as well. Jeff and Carol toured the property and were delighted to find that the home included many features they had been looking for, such as streaming natural light in almost every room, floor-to-ceil-ing windows and a spacious open floor plan. As they entered the home Jeff and Carol were captivated by the breathtak-ing water view, visible from the living and family rooms. As we toured the property, there were other potential buyers there that appeared very interested as well. Jeff and Carol were ready to make an offer immediately; they did not want to miss this opportunity. They initially wanted to make an offer much lower than the market value of the property. I prepared a detailed analysis of the comparable sales over the last six months for their review. After careful assessment of the sales data, Jeff and Carol realized the initial offer price they wanted to begin with would not be a strong offer. The supporting sales his-tory indicated a much higher price than they wanted to offer. I explained to the buyers that the best approach for buyer and seller to come to terms is to set realistic expectations by reviewing equivalent home sales in the area, what was special and unique about this home and property on which they are making and why they would need to proceed with a solid offer. We discussed that the best strategy was to proceed with a strong offer, as it appeared the sellers would be receiving multiple offers. Many buyers wait until they locate a home to obtain a preapproval letter from their bank if they plan to finance. This process will delay the ability to place a strong offer if the buyer does not have the approved documents to submit with an offer. Jeff and Carol planned on financing; they followed my advice and had a pre-approval letter from their bank available to submit with the offer. We submitted the offer with a oneweek inspection and 30-day closing; these terms usually are appealing to a seller. The seller's agent indicated there was another offer submitted at the same time and the seller would review both options. Jeff and Carol were very anxious to have an answer from the seller, but they hoped that the special measures they had taken would provide then with an advantage. We received a counter offer for a higher dollar amount than Jeff and Carol had submitted on their original offer. The seller did not change the terms of the offer, so Jeff and Carol hoped that they had an advantage. Before they increased their offer price, they wanted to view the home again, so we promptly scheduled a visit of the property. Jeff and Carol walked into the home, looked at each other and said, This is the home we have been looking for.Ž That same day, Jeff and Carol raised their offer price and the sellers accept-ed. Jeff and Carol confided in me after the transaction that three of the rooms in the home were very similar to their existing home, including the furnish-ings and some of the artwork. They also knew the exact spot that their dog Smith would have his bed by the family room French doors looking out the window at the lake. They also learned that the sell-ers first home was in the same town in New York that they were moving from. Jeff and Carol were thrilled to find such a perfect fit. If you are looking for a home, consider the strategies Jeff and Carol used. When you find the home that's right for you and proceed with knowledge and a strong offer, youll maximize your chances of success. Q „ Linda Bright, real estate professional, Mirasol Realty Operated by Fite Shavell & Associates, lbright@mirasolrealty.com, 629-4995. linda BRIGHT

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Recipients of the 2012 Ritz Carlton Residences Singer Island Power Broker Award For more information on these Great Buys and Next Sea son’s Rentals, email us at Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com561.328.7536www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com LUXURY RENTALS AVAILABLE……RITZ CARLTON, RESORT, BEACHFRONT Beach Front PH 2002 4BR/4.5BA Penthouse with over 4,000 Sq ft. of living space. Upgrades plus poolside Cabana. $2,150,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front PH 1903 3BR/3BA Spectacular views. This unit has 10FT Ceilings, marble ” oors and a private poolside cabana. $ 1,595,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Frenchmans Reserve 2BR/2.5BARolls Royce of Chambord with luxurious upgrades including elevator. $789,000Kathy Miller … 561-601-9927 Martinique WT201 2BR/3.5BA Unique completely renovated unit with spectacular large private terrace. A must see! $399,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique WT2304 2BR/3.5BA Amazing Views of ocean & ICW. Coveted SE corner on 23rd ” oor. $585,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique ET1103 2BR/3.5BA One of a kind 11th ” oor ocean front condo with beautiful ocean & in-tracoastal views. Designer built-in furnishings. A must see. $649,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING PB Shores 606 2BR/2BA top ” oor Co-op. New hurricane windows & shutters, stove, dishwasher & dryer. View from every room. NOW $312,500Sylvia Jeannin … 561-926-0234 Cote D Azur 2-1403 2BR/2BA Remodeled with new kitchen,granite,appliances Views of ocean & ICW. NOW $285,000 Joan Tucker … 561-531-9647 Martinique WT2302 3BR/4BA Coveted SE corner unit with impact glass. Beautiful views of ocean and ICW. fully furnished, Immediate availability Turnkey. $849,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front 703 BEST BUY AT Beach Front 3BR/3BA with spectacular direct ocean and ICW views. Gourmet kitchen. $875,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique ET702 2BR/3.5BA Breathtaking ocean and intracoastal views from this coveted SE corner unit. Marble ” oors, wet bar & two parking spaces. $695,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties UNDER CONTRACT RITZ CARLTON RESIDENCES Martinique ET304 2BR/3.5BA Coveted SW corner unit. Ocean views, porcelain ” oors throughout Light and bright with neutral tones. $525,000.Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING One Singer 601 3BR/3BA W Penthouse. Spectacular views of the Intracoastal & City. One of only 15 exqui-site residences with gated entrance. Private elevator foyer. $1,600,000.Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Resort 1750 3BR/3.5BA Ocean views from this private residence at the Resort on Singer Island beach front living at its absolute “ nest. Outstanding amenities! $1,299,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Ritz 2502A 3BR/3.5BA Designer ready unit with amazing ocean views and expansive glass balconies. Price includes a furnished pool side cabana. $3,945,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Ritz 1904B 2BR/2.5BA … One of a kind sophisticated luxury retreat. Stunning views and top of the line upgrades including Miele appliances. Contemporary design … sold fully furnished. $1,499,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Ritz 2003A 3BR/3.5BA One of only a few highly sought after 03Žon the market. Panoramic views of the ocean. Utmost attention to detail numerous upgrades. $3,700,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Ritz 1603A 3BR/3.5BA Model residence designed by internationally known interior designer Charles Allem. Gorgeous views of the Ocean, Intra-coastal & PB Island. Fully furnished … turnkey. $3,495,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING Ritz 1704A 3BR/3.5BA Beautiful ocean front fully furnished residence. Professionally decorated with private elevator access. $2,699,000 Jeannie Walker 561-889-6734 NEW LISTING

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 FLORIDA WEEKLY B1 INSIDE Perfect seared tunaDave’s Last Resort in Lake Worth offers this plate of rare, perfect tuna. B19 XAn artist’s lifeSingers Will and Anthony Nunziata talk about what makes them tick as artists in our new feature. B9 XSocietySee who was out and about in Palm Beach County. B10-11, B15, 16, 17 X Sandy Days, Salty NightsThere are times one may be reminded that living alone is best. B2 X SEE GUY, B4 XBuddy Gu ys new release, Rhythm & Blues,Ž is a rarity in an era where EPs and singles are becoming popular formats to release new music. Its a double album, 22 all-new tracks deep. Its an album for which he is touring. Hell perform a concert Nov. 20 at the Kravis Center. Jonny Lang opens. Mr. Guy and his producer Tom Hambridge didnt go into the project Buddy Guy fights to keep the blues alive, one song at a timeFrettin the BIGSTUFF BY ALAN SCULLEYSpecial to Florida Weekly Dirt. Sand. Silt. Soil.Deborah Koons Garcia explores them all in her documentary, Symphony of the Soil.Ž The film, which has a screening Nov. 17 at Muvico Parisian in CityPlace, is devoted to the Earths life source, soil. Healthy soil creates healthy plants that create healthy people,Ž she said by phone from her home in the San Fran-cisco Bay area. The documentary highlights an issue for which Mrs. Garcia has been pas-sionate for more than 40 years. For me personally, Ive been really interested in food and health and food and social justice issues since I was in college,Ž she said. Mrs. Garcia also directed the 2004 film The Future of Food.Ž That film explores the history and technology of genetic engineer-ing and the complex implications of releasing such crops into the food environment and food supply. In Symphony of the Soil,Ž We give people an understanding of how many different kinds of soil there are. Its resilient but at the same time its frag-ile,Ž she said. Soil is the part of the amazing complexity of cycles.Ž Most people live their lives blithely unaware of its complexity. Most people are soil blind. They not only take it for granted but they dont even see it. One of the reasons I made the film was to take people away from being soil blind or soil unconscious,Ž she said. Of course, theres a certain stigma that comes with being dirty. People dont want kids playing in“Symphony” delivers the dirt on saving soil BY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@floridaweekly.comSEE SOIL, B5 XGARCIA

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSCohabitating in good times and badI spent the last three weeks at an artists residency, those camps for adults of the arty persuasion. There were intense discussions, fortuitous collaborations, and breakthroughs in creative pursuits. There was also a lot of drinking, at least two dance parties, and who knows how many covert relationships. Of which I, of course, had my own.All of the residents lived in individual rooms. These rooms lined up dormi-tory-style, one after the other, like in a motel. The living spaces felt cozy and well-equipped, but the walls between them seemed dangerously thin. So thin that I could hear the man in the room next to me as if no wall existed at all. If he moved in his chair, shuffled his papers, or took a deep breath, I knew it. We were more like roommates than neighbors, and I at first I found myself on my best behavior. When I woke up snoring one night my initial thought was, I hope he doesnt hear me.But as time passed, I relaxed into our daily habits. I sat at my desk, which pressed against his desk on the other side of the wall. I typed on my keyboard and read my stories out loud while he tapped the rhythm to his musical score and sang the notes. I thought of the quote from Joan Didion about life with her husband John Dunne „ how their days were filled with the sound of each others voices. I had forgotten how nice domestic arrangements can be. Despite our intimacy, the mans identity remained a mystery for days. Finally, one afternoon, he happened to be going in while I headed out. Hey, neighbor,Ž I said.He looked at me in a shy, startled way. Hey.Ž And that was it. We went on with our daily business, me listening to his orchestration sl owly take shape, him overhearing the new lines of the story I was writing. In the public spaces of the residency, we barely said hello. But in the private atmosphere of our adjoining rooms, I felt as if we were col-laborators. If only, I thought, he would acknowledge the specialness of our rela-tionship. At the last dance, I saw my neighbor across the dance floor casting around for a place to sit. He strode across the room and sat on the couch next to me. My heart gave a little pulse. He turned to me and I held my breath. These boots are no good for dancing,Ž he said. He pulled off his shoes and walked back to the dancing crowd without another word. That night he came back to his room late, long after Id already gone to bed, and I could hear him fussing around. I reached for a pair of earplugs, annoyed. The next morning I heard him cough, followed by a long, loud burp. We had beans in the dining hall the night before, and Ill just say that the morning was melodious „ on both sides of the wall. The sheen had worn off our arrangement, and I suddenly remembered why I like living alone. Q artis HENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 B3 Playhouse seeks volunteers SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Lake Worth Playhouse needs volunteers for ushers, stage crew, light board operator and sound board opera-tor for the production The Games Afoot.Ž The production runs Nov. 21 through Dec. 8. Rehearsals are Nov. 17, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Nov. 18 to 20, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Contact the playhouse at 353-6280, lakeworthplayhouse.org. Q CONTRACT BRIDGEThe odds are 30-1 BY STEVE BECKERAssume you're declarer in four spades, playing rubber bridge. If you make your contract, you score 820 points; if you go down one, you lose 100 points. It is therefore clear that if you are presented with an opportunity to score an overtrick, you should not grasp that opportunity if it might jeopardize the contract. It would be downright foolish to run the risk of suffering a 920-point loss for the sake of gaining an extra 30 points. Now let's apply this principle to today's hand. You win West's heart lead with dummy's ace and play a low trump to the ace, on which West pro-duces the jack. If you continue with the king of trumps, hoping West started with the Q-J doubleton „ in which case you'd finish with 11 tricks „ you wind up down one, losing two trump tricks and two diamonds. But that would be the wrong way to proceed. Once West's jack appears, it is far better to play safe by leading a low spade toward dummy's ten at trick three. This provides you with 100 percent protection against the possibil-ity of losing more than one trump trick. In the actual deal, East wins the ten with the queen, but his 9-7 of trumps later succumb to your K-8-4 when you lead a trump from dummy. It is true that the recommended play gives up all chance of scoring an over-trick (if West has the Q-J alone), but this is one of those luxuries you can easily afford to do without. Q PUZZLE ANSWERS Maltz explores “Looking Glass” SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Maltz Jupiter Theatre is set to step Through the Looking Glass.Ž The all-new Alice in Wonderland like youve never seen it before, Through the Looking Glass will come to life at 7:30 p.m. Nov 15 and 8 p.m. Nov. 16, featuring eye-popping sets, costumes, black light theatre, magic and puppets. Join many of the beloved Lewis Carroll characters „ the Queen of Hearts, Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat and more „ as they travel to wild new world with floating heads, talking animals and a tap-dancing egg. Follow teenage Alice as she learns to look in the mirrorŽ and like what she sees. New this year is a cast album featuring a full orchestra, available for pur-chase at the show. The musical stars 31 local children and teens, ages 8-18, who will all sing, dance and act throughout the produc-tion, otherwise known as triple threatŽ performers. Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students. The Maltz is at 1001 E. Indian-town Road. Call 575-2223 or visit www.jupitertheatre.org. Q

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLYexpecting to make any more than a single album. What really happened was every time we came up with a song and we were both excited about it (we d say) lets do it,Ž Mr. Guy said in a recent phone inter-view. And every time we finished that, there was another one. Well, lets do it. All of a sudden I said, they put 12 cuts on a CD or something like that, and we had 16, and (then) another one popped up. Lets do it. All of a sudden we had, I figured, 22.Ž Mr. Guy and Mr. Hambridge believed in all of the tracks, but they werent so sure the idea of a double album would fly with Mr. Guys label, RCA Records. I was going to meet the top Mr. Guy from RCA, and he said Hey man, and Im thinking hes going to say Im going to give me a pink slip,Ž said Mr. Guy, who one can only assume wasnt ever in danger of being dropped by the label. In fact, Mr. Guy, in all seriousness, said he thought RCA would accept just a single album and have him hold some of the 22 tracks for a future album. Instead, RCA bought off on the double album. Im like saying Oh, thank God,Ž Mr. Guy said. I cant wait to see whats going to happen. If we can get a little airplay, hopefully I can sell ƒ more CDs and keep the blues alive a little longer.Ž Introducing the blues to more fans and breathing life into the genre was a topic that Mr. Guy brought up several times during the interview. Its a mis-sion he has been trying to fulfill for more than three decades. Ive dedicated my life to the music,Ž he said. The late Muddy Waters, Little Walter, the late Junior Wells, I could go on and on, and we used to sit down and talk and be having a shot of wine or a shot of whiskey, and we would be joking and laughing about it. If I leave here before you do, you had better not let that goddamn blues die. Muddy Waters, he didnt let me or a lot of us know that he had cancer,Ž Mr. Guy said. I kind of got it from the grapevine. And Junior Wells and I were in a little club, the Checkerboard Lounge (in Chicago), and I said Man, weve got to go out there and see him. Lets call him and see. We rang him up and he cursed us out and said I aint sick, just dont let the blues die. I remember that precisely.Ž A week later, Waters had died, and Mr. Guy continues to do his part to keep the blues alive. Mr. Guy may be 77, but he doesnt act anywhere near his age. Hes energetic and passionate about blues and is doing more shows this year than many musi-cians half his age. Mr. Guy and long-time friend, B.B. King, though, are the last of the major blues stars still living from the post-World War II wave of blues artists still recording and touring regularly. A native of Louisiana, Mr. Guy began his career in earnest when he moved to Chicago in September 1957, where he was signed by that citys legendary blues label, Chess Records, in 1960, home to the likes of Waters, Howlin Wolf and Little Walter. Already an accomplished guitarist, Mr. Guy was recruited to play on numerous albums by the labels leading artists, but struggled to get label co-owner Leonard Chess to embrace the high-charged, hard-edged type of blues he wanted to record. Mr. Guys tenure with Chess ended in 1967, when he moved to Vanguard Records. But he went through the 1980s without a record deal, before he was signed by Silvertone Records and released the 1991 Grammy-winning comeback CD, Damn Right, Ive Got The Blues.Ž He has recorded regularly ever since. And Mr. Guy has delivered one of his best albums with Rhythm & Blues.Ž Even with 22 songs, there isnt much filler, as Mr. Guy shows his command of several forms of blues. There are hard-hitting rockers like Never Gonna Change,Ž JustifyinŽ and Whats Up With That Woman,Ž tunes with a little funk and Memphis soul (Best In TownŽ), a little (mostly) acous-tic country blues (I Could Die HappyŽ) and even some horn-filled jump blues … a style Mr. Guy has not often recorded … on songs like Well I Done Got Over ItŽ and Poison Ivy,Ž Mr. Guy may be enjoying some of his greatest popularity now, but he sees the future of blues being less certain than it perhaps has ever been. One of the big challenges facing the genre is the lack of radio play for blues acts. The radio stations have almost completely quit playing blues, man,Ž Mr. Guy said. Its not like it was in the 50s. There werent as many guitar players. If you played two or three good licks, somebody knew about you and we had all of the AM stations and the disc jockey could play what he wanted. You could take him a demo of something and he would play it. Well, you dont get that now on blues.Ž Blues artists also dont have the extensive network of blues clubs that once existed. In the early days we had the little blues clubs all over the country and in Europe, where you could go and hope-fully be seen and make a little name for yourself,Ž Mr. Guy said. In the last 20 years, 30 years, all of those small blues clubs have disappeared. Fifty years ago, if you could play at all, somebody knew about you because we had all of those little clubs you could go in,Ž he said. Mr. Guy is doing his part to keep the blues going by touring extensively and bringing his music directly to the people. He also makes a point of touting young blues talents. In this interview, he talked up Gary Clark Jr., who guests on the song Blues Dont CareŽ from Rhythm & Blues,Ž and a 14-year-old guitar phenom, Quinn Sullivan, whom he first saw play when Sullivan was just 9. And those who see Mr. Guys energetic live show might get excited enough about the blues to check out other blues artists of the present and past. Mr. Guy tries to cater to his audiences from night to night by not working from a set list. I go to the stage, and you can hear people,Ž Mr. Guy said. Theyll call out a song. Ill look at my band and say Lets do it. Thats why Im here. Thats why this particular fan came to hear me.Ž I listen to the audience,Ž he said. Im going to give you the best that I got, whatever I do. But I dont go there saying Im going to drive Damn Right, I Got The Blues down your throat. You might want to hear Slippin In. Or you might want to hear me try to do some-thing like Muddy Waters.Ž Q COURTESY PHOTO Buddy Guy has been recording steadily since the 1960s. His latest recording, “Rhythm & Blues,” is a double album.GUYFrom page 1 >>What: Buddy Guy with Jonny Lang >>When: 8 p.m. Nov. 20 >>Where: The Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach>>Cost: $25 and up >>Info: 832-7469 or Kravis.org in the know

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B5 FOUR ARTS. FOR EVERYONE.'PVS"SUT1MB[Bt1BMN#FBDI 'PSUJDLFUJOGPSNBUJPOrDBMMPSWJTJUGPVSBSUTPSH iF8FEOFTEBZ&WFOJOH$PODFSU4FSJFT8 p.m. OTickets: $40 (balcony) / $45 (orchestra) Palm Beach Sympho ny ....................................December 4 (7 p.m.) Q e State Capella of Russia .........................................December 18 Q Keyboard Conversations with Jerey Siegel, ..................January 8 Q  Franz Schubert: Music in the Age of the Sound BiteŽJay Hunter Morris, Tenor ................................................January 22 Q Krasnoyarsk National Dance Company of Siberia .......February 5 Q Europa Galante with Fabio Biondi ...............................February 12 Q Walnut Street eatre Driving Miss DaisyŽ..............February 19 Q Arnaldo Cohen, piano ........................................................March 12 VFlamenco Vivo Carlota Santana A Soul of FlamencoŽ ....March 19 V iF4VOEBZ$PODFSU4FSJFT3 p.m. OTickets: $20 Tempest Trio .................................................................December 15 Q Brentano String Quartet ..................................................January 12 Q Calder Quartet ..................................................................January 19 QAmerican Chamber Players .............................................January 26 QKeyboard Conversations with Jerey Siegel, ................February 2 O  Mistresses and Masterpieces: Music of Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, and BrahmsŽ Benjamin Grosvenor, piano .............................................February 9 OSt. Lawrence String Quartet .........................................February 16 OTrio Solisti .......................................................................February 23 OElias String Quartet .............................................................March 9 OKeyboard Conversations with Jerey Siegel, ..................March 16 V e Miracle of MozartŽ Jerusalem String Quartet ...................................................March 23 VDailey & Vincent .................................................................April 13 V 5JDLFUTBWBJMBCMF Q O V the dirt,Ž she said. And thats where lessons are learned.One of the really important things I learned was that you need to feed the soil and return organic matter back into the soil,Ž she said. Think about it: In a natural state, trees drop leaves and build up a layer of compost. But with farming?When you take crops off the farmland, youre basically depriving it of something that would happen in a natu-ral state,Ž she said. Theres an easy answer to that.We need to get composting programs going,Ž Mrs. Garcia said. Thats a super healthy thing to for soil to give back. Forty percent of food in the United States is wasted, which is pretty sad.Ž People already are beginning to take composting seriously. Not only does it reinvigorate the soil, it also keeps waste from going into landfills. I think composting is going to be like the 70s was when kids embarrassed their parents into recycling,Ž she said. Americans have been wasteful with their soil because U.S. resources are so plentiful; in pioneer times, farmers could wear out the soil of a particular area, as they did with tobacco land in Virginia, then move west. That shaped our American character in that we dont need limits, and we do,Ž she said. Of course, the country already has expanded to its western limits. One of the things that we bring out in the film is that in the United States, over 40 percent of our soils in this country are part of two productive soil orders,Ž she said. In China, only 11 percent of their soils are very good, and they dont have much water. We are amazingly blessed with this resource, which is the reason why we are such a wealthy and productive country.Ž That calls for a change of mindset.Its American exceptionalism. Its because of our resources, its not because someone sprinkled fairy dust on us. We need to realize we are up against limits and people dont want to recognize that. They say its un-American to recognize limits,Ž Mrs. Garcia said. If we keep farming like we are, well be out of soil in 30 years.Ž Thats a lot of land.We still are losing millions of acres every year,Ž she said, citing soil that just blows away much as it did during the 1930s Dust Bowl. We dont use cover crops. Or we use combinations of fertilizers and chemicalsŽ that kill off essen-tial organic materials. It is a grim situation, but she sees hope. But the other part of the American character is that we like challenges,Ž she said. Im hoping we shift over from, We dont need to limits to Wow, weve got challenges here, and make changes that lead to a healthier climate and political system.Ž Florida has special challenges with its soil. I think that the issues in South Florida is almost heightened because its such a fragile area,Ž said Mrs. Garcia, whose brother Jeff Koons is a former Palm Beach County commissioner and whose late husband was Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead. Soil in the Midwest has a little more history. Soil in South Florida is just more of a specialized soil,Ž she said. The dirt in the center of the state is muck composed largely of organic matter that forms when the area is covered with water during the summer rainy season. The main idea is that we need to take care of it, that were in a mutual depen-dency on it,Ž she said. Its a good idea to make friends with the soil, she said. Its interesting to ponder where weve come and were going. Once peo-ple understand what soil is, you dont want to kill it.Ž Q SOILFrom page 1 >>What: “Symphony of the Soil” screening >>When: 3-6 p.m. Nov. 17 >>Where: Muvico Parisian, CityPlace, West Palm Beach>>Cost: Adults, $10 advance, $15 at the door; children 12 and under, $6 advance, $8 at the door.>>Info: graymockingbird.com/symphonyofthesoil.html in the know COURTESY PHOTO John Reganold explores a soil profile in this scene from “Symphony of the Soil.”

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOPlease send calendar listings to pbnews@floridaweekly.com. At The Arts Garage The Arts Garage is at 180 NE First St. in Delray Beach. Call 450-6357 or visit artsgarage.org.QThe Longing & The Short of It: A Song Cycle by Daniel Mat — Through Nov. 24; $30-$45QThe Jazz Project: Larry Coryell, jazz-rock fusion guitar — 8 p.m. Nov. 16; $25-$45; $5 more at door At The Bamboo Room The Bamboo Room is at 15 S. J St., down-town Lake Worth. Call 585-BLUES or visit bambooroomblues.com.QSouthern Hospitality — 9 p.m. Nov. 15; $15QPeter Rowan Blue Grass Band featuring Yungchen Lhamo — 9 p.m. Nov. 16; $25, $30 At The Colony Hotel 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Call 655-5430 or visit www.thecolonypalmbeach.comQThe Polo Lounge — Tommy Mitchell, pianist, Thursday and Satur-day evenings; Motown Friday Nights with Memory Lane At The Cruzan South Florida Fairgrounds, 601-7 Sans-burys Way, suburban West Palm Beach. 795-8883, www.cruzanamphitheatre.net.QWay-FM Celebrates 20 Years with tobyMac’s Deep Hits Tour — 7 p.m. Oct. 26. Tickets: $28-$45. At Cultural Council Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is at 601 Lake Ave., downtown Lake Worth; 471-1602 or palmbeachculture.com. At Delray Beach Center Delray Beach Center for the Arts is in Old School Square at 51 N. Swinton Ave. in Delray Beach. Call 561-243-7922 or visit delraycenterforthearts.org. QCornell Museum Exhibits — Through Feb. 2. Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Thursday until 8 p.m.; Sunday, 1-4:30 p.m. Closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission $8 general; $6 seniors and students with ID; free for ages 10 and under. Palm Beach County residents receive free admission every Thursday. ELVIS: Grace & Grit Exhibi-tionŽ: This fine art photography exhibi-tion is from the CBS photo archive. The collection of 35 large format, candid and on-air photographs, shot by various CBS Television photographers, documents Elvis before the Las Vegas years„ dur-ing his meteoric rise to stardom. Flash-back: A Retr o Look at the 60s & 70sŽ: Reminisce and enjoy a fun display of music, movie and sports memorabilia on loan from the community. At Delray Playhouse Delray Beach Playhouse is at 950 N.W. 9th Street in Delray Beach. Call 561-272-1281 or visit delraybeachplayhouse.com. All tickets $30 (group rates available for 20+).Q“Driving Miss Daisy” — Nov. 30-Dec. 15Q“You Can’t Take it With You” — Feb. 1-16 Q“The Pajama Game” — March 29-April 13Q“Doubt” — May 24-June 8 At Dramaworks Palm Beach Dramaworks Don & Ann Brown Theatre is at 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Call 514-4042, Ext. 2, or visit www.palmbeach-dramaworks.com. Q“Of Mice and Men” — Extended through Nov. 17Q“The Lion in Winter” — Dec. 6-Jan. 5Q“Old Times” — Jan. 31-March 2 Q“Dividing the Estate” — March 28-April 27Q“Tryst” — May 16-June 15 At The Duncan The Duncan Theatre at Palm Beach State College, 4200 Congress Ave., Lake Worth. Call 868-3309 or visit www.palm-beachstate.edu/theatre/duncan-theatre. QSaturday Family Fun Series: “Chinese Golden Dragon Acro-bats” — 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Nov. 23. Tickets: $15. At The Eissey The Eissey Campus Theatre is at Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive off PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens. 207-5900; www.eisseycampustheatre.org.QBallet Palm Beach: “The Nutcracker” — Nov. 29 Dec. 1. Tickets: $15-$35. balletpalmbeach.org or 207-5900. At FAU Florida Atlantic University is at 777 Glades Road in Boca Raton. Call (800) 564-9539 or visit fauevents.com.Q“The Importance of Being Earnest.” Nov. 15-24. At FAUs Studio One Theatre, Department of Theatre and Dance, Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton General admission tickets are $20; students, faculty, staff, alumni and children under age 12 may purchase tickets for $12; and group prices are avail-able. Tickets can be purchased by call-ing 1-800-564-9539 or at www.fauevents.com, presents Oscar Wildes outrageous comedy set in 1890s England. Fridays at 7 p.m.; Saturdays at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. At The Four Arts The Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach. Gallery and box office 655-7226 or visit www.fourarts.org.QMary Alice Fortin Children’s Art Gallery: Preschool Story Time: Grand Opening, Nov. 1: Illustrating Words: The Wondrous Fantasy World of Robert L. Forbes, poet, and Ronald Sear-le, artist,Ž with Robert L. Forbes. Free. Reservations preferred. Call 655-2776. At JCC The Mandel JCC is at 5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens; 689-7700. All events are at the JCC unless otherwise noted.QNov. 14: Opening of the George Rothman Aquatic Cen-ter — Swim with Olympic Gold Medalist Lenny Krayzelberg. Families are invited to swim and learn the Olympic techniques from the four-time Olympic medalist. 4 p.m.QNov. 15: Ready, Set, Shabbat — Families are invited for a festive, interactive Shabbat program where they will participate in crafts including tye-dying kippot and challah covers, as well as sing-ing and dancing with Miss Emily, 4 p.m.QNov. 18: 92nd St Y Broadcast featuring A Conversation with Jeb Bush, Immigration Wars: Forging an Amer-ican Solution, 8 p.m.; Timely Topics Discussion Group, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 1-2:30 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge Games, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Mah Jongg & Canasta Play Sessions, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Pouring Paint Class. Using acrylic paint, explore different ways of mark making, 10 a.m. QNov. 19: 92nd St Y Broadcast featuring Ari Shavit with David Remnick: The Tragedy and Triumph of Israel, BallenIsles Country Club, 8:15 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge Games, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 12:30-3:30 p.m. Supervised Bridge, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 10 a.m.-noon.QNov. 20: Book Festival Luncheon featuring Leslie Maitland at the Kravis Center, 11 a.m. Tickets: $85 for Friends of the JCC, $100 for guests, or $180 (includes autographed book). RSVP to Lisa Blum-berg at LisaB@JCConline.com; Mah Jongg & Canasta Play Sessions, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge Games, Mandel JCC Palm Beach Gardens, 12:30-3:30 p.m. At The Lighthouse Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $9 adults, $5 children ages 6-18; children under 6 and active U.S. military admitted free. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting, call for tour time. RSVP required for tours, 747-8380, Ext. 101. www.jupiterlighthouse.org.QLighthouse Moonrise Tour — Nov. 17, Dec. 17. Sunset. $15 Members/$20 Non-Members. RSVP required. 747-8380, Ext. 101.QTwilight Yoga at the Light — Nov. 18, Nov. 25, Dec. 2, Dec. 9, Dec. 16, Dec. 23, Dec. 30. Meet on back porch of Lighthouse Museum 15 minutes before class time. Yoga with Mary Veal, Kula Yoga Shala, on the Lighhouse deck at sunset! Class is for all levels. Beginners welcome. Bring a yoga mat and a flash-light Class offered by donation. Class is weather-dependent (check website). QLighthouse Sunset Tour — Nov.15, Nov. 20, Dec. 20. Sunset. $15 Members/$20 Non-Members. RSVP required. 747-8380, Ext. 101. At The Kravis The Kravis Center is at 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. For tickets, call 832-7469 or log on to www.kravis.org.QMiami City Ballet “First Ventures” — Nov. 15-17. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. Concert Hall. Showtimes vary. Tickets start at $20. QPalm Beach University Symphonic Band — 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15, Helen K. Persson Hall. Tickets: $10, $5 for students with ID. At The Lake Park Public Library Lake Park Public Library is at 529 Park Ave., Lake Park. All events are free. 881-3330.QSuper Hero Hour — 3:30 p.m. Thursdays. Ages 12 and under.QAdult Writing Critique Group — Saturdays 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 16 years and up.QAnime — 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Ages 12 and up. COURTESY PHOTO “Through the Looking Glass” — Emily Rynasko stars as Alice in the Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s contemporary retelling of the “Alice in Wonderland” story that was conceived by Andrew Kato and composed by John Mercurio. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 and 8 p.m. Nov. 16. Tickets: Adults, $25; students, $15. Maltz is at 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter; 575-2223 or jupitertheatre.org.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO At The Lake Worth Playhouse The Stonzek Theatre is at 709 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Playhouse: 586-6410; Films: 296-9382. www.lakeworthplayhouse.org. Q Onstage: “The Game’s Afoot… or Holmes for the Holidays” — Nov. 21-Dec. 8, 2 p.m. matinees, 8 p.m. evenings. Tickets: $23-$35. QFilm: 40th anniversary screening of the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar” — Nov. 16, 8 p.m. Tickets: $10. At Living Room Theaters Living Room Theaters, on the campus of Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, is at 777 Glades Road. Call 549-2600 or visit fau.livingroomtheaters.com.QFilms: Through Nov. 14: CapitalŽ and God Loves Uganda.Ž Nov. 15: Sun-light Jr.,Ž Let the Fire Burn.Ž At Lynn University Lynn Universit ys Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center is at 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton. 237-9000.QPalm Beach Chamber Music Fall Festival — Program 3, works by Tomaso Albinoni, Andres Jolivet, Boris Blacher and Leonard Bernstein „ 7:30 p.m. Nov. 14; Philharmonia, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 17, 4 p.m. Wold Center. Tick-ets: $35-$50. Call 237-9000 or visit www.lynn.edu/tickets. At MacArthur Park John D. MacArthur Beach State Park and Nature Center is at 10900 Jack Nick-laus Drive, North Palm Beach. 624-6952 or www.macarthurbeach.org.QNature walk — 10-11 a.m. daily QMoonlight Concert, 7-9 p.m. Nov. 16. Classic rock & pop music by local music school, School of Rock. $5 (chil-dren under 10 & Friends of MacArthur Park, free). Call 776-7449, ext. 109. At The Maltz The Maltz Jupiter Theatre is at 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Call 575-2223 or visit www.jupitertheatre.org.Q“Through the Looking Glass” — A contemporary retelling of the childrens classic Alice in Wonderland,Ž Through the Looking GlassŽ comes to life with eye-popping sets, costumes, magic and puppetry. In a colorful land where animals talk and characters amuse, 12-year-old Alice learns to look in the mirrorŽ and see the truly special person she is. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 and 8 p.m. Nov. 16. Tickets: Adults, $25; students, $15.Q“Annie” — Dec. 3-22 Q“A Chorus Line” — Jan. 14-Feb. 2 Q“Other Desert Cities” — Feb. 16-March 2Q“The King and I” — March 18-April 6 At The Mos’Art The MosArt Theatre is at 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Call 337-OPOD (6763) or visit www.mosarttheatre.com.QMovies — Nov. 14: Inequality for AllŽ and Blue Jasmine.Ž Nov. 15-21: At The Mounts Garden Mounts Botanical Garden is at 559 N. Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Call 233-1757 or visit www.mounts.org.QContain Yourself: Creative Container Design — Taught by Tom Hewitt, Master Gardener, Mounts Guild Member. 9 a.m.-noon Nov. 16. Members: $40; non-members: $45. At North Palm Beach Library 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach; 841-3383, www.npblibrary.org.QKnit & Crochet — 1-3 p.m. Mondays QKids Crafts ages 5-12 — 2 p.m. Fridays At PBAU Palm Beach Atlantic University, 901 S. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach. For tick-ets: 803-2970 or ticketcentral@pba.edu. At Palm Beach Improv Palm Beach Improv is at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach; 833-1812 or palmbeachimprov.com.QNov. 14: Improvs Annual Turkey Contest. 8 p.m. Tickets: $5QNov. 15, Damon Wayans. 7 p.m. Nov. 1617, 8 p.m. Tickets: $35 At Palm Beach Zoo Palm Beach Zoo is at 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. everyday. Tickets: Adults $18.95; seniors, $16.95; children 3-12, $12.95; free toddlers. 533-0887 or www.palmbeachzoo.org.Q“Wings Over Water” Bird Show — 11 a.m. weekdays; 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. weekendsQ“Wild Things Show” — 1 p.m. weekdays; noon weekends. QGalena the Spider Monkeys Birthday Bash — 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 18. At The Plaza Theatre Plaza Theatre, 262 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan; 5881820 or www.theplazatheatre.net.Q“Fingers and Toes — A Tap Comedy MusicalŽ „ Through Nov. 24. Tick-ets: $45 (special group rates available). At Science Center The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. 832-1988 or visit www.sfsm.orgQ“Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition” — Nov. 16-April 20. Visit an exhibit of authentic artifacts from the RMS Titanic with extensive room re-creations, put together by the only company permitted by law to recover objects from the wreck site of the Titan-ic. More than 25 million people world-wide have seen this exhibition over the last 18 years. Tickets: $13 for adults, $9.50 for children aged 3 to 12; $11.50 for seniors 62 and older. Center members and children under 3 are free. Due to the anticipated excitement surround-ing this exhibit, be advised that visitors may incur a small wait time. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit sfsciencecenter.org or call 832-1988. QScience Nights — 6-9 p.m. the last Friday of the month. Members: Adults $5, Children: free; Non-Members: Adults $12, Children $8 (3 and under free). Planetarium shows and mini-golf are not included in event admission. Fresh Markets QSailfish Marina Sunset Celebration — 6 p.m. Thursdays. Shop for arts and crafts made by artists from around the country. Sailfish Marina, east of the Intracoastal, just south of Blue Heron Boulevard, Palm Beach Shores; 842-8449.QJupiter Green & Artisan Market — 5-9 p.m. Fridays, Riverwalk Events Plaza, 150 S. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Free. Includes baked goods, fresh produce, arts and crafts, jewelry, pet products and more. Vendors welcome. Contact Harry Welsh at (203) 222-3574 or visit www.harrysmarkets.com.QWest Palm Beach GreenMarket — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays at Waterfront Commons, downtown West Palm Beach (through May 31). Includes ven-dors selling the freshest produce, baked goods, plants, home goods and more. Admission is free. Parking is free in the Banyan and Evernia garages during mar-ket hours. Info: wpb.org/greenmarket. QTequesta Green Market — 9 a.m.-1 p.m., third Saturday of the month through April (next market is Nov. 16). Constitution Park, 399 Seabrook Road, Tequesta. All items are fresh from the farm. Provides locally grown vegetables, fruits, meat, dairy and other farm prod-ucts, as well as hand-made items to neighbors in the community. Admission is free. Call Wendy at 768-0476.QAbacoa Green Market — 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays at Abacoa Town Center, 1200 Town Center Drive, Jupiter. Info: reggie.chasethesun@gmail.com.QWest Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market — 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays on Narcissus Avenue, north of Ban-yan Boulevard. For information, search Facebook or call 670-7473.QGardens GreenMarket — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays, City Hall Municipal Complex, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Come shop at more than 120 vendors with an abundance of just-picked, orchard-grown goods, a wide selection of seasonal vegetables and fruits, fragrant herbs, honey, and home-made old-fashioned breads, doughnuts, pies, cheeses, sauces and handmade crafts. Leave your pets at home. Visit pbgfl.com/greenmarket or call 630-1100. The meats, sauces, jewelry, QPalm Beach Green Market & Bazaar — 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays (through April 27), Commons Park, 11600 Poinciana Blvd., Royal Palm Beach. Shop some of the areas finest vendors selling fruits and vegetables, fresh flowers and plants. Enjoy artisan foods, baked goods and a unique selec-tion of artists and crafters. www.rpb-greenmarket.com. Thursday, Nov. 14 The Artists Studio & Gallery of Teques-ta is celebrating the grand opening of its new location with an Open House. Nov. 14. 5-8 p.m., at 385 Tequesta Drive, Suites 8 & 1, Gallery Square North, Tequesta. Open to the public. Exhibit-ing artists: Judith Boland-Caruso, Marie Cardi Etherington, Suzanne Fico, Geri Troast, Joseph Pierre, Manon Sander, Lois Barton, Barbara Dave, Carol Rios.QLe Cercle Francais — Francophiles and Francophones can join for a monthly gathering at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month (next session Nov. 14), in members homes. Call 744-0016.QPalm Beach Chamber Music Fall Festival — 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 14 at Lynn Universitys Wold Perform-ing Arts Center in Boca Raton and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 15 at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in downtown Lake Worth. Tick-ets: $20 per concert or $45 for three-concert subscription. Free admission for students (with ID). For Lynn tickets, call 237-9000 or visit www.lynn.edu/tickets. For Lake Worth tickets, call 800-330-6874 or visit www.pbcmf.org.QStory time session at the Loxahatchee River Center — 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123; or visit www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter.QBingo — Noon every Thursday at the Moose Lodge, 3600 RCA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Lunch available at 11 a.m. Packs start at $15. $250 games. 626-4417.Q“Women on the Run Palm Beach” — The Junior League of the Palm Beaches Inc., in conjunction with the Womens Foundation of Palm Beach County and the Political Institute for Women, will host a series of training initiatives to help women take the first steps toward running for elected office or a public service leadership position to be held 1-5 p.m. Nov. 21 at Junior League of the Palm Beaches headquar-ters, 470 Columbia Drive, Building F, West Palm Beach. Cost: $60 per course. jlpb.org/our-events/women-on-the-run-palm-beach.QClematis by Night — Live music 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Clematis Street at the Waterfront, downtown West Palm Beach, 8221515 or visit www.clematisbynight.net. Friday, Nov. 15 QMultilingual Language & Cultural Society — 210 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Nov. 15: 6:30-8 p.m. Inspired by ItalyŽ Art Exhibition & Reception. Showcase of artwork by Armory Art Center faculty member Dennis Aufiery and students. Free to MLCS members; $8 general public. 228-1688.

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY I FOUND IT! at the West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market(Narcissus Ave. and Banyan Blvd. in front of the Old City Hall)GPS 200 Banyan Blvd.CALL 561-670-7473 www.wpbantiqueand” eamarket.com Every Saturday 8am-2pm WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Saturday, Nov. 16 QJove Comedy Experience — Appears 8 p.m. Nov. 16, The Borland Center for Performing Arts, Midtown, 4885 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Call 904-3130 or visit www.borlandthe-ater.com. Tickets: $17/advance, $20/door.QKids Story Time — 11:30 a.m. Saturdays, Loggerhead Marinelife Cen-ter, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; free. Visit marinelife.org.QAPBC Autumn Exhibit — Noon-6 p.m., Monday through Saturday, through Nov. 23, Artists of Palm Beach County, 800 Park Ave., Lake Park. Call 345-2842. QGinger’s Dance Party — 8-10 p.m. Saturdays, Palm Stage, Waterfront Commons, downtown West Palm Beach. Free. 8221515; wpb.org /gingers. Sunday, Nov. 17 QPalm Beach Post Sunday on the Waterfront Concert Series — Free concerts the third Sunday of each month from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Meyer Amphi-theatre, downtown West Palm Beach. Nov. 17: Satisfaction, the Rolling Stones tribute band. Info: 8221515 or wpb.org/sow/. Monday, Nov. 18 QBarre Pilates Classes — Ages 16 years and up can participate 6:15-7:05 p.m. Mondays at the Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Garden. Sign up for a 6-week session or just pay the drop-in fee per class. For more information or to register, visit www.pbgfl.com/recreationandparks or call 630-1100. Wednesday, Nov. 20 QHatchling Tales — 10:30-11 a.m. Wednesdays. Loggerhead Marinelife Center, 14200 U.S. Highway 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280 or info@marinelife.org. Ongoing Events QAnn Norton Sculpture Gardens — The 7th Annual Holiday House is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 21Dec. 14. Wednes-day-Sunday. Gifts, furniture, artwork, collectables, and decorative items fill every corner of the 7th Annual Holiday House. Tickets: $10 adults; $8 seniors; $5 students; 832-5328 or ansg.org. QAqua Pilates — 10-11 a.m. Tuesdays and 5:15-6:15 p.m. Thursdays at the Palm Beach Gardens Aquatic Complex, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. All equipment provided. Drop-In fee is $6 for residents of Palm Beach Gar-dens and $8 non-residents. Call Brittani Benko at 630-1145.QArmory Art Center — Nov. 15-16: Florida Artworks ADL: Justice, Advo-cacy & ArtŽ (Opening Reception Nov. 14, 6-10 p.m.). Through Nov. 30: Sculp-ture by Orlando Chiang. Armory Art Center is at 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 832-1776 or armoryart.org.QBoca Raton Museum of Art — Through Nov. 17: Heightened Perspec-tives: Marilyn Bridges.Ž Through Dec. 29: Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony.Ž Through Dec. 29: Nancy Da vidson: Leter Buck.Ž Through Dec. 29: Dulce Pinzn: The Real Story of the Superheroes.Ž Through Jan. 5, 2014: Caught on FilmŽ: Photography from the Collection. Hours: Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; closed Mondays and holidays. Admis-sion: Free for members and children 12 and under; adults $8; seniors (65+) $6; students (with ID) $5. Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton (In Mizner Park). 561-392-2500; bocamuseum.org.QChildren’s Research Station — Loggerhead Marinelife Center program is designed to exercise childrens science skills through an experimental lab. 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays. Free. 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280.QDeep Water Aerobics — In the Palm Beach Gardens Aquatic Complex heated pool. Classes are held 9-10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 10:30-11:30 a.m. Fridays at 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. All equipment provid-ed. Drop-In fee is $4 for residents of Palm Beach Gardens and $5 for non-res-idents. Call Brittani Benko at 630-1145.QFlagler Museum — Through Jan. 5: Man of the Century: The Incompara-ble Legacy of Henry Morrison Flagler.Ž Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Museum is housed in Henry Flaglers 1902 beaux-arts man-sion, Whitehall; at 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tickets: members free; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; under 6 free. 655-2833; www.flaglermuseum.us. QGardensArt Exhibition — Color Birds,Ž a mixed media display using color pencils and acrylic on wood and canvas. Through Nov. 14, Palm Beach Gardens City Hall Lobby, 10500 N. Mili-tary Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Call Amy Stepper at 630-1116.QLighthouse ArtCenter — Nov. 14-Feb. 15: Chris Gustin,Ž exhibition and workshop. Artist talk and reception, 6 p.m. Jan. 23. 3rd Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Museum admission: $5 ages 12 and above. Under 12 free. Saturdays, free admission. Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; 746-3101 or lighthousearts.org.QLighthouse ArtCenter Midtown Gallery — Through Jan. 8: Lighthouse ArtCenter Artists Guilds Midtown Bash.Ž Free admission. Lighthouse Art-Center Midtown Gallery, 4877 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. For an appointment to view exhibition, call 746-3101.QLoxahatchee River Environmental Center — Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123 or www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter.QMorikami Museum and Japanese Gardens — Through Feb. 23: Contemporary Kogei Styles in Japan.Ž Representing a prestigious status in Japan, KogeiŽ is an authentic Japanese art form that requires the practical use of natures artistic beauty by using organic natural materials such as stone, miner-als, trees and plants. Contemporary Kogei Styles in JapanŽ features a unique collection of 90 Kogei-styleŽ contem-porary artworks, including ceramics, textiles, dolls, metal works, urushi (lac-quer work), wood, bamboo and glass. As the first of its kind to appear in the U.S., this exhibit represents the starting point for a presentation of KogeiŽ art world-wide. Also through Feb. 23: Breaking Boundaries: Contemporary Street Fash-ion in Japan,Ž displaying some of the most popular and imaginative clothing styles made and worn on the streets of Japan today. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. The Morikami Museum is at 4000 Morikami Park Road in Delray Beach. For information, visit morikami.org or call 495-0233. QNorton Museum of Art — Through Dec. 8: A Masterpiece Rediscov-ered: Claude-Joseph Vernets The Fisher-men.Ž Through Aug. 31: Faux Real,Ž by Mickalene Thomas. Art After Dark: 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. 1451 S. Olive Ave. in West Palm Beach. Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed on Mondays and major holidays). General admission is $12 for adults, $5 for students with a valid ID, and free for members and children ages 12 and under. Thursdays are half-price for everyone. Special group rates are avail-able. West Palm Beach residents receive free admission every Saturday with proof of residency. Palm Beach County resi-dents receive free admission the first Saturday of each month with proof of residency; 832-5196 or norton.org.QPalm Beach Photographic Centre — Through Nov. 16: Kadir Lopez, two exhibitions; The Conflux of EternitiesŽ and An American Pres-ence in Cuba.Ž The Photographic Centre is in the City Center, 415 Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; call 253-2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org.QWick Theatre & Costume Museum — The Broadway Collection is an astounding exhibit of the finest costumes ever brought to the Broadway stage by the most honored and respected designers in the history of the American theater. Presented in a fully interactive environment, tours are led by theater pro-fessionals who give the visitor a remark-able behind-the-scenesŽ look at the work of iconic designers. The Wick is open for tours, luncheons and high tea events, with special engagements by appointment only. Tours typically start between 11 and 11:30 a.m. and are available from individual admissions to groups by appointment only. All tours include a guided journey through the collection and lunch. Tour & Luncheon (off-season): $38. 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. 995-2333 or thewick.org. Upcoming Events QGreat Books Reading and Discussion Group — Nov. 21. Meets at 10 a.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Barnes & Noble coffee shop, 11380 Legacy Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. Free; 624-4358.QThe Chamber Music Society of Palm Beach — The seasons first concert: 7-8 p.m., Nov. 21 at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach: „ MILO—, a world-renowned guitarist. For information on the by-invitation-only concerts, call 379-6773. Q Located on the SE corner of US Highway One and PGA Boulevard next to Paris in Town 561.799.1878 www.thebackporchstore.com :_Z[nehnl[hnmbjn^pbmaZZbk_hkma^ngbjn^ Voted #1 Best Houseware Store in the Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. Monday Friday 10 5 Saturday 10 2 Closed Sunday Come see our "Cookie Maker" and "Cookie Taster" Holiday Aprons

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 A&E B9 Subscribe online at www.FloridaWeekly.com or Call 561.904.6470 Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for only$3195PER YEAR*Rates are based on standard rate postage. A one-year in-county subscription will cost $31.95 to cover shipping and handling. Call for out-of-county and out-of-state postage and pricing options. AN ARTISTS LIFEThis week, twin New York City-area singers Will and Anthony Nunziata, who appear throughout South Florida, talk about what makes them tick. They are staying busy. Upcoming gigs include a New Year s Eve concert with the Cleveland Pops Orchestra. Heres a little about their work.Will Nunziata,cabaret singerWhat inspires you to work on your music? The audience. I feel a huge responsibility to always give my best to people who have paid to see me perform, so in rehearsal, I am always challenging myself to dig into the material more and more to find new discoveries and nuances. Is there anything special you do to spark that inspiration? I love to watch YouTube clips of my favorite performers right before I rehearse and get onstage. The perform-ers I am attracted to have always been the ones who are both great storytellers and great emotional singers. Favorites include Sammy Davis Jr., Patti LuPone, Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland. When do you typically work?I prefer the afternoon. I like that I have already had some of a dayŽ to exercise and get the blood flowing. When do you know its time to stop working on something? I stop working on something when it stops scaring me a little. Anthony Nunziata,cabaret singerWhat inspires you to work on your music? My full-time job is working for myself and for Will & AnthonyŽ, so its impor-tant to me to keep a disciplined sched-ule. I set up the following days sched-ule of events the night before. I run through the next day through my head the night before „ my morning routine, the meetings, rehearsals, performances, lunches, dinners, etc. This allows me to wake up fully aware of the day. I wake-up at around 8. I go for a run/work-out at my neighborhood gym. During this time, the creative side really awakens. Ideas come to mind. Songs run through my head. I have my superfood breakfast drink with a hearty bacon, egg and cheese sandwich with hot sauce from my local vendor. Bacon, egg and cheeses from a good outside vendor is the greatest thing. On the cor-ner of 66th Street and West End Avenue is a truck that has the BEST. And only $4! I know! When I get back to my apartment, I put on light classical music in the background, and Im off! What inspires you to work on your music? What inspires me most to work on my music is the visualization of how an audience reacts to my singing. The response from an audience when Im on stage, to the more personal one-on-one moments I have with audience members after a show „ this is why I do what I do. I have recognized that I have a little gift that needs to be shared that hopefully will make people feel. Make them feel alive. Happy. Nostalgic. My goal in all I do is to entertain and inspire. Is there anything special you do to spark that inspiration? Listening to light classical music unlocks all the creative juices. Song melodies, lyrics, songs that have already been written, ideas, visualizations of how something is going to look on stage, business strategies, marketing plans .... when it overflows like this, I find myself free-writing for an extended period of time. The light classical music provides a steady rhythm and enhances my creativity. When do you typically work?Every day is different, but for the most part, I get most of my creative work done in the morning, usually from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. I schedule my business meetings, rehearsals, and strategy ses-sions in the afternoon. When do you know its time to stop working on something? When the ideas are no longer freely flowing, I take a break. I dont stress about it. I work on something else. Ill go for a quick run and see what comes to mind! Q In this occasional series, visual and performing artists discuss their work habits COURTESY PHOTO Will Nunziata (left) and his twin brother, Anthony Nunziata, tour the country singing cabaret concerts.

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B12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY Put your custom made orders in early. Huge Selection of Faux Custom Florals, Trees and Home AccessoriesOur Goal is to exceed your expectations.... 561-691-5884 CRYSTAL TREE PLAZA1/2 mile south of PGA Blvd on US Hwy 1 64)XZt/PSUI1BMN#FBDI 0QFO.POo4BUoQNt4VOoQN Christmas Wreaths are on display. Q SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A new development could snarl travel schedules or other holiday-linked projects. Some flexibility might be called for to deal with the problems before they get too far out of hand. Q SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Relatives seek your advice on a matter you d rather not be involved in. If so, use that sage Sagittarian tact to decline the offer,Ž so that no ones feelings are needlessly hurt. Q CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A shift in planning direction might help you speed up your progress toward achieving that long-planned goal. Trusted colleagues are ready to offer some valuable support. Q AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) An unexpected demand for settlement of an old loan could create some pre-holi-day anxiety. But you might not really owe it. Check your records thoroughly before remitting payment. Q PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Its a good time to get into the social swim and enjoy some well-earned fun and games with those closest to you before you have to resume more serious activities next week. Q ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A project benefits from your organizational skills that get it up and running. Your suc-cess leaves a highly favorable impression. Dont be surprised if you get some positive feedback soon. Q TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Spend time on practical matters through the end of the week. Then begin shifting your focus to more-artistic pursuits. Resist being overly self-critical. Just allow your-self to feel free to create. Q GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Restarting those creative projects you had set aside for a while will help provide a much-needed soothing balance to your hectic life. Besides, it will be like meeting old friends again. Q CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A change in plans could make it tough to keep a commitment. But stay with it. Youll get an A-plus for making the effort to do whats right and not taking the easy way out by running off. Q LEO (July 23 to August 22) The Lions enthusiasm for a workplace policy review is admirable. But be sure you know who is really behind the resistance to change before pointing your finger at the wrong person. Q VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You can expect to have to do a lot of work through midweek. Devote the rest of the week to checking your holiday plans in case some need to be adjusted to accom-modate changes. Q LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Try to avoid signing on the dotted line in the early part of the week. You need time to study issues that werent fully explored. Later in the week might be more favorable for decision-making. Q BORN THIS WEEK: Your ability to sense the needs of others makes you a wise counselor for those seeking help with their problems. PUZZLES HOROSCOPES PEOPLE BY THE SOUND By Linda Thistle +++ Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: W SEE ANSWERS, B3 W SEE ANSWERS, B3

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 B13 Buying a car at the best of times is a stress-ful and often frustrating experience. Even with tools like CarFax and AutoCheck, the used car customer may not really have the informa-tion needed to make an informed deci-sion. One business is out to change that. North Palm Beach resident Bill McLaughlin has come up with an alternative — one he hopes changes the way all of America shops for cars and trucks. Mr. McLaughlin, the former president and CEO of Starwood Vacation Resorts, was looking for something post retirement to “get him out of the house” when he hit on a way to not only make money but help others. “I’ve always been a car guy,” he said. Setting himself up as an auto manufacturer’s representative, he began to attend closed auctions, buying as many as 15 off-lease vehicles at a time, mostly for Northeast dealerships looking for rust-free Florida cars. His client list grew to include new car deal-ers from New York to Georgia — dealers sold on Mr. McLaughlin’s stringent testing and practice of charging the dealerships only $500 over his cost. He started AutoMax of America in 1992, scouring the country for luxury brands, trans-porting them to Florida then shipping them out as soon as possible “AutoMax doesn’t look like your typical car lot,” he said of the 5401 North Haver-hill Rd #105 in West Palm Beach. “It looks more like a maintenance place with 30-50 cars set up to ship to different parts of the country. Through word of mouth and friends of friends we started getting requests direct from the consumer and so we set up a web-site.” A car buyer can log on to automax ofamerica.com and enter in exactly the type of car he or she is looking for from color, make, options, model to mileage. “I put in an order last Monday and we just picked up two trucks from Bill in less than a week,” said Buddy Wittmann of Wittmann Building Corporation in Palm Beach. “There were only five of these trucks in the U.S. You couldn’t ask for a more reliable and honest salesperson. “It takes about a week for Mr. McLaughlin to find the requested car. He charges consum-ers the same $500 over wholesale fee he charges dealerships and if you are a veteran or in the military, the price is reduced to $250.“I have access to 100,000 to 150,000 cars every week,” Mr. McLaughlin said. “I can find the exact car you are looking for. I charge less than what the dealerships charge in dealer’s fees.” Mr. McLaughlin, who served four years in the military, was born in West Point. His father was an instructor there. He says he has been around the military his whole life and is committed to helping active service men and women, and veterans, find affordable cars. “I don’t make any money on those cars,” he said. “It’s hard to find a quality car for less than $2,000. People don’t realize how much work goes into what we do.” Mr. McLaughlin’s cars come with the CarFax and AutoCheck reports in addition to his own condition report and post-sale inven-tory. He recommends all car buyers purchase extended service warranties because the cars he specializes in — BMW, Acura, Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, Lexus — can be expensive to service. If your warranty is about to expire or you don’t have one call and ask about our extended warranty service. For informa-tion, call 632-9093 Q Not your typical car dealer SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYCOURTESY PHOTO Bill McLaughlin started Automax in Lake Park. Advertorial This article appeared in Florida Weekly on 10/11/2012. classicalsouth”orida.org Classical Music.Its In Our Nature. Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. Its in your nature. ++ Is it worth $10? NoWe remember Diana the princess, the icon of the public eye whose life was cut short in a horrific car accident. DianaŽ the movie attempts to reveal a more personal side of the would-have-been queen, specifically her relationship with a Pakistani doctor in the last two years of her life, but the film woefully fails to depict her as anything other than an angelic, flustered victim of her own circumstance. I ts not that we cant be sym-pathetic, its that shes so perfect it becomes hard to take any of it seriously because it doesnt feel honest. While separated from her husband, Prince Charles, in 1995, Diana (Naomi Watts, The ImpossibleŽ) is lonely. In dreams she falls and no one catches her. Diana even confides to her friend Sonia (Juliet Ste-venson) that shes worried she cannot receive love. She is the idol of the public eye, and depressed beyond belief. While visiting a friend in the hospital she meets Dr. Hasnat Khan (Naveen Andrews, LostŽ), a heart surgeon whos attracted to her but values his privacy. They connect. Diana goes so far as to wear wigs while they eat Burger King, and they fall in love. When reality hits, however, things arent nearly as grand. In between Dianas assignations with Hasnat we see her on humanitarian missions to Angola and visiting chil-dren in the hospital. So shes not just a put upon, sheltered queen who doesnt spend enough time with her kids, shes also a saintly figure who uses her stat-ure to cure the world of its social evils. If you didnt know better, youd think Diana was Mother Theresas daughter. Surely, a movie that purports to offer insight into Dianas life should take care to divulge more flaws. Theres not a thing wrong with her, and her per-fection becomes grating after a while, especially when were asked to feel sorry for little miss queen perfect. This isnt entirely Ms. Watts fault. She takes what the script gives her and does her best. Director Oliver Hirschbiegel (The InvasionŽ) and screenwriter Stephen Jeffreys, working from a book by Kate Snell, notably struggle to provide Diana with any sort of dimension to make her interesting. Failure to make (at the time) the most famous woman in the world compelling is inexcusable. It doesnt help that Ms. Watts and Mr. Andrews have no chemistry. Watching them interact is like observing the first date of an arranged marriage. This is okay for the ini-tial meeting, but not acceptable when theyre allegedly in love but look at one another like strangers. If the actors dont believe in the love story, why should we? Surely Dianas children, Harry and William, brought her happiness, youre thinking. Perhaps, but she only passively alludes to them and we never see their faces. In fact, seeing their backs as they walk away from the camera in one scene is the only part of the royal family we see outside of Diana. Why not include some awkward interactions with her estranged husband, which would show and prove to us why shes so unhappy? DianaŽ is a misfire from all angles, an attempt at regal angst that is more like regal anguish for the viewer. If you must see it, at least wait until its on video and know that its okay if youre distracted and miss parts of it. Be assured you will not miss much. Q LATEST FILMS‘Diana’ i c a f e s dan HUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com >> Jessica Chastain (“Zero Dark Thirty”) was at one point attached to play Diana. CAPSULESLast Vegas +++ (Michael Douglas, Kevin Kline, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman) Four old friends reunite in Las Vegas when Billy (Mr. Douglas) decides to marry some-one half his age. The veteran Oscar-win-ning actors share affable chemistry and the film is genuinely funny. Rated PG-13.Free Birds +++ (Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Amy Poehler) Modern turkeys Reggie (Mr. Wilson) and Jake (Mr. Harrelson) travel back in time in an attempt to get turkeys off the Thanksgiving menu forever. The clever premise is enjoyable for all ages, with good laughs and crisp animation. Rated PG.Gravity ++++ (George Clooney, Sandra Bullock, voice of Ed Harris) After debris destroys their ship, astronauts Kowalsky (Cloo-ney) and Stone (Bullock) work together to survive. The visuals are absolutely stunning and a strong lead performance from Bullock makes this one of the years best. Rated PG-13.Bad Grandpa ++ (Johnny Knoxville, Jackson Nicoll, Spike Jonze) Saddled with his young grandson (Mr. Nicoll), 86 year-old Irving Zisman (Mr. Knoxville) decides to drive the boy across country to the boys father. Its essentially a sketch comedy with Mr. Knoxville and Mr. Nicoll having fun with real people via hidden camera, but its never insulting to innocent individuals and is reason-ably amusing throughout. Rated R. Q

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B14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY HolidayGIFT GUIDE Want to advertise the perfect holiday gift?....Then promote your product or services to Florida Weeklys readers in our holiday gift guide. This convenient section with unique holiday events and editorial content will be carried from store to store for area residents searching for that perfect gift.Publication Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013 Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 To advertise, contact your account executive or call 561.904.6470 FLORIDA WRITERSAuthor beats the odds with a thoroughbred of a thriller Q Secretariat RebornŽ by Susan Klaus. Oceanview Publishing. 280 pages. $26.95.Can another horse as magnificent as Secretariat come along? In the imagina-tion of Susan Klaus, thats exactly what happens. The complications that follow are artfully developed to create the same kind of suspense one feels when the thundering hoofbeats of thoroughbreds pound toward the finish line. Christian Roberts (hereafter, Chris), a handsome blond fellow in his mid-20s, makes a modest living from renting small sailboats and providing various services to boaters on Sarasota Bay. Long estranged from his father, a down-on-his luck horse trainer in Ocala, Chris enjoys a blistering relationship with his sex-crazed and increasingly possessive girlfriend, Kate. Learning that his father, Hank, is nearing death, Chris makes his way to the dilapidated Ocala farm and begins a slow reconciliation with the bossy, judgmental man who always chose the thrill of rais-ing and racing horses over time with his son. Hank forces a sure-thingŽ racehorse upon Chris, who reluctantly agrees to play into his fathers dreams of having the big winner. The horse turns out to be a great prospect, but a crooked trainer, Ed Price, hides its talent through falsifying time trials and then puts the horse in a claim-ing stakes race, assuring Chris that no one would make the offer. When an Arab sheik (whos in league with Ed) claims the winning horse, Chris is devastated. Hes also broke. Another chance comes when Hank hands over to Chris a marvelous horse whose registration papers obscure the fact that he is a clone of the great Sec-retariat. Needing to pay off a huge debt on the horse, Chris succumbs to taking a loan from a New York mob kingpin named (of course) Vince. Soon enough, Chris is paying off his debt by participat-ing in drug transfers for Vince in Gulf Coast waters. At the Miami racetrack, Chris meets and falls for a female trainer, the tough and gorgeous Allie. Though Chris has already broken up with the totally self-centered Kate, his former flame cant deal with this turn of affairs, and her wild threats turn into dangerous action. Though Chris feels obligated to fulfill his promises to his father about racing the sure-thing clone, he is certainly trou-bled by the ethical „ and legal „ prob-lems he has brought upon himself. Wont the truth eventually come out and tarnish anything that Secretariat RebornŽ might accomplish? Will Chris ever shake loose from the grip Vince has on him? Will Kate continue to stalk and perhaps bring injury or worse to him and Allie? As the author deftly maneuvers our concerns from one problem to anoth-er, the pressure on Chris builds „ as does the novels suspense. Special attractions in this novel include Ms. Klauss sure-handed insider descriptions of the thor-oughbred racing world, including its susceptibility to deceit and corruption. Just as interest-ing is the carefully nuanced development of the romance between Chris and Allie, compromised as it is by Chriss need to hide the ugly truths about the clone and about his deal with Vince. Descriptions of the Ocala-SarasotaMiami triangle are sufficiently detailed to orient readers visually and culturally without bogging down the narrative pace. In the high-stakes world of fiction writing, Secretariat RebornŽ is a darn good bet. More about the authorA Sarasota native, Ms. Klaus has been a pet groomer for 30 years, an exhibiter in dog obedience trials and a breeder of show cats. She has bred and raced thoroughbred horses, and she currently raises rodeo bulls. She founded and is still president of the Sarasota Authors Connection Club, presently with 230 members, and she is the web radio host and co-producer of The Authors Connection,Ž a show with 15 million listeners in 148 countries. In 2009, Ms. Klaus rewrote her novel The Golden HarpyŽ and renamed it Flight of the Golden Harpy.Ž It won the Florida Writers Royal Palm Literary Award for Best Science Fiction Manuscript of 2010. Flight of the Golden HarpyŽ has been optioned by Tor and will come out in 2014. Secretariat RebornŽ is her first suspense/thriller. She is working on Shark Fin Soup,Ž the sequel to the Secretariat novel, and another suspense/thriller, A Murder in Sarasota,Ž based on a true story. Q „ Phil Jason, Ph.D., United States Naval Academy professor emeritus of English, is a poet, critic and freelance writer with 20 books to his credit, including several studies of war literature and a creative writing text. phil JASONpkjason@comcast.net Palm Beach Dramaworks presents “The Lion in Winter” SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Join King Henry II and his estranged wife, Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, as they celebrate Christmas with their three sons. But be prepared to experience duplicity, backstabbing and caustic barbs when Palm Beach Dramaworks presents James Goldmans classic comic-drama, The Lion in Winter,Ž opening Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. The per-formances will take place at the Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis Street, and are scheduled through Jan. 5 with spe-cially priced previews on Dec. 4 and 5. Based on actual historical events and set in 1183 in Henrys palace, the future of England is at stake and everyone is selfishly plotting to force Henry to name his successor. The Lion in Winter will be directed by Producing Artistic Director Wil-liam Hayes, and features C. David John-son (Henry), Tod Randolph (Eleanor), along with Katherine Amadeo, Justin Baldwin, Cliff Burgess, Chris Crawford, and Pierre Tannous. Scenic design is by Michael Amico, costume design by Brian OKeefe, lighting design by Ron Burns, and sound design by Matt Corey. The original production of The Lion in Winter opened on Broadway on March 3, 1966, followed by the hugely successful 1968 film and the 2003 TV movie. It is the most celebrated of Mr. Goldmans plays. Mr. Goldman was an American playwright, screenwriter, and novelist. His plays include Blood, Sweat and Stanley Poole, They Might Be Giants, A Family Affair, and Follies. He won the Academy Award for his screen adap-tion of The Lion in Winter. Palm Beach Dramaworks is a non-profit, pro-fessional theatre and is a member of the Theatre Communications Group, the South Florida The-atre League, Southeastern Theatre Conference, Flor-ida Professional Theatres Association, Florida The-atre Conference, and the Palm Beach County Cul-tural Council. For 14 years, West Palm Beach's only professional, multi-awardwinning resident theatre has brought to the Palm Beaches a distinguished roster of plays under the guidance of Produc-ing Artistic Director William Hayes. The performance schedule is as follows: Evening performances are Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m. Matinee performances are on Wednesday, Satur-day and Sunday at 2 p.m. Individual tick-ets are $60 for all performances. Pre-view performances are $52 and Opening Night tickets are $75. Student tickets are available for $10. Group rates for 20 or more and discounted season subscrip-tions are also available. The Don & Ann Brown Theatre is located in the heart of downtown West Palm Beach, at 201 Clematis Street. For ticket information contact the box office at 514-4042, open Monday through Sat-urday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; or visit www.palmbeachdrama-works.org. Q

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15 PALM BEACH SOCIETY Adopt A Cat Foundation Spa’cat’ti Dinner, Palm Beach Gardens LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeekly PalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area event s than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOS Adopt A Cat Foundat  LikeŽ us on Facebook.com “ t in the newspaper. So, i f y eve n Karen Vitale, Susan Daniels and Tom Vitale Curt Fonger, Hannah Ben-Ezra and Susan Thomas Inga Hanley Liz Stoudt, Cardine Fiore and Lisa Philips Monica Garlington, Jim Gill and Pam Govekar Thursday, December 12 | 6 9 p.m. Cultural Council | 601 Lake Ave | Lake Worth $50 | Members $40 Cocktail Attire | Complimentary Valet Parking Trunk Show | Silent Auction Join us at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County for a creative cocktail reception featuring a trunk show and silent auction of work by local artists.Generously Sponsored byRoe Green FoundationRoe Green, Founder Boynton Beach Flower Market RSVP | 561.472.3342 or ksmiley@palmbeachculture.comAdditional support from: Curt Fonger

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B16 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH SOCIETY Art in the Gardens at Downtown at the Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens LikeŽ us on Facebook.com / FloridaWeekly PalmBeach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly. com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Tyann Smith, Beth Kozak, Donna Arkin and Noel MartinezTom Miller and Geri Gautney Lauren Wescott and Miles Mikolas Michelle Ebrick, JR Weinberg and Megan Weinberg Jeff Woolridge, Lisa Woolridge, Maddy Woolridge and Fred Woolridge Clarence Roberts, Patrice Roberts and Patsy Roberts Gina Carmichael and Josh Carmichael Anne Mittleholzer, Ernie Mittelholzer, Ellen Roy and Suman Roy Cheri Mulcahy, Lynne Mulcahy and Irene Kaneski Glen Weeks, Cindy Weeks, Ryder Weeks and Cooper Weeks Meridith Cooper and Ronda Cooper Kendall Rumsey, Brittany Cartwright and Erin DevlinANDREW SPILOS / FLORIDA WEEKLY GlenWeeksCindyWeeksRyderWeeksandCooperWeeks

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B17 PALM BEACH SOCIETY Sandy Garfunkel and George Garfunkel host New York reception for Classical South Florida LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /FloridaWeekly Palm Beach to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area even ts than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.Judy McAlpine, Sandy Garfunkel, George Garfunkel and Dave Kansas Nancy Parker and Jay Parker Carl Hewitt and Marsha Hewitt Chris Kellogg and Vicki Kellogg Stephen Anbinder and Madeline AnbinderToby Perlman, Carol Wincenc and Cynthia Friedman Joan Kalkin and Eugene KalkinKatherine DeConti and Katie Nojima Ellen Liman and Margo Sappington George Palladino, Beth Holland and Jerrold St. George Margo Sappington and Anka PalitzCOURTESY PHOTOS

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B18 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY VINOSelecting the right wine starts with picking the right storeShopping for wine can be challenging, even for experienced buyers. Knowledgeable wine buyers can find a large selection frustrating because they can only choose a few bottles to buy, while wine novices can find the experience over-whelming as they contemplate aisles and aisles of wine before them. Shopping for wine requires a measure of trust in the store, the salesperson, the blurb about the wine pinned to the shelf or or the winerys reputation. Here are ways to elimi-nate some of the guesswork and make your purchasing easier. If you are a novice, start out by shopping at a boutique wine shop where the own-ers are often on hand, tend to know their wines well and are interested in educating customers with whom they hope to build long-term relationships. They often offer free tastes as well. Is the place nicely lighted and clean, or dark and dingy? The atmosphere of the store can be a good indicator of how care-fully the wines are selected and stored. No matter what sort of store you shop in, a salesperson can help with your selection, but you need to be careful. How can you be sure this person knows something about wine or is simply pitching what the man-agement wants to sell that week? On a recent shopping trip to a large wine store, I was taken aback when I heard a salesperson tell a customer standing behind me, No maam, they dont make white Bur-gundy. Its all red.Ž In this case, the proper response would be to flee. A good salesperson will want to know if youre shopping for a wine to go with tonights steak dinner, something to serve a crowd at a party or a special gift that can age for a few years. He also might ask what kind of wine you typically drink to determine your flavor preferences. Dont be shy about telling the salesperson your budget. Beware any wine the salesperson is pushing but cant tell you anything about or hasnt tried. If you ask for a $15 bottle and she shows you one for $25, be on guard. If, however, she suggests some-thing she drinks herself and it costs $18, you might give it a try. Where the wine comes from can affect the price as well. Many wine regions are known for producing very nice wines at reasonable prices. Spain, Australia, Argen-tina, South Africa and Chile are just a few countries that offer good value wines. Another option is to try wine from areas just outside of better-known wine growing regions. If, for example, you enjoy wines from the pricey district of Pomerol in Bor-deaux, stroll down the road to try Lalande-de-Pomerol. Its the same grape (merlot), but youll pay a much lower price. For those times when you shop without the services of a helpful salesperson, you still have resources available to help pick the right wine. Many shops offer samples of wines, especially on the weekends. Listen to what other customers say about the wines you are trying. Get on mailing lists of retailers and wineries for advance notice of upcom-ing tastings. Taking a knowledgeable friend shopping can be helpful because you feel you can trust his or her palate. But when that person points at a bottle and says, I really liked that one,Ž be aware that he might not have honed in on what you are looking for. Do not feel pressured to take his suggestion. Dont be ashamed to take notes with you. There is plenty of wine buying information available online and in print. Wine Spectator, Wine Enthusiast, Robert Parkers The Wine Advocate, Stephen Tan-zers International Wine Cellar and Food & Wine Magazine are a few of the wine publi-cations with reliable information. This column always includes three or more wines (with descriptions) Ive tasted and enjoyed. Theres an archive of several years worth at www.floridaweekly.com. Print out what seems interesting and take it to the store. Find a source that you trust, making sure that the recommendations are not advertisements disguised as independent reviews. Wine Picks of the Week: Q Robert Mondavi 2010 Oakville Cabernet Sauvignon ($55): A classic Napa cabernet from the famous To-Kalon vineyard in the Oakville district, the wine shows both power and finesse. With lay-ers of blackberry and black cherry on the nose and the palate, it is both complex and approachable, with a mouth-filling texture and refreshing acidity. Q Robert Mondavi 2011 Oakville Fum Blanc ($32): Sauvignon blanc and smillon grapes show enticing citrus and melon aromas that merge with orange with crisp, balanced flavors. Ends with a silky palate and lingering finish. Q Zind-Humbrecht Gewrztraminer Alsace Grand Cru Rangen de Thann Clos St.-Urbain 2008 ($65): Rich aromas and flavors of lychee, cream and rose petal with a tinge of sweetness and an underlying acidity. A briny minerality runs through the wine, and the finish goes on and on. Q jim McCRACKENvino@floridaweekly.com COURTESY PHOTOSMondavi Oakville Fume Blanc label.

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GARDENS/JUPITER FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14-20, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B19The Dish: Seared tuna The Place: Dave s Last Resort, 632 Lake Ave., downtown Lake Worth; 588-5208 or daveslastresort.com The Price: $12.99 The Details: You could make a meal of this seared tuna and leave feeling stuffed. Or you could order a plate of the tender tuna, cooked rare, and share it with others, as Dave intended you to. The tuna was perfectly cooked, save a couple of slices that spent a little too much next to the heat. But we wont complain about the rest of this plate of sesame-crusted perfec-tion, served with wasabi, pickled ginger and Daves sesame dipping sauce. Nothing like a dish thats good, and good for you. Oh, and be sure to check out Daves gluten-free menu while youre there. Q „ Sc ott Simmons FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Gluten-free, portion controlled, healthy and delicious „ this is what Chris Twardowski and Jennifer Anto-nuccios Fit Body Bistro is all about. With help from chef Emilio Herrera, the Bistro offers clean eatingŽ options in a fast and casual setting. We not only serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, but we serve quality food to help with peoples dietary restrictions or health and fitness goals,Ž says Mr. Herrera, the lead chef since the Bistros grand opening in July. Mr. Herrera, originally from Omaha, lived on Offutt Air Force Base before moving to Boynton Beach at age 8. He says that his passion for cuisine evolved while he was in seventh grade and his parents were attending night school. We were always a military family, so when my parents had the option to finish their degree at Northwood Uni-versity, they took advantage of it,Ž he says. I would call my mom constantly when she was at school to help me cook meals and it soon turned into a pas-sion.Ž Mr. Herrera says that he continued his exploration for culinary throughout high school by taking multiple cooking classes. After graduating high school, Mr. Herrera attended the Florida Culi-nary Institute as well as worked at vari-ous restaurants in The Breakers. I was very fortunate to get a job at The Breakers while I was still in culi-nary school,Ž he says. It really helped me understand that just having a degree wont make me a chef; I needed as much experience as possible.Ž After working at The Breakers, Mr. Herrera started working as a caterer for the Palm Beach County Convention Center. He says that because catering at the convention center was a seasonal job, he was able to apply as the head chef for Fit Body Bistro. I have always been really interested in health, fitness, and weight training,Ž he says. Being the chef at Fit Body Bis-tro was a perfect match for me.Ž Fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry, smoothies and even personalized meal plans are not only available at the Bis-tro, but are also in popular demand. Chris and Jennifer came up with the concept and menu items, and I essen-tially helped put it all together,Ž he says. They needed a chef who knew how to avoid drenching the potatoes in oil and blanching the vegetables correctly; I was that guy.Ž Purple walls, inviting couches, complimentary Wi-Fi and the smell of fresh food creates a chic and warm envi-ronment. Fit Body Bistro is a great fit whether youre just coming from the gym or looking to eat right. We cater to a very diverse group of people here,Ž says Mr. Herrera. You dont have to be in shape to eat our food, but just like our motto, we will serve you food that shapes the body.Ž Name: Emilio Herrera Age: 25 Original hometown: Omaha Restaurant: Fit Body Bistro, 5440 Military Trail, Abacoa Plaza, Jupiter; 627-5747 or fitbodybistro.com. Mission: My mission here is to make the best tasting and cleanest food possible to help people reach their goals in fitness and in health.Ž Cuisine: Clean food options in a fast casual setting Whats your footwear of choice in the kitchen? Danskos. I wouldnt wear anything else!Ž What is your guilty culinary pleasure? I love a good New York strip steak with gorgonzola cheese and onions.Ž What advice would you give someone who wants to be a chef? The way you really learn is by doing,Ž he says. As a chef, you make food, but it is also important to make food your own.Ž If you go to culinary school, you really need to go out and work towards what you want,Ž he says. You need to apply what youve learned and use it in the real world.Ž Q In the kitchen with...EMILIO HERRERA, Fit Body Bistro BY LOREN GUTENTAGlgutentag@floridaweekly.comTHE DISH Highlights from local menus Clematis barbecue spot goes IrishSCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTO Emilio Herrerra strives to offer “clean eating” options at Fit Body Bistro in Jupiter. Whats an Italian guy who once had a couple of pizzeria/pasta houses doing helping an Irish pub get started? Frank Eucalitto has the quick answer: Im part Irish „ my grand-mother was a McCarthy.Ž Mr. Eucalitto, long-time restaurant owner (Cafe Chardonnay and the for-mer No Anchovies!) is helping Cleve Mash and a group of investors, includ-ing the John Flynn family, transform the former Bobbi Sue BBQ in down-town West Palm Beach into an Irish pub. It just wasnt the right concept for downtown crowd,Ž Mr. Eucalitto said of the barbecue spot. Its family-ori-ented food, really, and Clematis Street is not as family friendly. Its more of a pub and bar food crowd.Ž The Flynns are from Ireland, but have been visitors to West Palm Beach for nearly 30 years, Mr. Eucalitto said. They know the area and think this is a good fit.Ž The restaurateur will create the menu that the chef will follow. Theyre my recipes, for some typi-cal Irish fare but with a twist. Were going to tweak it a little bit toward a gastro pub. Ill be able to do a bunch of casual foods that are interesting items that Ive wanted to do at Cafe Chardonnay „ more like what I did at No Anchovies!Ž It wont be a large menu, he said, but specials will allow the chef room for creativity. Its going to be a fun menu with great beers.Ž Eight beers will be on tap „ Guinness and Harp, of course, and six microbrews. Forty craft brews in bottles and 35 wines, half by the glass, will be offered. Mr. Mash, whose successes include Dirty Martini and Dr. Feelgoods, will manage the front of the house and entertainment. Live bands will per-form on weekends, and will include Irish bands. They want this authentic look and they did a great job with the interior,Ž Mr. Eucalitto said. Cubbies and snugs, typical seating in village pubs that dot the Irish countryside, are part of the authenticity. Its going to look like its been on Clematis forever.Ž Modern touches are included. Theyll have eight TVs „ but its not a sports-bar look. They fit right in with the decor.Ž International soccer and rugby games will be shown live, so breakfast on weekends, and late-late-night fare is planned along with lunch and dinner daily. Theres room for it on the street despite others, he said. Its going to be a great place to just hang out and have good food and a beer and meet up with friends.Ž Q „ J. Flynns is at 223 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach. Website: Jflynnpub.com. „ Jan Norris writes about food and travel. Read her at jannorris.com. BY JAN NORRISjnorris@floridaweekly.comHead to Tequestas In The Kitchen to learn some cool dishes for the holi-day season: Chef Lenore Pinello will teach her students how to create all of these fabulous menus. Youll enjoy the complete meal and take recipes home for every dish. These evenings are BYOB; bring your favorite wine or adult beverage to complement your dinner. Off the Hook! „ 6:30 p.m. Nov. 21. Cost: $80. Feast of the Seven Fishes … The Traditional Italian Christmas Eve Feast! „ 6:30 p.m. Dec. 12. Cost: $90. Christmas in Paris! „ 6:30 p.m. Dec. 17. Finish the meal with a Bche de Nol. Cost: $80. In The Kitchen is at Gallery Square North, 389 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Reservations required. Call 747-7117 or visit www.inthekitchennow.com. Q Learn and eat at In the KitchenSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTO J. Flynn’s has an Irish village pub look.

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MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PRESENTS 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter FL 33477FOR TICKETS: (561) 575-2223 FOR GROUP SALES: (56 1) 972-6117 www.jupitertheatre.org LINKEDIN ;@JAKE9;
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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY REACHING PALM BEACH COUNTYÂ’S MOST AFFLUENT READERS CTIVE ADULTS SUFFERING FROM HIP PAIN DUE TO DEGENERAtive hip disease and abnormalities such as osteoar-thritis, post-traumatic arthritis, dysplasia or avascu-lar necrosis now have an alternative to hip replace-ment surgery to ease their pain: hip resurfacing. Unlike total hip replacement, hip resurfacing resurfaces only a few centimeters of the bone, reducing pain and enabling individuals to return to high-demand occupations and recreational activities. During traditional hip replacement surgery, both the head and neck of the femur (thighbone) are removed and replaced with metal or plastic implants. In hip resurfacing, Florida WeeklyÂ’s monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living Better living living healthyNovember 2013A BY VINCENT A. FOWBLE, MDBoard Certified, Orthopedic SurgeryREPLACEMENTAn alternative to HIP SEE HIP, C11 X

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C2 healthy living NOVEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY D ental implant restorations are replacement teeth comprised of several components: an implant post made of biocompatible titanium that is anchored to the jawbone, an implant abutment that attaches to the implant and protrudes from the gum line, and a custom-made restoration (often a crown or bridge) that is fitted onto the abut-ment for a natural appearance. Dental implants can be used to replace a single failing or missing tooth as well as mul-tiple failing or missing teeth. In many cases, Dr. Jay Ajmo can replace all of a pa tients teeth with dental implants.Who is a candidate for dental implants?Most adults at any age who want to replace missing teeth are candidates. They are used to permanently replace a single missing tooth or multiple missing teeth and have become the optimum choice for many patients requiring tooth replacement and dental restoration. Implants also serve as secure attachments for removable dental prostheses such as full dentures or partial plates.What does a complete dental implant procedure involve?The process in our office has become simplified because we use state-of-the art techniques to surgically place and complete-ly restore your implants, all in our specially designed cosmetic and implant facility in Palm Beach Gardens. Well schedule your implant surgery in our on-site surgi-cal suite, where youll be kept comfortable and relaxed with a sedative, if necessary. Dr. Ajmo will place small, biocompatible implant posts precise-ly where your teeth are missing in your jaws. The same day, in many cases, he will attach abutments and temporary crowns to the implants. Your mouth will heal over the next few weeks and the implants will fuse to your jawbone over several months (a process called osseointegration). After the implants are securely fused to your jawbone, Dr. Ajmo will custom design permanent res-torations that will look, feel and function like your real teeth. Your personal treatment plan might include a single tooth replacement with a cosmetic porcelain crown, the replacement of multiple teeth with permanent bridge-work or a full set of replacement teeth. Dr. Ajmo also offers a variety of implant-retained denture options that firmly and securely support removable appliances without the use of messy glues or denture adhesives. To ensure your comfort during implant procedures, we offer a variety of relaxing sedation techniques, including mild oral and IV sedation. Since Dr. Ajmo is board certi-fied in IV sedation and is highly skilled in all of these comprehensive implant services, you can be certain youre getting the most comfortable care possible while feeling con-fident that youre receiving the absolute best in modern dentistry. Q Dental implants simplified with state-of-the-art surgery Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A.PGA CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY 7100 FAIRWAY DR. SUITE 59 PALM BEACH GARDENS561-627-8666PGADENTISTRY.COM Before After #VSOT3PBEr1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt pbgmc.com UnE-* r-1,r,9U/"/" /-1,r,9U-*",/-rn rU",/"*rn,r Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to enjoy the course, the game, and be the healthiest you can be. Our team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS have trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. If you take care of your game on the course, we will take care of your orthopedic needs off the course.Call 561-625-5070 for a referral to an orthopedic surgeon or visit pbgmc.com. -iˆ}…i œ`->`>` ˆ "…œi`ˆV n >i ',œ>`U*>“i>V…>`iUL}“VVœ“ Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center ORTHOPEDIC CARE

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT NOV. 2013 healthy living C3 CDC report: E-cigarette use among teens in the U.S. doubles T he number of middle school and high school students in the United States who used electronic cigarettes doubled in 2012 compared to just a year earlier, according to a report released recently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 1.8 million middle school and high school students nation-wide had tried e-cigarettes last year, the report said. The Florida Department of Health s Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida is alarmed by the mounting body of evidence that shows that youth are, indeed, using e-cigarettes. In Florida, 4.3 percent of middle school students and 12.1 percent of high school stu-dents had ever tried e-cigarettes in 2013, according to new data released by the health department. The number of Flor-ida high school students who had tried e-cigarettes doubled „ from 6 percent in 2011 to 12.1 percent in 2013. Aside from their potentially harmful health effects, e-cigarettes are a means to becoming hooked on nicotine, which is a highly addictive, dangerous chemical. To add to this concern, these unregulated products are available in fruit and candy flavors, which are espe-cially enticing to young people because they mask the harsh flavor of traditional tobacco. The increased marketing of these products is also worrisome to anti-smoking advocates. E-cigarettes have brought Big Tobacco back into families living rooms,Ž said Tobacco Free Florida Bureau Chief Shan-non Hughes. Tobacco products like ciga-rettes and dip have been banned from advertising on TV for decades, and for good reason. Yet, new in-your-face e-cig-arette ads have recently infiltrated our airwaves with commercials that seem to have taken a page out of Big Tobaccos playbook for targeting young people.Ž The CDCs e-cigarette report comes on the heels of new Florida data that show that teen cigarette smoking reached a record low in the state. The new data from the state health depart-ment indicates that there are tens of thousands of fewer teens smoking ciga-rettes today than before the Tobacco Free Florida program launched in 2007. We have seen notable progress in Florida, yet the alarming increase in e-cigarette use and in their availability has the potential to normalize smoking again, after decades of hard work in the state and across the country to reverse that norm,Ž said Ms. Hughes. A state where seeing someone smoke is the exception not the norm is a state where more smokers are encouraged to quit and fewer youth ever start „ a healthier Florida for all.Ž Q

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C4 healthy living NOV. 2013 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT <:=-*-)5‘+A*-:361.-:)81,):+‘*:)+0A<0-:)8A ;W]\P.TWZQLI:ILQI\QWV7VKWTWOaQ[KPIVOQVO\PM_IaT]VOKIVKMZQ[\ZMI\ML 4]VOKIVKMZQ[\PM[MKWVLUW[\KWUUWVKIVKMZQVJW\PUMVIVL_WUMVIKKW]V\QVONWZXMZKMV\WNITTVM_KIVKMZ[ ?PMVaW]ZMLQIOVW[ML_Q\PKIVKMZQ\[XMZ[WVIT aW]_IV\\PM UW[\IL^IVKML\ZMI\UMV\[IVL\PMJM[\XPa[QKQIV[WVaW]Z\MIU)\;W]\P.TWZQLI:ILQI\QWV7VKWTWOa;.:7_MPI^M \PM M`XMZ\Q[MIVL\PMK]\\QVOMLOM\ZMI\UMV\WX\QWV[\W PMTXaW]_Q V aW]ZNQOP\IOIQV[\T]VOKIVKMZ
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Steps toward getting help with plantar fasciitis symptoms A common overuse injury that professionals at OYM Cycling and Performance Center see with their athletes is plantar fas-ciitis. Triathletes are especially prone to this chronic condition whenever they rapidly increase the running intensity of their train-ing program. Characterized by inflammation of the tough fibrous tissue band (fascia) running longitu-dinally along the bottom (plantar) surface of the foot from the heel to the base of the toes, plantar fasciitis can be incred-ibly painful as well as debilitating. Frequent and improper loading of this part of the foot can result in micro-tearing of the surrounding tis-sue. This can lead quickly to a chronic foot problem if left untreated. Runners are particu-larly susceptible to inflammation of the plantar fascia due to repetitive stressful pounding of the foot with the toes in a backward or dor-siflexed position. Dorsiflexion can increase the arch of the foot, further shortening the plantar fascia band, which often leads to inflammation. An athlete experiencing symptoms of plan-tar fasciitis might feel considerable discomfort while taking his or her first steps upon waking in the morning. This pain is caused when the already irritated plantar area contracts even farther during sleeping hours. Barefoot early morning steps place a forceful stretch upon this tight-ened tissue, particularly when those steps are taken on a hard tiled floor. Weight gain, incorrect shoe wear and arthri-tis can also con-tribute to this syndrome. The experienced profes-sionals at OYM Cycling and Per-formance Center have the tools and training to help get you back on track. Matt and Julie Goforth carry a complete line of Trigger Point Performance Therapy products specifically designed to treat symp-toms of plantar fasciitis. We re proud to offer our athletes the popular TPPT Foot and Lower Leg Kit, featuring a combination of two soft massage balls, foot roller, positioning block and instructional videos,Ž Julie Goforth said. Weve really had great success with these products.Ž The Goforths were introduced to this line of products several years ago and were impressed with their qual-ity, so they decided to carry the line in their store for their athlete clients. Matt decided to go a step further and take product training directly from the source. In 2009, he flew to Dallas to receive instruction with Cassidy Phil-lips, CEO and founder of Trigger Point Performance Therapy. Mr. Phillips is a biomechanical specialist and an accom-plished triathlete who unfortunately experienced first-hand the devastating effects of fibromyalgia. Through his own physical rehabilitation, Mr. Phillips developed the unique Myofascial Com-pression Technique approach, products and informational videos marketed by Trigger Point Performance Therapy. For overuse injuries, this is the stuff,Ž Matt Goforth said. Its not just for rehab, though. Myofascial release should be a part of your regular train-ing program.Ž Stop by OYM Cycling and Performance Center today for a first-hand demonstration of these and other qual-ity products for athletes of all levels. Q ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com NOVEMBER 2013 healthy living C5 Faced with cancer and an ill husbandMargaret came out swinging. SHE HAD REASON TO HOPE FOR THE BEST. Thats Good Medicine. “I’m Margaret and I’m a true cancer success story. I was diagnosed with ductal breast cancer while my husband was in Hospice. After my surgery, Dr. Raymond and her incredible staff at Good Sam became the most important people in my life…and they still are.”For a physician referral or for more information, please call 561.650.6023 or visit GoodSamaritanMC.com 1309 N. FLAGLER DRIVE @ PALM BEACH LAKES BLVD. IN WEST PALM BEACH www.oymbike.com(561) 842-2453ON YOUR MARK PERFORMANCE 819 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY LAKE PARK BY ROBIN BRADLEY HANSELPhysical therapist m mon overuse injury t h at of essionals at OYM c lin g and r f o rman ce wit h t he ir p lantar f asthle t es ar e prone to c co n di ti o n h ey rapi dl y h e runnin g their train. r ize d b y o n of th e s tissue band n in g lon g itug the bottom r face of the e h ee l t o th e t oes, p lantar be i n c r e das well as an d loadin g of the es ult in ng o f d ing tisc an le a d qyp le f t untreated. Runners are p articu larly susceptible to in f lammation o f t h e p l antar fascia due to repetitive stress f ul poundin g o f th e fo o t w it h th e t oes in a b a ck war d o r do r si f lexed position. Dor si fl e x io n c an in c r e a se the arch of the foot, f urther shortenin g the p lantar f ascia band, whi c h o ft e n l e ad s t o in fl amma ti o n. An athlete ex p erienc in g symptoms of pl an tar f asciitis mi g ht f eel co n s id e ra b l e di sco m fo rt w h i l e ta k in g h is or h er f irst steps upon wakin g in the mornin g This p ain is cause d w h en the already irri tate d pl an t ar ar ea g hours. Bare f oot early mornin g pl ace a f orce f ul stretch upon thi ene d tissue, particu l ar l y w h e n s te p s are taken on a hard tile d We ig ht in co rr ec t w e ar an d ti s c an al s tri b ut e t o syn d rome The e enced p si o n al s a t Cyclin g a n f o rman ce ha v e t he and train h e lp g et y o o n tra c k and Ju lie G carry a co line o f T Point Performance Therapy p r s peci f ically desi g ned to treat toms o f pl antar f asciitis. Were proud to offer our a t h e p o p u l ar TPPT Foot an d Le g Kit, f eaturin g a na ti o n o so f t m w ww.oymbike.co m ( 561 ) 842-245 3 O N YOUR MARK PERFORMANC E 819 NO RTH FE DER AL HIG HWA Y LAKE PARK st Inflammation of the plantar fascia

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C6 healthy living NOVEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Complete Dentistry in One State -of-the-Art Facility. PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry is where patients from all over South Florida have been seeking outstanding care since 1987.'U-D\$MPRLVXQLTXHO\TXDOLHGDPRQJPRGHUQGD\GHQWLVW EHFDXVHKHVQRWRQO\DQ DFFRPSOLVKHGFRVPHWLFDQGUHVWRUDWLYHGHQWLVWKHVDOVR&HUWLHG'HQW DO,PSODQW6XUJHRQ %RDUG&HUWLHGLQ,96HGDWLRQHis state-of-the-art facility in Palm Beach Gardens is equipped with the most modern technology for optimum treatment and superior patient satisfaction. This unique concept in DGYDQFHGHQWLVWU\RIIHUVSDWLHQWVWKHEHQHWVDQGFRQYHQLHQFHRIKDYLQJ DOOWKHODWHVWIRUPV of dental implant, cosmetic and restorative procedures completed with total comfort in one H[FHSWLRQDORIFH See more atPGAdentistry.comCall 561-627-86663*$1DWLRQDO/$)LWQHVV3OD]D‡3*$%OYGNew Patient Complimentary Consult or 2nd opinion. Before BeforeAfter After“I feel so much younger and healthier after having my smile repaired. “The sedation kept me totally relaxed and comfortable. Dr. Ajmo and his staff were wonderful.” ~Thanks, Karen Jennifer MartinBODHI HOT YOGA 9920 ALT A1A, SUITE 801 PALM BEACH GARDENS(561) 835-1577www.BodhiHotYoga.com Confessions of a sweaty yogi: Ancient moves for orthopedic problems C alling all athletes, week-end warriors and anyone else with aching joints and bones: We never tire of letting you know how yoga can help you both treat and prevent a wide variety of orthopedic problems. Many of us know that yoga poses are meant to train the body to be healthy and supple, with consistent prac-tice and applica-tion resulting in improved flexibil-ity, greater sense of balance and increased strength. Yoga helps increase strength and flexibility in very specific mus-cles and muscle groups. Both hold-ing and flowing in between yoga postures in a Hot Vinyasa sequence requires concentration and specific use of muscles throughout the body, building strength. Yoga also incorpo-rates stretching and relaxation, which reduces the tension in stress-carry-ing muscles. In particular yoga pos-tures, certain muscles flex while oth-ers stretch, promoting relaxation and flexibility in muscles and joints. The heat particularly promotes increased and deepened flexibility by acting as a protective envelope for joints and muscles. It also aids in heightened circulation to bring blood and oxygen to many parts of the body, as well as releasing toxins in the muscles and soft tissues. Yoga can also be used to help treat a wide variety of common orthopedic problems and disorders such as back pain, rotator cuff injuries, and bone disease without the use of drugs, sur-gery or endless months of physical therapy. For people suffering with lower back pain, stretching is very important. For example, stretching the hamstrings helps expand the motion in the pel-vis, decreasing stress across the lower back. Many of the postures in yoga gently strengthen the muscles in the back, as well as the abdominal mus-cles. Back and abdominal muscles are essential components of the muscular network of the spine, helping the body maintain proper upright posture and movement. A consistent, regular yoga practice can even offer relief from scoliosis and its side effects, including back pain, sciatica, intervertebral disc prolapse, sacroiliac issues and tingling in the hands. In all cases, when these muscles are well-conditioned, back pain can be greatly reduced or avoided. Rotator cuff injuries are common among athletes, gym and sports enthu-siasts, older people, accident victims and people whose jobs involve repeat-ed overhead motions. For patients fac-ing surgery to repair a tear in the rota-tor cuff and many months of rehabilita-tion, the surprising yoga remedy of a modified yoga headstand or supported headstand can serve as a miracle to relieve shoulder pain for most. This adaption of a yoga headstand, called the triangular forearm support, trains a muscle below the shoulder blade „the subscapularis „ to take over the job of the injured muscle and connective soft tissue, thus removing the constant strain and stress on the rotator. Yoga also has benefits to bones. Bone loss is epidemic in our society, and the methods to prevent and treat it are far from ideal. Weight-bearing exercise helps, but many studies are citing strength training, in which mus-cles pull on the bones, as perhaps even more beneficial. Daily yoga practice of as little as 30 minutes a day can increase bone density in both spine and hips. Osteoporosis and resulting fractures are rarely seen among regu-lar yoga practitioners at any age. Also, improved balance decreases the risk of falls, which can result in fractures. Awareness of the body through yoga increases with practice. In theory, spe-cific positioning and repositioning not only limbers the body, but also trains practitioners to understand the limi-tations of their body. An increased awareness acts as a preventive mea-sure, in that the individual will know what types of motions should and should not be avoided. If you suf-fer from any orthopedic disorders or injuries, consider the following before starting a yoga regime:€ If you have any medical conditions or injuries, speak to your doctor before participating in yoga. € Work with a qualified yoga instructor. Ask about his or her experience and credentials. € Discuss any known illness or injury with your yoga instructor prior to the class so that he or she can recommend pose modifications. € Learn what type of yoga you are performing. There are hundreds of different forms of yoga, some more strenuous than others. It is important to learn which type of yoga will best suit your needs. € Select the class level that is appro-priate for you. Beginners should start slowly and learn the basics first „ holding even the basic postures builds strength and alignment „ rather than trying to stretch too far. € Wear appropriate clothing that allows for proper movement. € Warm up thoroughly before a yoga session; cold muscles, tendons, and ligaments are vulnerable to injury. € If you are unsure of a pose or move-ment, ask questions. € Know your limits. Do not try posi-tions beyond your experience or com-fort level. € Keep hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids, especially if participating in a hot yoga class. € Listen to your body. If you are expe-riencing pain or exhaustion while par-ticipating in yoga, stop or take a break. Nothing in yoga should elicit this phys-ical response, so learn to relax and enjoy the class. Bodhi Hot Yoga is the perfect sanctuary for mind and body transforma-tion. To see more studio information or class times, visit our website. Q

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com NOVEMBER 2013 healthy living C7 901 45th S treet, W est P a lm B ea ch Learn more at Palm B each C hildrens .com Children’s Medical CareIs Soaring to New Heights. cardiology & cardiac surgery neurosurgeryemergency trauma care oncology neonatal intensive carelimb reconstruction & lengthening Helping a five year old overcome a battle with cancer. Reconstructing a child’s misshapen leg. Performing heart surgery on a patient who is only 12 hours old. Palm Beach Children’s Hospital has elevated the quality of children’s medical care in South Flori da. Our goal: to provide advanced care that is less invasive, requires less recovery time and alleviates the need for families to travel. Palm Beach Ch ildren’s Hospital helps ensure that children have access to the care they need close to home. More than 170 doctors representing 30 specialties. For your freeKITE, call 5 6 1-84 1-KID S Scan with your smartphones Q R code reade r I n most divorce cases money is the centrally disputed issue. In any given divorce case the issues of equitable distribution of assets and liabilities, alimony, child support, and of course, who s going to pay for the attorneys fees and costs incurred by both sides are all about money. When dealing with financial issues in a divorce people usually have two distinct points of view. I affection-ately label these points of view as the Stickler and Adjuster perspec-tives. The Stickler wants to make sure that no stone is left unturned so as to insure that they get every penny theyre entitled to. They are less concerned with the final result than they are that they are not taken advantage of. Alternatively, the Adjuster wants to find an expedited big-pictureŽ solution, and is more interested in a reasonable settle-ment. The Adjuster is generally will-ing to take less to avoid confrontation. There are plenty of people who occupy the middle ground between these per-spectives, however most people tend to trend one way or the other. While there is nothing wrong with either point of view, as a general rule the Stickler should be prepared to spend substan-tially more money on a divorce. As a divorce lawyer it is my job to act as a human barometer in the initial consultation, essentially predicting what is likely to happen if the case was to go to trial. This is important because if you do not know what is likely to happen in court, you do not know what would be a reasonable settlement. Pay close atten-tion, I used the word reasonable, not fair. One of the biggest hurdles for most people who are getting divorced is the exclusion of the word fair from their divorce vocabulary. Websters College Dictionary defines the word fair as, free from bias, dishon-esty, or injustice; legitimately sought, done, given, etc.; proper under the rules.Ž The reality is that people going through a divorce rarely share the same perspective about much of any-thing, particu-larly about money. Fairness is completely subjective, and as such not a realistic goal in divorce. Realism on the other hand contemplates an objective look at ones situation. I consistently advocate realism to aid my clients in navigating through a divorce, because it is only the willingness to embrace the realities of ones position which allow them to move forward. It has been said that money is the root of all evil. It has also been said that money makes the world go round. Either way, there is no question that money is a deeply important part of all of our lives. But there is more to money than just the obvious. Somehow money seems to touch almost every aspect of our lives. There is no end to various facets of the human condition that we can tie to money issues, such as: joy, expectation, worry, anger, love, hate, c onfusion, and motivation. To quote Cyndi Lauper, moneyƒchanges everything.Ž In the context of a divorce, the financial issues of the case end up being a battlefield for many of the longstanding psychological and emotional issues which divided the cou-ple to begin with. Alimony is one of the most contentious issues in divorce. One of the rea-sons it is so contentious is that there are no specific guidelines as to whether alimony is appropriate; how much ali-mony should be paid; and for how long. When alimony might be appropriate in a case there are two absolutes, which are that no one wants to pay it and everyone wants to receive it. Equitable distribution, or dividing stuff in laypersons terms, is a different animal altogether. In this instance peo-ple are arguing about the division and value of assets and liabilities. In Flor-ida, while there is a presumption that assets and liabilities should be divided equally, the courts do have the ability to divide them unequally. It is important to remember that we are still essentially talking about money. Most things are replaceable, and while it shouldnt mat-ter whether you get a particular asset or its financial equivalent, somehow it does. Once while attending mediation, my client sent word to her husband that she would either buy or sell a particular asset for a particular price. At the time I recall thinking that she had just indisput-ably set the fair market value. When her husband refused the deal, I realized what the true lesson was. Sometimes, it just isnt about the money and sometimes it is. Q It’s “only money” until you’re in the throes of divorce Kenneth A. Gordon PARTNER AT BRINKLEY MORGAN BOARD CERTIFIED SPECIALIST IN MARITAL AND FAMILY LAW(954) 522-2200brinkleymorgan.com

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C8 healthy living NOVEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY Assisted Living Facility #9213 € Independent Living € Assisted Living € Skilled Nursing € Premiere Rehabilitation Services All levels of senior care under one roof Love may be all you need, but at Lourdes-Noreen McKeen we offer even more. A staff of professionals devoted to our residents. Three spacious, gracious types of residences that you make all your own. A breathtaking waterfront location overlooking Palm Beach and just steps from dozens of shops and restaurants. Deliciously fresh, healthy menus to restore body and spirit after the gym or an easy walk along shaded Intracoastal promenades. We are a family; your extended family, offering the very best care for seniors by the Carmelite Sisters and their team of skilled professionals since 1960. Served by the Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm 315 South Flagler Drive € West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561.655.8544 € www.lnmr.org C olorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States in both men and women, with more than 143,000 new cases predicted for 2012. The term colorectalŽ actually comprises two different entities that are often treated very differently. They behave differently, having different patterns of spread and a different prognosis for each stage at presentation. In particular, radiation therapy frequently plays a major role in the treatment of rec-tal cancer, both in terms of increasing survival rates and improving the quality of life of our patients through preservation of the anal sphincter, there-by eliminating the need for a permanent colostomy (a bag attached to the front of the abdomen to collect the feces). Modern cancer treatment often involves what we call multi-disciplin-ary care,Ž whereby multiple specialists such as surgeons, medical oncologists (chemotherapy specialists), and radia-tion oncologists work together to maxi-mize the chances for success by com-bining our particular areas of expertise. Rectal cancer is an excellent example of this process. The rectum is defined as the last portion of the large intestine, the portion of the bowel extending from the sigmoid colon to the anal canal. Its major func-tion is to store the stool prior to elimi-nation, and the muscle that controls this process is called the anal sphincter. The type of surgery that is necessary for the removal of a cancer arising in this region is very much dependent upon the exact location of the tumor „ the closer it is to the critical anal sphincter (a low rectal cancer), the more likely it is that an APR (abdomi-noperineal resection) will be required which involves a permanent colostomy. If the tumor is located far enough away from the anal sphincter (an upper or mid-rectal can-cer), then a different surgical procedure called an LAR (low anterior resection) is feasible and will avoid the need for the colostomy as the sphincter is preserved. Many cases are border-line,Ž that is, the cancer is just a little too close for comfort to spare the sphincter but, with a little shrinkage, it might just make the cut.Ž That is where radiation therapy, with the help of concurrent sensitizingŽ chemotherapy, comes in. Pre-operative radiation therapy, with help from sensitizing chemotherapy (often with a well-known drug called 5-FU, or sometimes with an oral ver-sion known as XelodaŽ), can frequent-ly allow these borderline patients to become eligible for sphincter-saving procedures. The usual course of treat-ment lasts around four to five weeks, and is very well tolerated with only mild to moderate, usually temporary side effects. Using modern radiation therapy techniques, such as IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) or IGRT (Image Guided Radiation Therapy) or both, the side effects are much reduced and often eliminated completely. Then, the patient is re-assessed after around four weeks or so and a decision reached as to whether the sphincter can be spared, making some fortunate patients (and their treating physicians like me) very happy indeed. For other patients with rectal cancer, surgery can be performed immediately after diagnosis and then post-operative radiation therapy and chemotherapy may be utilized to increase the chances for long-term survival and cure. Once again, modern treatment techniques such as IMRT help to make the course of radiation therapy much more toler-able and with a greatly reduced risk of complications. The major factors deter-mining whether radiation therapy is needed are the depth of penetration of the tumor into the wall of the rectum and if the cancer has spread into the regional lymph nodes. These factors are expressed in the term staging,Ž usually using the TNMŽ system, which stands for Tumor, Nodes, and Metas-tasis. Patients, based upon the findings at the time of surgery, are given a stag-ing designation, such as T2 N1 M0 for example, which helps to define the best treatment for that patient afterwards. All patients should be appropriately staged, and you, as a colorectal cancer patient, should know your own stage. Stages are often also grouped together into simpler categories, such as Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV to make it easier to report on treatment results. With the appropriate use of post-opera-tive radiation therapy, clinical research studies have consistently demonstrated improved rates of local and regional control of disease in the pelvis as well as survival. Much is known about rectal cancer, but clinical trials continue in order to improve upon these already favorable outcomes for many patients. Survival is extremely important, but so is quality of life, and anal sphincter preservation is an excellent example of how modern cancer treatment can offer optimal func-tion and cure at the same time. Make sure that you receive the best treatment possible the first time around, as recur-rences are often more difficult to treat and cure. Seek out the best physicians and facilities with the most modern, up-to-date equipment and staff to give you the best chance to save your life and your sphincter.Ž Q Saving lives, saving sphincters: The role of modern radiation therapy in rectal cancer Dr. Jerome Spunberg M.D., FACR, FACROwww.sfrollc.com877-930-7376 SOUTH FLORIDA RADIATION ONCOLOGYCOURTESY PHOTO All Varieties of Bicycles Triathlon Recreational Racing Repair Service Group Triathlon Training Personalized Coaching Professional Bike Fittings Accessories and Clothing Transportation Racks Indoor Cycling 819 N Federal Highway, Lake Park 561.842.BIKE (2453)NEWLY EXPANDED SHOWROOM FREE PICKUP & DELIVERYCall for details $2 5 TUNE-UPAdjustments-lube & polish Reg $59 OYMbike.com Phyllis Stirparo Certified Nursing AssistantLicensed, Insured & Bonded772-349-0023 Sometimes family members do not know where to turn when they realize a family member and loved one needs help that you cannot provide. If you are looking for s omeone to help you or a loved one physically & emotionall y get through day-to-day living, give me a call. (_/)D`/T;A6_3TD@_]T6/Tc(_rA6/@/AZ_D3_9TDA;)_DA-;Z;DAU(_A3/)Z;DA_DAZTD>(_/TUDA>_T/ Need Home Healthcare?

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com NOVEMBER 2013 healthy living C9 Palm Beach1800 Corporate Blvd., N.W.Suite 302Boca Raton, FL 33431561.665.4738 Fort Lauderdale200 East Las Olas Boulevard19th FloorFort Lauderdale, FL 33301954.522.2200 (telephone)954.522.9123 (facsimile) A s people age, many elders feel uncertain about travel. Often anxious to deal with the hus-tle and bustle associated with toda ys airports and airline travel, many decline attending family gatherings for the security of home. Even for the most seasoned frequent flier, airline travel can be a daunting task. Long lines for check in, lug-gage handling, TSA screening and the boarding process can be all too much for the elderly. Taking the nice and easyŽ approach will help you through and allow you to enjoy the travel experience. Just like the captain, plan your flight. Some tips: € Shop for your flight well in advance, taking into consideration flight sched-ule, stops and airports. € Avoid changing planes if at all possible. Nonstop is best even if you need to drive a bit farther to an alternate airport. The nonstop flight will save you time and the hassle of changing planes. The next best option is a direct flight. Although the plane will stop to unload and take on some passengers, you remain seated and continue on. Also shopping in advance should save money as airfares tend to rise closer to the travel date. € Schedule the travel for offpeak travel times and days. Avoid the Monday morning business rush and pre-holiday travel. For example, flying on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving will beat the rush and give a day to rest before the big event. This will allow easier movement through the terminals and better seat availability. An added bonus is that airfares tend to be lower at off-peak times and days. € Smaller airports tend to be less daunting. Avoid the mega airports such as Atlanta; you simply do not want to navigate through the estimated 260,000 people who visit the Atlanta air-port each day. € Pack light. Invest in new, lightweight suitcases with wheels and extended handles. You do not need the hassle of schlepping your belongings along the way „ check your bags and avoid carry-on luggage. However, make sure to carry all essential medications with you. Or better yet, my friend Bill ships his clothes a week early via UPS with his family confirming arrival in advance. The shipping cost is less than the airline bag fees and Bill avoids the luggage hassle completely (smart guy). € Arrive at the airport two hours early. Add an extra hour to the airlines suggested hour. This way you take your time, find a seat at your gate and relax and enjoy some people watching while drinking a cup of coffee or tea. € Consider using a wheelchair. Airports provide this service for free (although a TIP is appreciated). The Sky Cap is experienced in moving about the airport terminal. It will save you from getting lost and help expedite you to the proper gate. Dont be intimidated by security: Simply go with the flow and follow the TSA instructions. Most TSA inspectors try to be helpful and have gotten friendly over the past few years. I think they received some Dale Carnegie training. I have actually seen some smile on occa-sion! By the way, this is when check-ing or pre-shipping your luggage really helps. A travel companion will surely help, whether it be a family mem-ber, friend or professional medical escort. It is always good to have a helping hand. If one should find themselves in need of a professional medical escort, Air Trek is always more than happy to help. We have a Commer-cial Airline Medical Escort Service set in place to meet international and long-distance transportation needs for those who require or desire assistance onboard a com-mercial aircraft. Air Trek will take care of everything, includ-ing booking airline tickets, helping with navigation through crowded airports (especially useful around the holidays), getting one to their desired destination and any addi-tional needs that may arise. Those with health concerns should check with their health care provider before traveling. A sim-ple prescription for supplemental oxygen or perhaps a Valium could make the flight more enjoyable. Remember: Pre-planning and nice and easyŽ does it. Q „ Dana Carr is an airline transport pilot and serves as director of operations for Air Trek Inc., which is family owned and operated since 1978, and specializes in helping people travel throughout the world. Air ambulance information is available at www.medjets.com. Aircraft charter and luxury travel info is available at www.airtrek.aero. Nice and easy does it when traveling by air Dana CarrAIRLINE TRANSPORT PILOT AND DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS FOR AIR TREK INC.(941)639-7855 www.medjets.com www.airtrek.aero

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Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Adapting to todays changing consumer. Florida Weekly newspaper is available on the iPad.TM With tens of thousands of downloads in seven different countries, Florida Weeklys app for the iPadTM is leading the way for todays readers. Download it today for FREE on the App Store.iPadTM is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved.

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com NOVEMBER 2013 healthy living C11 the head of the femur is resur-faced with a metal hip joint and the remain-der of the thigh-bone is left intact, therefore preserving bone. Some implants used in tra-ditional hip replacement surgery are smaller than the bone that they replace. Hip resurfacing was originally conceived as a way to more closely match the size of the head of the femur bone, while potentially increasing sta-bility and decreasing opportuni-ty for dislocation „ one of the most common complications of total hip replacement. All forms of hip replacement allow improved mobility. However, hip resurfacing more closely mimics the normal hip. After a total hip replacement, it is difficult to return to physical activities such as golf or tennis; only light activ-ity is recommended. After hip resurfacing, patients can return to normal activities with little to no pain or stiff-ness. Potential benefits of hip resurfacing include: € Bone preservation: With hip resurfacing, the ball and socket bones are resurfaced rather than completely replaced. € Improved stability: The size of the implant may also help retain hip stability and range of movement. € Pain relief: Hipresurfacing implants offer many years of pain relief for qualifying patients. € Faster return to activity: Many hip-resurfacing patients resume low-impact activities safely, free from pain and stiff-ness. Hip resurfacing has many advantages, but is not for every-one. This procedure is intended for active patients who are younger than 60 and in need of a hip replacement. Hip resurfacing is ideal for younger patients with strong bone quality since a total hip replacement only lasts between 15 to 20 years (possibly resulting in another replace-ment later in life). Choosing hip resurfacing first eases the con-version to a total hip replace-ment if needed later in life. Adults older than 60 who are living an active lifestyle may also be considered for this pro-cedure, which is determined by a review of bone quali-ty. Patients with osteo-porosis, limb shorten-ing of more than one-half inch, severe hip deformity and prior hip surgery are not good candidates for hip resurfacing. Q „ Get back on your feet to get back to doing the things you love. The Anderson Family Orthopedic & Spine Center of Excellence „ certified by the Joint Commission for Total Joint Replacement for Hips, Knees and Shoulders „ features all private patient rooms, a dedicated orthopedic and spine clinical coordinator, pre-operative patient educational classes, rehabilitation and pain management specialists, and the latest advances in joint replacement surgery. To learn more about the Anderson Family Orthopedic & Spine Center of Excellence, and to find out if hip resurfacing is right for you, visit www.jupitermed.com/ortho or call (561) 263-3633.HIPFrom page 1 JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER 1210 S OLD DIXIE HWY. JUPITER FLA. 33458 FOWBLE (561) 747-2234 www.jupitermed.com What more can a doctor aspire to after becoming a renowned surgeon? Possibly the noblest achievement of all, that of Teacher.Ž Dr. Srinivas Kazas commitment to excellent care and innovation is one of the reasons JFK Medical Center has been designated as a Robotic Program of Excellence in General Surgery. We are one of only two programs in the state of Florida and eight in the country. The Epicenter designation is given to the most advanced and experienced robotic surgeons and hospitals who demonstrate the superior outcomes and a passion for teaching. As an Epicenter, JFK acts as a training ground for surgeons across the U.S. to observe and train in robotic surgery with Dr. Kaza.Da Vinci robotic-assisted surgery is especially well-suited for procedures such as general surgery, colorectal, and bariatric procedures. Patients who undergo robotic-assisted surgery usually have less pain, quicker recoveries, smaller scars and return to their normal lives much sooner. Doctor. Surgeon. Teacher. FOR MORE INFORMATION, ASK YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY AT JFK MEDICAL CENTER, VISIT US ONLINE AT JFKMC.COM OR CALL 561-548-4JFK (4535).

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Total Shoulder € Hip & Knee Replacement € Sports Medicine € MAKOplasty Partial Knee Resurfacing Spine Surgery € Arthroscopic Shoulder Repair € hana Table for Anterior Hip ReplacementThe Anderson Family Orthopedic & Spine Center of Excellence So Much More Than Medicine1210 South Old Dixie Highway, Jupiter, Florida 33458 € jupitermed.com/ortho This Ride Made Possible By The Orthopedic & Spine Program at Jupiter Medical Center. Bruce and Maria Shaw love the outdoors. But when hip pain made it dif“ cult for Bruce to walk from the parking lot to the grocery store, he knew he needed help. Certi“ ed by the Joint Commission for Total Joint Replacement for Hips, Knees and Shoulders Bruce had a hip resurfacing procedure at Jupiter Medical Center. Maria was so impressed with his results that she followed suit two years later. Today, they are pain-free and back on the right bike path.Hip resurfacing may be an alternative to total hip replacement. It is especially bene“ cial for younger patients ages 40-55 with mild osteoarthritis. This bone-conserving procedure relieves pain and stiffness, allowing patients to quickly get back to their activities. From Pre-hab to Re-hab, Nobody Does Orthopedics Better Than JMC. To learn more about our comprehensive orthopedic and spine program, visit jupitermed.com/ortho, or please call Judy Dellosa, Orthopedic & Spine Nurse Navigator, at (561) 263-3633. To “ nd an orthopedic or spine surgeon whos just right for you, call our Physician Referral Service at (561) 263-5737. This surgery was life-changing for both of us.Ž … Bruce & Maria Shaw Recipient of the HealthGrades Americas 50 BestŽ AwardTM for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013).

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Your guide to Southwest Florida Physicians: Lee County 16 Collier County 85 Charlotte County 100 Southwest FloridaÂ’s Physician Directory is your advertising vehicle to reach residents looking for information on local medical professionals. Physician Directory Physician Directory Physician Directory DISTRIBUTED IN LEE, COLLIER AND CHARLOTTE COUNTIES 3RDANNUAL 2013-2014 Southwest Florida Physician Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida

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7 Dangers of Foot/Ankle Deformities DR. LAM ** FACFAS, DABLES, DABPS DR. FAHIM DPM DR. TIMM FACFAS, DABLES, DABPS DR. ADARVE DPM Now accepting new patients:North, Central and East Naples:(239) 430-3668www.NaplesPodiatrist.com1) Flat feet or high arches can cause your knees, hips, back to have massive pain2) Unattended tendon injuries can cause permanent disability3) Ingrown Nails can cause deadly MRSA infections4) Diabetic foot infections are the leading cause of amputations5) Bunions can lead to debilitating arthritis6) Feeling of a pebble in your foot can be a nerve tumor7) Heel/Achilles Conditions: If not treated early, will lead to chronic pain*Noninvasive Shockwave Therapy as used by the pros, now here for you. ** %RDUG&HUWLHGLQ5HFRQVWUXFWLYH$QNOH6XUJHU\ %RDUG&HUWLHGLQ)RRW Scan to see Dr. Lamtalk about foot & ankle trauma and the latest in technology

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www.CharlotteOrthopaedic.com 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 Thank you for your continued support! 2013

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PRIMARY CARE ” LAB SERVICES ” RADIOLOGY ” DIAGNOSTICS ” URGENT CARE ” PHYSICAL THERAPY DIABETES EDUCATION ” MEDICAL AESTHETICS NAPLES Fritz Lemoine, Jr., M.D.400 8th Street North, 2nd Flr, Naples, FL 34102 239-649-3365 John Diaz, M.D.Kae Ferber, M.D.Julie Diaz, FNP-BC400 8th Street North, 2nd Flr, Naples, FL 34102 239-263-8222 Maria del Rio-Giles, M.D. Alejandro Perez-Trepichio, M.D.Luis Pozniak, M.D.Michael Y. Wang, M.D.Yael Horn, ARNP1735 SW Health Parkway, Naples, FL 34109 239-249-7800 Charles Kilo, M.D.1495 Pine Ridge Road, Naples, FL 34109 239-594-5456 Julia Harris, M.D.James Faremouth, D.O.Nancy Baratta, MSN, ARNPLely Plaza 8803 Tamiami Trail E, Naples, FL 34113 2397321050 FORT MYERS Kim Schurman, M.D.2684 Swamp Cabbage Court, Fort Myers, FL 33901 239-935-8668 Athan Drimoussis, M.D., Endocrinology12700 Creekside Lane, Ste 201, Fort Myers, FL 33919 239-600-7808 Peter Lautenbach, D.O.James Taylor, D.O.Pamela Ledward, PA-C 13214 Palm Beach Blvd, Fort Myers, FL 33905 239-694-7887 Richard Torricelli, M.D.Fred Burford, D.O. Pablo Banderas, PA-C Aimee Herrington, PA-CChristina Smith, ARNP13691 Metro Parkway, Fort Myers, FL 33912 239-561-8033 Jose Lopez-Gutierrez, M.D. Tammy Sadighi, DNP, ARNP8911 Daniels Parkway, Fort Myers, FL 33912 239-939-2200 Javier Sosa, M.D.9400 Gladiolus Drive, Ste 50, Fort Myers, FL 33908 239-437-7070 CAPE CORAL Richard Torricelli, M.D. Pablo Banderas, PAAimee Israel, PA-C Angela Vallejo, PA126 Del Prado Blvd, Ste 104, Cape Coral, FL 33909 239-573-1606 William Hayes, D.O.Bethany Edouard, PA-C1708 Cape Coral Parkway West, Ste I, Cape Coral, FL 33914 239-540-1495 Michele Candelore, D.O.3326 Del Prado Blvd S., Unit 8, Cape Coral, FL 33904 239-540-0081 PUNTA GORDA Melody Burt, D.O.315 E. Olympia Ave., Ste 223Punta Gorda, FL 33950 941-205-2600 Stphane Calvino, M.D.Juan Rivera, M.D.Navija Valladares, M.D.Keith Rubin, D.O.315 E. Olympia Ave.Ste.111-112Punta Gorda, FL 33950 941-205-2600 PORT CHARLOTTE Steven Christesen, M.D.3440 Tamiami Trail, Ste 2Port Charlotte, FL 33952 941-624-3600 Sanjay Kumar, M.D.Numa Tamayo, M.D.2315 Aaron StreetPort Charlotte, FL 33952 941-613-2222 Raymond R. Burgess, D.O.Jerey A. Dash, D.O.Manuel Martinez, M.D.George Nackley, M.D.Karen Pham, M.D.Odel Ruano, M.D.2343 Aaron StreetPort Charlotte, FL 33952 941629-2900 Sanjeev Zutshi, M.D.3390 Tamiami Trail, Ste 105Port Charlotte, FL 33952 941-883-5050 Gina Lombardo Paz, M.D.Louise Cohen, M.DCathy Criss, D.O.David McAtee, D.O.Gregory Miller, D.O.Jean Murphy, M.D.Janice Nord, M.D.Dana Planer, D.O.19531 Cochran Blvd.Port Charlotte, FL 33948 941-255-3535 ENGLE WOOD Joseph Chirillo, M.D.David Gooding, D.O.190 W. Dearborn StreetEnglewood, FL 34223 941-474-3359 Lynette Llerena, D.O.779 Medical Drive, Ste 6Englewood, FL 34223 941-681-3690 Todd Chace, D.O.Julian Gershon, D.O.Gary Bartlett, PA-C2400 S. McCall Road,Englewood, FL 34224 941-474-9314 Donald Robertson, D.O.2828 S. McCall Road,Englewood, FL 34224 941-474-8154 NORTH PORT Robert Gutierrez, D.O.David Cislo, D.O.William Eaton, M.D.13815 Tamiami TrailNorth Port, FL 34287 941-426 -4900 Walk-in Medical Center Shawn Miller, M.D.Michael Mayhew, PA-C9400 Bonita Beach Road, Suite 101, Bonita Springs, FL 34135 239-498-9294 Walk-in Medical Center Ebrahim Papan, M.D.Brian Kerbyson, D.O.Emil Dame, M.D.2450 Tamiami TrailPort Charlotte, FL 33952 941-624 -2704 Walk-in Medical Center Constantine Georgiadis, D.O.2828 S. McCall Road, Suite HEnglewood, FL 34224 941-474-8154 $FFHSWLQJ 3DWLHQWV DSSRLQWPHQWV DYDLODEOH Millennium Physician Group is proud to care for our family, friends and neighbors in our communities. With a sta of more than 130 health care providers, we are committed to providing an exceptional level of service to all of our patients throughout Southwest Florida. www.MillenniumPhysician.com FOR MORE INFORMATION ON MILLENNIUM PHYSICIAN GROUP PLEASE VISIT WWW.MILLENNIUMPHYSICIAN.COM.

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Dr. Charlene Okomski, D.O.P.A.-FACOOG Dr. Charlene Okomski Board Certied Obstetrics & Gynecology 941-205-2666 (Medical) 941-205-5500 (Cosmetics)Call for a FREE Consultation for Cosmetics tttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt 4DPUU4USFFUr4VJUFr Punta Gorda, Florida www.timelessimagesw.com Our Services Include: MEDICAL r4JNQMFrJOPDFQSPDFEVSFTGPSIFBWZCMFFEJOHBOEJODPOUJOFODFr)FBMUIZ8FJHIU-PTTr3PVUJOFHZOFDPMPHJDBMDBSFGPSXPNFOPGBMMBHFTJODMVEJOHBEPMFTDFOU Tn r6SJOBSZ*ODPOUJOFODFFSBQZr4QFDJBMJ[JOHJOIJHIRVBMJUZ0CTUFUSJDT(ZOFDPMPHJDBMDBSF Cosmetic For the Women and Men in your Life! r#PMPUFSP#PUPYBOE3BEJFTTF"WBJMBCMF r"DOF-BTFS5SFBUNFOUr5VNFTMFOU-JQPTVDUJPO r-BTFSTLJOSFKVWFOBUJPOr-BTFS)BJS3FNPWBMGPS.FOBOE8PNFO r-BTFS7FJO5SFBUNFOUr1SFWBHF.%1SPEVDUT"WBJMBCMF r7JWBUF1SPEVDUT"WBJMBCMFr$IFNJDBMQFFMT Healthcare with a WomanÂ’s Touch We are now accepting OB Medicaid patients! Where Health And Beauty Become One.

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Dr. Domingo E. Galliano Jr. MD, FACS, FASCRS www.gallianosurgery.com General Surgery )VHYK*LY[PLKI`[OL(TLYPJHU)VHYKVM:\YNLY` Colon and Rectal Surgery )VHYK*LY[PLKI`;OL(TLYPJHU)VHYKVM*VSVUHUK9LJ[HS:\YNLY`()*9: Surgical Critical Care )VHYK*LY[PLKI`;OL(TLYPJHU)VHYKVM.LULYHS:\YNLY ` New surgical technique eases pain, recovery timeD r. Domingo E. Galliano Jr., direc-tor of robotic surgery at Peace River Regional Medical Center, provides the latest in painless, minimally invasive robotic surgery, medical testing and care in the treatment of gastro-intestinal conditions. In fact, he recently performed the first robotically assisted, single-incision gall bladder surgery ever performed in Char-lotte or Lee counties. “This exciting new procedure with the da Vinci Surgical Sys-tem is a surgeon’s dream,” Dr. Galliano said. “With this new procedure, patients can now have their gallbladder removed through a small incision buried in their belly button, where no visible scar can be seen.” Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgical procedures can result in significantly less pain, less discomfort and minimal scarring. The da Vinci System is a state-of-the-art surgical platform with 3D, high-definition vision and patented surgical instruments that take surgery beyond the limits of the human hand. By overcoming the challenges of traditional open and lapa-roscopic surgery, da Vinci is changing the experience of surgery for people around the world. According to Dr. Galliano, “We use the most up-to-date medical equipment used in the testing and treatment of medical and surgical conditions. Most surgery can be performed with minimal discomfort on an outpatient basis, and in some cases, with no incisions. Minimally invasive procedures are performed through one or more dime-sized incisions, with much less trauma to the body. “ Patients get the highest-quality care available in his state-of-the-art, Medicare accredited, state-licensed surgery center, says Dr. Galliano. “This avoids treatment in the hospital, reduces cost, and lessens pain, scarring and recovery time,” he said. “You may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery. Using state-of-the-art technology, the da Vinci System enables delicate and complex operations through a few tiny incisions with break-through vision, precision, dexterity and control,” Dr. Galliano said. Da Vinci Surgery is used to treat such colorectal conditions as: colon cancer, rec-tal cancer, diverticulitis, and inflamma tory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease). Surgery to remove all or part of the colon is known as a colectomy. Rectal cancer surgery is known as a low anterior resection. Da Vinci offers patients facing colon surgery (right, left or sigmoid colectomy) such potential benefits as: low blood loss, quicker return to bowel function and diet and a short hospital stay Da Vinci offers patients facing rectal cancer surgery (low anterior resection and APR) such potential benefits as: excellent clinical outcomes for cancer control, quick return to bowel function and diet, less blood loss and shorter hospital stay and recovery time. Robotic/laparoscopic surgery also is used for gallbladder and colon resection, adre-nalectomy (adrenal gland resection), hernia repair, anti-reflux (GERD), appendectomy, and ventral and inguinal hernia repair. As with any surgery, these benefits cannot be guaranteed since surgery is specific to each patient, condition and procedure. It is important to talk to your doctor about all treatment options, including the risks and benefits. This information can help you make the best decision for your situation. GERD treatments can be easy on the stomachG ERD is a chronic digestive dis ease that occurs when stomach acid or, occasionally, bile flows back (refluxes) into your food pipe (esophagus). The backwash of acid irritates the lining of your esophagus and causes GERD signs and symptoms. According to Dr. Domingo E. Galliano, “Some people are born with a naturally weak sphincter (LES). For others, how ever, fatty and spicy foods, certain types of medication, tight clothing, smoking, drinking alcohol, vigorous exercise or changes in body position (bending over or lying down) may cause the LES to relax, causing reflux. A hiatal hernia (a common term for GERD) may be pres ent in many patients who suffer from GERD, but may not cause symptoms of heartburn.” Signs and symptoms of GERD include acid reflux and heartburn. Both are com mon digestive conditions that most peo ple experience from time to time. When these signs and symptoms occur more than twice each week or interfere with your daily life, doctors term this GERD, says Dr. Galliano. In addition, most people can manage the discomfort of heartburn with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medications. But for people with GERD, these remedies may offer only temporary relief. Patients who do not respond well to lifestyle changes or medications, or those who continually require medica tions to control their symptoms, will have to live with their condition or may undergo a surgical procedure. Surgery is very effective in treating GERD. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (commonly referred to as laparoscopic nissen fundoplication) involves reinforc ing the “valve” between the esophagus and the stomach by wrapping the upper portion of the stomach around the low est portion of the esophagus — much the way a bun wraps around a hot dog. According to Dr. Galliano, “in a lapa roscopic procedure, surgeons use small incisions (1/4 to 1/2 inch) to enter the abdomen through cannulas (narrow tube-like instruments). The laparoscope, which is connected to a tiny video cam era, is inserted through the small inci sion, giving the surgeon a magnified view of the patient’s internal organs on a television screen. The entire operation is performed “inside” after the abdomen is expanded by inflating gas into it.” TIF (transoral incisionless fundopli cation) with the EsophyX device is the first procedure that provides an inci sionless solution for correcting the root cause of GERD, an anatomic defect at the gastroesophageal junction. Inserted through the patient’s mouth, under visual guidance of an endoscope, the EsophyX device is used to reconstruct a durable antireflux valve and tighten the LES (lower esophageal sphincter), reestab lishing a barrier to reflux and restoring the competency of the gastroesopha geal junction. The result is the effective elimination of GERD, says Dr. Galliano. Recent clinical studies show that at two years following the procedure, 85 percent of patients are still heartburn-free and 79 percent are still off daily PPIs. Since TIF is non-invasive and repeat able, it offers the best of both worlds — the high effectiveness of a surgical repair and the low complication rate of a transoral approach. Dr. Galliano welcomes your inquiries regarding this article. He can be seen at 18308 Murdock Circle, Suites 108-109 in Port Charlotte. For more information or to schedule a consultation appointment, please call (941) 6253411. Coming soon: future ofce opening in Englewood! Call for more details. t#PBSEDFSUJFErDPMPOBOESFDUBMTVSHFSZt#PBSEDFSUJFErHFOFSBMTVSHFSZt#PBS EDFSUJFEr TVSHJDBMDSJUJDBMDBSFt%JSFDUPSr$PMPO3FDUBM1IZTJPMPHZ-BC1FMWJD%JTPSEFS$FOUF S Yes! Please send me information about: T Hemorrhoid treatment T Colorectal cancer screening T Call me to schedule a consultation Name ________________________________________________Address ______________________________________________City ______________________State _______Zip _____________Phone ________________________________________________E-mail _______________________________________________ Mail to: Domingo E. Galliano, Jr., MD, FACS, FASCRS, Murdock Circle Execu tive Center 18308 Murdock Cir., Suites 108 & 109, Port Charlotte, FL 33948T Colonoscopy T Hernia repair 5FTUJOHBOEUSFBUNFOU 4063$&*450$,1)050$0. 4063$&*450$,1)050$0. t#PBSEDFSUJFErDPMPOBOESFDUBMTVSHFSZt#PBSEDFSUJFErHFOFSBMTVSHFSZt#PBSEDFSUJ FEr TVSHJDBMDSJUJDBMDBSFt%JSFDUPSr$PMPO3FDUBM1IZTJPMPHZ-BC1FMWJD%JTPSEFS$FOUFS TTT TT Domingo E. Galliano, Jr., MD, FACS, FASCRS, is board certied in colon and rectal surgery by the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery and by the American Board of Surgery in general surgery. He is also board certied in Surgical Critical Care. After completing under graduate work and receiving his medical degree, magna cum laude, Dr. Galliano completed a ve-year general surgery residency at Jersey City Medical Center, NJ. He completed a fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore. He also completed a fellowship in advanced colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic, Florida. Dr. Galliano is a clinical assistant professor at the University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa. He has been in private practice in Port Charlotte since and he is aliated with Fawcett Memorial Hospital, Peace River Regional Medical Center, and Charlotte Regional Medical Center. eleased; feel -l es -t half or 5FTUJOHBOEUSFBUNFOU 4063$&*450$,1)050$0. 4063$&*450$,1)050$0.

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Douglas H. Joyce, DO, FACOSTriple Board Certi ed in CardioThoracic & Vascular Surgery, General Surgery and Phlebology (Venous Disease) Joyce answered my questions and concerns. I am extremely happy with the results of the procedures. I would not hesitate to recommend Dr. Joyce to friends and M.B., North Port, FL “My legs have not felt this good in twenty years.” M.W, Arcadia, FL JVAI VISION… Joyce Vein & Aesthetic Institute’s vision is to foster excellence in patient care and continually improve our services. Our goal is to be the leader in the area for both venous surgery and non-surgical medical aesthetic services. JVAI MISSION… At JVAI, our job is to heal people of venous disease and provide aesthetic skin care and beauty enhancements that are safe, effective, affordable and convenient for patients.JVAI State-of-the-Art Approach… VEIN TREATMENT MEDICAL SPA AESTHETIC SKIN CARE AND BEAUTY TREATMENTS The board certi ed vein treatment medical professionals led by Dr. Douglas H. Joyce, D.O., triple board certi ed in Cardio-Thoracic & Vascular Surgery, General Surgery and Phlebology (Venous Disease) at JVAI, offer you the bene t of over 70 years of combined medical and surgical experience. Our gold standard treatment of venous disease is unique and based on correctly diagnosing and treating the causes of subcutaneous venous hypertension. At JVAI, our approach continues to be recognized nationally resulting in numerous speaking engagements, research grants and education of physicians from all over the country. We have continued to innovate and develop new techniques enabling us to provide all patient treatments within our facility. Dr. Joyce has performed over 13,000 venous procedures and has the experience to provide an exceptional level of care for his patients.Our certi ed and experienced medical aesthetic professionals, under the direction of Dr. Joyce, provide state-of-the-art medical spa treatments in line with a foundational and exclusive JVAI Four Step Approach to beautiful, healthy and young looking skin. Advanced technologies and state-of-the-art equipment proven through clinical research and FDA approval, is exclusively used at JVAI in the services we provide. Our aesthetic staff has special training and certi cations to select, administer and manage appropriate treatments for aesthetic patients. AESTHETIC SKIN CARE AND BEAUTY TESTIMONIALS “I am so excited with my results after receiving Radiesse llers from JVAI. I no longer have those deep wrinkles around my nose and mouth staring back at me in the mirror. The results are AMAZING! I feel so refreshed! AI for making this a wonderful experience for me.” LAB, El Jobean, FL great experience at Joyce Vein & Aesthetic Institute today. The HydraFacial feels relaxing and my skin feels rejuvenated and fresh. A treat to myself. The entire staff is always wonderful. Beth P, Punta Gorda, FL 6Vœ“U"x™""“ˆ>i'i]-'ˆixU*'>œ`>U™{£‡x x‡£"

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LEE COUNTYAesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery 16 Allergy and Immunology 16 Anti-Aging, Functional and Regenerative Medicine 16 Anti-Aging and Functional Medicine 16 Audiology 18 Behavioral Health 18 Breast Radiology 20 Breast Surgeon 20 Cardiology 20 Cardiothoracic Surgery 28 Clinical Research – General Medicine 28 Colon and Rectal Surgery 30 Dentistry 30 Dermatology 33 Endocrinology 34 Family Medicine 34 Gastroenterology 34 General Surgery 36 General and Vascular Surgery 37 Geriatrics 38 Gynecologic Oncology 38 Gynecology, Surgery, Aesthetics 40 Infectious Disease 40 Internal Medicine 42 Neurosurgery 42 Obstetrics and Gynecology 43 Occupational Medicine 47 Ophthalmology 47 Orthopedics 52 Pain Management 54 Palliative Care 55 Pediatric Specialist 58 Pediatrics 63 Plastic Surgery 66 Podiatry 66 Primary Care 68 Pulmonology 75 Radiation Oncology 77 Radiology 78 Rheumatology 79 Sleep Medicine 79 Spine Care 79 Urgent Care 79 Urology 81 Vascular Surgery 82 Vein Specialist 83 Wound Care 83 COLLIER COUNTYAnti-Aging and Functional Medicine 85 Breast Radiology 85 Breast Surgery 85 Cardiologist 86 Chiropractic 86 Cosmetic Surgery 87 Dentistry 87 Dentistry General and Cosmetic 88 Dermatology 88 General Surgery 88 Internal Medicine 90 Neurology 90 Neurosurgery 91 Ophthalmology 92 Orthopaedic Surgeon 94 Palliative Medicine 94 Plastic Surgery 94 Plastic Surgeon 96 Podiatry 96 Urogynecologist 98 Urology 98 CHARLOTTE COUNTYAesthetician 100 Audiology 100 Breast Radiology 100 Cardiac Surgery 101 Colon and Rectal Surgery 101 Dentistry 102 Endovascular Surgery 104 General Surgery 104 Obstetrics and Gynecology 104 Ophthalmology 106 Orthopaedic 106 Orthopaedic Surgery 108 Plastic Surgery 108 Physician Assistant 109 Psychology 109 Thoracic Surgery 109 Vascular Surgery 110 Vein Specialist 110 INDEX {œ`-ii]-'ˆi£xUœi]œˆ`>™£U*…œi\"™"£xU>\"™"£{nœˆ}…\/…iVœiœv…i"£‡"£{-œ'…iœˆ`>*…ˆVˆ>ˆiVœ>iVœˆ}… "£Lœˆ`>i`ˆ>œ']n œœˆœ“>Liiœ`'Vi`ˆ…œ'…iiiˆiVœiœvœˆ`>i`ˆ>œ']n Physician Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida

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Ranked #1 in Florida for heart care...againRanked 1st in Florida for overall cardiac services by Health Grades 2013 For an appointment call the NCH Heart Institute at 239-6 24-4200 www.NCHmd.org

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here Health Meets Beauty W 239.243.8222 12640 World Plaza Lane, Building 71 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.ufirsthealth.com GYNECOLOGY COSMETICS Ablation for Heavy Periods Bioidentical Hormones/Pellets Labiaplasty/Vaginaplasty Permanent Birth Control Smartlipo-Liposuction Botox/Fillers DR. ANNE LORDTOMAS D.O., FACOOG DR. ROBERT E. TOMAS D.O., FACOSGENERAL SURGERY NO Mesh Hernia Surgery Inguinal Hernia Repair Umbilical Hernia Repair Ventral Hernia Repair Gallbladder Surgery Smartlipo-Liposuction Our mission is to make patient satisfaction a priority amongst your healthcare needs and to make your journey as stree-free as possible. 6'JSTU4VSHJDBM$FOUFSt""""4'$FSUJGJFE 'BDJMJUZt"OFTUIFTJBt4VSHFPO'FF"MM"U0/&1SJDF

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www.LeeMemorial.org With 16 Locations for Health Care Services WeÂ’ve Got You Covered Lee Memorial Health Syst em oers a wide array of health care options for patients of all ages. From testing to treatment, Cape Coral to Naples, we are here for you. With numerous services at many locations, we make health care convenient.Outpatient Center at HealthPark Commons 16281 Bass RoadFort Myers, FL 33908 Outpatient Center at The Sanctuary 8960 Colonial DriveFort Myers, FL 33905 Outpatient Center at Riverwalk 12600 Creekside Lane, Suite 3Fort Myers, FL 33919 Outpatient Center at Plantation 13601 Plantation RoadFort Myers, FL 33912 Riverwalk Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation 8350 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 3Fort Myers, FL 33919 Lee Center for Rehabilitation & Wellness 2070 Carrell RoadFort Myers, FL 33901 Lee Center for Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation 609 SE 13th CourtCape Coral, FL 33990 Regional Cancer Center 8931 Colonial Center Dr.Fort Myers, FL 33905 Wound Care & Hyperbaric Medicine 13778 Plantation RoadFort Myers, FL 33912 The ChildrenÂ’s Rehabilitation Center 15901 Bass RoadFort Myers, FL 33908 Adolescent & ChildrenÂ’s Orthopedic Physical Therapy 15821 Hollyfern CourtFort Myers, FL 33908 Pediatric Specialty Clinic 1265 Creekside Pkwy., Suite 200Naples, FL 34108 Cape Coral Hospital 636 Del Prado Blvd.Cape Coral, FL 33990 Gulf Coast Medical Center 13681 Doctors WayFort Myers, FL 33912 HealthPark Medical Center 9981 S. HealthPark Dr. Fort Myers, FL 33908 Lee Memorial Hospital 2776 Cleveland Ave.Fort Myers, FL 33901 To schedule an appointment call 239-424-1499* For The ChildrenÂ’s Rehabilitation Center, call 239-343-6690 -FF.FNPSJBM)PTQJUBMr(VMG$PBTU.FEJDBM$FOUFSr$BQF$PSBM)PTQJUBMr)FBMUI1BSL.FEJDBM$FOUFS SE R VICES INCLUDE: t"-4 DMJOJD t"TUINB NBOBHFNFOU t#SFBTU IFBMUI TFSWJDFT t$BSEJPWBTDVMBS TFSWJDFT t%JBCFUFT FEVDBUJPO t(FOFUJD UFTUJOH t)ZQFSCBSJD PYZHFO UIFSBQZ t-BC TFSWJDFT MPDBUJPOTn t/FVSPEJBHOPTUJDTt/VUSJUJPO DPVOTFMJOH t0DDVQBUJPOBM UIFSBQZ t1BJO NBOBHFNFOU t1IZTJDBM UIFSBQZ t1VMNPOBSZ TFSWJDFT t3BEJPMPHZ*NBHJOHt4MFFQ %JTPSEFST $FOUFS t4QFFDI UIFSBQZ t4BNF EBZ TVSHFSZ t8PVOE DBSF

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Nelson L. Charles, MD, FACC, FACP Lynette Schultz, PA-C Shalin B. Mehta, MD, FACC Henry H. Hon, MD, FACC Kimberly Brazley, PA-C Bala Karan, MD, FACC Sara E. Dube, PA-C Michael R. Rubin, MD, FACC James E. Sensecqua, MD, FACC Steven V. Priest, MD, FACC, FACP, FSCAI Nicole Vanderlaan, RD, PA-C Jennifer Gilbert, PA-C Jeffrey H. Rosen, MD, FACC Steven L. Longobardi MD, RDCS, RVT, FACC Arthur J. Muller, DO Elizabeth M. Cosmai-Cintron, MD, FACC, FACP Brian A. Hanlon, MD, FACC David J.O. Bailey, MD, MRCPI, FACP, FACC, FSCAI Kenneth M. Towe, MD, FACC Lynne Einbinder, MD, FACC s.UCLEAR#ARDIOLOGY0%430%#4s!NTICOAGULATION#LINICs2EGULAR3TRESSs%CHOCARDIOGRAPHYs4ILT4ABLE3TUDYs6ASCULAR#LINICs#ARDIAC#ATHETERIZATION Fort Myers Ofce: "ARKLEY#IRCLE&ORT-YERS&, Cape Coral Ofce: #OUNTRY#LUB"LVD#APE#ORAL&, WWW&LA(EARTCOMsr Maintaining Quality and Compassionate Heart Care One Beat at a Time!

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LEE COUNTY 16 LEE COUNTY L LE EE C CO U UN NT TY Physicians Directory 2013 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY AESTHETIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Drew Kreegel, MDAesthetic & Reconstructive SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Plastic Surgery, OtolaryngologyEDUCATION: University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis; residency at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta, Ga., the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis, and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill/UNC Hospitals (239) 343-9777 16410 HealthPark Commons Dr., Suite 200 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY Gaston Turnier, MDAllergies/ImmunologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatric and Adult Allergy/ImmunologyEDUCATION: Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Port-au-Prince, Haiti; University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; residency at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital, Bronx, New YorkEnglish, French, Creole (239) 343-9722 4761 S. Cleveland Avenue, Suite 3 Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 343-9722 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org ANTI-AGING, FUNCTIONAL & REGENERATIVE MEDICINE Michael Varveris, MDHormone Replacement, Weight Loss & Age ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Dr. Varveris is board-certied in Anti-Aging, Functional & Regenerative Medicine, Internal Medicine as well as Clinical Lipidology.EDUCATION: Dr. Varveris earned his medical degree from the University of Miami in 1993. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Orlando Regional Medical Center in 1997 where he received 18 months of additional residency training in Clinical and Anatomic Pathology and served as Chief Medical Resident for 12 months. Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 482-1900 12998 South Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.garramone.com ANTI-AGING & FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE Teresa A. Sievers, MD, MSMS, FAARM, ABAARMBio Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy & Weight LossBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Internal Medicine and Anti-aging, Regenerative and functional MedicineEDUCATION: Ross University School of Medicine; Residency: University of Florida in Jacksonville; MSMS in Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine, USF (239) 948-7291 10201 Arcos Avenue, Ste. 201 Estero, FL 33928 www.drteresasievers.com

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9LVLWXVDWRQHRIRXUYH FRQYHQLHQWO\ORFDWHGRIFHVLQ )RUW0\HUV‡&DSH&RUDO‡%RQLWD6SULQJV 1DSOHV‡3RUW&KDUORWWH‡ (800) 282-8281www.eye.md1HZSDWLHQWVZHOFRPH0RVWLQVXUDQFHVDFFHSWHG Worried About Vision Loss? :H7UHDW ‡0DFXODU'HJHQHUDWLRQ ‡'LDEHWLF(\H'LVHDVHV ‡5HWLQDO7HDUV'HWDFKPHQWV ‡2WKHU9LVLRQ7KUHDWHQLQJ'LVHDVHV Let our \HDUV RIFRPELQHGH[SHULHQFH work for you!

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 18 AUDIOLOGY Drianis Duran, AuDHearing Loss and Hearing Aids; TinnitusBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of AudiologyEDUCATION: A.T. Still University (239) 267-7888 8900 Gladiolus Drive, Suite 201 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.GulfCoastAudiology.com BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Zaheer Aslam MDPsychiatric Evaluations, Addictive Disorders, Medication Management and Variety of TherapiesBOARD CERTIFICATION: Diplomate American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in Addictive Disorders.EDUCATION: Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS), Allama Iqbal Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan (AIMC). Residency: General Psychiatry at University of North Dakota, Fargo, ND. Fellowships: Addictive Disorders – Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Memberships: APA, AMA, AAAP. (239) 985-2700 9241 Park Royal Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.ParkRoyalHospital.com BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Elena Reyes, PhDEDUCATION: Graduate school: Florida State University in Tallahassee, Fla. ; clinical psychology internship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-3831 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 709 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org Gu lf Co as t Au diol og y Ex pe rt s In Hearing And Balanc e An Audiologist Like No Other ,$!('&"!%,$!%,%%"$%#$%,!!&'%! !& 239-267-7888 n"'%$ "$&*$%n)))'"%&'""*" $!%'$!'r"$$&+"&"$"'""* We are an audiology practice dedicated to providing state-of-the-art hearing care and comprehensive vestibular evaluations. At Gulf Coast Audiology we welcome the opportunity to talk with you and to listen to your hearing needs. The decision to invest in better hearing is one of the most important you will ever make. Because of this, our goal is to provide you with compassionate care, the most current hearing aid technology, and professional service. The owner herself, Dr. Drianis Duran, will always be the one to work with you. "")'%"! CONTA C T US A T 239.936.4421 FOR MORE IN F OR M AT I ON 4110 Center Pointe Drive, Suite 219 I Fort Myers, Florida 33916 239.936.4421 WWW.CLINICALST U DY C ENTER.COM ] Chronic Pain ] Osteoporosis ] Endometriosis ] PHN (Pain from Shingles) ] ] ] BENEFITS TO VOLUNTEERING ] No insurance needed, No co-pays, No deductibles ] Free study related physical examination & study related procedures ] Free study related medications ] 3DUWLFLSDWHVZLWK%RDUG&HUWLHG3K\VLFLDQV ] Compensation for time & travel Call Us Today! At the Clinical Study Center, We Are Celebrating 35 YEARS of Providing Health Care Through Research to the Residents of Lee, Charlotte and Collier Counties.

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 20 BREAST RADIOLOGY Harmindar K. Gill, MDThoracic & Breast ImagingBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Radiology. Member of Society of Breast ImagingEDUCATION: Medical School & Residency: West Virginia University, Fellowship Clinical: Yale University, Fellowship Research: University of Maryland; Faculty: Johns Hopkins University 2000-Current (239) 494-4300 27160 Bay Landing Dr., Suite 201 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.PremierWomensRadiology.com BREAST SURGEON Rie Aihara, MDBreast Surgery; Breast DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (239) 277-0479 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 301 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RegionalBreastCare.com BREAST SURGEON Nilima Patwardhan, MDBenign and High Risk Breast PatientsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Surgeon with special interest in breast diseases; Member of the American College of Surgeons, Surgical Society of Oncology, American Society of Breast Surgeons, and a Senior Member of the America College of Surgeons; Massachusetts Medical Society and American Society of Endocrine SurgeonsEDUCATION: Professor of Surgery and Director of the Multi-Disciplinary Breast Fellowship Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) in Worcester, MA (239) 277-0479 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 301 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RegionalBreastCare.com BREAST SURGEON David Rock, MDOncoplastic Surgery including Nipple Sparing Mastectomy TechniquesBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in General Surgery by the American Board of Surgery and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Member of the American Society of Breast Diseases and the American Society of Breast SurgeonsEDUCATION: Degrees in both Pharmacy and Medicine from the Medical College of Virginia; Residency training completed at East Carolina University (239) 277-0479 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 301 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RegionalBreastCare.com CARDIOLOGY Brian K. Arcement, MDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Cardiology, Interventional CardiologyEDUCATION: University of South Alabama Medical School in Mobile; residency at USA Medical Center in Mobile; fellowships at the University of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville (239) 334-7177 14051 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Michael Bolooki, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: University of Miami School of Medicine; residency at Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio; fellowship at the University of Minnesota (239) 424-1660 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL www.LeeMemorial.org

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When it comes to breast cancer, the right team makes all the difference. The Regional Breast Care Physicians will answer your questions.Hearing youÂ’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer often leaves you feeling shocked and overwhelmed. The Physicians at Regional Breast Care understand this. ThatÂ’s why, Dr. Aihara, Dr. Rock and Dr. Patwardhan encourage you to participate in your care, helping you feel empowered. This feeling of empowerment makes all the di erence. Dr. Aihara Dr. Rock Whether youÂ’ve just been diagnosed with breast cancer or need a 2nd opinion, the expert Physicians at Regional Breast Care can help. Our team approach to care means you have a compassionate group of specialists, all in one location, working together for you. Call (239) 277-0479 to schedule an appointment Regional Breast Care at the Regional Cancer Center &RORQLDO&HQWHU'U6XLWHv)RUW0\HUV)/ Learn more at www.RegionalBreastCare.com Dr. Patwardhan

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 22 CARDIOLOGY M. Erick Burton, MDInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiac ElectrophysiologyEDUCATION: Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Ga.; residency at the University of Alabama Hospitals, Birmingham; fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta (239) 433-8888 9800 S. HealthPark Dr., Suite 320 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY James F. Butler, DOInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency at Overlook Hospital in Summit, NJ; fellowship at Case Western Reserve University Hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. (239) 334-7177 14051 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Richard A. Chazal, MDInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: University of South Florida Medical School; residency at the University of South Florida in Tampa; fellowship at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis (239) 433-8888 9800 S. HealthPark Dr., Suite 320 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY James Conrad, MD, PhDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Nuclear Cardiology, CT Angiography, Interventional Cardiology EDUCATION: University of Wisconsin in Madison Medical Schoo;, residency at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio; fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Department of Medicine in MadisonLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-6410 16261 Bass Road, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Michael A. Corbellini, DOInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency and fellowship at Hahnemann University Hospital/Medical College in Philadelphia, Pa. (239) 433-8888 9800 S. HealthPark Dr., Suite 320 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Robert Cross, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: St. GeorgeÂ’s University School of Medicine in Grenada; residency and fellowship at Temple University, Philadelphia; fellowship at Marshall University in Huntington, WVLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 424-1660 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Florida Specialists in UrologyState of the Art Urology in a Caring Environment. “O ur goal is to offer the latest technology in an environment conducive to patient comfort.”Solutions for Men Suffering with Enlarged Prostate Like many of my patients, you may know how it feels to suffer from an enlarged prostate – the frequent urination, WKHZHDNRZWKHLQWHUUXSWHGVOHHS%HQLJQSURVWDW LF K\SHUSODVLD%3+DQRQFDQFHURXVHQODUJHPHQWRIWK H SURVWDWHJODQGDIIHFWVKDOIRIDOOPHQRYHUWKHDJ HRI 0DQ\PHQDUHSUHVFULEHGPHGLFDWLRQVIRUWKLVFRQGLW LRQRU DUHUHFRPPHQGHGWRXQGHUJRDVXUJLFDOSURFHGXUHNQR ZQDV WUDQVXUHWKUDOUHVHFWLRQRIWKHSURVWDWH7853 Normal ProstateEnlarged Prostate Steven H. Paletsky, M.D.Diplomate of American Board of Urology Fort Myers7335 Gladiolus Drive (239) 689-6677Cape Coral126 Del Prado Blvd N. (239) 458-6677Bonita Springs3501 Health Ctr BLVD, Ste 2120 (239) 949-2211www.floridaspecialistsinurology.com What are the symptoms of BPH? As the prostate enlarges, it puts pressure on the urethra similar to DFODPSRQDJDUGHQKRVH:LWKFRQWLQXHGJURZWKWKHH[SDQGLQJSURVWDWHPD\FRQVWULFWWKHXUHWKUDFDXVLQJV\PSWRPVVXFKDVGLIFXOW\VWDUWLQJXULQDWLRQRUDZHDNXULQHVWUHDP Symptoms can include: ‡6XGGHQXUJHWRXULQDWH XUJHQF\ ‡'LIFXOW\VWDUWLQJDQG stopping your urine stream KHVLWDWLRQ ‡7KHQHHGWRSXVKRU strain when urinating ‡'ULEEOLQJ ‡,QFRPSOHWHHPSW\LQJWKH VHQVDWLRQWKDWWKHEODGGHULVQRWHPSW\DIWHUXULQDWLQJ ‡:HDNXULQHRZ‡,QFUHDVHGRUGHFUHDVHG IUHTXHQF\RIXULQDWLRQ ‡)UHTXHQWQLJKWWLPH XULQDWLRQQRFWXULD ‡%XUQLQJRUSDLQGXULQJ urination ‡,QFRQWLQHQFH‡%ORRGLQXULQHKHPDWXULD7KHVHERWKHUVRPHV\PSWRPV FDQKDYHDSURIRXQGHIIHFWRQDPDQVOLIHDVPHQRIWHQFKDQJHWKHLUOLYHVWRDFFRPPRGDWHWKHQHHGWRXULQDWHIUHTXHQWO\7UHDWPHQWIRUWKHFRQGLWLRQLVQHFHVVDU\RQO\LIV\PSWRPVEHFRPHLQWROHUDEOH%\DJHWRRIPHQH[SHULHQFH%3+V\PSWRPVVHYHUHHQRXJKWRUHTXLUHWUHDWPHQW ,KDYHIRXQGWKDWVRPHRIP\ patients are frustrated with the side HIIHFWVDQGWKHOHYHORIV\PSWRPUHOLHIWKDWPHGLFDWLRQVRIIHU$QGZKLOH7853LVDQHIIHFWLYHVXUJHU\UHFRYHU\WLPHDIHZGD\VLQWKHKRVSLWDODQGSRVVLEOHFRPSOLFDWLRQVDUHGUDZEDFNVIRUPDQ\PHQ 7RGD\WKHUHDUHPDQ\WUHDWPHQW options for patients suffering from DQHQODUJHGSURVWDWH,I\RXDUHQRWJHWWLQJFRPSOHWHUHOLHIRUDUHXQKDSS\ZLWK\RXUPHGLFDWLRQRURWKHUWUHDWPHQWRIFKRLFH,LQYLWHyou to make an appointment so ZHFDQH[SORUHWKHEHVWWUHDWPHQWRSWLRQIRU\RX,ZDQW\RXWRNQRZDERXW DQRWKHUWUHDWPHQWWKDWFDQSURYLGHUHOLHIZLWKRXWPHGLFDWLRQV7KHU0DWU[LVDODVWLQJRQHWLPHVROXWLRQWKDWPD\EHDSSURSULDWHIRUVRPHSDWLHQWV,WLVFRYHUHGE\0HGLFDUHDQGPRVWSULYDWHLQVXUHUV ,QFOLQLFDOVWXGLHVRQWKH70[ %3+WUHDWPHQWVV\VWHPPRVWSDWLHQWVGLGQRWH[SHULHQFHDQ\VLGHHIIHFWV7KHPDMRULW\RIWKHVLGHHIIHFWVZHUHUHSRUWHGwithin days after the treatments and disappeared shortly thereafter ZLWKRXWPHGLFDWLRQ 7KHUPRWKHUDS\LVQRW UHFRPPHQGHGIRUHYHU\RQH
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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 24 CARDIOLOGY Michael D. Danzig, MDInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: Yale University School of Medicine; residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn.; fellowship at Georgetown University (239) 433-8888 9800 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 320 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 495-4375 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2330 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Robert M. Grohowski, MDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Cardiology, Interventional CardiologyEDUCATION: University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Medical School; residency at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor; fellowships at the University of Michigan (239) 343-6410 16261 Bass Rd., Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Vladimir Ilic, MDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Hypertension, Interventional Cardiology, Adult Echocardiography, Nuclear CardiologyEDUCATION: University of Zagreb Medical School in Croatia; residency and fellowships at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York (239) 334-7177 14051 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Jihad Khalil, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Nuclear CardiologyEDUCATION: University of Damascus School of Medicine in Damascus, Syria, residencies at the University of Damascus and Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., fellowship at Michigan State University (239) 343-9700 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Steven T. Lee, MD, FACCInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Interventional Cardiology EDUCATION: Brown University School of Medicine; residency and fellowships at Brown UniversityÂ’s Rhode Island Hospital in Providence (239) 343-6410 16261 Bass Rd., Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY John Macaluso, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, CardiologyEDUCATION: The State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine; residency at The State University of New York in Buffalo, fellowship at Case Western Reserve UniversityLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9700 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 26 CARDIOLOGY Jesus Mendiolaza, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease EDUCATION: Federico Villarreal University School of Medicine in Lima, Peru; residency at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; fellowship at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New JerseyLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9700 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Murali Muppala, MDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, Nuclear CardiologyEDUCATION: Sri Venkateswara Medical College in India; residency at LeHigh Valley Hospital, in Allentown Penn.; fellowships at the Graduate Hospital, University of Pennsylvania and at St. LukeÂ’s Hospital Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Mo. (239) 334-7177 14051 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Edward A. Palank, MDInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Mass.; residency and fellowships at the New England Medical Center in Boston, Mass. (239) 495-4375 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2330 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Jian Xin Qin, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Echocardiography, Nuclear Cardiology EDUCATION: Yale University School of Medicine; residency at St. MaryÂ’s Hospital Yale University School of Medicine in Waterbury, Conn.; fellowships at Nanfang Hospital, First Military Medical University in China, Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Fla. and the Cleveland Clinic English, Mandarin Chinese, Cantonese (239) 343-9700 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Ashwini Sahni, MDNon-Invasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Nuclear CardiologyEDUCATION: B.J. Medical College in Pune, India; residency at Coney Island Hospital; fellowship at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. (239) 424-1659 1681 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33906 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOLOGY Brian C. Taschner, MDInterventional CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Echocardiography, Nuclear Cardiology EDUCATION: Brown University School of Medicine; residency and fellowships at Brown UniversityÂ’s Rhode Island Hospital in Providence (239) 343-6410 16261 Bass Rd., Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org

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UNDERLYING CAUSES FOR LIMB SWELLING There can be many different causes for limb swelling however two of the most common diseases for chronic limb swelling are Lymphedema and Venous insufciency. After having a surgical procedure it may take months or years for Lymphedema to manifest because of its slow progression. It is imperative that Lymphedema is treated quickly and effectively, regardless of the severity. Complications dramatically decrease when treatment is started in the earliest stage of Lymphedema. Chronic venous insufciency is another condition that causes swelling in the legs along with open wounds. CVI occurs when the valves in the veins that normally channel the blood to the heart become damaged which then leads to pooling of the blood in the lower extremities. Sometimes a discoloration of the skin occurs, referred to as hemosiderin staining, identied by a reddish staining of the lower limb. At times poor circulation results in shallow wounds due to the stagnant blood that would normally return to the heart. Symptoms vary but may include swelling, aching, sharp pains, itching or burning, varicose veins, infection, chronic venous ulcer, and decreased mobility. Treatment Pneumatic compression devices are one of the most highly recommended treatments for limb swelling and a Medicare approved treatment option. A compression device is used for both acute care (short term in the hospital) as well as chronic care (long term in the home). The compression pump increases blood ow and lymphatic ow. By increasing the circulation in the affected limb, many painful symptoms will be alleviated. When compression treatment is used on a limb, the excess uid is removed and worked back into the lymphatic system the natural way. For patients with chronic ulcers, using a compression device will help heal the wound from the inside out by increasing the circulation in the return of the blood from the heart. The heart delivers oxygen rich blood back to the legs and the tissue. The pneumatic sequential compression relieves the pain and pressure in the swollen area and reduces the size of the limb. The sequential ination of the chambers, of the sleeve around the affected limb, begins distal (lower region of the limb furthest from attachment) to proximal (area of attachment to the body) naturally mimicking your bodies lymph return while stimulating the blood ow in the legs. Contact us Acute Wound Care, LLC is a highly focused local provider of wound products and compression pumps working with select area physicians highly versed in this condition.For more information and articles on this topic, or call 239-949-4412 and speak with a specialist, or visit www. AcuteWoundCare .com. Remember, nothing heals faster than an educated patient.ADVERTORIAL Acute Wound Care 11100 Bonita Beach Rd STE 101-A | Bonita Springs FL,34135Phone:(239)949-4412 | Fax:(877)262-3226 | www.AcuteWoundCare.comHemosiderin strainingDeductibles and copays may apply. Qualifying patients only.

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 28 CARDIOLOGY Roshan K. Vatthyam, MDInvasive CardiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular DiseaseEDUCATION: Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science Chicago Medical School, Chicago; residency at University of Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital; fellowship at Saint Vincent Hospital/The Care Group in Indianapolis, Ind. (239) 433-8888 9800 S. HealthPark Dr., Suite 320 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY Randall Buss, M.D., F.A.C.SCardiothoracic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Thoracic SurgeryEDUCATION: Auburn University; University of Alabama School of Medicine; University of Texas Southern Medical School Afliated Hospitals, Dallas, TX (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY George M. Comas, M.D.Cardiothoracic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Princeton University, New Jersey; Cornell University Medical College, New York; General Surgery Residency and CT Fellowship, Columbia University, NY; CT Fellowship Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY Paul DiGiorgi, M.D., F.A.C.SCardiothoracic SugeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Thoracic SurgeryEDUCATION: New York University; New York University School of Medicine; University of Connecticut/ Hart Ford Hospital; Columbia Presbyterian Hospital (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY Brian Hummel, M.D., F.A.C.S.Cardiothoracic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Thoracic SurgeryEDUCATION: University of South Dakota; University of Iowa College of Medicine; University of Texas Southwestern Medical School of Afliated Hospitals, Dallas (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com CLINICAL RESEARCH – GENERAL MEDICINE Eli Zonana, M.D.Pathology and General MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pathology EDUCATION: University of Texas (239) 561-0009 6150 Diamond Centre Court, #500 Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.GulfCoastClinicalResearch.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 30 COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Valerie R. Dyke, MD, FACS, FASCRSTreatment of Colon and Rectal DiseasesBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Colon and Rectal SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Maryland School of Medicine; Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at Ferguson Clinic and Spectrum Health Fellowship at Grand Rapids, MI (239) 275-0728 13770 Plantation Road, Suite 2 Fort Myers, FL 33912 2721 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 210 Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.thecolorectalinstitute.com COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Janette U. Gaw, MD, FACS, FASCRSTreatment of Colon and Rectal DiseasesBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Colon and Rectal SurgeryEDUCATION: Yale University School of Medicine; Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at Georgia Colon and Rectal Surgery Clinic, Atlanta, GA(239) 275-0728 13770 Plantation Road, Suite 2 Fort Myers, FL 33912 1530 Lee Blvd., Suite 2100 Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 www.thecolorectalinstitute.com COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Jeffrey A. Neale, MD, FACS, FASCRSTreatment of Colon and Rectal DiseasesBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Colon and Rectal SurgeryEDUCATION: University of St. Eustatius; Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (239) 275-0728 13770 Plantation Road, Suite 2 Fort Myers, FL 33912 2721 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 210 Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.thecolorectalinstitute.com COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Nagesh B. Ravipati, MD, FACS, FASCRSTreatment of Colon and Rectal DiseasesBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Colon and Rectal SurgeryEDUCATION: J.J.M. Medical College, India; Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at Cleveland Clinic, Weston, FL (239) 275-0728 13770 Plantation Road, Suite 2 Fort Myers, FL 33912 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2145 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.thecolorectalinstitute.com DENTISTRY Leticia Acosta, DMDGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, Florida Dental Association, West Coast Dental AssociationEDUCATION: University of Florida College of Dentistry (239) 283-1041 10484 Stringfellow Rd. St. James City, FL 33956 www.RiverdaleDental.com DENTISTRY Eduardo Correa, DDSGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, Florida Dental Association, Academy of General DentistryEDUCATION: Federal University of Santa Catarina Brazil, University of Florida Languages Spoken: Portuguese (239) 694-0834 13432 Palm Beach Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RiverdaleDental.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 31 DENTISTRY Lisa Deese, DMDGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryEDUCATION: Florida Memorial University, University of Alabama at Birmingham College of Dentistry (239) 303-2400 201 Plaza Dr. #1 Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 www.RiverdaleDental.com DENTISTRY Tyler McCabe, DMDGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryEDUCATION: University of Mississippi Medical Center (239) 561-0002 11300 Lindbergh Blvd. #101 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RiverdaleDental.com DENTISTRY Shane R. McDowell, DMD, PACosmetic, Restorative, Implants, GeneralBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, Florida Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, Florida Dental Association, Lee County Dental Society, The Periodontal – Restorative Study ClubEDUCATION: Doctor of Medical Dentistry from University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, General Practice Residency at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Pittsburgh (239) 936-0597 7711 Cambridge Manor Place Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.MyFortMyersDentist.com www.riverdaledental.com Fort Myers Shores 13432 Palm Beach Blvd.Fort Myers, FL239-694-0834Pine Island 10484 Stringfellow Rd Suite 3St. James City, FL239-283-1041 Lehigh Acres201 Plaza DriveSuite 1Lehigh Acres, FL239-303-2400Gateway Dental Suites 11300 Lindbergh Blvd. Suite 101Fort Myers, FL239-561-0002Buckingham/Alva 14651 Palm Beach Blvd. Suite 101Fort Myers, FL239-694-9993North Fort Myers13720 N. Cleveland Av. Suite ANorth Fort Myers, FL239-995-6200 Serving Lee County for Over 30 Years INSURANCE PLANS WELCOMED LOW MONTHLY P AYMENTS & FINANCING PROVIDED BY CARECREDIT SPECIALIZING IN:'BNJMZ$PTNFUJD%FOUJTUSZt/FX1BUJFOUT8FMDPNFii>iˆUn…ˆ`iiˆU ˆœ'"ˆ`i-i`>ˆœ nœUˆ`}iU“>Ui'i*>ˆ>Unœ“iˆV*œVi`'i /œœ…7…ˆiˆ}U6iiiU//i>“iU*œ…œ`œˆV r`œ`œˆVU">-'}iUˆ}ˆ>8‡,> *iˆœ`œ>ˆi>iU-œˆ}ˆ>Vi ri ˆ } E >' ` > œˆ “i >ˆ>L i

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 32 DENTISTRY Douglas E. Milsap, DDSGeneral & Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association; Florida Dental Association; Lee County Dental Association; West Coast Dental AssociationEDUCATION: Emory University; Temple University Dental School (239) 936-3030 12530 New Brittany Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.douglasmilsapdds.com DENTISTRY James A. Mitchell, DDSGeneral and Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, American Academy of Implant Dentistry, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, American Academy of General Dentistry, Florida Dental AssociationEDUCATION: University of Florida, Emory University School of Dentistry (239) 939-5556 32 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.MitchellDentist.com DENTISTRY Joseph P. Mitchell, DDSGeneral and Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, American Academy of General Dentistry, Florida Dental Association, West Coast District Dental AssociationEDUCATION: University of Notre Dame, Marquette University School of Dentistry (239) 939-5556 32 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.MitchellDentist.com DENTISTRY Yolanda F. Mitchell, DDSGeneral and Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, American Academy of Implant Dentistry, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, American Academy of General Dentistry, Florida Dental AssociationEDUCATION: Emory University, Emory University School of Dentistry (239) 939-5556 32 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.MitchellDentist.com DENTISTRY Matthew NavidomskisGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryEDUCATION: Duke University, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (239) 995-6200 13720 N. Cleveland Ave. #A North Fort Myers, FL 33903 www.RiverdaleDental.com DENTISTRY BJ SamsGeneral, Cosmetic, Restorative DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, Christian Medical & Dental AssociationsEDUCATION: Texas A&M University, Baylor College of Dentistry (239) 694-9993 14651 Palm Beach Blvd. #101 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.RiverdaleDental.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 33 DENTISTRY Deborah Streater, DDSGeneral & Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Dental Association; Florida Dental Association; Lee County Dental Association; West Coast Dental AssociationEDUCATION: University of Texas; Baylor University (239) 936-3030 12530 New Brittany Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.douglasmilsapdds.com DERMATOLOGY Brian A. Harris, MDMOHS Micrographic Surgery, Skin CancerBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow, American Academy of Dermatology and American Society of MOHS SurgeonsEDUCATION: University of Florida, Medical School, University of Miami, Residency; Mayo Clinic, Residency (239) 936-3344 9090 Park Royal Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.harrisdermatology.com DERMATOLOGY Keith A. Harris, MDSkin Cancer, General Skin ExamsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow, American Academy of DermatologyEDUCATION: University of Miami, Medical School and Residency (239) 936-3344 9090 Park Royal Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.harrisdermatology.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 34 ENDOCRINOLOGY Heitham Ajlouni, MDEndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Jordan University of Science and Technology in Irbid, Jordan, Residency at Seton Hall University in Newark, N.J., Fellowship at University Hospital Case Medical Center in Cleveland (239) 343-9686 8960 Colonial Center Dr., Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org ENDOCRINOLOGY Patricia Sareh, MDEndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, EndocrinologyEDUCATION: Medical degree from Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Internal Medicine Residence at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami. Endocrinology fellowship at University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (239) 343-9686 8960 Colonia Center Dr., Suite 302 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org FAMILY MEDICINE Andrew Oakes-Lottridge, MD, FAAFPFamily Medicine, House Calls, PedsBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Academy of Family PhysiciansEDUCATION: University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Residency, Family Medicine at Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, Jacksonville, FLServing SW Florida (239) 694-6246 www.drandy.us GASTROENTEROLOGY Irma Cruz, M.D.GastroenterologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in GastroenterologyEDUCATION: Medical School UNAM School of Medicine – Residency Internal Medicine University of South Florida – Fellowship Gastroenterology University of South FloridaLanguages Spoken: Spanish (239) 561-7337 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Ste. 200 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.Digestive-Specialists.com GASTROENTEROLOGY Evelyn R. Kessel, M.D.GastroenterologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Gastroenterology and Internal MedicineEDUCATION: Medical School University of Michigan – Residency Internal Medicine University of Florida – Chief Resident Internal Medicine University of Florida – Fellowship Gastroenterology University of FloridaLanguages Spoken: German, English (239) 561-7337 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Ste. 200 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.Digestive-Specialists.com

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Let OUR Family Take Care of YO UR Family OUR FAMILY MEDICINE/ INTERNAL MEDICINE TEAM PhysiciansÂ’ Primary Care also specializes in Obstetrics & Gynecology and Pediatrics To nd a physician near you, visit our web site at www.ppcsw.com Cape Coral Adult Medicine Ofce /r*!((/ (239)574-1988 Cape Coral Family Practice Ofce /nn").(#-./ (239) 574-1988 Fort Myers Family Practice/Internal Medicine Ofce /"&#$('/ (239) 482-1010 ** Fort Myers Family Practice Ofce /r%(" &'($/ (239) 275-6778 *** Fort Myers Family Practice Ofce /(#'.$(",/ (239) 267-0914 **** Fort Myers Internal Medicine Ofce /n)'&'("&'+(*+"*/ (239) 274-0200 Lehigh Acres Family Practice /n'+$,(/ (239) 368-8500 Saturday appointments available at some locations Medicare and most insurances accepted Jon P. Burdzy, D.O.** Joanna C. Muller-Carioba, M.D. Charles H. Curtis, M.D. Mardelle DeLight, M.D. F. Richard Kirley, M.D. Alejandro N. Martinez, M.D. Barry J. Sell, M.D. Anna Shuster, D.O. Joseph A. Testa, M.D. Jerry Von Thomas, M.D. Dean S. Traiger, M.D. Scott E. Wiley, M.D. Kevin Poelker, P.A. Jeanne Abdou, A.R.N.P. Vincent A. Azzara, D.O.* Peter A. Lewis, M.D.**** Kathleen Mahan, A.R.N.P.* FORT M Y ERS C APE CORAL Paul B. Engel, M.D. Timothy J. Snodgrass, D.O.* Michael S. Verwest, M.D. LEHIGH A C RES Staci Van Winkle, M.D.*** **

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 36 GASTROENTEROLOGY Brent M. Myers, M.D.GastroenterologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine and Transplant HepatologyEDUCATION: Medical School University of Texas Residency Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Fellowship Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic (239) 561-7337 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Ste. 200 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.Digestive-Specialists.com GENERAL SURGERY Peter M. Denk, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Michigan Medical School 2001. University of South Florida – General Surgery Residency 2006. Minimally Invasive and Endoscopic GI Surgery Fellowship 2007.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 313-7522 13710 Metropolis Ave., #101 Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.gisurgical.com GENERAL SURGERY Bertrand Fonji, MDGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: General Surgery EDUCATION: State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brookly, N.Y., residency at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando, Fla., special training in oncological procedures at the M.D. anderson Cancer Center in Orlando (239) 424-2755 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 1 Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org GENERAL SURGERY Barry N. Haicken, MDGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: General Surgery EDUCATION: University of Rochester School of Medicine in Rochester, N.Y., residency at Monteore Hospital of the Albert Einsten College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y. (239) 424-2755 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 1 Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org GENERAL SURGERY Jeffrey W. Lewis, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: MD University of Nebraska; Surgical Residency at University of Iowa (239) 278-5200 16400 HealthPark Commons Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 GENERAL SURGERY Robert Tomas, DO, FACOSGeneral Surgery, Laparoscopy, Endoscopy, AestheticsBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Osteopathic Board of Surgery (239) 243-8222 12640 World Plaza Lane, Bldg. 71 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.ursthealth.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 37 GENERAL & VASCULAR SURGERY Moutaa BenMaamer, MDGeneral and Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Surgery EDUCATION: University of Medicine in Tunis, Tunisia; residencies at the University of Nice College of Medicine, France and St. Elizabeth Health Center in Youngstown, Ohio, fellowships at the University of Nice, France and the University of Texas Medical School-Baylor College of Surgery in Houston Languages Spoken: English, French, Arabic (239) 343-9960 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GENERAL & VASCULAR SURGERY Eric Goldsmith, DOGeneral and Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: General Surgery EDUCATION: University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health Sciences in Des Moines; residency at Metropolitan Hospital in Springeld, Pennsylvania (239) 424-1611 1682 NE Pine Island Road, Suite 4 Cape Coral, FL 33909 (239) 424-1611 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 3 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org 239-278-5200 Providing surgical care for the Fort Myers community for over 25 years. Listed as one of AmericaÂ’s Top Doctors(Castle-Connolly) 16400 HealthPark Commons Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 Jeffrey W. Lewis, M.D., FACSGeneral Surgeon Specializing in the treatment of womenÂ’s breast disease.

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 38 GENERAL & VASCULAR SURGERY William A. Kokal, MDGeneral and Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Surgery EDUCATION: Loyola University Medical School in Illinois; residency at Loyola University Medical Center; fellowships at the University of Newcastle and the Medical College of Virginia (239) 343-9960 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GENERAL & VASCULAR SURGERY Darren B. Miter, DOGeneral and Vascular SurgeryEDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency at Doctors Hospital of Stark County/Ohio University; fellowship at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center at Houston Northwest Medical Center (239) 343-9960 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GENERAL & VASCULAR SURGERY John A. Moss, DOGeneral and Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Vascular and General SurgeryEDUCATION: Nova-Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency at Botsford General Hospital in Farmington Hills, Michigan; fellowship in Peripheral Vascular Surgery at Botsford General Hospital (239) 343-9960 8380 Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GERIATRICS Tanja Mani, PhDMemory CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Clinical Psychology EDUCATION: Graduate School: University of Georgia in Athens; Fellowship at the Methodist Rehabilitation Center/University of Mississippi Medical Center (239) 343-9220 12600 Creekside Lane, Suite 7 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GERIATRICS Aboo Mannan, DOMemory CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine at the New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury, N.Y., residency at St. JohnÂ’s Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway, and Niagra Falls Memorial Medical Center in Niagra Falls, N.Y., fellowship at Long Beach Medical Center in Long Beach, N.Y. (239) 343-9220 12600 Creekside Lane, Suite 7 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY Edward C. Grendys, Jr., MDGynecologic OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; American Board of OB/GYN and Gynecologic OncologyEDUCATION: Northwestern University Medical School (239) 334-6626 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 400 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.FlaGynOnc.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 40 GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY James W. Orr, Jr., MDGynecologic OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Subspecialty Certication Gynecologic OncologyEDUCATION: University of Virginia School of Medicine; Fellowship, University of Alabama in Birmingham (239) 334-6626 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 400 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.FlaGynOnc.com GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY Fadi Abu Shahin, MDGynecologic OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Palliative CareEDUCATION: University of Damascus Faculty of Medicine (239) 334-6626 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 400 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.FlaGynOnc.com GYNECOLOGY, SURGERY, AESTHETICS Anne Lord-Tomas, D.O., FACOOGGynecology, Surgery, Aesthetics, CosmetogynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Osteopathic Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology (239) 243-8222 12640 World Plaza Lane, Bldg. 71 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.ursthealth.com INFECTIOUS DISEASE Alvaro Beltran, MDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: Instituto Ciencias de la Salud in Medellin, Columbia; residency and fellowship at Maimondes Medical Center in Brooklyn, NYLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9680 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 809 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org INFECTIOUS DISEASE Douglas Brust, MD, PhDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University; residency at Harvard Medical School Brigham and WomenÂ’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts; fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland (239) 343-9680 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 809 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org INFECTIOUS DISEASE Esther Morrison, MDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: University of Florida College of Medicine, fellowship at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio (239) 343-9680 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 809 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 41 INFECTIOUS DISEASE Manuel Revuelta, MDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., residency and fellowship at St. VincentÂ’s Hospital and Medical Center in New York, N.Y.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9680 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 809 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org INFECTIOUS DISEASE Mary Beth Saunders, DOInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of Health Sciences in Kansas City, Missouri; residency at Garden City Hospital in Michigan; fellowship at Botsford General Hospital in Farmington Hills, Michigan (239) 343-9710 9981 HealthPark Drive, Suite 454 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org COL ONIAL BLVD. FORUM BLVD. N 82 75 MLK JR. BL VD. An exciting new lifestyle awaits you at Southwest FloridaÂ’s newest senior community for supervised independent living, assisted livi ng and memory care. Plus, a state-of-the-art wellness center and our one-price, all-inclusive personalized assisted living and memory care make it the perfect choice. ItÂ’s everything you may need now and in the future. Come visit this one-of-a-kind community today! Located within The Forum 2619 Forum Blvd., Fort Myers, FL 33905 239.989.0444 | www.DiscoveryVillages.com Assisted Living Facility License #12420 | 2013 DISCOVERY SENIOR LIVI NG | MANAGED AND OPERATED BY DISCOVERY SENIOR LIVING Supervised Independent Living | Assisted Living | Memory CareNEW COMMUNITY. NEW START. NEW YOU!Lock In Your Rent For 3 Years...Ask Us How!Arrange a tour and lunch is on us for you and a guest. 3-YEAR NO W O P EN!

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 42 INFECTIOUS DISEASE Rajendra (Sunita) Sharma, MDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, India; residency at Bridgeport Hospital, Connecticut; fellowship at Baystate Medical Center in Springeld, Massachusetts (239) 343-9710 9981 HealthPark Drive, Suite 454 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org INFECTIOUS DISEASE James Toomey, MDInfectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: Northwestern University Medical School; residency and fellowship at the University of Florida Health Science Center in Jacksonville, Florida (239) 343-9710 9981 HealthPark Drive, Suite 454 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org INTERNAL MEDICINE Manuel Del Sol, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: Internship and Residency completed at New York Medical College Stamford HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 217-4470 2002 Del Prado Blvd. S., Suite #100 Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.delsolmedicalcenterinc.com NEUROSURGERY John Dusseau, MDNeurosurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurological Surgery EDUCATION: The Medical College of Ohio in Toledo; residency at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis (239) 343-3800 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 819 Fort Myers, FL 33901 (239) 343-3800 8931 Colonial Center Blvd., Suite 401 Fort Myers, FL 33905 (239) 343-3800 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 120 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-3800 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 6 Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org NEUROSURGERY Jeffrey S. Henn, MDNeurosurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurological Surgery EDUCATION: Duke University School of Medicine; residency and fellowship at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix (239) 343-3800 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 819 Fort Myers, FL 33901 (239) 343-3800 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 6 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-3800 8931 Colonial Center Blvd., Suite 401 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 43 NEUROSURGERY Sam P. Javedan, MDNeurosurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurological Surgery EDUCATION: Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; residency and fellowship at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix; fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (239) 343-3800 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 819 Fort Myers, FL 33901 (239) 343-3800 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 6 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-3800 8931 Colonial Center Blvd., Suite 401 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org NEUROSURGERY Dean D. Lin, MD, PhDNeurosurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurological Surgery EDUCATION: Medical College of Virginia in Richmond; residency at the University of Florida; fellowship at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in University of Western Australia in Perth (239) 343-3800 2780 Cleveland Ave., Suite 819 Fort Myers, FL 33901 (239) 343-3800 708 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 6 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-3800 8931 Colonial Center Blvd., Suite 401 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org NEUROSURGERY Gregory Velat, MDNeurosurgeryEDUCATION: University of Florida College of Medicine; residency and fellowships at the University of Florida and the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix (239) 343-3800 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 120 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Kevin S. Campbell, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of South Florida College of Medicine; residency at the University of FloridaLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Shelly Chvotzkin, DOObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia; residency at the Hospital Consortium of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-7100 4040 Palm Beach Blvd., Suite F Fort Myers, FL 33916 (239) 343-7100 930 S. Main LaBelle, FL 33935 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 44 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Diana D. DeVall, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Tennessee; residency at the University of Tennessee (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Gilbert Draulans, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Leuven, Belgium; residency at Lloyd Noland Hospital, Faireld, AlabamaLanguages Spoken: English, Flemish (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-7100 4040 Palm Beach Blvd., Suite F Fort Myers, FL 33916 (239) 343-7100 930 S. Main LaBelle, FL 33935 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Martin Ebenger, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Miami School of Medicine; residency at Arnold Palmer Hospital (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Deidre Fish, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Florida; residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org

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OUR OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY TEAM Diane Byrd, CNMDenise Staerker, CNM Heather Auld, M.D. David Brown, M.D. Anita Del Bianco, M.D. Sarah DiGiorgi, M.D. Kevin Fleishman, M.D. Randall Cowdin, M.D. Aparna Eligeti, M.D. Paul Joslyn, M.D. Blaise Kovaz, M.D. George Kovacevic, M.D. Sarah Krauss, M.D. Kathleen Shimp, M.D. Rex Stubbs, M.D. Mary Yankaskas, M.D. Susan Yeomans, CNM PhysiciansÂ’ Primary Care also specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and Pediatrics To nd a physician near you, visit our web site at www.ppcsw.com Cape Coral Ob/Gyn Ofce $ 1265 Viscaya Parkway $ (239) 574-2229 Fort Myers Ob/Gyn Ofce $ 9021 Park Royal Drive $ (239) 432-5858 Lehigh Ob/Gyn Ofce $ 3507 Lee Blvd. $ (239) 432-5858 Saturday appointments available at some locations rrrrrrrr Let OUR Family Take Care of YO UR Family

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 46 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Melissa Lee, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: Medical College of Georgia at Augusta; residency at Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women and Babies in Orlando, Fla. (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Edward Marineau, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: Wayne State University School of Medicine, Michigan; residency at Wayne State University School of Medicine, Michigan (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Raod Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-7100 4040 Palm Beach Blvd., Suite F Fort Myers, FL 33916 (239) 343-7100 930 S. Main LaBelle, FL 33935 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Cherrie Morris, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey; residency at the University of South FL College of Medicine (239) 343-6100 15901 Bass Road, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-6100 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 4 Fort Myers, FL 33907 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2130 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY John Oliva, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: University of Miami School of Medicine; residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami (239) 424-1600 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Dirk Peterson, MD, PhDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: Case Western Reserve University; residency at University of Florida Health Science Center, Jacksonville (239) 424-1600 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 47 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Bipin Shah, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Obstetrics and GynecologyEDUCATION: Seth G.S. Medical College University of Bombay; residency at Bronx Lebanon Hospital Medical CenterEnglish, Hindi, Gujarti (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-7100 4040 Palm Beach Blvd., Suite F Fort Myers, FL 33916 (239) 343-7100 930 S. Main LaBelle, FL 33935 www.LeeMemorial.org OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE Andrew Singh, MDOccupational Health ServicesBOARD CERTIFICATION: Occupational MedicineEDUCATION: St. Louis University School of Medicine, residency at St. Louis University School of Medicien,masterÂ’s degree in public health from St. Louis University. (239) 343-9841 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org OPHTHALMOLOGY Rachid Aouchiche, M.D., FACSFellowship Trained NeuroOphthalmologist, Cataract SurgeonBOARD CERTIFICATION: Diplomate of the American Board of Ophthamology, Fellow of the American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: University of Algiers, Greater Baltimore Medical Center (Internship & Residency), Pennsylvania Hospital in Philidelphia (Neuro-Ophthalmology), The Greater Baltimore Medical Center (Retinal Vascular Disorders) (239) 466-3111 15640 New Hampshire Court Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.west-coast-eye.com OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael J. Collins, Jr., MD, FACSCornea, Cataract and LASIK SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Ophthalmology and a Fellow of the American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; Eye Surgery Residency at Emory University; Advanced Fellowship Training in Cornea and Refractive Surgery (239) 936-4706 6900 International Center Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33912

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 48 OPHTHALMOLOGY E. Trevor Elmquist D.O.Comprehensive Eye Care, Cataract Surgeon and Optical BoutiqueBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Ophthalmology, 1990; American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology, 1991EDUCATION: Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences College of Osteopathic Medicine; Chief Resident at Walter Reed Army Hospital (239) 936-2020 12670 New Brittany Blvd., Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33907 2336 Surfside Blvd., Suite 121 Cape Coral, FL 33991 www.Elmquist.com OPHTHALMOLOGY Jonathan M. Frantz, MD, FACSCataract and LASIK SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Ophthalmology Fellow American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: Vanderbilt University; University of Miami Medical School; Ophthalmology Residency at Louisiana State University Eye Center; Fellowship Cornea, External Diseases and Refractive Surgery (239) 418-0999 12731 New Brittany Blvd. Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.BetterVision.net OPHTHALMOLOGY Thomas Ghuman, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmology; Retina/ VitreousBOARD CERTIFICATION: Schepens International Society; American Society of Retina Specialists (formerly The Vitreous Society); American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association, American Diabetes Association; Collier County Medical Society; Lee County Medical Society; Charlotte County Medical Society. EDUCATION: 1990 University of Texas, San Antonio, TX Bachelor of Science; 1995 University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX Doctor of Medicine; 1995-1996 Intern in Medicine St. Joseph’s Hospital Houston, TX; 1996-1999 Resident, Ophthalmology University of Texas Houston, TX; 1999-2000 Fellow, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery West Virginia University Morgantown, WV, Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S.); Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology (239) 939-4323 6901 International Center Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33913 http://www.eye.md/ OPHTHALMOLOGY R. Thad Goodwin, M.D.General OphthalmologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of OphthalmologyEDUCATION: BS – William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA; MD – University of North Carolina; Residency in Ophthalmology at University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (239) 939-3937 1510 Royal Palm Square Blvd. #106 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.goodwineyemd.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 49 OPTHALMOLOGY Alexandra Konowal, DOCataract, Lasik & Cornea SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Fellowship Trained in Cornea and Refractive SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Illinois, Fellowship trained Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago; Dr. Konowal participates with the American Academy of Ophthalmology, The American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and the International Society of Refractive Surgery.Languages Spoken: Ukrainian (239) 948-7555 9500 Corkscrew Palm Circle, Ste. 3 Estero, FL 33928 www.Drkonowal.com OPHTHALMOLOGY Stephen J. Laquis, MD, FACSOphthalmic/ Facial Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: The American Board of Ophthalmology and a Fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryEDUCATION: New York Medical College, Residency in Ophthalmology at Yale University, Fellowship at University of Tennessee, Fellowship at Vanderbilt University in Ophthalmic/ Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (239) 947-4042 7331 College Parkway, Suite 200 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.laquis.net N ow accepting EyeMed & VSP Vision Plans at our Cape Coral Office! FORT MYERS OFFICE12670 New Brittany Blvd., Suite 102, Fort Myers Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.CAPE CORAL OFFICE2336 Surfside Blvd., Suite 121, Cape Coral Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. ntXXX&MNRVJTUDPN Offering Saturday & 4BNF%BZ "QQPJOUNFOUT From left: Kate Wagner, O.D.; E. Trevor Elmquist, D.O.; Nina Burt, O.D. 2013 Blade Free Custom Laser Vision 7KHODVHUFDWDUDFWWHFKQRORJ\RIWRPRUURZLVKHUHIRU\RXWRGD\7KDQNVWR1HZ$GYDQFHPHQWVWKLVLVD*UHDW7LPHWR+DYH&DWDUDFW6XUJHU\ 6FKHGXOH\RXUDSSRLQWPHQWWRGD\If you are considering‡/DVHU&DWDUDFW6XUJHU\‡&XVWRP/DVHU9LVLRQ&RUUHFWLRQ ‡%RWR[&RVPHWLF-XYHGHUP,QMHFWDEOH*HO 5DGLHVVHŠ1DWXUDO&ROODJHQ6WLPXODWLRQ ‡/DWLVVHIRUORQJHUIXOOHUGDUNHUH\HODVKHVCall Dr.Konowal today!VOTED THE BEST EYE DOCTOR/EYE SURGEON 7 YEARS RUNNING!239.948.7555 www.DrKonowal.comDr. Alexandra Konowal%RDUG&HUWLHG2SKWKDOPRORJLVW&RUNVFUHZ3DOP&LUFOH (VWHUR)/

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 50 OPHTHALMOLOGY F. Rick Palmon, M.D.Cataract, Lasik & Cornea SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of OphthalmologyEDUCATION: Georgetown University, Bachelor of Science; Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Internship University of Pennsylvania, Internal Medicine; Residency Wills Eye Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Fellowship University of Minnesota, Cornea and Refractive Surgery (239) 768-0006 6850 International Center Blvd Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.SWFLEYE.com OPHTHALMOLOGY Paul A. Raskauskas, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmology; Retina/ VitreousBOARD CERTIFICATION: Florida Medical License ME0060400, HIPAA and Clinical Trials for Researchers training; Human Participant Protectors Education for Research; Good Clinical Practices training Board Certied, American Board of Ophthalmology.EDUCATION: 1982 Harvard College, Cambridge, MA Bachelor of Science; 1986 Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC Doctor of Medicine 1986-1987 Intern in Medicine Faulkner Hospital Jamaica Plain, MA; 1987-1990 Resident, Ophthalmology Wills Eye Hospital Philadelphia, PA; 1990-1991 Fellow, Vitreoretinal Diseases and Surgery Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, FL; Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S.) (239) 939-4323 6901 International Center Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33913 http://www.eye.md/ &SEVH'IVXMIH(IVQEXSPSKMWXW/IMXL%,EVVMW1(ˆ,6SWW,EVVMW1(ˆ&VMER%,EVVMW1 ( 7SYXL[IWX*PSVMHEW7OMR'ERGIV 7TIGMEPMWXWJSV=IEVW ,EZI]SYLEH]SYV %RRYEP7OMR)\EQMREXMSR#1IHMGEVI%WWMKRQIRX%GGITXIH4EVO6S]EP(VMZI ,IEPXL4EVO*PSVMHE *SVX1]IVW*04LSRI 4EVO'IRXVEP'SYVX 2ETPIW*04LSRI [[[LEVVMWHIVQEXSPSK]GSQ

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 51 OPHTHALMOLOGY Ashish G. Sharma, MD, F.A.C.SOphthalmology; Retina/ VitreousBOARD CERIFICATION: Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S); American Academy of Ophthalmology; American Society of Retina Specialists; American Medical Association: Association for Research in Vision and OphthalmologyEDUCATION: 1997 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Bachelor of Science; 2002 Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI Doctor of Medicine; 1999 Summer Research Externship Retina Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Inrmary Boston, MA; 2002-2003 Preliminary Medicine McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint, MI; 2003-2006 Ophthalmology Residency Chief Resident, Kresge Eye Institute Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI; 2006-2008 Vitreoretinal Fellowship Kresge Eye Institute Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI(239) 939-4323 6901 International Center Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33913 http://www.eye.md/ OPHTHALMOLOGY Joseph P. Walker, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmology; Retina/ VitreousBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S); Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology; American Society of Retina Specialists (formerly The Vitreous Society) American Diabetes Assoc; American Medical Assoc; Florida Medical Assoc; Lee County Medical SocietyEDUCATION: 1970 University of Pennsylvania, Bachelor of Arts; 1974 New York Medical College, New York, NY Doctor of Medicine; 1974-1975 Intern in Medicine St. Vincent Hospital Worcester, MA; 1975-1976 Resident, Ophthalmology Catholic Medical Center New York City, NY; 1976-1978 Resident, Ophthalmology Tufts New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, MA 1978-1979 Chief Resident, Ophthalmology Tufts New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, MA; 1979-1980 Fellow, Vitreoretinal Diseases Massachusetts Eye and Ear Inrmary, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA. (239) 939-4323 6901 International Center Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33913 http://www.eye.md/

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 52 OPHTHALMOLOGY Glenn L. Wing, M.D., F.A.C.S.Ophthalmology; Retina/ VitreousBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow, American College of Surgeons (F.A.C.S.) Fellow, American Academy of Ophthalmology Schepens International Society (Board Member, Past President); American Society of Retina Specialists, American Medical Association. American Diabetes Association.EDUCATION: 1971 University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA Bachelor of Arts; 1975 Tufts University School of Medicine Boston, MA Doctor of Medicine. 1975-1976 Intern in Medicine Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School Cambridge, MA; 1976-1980 Resident in Ophthalmology Tufts New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, MA; 1979-1980 Chief Resident, Ophthalmology Tufts New England Medical Center Hospital Boston, MA; 1980-1982 Fellow, Vitreo-Retinal Diseases and Surgery Massachusetts Eye and Ear Inrmary, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA; 1980-1982 Clinical Research Fellow Eye Associates, Eye Research Institute of the Retina Foundation Boston, MA. (239) 939-4323 6901 International Center Boulevard Fort Myers, FL 33913 http://www.eye.md/ ORTHOPEDICS Todd S. Atkinson, MDOrthopedic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board or Orthopedic SurgeryEDUCATION: BA – Harvard University; MD – Yale School of Medicine; Residency in Orthopedics at Duke University; Intercontinental Shoulder Fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Zurich. (239) 482-8788 8710 College Parkway 5 Nicholas Parkway West Fort Myers, FL 33919 Cape Coral, FL 33991 www.KaganOrthopedics.com ORTHOPEDICS Sandra B. Collins, M.D.Hand, Upper Extremity & Microvascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopedic and Hand SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical School University of Maryland School of Medicine, Residency Orthopaedic Surgery: University of Maryland, Fellowship Hand Surgery: Duke University (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net ORTHOPEDICS Larry S. Eisenfeld, M.D.Non-Surgical Orthopedic CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopedic SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical School George Washington University; Residency Orthopaedic Surgery: George Washington University (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net ORTHOPEDICS Mark E. Farmer, M.D.Arthroscopic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder, Knee and HipBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopedic SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical School Georgetown University; Residency Orthopaedic Surgery: Monteore Medical Center/Albert Einstein; Fellowship Sports Medicine: Thomas Jefferson University (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net

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John C. Kagan, M.D.Providing world-class orthopedic care for more than 34 years in Southwest Florida www.kaganortho.com ()03s3(/5,$%23s+.%%3s"/.%3 You need an experienced partner who will empower you to make informed decisions about your options. Let Dr. John Kagan show you innovative solutions to improve mobility and reduce pain—sometimes without surgery. Call today to explore your options. Orthopedic care is a joint endeavor.Joint Pain?Let Experience Help. Phone: 239-936-6778 Blog: kaganbonehealth.com Team physician since 2000 forFORT MYERS: 3210 Cleveland Ave., Suite 100, Fort Myers, FL 33901 CAPE CORAL: 2721 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 260, Cape Coral, FL 33904

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 54 ORTHOPEDICS Abbott (Bo) Kagan, II, MDOrthopedic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Orthopedic SurgeryEDUCATION: Emory University; Medical School and Residency at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fellowships in arthritis surgery in Leuven, Belgium and Denver, CO. (239) 482-8788 8710 College Parkway 5 Nicholas Parkway West Fort Myers, FL 33919 Cape Coral, FL 33991 www.KaganOrthopedics.com ORTHOPEDICS John C. Kagan, MDOrthopedic Care, Joint Replacement, Fracture Care and Sports InjuriesBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Orthopedic SurgeryEDUCATION: BS University of Alabama; MD USF School of Medicine; Shands, University of Florida; University of Alabama Orthopedic Surgery Residency (239) 936-6778 3210 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.kaganortho.com ORTHOPEDICS John N. Mehalik, M.D.Arthroscopic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder and KneeBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopedic SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical School Medical College of Ohio; Residency Orthopaedic Surgery: Medical College of Ohio; Fellowship Sports Medicine/Arthroscopic Surgery: Southern California Orthopedic Institute (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net PAIN MANAGEMENT Gilberto Acosta, MD, MPHAnesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Anesthesiology and Pain Management by the American Board of AnesthesiologyEDUCATION: Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston; Residency in Anesthesiology at New York University Medical Center; Pain Management Fellowship at the Medical University of South Carolina (239) 333-1177 23 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.paincenters.com Brenda Listowski, ARNP-FNP-BC Velimir Micovic, MDPain Management Consultants treats a broad range of chronic pain problems with an emphasis on spinal ailments that lead to chronic back and neck pain. Other areas of expertise include, treatment of headache and facial pain, muscular pain and spasms, pain secondary to work injuries, RSD (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), shingles (post-herpetic neuralgia) and nerve injury pain. Our friendly, caring and experienced staff and physicians will help you with all aspects of your treatment plan, and will attend to your needs with compassion and professionalism. FLORIDA PAIN CENTERS Pain Management Consultants, PL ">ŽinˆViUœi]™ "™££Uv>ˆViiVœ“Gene D. Mahaney, MD Adam M. Shuster, DO Gilberto Acosta, MD, MPH Maria A. De La Pea, M.D.Pain Management Consultants welcomes their newest member

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 55 PAIN MANAGEMENT Maria A. De La Pea, MDAnesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Anesthesiology and Pain Management by the American Board of AnesthesiologyEDUCATION: Universidad del Norte, Barranquilla, Columbia School of Medicine; Pain Management Fellowship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (239) 333-1177 23 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.paincenters.com PAIN MANAGEMENT Andrew Gross, M.D.Anesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Anesthesiology and Pain ManagementEDUCATION: Medical School Temple University School of Medicine; Residency Anesthesiology: The Johns Hopkins Hospital; Fellowship Pain Management: Emory University(239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net PAIN MANAGEMENT Gene D. Mahaney, MDAnesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Anesthesiology and Pain Management by the American Board of AnesthesiologyEDUCATION: Albany Medical College in Albany, NY; Residency in Anesthesiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School; Pain Management Fellowship at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center in Charlottesville, VA (239) 333-1177 23 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.paincenters.com PAIN MANAGEMENT Velimir Micovic, MDAnesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Anesthesiology and Pain Management by the American Board of AnesthesiologyEDUCATION: University of Rijeka in Croatia; Emergency Medicine and Surgery at University Hospital in Rijeka; Pain Management Fellowship at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia (239) 333-1177 23 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.paincenters.com PAIN MANAGEMENT Adam M. Shuster, DOAnesthesiology and Pain ManagementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Anesthesiology and Pain Management by the American Board of AnesthesiologyEDUCATION: Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University; Residency training in Anesthesiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit; Pain Management Fellowship, Henry Ford Health System (239) 333-1177 23 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.paincenters.com PALLIATIVE CARE Andrew Esch, MDPalliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Hospice and Palliative Care, Palliative Care, Internal MedicineEDUCATION: The University of Buffalo; residency at the University of Buffalo Sisters of Charity Hospital (239) 343-9560 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 206 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Pine Island Per 1 Internal Medicine 2 Aesthetic Surgery, Cardiology*, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatric Nephrology, Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric Ear, Nose, Throat, Pediatric Surgery, Pediatric Endocrinology 3 Cardiology*, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics 4 Cardiology, Family Medicine, General & Vascular Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology 5 Internal Medicine, Obstetrics/Gynecology 6 Family Medicine, Internal Medicine 7 Cardiology, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Neurosurgery, Palliative Care, Spine Center* 8 Family Medicine, General & Vascular Surgery, Internal Medicine, Pulmonology, Geriatrics-Memory Care 9 Cardiology* 10 Allergy/Immunology, General & Vascular Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Rheumatology, Pediatrics 11 Cardiology*, Infectious Diseases, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Vascular Neurology, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Pediatric Neurology, Pediatric Psychology 12 Pediatric Specialists, Pediatric Rehabilitation 13 Neurosurgery, Surgery, Pediatrics, Community Health Center 14 Pediatrics 15 Obstetrics/Gynecology 16 Family Medicine, Pulmonology 17 Sleep Medicine* 18 Infectious Diseases, Neurosurgery, Family Medicine 19 Community Health Center 20 Community Health Center 21 Wound Care & Hyperbaric Medicine* 22 Pediatric Specialists*An outpatient department of Lee Memorial HospitalMore an 20 PhysiciansÂ’ Oces roughout L Lee Physi To schedule an appointment with any of our physicians, call 239-481-4111. Lee Memorial Health System employs more than 170 physicians who specialize in cardiology, family and internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, neurosurgery, and more. With Lee Physician Gr oup oces located throughout Lee, Collier, Charlotte and Hendry counties, you and your family can receive the care and treatment you need at a location that is convenient for you.-FF.FNPSJBM)PTQJUBMr(VMG$PBTU.FEJDBM$FOUFSr$BQF$PSBM)PTQJUBMr)FBMUI1BSL.FEJDBM$FOUFS Educat io n Wa yM urd ock 22

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Summerlin Rd EXIT 141 Fort Myers Pine Island Bonita Springs Sanibel Island Cape Coral er iwink le W ay Bonita Beach Rd Coconut RdCorkscrew RdAlico Rd Lee Blvd Colonial Blvd Cleveland Ave Plantation Rd Metro Pkwy Six Mile CypressPkwyDaniels PkwyGladiolusB ass R dMcG r egor Blvd Cape Coral Pkwy Blvd Del Prado Hancock Bdg PkwyVeterans Pkw y P ine Island Rd EXIT 138 EXIT 136 EXIT 131 EXIT 128 EXIT 123 EXIT 116N. Cleveland A ve www.LeeMemorial.org hout Lee, Collier, Charlotte and Hendry Counties e Physician Group—We’ve Got You Covered all 239-481-4111. 1 2 4 3 5 LaBelle Hendry County 6 7 8 10 15 16 19 20 9 11 13 14 17 18 21 EXIT 111Tamiami Trail North Airport Pulling Road Goodlette-Frank Road Livingston RoadImmokalee Road 12 Naples -FF.FNPSJBM)PTQJUBMr(VMG$PBTU.FEJDBM$FOUFSr$BQF$PSBM)PTQJUBMr)FBMUI1BSL.FEJDBM$FOUFS T a mia mi Tra ilrd ock Circle Port Charlotte

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 58 PALLIATIVE CARE Ahmed Hassan, MDPalliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Family Medicine and GeriatricsEDUCATION: University of Cairo Faculty of Medicine in Cairo, Egypt. Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Disease internship at Cairo Hospital and St. Joseph Hospital in Flint Mich. (239) 343-9560 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 206 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PALLIATIVE CARE Rabia Khan, DOPalliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Geriatric MedicineEDUCATION: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, FL, residency and geriatric medicine fellowship at Case Western Reserve University/MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, OH (239) 343-9560 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 206 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PALLIATIVE CARE Sherika Newman, DOPalliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative CareEDUCATION: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale; residency at Broward General Medical Center; fellowship at Broward Health Hospice and Palliative Medicine (239) 343-9560 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 206 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Dina Belachew Pearson, MDPediatric EndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Addis Ababa University, Faculty of Medicine in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, residency at Penn State University/Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, ChildrenÂ’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 254-4270 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 (239) 343-9890 18316 Murdock Cir., Suite 106 Port Charlotte, FL 33948 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Robin Churchill, MDPediatric Infectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: West Virginia University School of Medicine; residency at West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morganstown; fellowship at the University of Florida in Jacksonville and Eastern Virginia Medical School, ChildrenÂ’s Hospital of The KingÂ’s Daughter in Norfolk (239) 343-9710 9981 HealthPark Drive, Suite 279 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org

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To nd a physician near you, visit our web site at www.ppcsw.com Cape Coral Pediatric Ofce "! !" (239) 573-7337 Fort Myers Pediatric Ofce "r" (239) 481-5437 Lehigh Pediatric Ofce "nn" (239) 481-5437 n rnrnrnnn OUR PEDIAT R IC TEA M „ Pediatrics „ Family Practice „ Internal Medicine „ Obstetrics & Gynecology M. Annabelle Martin, M.D. John W. Bartlett, M.D. Bruce H. Berget, M.D. Nuel Celebrado, M.D. Angela D’Alessandro, D.O. Eric Jones, M.D.R. Nathan Landefeld, M.D. Let OUR Family Take Care of YO UR Family Kimberly Nicholson, M.D. John Ritrosky, Jr., M.D. Georgia Rocha-Rodriguez, M.D. Stanley L. Wiggins, M.D. Susan Bengtsson, ARNP Jessica Schumaker, ARNP

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 60 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Eric Eason, DOPediatric CardiologistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury, N.Y., residency at Miami ChildrenÂ’s Hospital in Miami, Master of Public health from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., fellowship at ChildrenÂ’s Hospital of Richmond in Richmond, Va., and University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital (239) 343-7490 16281 Bass Road, Suite 301 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Sam P. Edwards, MDPediatric CardiologistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics with specialty board certication in Pediatric CardiologyEDUCATION: Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C; residency at University of Minnesota Hospitals in Minneapolis; fellowship at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C. (239) 482-0991 16281 Bass Road, Suite 301 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Irina Gershin-Stevens, DOPediatric NephrologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology; residency at Nassau University Medical Center in New York; fellowship at ChildrenÂ’s Hospital at Monteore/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Douglas Gottschalk, MDPediatric Ear, Nose and ThroatBOARD CERTIFICATION: Otolaryngology EDUCATION: University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health Sciences, Des Moines, Iowa; residency at Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas; fellowship at Arkansas ChildrenÂ’s Hospital in Little Rock (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Michelle Hoffman, MDPediatric Infectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; residency and fellowship at Creighton University/ University of Nebraska Medical Center (239) 343-9709 9980 HealthPark Drive, Suite 279 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Cayce Jehaimi, MDPediatric EndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Alfetah University of Tripoli, Libya; residency at Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans; fellowship at the University of Texas, Houston, Tex. (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 61 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Asjad Khan, MDPediatric EndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY; residency and fellowship at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, NYLanguages Spoken: Urdu, Punjabi, English, Spanish (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Craig MacArthur, MD, PhDPediatric Hematology and OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology and OncologyEDUCATION: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo.; residency and fellowship at the ChildrenÂ’s Hospital Los Angeles (239) 343-5333 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 156 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Rodrigo Mon, MDPediatric SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: General Surgery EDUCATION: Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico; residency at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics; Fellowship at Miami ChildrenÂ’s HospitalEnglish, Spanish (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Margie Morales, MDPediatric NeurologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Neurology with special qualications in child neurologyEDUCATION: University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan; residency at University Pediatric Hospital, San Juan; fellowship at UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, Calif.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-6050 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Cameron Nicholson, MDPediatric Hematology and OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology and OncologyEDUCATION: Ohio State University in Columbus; residency and fellowship at Cleveland Clinic ChildrenÂ’s Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio (239) 343-5333 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 156 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Guillermo Philipps, MDPediatric NeurologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurology with special qualications in child neurologyEDUCATION: Saint Louis University School of Medicine; residency at the Miami ChildrenÂ’s Hospital; fellowship at the University of Chicago, Comer ChildrenÂ’s Hospital (239) 343-6050 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 62 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Sujanna Reddy, MDPediatric EndocrinologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Kilpauk Medical College, Chennai, India; residency at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, N.Y.; fellowship at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 343-9890 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Emad Salman, MDPediatric Hematology and OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology and OncologyEDUCATION: American University of Beirut, Lebanon; residency and fellowship at the University of Florida in Gainesville (239) 343-5333 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 156 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Kim Shimoda, PhDPediatric PsychologyEDUCATION: Gradulate School: University of Utah, Salt Lake City, fellowship at Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (239) 343-5333 9981 S. HealthPark Drive, Suite 156 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Amy Stanll, MDPediatric SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Surgery EDUCATION: University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City; residency at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinisc; fellowship at Miami ChildrenÂ’s Hospital (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Stephanie Stovall, MDPediatric Infectious DiseaseBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics, Pediatric Infectious DiseaseEDUCATION: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock; residency at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas ChildrenÂ’s Hospital, Little Rock; fellowship at the University of Tennessee, Memphis (239) 343-9710 9981 HealthPark Drive, Suite 279 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Britt Stroud, MDPediatric NeurologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurology with special qualications in child neurologyEDUCATION: University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio; residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center; fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine (239) 343-6050 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 63 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Eric Vernier, MDPediatric NeurologyEDUCATION: Universidad Evanglica de El Salvador School of Medicine, San Salvador; residency at Lincoln Medical Center. Bronx, NY, Weill Cornell University Medical School; fellowship at University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, NewarkLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-6050 15901 Bass Road, Suite 108 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST Indravadan Vyas, MDPediatric SurgeryEDUCATION: BJ Medical College, Gujarat University, India; residencies at the University of Nevada Mrdical Center in Las Vegas and the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville; fellowship at Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, Calif. (239) 343-9890 15901 Bass Road, Suite 102 Fort Myers, FL 33908 1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200 Naples, FL 34108 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS John Distasio, MD, PhD PediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Medical degree from University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Doctorate degree in microbiology from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., Internship and Residence at The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City, NY, Fellowships in pediatric hematology/oncology at New York Hospital Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer center and in immunology at the University of Miami (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey, Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 33928 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Denise Drago, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Earned her medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College, Pediatric internship and residency at Penn State Hershey ChildrenÂ’s Hospital (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado, Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey, Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 64 PEDIATRICS Kimberly Ghuman, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: University of Michigan; residency at Baylor Afliated Hospitals, Houston (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Lindsay Graham, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; residency at the University of South Florida College of Medicine (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Pierre Loredo, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: University of South Florida; residency at Florida State UniversityEnglish, Spanish (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Anthony Pietroniro, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Tulane University School of Medicine; residency at Sacred Heart ChildrenÂ’s Hospital (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 65 PEDIATRICS Thomas Schiller, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Vanderbilt University Medical School; residency at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Martin Sherman, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Tufts University School of Medicine; residency at UCLA Harbor General Hospital (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Piedade Silva, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Brown University; residency at David Grant USAF Medical CenterLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PEDIATRICS Nancy Witham, MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: University of Pennsylvania; residency at ChildrenÂ’s Hospital of Philadelphia (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 66 PEDIATRICS William Daniel Wood, Jr., MDPediatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pediatrics EDUCATION: Medical University of South Carolina; residency at the University of Florida, Shands Hospital (239) 343-9888 4751 S. Cleveland Ave. Fort Myers FL 33907 (239) 343-9888 650 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 107 Cape Coral, FL 33990 (239) 343-9888 260 Beth Stacey Blvd., Suite C Lehigh Acres, FL 33936 (239) 343-9888 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2220 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PLASTIC SURGERY Robert J. Brueck, MD, F.A.C.SCosmetic Surgery/ Body & FaceBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago; Rush Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago (239) 939-5233 3700 Central Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.Beauty-By-Brueck.com PLASTIC SURGERY Ralph R. Garramone, MDPlastic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Dr. Garramone is a Diplomat of the American Board of Plastic Surgery and is a board-certied member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.EDUCATION: Dr. Garramone earned his medical degree from New York Medical College in 1987. He completed his 6-year residency in general surgery at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine/Hartford Hospital followed by his plastic surgery residency at Brown University/Rhode Island Hospital 1995. He earned fellowships in hand surgery and craniofacial surgery. (239) 482-1900 12998 South Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.garramone.com PODIATRY Andrew M. Belis, D.P.M.Foot and Ankle Surgeon Specializing in ArthroscopyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Foot Surgery; Reconstructive Rear Foot and Ankle SurgeryEDUCATION: DPM Temple University; Boston University; Residency Podiatry: Wyckoff Heights Medical Center; Residency Podiatric Surgery Greater Baltimore Medical Center (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 68 PODIATRY Eric S. Trathen D.P.M.Foot and Ankle Surgeon Specializing in Sports MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Eligible in Diabetic Care & Reconstructive SurgeryEDUCATION: DPM Barry University; Residency Miami Veterans and Oak Forest Hospital (239) 482-2663 Orthopedic Center of Florida 12670 Creekside Lane Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.OCFLA.net PRIMARY CARE John Ardesia, DOInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency at New York Methodist Hospital (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE George Ball, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Tulane University School of Medicine; residency at Charity Hospital In La. (239) 939-1700 1569 Matthew Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Carmen Barres, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; residency at Cooper Hospital, Rutgers UniversityLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9470 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Patrick Bowman, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: St. GeorgeÂ’s University; residency at ETSU / University of Miami (239) 939-1700 1569 Matthew Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Charles Briseo, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center Medical School; residency at University of Miami-Jackson Memorial HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 69 PRIMARY CARE Christina Cavanagh, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Florida College of Medicine; residency at Self Regional Healthcare Family Residency Program, Greenwood, S.C. (239) 343-3831 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 709 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Kai-Fu Chow, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: University of Miami; residency at Maryland General Hospital 863-675-4450 930 S. Main Street LaBelle, FL 33935 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Lisa Chow, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: University of Miami; residency at Maryland General Hospital (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Alberto Concepcion, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: University of Science, Art & Technology School of Medicine in Montserrat, West Indies, residency at Boston University/roger William Medical Center in Providence, R.I.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 495-5020 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2180 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Patricia Daneshmand, DOFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Nova Southeastern University; residency at Michigan State University, Sparrow HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9470 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Hilario David, MDFamily MedicineEDUCATION: Far Eastern University Medical School, Manila, Philippines; residency at St. Elizabeth Hospital, New JerseyLanguages Spoken: English, Tagalog 507 Cape Coral Parkway Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 70 PRIMARY CARE Sebastian Draulans, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of South Florida, Tampa; residency at University of Florida, Shands at Alachua General HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Dutch (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Marshall DÂ’Souza, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Karnatak University, India; residency at Michigan State UniversityLanguages Spoken: English, Arabic, Hindi (239) 549-8789 507 Cape Coral Parkway Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Julia Fashner, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio; residency at Good Samaritan Hospital in Dayton, Ohio; primary care faculty development fellowship at Michigan State University (239) 343-3831 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 709 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Manuel A. Garcia, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Universidad de Oviedo School of Medicine, Oviedo, Spain; residency at University of Miami, Jackson Memorial HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Carrie Gittings, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Miami School of Medicine; Residency at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia (239) 997-9733 13279 N. Cleveland Ave. North Fort Myers, FL 33903 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Alfred Gitu, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Nairobi in Nairobi, Kenya; residency at Self Regional Healthcare in Greenwood, S.C. (239) 343-3831 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 709 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 71 PRIMARY CARE Gary Goforth, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn.; residency at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. (239) 343-3831 2780 Cleveland Avenue, Suite 709 Fort Myers, FL 33901 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Shailaja Hegde, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: St.GeorgeÂ’s University School of Medicine in Grenada; residency in at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Joseph Hobson, DOFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine; residency at the U.S. Naval Hospital, California (239) 939-7222 5225 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Ellen Hoefer-Hopf, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Justus-Liebig University, Germany; residency at St. Vincent Hospital, IndianapolisLanguages Spoken: English, French, German (239) 549-8789 507 Cape Coral Parkway Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Gregory E. Krill, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine, Geriatric MedicineEDUCATION: Temple University School of Medicine; residency at Reading Hospital & Medical Center, Pennsylvania (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Aldith Lewis, DOInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens, Ohio; residency at Doctors Hospital in Columbus, OhioLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 72 PRIMARY CARE Bruce J. Lipschutz, DOInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Hospice and Palliative MedicineEDUCATION: College of Osteopathic Medicine & Surgery,Iowa; residency at HealthEast Teaching Hospital, Pennsylvania (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Adriana Loukanova, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Charles (Karlov) University, Prague; residency at Danbury Hospital, Yale UniversityLanguages Spoken: English, Russian, Czech, Bulgarian (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Milena Loukanova, MD, PhDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Medical University, Soa, Bulgaria; residency at Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Pennsylvania (239) 549-8789 507 Cape Coral Parkway Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Leah Lynch, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of South Florida College of Medicine; residency at Medical University of South Carolina (239) 939-1700 16281 Bass Road, Suite 304 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Paul Mantell, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Hahnemann University School of Medicine; residency at the University of Pittsburgh (239) 939-1700 1569 Matthew Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Francisco Marasigan, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Phillippines; residency at Harlem Hospital in New York (239) 424-1600 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 73 PRIMARY CARE Felix R. Mestas, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: American University of the Caribbean; residency at University of Alabama HospitalLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 549-8789 507 Cape Coral Parkway Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Whistler Mondesir, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Ross University School of Medicine, West Indies, residency at Lynchburg Family Medicine, Lynchburg, Va. (239) 939-7222 5225 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Marlene Moulton, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: Meharry Medical College; residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida (239) 939-1700 16281 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Phyllis Neef, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Wright State University, Dayton, OH; residency at Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, OH (239) 495-5020 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2310 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Rodolfo Perez-Gallardo, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Medical School, Mexico; residency at The Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, NYC, NYLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 939-7222 5225 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Bharath Radhakrishna, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Geriatric MedicineEDUCATION: Mysore Medical College, India; residency at Wayne State University, MichiganLanguages Spoken: English, Hindi (239) 424-1600 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 74 PRIMARY CARE Rhea Ramlal, DOFamily MedicineEDUCATION: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Davie, Fla., residency at St. JohnÂ’s Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway, N.Y. (239) 343-9470 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Gilberto Riveron, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Superior Institute of Medical Sciences of Santiago de Cuba, Residency at Bayfront Medical Center in St. Petersburg, FloridaLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 424-1600 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Joseph R. Salaz, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Arizona Medical School; residency at Marshall University Medical School (239) 939-7222 5225 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Mala Singh, DOFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Erie, Pa.; residency at Michigan State University/Garden City Hospital (239) 343-9470 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Jason Triana, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: University of Science, Art & Technology School of Medicine in Montserrat, West Indies, residency at Boston University/roger William Medical Center in Providence, R.I.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 495-5020 3501 Health Center Blvd., Suite 2180 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Binh N. Truong, MDInternal MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester; residency at Brown Medical School/Rhode Island Hospital, The Miriam Hospital, Providence VA Medical CenterLanguages Spoken: English, Catonese, Vietnamese, Mandarin (239) 939-1700 16281 Bass Road, Suite 304 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 75 PRIMARY CARE Albert Van Zyl, MDFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Stellenbosch Medical School, Cape Town, South Africa; residency at the University of FloridaLanguages Spoken: English, Afrikaans, Dutch, Flemish (239) 939-7222 5225 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Rick Waks, DOFamily MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, residency at Frankford Health System, Emergency Medicine; Crozer Keystone Health System, Family Practice, Pa. (239) 343-9470 8960 Colonial Drive, Suite 300 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org PRIMARY CARE Diana Young, MDInternal MedicineEDUCATION: Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, residency at University Hospitals of Cleveland (239) 343-7100 16271 Bass Road Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Ashish Adi, MDPulmonology, Sleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Sleep MedicineEDUCATION: Medical School N/A, residency and fellowship at Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn, New York, fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Imtiaz Ahmad, MD, FCCPPulmonary, Sleep Medicine and Critical CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Pulmonary, Sleep Medicine, Internal MedicineEDUCATION: Dhaka Medical College, Bangladesh; Residency: State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY; Fellowship University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (239) 369-5443 16420 Healthpark Commons Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.LungCare.net PULMONOLOGY Vijay Das, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Medical College in Jamshedpur, India, residency at St. MaryÂ’s Hospital, University of Rochester in Rochester, N.Y., fellowships SUNY Health Science Center in Syracuse, N.Y. and at The New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens, Cornell University in New York, N.Y. (239) 274-8500 5216 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 274-8500 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 76 PULMONOLOGY Razak Dosani, MDPulmonology, Sleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Sleep Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Seth G.S. Medical College, King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Bombay University in India, residency and fellowships at Georgetown University Medical Center, D.C. and at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, Ky., (239) 274-8500 5216 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 274-8500 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Abusayeed Feroz, MDPulmonology, Sleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Sleep Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Dhaka Medical College in Bangladesh, residency at Kings Brook Jewish Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., fellowship at Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. (239) 274-8500 5216 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 274-8500 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Frank Grassi, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Tulane University of Louisiana; residency and fellowship at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Calif. (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Sagar Naik, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Medical College in Baroda, India, residency and fellowship at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. (239) 274-8500 5216 Clayton Court Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 274-8500 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33990 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Sunil Pammi, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board certied in internal, pulmonary and critical care medicine.EDUCATION: Bangalore Medical College in Karnataka, India. Residency in Internal Medicine at Our Lady of Mercy Hospital, Bronx, N.Y., Fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine, Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, N.Y. (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Priya Raju, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary MedicineEDUCATION: Andhra Medical College, Andhra University, India, residency and fellowship at Yale University Bridgeport Hospital Program in Bridgeport, Connecticut (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 77 PULMONOLOGY Raymond Santucci, MDPulmonologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care MedicineEDUCATION: Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Illinois, residency at University of Cincinnati University Hospital, Ohio, fellowship at University of Cincinnati, University Hospital (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Houton Sareh, MDPulmonology, Sleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Sleep MedicineEDUCATION: University of Miami, residency at the University of Miami, fellowships at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, and the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org PULMONOLOGY Kenneth Tolep, MDPulmonaryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care MedicineEDUCATION: S.U.N.Y. Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, NY, residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, fellowship at Temple University Hospital (239) 343-9100 9131 College Pointe Court Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.LeeMemorial.org RADIATION ONCOLOGY Alan Brown, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: The University of Michigan; Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIATION ONCOLOGY Daniel Dosoretz, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: The University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine; Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIATION ONCOLOGY Amy Fox, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Residency at Harvard Radiation Oncology (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 78 RADIATION ONCOLOGY Michael Katin, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: University of Pennsylvania Medical School; Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIATION ONCOLOGY Constantine Mantz, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: University of ChicagoÂ’s Pritzker School of Medicine; Residency at University of Chicago (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIATION ONCOLOGY Keith Miller, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: University of Florida; Residency at Duke University (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIATION ONCOLOGY James Rubenstein, MDRadiation OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Radiology; American Board of Internal MedicineEDUCATION: New York University School of Medicine; Residency at University of Pennsylvania Hospital (239) 936-0382 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.21stCenturyOncology.com RADIOLOGY Chaim J. Margolin, MDDiagnostic RadiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: New Jersey Medical School, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Internship, Beth Israel Hospital Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital MRI Fellowship, University South Florida MBA (239) 333-2742 13731 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.aria-images.com RADIOLOGY Saurin J. Shah, MDDiagnostic RadiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of RadiologyEDUCATION: Georgetown School of Medicine, Brown University Medical Internship, Tufts University Radiology Residency, Harvard Medical School Fellowship in Musculoskeletal RadiologyLanguages Spoken: English, Hindi (239) 333-2742 13731 Metropolis Ave. Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.aria-images.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 79 RHEUMATOLOGY Shabnam Ali, MDRheumatologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: DOW Medical College in Karachi, Pakistan, residency at Texas Tech University Health Science Center in Odessa, Texas, fellowship at Louisiana State Health Science Center in Shreveport, La., and Wayne State University, Detroit Medical Center in Detroit (239) 343-9722 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 3 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org RHEUMATOLOGY Juan C. Bustillo, MDRheumatologyEDUCATION: Universidad Central del Este, San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic, residency at Fitzgerald Mercy Catholic Medical Center, Philadelphia, fellowship at University of Tennessee, MemphisLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9722 4761 S. Cleveland Ave., Suite 3 Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org SLEEP MEDICINE Jose Colon, MDSleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Sleep Medicine, Neurology with special qualications in child neurologyEDUCATION: University of South Florida in Tampa; residency at University of South Florida and fellowship at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in NashvilleLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-0762 13601 Plantation Road Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org SLEEP MEDICINE Javaad Khan, MDSleep MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine, Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Sleep MedicineEDUCATION: Iberoamerican University in the Dominican Republic, residency and fellowships at Case Western Reserve University MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (239) 343-0762 13601 Plantation Road Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org SPINE CARE Donna Lanthier, MDPhysical Medicine and RehabilitationBOARD CERTIFICATION: Physical Medicine and RehabilitationEDUCATION: New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York, residency at Nassau County Medical Center/SUNY at Stony Brook School of Medicine (239) 343-9465 8960 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 202 Fort Myers, FL 33905 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Ann Boudreaux, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Emergency Medicine EDUCATION: Louisiana State University, Shreveport, residency at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 80 URGENT CARE Karen Calkins, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Emergency Medicine EDUCATION: New York Medical College, residency at St. MaryÂ’s Hospital, Waterbury, CT nd University of Connecticut, Farmington (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Paul Fortier, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine EDUCATION: Chicago Medical School, residency at Lutheran General Hospital, Illinois (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Karl Friedrich, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Ross University; residency at Duke University in Durham, N.C. (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Saiful Islam, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Sind Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan, residency at Illinois Masonic Medical Center, and Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, Missouri (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Chris Loutzenhiser, DOWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, Mo., residency at Cox Family Medicine Residency in Springeld, Mo. (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Tiffani MaGee, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C.; residency at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, Florida (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 81 URGENT CARE Abel Natali, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan; residency at Cagus Regional Hospital in Puerto Rico (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Rose Pothen, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: University of Padova, Italy, residency at Genesys Regional Medical Center, Flint, Michigan (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE David Schultze, MDWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Technical University of Santiago, Dominican Republic, residency at Oakwood Hospital, Dearborn, Mich.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 (239) 424-1655 1682 NE Pine Island Road Cape Coral, FL 33909 www.LeeMemorial.org URGENT CARE Avery Wright, DOWalk-InBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine EDUCATION: Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, residency at Sun Coast Hospital, Largo, Florida (239) 343-9800 4771 S. Cleveland Avenue Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.LeeMemorial.org UROLOGY Meir Daller, MDUrologic Oncology; Incontinence; Erectile DysfunctionBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of UrologyEDUCATION: Boston University School of Medicine (239) 277-5770 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 2721 Del Prado Blvd., Ste. 220 Cape Coral, FL 33904 3501 Health Center Blvd., Ste. 2420 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.UROASAP.com UROLOGY Pedro A. Marcucci, MDUrologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of UrologyEDUCATION: Ponce School of Medicine, Puerto RicoLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 541-2901 13685 Doctors Way Fort Myers, FL 33912 18900 N. Tamiami Trail North Fort Myers, FL 33903 2721 Del Prado Blvd. S. Cape Coral, FL 33904 www.premierurology.com

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Comprehensive urologic care with a personal touch… At Gulfstream Urology, we are committed to going “the extra mile” for physicians and patients while paying attention to the little details because they make a BIG difference. ‹ Leading-Edge, Superior Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques ‹ Experienced in working with World Renowned Surgeons ‹ Unmatched Accessibility ‹ Convenient Locations ‹ Extended Hours (6am – 6pm) Experience the Urology Difference. *VSVUPHS6MJL 8931 Colonial Center Dr. Suite 100 )VUP[H,Z[LYV6MJL 3501 Health Center Blvd. Suite 2420 *HWL*VYHS6MJL 2721 Del Prado Blvd. Suite 220 (SLQHUKYV4PYHUKH:V\ZH4+Urologist c www.UROASAP.com Three Convenient Locations to Better Serve You 4LPY+HSSLY4+Urologist

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 83 J oseph G. Magnant, M.D., F.A.C.S.239.694.VEIN (8346) weknowveins.com TRY OUR F REE eVEIN SCREENING NOW! UROLOGY Alejandro J. Miranda-Sousa, MDUrologic Oncology, Neuor-Urology, Urodynamics, Urinary Incontinence, Erectile Dysfunction, Vasectomy, Treatment & Prevention of Stones, Treatment of BPH.BOARD CERTIFICATION: Diplomate of the American Board of Urology and Board Certied in UrologyEDUCATION: Residency and Fellowship at University of South Florida; Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia School of Medicine in Lima, Peru. (239) 277-5770 8931 Colonial Center Drive, Suite 100 Fort Myers, FL 33905 2721 Del Prado Blvd., Suite 220 Cape Coral, FL 33904 3501 Health Center Blvd., Ste. 2420 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.UROASAP.com UROLOGY Steven H. Paletsky, MDUrologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: The American Board of UrologyEDUCATION: Medical University of South Carolina (239) 689-6677 7335 Gladiolus Drive Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.FloridaSpecialistsInUrology.com UROLOGY Robert Scappa, DOMale and Female Urology(239) 415-6919 Ofces in South Fort Myers, North Fort Myers and Cape Coral ‹ ‹ ‹ ‹ ‹ *VSVUPHS6MJL)VUP[H,Z[LYV6MJL*HWL*VYHS6MJL (SLQHUKYV4PYHUKH:V\ZH4+ c 4LPY+HSSLY4+

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com LEE COUNTY LEE COUNTY 84 UROLOGY Harry Tsai, MDUrology/Urologic OncologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of UrologyEDUCATION: Rush Medical College in Chicago; Fellowship trained at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center specializing in minimally invasive ofce treatments for overactive bladder, incontinence and BPH (239) 985-1900 7335 Gladiolus Drive, Suite B Fort Myers, FL 33908 www.urologyfortmyers.com VASCULAR SURGERY Joseph Magnant, MD, F.A.C.SPhebology, Vein SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Vascular SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical College of Virginia (239) 694-8346 1510 Royal Palm Square Blvd., Suite 101 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.weknowveins.com VASCULAR SURGERY Michael Novotney, M.D., F.A.C.S.Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Missouri, Columbia; University of Washington, Seattle; University of South Florida, Tampa (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com VASCULAR SURGERY Abraham Sadighi, M.D., F.A.C.S.Vascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of South Carolina; Medical University of South Carolina; Baylor Afliated Hospital, Houston, TX; University of MiamiÂ’s Jackson Memorial Hospital (239) 243-9621 8010 Summerlin Lakes Drive Fort Myers, FL 33907 www.gulfcoastsurgeons.com VEIN SPECIALIST Joseph Magnant, MD, F.A.C.SPhebology, Vein SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Vascular SurgeonEDUCATION: Medical College of Virginia (239) 694-8346 1510 Royal Palm Square Blvd., Suite 101 Fort Myers, FL 33919 www.weknowveins.com WOUND CARE Robert Kupsaw, MDWound Care, Hyperbaric MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Undersea and Hyperbaric MedicineEDUCATION: University of Connecticut in Farmington, residencies at Georgia Baptist Medical Center in Atlanta and Brown University in Providence, RI. (239) 343-0454 13778 Plantation Road Fort Myers, FL 33912 www.LeeMemorial.org

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Physicians Directory 2013 Southwest Florida COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY ANTI-AGING & FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE Lee R. Light, MDAnti-Aging & Functional MedicineBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.EDUCATION: University of Illinois Medical School, Chicago; Internship and Residency: University of South Florida (239) 659-3266 850 Central Avenue, Suite 301 Naples, FL 34102 www.napleslongevity.com ANTI-AGING & FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE Teresa A. Sievers, MD, MSMS, FAARM, ABAARMBio Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy & Weight LossBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Internal Medicine and Anti-aging, Regenerative and functional MedicineEDUCATION: Ross University School of Medicine; Residency: University of Florida in Jacksonville; MSMS in Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine, USF (239) 948-7291 10201 Arcos Avenue, Ste. 201 Estero, FL 33928 www.drteresasievers.com BREAST RADIOLOGY Harmindar K. Gill, MDThoracic & Breast ImagingBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Radiology. Member of Society of Breast ImagingEDUCATION: Medical School & Residency: West Virginia University, Fellowship Clinical: Yale University, Fellowship Research: University of Maryland; Faculty: Johns Hopkins University 2000-Current (239) 494-4300 27160 Bay Landing Dr., Suite 201 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.PremierWomensRadiology.com BREAST SURGERY Jan Forszpaniak, MDBreast SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: European Board Certied; American Board EligibleEDUCATION: Surgical residency and specialty in General Surgery at Mikulicz Institute of Surgery in Wroclaw, Poland; Residency in General Surgery at Wyckoff Heights Hospital; State University Hospital of New York (239) 263-4499 730 Goodlette Road, Suite 204 Naples, FL 34102 www.NaplesBreastSurgeryCenter.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 86 CARDIOLOGIST Ronald L. Levine, MDInterventional Cardiology, General Cardiology, Peripheral Vascular InterventionBOARD CERTIFICATION: Interventional Cardiology – Am Bd of Internal Medicine Cardiovascular Disease – Am Bd of Internal MedicineEDUCATION: Medical College of Virginia – Richmond, VA, Residency Medical College of Virginia Hospital – Richmond, VA From 1989-1992; Fellowship University of Alabama at Birmingham – Birmingham, AL from 19921997 (239) 206-2833 Levine Heart & Wellness 680 2nd Ave North, Suite #304 Naples, FL 34102 CHIROPRACTIC Angelo M. Gadaleta, D.C.Chiropractic, Spinal Decompression, VAX-D TherapyBOARD CERTIFICATION: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, Florida Board of Chiropractic MedicineEDUCATION: Life University, School of Chiropractic, Florida Chiropractic AssociationLanguages Spoken: Spanish, Italian, English (239) 659-0476 1234 Airport Pulling Rd. N. Naples, FL 34104 www.gulfviewdentistry.com x£œœ`ii,œ>` œ…]-'ˆi""] >iU"iœ`> ‡/…'`>™‡xnœi`ˆ`>‡-'`> The Friendliest Practice You Will Find! WOW!!! r7*/r /-*rn Patient Consultation, Exam, Cleaning and Necessary X-Rays D0110, D0150, D0274PLUS FREE TEETH WHITENING$431 Value, You Save $338! ALL FOR $97.00 NOT VALID WITH THE PRESENCE OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE.CALL FOR AVAILABILITY OF NEW PATIENT SPECIAL FREE CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE FOR ADULT AND ADOLESCENT BRACES CROWNS DENTAL IMPLANTS WHITENING EXTRACTIONS BRIDGES VENEER REPLACEMENT AND REPAIR Call 239-300-9693 & set an appointment (239) 300-9693

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 87 Digital Breast Tomosynthesis 3D Mammography This exciting new technology, which has been shown in clinical studies to be superior to standard digital mammography, is FDA approved and now available to you. Breast tomosynthesis (3D) allows doctors to examine breast tissue one layer at a time, providing more accurate results and reduced recall rates. Whole Body/Vascular Ultrasound Abdominal, Breast, Pelvic, Thyroid, Vascular Whole Body Bone Densitometry Osteoporosis and Visceral Fat Assessment Sonohysterography Uterine Ultrasound Biopsy Ultrasound guided aspiration/biopsyStereotactic guided core biopsyMRI guided core biopsy7K\URLGQHQHHGOHDVSLUDWLRQ DR. HARMINDAR GILL LVDERDUGFHUWLHGUDGLRORJLVW a faculty member of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine since 2000, and medical director of Premier WomenÂ’s Radiology. As the only fellowship trained thoracic and breast imager in Collier County she brings a unique expertise with cutting edge technology and her passion IRUWKHHOGEvery patient consults with the physician. 27160 Bay Landing Dr. Suite #201Bonita Springs, FL 34135 Schedule your appointment today 239-494-4300 PremierWomensRadiology.comTHE FIRST IN SWFL TO OFFER 3D MAMMOGRAPHY. WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING Premier WomenÂ’sRadiology Harmindar K. Gill, MD The Breast Ideas Stem From Within em P o W e R yourself COSMETIC SURGERY Kent V. Hasen, M.D., P.A.Plastic Surgery: Face, Breast and BodyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS)EDUCATION: Indiana University in Bloomington, Cornell University in New York, 7-Year Residency Program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, Cosmetic Surgery Fellowship in Miami (239) 262-5662 4081 Tamiami Trail North, Suite C-203 Naples, FL 34103 www.drhasen.com DENTISTRY W. Craig Ashton, DDSGeneral DentistryEDUCATION: University of Buffalo in 1963. Residency at Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, NY (239) 300-9693 501 Goodlette Rd. N, Ste. B202 Naples, FL 34102 www.gulfviewdentistry.com DENTISTRY Gary Gordon, DDSGeneral Dentistry, Fast Braces CertiedEDUCATION: University of Michigan Dental School (239) 300-9693 501 Goodlette Rd. N, Ste. B202 Naples, FL 34102 www.gulfviewdentistry.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 88 DENTISTRY Bradley Piotrowski, DDS, MSDPeriodonticsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board-Certied PeriodontistEDUCATION: University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Indiana University School of Dentistry (239) 263-6003 1044 Castello Drive, Suite 202 Naples, FL 34103 www.periodonticsnaples.com DENTISTRY GENERAL AND COSMETIC Sean Carr, DDSGeneral and Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Afliations: American Dental Association, Florida Dental Association, West Coast Dental Association, Collier County Dental Association and Eco Dentistry AssociationEDUCATION: Creighton University School of Dentistry, Residency at UNC – Chapel Hill School of Dentistry (239) 597-2995 Oak Tree Medical Center 90 Cypress Way E., Suite 20 Naples, FL 34110 www.SeanCarrdds.com DENTISTRY GENERAL AND COSMETIC Oivind E. Jensen, DDS, MSGeneral and Cosmetic DentistryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Afliations: American Dental Association, Florida Dental Association, West Coast Dental Association, Collier County Dental Association and Eco Dentistry AssociationEDUCATION: University of Oslo, Norway, University of Rochester, NY, Residency at Eastman Dental Center (239) 596-5771 Oak Tree Medical Center 90 Cypress Way E., Suite 20 Naples, FL 34110 www.BoutiqueDentalCare.com DERMATOLOGY H. Ross Harris, MDGeneral Exams, Skin Cancer, MOHS Micrographic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellow, American Academy of Dermatology and American Society of MOHS SurgeonsEDUCATION: University of Florida, Medical School; University of Miami, Residency (239) 596-1848 5415 Park Central Court Naples, FL 34109 www.harrisdermatology.com DERMATOLOGY Morris J. Lipnik, MD, FAADDermatology – Treating Disease of the SkinBOARD CERTIFICATION: Dermatologist – Board Certied, Treating Diseases of the SkinEDUCATION: B.A.Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; M.D. – Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; Intern – Detroit Receiving Hospital, Detroit, MI; Resident – Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Additional Training: John Hopkins – Baltimore, MD; Walter Reed – Washington, DC. (239) 594-9075 11181 Health Park Blvd., Suite 2280 Naples, FL 34110 www.DrLipnik.com GENERAL SURGERY Peter M. Denk, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Michigan Medical School 2001. University of South Florida – General Surgery Residency 2006. Minimally Invasive and Endoscopic GI Surgery Fellowship 2007.Languages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 313-7522 8340 Collier Blvd., #205 Naples, FL 34114 www.gisurgical.com

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Physicians Regional Healthcare System recognizes its responsibility to serving the healthcare needs of Collier County and surrounding areas. We are also one of the communityÂ’s largest tax paying entities and employers. In 2012 alone, we paid in excess of $8.5 million in taxes and more than $100 million in employee wages and benets. Over the past ve years, we invested $78 million in facility and service improvements. ThatÂ’s a few of the ways we invest in our community, and we plan to continue investing for many decades to come. PHYSICIANS REGIONAL-PINE RIDGE 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Naples PHYSICIANS REGIONAL-COLLIER BOULEVARD 8300 Collier Boulevard, Naples PhysiciansRegional.com PHYSICIANS REGIONAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 90 GENERAL SURGERY Jacob H. Jordan, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Residency at University of Florida (239) 263-0011 2335 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 501 Naples, FL 34103 GENERAL SURGERY Mark A. Liberman, MD, FACSGeneral and Minimally Invasive SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD; Residency – Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA; Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery Fellowship – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (239) 348-4123 6101 Pine Ridge Road Naples, FL 34119 GENERAL SURGERY Samuel Tunkle, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Louisiana State University Health Science Center; Residency and Chief Residency at University of Florida (239) 263-0011 2335 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 501 Naples, FL 34103 GENERAL SURGERY Justin D. Warner, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine; Residency and Chief Residency at University of Florida (239) 263-0011 2335 Tamiami Trail North, Suite 501 Naples, FL 34103 INTERNAL MEDICINE Lee R. Light, MDInternal Medicine and GeriatricsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Internal Medicine and GeriatricsEDUCATION: University of Illinois Medical School, Chicago; Internship and Residency, University of South Florida (239) 262-1833 850 Central Avenue, Suite 301 Naples, FL 34102 www.napleslongevity.com NEUROLOGY Michael A. Novak, MDMigraines and Headaches, Pain Management, Neurology, Back and Neck PainBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurology and PsychiatryEDUCATION: University of Florida College of Medicine; Residency also at University of Florida (239) 566-3434 1660 Medical Blvd., Ste. 200 Naples, FL 34110 www.nasamri.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 91 Living with back pain? Neuroscience and Spine Associates Of ces in Naples and Ft. Myers(239) 649-1662 Dr. R. Rick Bhasin, MD Neurosurgeon Clinical Af liation, Department of Neurosurgery University of Florida Minimally invasive surgical techniques to treat neck pain, back pain and spinal stenosis. NEUROLOGY Igor Levy-Reis, MDHeadache, Dementia, Neuropathy, NeurophysiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry, Diplomate in Neurology and Neurophysiology, Geriatric NeurologyEDUCATION: Federal University of Minas Gerias; Residency at Northwestern University Medical SchoolLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 594-8002 877 111th Ave. N, Ste. 1 Naples, FL 34108 www.nasamri.com NEUROLOGY Christopher L. Wey, MDNeuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disease, Back and Neck Pain, Epilepsy, Memory Disorders, Migraines and HeadachesBOARD CERTIFICATION: Neurology EDUCATION: University of South Florida College of Medicine; Residency at University of Florida and Baylor College of Medicine. (239) 649-1662 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Desk 24 Naples, FL 34119 www.nasamri.com NEUROSURGERY R. Rick Bhasin, MDNeurosurgery, Brain Tumors, Spinal Surgery, Spinal Instrumentation and Neuro-surgically Placed Spinal Cord StimulationEDUCATION: University of Michigan Medical School; Residency and Fellowship at the University of Florida, Department of Neurosurgery. (239) 649-1662 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Desk 24 Naples, FL 34119 www.nasamri.com &SEVH'IVXMIH(IVQEXSPSKMWXW /IMXL%,EVVMW1(ˆ,6SWW,EVVMW1(ˆ&VMER%, EVVMW1( 7SYXL[IWX*PSVMHEW7OMR'ERGIV7TIGMEPMWXWJSV=IEVW 4EVO6S]EP(VMZIˆ*SVX1]IVW*0ˆ 4EVO'IRXVEP'SYVXˆ2ETPIW*0ˆ [[[LEVVMWHIVQEXSPSK]GSQ

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 92 NEUROSURGERY Michael D. Lusk, MDMinimally Invasive Surgery for the Cervical & Lumbar Spine; Especially Severe Cervical Cord Compression.BOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Neurological Surgeons.EDUCATION: Louisiana State University School of Medicine; Residency at John Hopkins and Louisiana State University. Special training at UCF San Francisco and Zurich, Switzerland. (239) 649-1662 6101 Pine Ridge Road, Desk 24 Naples, FL 34119 www.nasamri.com OPHTHALMOLOGY Austin W. Coleman, DOOphthalmologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Osteopathic Board of OphthalmologyEDUCATION: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine; Residency and Fellowship at Michigan State University. (239) 597-2792 10661 Airport Pulling Road, Suite 12 Naples, FL 34109 OPHTHALMOLOGY Michael J. Collins, Jr., MD, FACSCornea, Cataract and LASIK SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Ophthalmology and a Fellow of the American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; Eye Surgery Residency at Emory University; Advanced Fellowship Training in Cornea and Refractive Surgery (239) 936-4706 860 111th Avenue North Naples, FL 34108 OPHTHALMOLOGY Jonathan M. Frantz, MD, FACSCataract and LASIK SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Ophthalmology Fellow American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: Vanderbilt University; University of Miami Medical School; Ophthalmology Residency at Louisiana State University Eye Center; Fellowship Cornea, External Diseases and Refractive Surgery (239) 430-3939 2100 Tamiami Trail North Naples, FL 34102 www.BetterVision.net OPHTHALMOLOGY Stephen J. Laquis, MD, FACSOphthalmic/Facial Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: The American Board of Ophthalmology and a Fellow of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive SurgeryEDUCATION: New York Medical College, Residency in Ophthalmology at Yale University, Fellowship at University of Tennessee, Fellowship at Vanderbilt University in Ophthalmic/ Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery(239) 947-4042 860 111th Avenue North, Ste. 1 Naples, FL 34108 www.laquis.net OPHTHALMOLOGY F. Rick Palmon, M.D.Cataract, Lasik & Cornea SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of OphthalmologyEDUCATION: Georgetown University, Bachelor of Science; Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; Internship University of Pennsylvania, Internal Medicine; Residency Wills Eye Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA; Fellowship University of Minnesota, Cornea and Refractive Surgery (239) 594-0124 11176 Tamiami Trail Naples, FL 34110 www.SWFLEYE.com

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Call or stop by our Information Center today! (239) 206-2646 or (866) 986-9690 !(#"% *&%%&($*"&%%*(%&#/$"$"(" #)*+"*n/'#) &%("rn.*.+%.(-''&"%*$%*/,,,(#"% *&%'# )&( The Arlington of Naples welcomes people of all faiths, beliefs and traditions. A Lutheran Life Community — Serving seniors and WKHLUIDPLOLHVIRUPRUHWKDQDFHQWXU\/XWKHUDQ/LIH&RPPXQLWLHV(PSRZHULQJYLE UDQWJUDFHuOOHGOLYLQJDFURVVDOOJHQHUDWLRQV The Arlington of Naples has officially exceeded its presales goal—and that means we’re getting ready for a much-anticipated event: groundbreaking. Founders have already prepared for a secure future—and soon they’ll be choos-ing nishes and xtures for their new homes! If you’ve not yet joined “the A-List,” we invite you to learn more about signicant benets available only to Founders—and only until we break ground. is getting ready ListThe

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 94 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON H. Kurtis Biggs, DOBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopaedic SurgeonEDUCATION: Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens, OH; Internship: Doctors Hospital Stark County, Massillon OH; Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: Doctors Hospital Stark County, Massillon OH; Total Joint Fellowship: Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (239) 261-2663 1250 Pine Ridge Road, Suite #3 Naples, FL 34108 www.jointinstitute.com ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON Jaime Weaver, DPMPodiatric Specialist in Foot and AnkleEDUCATION: Temple University School of Posiatric Medicine, Philadelphia, PA; Foot and Ankle Residency: San Francisco Bay Area Foot and Ankle Residency Program, San Francisco, CA (239) 261-2663 1250 Pine Ridge Road, Suite #3 Naples, FL 34108 www.jointinstitute.com PALLIATIVE MEDICINE Lawerence Dorf, MDHospice and Palliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Family Practice, Board Certied Hospice and Palliative MedicineEDUCATION: University of Miami – Autonomous; University of Guadalajana, Jalisco MexicoLanguages Spoken: English & Spanish (239) 649-2300 4980 Tamiami Trail N. Naples, FL 34103 www.vitas.com PALLIATIVE MEDICINE Natalia Keyser, MDHospice and Palliative CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in Internal MedicineEDUCATION: Temple University Pennsylvania, Instituto De Ciencias de la Salud, Ces Colombia.Languages Spoken: English & Spanish (239) 649-2300 4980 Tamiami Trail N. #102 Naples, FL 34103 www.vitas.com PLASTIC SURGERY Kent V. Hasen, M.D., P.A.Plastic Surgery: Face, Breast and BodyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS)EDUCATION: Indiana University in Bloomington, Cornell University in New York, 7-Year Residency Program at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, Cosmetic Surgery Fellowship in Miami (239) 262-5662 4081 Tamiami Trail North, Suite C-203 Naples, FL 34103 www.drhasen.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 96 PLASTIC SURGEON Manuel Pena, MDCosmetic Surgery of the Face, Body and BreastsBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic Surgery, American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Fellowship: Ralph Millard, MD at University of Miami; Post Graduate Fellowship: Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York University; Plastic Surgery Residency: Medical College of Georgia; Surgical Residency: Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami; Surgical Internship: Charity Hospital Tulane University; Medical Degree: Medical College of Georgia; Undergraduate: University of Georgia. American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association, Collier County Medical Association; Florida Society of Plastic SurgeonsLanguages Spoken: English, Spanish (239) 348-7362 6370 Pine Ridge Road, Suite 101 Naples, FL 34119 PODIATRY Diego Adarve, DPMFoot and Ankle SurgeryEDUCATION: University Honduras (Orthopedic), Barry University (Podiatry) 2004; Residency at Jackson Memorial Health System (PM&S-36) Foot and Ankle Surgery (239) 417-2256 12250 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 101 Naples, FL 34113 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com PODIATRY Ramy Fahim, DPMPodiatryEDUCATION: Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine Residency: St. Vincent Charity Medical Center Cleveland, OH. Fellowship: Kent State University/ Ankle & Foot Centers Reconstructive Foot & Ankle Surgery.Languages Spoken: Arabic, French (239) 776-3080 1660 Medical Blvd. #302 Naples, FL 34110 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com PODIATRY Kevin Lam, DPMShockwave Therapy-Heel Pain, Foot & Ankle Reconstructive SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Lower Extremity Surgeons; American Board of Podiatric Surgery; Foot and Reconstructive Rear Foot/ Ankle Surgery; American Board of Podiatric SurgeryEDUCATION: Temple University of Podiatric Medicine, 2002 (239) 430-3668 661 Goodlette Road, Suite 103 Naples, FL 34102 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com PODIATRY Kelly Malinoski, DPMReconstructive Foot & Ankle SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: ABPS Board Qualied (American Board of Podiatric Surgery)EDUCATION: Medical School: New York College of Medicine, Fellowship: Weil Foot & Ankle Orthopedic Institute, Residency: University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey (239) 260-5181 7955 Airport Pulling Rd. N, Ste #101 Naples, FL 34109 www.podiatristofnaples.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 97 PODIATRY Brian Timm, DPMReconstructive Foot and Ankle SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Lower Extremity Surgeons; American Board of Podiatric SurgeryEDUCATION: Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine and Science – Scholl School of Podiatry, 2006 (239) 417-2256 12250 Tamiami Trail East, Suite 101 Naples, FL 34113 www.NaplesPodiatrist.com $FFHSWLQJ 3DWLHQWV $W CALL 239-261-5511 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT! WWW.NAPLESMEDICALCENTER.COM 2XU3K\VLFLDQV$UH Downtown400 8th St N 1st FloorNaples, Florida 34102HealthPark11181 Health Park Blvd, #3000Naples, Florida 34110 Willow Park6610 Willow Park Drive, Ste 101Naples, Florida 34109French Quarter501 Goodlette Rd., Ste. 100ANaples, Florida 34102 Marco Island606 Bald Eagle Drive, Ste. 302Marco Island, Florida 34145 Our Locations: Turn Back the Hands of Time rnrrnnnrnnnn €n‚ r€ ƒr€„………Become Younger!†‡ˆ‰Šˆ‡†‰‰†‡ˆ†‰†‹Œ‡‡ ……rn  n€…Ž… €€‚ƒ„…†n

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 98 UROGYNECOLOGIST Joseph Gauta, MDUrogynecology, Female Pelvic Floor DisordersBOARD CERTIFICATION: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery, OB/GynEDUCATION: Albany Medical College, Residency at Tulane University of New OrleansLanguages Spoken: English, Croatian (239) 449-7979 1890 SW Health Pkwy, Suite 205 Naples, FL 34109 www.FloridaBladderInstitute.com UROLOGY Arturo Balandra, MDGeneral Urology, Voiding Dysfunction, Erectile DysfunctionBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of UrologyEDUCATION: Undergraduate at Vanderbilt University. MD at University of Pennsylvania Medical School. Residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (239) 434-8565 26800 South Tamiami Trail Bonita Springs, FL 34134 6101 Pine Ridge Road Naples, FL 34119 www.UrologyofNaples.com UROLOGY Joanna K. Chon, MDUrology, Treatment of Pelvic Floor Disorders, Voiding DysfunctionBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board of the Society of Women in UrologyEDUCATION: University of Pennsylvania; George Washington University; Residency at University of Maryland; Fellowship in Female Urology, Voiding Dysfunction, and Urodynamics at The Tower Institute of Continence, Los Angeles, CA at the Cedars Sinai Medical Center (239) 434-8565 3291 Woods Edge Parkway Bonita Springs, FL 34134 Colonial Square Ofce Park 1132 Goodlette Rd. Naples, FL 34102 www.UrologyofNaples.com UROLOGY Marc Joel Guttman, DOGeneral UrologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in UrologyEDUCATION: New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Urology training at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (239) 434-8565 Colonial Square Ofce Park 1132 Goodlette Road Naples, FL 34102 8340 Collier Blvd., Suite 204 Naples, FL 34114 www.UrologyofNaples.com UROLOGY David K. Ornstein, MDUrologic Oncology and Robotic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied, Urology; Fellowship trained, Urologic OncologyEDUCATION: MD and Urology Residency at Washington University; Urologic Oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute (239) 434-8565 Colonial Square Ofce Park 1132 Goodlette Road Naples, FL 34102 6101 Pine Ridge Road Naples, FL 34119 www.UrologyofNaples.com UROLOGY Kendall Lee Wise, MDUrologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied in UrologyEDUCATION: MD Vanderbilt University; Residency at Duke University Medical Center (239) 434-8565 1044 Goodlette Road North Naples, FL 34102 www.UrologyofNaples.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-14 Southwest Florida COLLIER COUNTY COLLIER COUNTY 99 NAPLES URGENT CARE WALK-IN MEDICAL CLINIC 1713 SW Health Pkwy, Suite 1, Naples 239.597.8000 NaplesUrgentCareOnline.com -ONr&RIAMrPMs3AT3UNAMrPM *Rates may vary for insured patients. ESTERO URGENT CARE WALK-IN MEDICAL CLINIC #ORKSCREW2D3UITE%STERO 239.948.1310 %STERO5RGENT#ARE/NLINECOM -ONr&RIAMrPMs3AT3UNAMrPM SKIN CANCER %VALUATIONSAND2EMOVALFLU SHOTS $19.00*Shingles and Pneumonia Vaccinations.OW!VAILABLEAT"OTH,OCATIONSPRIMARY CARE AND FAMILY PRACTICEBYAPPOINTMENT30% OFFFirst DoctorÂ’s Visit for all patients without insurance MINOR SURGERIES 0REFORMEDBYA "OARDr#ERTIlED'ENERAL

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY AESTHETICIAN Teressa Lorenz, Licensed Facial Specialist, CMELaser Hair Removal, Facial Rejuvination, AestheticsBOARD CERTIFICATION: Certied Medical Electrologist, Laser Specialist, Licensed Facial SpecialistEDUCATION: Florida School of Electrolysis & Skin Care (941) 575-0123 25092 Olympia Avenue #500 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.jvai.com AUDIOLOGY Ricardo A. Gauthier, Au.DAudiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Academy of Audiology, Florida Academy of Audiology and serves on the Board of Directors of Murdock Rotary ClubEDUCATION: Doctorate of Audiology at the University of Florida; Residency at VA Medical Center in Bay Pines (941) 505-0400 Harbor Audiology 100 Madrid Blvd. #315 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.harboraudiology.net AUDIOLOGY Marilyn K. Larkin, Au.DAudiologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Academy of Audiology and served two years on the AcademyÂ’s ethics board.EDUCATION: Undergraduate training at The Ohio State University; MasterÂ’s degree in Audiology and Deaf Education at Adelphi University; Doctorate of Audiology at the Arizona School of Health Sciences. She founded and directed an Audiology and Speech center in New York. (941) 505-0400 Harbor Audiology 100 Madrid Blvd. #315 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.harboraudiology.net BREAST RADIOLOGY Harmindar K. Gill, MDThoracic & Breast ImagingBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Radiology. Member of Society of Breast ImagingEDUCATION: Medical School & Residency: West Virginia University, Fellowship Clinical: Yale University, Fellowship Research: University of Maryland; Faculty: Johns Hopkins University 2000-Current (239) 494-4300 27160 Bay Landing Dr., Suite 201 Bonita Springs, FL 34135 www.PremierWomensRadiology.com

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 101 CARDIAC SURGERY Tom Kartis, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCPCardiac Surgery/ Thoracic Surgery; Vascular/ Endovascular SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Cardiac/Thoracic Surgery; General Surgery; Member Society of Thoracic Surgeons; Society for Vascular Surgery; Fellow American Colleges of Surgeons, Cardiology & Chest PhysiciansEDUCATION: State University of New York at Stony Brook; Surgery Residency New York Hospital, Queens, Cornell, NY; Cardiac Surgery Residency in Tufts, Boston, Massachusetts (941) 235-4400 2595 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 102 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Domingo E. Galliano, Jr., MD, FACS, FASCRSColon and Rectal SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery; American Board of Surgery; Surgical Critical CareEDUCATION: General Surgery Residency at Jersey City Medical Center, NJ; Fellowship in Colon and Rectal Surgery at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; Fellowship in Advanced Colon and Rectal Surgery at the Cleveland Clinic, FL (941) 625-3411 18308 Murdock Circle, Suites 108-109 Port Charlotte, FL 33948 www.GallianoSurgery.com Tom Kartis, M.D. HEART, LUNG & VASCULAR PATIENT-CENTERED CARE Where... t5FTUJOHPSEFSFEBUZPVSQSJNBSZDBSFEPDUPSTPDFXI FOGFBTJCMF t1SPWJEJOHEJBHOPTJTBOEUSFBUNFOUPQUJPOTXJUIPSXJUIPV UTVSHFSZ t$PMMBCPSBUJOHXJUIZPVSPUIFSEPDUPSTyBOEZPVSPUIFSTQF DJBMJTUT )JHIMZ"DDPNQMJTIFE 0/-:EPDUPSJOSFHJPOXIPJTBNFNCFSPGCPUI SOCIETY of THORACIC SURGEONS / SOCIETY for VASCULAR SURGERY Double Board-Certi ed, Colleges: Cardiology, Surgeons, Chest Physicians Listed 2012 Guide to AmericaÂ’s Top SurgeonsSEES PATIENTS IN 8 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 5 HOSPITALS AND 3 OFFICES Over 25 years experience as an MD performing Surgery and training LONGEST LOCAL CURRENT TRACK RECORD OF OUTCOMES IN CARDIAC SURGERY Patients themselves may call to be seen: 941-235-4400 7JTJUXXX.Z)FBSU-VOH%PDDPN Now Accepting New Patients For 2014! 2013

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 102 DENTISTRY Joseph C. Bender, D.M.DDentistryEDUCATION: University of Pittsburgh, B.S. in Biology; University of Pittsburgh, School of Dental Medicine, D.M.D.; Veterans Administration Medical Center/ University of Florida, General Practice Residency; Fellowship in Academy of General Dentistry; Fellowship in International Congress of Oral Implantologists. (941) 743-7435 Panther Hollow Dental Lodge 19240 Quesada Avenue Port Charlotte, FL 33948 DENTISTRY R. Boyd Gilleland, DDSGeneral; Cosmetic; ImplantBOARD CERTIFICATION: Member of the American Dental Association; Member of the Academy of General Dentistry; Fellow of the International Congress of Implant Dentistry; Member of the Dental organization for Conscious SedationEDUCATION: University of Pittsburgh; Emory University; Advanced Training in Cosmetics, Implants and Comprehensive Dentistry (941) 627-9900 2496 Caring Way Port Charlotte, FL 33952 www.CaringWayDentistry.com da Vinci Robotic Surgery“TIF” Incisionless Heartburn & Gerd Surgery“Ultroid” Non Surgical Office Treatment for HemorrhoidsHernia RepairColon & Rectal SurgeryGallbladder Problems“SILS” (Single-Incision Laparascopic Surgery)Gastro Intestinal SurgeryAppendectomyLaparoscopic SurgeryEsopho gastro Dilitation / EGDColonoscopyBreast surgerySkin LesionsSkin Cancer Surgery Call Now (941) 255-0069www.badamd.com s www.re uxbadamd.com -URDOCK#R0ORT#HARLOTTEs3ATELLITE/FlCESIN.ORTH0ORTAND0UNTA'ORDA Dr. Alvaro R. Bada, M.D. BOARD CERTIFIED GENERAL SURGEON FELLOW AMERICAN COLLEGE OF SURGEONS

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 104 ENDOVASCULAR SURGERY Tom Kartis, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCPVascular/Endovascular Surgery; Cardiothoracic; Fully Percutaneous Aortic Endograft StentingBOARD CERTIFICATION: Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgery; Fellow American Colleges of Surgeons, Cardiology & Chest Physicians; Member of Society for Vascular SurgeryEDUCATION: State University of New York at Stony Brook; Surgery Residency at New York Hospital, Queens, Cornell, NY; Cardiovascular Thoracic Residency in Tufts, Boston, Massachusetts (941) 235-4400 2595 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 102 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 GENERAL SURGERY Alvaro R. Bada, MD, FACSGeneral SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; Fellow American College SurgeonsEDUCATION: Universidad Central del Este, Dominican Republic, Medical Degree; Surgery Residency at South Macomb Hospital – Warren-MI and Internship at Saint Thomas Medical Center – Akron, OH (941) 255-0069 Murdock Circle Executive Center 18308 Murdock Circle, Suite 101 Port Charlotte, FL 33948 www.badamd.com OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Charlene Okomski, MDObstetrics and GynecologyBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied OB/ GYNEDUCATION: Bachelor Degree from the University of Dayton, Dayton, OH; Medical Degree from the University of Health Sciences, Kansas City, MO; Internship and Residency in OB/GYN at Lancaster Community Hospital, Lancaster, PA (941) 205-2666 6210 Scott Street, Suite 216 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.timelessimagesw.com PATIENTS TREATED AT ALL 3 AREA HOSPITALS Critical Care, Sleep & Interventional Pulmonary (941) 205-LUNG (5864) | 603 E. Olympia Avenue Punta Gorda, FL 33950 (941) 206-LUNG (5864) | 2400 Harbor Blvd. #19 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 Appointment ( 941) 205-5864 “You only have two lungs and one heart …that’s where I come in.” I’m Dr. Wei, your pulmonologist. Your overall health and wellness in my primary concern. Our practice emphasizes a PREVENTATIVE PROTOCOL since we’d much rather keep you well than treat you after you’ve become ill.” Pulmonary Associates of Charlotte County 1UESADA!VENUEs0ORT#HARLOTTE941.743.7435 www.PantherHollowDental.com 3TANDING,TO2r$R+ERSTEIN$R#OSEO$R2EYNOLDS$R0ALMER$R'ELDER 3ITTING$R7ATTERSAND$R"ENDER s#OSMETICS s 6ENEERS s 4EETH7HITENING s#ROWNS s 2OOT#ANALS s)NVISALIGN s $ENTAL)MPLANTS s%XTRACTIONS s 0ARTIAL$ENTURES s$ENTURESs4REATMENTOFOCCLUSAL BITEDISORDERS4-*$YSFUNCTION s$ENTALHYGIENE INCLUDINGCLEANINGSANDPERIODONTALTREATMENT

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 106 OPHTHALMOLOGY Jonathan M. Frantz, MD, FACSCataract and LASIK SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: Ophthalmology Fellowship American College of SurgeonsEDUCATION: Vanderbilt University; University of Miami Medical School; Ophthalmology Residency at Louisiana State University Eye Center; Fellowship Cornea, External Diseases and Refractive Surgery (941) 505-2020 109 Taylor Street Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.BetterVision.net ORTHOPAEDIC David J. Kaler, M.D.Total Joint Replacement; Revisions; Arthroscopic Surgery; Sports Medicine; Fracture CareBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied Orthopaedic SurgeonEDUCATION: University of Louisville, Doctor of Medicine; Surgical Internship; Baptist Memorial Hospital, Memphis, TN; Fellow in Orthopaedic Surgery, WC Campbell Clinic, Memphis, TN; Fellowship in Spinal Surgery, Southern Illinois University; Murray State University, B.S. Chemistry/Biology (941) 625-0984 4161 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 1010 North Mills Avenue Arcadia, FL 34266 2975 Bobcat Village Center Road North Port, FL 34288 www.CharlotteOrthopaedic.com Thank You Charlotte County For Voting Us The Best Audiologists and Number 1 in Hearing Aids For The Last 10 Years. Dr. Marilyn K. Larkin PERSONAL SERVICE (941) 505-0400100 Madrid Blvd., Suite 315 Punta Gorda www.harboraudiology.net Harbor Audiology Hearing Evaluations | Digital Hearing Aids | All Make Repair PROFESSIONAL HEARING CARE PERSONAL SERVICE Dr. Ricardo Gauthier 2011 2012 2012 941-205-3030spagodayspa.com lookyoungeratanyage.com Dr. Michael Stampar D.O. Board Certied Facial Plastic Surgeon23 years of experienceExpert Surgical and Non-Surgical Facial Rejuvenation Experience the Best 2012 First Place 2008-2012

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425 Cross Street, #111 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 (941) 505-6162 18308 Murdock Circle, Suite 109 Port Charlotte, FL 33948 (941) 255-5489 Celebrating 13 Years! Karin Galliano, PH.D. Licensed Clinical PsychologistLic. #PY6197Daniel Goldman, Ph.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist Lic. #PY8470Deborah Burgess, M.S. L.M.H.C. PsychotherapistLic. #MH5712Steven R. Pollard, PH.D. Licensed Clinical PsychologistLic. #PY5711 Child, Adolescent & Adult Psychotheraphy Psychological Testing

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 108 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Jeffrey G. Bentson, MDOrthopaedic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Orthopaedic SurgeryEDUCATION: MD – Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI; Residency Orthopaedic Surgery and Internship – Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN. (941) 625-0984 4161 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 1010 North Mills Avenue Arcadia, FL 34266 2975 Bobcat Village Center Road North Port, FL 34288 www.CharlotteOrthopaedic.com ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY John P. Braut, DOOrthopaedic SurgeryEDUCATION: AO Trauma Fellowship, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey – School of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of South Carolina B.S. (941) 625-0984 4161 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 1010 North Mills Avenue Arcadia, FL 34266 2975 Bobcat Village Center Road North Port, FL 34288 www.CharlotteOrthopaedic.com ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Howard E. Saslow, MDOrthopaedic Surgery, Total Joint ReplacementBOARD CERTIFICATION: Fellowship trained knee and hip replacementEDUCATION: MD – University Autonoma de Guadalajara Mexico; Orthopedic Residency – Bronx Lebanon Hospital – Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; Fellowship – Total Joint Replacement at Wrighten Center for Hip Surgery in England. (941) 625-0984 4161 Tamiami Trail Port Charlotte, FL 33952 1010 North Mills Avenue Arcadia, FL 34266 2975 Bobcat Village Center Road North Port, FL 34288 www.CharlotteOrthopaedic.com PLASTIC SURGERY Robert J. Brueck, MD, F.A.C.SCosmetic Surgery/ Body & FaceBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Plastic SurgeryEDUCATION: University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago; Rush Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago (941) 505-2714 25097 Olympia Ave., Suite #101 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.Beauty-By-Brueck.com PLASTIC SURGERY Michael Stampar, DOPlastic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Board Certied ENT and Facial Plastic SurgeonEDUCATION: Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine; Internship; Residency in ENT and Facial Plastic Surgery (941) 205-3030 201 West Marion Avenue, Suite 1311 Punta Gorda, FL 33950

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 109 PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT Joann Thompson, PA-CVascularEDUCATION: Western Michigan University (941) 575-0123 25092 Olympia Avenue #500 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.jvai.com PSYCHOLOGY Karin Galliano, PHDChild and Adolescent Psychology; Adult Psychotherapy; Psychological TestingEDUCATION: Fairleigh Dickinson University; Foldham University; PhD. Florida International University (941) 505-6162 Peace River Psychology 425 Cross Street, Suite 111 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 THORACIC SURGERY Tom Kartis, MD, FACS, FCCP, FACCMinimally Invasive Thoracic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: Thoracic Surgery; General Surgery; Fellow American Colleges of Chest Physicians, Surgeons & Cardiology; Member Society of Thoracic SurgeonsEDUCATION: S.U.N.Y Stony Brook; Surgery Residency at New York Hospital, Queens, Cornell, NY; Thoracic Surgery Residency in Tufts, Boston (941) 235-4400 2595 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 102 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 Board-Certi ed in Vascular Surgery Practice devoted entirely to the diagnosis and treatment of venous diseaseOver 12 years experienceFriendly, caring environment UNSIGHTLY, PAINFUL VARICOSE VEINS?LEG SWELLING & DISCOLORATION?Varicose veins and heavy, painful legs can be treated in the o ce with the VNUS Closure procedure. To schedule an evaluation, call:941-627-6700Advanced Vein Center of Charlotte County18316 Murdock Circle Suite 107Port Charlotte, FL 33948Laura A. Gruneiro, MD All treatment performed in the o ce setting Immediate return to normal activities Covered by most insurances t4QJEFSWFJOTt7BSJDPTFWFJOTt-FHBDIJOHrIFBWJOFTTrGBUJHVFt-FHTXFMMJOHBOETLJOEJTDPMPSBUJPOt7FOPVTVMDFSBUJPOTt#MPPEDMPUTPGUIFMFH VOTED AS ONE OF CASTLE CONNELLYÂ’S TOP DOCTORS 2012 & 2013 VOTED TOP DOCTOR IN VASCULAR SURGERY IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA -Gulfshore Life Magazine, 2012 & 2013 BEFORE AFTER

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Physicians Directory 2013-2014 Southwest Florida www.floridaweekly.com CHARLOTTE COUNTY CHARLOTTE COUNTY 110 VASCULAR SURGERY Tom Kartis, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCPVascular Surgery; Endovascular Surgery; Cardiac & Thoracic SurgeryBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of Surgery; American Board of Thoracic Surgery; Member Society for Vascular Surgery; Fellow American Colleges of Surgeons, Cardiology & Chest PhysiciansEDUCATION: S.U.N.Y Stony Brook; Surgery Residency New York Hospital, Queens, Cornell, NY; Cardiovascular Thoracic Residency in Tufts, Boston, Massachusetts (941) 235-4400 2595 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 102 Port Charlotte, FL 33952 VEIN SPECIALIST Laura Gruneiro, MDVascular Surgery; Vein SpecialistBOARD CERTIFICATION: American Board of SurgeryEDUCATION: Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, NY; Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York City, NY; Southern Illinois University, Springeld IL (941) 627-6700 18316 Murdock Circle, Suite 107 Port Charlotte, FL 33948 VEIN SPECIALIST Douglas H. Joyce, DO, FACOSPhlebology (Venous Disease)BOARD CERTIFICATION: Cardio-thoracic and Vascular Surgery, General Surgery, Phlebology (Venous Disease)EDUCATION: University of Michigan: B.S. Zoology with Honors 1976, M.S. Biology 1978. Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine: D.O. 1981. Internship and general surgery residency: Lansing General Hospital, Lansing, MI. 1981-1985. Adult & Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Fellowships: The Cleveland Clinic, OH and Deborah Heart & Lung Center, NJ 1985-1988. (941) 575-0123 25092 Olympia Avenue #500 Punta Gorda, FL 33950 www.jvai.com