Citation
Florida weekly

Material Information

Title:
Florida weekly
Place of Publication:
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
Publisher:
Florida Media Group, LLC
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 online resource : ;

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
on10385 ( NOTIS )
1038532305 ( OCLC )
2018226750 ( LCCN )
on1038532305
Classification:
AN1.F6 P35 F56 ( lcc )

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Digital Military Collection

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-26, 2013 Vol. III, No. 50  FREE INSIDE OPINION A4PETS A6SOCIETY A11, 18-19, 34HEALTHY LIVING A14 BUSINESS A20 ANTIQUES A21REAL ESTATE A22ARTS A25 SANDY DAYS A26EVENTS A28-29PUZZLES A30DINING A35 SocietySee who was out and about in Palm Beach. A16, 18-19, 34 X On their toesStudents at Tequesta’s ArtStage learn dance, art and life. A25 XMoney and investingOil pipelines are at the heart of the Syria problem. A20 X PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 CuisineWe like the Mediterranean Cobb at Figs by Todd English. A35 XTwo of Palm Beach Countys culinary stars have opened a restaurant together. Aah Loi, which recently opened in Jupiter, combines the Thai fare that Char-lie Soo has been cooking for five years at Talay Thai, with the sushi and exotic food for which Filipino chef Roy Villacrusis has made his name at various restaurants. The two men sat down to chat recently about their venture. It was a quiet afternoon at Talay Thai, but customers still were coming in for a late lunch from Mr. Soos elegantly simple menu of stir-fries and curries. The new places name „ Aah Loi „ isCulinary styles come together for Aah LoiBY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@” oridaweekly.com Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. X VINTAGEBY DESIGNBY SCOTT SIMMONS • SSIMMONS@FLORIDAWEEKLY.COM www. Fl or id a W ee k ly .co m 19 9 9 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 -2 -2 -2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 -2 -2 2 2 2 -2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6, 6, 6, 6, 6 6 6, 6, 6, 6 6 6, 6, 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6, 6, 6 6 6, 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6 6 6 6 6, 6 6, 6, , 6 , 6 6 6 6 6 , 2 2 2 2 01 3 V o l ORGET MIAMI. Forget Fort Lauderdale.Yes, they have their design districts.But Palm Beach Gardens has a budding district of its own. Michael Kupritz calls it The Palm Beach Gardens Design District.Ž His new store, Mbler Home Decor, officially set to open Oct. 1, pays homage to 20th-century furniture and accessories by the great designers „ a laminated plywood chair by Charles and Ray Eames, a Barce-lona chair by Mies van der Rohe. Mr. Kupritz joins a growing array of shops at Northlake Commons, home to Home Depot and a True Treasures annex. In the past year, Palm Antique Mall hasShops specializing in midcentury furnishings and accessories, as well as antiques, have been cropping up in North Palm Beach and Palm Beach Gardens Societ y Se e who was out an Pa lm Beach A16, 1 M oney an d Oi l pipelines ar e Syria problem. @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL F FL L FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL FL F F L L L L L L FL F F OR OR OR OR OR OR OR OR O OR OR OR OR O O OR OR OR OR O OR R R R OR OR O OR O O R R O O O O O O O ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID D D D D D D D ID D D D ID ID ID ID D ID ID D D D D D I ID D D D D D D D D ID D D ID ID D D D D I D AW AW AW AW AW AW A AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW AW W W AW AW AW W A AW AW AW W AW W AW W W W W W W W AW W W W A A A AW W AW A AW A EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE E EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE EE E E EE EE EE EE EE EE EE E EE E EE EE E E E E KL KL KL KL KL KL KL KL KL L L KL L L L L L L KL KL KL KL L L KL L L L L L L L L KL L L L L L L L L L Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y Y. Y. Y. Y. Y Y. Y. Y. Y. Y. Y Y Y. Y. Y Y. Y. Y Y Y Y Y Y. Y Y Y CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO C CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO O CO CO CO C CO CO O O CO CO CO CO CO CO CO C CO CO C C C CO CO O M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M di di di di di d di di di i di d d d d d st st st st st st t t st st t t st st t t s ri ri ri ri ri ri ri ri ri i r r ct ct ct ct ct ct ct ct c t ct c s. s. s. s. s. s. s. s. s s. s as as as a as as as as as s s s as s a a a a a a a a a a a b b b b b b b b b b b b b b b ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud ud d d m m m m m m m m m B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea ea a e e ea e ch ch ch ch ch ch ch h ch ch ch ch c c c c c c c or or or or or or or or or o o , , of of of of of of of of of op op op op op p p p op p en en en en en en en n n n O O O O O O O O O O ct ct ct ct ct ct ct c . . . . . e e e e e e e e e e t t t t t t t t o o o o o o o o 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 0 20 2 0 th th th th th th th th t t t t t th th t t t t t t t ur ur ur ur ur ur ur ur ur u r r e e e e e e e e e e e an an an an an an n an an n n n a d d d d d d d d d d d d y y y y y y y y t t t t t t t t t t t he he he he he he he he h he h g g g g g g g g g g g g g re re re re re re re re re re re re e e at at at at at at at at at at at t t t a a a a a a a a a a a la la la la la la la la la l la l mi mi mi mi mi mi mi mi i mi m m m na na na na na na na na a na na na te te te te te te te te te t t te t t t t te te t d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d i i i i i i i i i i r r r r r r r r r by by by by by by by by y y C C C C C C C C C C C C C C ha ha ha ha ha ha ha a ha ha h h rl rl rl rl rl rl r rl rl rl es es es es es es es es es es s s e e e e me me me me me me me m e e s, s, s, s, s, s, s, s s, s a a a a a a a a a B B B B B B B B B B B B ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar ar a ar a ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce ce c c c c e c c y y y y y y y y Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi Mi M M es e es es es es es e e e e v v v v v v v v v v an an an an an an an an n n n n t t t t t t t t t z z z z z z z z jo jo jo jo jo jo jo jo j jo j j in in in in in in in in in n s s s s s s s s s a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y of of of of of of of of of f o s s s s s s s s ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho ho o ho ho o ps ps ps ps ps ps ps ps ps ps ps p p p p s a a a a a a a a a a a a t t t t t t t t t t t t mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm m m m mm mm on on on on on on on on on on n n on n on n n s, s, s, s, s, s, s, s, s, s, s s h h h h h h h h h h h h om om om om om om om om om o m om m e e e e e e e e e e s as s as s s s s s s ur ur ur ur ur ur r u ur ur u u r r es es es es es es es es s es es e es e es e a a a a a a a a a nn nn nn nn nn nn nn nn nn nn n n n n n ex ex ex ex ex ex x ex ex ex ex x . . . . e e e e e e e e e M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M al al al al al al al al al a al l l l l l l l l l l ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha h ha h h h h h s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s FKUPRITZ SEE VINTAGE, A8 X SEE AAH LOI, A3 XV A plaster sculpture of Abraham Lincoln is for sale at I Found It! A ceramic figure holds a pose at I Found It!PHOTOS BY SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYV COURTESY PHOTO/LIBBYVISIONRoy Villacrusis and Charlie Soo at Aah Loi.

PAGE 2

An embarrassment of richesEnterprising developers have come and gone in Palm Beach County. They left behind, as evidence of their passing, decidedly mixed results; but to some we owe acknowledgment and an expression of gratitude for the generosity to protect through their philanthropy a small por-tion of what is unique about the state of Floridas landscape. A stunning example of a deed well done is John D. MacAr-thurs donation of land for a public park, which along with the support of the state of Florida and others, enabled the estab-lishment in 1989 of the John D. MacAr-thur Beach State Park, the only state park in Palm Beach County. My first visit to the park was in 2007. The experience was one of discovery, encountering with surprise, an embar-rassment of environmental riches, deep-ly cloaked in verdant shadows, hidden in plain sight, yet its pleasures and myster-ies accessible as a legacy for all to enjoy. The moss-draped live oaks and luxu-riant, subtropical vegetation welcome visitors to a place that belongs to the age when Florida was Eden. This lush stretch of coastal land and beach between the Atlantic Ocean and Lake Worth Lagoon is more than 400 acres of natural envi-ronments available year-round to the public to enjoy and explore. The parks bio-diversity includes many endangered species of birds and plants. Two miles of pristine beaches on turquoise waters are among the worlds most important nest-ing grounds for rare sea turtles. It is remarkable that such a place is sustained in a comparatively natu-ral state, given its location is only a short gulls flight from the major com-merce and urban development of Palm Beach Gardens. The parks full expanse includes an additional 500 acres of sub-merged lands and a small wilderness island, once the site of a luxury hotel, accessible only by boat. If you imagined yourself seeking refuge on an island of calm, with a welcoming and hospitable shore, this would be the tropical oasis of your dreams. How this special place came to be conserved and protected for now and future generations demonstrates the multipli-er effect of philanthropy: Abundance is born out of generosity and common goals are accomplished through part-nerships „ even though there may be powerful, competing interests. The state of Floridas role is key to the parks con-servation but the peoples ownershipŽ is critical too, if the parks stewardship is to be manifested in experiences and educational opportunities that broadly touch many lives; and instill attitudes essential for the conservation and pro-tection of this and similar places, for now and all time. The story of how the park came into existence begins with John D. MacArthur, a name as ubiquitous as that of Henry Flagler in Palm Beach County. MacArthur arrived in Florida decades after Flagler. He made his vast fortune in the insurance business in Chicago. Known for his shrewd business acumen, MacArthur started investing in Florida real estate in the mid-50s, purchasing 2,600 acres in North Palm Beach County for $5.5 million. He did his land deals in an eatery at the Colonnades Beach Hotel on Singer Island, where he and his wife had a residence. On his death, the majority of Mr. MacArthurs estate was gifted to estab-lish The John D. and Catherine T. Foun-dation. The foundation supported the park in its early years, providing funding for the nature center and park facilities. Over time, the foundations ties to the county have diminished. Growing sourc-es of local charitable investment in the park became necessary and important. In 1990, local leaders formed the Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park as a citizens support group. Similar groups around the state are associated with other public lands but this group is one of the most effective, leveraging substantial contribu-tions that help fund MacArthur Beach State Parks operations, recreational activities and educational programs. The nonprofit relies on memberships, donors and community volunteers to help finance a broad range of activities at the park, including educational and community outreach programs, special exhibits, guided tours, and interpretive programs. Contributions also help sup-port physical improvement in the parks facilities. The groups major fundraisers include the annual Shop till You DropŽ event and luncheon to be held this year at the Club at Admirals Cove on Dec. 14. The fundraiser supports a hands-on natu-ral science education experience ben-efiting more than 5,000 students in Palm Beach County. With so many families and children benefiting from the outreach effort of the Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park, one can reasonably presume Mr. MacArthur would have been pleased with the returns on his investment. Q „ Leslie Lilly is a native Floridian and the past president and CEO of the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties. Her professional career spans more than 25 years in the charitable sector, leading major philanthropic institutions in the South and rural Appalachia. She resides with her family and pugs in Jupiter. Email her at llilly15@gmail.com and follow Lilly on Twitter @llilly15. A2 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY 901 45th S treet, W est P a lm B ea ch Learn more at Palm B each C hildrens .com Children’s Medical CareIs Soaring to New Heights. cardiology & cardiac surgery neurosurgeryemergency trauma care oncology neonatal intensive carelimb reconstruction & lengthening Helping a five year old overcome a battle with cancer. Reconstructing a child’s misshapen leg. Performing heart surgery on a patient who is only 12 hours old. Palm Beach Children’s Hospital has elevated the quality of children’s medical care in South Flori da. Our goal: to provide advanced care that is less invasive, requires less recovery time and alleviates the need for families to travel. Palm Beach Ch ildren’s Hospital helps ensure that children have access to the care they need close to home. More than 170 doctors representing 30 specialties. For your freeKITE, call 5 6 1-84 1-KID S Scan with your smartphones Q R code reade r a i i r s m leslie LILLYllilly15@gmail.com FLORIDA WEEKLY FILE PHOTO MacArthur Park, an oasis near major development, offers an object lesson in philanthropy.

PAGE 3

AWARDS INCLUDE: One of Americas 100 Best Hospitals for Stroke Care’by HealthGrades for 2 Years in a Row. (2012-2013) Five-Star Recipient for Coronary Interventional Procedures by HealthGrades for 11 Years in a Row (2003-2013) Five-Star Recipient for Treatment of Heart Failure by HealthGrades for 7 Years in a Row (2007-2013) Recipient of the HealthGrades Stroke Care Excellence Award’for 4 Years in a Row (2010-2013) Ranked Among the Top 5% in the Nation for Treatment of Stroke by HealthGrade for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013) Certified Primary Stroke Center, Joint Commission American Heart Association Get with the Guidelines Gold Plus Award for Stroke, Heart Failure and Resuscitation Chest Pain Center Accreditation from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient CareAnd more EMERGENCY CARE REMEMBER: You have a choice.You can ask the EMS to take you to Palm Beach GardensMedical Center. Be prepared for an emergency. Call 561.625.5070for your FREE First Aid Kit. Setting the Gold Standard in Emergency Care 3360 Burns Road | Palm Beach Gardens | PBGMC.com H TAKE ME TO PALM BEACH GARDENS MEDICAL CENTER!Ž

PAGE 4

A4 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Publisher Michelle Nogamnoga@floridaweekly.comEditor Betty Wellsbwells@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsScott Simmons Athena Ponushis Tim Norris Jan Norris Mary Jane Fine Loren Gutentag Artis Henderson Linda Lipshutz Roger Williams Jim McCracken Heather Purucker Bretzlaff Nina CusmanoPresentation Editor Eric Raddatzeraddatz@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersPaul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Mitzi Turner Hannah Arnone Chris AndruskiewiczAccount ExecutivesBarbara Shaferbshafer@floridaweekly.comJohn Linnjlinn@floridaweekly.comCirculation ManagersWillie Adams Maggie HumphreyCirculationEvelyn Talbot Frank Jimenez Published by Florida Media Group LLC Pason Gaddispgaddis@floridaweekly.comJeffrey Culljcull@floridaweekly.comJim Dickersonjdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: FLORIDA WEEKLY 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470  Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state $59.95 out-of-state Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2013 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. OPINIONUnbelievably small and unpersuasive rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly amy GOODMANSpecial to Florida Weekly Now that John Kerry is the secretary of state, his gaffes can launch major dip-lomatic initiatives. A reporter in London asked what Syrian President Bashar al-Assad could do to avoid war. Kerry responded: He could turn over every single bit of his chemical weapons to the international community in the next week „ turn it over, all of it without delay and allow the full and total accounting. But he isnt about to do it, and it cant be done.Ž The State Department quickly noted that the secretary was merely making a rhetorical point. But the Russians imme-diately embraced the Kerry flourish as a serious proposal. It was welcomedŽ by Damascus and spoken of warmly by the U.N. secretary-general and the British and French governments. Never mind that Kerry punctuated the launch of his unintended Syria peace plan with the words it cant be done.Ž In a storm, any port will do, and during a catastrophic meltdown of an administrations case for war, so will any diplomatic fig leaf. Not all of Kerrys gaffes in London rose to the level of game-changing diplomacy. He said the strike on Syria would be unbelievably small.Ž Surely, Kerry was making another one of his rhetorical points, that compared with, say, Dresden or Shock and Awe,Ž the strike on Syria would be a much more circumscribed affair. But unbelievably smallŽ is not a rallying cry. An anonymous administration official resorted to an analogy to childrens cereal. As USA Today paraphrased his explanation: If Assad is eating Cheeri-os, were going to take away his spoon and give him a fork. Will that degrade his ability to eat Cheerios? Yes. Will it deter him? Maybe. But hell still be able to eat Cheerios.Ž A military strike to change Assads options in breakfast flatware is even less stirring than Kerrys assurance of unbe-lievable smallness. At the beginning of what is supposed to be the administra-tions full-court press for a strike, it has done more to open itself to mockery than to persuade, more to set back its case than to advance it. Part of the problem, besides simple incompetence, is that the administration has dual, and conflicting, audiences. The presidents political base wants a strike to be as symbolic as possible, while the rapidly diminishing number of Republican supporters want it to be as robust as possible. Please one side and you alienate the other. The case for a strike comes down to a matter of national credibility that is more likely to move Henry Kissinger. Voters are not in the mood for any more Middle Eastern entanglements, so the administration is performing before a hostile crowd. Its always easier to look at the top of your game when you are not up against a howling head wind of public opposition. If hes not already, the president may soon wonder why, with the Syria vote, he built a pyre, threw his presidency on it and asked Congress to decide whether to light a match. Considering the gravity of the possible defeat before him, any escape hatch can look attractive, even one provided by his secretary of states careless words. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.Kerry, Kissinger and the other Sept. 11As President Barack Obamas attack on Syria appears to have been delayed for the moment, it is remarkable that Secretary of State John Kerry was meet-ing, on Sept. 11, with one of his prede-cessors, Henry Kissinger, reportedly to discuss strategy on forthcoming negotia-tions on Syria with Russian officials. The Kerry-Kissinger meeting, and the public outcry against the proposed attack on Syria to which both men are publicly committed, should be viewed through the lens of another Sept. 11 ... 1973. On that day, 40 years ago, the democratically elected president of Chile, Sal-vador Allende, was violently overthrown in a U.S.-backed coup. Gen. Augusto Pinochet took control and began a 17-year dictatorial reign of terror, during which more than 3,000 Chileans were mur-dered and disappeared „ about the same number killed on that later, fateful 9/11, 2001. Allende, a socialist, was immensely popular with his people. But his policies were anathema to the elites of Chile and the U.S., so President Richard Nixon and his secretary of state and national-secu-rity adviser, Henry Kissinger, supported efforts to overthrow him. Kissingers role in plotting and supporting the 1973 coup in Chile becomes clearer as the years pass and the docu-ments emerge, documents that Kiss-inger has personally fought hard to keep secret. Peter Kornbluh of the non-profit National Security Archive has been uncovering the evidence for years, and has recently updated his book, The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability.Ž Kornbluh told me that Kissinger was the singular most important figure in engineering a policy to overthrow Allende and then, even more, to embrace Pinochet and the human-rights violations that followed.Ž He said that Kissinger pushed Nixon forward to as aggressive but covert a policy as possible to make Allende fail, to destabilize Allendes ability to gov-ern, to create what Kissinger called a coup climate.Ž The Pinochet regime was violent, repressive and a close ally of the United States. Pinochet formed alliances with other military regimes in South Amer-ica, and they created Operation Con-dor,Ž a campaign of coordinated terror and assassinations throughout Argen-tina, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Boliv-ia and Brazil. Operation Condor even reached onto the streets of Washington, D.C., when, on Sep. 21, 1976, a former Chilean ambassador to the U.S. during the Allende government, Orlando Lete-lier, along with his assistant, a U.S. citi-zen named Ronni Moffitt, were killed by a car bomb planted by Pinochets secret police on Embassy Row, just blocks from the White House. Eventually, under increasing global condemnation and growing internal, nonviolent resistance, the Pinochet regime was forced to hold a plebiscite, a national vote, on whether Pinochet would continue as Chiles dictator. With a resounding No!Ž the public rejected him, ushering in the modern, demo-cratic era in Chile. At least two U.S. citizens were murdered during the 1973 coup. Charles Horman and Frank Teruggi were in Chile to observe the democratic expe-rience there, working as writers and journalists. Their abduction and mur-der by Pinochets forces, with the likely collaboration by the U.S. government, is depicted movingly in the 1982 Oscar-winning film Missing,Ž directed by Costa Gavras, starring Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek. On the week of the coups 40th anniversary, Charles Hor-mans widow, Joyce Horman, held a commemoration. The event, hosted in New York City by the Charles Horman Truth Foundation, attracted hundreds, many who were personally involved with the Allende government or who were forced into exile from Chile during those terrible years. Among those in attendance was Juan Garces, a Spanish citizen who was Presi-dent Allendes closest adviser. Garces was with Allende in the presidential palace on Sept. 11, 1973. Just before the palace was bombed by the air force, Allende led Garces to the door of the palace and told him to go out and tell the world what had happened that day. Allende died during the coup. Garces narr owly escaped Chile with his life. He led the global legal pursuit of Pinochet, finally securing his arrest in Britain in 1998, where Pinochet was held for 504 days. While Pinochet was eventu-ally allowed to return to Chile, he was later indicted there and, facing trial and prison, died under house arrest in 2006, at the age of 91. Today, Garces sees alarming similarities between the repression in Chile and U.S. policies today: You have extraor-dinary renditions. You have extrajudi-cial killings. You have secret centers of detentions. I am very concerned that those methods ... were applied in Chile with the knowledge and the backing of the Nixon-Kissinger administration in this period. The same methods are being applied now in many countries with the backing of the United States. That is very dangerous for everyone.Ž Rather than meeting with Kissinger for advice, John Kerry would better serve the cause of peace by consulting with those like Garces who have spent their lives pursuing peace. The only rea-son Henry Kissinger should be pursued is to be held accountable, like Pinochet, in a court of law. Q „ Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. „ Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!,Ž a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America. She is the co-author of The Silenced Majority,Ž a New York Times best-seller.

PAGE 5

*On select models. See dealer for details. For qualified buyers with credit score of 700. APRLargest Infiniti Certified Pre-Owned Dealer in South Florida1.9%FOR UP TO 36 MONTHS Warranty Coverage 72 months/100,000 miles Roadside Assistance Towing Vehicle History Report 1.9% APR FINANCINGAvailable On Select ModelsWith approved credit. See dealer for details. 2013 Infiniti G Coupe$359Lease ForPer Month$469Lease ForPer Month$529Lease ForPer Month2013InfinitiJX2013Infiniti G Convertible39 Month Lease ZERODOWN 39 Month Lease ZERODOWN 24 Month Lease ZERO DOWNPremium Package Premium Package Premium Package Model 93013Two or more vehicles available at this price.Two or more vehicles available at this price.Model 92113Back-up camera, BlueTooth,iPod equipped, HomeLink 3101 Okeechobee Blvd.Just West Of Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.www.infinitiofpalmbeach.comwww.schumacherauto.comHours: 8:30 8PM Mon-Fri Sat 8:30AM 6PM OPEN SUNDAY Noon til 5PM SCHUMACHER 888-816-7321 SCHUMACHER AUTO GROUP ** *Two or more vehicles available at this price.Back-up camera, BlueTooth,iPod equipped, HomeLink Infiniti of the Palm Beaches is Recipient of the2013 Infiniti Award of Excellence Chuck Schumacher SCHUMACHER *Lease the G37 Sedan, and G Coupe for 24 months, 10k miles per year, G37, G coupe Zero Down, QX70 and G Convertible for 39 months, 10k miles per year. Zero Down. Lease the Infiniti JX and Q50 for 39 months, 10k miles per year, JX Zero Down, Q50 requires $3,999 down. These Vehicles requir e $1,550.00 due at signin g, all plus dealer fee, bank acquistion fee, first payment. No security deposit on all vehicles shown. All offers dealer retains all rebates, incentives and Loyalty. Payments do not include state and local taxes, tags, registration fee and dealer fee. Must take delivery from dealer stock. Pictures for illustration purposes only. WAC for qualified buyers, See dealer for details. Expires 9/30/2013. The All-New 2014Infiniti QX7039 MonthLease Two or more vehicles available at this price.$499LeaseForPer Month 2013 Infiniti G37 Sedan24 Month Lease Two or more vehicles available at this price.$299Lease ForPerMonthModel 91113Nicely Equipped ZERO DOWNPremium Package*Model 84113 The All-New2014 Infiniti Q50Starting At $37,305*$399Per Month39 month leaseTwo or more vehicles available at this price.orLease ForPremium PackageZERO DOWNModel 82114 Model 84113 11 Infiniti Q56Loaded, black onblack, nice#Z2682 $49,99711 Infiniti G37Navigation, sunroofand more#Z2679 $28,997 12 Infiniti M37Must experiencethis vehicle#130832A $38,59710 Infiniti M35Spotless vehicleone owner#131242A $24,997

PAGE 6

A6 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY PET TALESBred for back troubleLong backs, short legs and slipped disks: Is your dog at risk? BY DR. PATTI KHULYUniversal UclickIm not sure exactly how it happens, but veterinarians tend to take on special needsŽ pets. Of course, Im no exception. My French bulldogs chronic spinal problems and ensuing disability make him a perfect poster child for veterinari-an-owned pets everywhere. It also makes him the ideal subject of a discussion on intervertebral disk disease, arguably the most common spinal malady among dogs. Intervertebral disk disease, like my dog Vincents, is referred to as IVDDŽ by veterinarians, but is better known to the general public as slipped disk.Ž Its a condition caused by the untimely degeneration of one or more of the disk-shaped structures that serve as cushions between the bony vertebrae of the spine. When these disks go bad, the mate-rial contained within them is extruded, thereby compressing the most sensitive nearby structure: the spinal cord.Like my temperamental Vincent (his spine isnt the only source of his spe-cialnessŽ), the spinal cord doesnt take insults lying down. It lets everyone know when its unhappy. In most cases, pain is the bodys most obvious response to an affronted spinal cord. Afflicted dogs may stand in a hunched position, cry out when picked up, refuse to jump or decline to eat, among other possible symptoms.But some dogs arent especially demonstrative when it comes to letting you know theyre hurting. In fact, plenty will never whine, cry or otherwise display their discomfort „ ever. For some, thats because their disease is mild. For others, its because its simply their nature to conceal any pain. In more advanced cases, however, the evidence of IVDD may ultimately appear in how they move. An odd hitch in her stride, a peculiar dragging of a hind foot, a funny crossing-over of his hind limbs „ theyre all possibilities. In these patients, what youre observing is the end result of a serious spinal offense: evidence of nerve damage. When the spinal cord is damaged „ whether permanently or temporar-ily „ the communication between the brain and the body is disrupted. And for most IVDD patients, the hind limbs are the first to go. Thats why the unluckiest patients will forever walk oddly, if they walk at all. In Vincents case, it has taken three surgeries to get him back on all four paws. Nonetheless, these separate IVDD events have claimed most of his hind limb function. The next time, his neuro-surgeons tell me, he wont be so lucky. Which is why hes already being trained to use his K-9 cart, aka a doggie wheel-chair.Ž To be sure, its a depressing disease. More so for dogs who dont have the lux-ury of a veterinarian owner and a bunch of board-certified neurosurgeons to lav-ish them with their professional services. But fortunately, few dogs are as seriously diseased as Vincent. Trouble is, for every wheelchair-bound patient, hun-dreds more suffer painful IVDD symp-toms that arent detected or treated. It makes sense, then, that research dollars might be dedicated to explor-ing the basis for this disease. Because its especially common in dachshunds, among other short-legged long-backed breeds (bassets, shih tzus, Welsh corgis, etc.), a recent veterinary study at The Royal Veterinary College in the United Kingdom undertook to understand this connection, ultimately establishing a relationship between long backs, short legs and IVDD. Although all dog owners should be on the lookout for pain and dysfunc-tion, those who count stubby-legged, long-backed dogs among their family are effectively put on notice: Spinal troubles may be headed your way. So at your next veterinary visit, why not ask your pets doctor to check for telltale signs you might be missing? The earlier the diag-nosis, the more treatment options there are, and the better chance your dog has of living without the chronic pain IVDD can cause. „ Guest columnist Dr. Patty Khuly (drpattykhuly.com) is a Miami-based veterinarian and popular author, as well as a top veterinary blogger and the creator of The Fat Dog Diet,Ž a smartphone app designed to help pet owners reduce their dogs weight. Q >> Henley is a 3-yearold neutered male Pit Bull mix. He loves people and follows several com-mands. He likes to sniff the ground on his walks.>> Simon is an 11-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair. He likes to be held, and loves people. He’s eligible for the Senior to Senior program.To adopt: The Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information call 686-6656.>> Jenny is a spayed female calico, approxi-mately one and a half years old. She’s high-spirited, and gets along well with her companions, both human and feline. >> Barney is a neutered male tabby, approximately 5 months old. He and his sister Betty (not shown) came to the shelter as kit-tens. He’d love it if Betty could come with him!To adopt: Adopt A Cat is a no-kill, freeroaming cat rescue facility located at 1125 Old Dixie Highway, Lake Park. The shelter is open to the public Mon-Sat, noon to 6 p.m. For additional information, and photos of other adoptable cats, see our website at www.adoptacatfoundation.org, or visit us on Facebook (Adopt A Cat Foundation). For adoption information, call 848-4911 or 848-6903.Pets of the Week

PAGE 7

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A7 Get Back in the Game Full Chiropractic & Physical Therapy FacilityTreat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t#6-(*/()&3/*"5&%%*4$4t%&(&/&3"5*7&%*4$%*4&"4& t'"$&54:/%30.&t'"*-&%#"$,463(&3: WITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY #BDL1BJO DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director Over 20 years in Palm Beach County DR. BRUCE GOLDBERGChiropractor, Acupuncture GIFT CERTIFICATE$0.1-*.&/5"3:$)*3013"$5*$ &9".*/"5*0/$0/46-5"5*0/ This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 10/11/2013. $150VALUE $150VALUE ~ Chiropractic & Physical Therapy Insurance List ~ AARP, Medicaid – 21 y/o and younger, Aetna, Medicare, Alignetworks, MedRisk, Allstate, Mercury Auto, Ameriprise Metropolitan Casualty, Avmed, Network Synergy, BCBS Multiplan, Beechstreet, Nationwide, Cigna, Neighborhood Health Partnership, Corvel, PHCS, Coventry, Prime Health Services, Dairyland Auto, Progressive Auto, Department of Labor, Providian, Fara, Rockport, FirstHealth, State Farm, Focus, Summit, Gainsco Auto, Tech Health, Geico, Three Rivers, GHI Travelers, GoldenR ule, Tricare, GreatWest, UHC/Optum Health, Heartland Therapy, UMR, Healthy Palm Beaches, Universal Smart Comp, Humana, Vista, Liberty Mutual, Wellmed 2632 Indiantown RoadJupiter561-744.73739089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37Palm Beach Gardens561-630-9598www.PapaChiro.com (FU IFMQ toda y " P S EBCMF c ash rat es Flagler Museum2013-2014 Season Programs For information or to purchase tickets visit www.FlaglerMuseum.us or call (561) 655-2833 For a free Season Program Guide call (561) 655-2833, or e-mail: mail@FlaglerMuseum.us Fall Exhibition Man of the Century: The Incomparable Legacy of Henry Morrison Flagler October 15, 2013 January 5, 2014 Caf des Beaux-Arts open for the Season in the Flagler Kenan Pavilion November 29, 2013 April 19, 2014 Annual Christmas Tree Lighting Festivities and Special Holiday Lecture December 1, 2013, 2:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Winter ExhibitionStories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York January 28 April 20, 2014 Holiday Evening Tours of Whitehall December 18 23, 2013 Whitehall Lecture Series Crimes of the Century The Inventor and The Tycoon Feb. 2 American Lightning Feb. 9 The Devil’s Gentleman Feb. 16 Depraved Feb. 23 American Eve Mar. 2 Flagler Museum Music Series 7KHQHVWFKDPEHUPXVLFVHWWLQJLQ6RXWK)ORULGD Shanghai Quartet Jan. 7 Yoonie Han Jan. 21 Cuarteto Latinoamericano Feb. 4 Atos Trio Feb. 18 Talich Quartet Mar. 4 6th Annual Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation Golf Tournament tees off Oct. 12The deadline is Oct. 7 for registra-tion for the sixth annual Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation golf tournament. The four-person scramble, on Sat-urday, Oct. 12 at the PGA National Resort and Spa, will be played on both the Champi-on Course, home of PGAs Honda Classic and on the Fazio Course, a recent reinvention and modernization of the Haig course. The cost of the tournament is $155 on the Champion course and $130 on the Fazio course and includes breakfast, lunch including a silent auction, 18-holes of golf and a pre-event evening wine and cheese party at Talay Thai in LA Fitness Plaza. Each player will also receive a tournament shirt or wind shirt, and tournament cap on the morning of the event. Both courses are selling out fast, said Tom Murphy, president of the Police Foundation, so interested players are encouraged to sign up quickly at golf.pbgpf.org or by calling Sgt. Jack Schnur at 799-4565. Several levels of sponsorship are still available for this charitable event and most include a complimentary four-some. Opportunities exist for business-es as well as individual sponsors. Funds raised by the tournament are used for youth-related crime preven-tion programs and to support our local Police Explorer Post which is made up of young men and women, ages 14-21, who have expressed an interest in learning more about careers in the field of law enforcement. The Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation is a non-profit entity holding IRS 501(c)(3) status. Its mission is to secure private funding to enhance the safety of the community and the effectiveness of the Palm Beach Gardens Police Depart-ment. For more information visit www.pbgpolicefoundation.org Q

PAGE 8

A8 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYexpanded to new quarters next to True Treasures, and Just in USA, another antiques shop, has moved a larger space just south of there. Antique Treasures Gallery Inc. is sandwiched in between. Pandoras Box is set to officially open in October next to Mr. Kupritzs shop. And farther up the road, Bill Jacobson has debuted I Found It!, which has a similar midcentury vibe to Mr. Kubritzs space, on Alternate A1A north of Northlake Boulevard. It has a certain appeal. I think really its just that the 60s in particular and midcentury in general was the age of design. It was made to be beautiful and functional at the same time,Ž Mr. Kubritz said. Everything that was coming out of Scandinavia and Italy and other places at that time was designed to be both beauti-ful and functional, not only that but the quality was at its peak as well.Ž Perhaps it is a way of recapturing his youth. My parents, in their first apartment in New York, had Danish modern furniture. I never noticed it because it was what my parents had. Then they gave all their things away without asking me,Ž he said. Mr. Jacobson saw a practical need for a store. First of all, I always wanted to have a brick and mortar location. I had one in West Palm Beach years ago, but it was a weekend-only location,Ž he said. He also runs the West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market, which resumes Oct. 6 on Narcissus Avenue in downtown West Palm Beach. Northern Palm Beach County is an area with economic potential. I felt the success of the stores in that Northlake corridor was indication that it was a good place to be. Success breeds success,Ž Mr. Jacobson said. The growth in new homes and sales of existing properties has been strong up there. Quite frankly, it leads me to believe theres a little bit higher per capita income in the area as well.Ž Mr. Jacobson, whose day job is as a lawyer, is passionate about antiques and design, especially from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. His shop may remind visitors of sets from Mad Men.Ž Why that era?First of all, I love the colors. I will tell you that theres a huge collection of ashtrays, both cigar and cigarette ash-trays, in my store,Ž he said. The reason I started my collection was because the colors are fabulous „ the browns, yellows and greens. That combination is pretty explosive in my eyes. Im just drawn to it.Ž These objects are not the traditional antiques of Victorian frills and Georgian curves. When I started in this business, collecting on my own, I really liked antiques, and I think a lot of people were still collecting dark-wood antiques,Ž Mr. Jacobson said. That market dried up around here, and midcentury became popular.Ž Mr. Kupritz agreed.I had an antiques store in Baltimore 25 years ago, and I sold what is referred to as brown furniture. It was mahogany, inlaid with satinwood, very formal. Thats what was popular,Ž he said. Now people are coming back to midcentury modern. They want things that are more fun, more expressive of their taste. Theyre not so concerned about sticking to some strict guideline. They want to enjoy their interiors.Ž Both men are passionate about the items they sell. Im what you call a compulsive buyer. Maybe like a lot of shop owners, I think the reason we go into busi-ness is because we have exceeded the amount of space we have in our homes,Ž Mr. Kupritz said. A lot of it came from my personal collection,Ž Mr. Jacobson said. The same could be said for Judith Westerfield and Joyce Craig, owners of Pandoras Box. At the bottom of Pandoras Box is hope. So when she let out all these uglies, there was hope,Ž said Mrs. Craig, a pas-sionate collector who has finally trans-lated that passion into a storefront. She had a space at Palm Antique Mall and did well there. I made $500 the first month,Ž she said. That inspired her to do more. She has a booth each month at the West Palm Beach Antiques Festival, at the South Florida Fairgrounds. Ive been collecting all my life, my moms been collecting. Its been an extension of my collecting,Ž she said of her retail venture. Its rustic. Country antiques. I like dirt, rust, Tennessee mud. I go picking in Tennessee in barns, cel-lars.Ž But traditional antiques have not been selling well, at least not in South Florida, where shoppers want lighter items with clean lines and a tropical vibe. I have rustic antiques, like with my cast-iron stove. There are people who do the rustic, dirty Bible-belt antiques. There are a lot of people who dont do that. They dont think theyre worth any-thing,Ž she said. But there are enough customers to make it worth her while. Ms. Westerfield, her business partner, said she once had a store on Worth Avenue. She walks to the back of the store, which is filled with clothing, wigs and beauty product closeouts. When I met Joyce, she had collected antiques and wanted to go into business,Ž she said. I had closed my business about a year and a half ago and was afraid to go out on my own.Ž Ms. Westerfield had a booth at a flea market in Stuart. I collect copper, brass, crystal and decorative accessories,Ž she said, point-ing to many of those objects in the front of the store. A shelf holds a jade elephant here, a 1920s pincushion doll there. She had a career in design of a different sort. I made Corvette cup holders,Ž she said. I used to travel to Corvette shows VINTAGEFrom page 1 PHOTOS BY SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYMbler Home Decor offers a range of midcen-tury furniture, lighting, artwork and acces-sories. This sculptural lamp is the mascot at Pan-dora’s Box in Palm Beach Gardens. A cat-themed cigar and cigarette ashtray set dates from the 1960s. It’s at I Found It! Vintage design shopsHere are antiques/design stores that have opened or expanded in the past year in the Northlake Boulevard corridor: >> Antique Treasures Gallery, Northlake Commons, 3908 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 775-7776. Offers antiques and vintage furnishings and accessories. >> Just in USA, Northlake Commons, 3902 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; (772) 546-1234. Offers an array of antiques and collectibles. >> I Found It!, 9249 Alternate A1A, North Palm Beach; 557-2881. Midcentury furniture and accessories, as well as some antiques and collectibles. >> Mbler Home Decor, Northlake Commons, 3970 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 972-8489. Midcentury furniture, lighting, artwork and accessories. >> Palm Antique Mall, Northlake Commons, 3922 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 459-8083. Group of dealers offers a mix of antiques and accessories. >> Pandora’s Box Boutique and Consignment Thrift Store, Northlake Commons, 3972 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 870-3135 or 797-2887. Art, furniture, col-lectibles and clothing. >> Treasures for Hope, 3540 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 691-8881. Charity shop offers high-end furniture, ac-cessories, housewares and clothing. JACOBSON

PAGE 9

to sell trim tips for Vettes. The trim was always dam-aged on the T-top latches. We designed a piece that would fit over the top of the trim to protect new trim or cover the damage on the old trim.Ž She loves meeting people at the shop. Its fun. Its much nicer than sitting at home being bored. I like to be around people,Ž she said. People are the main component of a business in which the more dealers there are the merrier, as least as far as drawing customers. We opened during the summer, which is the slowest time of the year,Ž said Mr. Jacobson. Every-one who walks into the store really likes it.Ž He said he plans two large events at the store in early October, a second in late October or early November. Everyone has been, Gosh, I wish I could have that,Ž Mr. Jacobson said. Who wouldnt like to have a big roulette spin-ning wheel in their house? Quite frankly, I think the store is very unique. Its got a low-key feel and (customers) feel good about it.Ž And perhaps most important of all: There is lots of good stuff to look at.Ž Q FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 20133 A9 PHOTOS BY SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLYHarp sculpture at I Found It! originally was part of a display. Paintings and vintage lamps at Mbler Home DecorThe entrance to Pandora’s Box offers a hint at the shop’s eclectic mix of merchandise.

PAGE 10

24 Hour Emergency CareOur emergency facilities are open 24 hours a day for the treatment of emergent medical conditions in adults and children. We provide the same emergency care that patients receive in our hospital based emergency room, only closer to home. As an o-site emergency room, we oer a uniquely convenient, comfortable and welcoming atmosphere, with minimal wait time.Physicians at JFK Emergency Care are Board Certi“ed in Emergency Medicine and are committed to providing our patients with the highest level of care and personalized attention. Well have your child back on the playground in no time. Mainstreet at Midtown 4797 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 561-548-8200 Shoppes at Woolbright 10921 S. Jog Road Boynton Beach, FL 33437 561-548-8250 WHEN KIDS NEED GREAT EMERGENCY CARE, WE ARE HERE. Aliated with The Childrens Hospital at Palms WestTo Speak to a Nurse 24 Hours a day or for a Physician Referral, please call 561-548-4JFK (4535).

PAGE 11

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 NEWS A11SOCIETY Tribute to Military Order of the Purple Heart at CarmineÂ’s Ocean GrilleNINA CUSMANO/FLORIDA WEEKLYAli Sader, Gail Sheridan and Ed Nevins Katie Costain, Sherry Cawthra and Alissa Obrien Craig Fitzsimmons and Charles Dykes Jonathan Langford, Collin Langford, Kristina Langford and Ian Langford Kenny Becker, Mary Lou Dolezel, Mike Dolezel and Lisa Becker Ray Nora Dobski and Dr. Donald Provenzano Rebecca Gould, Lee R. Brown III and Claudia Vanoveo Tammie Damron and Merrill Lochmaier Thomas Burke, David Schmidt, Richard Hunt and Earl McMillan

PAGE 12

A12 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Imagine Having A Choice When It Comes To Your Emergency Care. As a patient, it is important to know that you have a choice when it comes to your immediate medical needs. ER visits are necessary when a medical condition is life or limb-threatening. If a medical condition is not life-threatening, an Urgent Care Center can be a less costly and faster alternative to the ER. Our team of dedicated and highly-skilled healthcare professionals at Jupiter Medical Centers ER and Urgent Care Center are here for all your immediate medical needs. You can walk-in at both of these locations, or schedule an appointment for minor emergencies. The ER at Jupiter Medical Center € Board-Certi“ed Emergency Physicians € Highly-Trained & Experienced ER Nurses and ER Medical Technicians € 21 Private Patient Rooms € Joint Commission Accredited Primary Stroke Center € Hospital-Based Comprehensive Emergency Services for a Seamless Patient Experience € Immediate Access to Advanced Radiology Services € Open 24/7 t4DIFEVMFBOBQQPJOUNFOUXXXKVQJUFSNFEDPN&3 Jupiter Medical Centers Urgent Care Center € Fast & Affordable Walk-In Service € Open Late & on Weekends € Digital X-Ray € Flu Shots € School & Sports Physicals € EKGs € Lab Services € Fast Track Services to Jupiter Medical Centers ER, Advanced Radiology Services or Physician Specialists (if necessary) t4DIFEVMFBOBQQPJOUNFOUCZDBMMJOHn Urgent Care Center 5430 Military Trail, Suite 64, Jupiter, Florida 33458 jupitermed.com/urgentcare € (561) 263-7010 Monday to Saturday, 8 a.m. 8 p.m. € Sunday, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. The ER at JMC 1210 South Old Dixie Highway, Jupiter, Florida 33458 jupitermed.com/ER € (561) 263-4460 Ranked by HealthGrades Among the Top 5% in the Nation for Emergency Medicine for 3 Years in a Row (2010-2012)Recipient of the HealthGrades Americas 50 BestŽ AwardTM for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013) “Decoding Annie Parker” premiere is Oct. 12 in West Palm BeachFacing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE), hosts the exclusive pre-miere of the feature film Decoding Annie Parker.Ž Forming a unique col-laboration, FORCE, the only non-profit organization devoted to helping those affected by hereditary breast and ovar-ian cancer, as well as their families, is bringing this picture to five cities across the United States, including West Palm Beach, on Oct. 12. The premiere of the movie, starring Helen Hunt, Samantha Morton, Bradley Whitfield, and Rashida Jones, will be at 7 p.m. at Muvico Parisian 20, 545 Hibis-cus St., West Palm Beach. Tickets are available at dappalmbeach.eventbrite.com. The movie tells the true story of two remarkable women, Dr. Mary Claire King and Annie Parker, each touched by hereditary breast cancer in her own way: Ms. Parker battles the disease and Dr. Kings genetic research leads to the discovery of the BRCA1 breast cancer gene. Dr. Kings discovery changed the way many in the medical community approached breast cancer and provided solace to families who, generation after generation, lost their mothers, wives and daughters to the disease. Compared with people in the general population, individuals with a BRCA mutation and those with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancers face many challenges, such as much higher likelihood of being diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer, being diagnosed at a younger age, developing cancer more quickly and in more aggressive forms, and having a 50 percent chance of pass-ing on a BRCA mutation to a child. With the screening of this feature film here in Palm Beach, especially since it falls during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month--which is an important milestone for our community „ there is a tremendous opportunity to educate people about the importance of knowing their family medical his-tory and speaking to a genetics expert if a pattern of cancer presents itself,Ž said Amy Shainman, a FORCE outreach coordinator. The presentation is sponsored by The Lillian Byer HBOC Fund; The Bro-cade Study; Jupiter Medical Center; Basser Research Center for BRCA; Dr. John Rimmer: Debby Gans Photogra-phy; Gardens Dermatology; Hollywood Cupcake; Palm Beach Illustrated; Provi-dent Jewelry; Small Fish Big Fish Swim School; Luka Mineral Cosmetics, and Swell. For more than 15 years, FORCE has been the voice of the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer community. FORCE provides support, education and aware-ness to help those facing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer know their healthcare options and make informed decisions. See facingourrisk.org. Q

PAGE 13

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 NEWS A13 D ear Kelly, : I am a 45-year-old sin-gle father with full custody of my 8-year-old son. My divorce was two years ago and I am now ready to date again. My son is well-adjusted and I feel that I need to do something nice for myself now. As they saying goes, Happy daddy, happy child.Ž My ques-tion is, if Im looking for love, where do I “nd nice women to date? D ear Single DadŽ: Hats off to you for putting your son “rst and for recog-nizing that you need a life, too. The worst thing you can do as a single par-ent is wait until they are out of the house (i.e., in college), and then start looking for love.First of all, you, Dad, would be 10 years older. There is no reason to miss out on a de-cade of romance and intimacy with a woman just because you are divorced and raising a son. Our children want us to be happy. You are correct in saying that „ the happier you are, the happier your son will be. Im proud of you for recogniz-ing that and for coming to me for guidance. In some areas, 70 percent of couples are divorced; so please know that there are plenty of nice women avail-able to date. Also, studies on children of divorceŽ show that the best thing we can do is to re-engage in a healthy relationship again, thereby setting a healthy example of how men and women should interact. Children of divorce that observe mom or dad „ or both „ in a new, healthy rela-tionship fare better then a child whose parent(s) stays single forever. Its a known fact. So, stay on course and know that there are many good women out there. There are women in your same situation. I represent many professional single moms and dads. They are too busy and logically cautious to look online or in a bar scene, so they come to me as a new friend who just knows more singles than they could meet on their own. Keep it simple! Be logical. Its only math; the odds are in your favor that you will “nd love again. Just use a trusted friend in the know to help you out. I see good times ahead for you. You are doing the right thing and thinking the right thoughts. Your son is very lucky! After all, you are kind of dating for two,Ž and you need a woman who will “t in with both of you „ since you are looking for long-term love again. Im sure you will “nd it!Begin today and join us at our Pri-vate September 21 Speed Dating Event. Its already 85% sold out...so hurry and rsvp... tiz the dating season.Kelly Leary is the Co-Founder of Precision Dating. She has 22 years in the dating industry and a masters degree in psychology. She has been featured on the ABC News, Talk Radio, Palm Beach Post, and Vero Beach 32963 Magazine. She pre-screens all of her clients “rst. Clients are photographed and background checked. No computer needed! Her club services clientele from age 28 to 78 with some exceptions! For more information, please call (561) 577-DATE in the Palm Beaches. RSVP at www.precisiondating.com.ADVERTISMENT Kelly Leary, M.S.Co-Founder of Precision DatingServing the Palm Beaches, South Florida, and Treasure Coast since 1991561-577-DATE (3283) www.precisiondating.comSingle father looking for love a take-off on the Thai word for delicious. And perhaps that is their mission. After all, Asian fare does have a common thread. Mr. Soo: Its all family food on a budget. Mr. Villacrusis: If you go back in time, 150-200 years from now and give these people a whole bunch of money, and they probably wont be able to cook this food deliciously, the way it is now, the way it tastes good is because they had to think about it. Weve got to make it last, make it taste good. Mr. Soo: Thats why our backgrounds come together so well. ƒ Two things I hate most was being cold and being poor. Mr. Soo was an only child, but his family still struggled financially when he was growing up. Today, his mother helps him with front of house at Talay Thai. Mr. Villacrusis: Ive always lived in an extended family house, but now I cant stand people in my house. It was my whole family: my mom and four of us kids, grandma and grandpa, one aunt and an-other aunt with one son. The house is def-initely big enough to hold all these, but it was a lot of people. We had one bathroom. Mr. Soo: Thats why you learn to be considerate. Some people think Asians are a little bit too nice, but when you live in that close quarters with so many peo-ple, you have to have a hyper-awareness or consideration so you dont step on the toes of others because thats just how you have to live. Mr. Villacrusis: Basically you have to know everyones schedules just so you can take a bath. Mr. Soo: Or anything else. The men laugh.Mr. Villacrusis: Its just that. Being able to move a lot of things around you. But you know, food doesnt taste good when youre eating alone. Mr. Soo: Thats for sure. Mr. Villacrusis: As good as if you were eating it with four other people where you were actually enjoying them and having the conversation and having that whole experience. Mr. Soo: Its a moment for respite when you sit with your family and eat. But I mean thats all around the world, Italians, anybody. Its just normalcy. Before he had his own restaurant, Kubo, at Crystal Tree Plaza in North Palm Beach, Mr. Villacrusis was a chef for several years at Marks at CityPlace, where he built a reputation as a sushi master. In the year or so since Kubo closed, Mr. Villacrusis has created a menu for Dirty Martini at Downtown at the Gardens, and has hosted a series of pop-up dinners in West Palm Beach. Mr. Villacrusis: When I was first starting, and I started not going to culinary school anymore because I was already teaching at Florida Culinary (Instit ute), but I was going to spend the money some-how, and still going to enrich my knowl-edge, so I started traveling around the U.S. and eating at the best restaurants, and I can remember going to a few of the tasting menus by myself and not really enjoying it the same way as if you were with a group. But some places I had to go by myself because I could not afford to bring a date because it was a $500 dinner. ... I get what I want to get out of it, but food experience-wise, its better if youre with someone who can appreciate it the same way. He constantly is looking for new ideas for preparing food „ he and his wife, Honeylet, even visit McDonalds restaurants around the globe. They recently traveled to Macau, Hong Kong, Japan and the Philippines. He travels to Thailand in December. Mr. Villacrusis: Im kind of biased toward Japan right now. Its my favorite nation-country, next to Singapore. Most of what I get out of the trip food-wise is still from Japan. Its just different now after being here for the longest time and visiting there for a week and seeing how excited these people are about their craft, about what they do. You can go from a grocery, to a restaurant to a bar to a fine-dining restaurant, and the guys who are cooking behind the line are just so happy. I dont know if its a front, because you cant have everyone be at this level of excite-ment of what they do, but thats how it is. You go to a bus station where this guy is cooking beef tongue on a stick, and hes so excited to tell you all about what he does and how long his family has been doing it, where they get their tongue and how long they marinate it. Theyre just so excitedƒ. Its the same experience from one store to another. It seems that we do have that now, but its on a celebrity level. Mr. Villacrusis and Mr. Soo are trying to find their own version of happy behind the line at their restaurant. During a recent lunch visit to Aah Loi, they sat at a counter and pored over menus. The menu that day had a mix of sushi and Thai fare, sashimi and curries. It was two distinct lists; the men say they hope to have a marriage of cuisines. Mr. Villacrusis: Our lunch is going to be basically what a regular Joe would want and were not going to mess with that. Come in and have your meal, and its still going to be better than your average place. Mr. Soo: You want to go out to lunch for $10-$15. Ambition just doesnt work for lunchtime. Youve only got an allotted time and we know that and we want to serve that community because if you look at this location, were stuck in the middle of nowhere, it seems like. All the restau-rants are along Donald Ross and Indian-town. Mr. Villacrusis: We just want to make sure its simple enough for everyone. At dinner, were still going to have comfort food in there, but at dinner, we want to give them those options. ƒ If you want to have the full-on experience, this will still be the place. Mr. Soo: Were a community restaurant. We try to serve all things without losing ourselves. During that visit, Mr. Soos signature fried wontons were light and crispy. They were served with a spicy sauce that com-plemented the wontons chicken filling. A Thai green curry dish was evenly sea-soned, its chicken cooked to al dente per-fection, tender with just the right amount of bite. Mr. Soo is learning about sushi and was sampling a roll that day for lunch. Mr. Villacrusis is known for his fancy flair with sushi, but diners still can find vegetable and California rolls on the menu. When asked about the costs of opening a new restaurant, Mr. Soo laughed and said, Too much money!Ž They have done an extensive build-out on the Aah Loi space, opening ceilings and creating a hip, urban space. Walls are painted a crisp jade green. LED lights highlight a coved ceiling. A small sushi bar lines the back wall. Mr. Villacrusis is grateful to have a culinary home. And, one would venture to guess, so is his fan base. Q „ Aah Loi Thai and Sushi is at 3755 Military Trail, Suite B14, Jupiter. 748-5201.AAH LOIFrom page 1 PHOTOS COURTESY OF LIBBYVISIONA roll from Aah Loi. The two chefs say that Asian food is “family food on a budget.”A cheesecake dish served at Aah Loi. A mussels dish.Roy Villacrusis and Charlie Soo

PAGE 14

Good Samaritan Medical Center reports its first water birthOn Aug. 21 at 3:47 a.m., Hannah Anderson became the first patient to have a water birth at Good Samaritan Medical Center. Her healthy baby boy, Ernest Russell Anderson V, was born at 7 lbs., 7 oz. and 20 inches long, the hospital reported in a prepared statement. Good Samaritan Medical Centers Maternity Services and Special Deliv-eries program recently began offering mothers the option to have their babies in a special birthing tub filled with soothing water. The goal is to reduce stress and pain during labor and delivery. The waters natural buoyancy creates a weightless-ness that can help decrease muscle tension and promote relaxation. Q Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint proteins vital to long-term memoryScientists from the Scripps Research Institute Jupiter campus have found a group of proteins essential to the forma-tion of long-term memories. The focuses on a family of proteins called Wnts. These proteins send sig-nals from the outside to the inside of a cell, inducing a cellular response crucial for many aspects of embryonic develop-ment, including stem cell differentia-tion, as well as for normal functioning of the adult brain, according to a statement from Scripps. By removing the function of three proteins in the Wnt signaling pathway, we produced a defi-cit in long-term but not short-term memory,Ž said Ron Davis, chair of the TSRI Department of Neuroscience, in the statement. The pathway is clearly part of the conversion of short-term memory to the long-term stable form, which occurs through changes in gene expression.Ž The findings stem from experiments probing the role of Wnt signaling com-ponents in olfactory memory formation in Drosophila, the common fruit fly „ a widely used doppelgnger for human memory studies. In the new study, the scientists inactivated the expression of several Wnt signaling proteins in the mushroom bodies of adult flies „ part of the fly brain that plays a role in learn-ing and memory. The resulting memory disruption, Mr. Davis said, suggests that Wnt signaling participates actively in the forma-tion of long-term memory, rather than having some general, non-specific effect on behavior. What is interesting is that the molecular mechanisms of adult memory use the same processes that guide the early development of the organism, except that they are repurposed for memory formation,Ž he said. One difference, however, is that during early develop-ment the signals are intrinsic, while in adults they require an outside stimulus to create a memory.Ž Q St. Mary’s Medical Center staff strengthens ties with Bahrain, Saudi ArabiaDr. Dror Paley of the Paley Advanced Limb Lengthening Institute at St. Marys Medical Center recently visited the Bah-rain and Saudi Arabian Embassies in Washington, D.C., to update them on services available at the institute. He gave an overview of the hospitals inter-national program and presented the embassies with before and after pictures of some of his most challenging cases, St. Marys said in a prepared statement. Dr. Paley was accompanied by Davide Carbone, CEO of St. Marys Medical Center; Caswell Walford, Tenet Floridas director of international business devel-opment; and Luma Ameer, international patient coordinator at St. Marys. The group hoped to strengthen ties with the Bahrain and Saudi Arabian Embassies to serve more patients from those areas. Q A14 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYAvoid the “Grandparent Olympics,” and just love the childrenMilt, I should have known wed never have the afternoon alone with the grandkids. The Baxters live 10 minutes away. Why the heck did they have to pick TODAY to come over? They know its not so easy for us to make the four-hour drive. Youd think they would respect this and give us some space. And it kills me that Ben will never speak up to his in-laws when it comes to us.Ž Sheila hated speaking poorly about their sons in-laws, because if truth be told, the Baxters were great people. They were generous to a fault, and were always available to babysit in a pinch. And, more important, they treated Ben like a son. Sheila and Milt did their best to Skype regularly and to visit as often as possible. But between their busy work schedules and caring for Milts elderly parents, they werent able to make the drive more than once every six weeks. Sheila couldnt help but feel jealous and resentful of the strong bond that proximity allowed the Baxters to forge with the grandchildren. It felt like a knife in her heart when 5-year-old Max spoke about his OTHER grandparents at a school assembly and didnt mention them. Max was the most delicious little boy. She knew he loved her and didnt mean any harm, but it was still a penetrating wound. In a recent movie, Parental Guidance,Ž Bette Midler laments to Billy Crystal, her movie husband, that theyve become the other grandparentsŽ„ less important, and less acknowledged than the other side. Realizing too late theyd assumed a more back street role in their grandchildrens lives, they were trying feverishly to claim favor. When it comes to our grandchildren, wed like to think that all the adults have a mutual interest in loving the same pre-cious children „ and were all on the same team. Sadly, it doesnt always work out that way. In theory, we know these young people have room in their hearts to love all of us in their own way. So it may be embarrassing to admit that some of us angle, not only to win their affections, but to outdo the other contenders. In these instances, we may feel petty and ungracious, especially when we actually LIKE the others, and know they have the childrens best interests at heart. However, like members of any group, some of us jockey for the advantage, viewing the others as rivals. We seek to be reasonable, but underneath, we often carry that guilty little wish to be the most loved of the group. We may puff our-selves up when it seems were basking in the little ones favor. And, we may forget theyre just innocents who are usually too young to comprehend the complexi-ties of adult relationships. We should give up on the notion that the extended family playing field will be even, because quite frankly, it rarely is. There can be so many factors explain-ing why one set of grandparents may be more involved in their childrens lives „ whether its proximity, lifestyle, extended family dynamics, the number of other grandchildren and the personalities of each player. And, of course, there are many who believe that the young mother calls most of the shots so the maternal grandpar-ents invariably have the edge.For those of us who have had disappointments in raising our own children, we may view grandparenting as a second chance to set things right. Some of us may have been consumed by career demands or personal issues when our children were growing, so we may still feel guilt that we were not as emotionally available to our children as we could have been. But, now, we may have the time and the emotional wherewithal to reach out to our grandchildren in a more personal way. We may unintentionally revisit old hurts, and wish to correct old mistakes by forging a closer, stronger bond with this grandchild. Some of us are not the hands-on, crawling on the groundŽ kind of folks who know how to spontaneously capti-vate the little ones. We may feel awkward and defensive when observing how the other grandparents seem to easily gush exuberance and elicit belly laughs. How-ever, its important to remember that children warm up to all sorts of personal-ities. No harm in being the more serious grandparentŽ whose fame is patiently reading storybooks over and over. The key is to demonstrate loving presence and interest. Children love routines and family rituals. Finding activities they can identify as your special cachet „ such as baking cookies, or scrapbooking family traditions „ can go a long way toward-cementing a bond. Children can sense which adults are bored and which prefer to watch television rather than spending quality time. Its important for the grandparents to be respectful of the young couples stresses and to avoid undue pressure by putting them in the middle. Some-times it helps for the young parents and grandparents to have frank discussions on how to navigate the conflicts in the extended relationships. This is not about fairness, because it will never be possible to treat each set of grandparents exactly the same. However, highlighting what is uniquely special about each relationship, and acknowledging the differences may be very important. Oh, it can be so difficult to maintain perspective. There are some who coin the term: Grandparent Olympics,Ž which conjures up images of seniors contorting themselves as they compete for the coveted trophy (the prize, of course, is to be most loved grandparent.) We all know the sad stories of children who are impressed by the allure of lavish gifts. In the long run, love and attention should reap the richest rewards. Its no accident that children run to the adults who have demonstrated genuine warmth and enthusiasm. Q „ The example at the beginning of this column is fiction. „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., LCSW, is a psychotherapist serving individuals, couples and families. A Palm Beach Gardens resident, she holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia and trained at the Ackerman Institute for Family Therapy in Manhattan. She can be reached in her Gardens office at 630-2827, online at www.palmbeachfamilytherapy.com, or on Twitter @LindaLipshutz. HEALTHY LIVING a C b i t a linda LIPSHUTZllipshutz@floridaweekly.com COURTESY PHOTO Hannah Anderson holds her son, Ernest Russell Anderson V, who was born at Good Samaritan Medical Center via water birth. COURTESY PHOTO Dr. Dror Paley and Davide CarboneDAVIS

PAGE 15

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A15 Physical therapy important after joint replacementPhysical therapy plays an important role in helping patients return to everyday activities following joint surgery to replace hips, knees, shoul-ders, fingers or ankles. Making a full recovery takes a considerable amount of time and significant effort on the part of the patient, but is often possible with the help of a physical therapist. For patients requiring rehabilitation care, the in-house Rehabilita-tion Institute at St. Marys Medical Center provides expert, intensive, individualized care. To promote the patients recovery after injury, an individually developed treatment plan identifies goals, coordinates efforts, and helps ensure that all therapies are carried through to recovery. The Rehabilitation Insti-tute at St. Marys Medical Center is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), which reflects our commit to quality improvement and our focus on the unique needs of each person we serve. Physical therapy following joint replacement surgery usually begins with a thorough assessment of your condition and the development of a treatment plan. During a quick screening, the physical therapist will check your heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, skin integrity, and range of motion and functional strength of other areas of the body. An evaluation of your overall ability to move may be done and you may be asked to complete a question-naire to describe problems you could encounter with day-to-day activities, such as getting dressed. Finally, the therapist will make a recommenda-tion of how many visits and for how long you will need physical therapy. Your physical therapist will recommend certain exercises as part of your rehabilitation program. Exer-cise can help improve flexibility, decrease swelling, increase strength, enhance endurance, improve balance and coordination, and lessen diffi-culties in performing daily activities. The type and intensity of exercises you do will take into account the surgery that was performed, type of replacement joint and condition of the joint before surgery. If you had a shoulder replacement, for example, your physical therapy program would typically begin with isometric strengthening exercises. This would focus on muscles that lift and push the arm forward and backward, raise the arm, and turn the shoulder. As your therapy progress-es, elastic bands would be intro-duced to further strengthen shoulder muscles. Approximately 12 weeks after surgery, light weights can be used, beginning with one-pound weights and gradually progressing up to five-pound weights. Aquatic exercises also may be included in your physical therapy program. As you go through physical therapy it is important not to overdo the exercises. If you notice any swelling, you may be doing too much, too fast. A small amount of muscle discom-fort during therapy is to be expected, but if you experience pain, you may be irritating or straining the joint too much. Check with your physical therapist if you experience any prob-lems with your exercises. Physical therapy may feel uncomfortable at first, but exercises will help speed your recovery and reduce pain after surgery. If you had a total hip replacement, you will be asked to begin walking to increase circulation in your legs and feet, and to prevent blood clots. It may take months to make a full recovery. During that time your physical therapist will work with you to build endurance so your muscles will work effectively for longer periods of time. You also may be asked to start weight-bearing and postural exercises, as well as balance and coordination exercises. Your physical therapist will recommend more advanced exercises as your condition continues to improve. During follow-up visits your thera-pist can make sure you are perform-ing the exercises routinely and safe-ly. Eventually you will be released to full activity, but keep in touch with your therapist to ensure that you achieve your optimal range of motion and make a complete recov-ery. To learn more about rehabilitation after joint surgery please visit our website at www.stmarysmc.com. You can also receive more information and a free physician referral by calling 882-9100. Q davide CARBONE CEO, St. Marys Medical Center Got Download?The iPad App Its FREE! Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com Search Florida Weekly in the iTunes App Store today.iPad is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. All rights reserved. Its Local. Its Entertaining. Its Mobile. ADVERTISEMENT ASK THE DENTAL EXPERT Question: Can Wisdom Teeth Create Serious Health Consequences? Answer: The third molars of the teeth are commonly known as the “wisdom teeth.” These teeth are the last teeth to erupt in the mouth, and it is common for these teeth to be removed before they have a chance to erupt on their own. Wisdom teeth are extracted when there is not enough room in the mouth to accommodate them. They are also removed as a preventative measure to avoid the pain, infection or disease that can occur while the teeth are erupting. Wisdom teeth are also removed when they present a health threat to surrounding teeth because they are impacted. A wisdom tooth is considered impacted when it is growing sideways, is only partially erupted, or is trapped beneath the gum line. When a wisdom tooth is impacted, the only treatment option is extraction. There can be serious health consequences if an impacted wisdom tooth is not removed. A poorly aligned impacted wisdom tooth may damage the roots of surrounding teeth. A partially erupted wisdom tooth may leave a hole where bacteria can enter the gum and cause an infection. A cyst may develop around the impacted tooth, causing damage to the surrounding bone structure. Wisdom-tooth extraction is a very common procedure. Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. He’s been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He’s a member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists.Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A., Board Certi“ ed Sedation DentistPGA Center for Advanced Dentistry Never Neglect Your Wisdom Teeth Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S.,P.A.PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry7100 Fairway Dr. Suite 59Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418x£‡"‡nU*`iˆVœ“ Ask The Health & Beauty Experts ASK THE COSMETIC SURGEON Chronic Sinus Headaches Question: Is there a simple solution for chronic sinus headaches and nasal obstruction? Answer: Today, millions of people suffer from difficulty breathing through their nose. They have never been able to breathe through their nose and get a comfortable volume of air to their lungs! Instead, they have to breathe through their mouth. Complicating this nasal obstruction is “sinus” with nasal congestion, post nasal drip, altered sense of smell, and headaches. Invariably, they have tried over the counter antihistamines, decongestants, and nose sprays without success. Today, relief is a doctor’s visit away. First, a diagnosis has to be made from the patients history and physical. Once a patient presents with the above symptoms, the nose and sinus openings are examined with a tiny telescope. Cultures for bacteria are taken and a CT scan of the sinuses is ordered. The patient is treated with appropriate antibiotics based on the culture and possibly steroids to reduce the swelling. If symptoms persist and the xray (CT scan) shows evidence of sinusitis, then the patient is a candidate for balloon sinuplasty. This is an office procedure done under local anesthesia requiring about 30 minutes. It is safe with almost no down time. If there is a blockage from the septum then this is corrected at the same time. Today, relief of nasal obstruction and “sinus” are covered by medicaire and most insurances. If you or someone you know has been complaining of constant “sinus” complicated by severe sinus headaches, call for an office visit at 561-776-7112.Dr. Dedo has been serving the South Florida community for over 35 years and is Triple Board certified in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology. Dr. Dedo has held leadership positions in the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the local hospital community as well as the past President of the Palm Beach County Medical Society. He has written 45 articles and chapters for textbooks and medical journals. Dr. Douglas Dedo, Board Certi“ ed Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery and Otolaryngology.Gardens Cosmetic Center 4060 PGA Blvd. Suite 203Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410561-626-3223www.gardenscosmeticcenter.com

PAGE 16

A16 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYNETWORKING Northern Chamber CEO Connection at Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Young Friends of the Jupiter Lighthouse Group social at Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.Christie Finnerty and Arty FaulkBrett Mayer and Lauren WorksEric Schmidt and Michael Rosenberg Jed Dorsey and Chet Tart Debbie Nellson, Suzanne Antonich and Sarah McKenzie Brittany Tuten and Darren Newhart Matt Ramirez and Christine Tanzella Roger Amidon, Iva Grady and Ben Joseph Donna Goldfarb and Susan James Linnea Brown, Stephanie Kaufer, Ilan Kaufer and Jason LoweAmyleigh Atwater, Dan Uzzi, Tami Borland and Brittany Miller Roger Amidon, Sharon Quercioli and Michael Papa Elena Peroulakis and Stephan ParkRoger Amidon, Sharon QuercioliANDREW SPILOS/FLORIDA WEEKLY COURTESY PHOTOS LikeŽ us on Facebook.com /PalmBeachGardensFloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.

PAGE 17

Your Window Into Palm Beach Real Estate www.FITESHAVELL.com 561.655.6570 101 N. County Rd., Palm Beach 561.694.6550 11237 US Hwy 1, North Palm Beach 257 SEDONA WAY Beautiful 4BR/3BA Mirabellahome. Spacious kitchen, breakfastand family room, pool and serene lakeviews. Web ID 3015 $614,900 L. WARREN 561.346.3906G. LITTLE 561.309.6379THOR BROWN 561.301.7048322 CLARKE AVENUE Landmarked Mediterranean revival-style classic 7BR/7.2BA estate designed by Marion Sims Wyeth in 1929. Located on a double185x178 lot in Palm Beach. Stunning lush gardens perfect for outdoor entertaining. Pool & pavilion. Web ID 3140 $10.895M NEW LISTING BANYAN ESTATES DRIVE Two 1 acre lots in gated North Palm Beachcommunity, Seminole Landing. Build your estate home on 1 or combined lots. Beach access.Web ID 139 $1.6M & Web ID 136 $1.7MPAULA WITTMANN 561.373.2666

PAGE 18

A18 NEWS WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Find your Inner Fashionista at The Boutiques of Downtown at the Gardens. BLESSED BOUTIQUE U<"Un,<9n 1, "1///r,-U nrn*rn "r,-U-n1-rn<"r97"7Un"1/1,r"*/+1r "n+"1/+1rU-7""
PAGE 19

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 NEWS A19 DowntownAtTheGardens.com11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Avenue Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 561.340.1600 FREE Garage & Valet Parking LET THE LIVE MUSIC MOVE YOU EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT! Don’t miss the weekend nightlife in Centre Court where the Rock ‘n’ Roll is electric, the Jazz is smooth, the Acoustic is sweet, and the listening is easy. DOWNTOWN at the Gardens is your destination for nighttime celebration and live rhythms that will make you anything but blue. FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS 7-10PM, CENTRE COURT SPONSORED BY: BLESSED BOUTIQUE U<"Un,<9n 1, "1///r,-U nrn*rn "r,-U-n1-rn<"r97"7Un"1/1,r"*/+1r "n+"1/+1rU-7""
PAGE 20

Oil pipelines at the heart of the Syria problemWhat is the real story behind Syria? The different twists to the Syrian crisis are widely known throughout Europe, thanks to the newspaper reporting of Great Bri-tians The Mail and Globe and The Telegraph. It is similarly reported by Al Jazeera. It is not headlined in major U.S. newspa-pers. Such side stepping has been the case „ over several decades „ when there has been U.S. military involvement in the Middle East. Not that our past involvement was unjustified, its just that the underlying reasons offered for our involvement most probably related to oil/energy issues and not exclusively humanitarian issues. The Syrian crisis, the Syrian use of chemical weapons against its own people, the senseless death of thousands, Russias aggressive, center stage role and Russias dictation of foreign policy to the U.S. might well relate to an ongoing oil/energy dispute that involves many Middle Eastern countries and whose o utcome will greatly impact the economies of Russia and Europe. As reported outside the U.S., there is a colossal abundance of Middle Eastern natural gas looking for new markets and needing a pipeline to be built for trans-porting the gas from the Persian Gulf into Europe. The proposed alternative pipeline routes would make some countries win-ners and others losers. The ancillary prob-lem is that, in the Middle East, losers do not fade gracefully and Syria plays a piv-otal role, as all of the pipelines would pass through Syria and require Syrian approval. The gargantuan natural gas reserves in Persian waters are to be found offshore of two Middle Eastern countries, Qatar and Iran. These two physically close countries have very different agendas. What is in common is that both countries are each vying for Syrias favor as each pipeline blueprint requires pipe-line transit through Syria before reaching Europe. This natural gas pipeline debate is not a new discussion; certainly there were pipeline proposals made to Syria as early as 2009. Mainland Europe is highly interested in getting an alternative to GAZPROMs natural gas (the Russian national operat-ing company) as GAZPROM delivers one third of Europes natural gas and virtually all of its pipeline gas. (Other gas comes to Europe by LNG tanker and requires the re-gasification of the liquid form of natural gas that was transported across oceans.) Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, etc. would all love to have another natural gas pipeline source. Russia has been highly interested that a competing pipeline NOT be built. Rus-sias close relationship to Syria no doubt reflects Russias desire that Syria walk from any pipeline deal or that Syria be too internally and politically confused such that the pipeline gets further delayed. Rus-sia will have a keen interest in supporting Syria until it can definitively cut a much better energy deal for itself. Qatar, which is adjacent to Saudi Arabia, is very interested in reaching new markets for its superior gas finds in the North Field of the Persian Gulf. Qatar has proposed many pipeline routes but all go through Syria and most plans go from Qatar to neighboring Saudi Arabia then into Syria (Saudi Arabias neighbor) and then to Tur-key (Syrias neighbor). Clearly Turkey is highly interested in the pipeline being built on its soil. Iran holds territorial rights to the Persian Gulfs South Pars Field, which is adjacent to Qatars coastal reserves. Iran is highly interested in economic betterment and thwarting the effect of economic sanc-tions (plans effected internationally but at the initiatives of the U.S. and Israel, as Iran has been determined to develop a nuclear arsenal largely directed toward the latter.) Obviously, any economic benefit accruing to Iran is not good for the US, Israel and the other countries that have supported economic sanctions. The Iran pipeline would travel through Iraq and Syria and would obviate Turkey. Saudi Arabia has lobbied for the Qatars proposed pipeline, as it would cross its country. It has also been suggested that the Saudi rulers want an unstable Bashar al-Assad out of power and a Saudi-installed puppet regime in Syria. Iraq would want the Iran proposed pipeline. As Syria is at the geographic crossroads for any and all proposed pipelines, Syria has been courted by all interested parties. Most recently, Syria decided against the Qatar pipeline and for the Iranian route. Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Turkey did not like that decision. There is suggestion that some of the interested countries have offered sweetheart deals to powerful Rus-sia to use its close connection with Syria to reverse such a pipeline course. There is suggestion that the several billions in rebel arms was financed by Qatar after Syria elected for a joint venture with Iran. So what does that mean to the U.S.? To our citizenry, it might mean that once again our agenda in the Middle East has been disguised as humanitarian and once again we are playing international foreign policy poker with an unruly group of play-ers with a winner take all, win at any cost, and take no hostages mentality. With so many dogs in this fight, it might be unrealistic to think that the U.S. can play peacekeeper and that our humanitar-ian goals can be achieved. Q jeannette SHOWALTER CFA showalter@ww fsyst ems.com MONEY & INVESTINGNew foreclosure filings down 61 percent from previous year BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY PALM BEACH COUNTY COMMERCE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A20 A new state law continued to affect the number of new foreclosure filings in Palm Beach County, with new cases down sub-stantially from 2012. There were 578 new foreclosures in August, a 49.4 percent increase from 387 new foreclosures in July, but a 61.1 percent decrease from 1,485 cases filed in August 2012. The new foreclosure filing requirements outlined in Section 702.015, Florida Statutes, requires plaintiffs to acknowl-edge in their foreclosure complaint that they have all the documents necessary to prove a case against a homeowner. Those requirements took effect July 1, 2013. We havent seen our foreclosure case load this low since 2006,Ž Clerk Sha-ron Bock said. Even though we saw an increase in August compared to July, it is evident that this new law continues to have an effect on our filings.Ž The number of new mortgages and deeds recorded in Palm Beach County during August remained higher compared with the previous year, but lower than the totals recorded in July. There were 6,228 deeds recorded in Palm Beach County during August, down 10.8 percent from 6,985 deeds recorded in Palm Beach County in July, but up 19.2 per-cent from 5,226 deeds recorded in August 2012. There also were 3,923 recorded in August, a 10 percent decrease from 4,358 mortgages recorded in July, but a 13.6 per-cent increase from 3,454 mortgages record-ed in August 2012. The Clerks office is the keeper of Palm Beach Countys official records, and records all deeds and mortgages submitted for recording in Palm Beach County. There were 917 properties sold during Augusts online foreclosure auctions, according to statistics from Grant Street Group, the facilitator of ClerkAuction. Of those, 677 were sold back to the plaintiff „ typically a bank or mortgage company „ in the foreclosure proceeding, and 240 were sold to a third party. There were 523 sales canceled in August, out of 1,441 scheduled for sale. The cancel-lation rate was 36.3 percent, compared with 35.5 percent in July. The Clerk & Comptrollers office processes all foreclosure-related court docu-ments, notices of action and motions. After a foreclosure judgment, the office con-ducts the foreclosure auction and issues all post-sale documents, such as the cer-tificate of title. Information about foreclo-sures, updates about when certificates of title will be issued and links to auctions of Palm Beach Countys foreclosed proper-ties are available at www.mypalmbeach-clerk.com. Q SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

PAGE 21

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 REAL ESTATE A21Autumn inspires art throughout the agesThe first day of autumn this year is Sept. 22. It is the day of the autumnal equinox, a term based on the journey of Earth around the sun. On that day, day and night are each almost 12 hours long. It marks the days when air cools in the north and leaves on trees begin to change colors. Artists for centuries have pictured colorful fall landscapes. Cameo glass artists often carved decorations from layers of glass made in the fall sea-sonal colors of orange and red. A Daum Nancy vase made in France between about 1895 and 1920 pictures a lake scene with birch trees. The rectangular vase auctioned last year for almost $4,000. Q: Please tell me the value of a Martha Washington sewing cabinet that belonged to my great-grandmother in the 1880s. It has four long legs and three drawers in the front. There is a semicir-cular wooden storage compartment with a hinged lid on each side. And why is it named after George Washingtons wife? A: Martha Washington (1731-1802) enjoyed knitting and used a similar type of sewing table, without drawers, at Mount Vernon. The style you describe, along with its name, was not introduced until the 1920s. The First Ladys name was used to market the style, which became especially popular during the Depression. In other words, your great-grandmothers table is not as old as you think it is. But depending on its quality and condition, it could sell for about $200. Q: When cleaning out a cupboard, I found an Old Plantation wooden cigar box about 7 inches long and 5 inches wide. The outside and inside labels picture plantation scenes. Theres a 1901 IRS stamp on it. Please tell me something about the box.A: The value of old wooden cigar boxes varies considerably depending on condition. The Old Planta-tion brand name dates from around the turn of the 20th century. Some Old Plantation boxes have impressed labels, while others have paper labels. A box with inside and outside paper labels in excel-lent condition recently auc-tioned for nearly $500.Q: In the summer of 1972, I was traveling in Europe and read that Paul McCartney and Wings were to appear at the Montreux Pavilion in Montreux, Switzerland. So off I went. The streets were lined with posters for the con-cert, so I pried one loose, and today its framed and hanging on a wall in my basement. Any idea what its worth? A: McCartneys stop in Montreux was part of his new groups Wings over EuropeŽ tour. Your poster, obviously an original, is not as valuable as an original Beatles poster. Still, it could sell for up to $70. Q: In 1950, on my 5th birthday, I was given an Empire toy stove. It was made by Metal Ware Corp. I still have the little stove and it is still working, 63 years later. If you could give me any information on it, I would appreciate it.A: Metal Ware Corp. has been operating in Two Rivers, Wis., for more than 90 years. It has made steam engines, driving accessories, popcorn poppers, roasters, hotdog warmers and other electric cooking appliances. In 1921 Metal Ware Corp. bought patent rights to the Empire toy line from Hughes Electric Co. of Chicago and began to make toy stoves. The stoves worked and would probably horrify todays safety-conscious parents. Your 1940s toy stove sells today for $10 to $35, depending on condition. Older Empire stoves from the 1920s and 1930s sell for more. The company still makes and imports small electrical appliances. Q: I inherited a 12-inch white pitcher and small covered dish from my grandmother, who was born in 1880. The pieces are white with gold trim and are decorated with blue and yellow flowers. Inside the dish is a disc with a hole. The bottom of each piece is stamped Wheeling Pottery Co.Ž inside a wreath. Can you tell me their value? A: Wheeling Pottery Co. of Wheeling, W. Va., was in business from 1879 until about 1923. The firm went through a number of mergers and name changes during that time. It made decorative and utilitarian pottery, semi-porcelain, art ware and sani-tary ware. Your pitcher, from a toilet set, is worth $25 to $50; if you had the matching wash bowl, the set would be worth about $125. The small dish is a soap dish worth $15. Wheelings flow blue pieces sell for more.Tip: Green-colored corrosion is sometimes found on old costume jewelry. It will spread if not removed. Clean with a mixture of a tablespoon of vinegar, a tablespoon of salt and a cup of hot water. Rub with an old toothbrush or a nylon scouring pad. Dry completely with tow-els and a hair dryer set on cool. Q „ Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. KOVEL: ANTIQUES b D g t o i terry KOVELnews@floridaweekly.com The colored leaves of autumn have inspired artists for centuries. This Daum Nancy cameo glass vase is decorated with an autumn scene. The 4-inch-high vase sold at a DuMouchelles auction in Detroit for $3,900.Once they choose, buyers of luxury homes love their housesWhat do luxury buyers want in a home? This was the title of an article I recently read on the Florida Associa-tion of Realtors website. According to the Better Homes and Gardens article, The luxury homebuyer has high stan-dards and invests the money, the time and the commitment to making their home fit their needs and reflect who they are. Its remarkable that they do this so well that nearly all „ 90 percent „ believe their house is the best one on the block.Ž Most owners believe their home is the best on the block because we all choose a home to fit our lifestyle. In Florida, there are obviously several different lifestyle choices and living opportunities that become important to most; one of the most important aspects of living in South Florida focuses on the outdoor living areas. In addition, there are so many choices of various lifestyles for the luxury buyer to choose from: waterfront, golf course, historic, oceanfront or condo-minium. All sounds very enticing, but this can also become very confusing for some. My husband and I have been working with a couple, clients since April. They were anxious and wanted to purchase a home before summer so they could take advantage of the market and spend some of their summer vacation here (as more and more are starting to do). The challenge was that they could not find the perfect fit. They liked it all!! First they wanted golf course. Then they wanted waterfront. Then they wanted a community with both golf course and water-front. Perfect! That narrowed choices down significantly. This all began during a recent trip to Florida visiting their friends who live in a luxury golf commu-nity. Of course, they fell in love with the area and wanted to seeŽ what was available. But that is just the beginning with luxury buyers because them seeingŽ what is avail-able usually turns into buyingŽ what is avail-able. These particular clients made an offer on a home within the first two days of their search. It wasnt what they expected to like, as the home would need significant work „ but they were not opposed. It was a large project, but since it was back in March they felt they could get through the construction and have it ready for November. Unfortunately, their offer was not accepted and they flew back to Connecticut to re-think their priorities. One month later they came back down specifically on a buying trip. They had changed their minds on properties. They now wanted to focus on the water, because they love the water and really appreciate the views. They are not boaters, but wanted to wake up to the sun and surf „ and they liked the idea of possibly becoming boaters as they are both only a few years from retirement. We searched from Jupiter Island to Palm Beach and after the weeklong visit, they decided on the Intracoastal versus the ocean. They are fortunate enough to purchase either type of property, but felt like this would give them the opportu-nity to see if they preferred being on the water versus living in a country club community. They selected an area that was close to a golf course so they would still have the option of joining the club while having the lifestyle they thought they wanted. Since purchasing the property, they have already come to Jupiter four times this summer. They have entertained family and friends and have really enjoyed the offseason.Ž Then, I received a phone call recently that they love the home, but would like to move to the ocean. I was a bit surprised, but very glad to hear that they have enjoyed the area so much that they actually want to live in a home that offers an ocean to Intracoastal opportunity on the property. And one of their friends who came to visit loves their home on the Intracoastal ƒ so again, the search begins! Q „ Heather Purucker Bretzlaff is a Broker in Palm Beach County. She can be reached at 722-6136. heather PURUCKER BRETZLAFF

PAGE 22

SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYThis exquisite custom Casto estate offers a lot measuring close to three-quarters of an acre, and features a large, 233-foot water view. The home at 136 Via Palacio is nestled in a private cul-de-sac in prestigious Palacio in Mirasol in Palm Beach Gar-dens. As you enter this magnificent five-bedroom, 7.5-bathroom home, you are captivated by sweeping water views, visible from all areas of a light-filled, open floor plan. This residence offers a wealth of rich architectural detailing and unsurpassed quality. Impeccably maintained, the Decorators Unlimited designed home features an elegant living room with a custom stone fireplace. A 21by 28-foot billiard entertainment room is equipped with a wet bar. The gourmet kitchen offers top-ofthe-line appliances with double ovens, dishwasher, microwave, Subzero refrig-erator and two cooling drawers. Featured are elegantly styled millwork and cabinetry, a spacious granite center island, walk-in pantry, custom built-ins and an abundance of storage. The richly appointed master bedroom suite with sitting area captures tranquil water views and includes two large walk-in closets, double master bathrooms, dual granite vanities and linen closets. A wet bar with custom cabinetry and vanity complete the master suite. A gen-erous office includes custom cabinetry and wood flooring. A spectacular patio offers sweeping water views. The large covered log-gia features a fully equipped summer kitchen and intimate seating areas. The free-form pool features an inviting spa. A 3.5-car garage, hurricane impact glass and much more is offered in this one-of-a-kind home. It is available furnished. A golf membership is available. Fite Shavell & Associates lists the home at $3,850,000. The agent is Linda Bright, 561-629-4995, lbright@fiteshavell.com. Q COURTESY PHOTOSExquisite estate in Mirasols exclusive PalacioA GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRYREAL ESTATE www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A22 FLORIDA WEEKLY

PAGE 23

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A23 Half of Lennar homes sold in Rialto in Jupiter Lennar Homes Southeast Division is selling homes in Rialto, a master-planned gated community built in Jupiter. Rialto features six estate home models, ranging from 2,800 square feet to 4,500 square feet, which sit on oversized 85-by 155-foot home sites, many with available lakefront views. Each home includes a three-car garage, walk-in closets, gourmet kitchens and lux-urious master retreat. We are enthusiastic about Rialtos success in Palm Beach County,Ž said Carlos Gonzalez, president of Lennar Southeast Florida Division. Homebuyers today are educated and decisive when it comes to their home buying needs. Rialtos blend of luxury appointments and family amenities, are a testament to the Lennar value and quality that homebuyers have come to trust and expect of Lennar and in the communities we offer. With Rialtos suc-cess, Lennar continues to prove to be a leading home builder in Southeast Florida, not only with our achievements in Miami-Dade and Broward, but also in Palm Beach County.Ž Prices for Rialto range from the upper $400,000s to mid $600s. The company said half the homes are sold. Visit the Lennar Welcome Home Center at 163 Darby Island Place, Jupiter. For more information, call 747-9901. Decorated Models and the Welcome Home Center are open daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Q Lang Realty has sold more homesover $400,000 inPalm Beach Countyover the past 5years than anyother real estatecompany.Jupiter 601 Heritage Drive, Suite 152 Jupiter, FL 33458 (561) 623-1238 Palm Beach Gardens 6271 PGA Blvd., Suite 200 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 (561) 209-7900 West Palm Beach 222 Lakeview Ave., Suite 166 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 340-1200 Delray Beach 900 E. Atlantic Ave., Suite 16 Delray Beach, FL 33483 (561) 455-3300 Manalapan 277A South Ocean Blvd. Manalapan, FL 33462 (561) 853-1100 Boynton Beach At Hunters Run 3200 Clubhouse Lane Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (561) 853-2300 Boca Raton 2901 Clint Moore Rd., Suite 9 Boca Raton, FL 33496 (561) 998-0100 Port St. Lucie 9700 Reserve Blvd. Port St. Lucie, FL 34986 (772) 467-1299 For all your Real Estate needs, call (866) 647-7770 www.LangRealty.com Illustrated Properties RE/MAX Advantage Fite/Shavell Coldwell Banker Prudential Florida Realty LiebowitzLang Realty 1.9% 1.7% 3.5% 3.4% 7.2% 5.0% 7.8% Market Share January 2008 …June 2013 All property types. Data based on RMLS/Trendgraphix reports Palm Beach County 2013. tntHBSEFOT!MBOHSFBMUZDPN www.langrealty.com 1("#PVMFWBSEr4VJUFt1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT PBG MIRABELLA AT MIRASOL PGA EAGLETON PGA PRESTWICK CHASE PBG LEGACY PLACE Enjoy the luxurious lifestyle of Mirabella at Mirasol in the lovely Cortina Model. 2 story, 4 bedroom, 3 bath, spacious and open ”oor plan with tile through out “rst ”oor. Open kitchen with granite countertops and formal dining. No membership dues, equity requirements or golf membership required. $350,000 CALL: MARC SCHAFLER 5615312004 One of the best PGA Blvd locations! Desirable Legacy Place, one bedroom, one bath, Condo feels like a loft, bright and very open. Open kitchen with breakfast bar, sliding glass doors to patio.$1150 per month CALL: SUSAN EDDY 5615127128 Two story home beautifully maintained. Formal dining and living rooms, kitchen has breakfast area. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths with the master suite on the “rst ”oor. Second ”oor has 2 bedrooms and loft area which can be converted to a 4th bedroom.$369,000 CALL: DEBBIE ARCARO 5613712849 Immaculate corner townhouse in PGAs Prestwick Chase. Fully furnished 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bath; den/of“ce converts to the 3rd bedroom. This light and bright townhome offers 3 patio areas.$1400 per month CALL: KAREN CARA 5616761655 ANNUAL RENT AL NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! RENT AL FURNISHED

PAGE 24

Jupiter | Juno Beach | Port St. Lucie Visit PlatinumHomeSearch.com for all South Florida listings! real people.real results.real estate. When you do what you love it shows. Our firm has become one of the fastest-growing real estate firms in the area. Home buyers and sellers have trusted Platinum Properties Realty, Inc. to be their partner. It starts with our people. Our agents care, listen, and know what is needed to get the job done because they love what they do. They approach buying and selling a home as if it was their own. Our agency retains a small and friendly feel, yet offers a professional team, comprehensive range of services, and thorough knowledge of the market. What does this mean to you? Plain and simple we get you results. Contact one of our featured agents today, and ask about the Platinum Properties Advantage Program to sell your home faster and for a higher selling price. Tina Hamor 561.703.7624TinaHamor@comcast.net Lisa Machak 561.951.9514Lisa@LisaMachak.com Margot Matot 561.707.2201 MargotMatot@yahoo.com Jessica DesPlaines 561.202.7061JKDesplaines@gmail.com Rita Boesky 561.596.9977Rita@RitaBoesky.com Don Beyersdorf 561.400.8230Don@DonBeyersdorf.com Matt Abbott 561.352.9608MAbbott@PlatProps.com Sandy Trowbridge 561.758.1055Sandy@SandyTrowbridge.com Thomas Traub 561.876.4568Tom@TomTraub.com Candace McIntosh 561.262.8367Mcintosh5755@bellsouth.net Juliette Miller 561.310.7761JulietteMiller1@gmail.com Dan Millner 561.379.8880Dan@MillnerHomes.com Featured Agents 17166 126th Terrace N. RX-9967162 $329,000 3BR / 2BA 125 Cape Pointe Circle RX-9958050 $435,000 3BR / 2BA Brigadoon RX-9968278 $540,000 2BR / 2BA 1515 Treemont Avenue RX-9966811 $288,900 2BR / 2BA 12335 165th Road N. RX-9958290 $330,000 3BR / 2BA

PAGE 25

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A25 FLORIDA WEEKLY The Norton Museum of Art was closed for two weeks. And during those two weeks, its public spaces have received a fresh coat of paint and its lobby has received a new signature artwork. That new artwork, a landscape mural by Mickalene Thomas, greets visitors as they enter the museum. It replaces Robb Wynnes I Remember Ceramic Castles, Mermaids, and Japanese Bridges,Ž and will remain in place for one year. Ms. Thomas, an artist based in Brooklyn, is best known for her elabo-rate paintings composed of rhine-stones, acrylic and enamel. Feminist themes radiate through much of her work. She is the third artist to create an installation for the museums main lobby. One question our staff is constantly asking, Is she going to put rhinestones on the walls? But not yet,Ž Cheryl Brutvan, the Nortons curator of con-temporary art and director of curato-rial affairs, said during a preview of the installation in progress. What we have seen consistently is this idea of using space to create a fractured space, Latest work gives Norton a lobby with a view BY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@floridaweekly.comSEE NORTON, A31 X A t ArtStage Performing Arts Center in Tequesta, no stu-dents who cant afford to pay or who dont have an innate ability to perform are turned away. And thats exactly the way artistic director Linda White established it when she formed the company back in 1990. We prepare students for life, not just for the Broadway stage,Ž said Ms. White, a former student of Joan Miller, an accomplished mentor, who trained hundreds of dancers in her 55 years of teaching at the Palm Beach Ballet Center in Lake Park. White later joined Dance Masters of America and Florida Dance Mas-ters, both of which require certifica-tion through rigorous training. In 1985, she received a scholarship for an intensive summer program at the Royal Ballet Academy in London, Students at Tequesta’s ArtStage learn life lessons in dance, theater classes On their toes BY ANNE CHECKOSKYSpecial to Florida WeeklySEE ARTSTAGE, A32 XCOURTESY PHOTO Artist Mickalene Thomas discusses the mural she was installing in the lobby of the Norton Museum of Art. The piece is a collage of printed vinyl, paper, paint and other materials. COURTESY PHOTO/LEE DEARLOVE A group of young dancers takes their positions in an ArtStage ballet production.

PAGE 26

A26 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSSuffering fools less gladly I am a tolerant person. I routinely overlook the sort of bad behavior that would be a deal breaker for most people, and theres not much I wont excuse. Stand me up for a date, forget my birthday, throw up in my car: I can get over just about anything. We are, all of us, deeply flawed human beings. Ive certainly commit-ted enough transgressions „ stand-ing up people for dates, forgetting birthdays, throwing up in cars „ that I find it nigh impossible to stand in judgment of anyone else. But even I cannot forgive everything. As a hazard of this trade, I receive a lot of sm utty mail. That is understandable and also pardonable. If Im going to dish out naughtiness, I should be prepared to receive a certain amount in return. Still, Im always shocked by just how much of the smut comes from men I know. These are men Ive met in real life, whom I have a relationship with off these pages, men who have taken me to dinner and listened to my secrets, men who believe our connec-tion might someday extend beyond friendship. These are the men who surprise me with their filthy messages, as if they learned nothing dur-ing our time together. Because if they had, they would know Im not the kind of woman who enjoys dirty missives. But as I said, I am a tolerant soul. So when I received an e-mail message this week from a man who I thought was courting me, I was prepared to overlook every inappropriate remark. I could ignore the use of the words pubic hair,Ž which are icky and make me shudder. No woman wants to read about that, her own or anyone elses. I could forgive the term pudendum,Ž which is as perplexing as it is vulgar. Why a man would select that par-ticular word among the many better options is beyond me. But even with that flagrant transgression of propri-ety, I retained my vast capacity for forgiveness. What I could not forgive was this: the line in the message that said I have a good body. For. My. Age. I gasped as I read it. Women do not want to be told that were holding up well. We dont want to hear that you know weve gone soft in the middle or that parts of our body are not as firm as they once were. We want to be told that were beautiful „ without qualifiers. In a recent Dear Abby column, a woman wrote in to say that an old boyfriend had landed in jail and was contacting her. He asked her for money and letters, and though the woman admitted she had bitter memoriesŽ about their relationship, she asked how she could extricate herself without hurting her former boyfriends feelings. As far as Im concerned, hurting his feelings should have been the last thing on her mind. As women, we get so wrapped up in being kind and tolerant that we forget to set clear boundaries. So heres mine: If youre going to write me smut, have the good sense to say something nice. And you can leave out the pudendum. Q artis HENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTConstruction Assistant must demonstrate the ability to manage the cradle-to-grave aspects of the entire life-cycle of a small commercial and/or institutional design. Assistant works primarily by means of subcontractors; however the Construction Assistant has the capability of managing self-performed construction activities that benefit the project. Assist in daily project coordination with clients, architects and other administrative tasks.SEND RESUME TO carl.fairfield@outlook.com

PAGE 27

FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A27 PUZZLE ANSWERS Friday Night Dance Party kicks off Sept. 27 in JupiterHere s an event made with Baby Boomers in mind. The Friday Night Dance Party returns to Jupiter on Sept. 27. The event is 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Jupiter Community Center, 200 Military Trail. Its great for a date night, or an evening out with friends. Enjoy a spacious dance floor and all your favorite music from the 60s, 70s and 80s. The DJ, Stevie Won-der, will have you on your feet all night long, playing your requests. Complimentary soft drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served. A beer and wine cash bar will be provided by St. Peters' Church, Knights of Columbus Council 13139, to benefit Autism Speaks. Singles and couples welcome. Doors open at 7 p.m. Cost is $5 at the door. For information, call Susan Cesarano at 741-2310 or 741-2400. Q CRYSTAL TREE PLAZA1/2 mile south of PGA Blvd on US Hwy 1 64)XZt/PSUI1BMN#FBDI 0QFO.POo4BUoQNt4VOoQN 561-691-5884 Huge Selection of Faux Custom Florals, Trees and Home AccessoriesOur Goal is to exceed your expectations.... SALE Making room for new arrivals! Don’t miss out!All custom floral arrangements in stock 20% OFF All Silk Trees 20% OFF Sale ends 9/25 2013 Hilton Worldwide Book the Best of Waldorf Astoria and receive a $50 resort reward for every night of your stay. When you arrive at Edgewater Beach Hotel, you can expect attentive service and the comfort of a spacious suite. What may surprise you are the amazing activities that will either awaken our sense of adventure, or give you the relaxation you are longing for. Escape the everyday, from $159 per night.Book today by calling 888.564.1308, or visiting EdgewaterNaples.com.*Visit EdgewaterNaples.com for complete terms and conditions. THE ONLY RUSH YOU NEED IS THAT OF THE OCEAN WAVES. creativememories-favorites.com AFFORDABLE Art at AFFORDABLE Prices PoetryŽby Ogden NieldDearest GerryŽA widows heartwarming love letters to her late husband. by B.R. Barbara creativememories-favorites.com is proud to present two amazing books Both books are available on creativememories-favorites.com, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Books A Million Boob Art Supports Breast Cancer Awareness

PAGE 28

A28 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYPlease send calendar listings to pbnews@floridaweekly.com. At The Bamboo Room The Bamboo Room is at 15 S. J St., down-town Lake Worth. Call 585-BLUES or visit bambooroomblues.com.QThomas Wynn and the Believers — 9 p.m. Sept. 20; $12 QAnthony Gomes — 9 p.m. Sept. 21; $15QThe Georgia Satellites — 9 p.m. Sept. 27; $33-$38QPage & Plant: Unledded Tribute To Led Zeppelin — 9 p.m. Sept. 28; $10 At The Colony Hotel 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Call 655-5430 or visit www.thecolonypalmbeach.comQThe Polo Lounge — Tommy Mitchell pianist Tuesday through Thurs-day evenings; Motown Friday nights with Memory Lane; the Mel Urban Trio Saturday nights. At The Cruzan South Florida Fairgrounds, 601-7 Sans-burys Way, suburban West Palm Beach. 795-8883, www.cruzanamphitheatre.net.QMiranda Lambert and Dierks Bentley — 7 p.m. Sept. 21. Tickets: $36-$564QKeith Urban, Little Big Town and Dustin Lynch — 7 p.m. Oct. 5. Tickets: $35-$1,027 At Cultural Council Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is at 601 Lake Ave., downtown Lake Worth; 471-1602 or palmbeachculture.com. Q“Palm Beach County Art Teachers Association Exhibi-tion” — Sept. 20-Nov. 9 At Dramaworks Palm Beach Dramawor ks Don & Ann Brown Theatre is at 201 N. Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Call 514-4042, Ext. 2, or visit www.palmbeach-dramaworks.com. Individual tickets go on sale Sept. 16.Q“Of Mice and Men” — Oct. 11-Nov. 10Q“The Lion in Winter” — Dec. 6-Jan. 5Q“Old Times” — Jan. 31-March 2 Q“Dividing the Estate” — March 28-April 27Q“Tryst” May 16-June 15 At The Eissey The Eissey Campus Theatre is at Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive off PGA Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens. 207-5900; www.eisseycampustheatre.org. Q“Duetto” — Painting Exhibition by Debra Lawrence and Robin Neary, through Oct. 9. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and during perfor-mances. At The Lighthouse Jupiter Lighthouse and Museum, Light-house Park, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter. Admission: $9 adults, $5 chil-dren ages 6-18; children under 6 and active U.S. military admitted free. 747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org. Children must be at least 4 feet tall to climb. Tours are weather permitting, call for tour time. RSVP required for tours, 747-8380, Ext. 101. QLighthouse Sunset Tour — Sept. 20, 25. Sunset. $15 Members/$20 Non-Members. RSVP required, 747-8380, Ext. 101.QLighthouse Chickee Chats – Story Time for Kids — Oct. 1, Nov. 5, Dec. 3. 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free; recom-mended for kids 10 and under.QHike Through History — Oct. 5, Nov. 2, Dec. 7. This two-mile trek passes through historic points of interest on the 120-acre Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area. The hike departs from the flagpole at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and is weather depen-dent. Program is open to adults and children. Minimum age 5, ages 13 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Hikers footwear, active wear, a hat, and a full water bottle or canteen should be carried. Admission is free but space is limited; RSVP required. 747-8380, Ext. 101.QLighthouse Moonrise Tour — Oct. 18, Nov. 17, Dec. 17. Sunset. $15 Mem-bers/$20 Non-Members. At The Lake Park Public Library Lake Park Public Library is at 529 Park Ave., Lake Park. All events are free. 881-3330.QSuper Hero Hour — 3:30 p.m. Thursdays. Ages 12 and under.QAdult Writing Critique Group — Saturdays 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 16 years and up.QAnime — 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Ages 12 and up. At The Lake Worth Playhouse The Stonzek Theatre is at 709 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. Playhouse: 586-6410; Films: 296-9382.www.lakeworthplayhouse.org. QFilms — Sept. 19: Una NocheŽ and Blackfish.Ž Sept. 20-26: Short Term TwelveŽ and In a World.ŽQSept. 21: Divas On Stage; $15. QSept. 27-29: LDUB Film Festival; $9-$30. At MacArthur Park John D. MacArthur Beach State Park and Nature Center is at 10900 Jack Nick-laus Drive, North Palm Beach. 624-6952 or www.macarthurbeach.org.QNature walk — 10-11 a.m. daily At The Mos’Art The MosArt Theatre is at 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Call 337-OPOD (6763) or visit www.mosarttheatre.com.QMovies — Sept. 19: Prince AvalancheŽ and Terms and Conditions May Apply.Ž Sept. 20-26: JewtopiaŽ and Is So Excited.ŽQ“Into the Woods” — 7 p.m. Sept. 20 At North Palm Beach Library 303 Anchorage Drive, North Palm Beach; 841-3383, www.npblibrary.org.QKnit & Crochet — 1-3 p.m. Mondays QKids Crafts ages 5-12 — 2 p.m. Fridays At Palm Beach Improv Palm Beach Improv is at CityPlace, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach; 833-1812 or palmbeachimprov.com.QOwen Benjamin — Sept. 19-22. Tickets: $15-$17 At The Plaza Theatre Plaza Theatre is at 262 S. Ocean Blvd., Manalapan; 5881820 or www.theplazatheatre.net.Q“You Made Me Love You” — Through Sept. 28. Tickets: $30 and up. At Science Center The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. 832-1988 or visit www.sfsm.org.QScience Nights — 6-9 p.m. the last Friday of the month. Sept. 27QScience of Beer & Wine — 6-9 p.m. Oct. 10. The evening will include food, music, giveaways, trivia and spe-cial demonstrations, including a liquid nitrogen beer ice cream demonstra-tion. Established local brewers includ-ing Brewzzi and PRP Wine will guide guests through the beer and wine mak-ing process, while offering samples, of course. Advance tickets: $15 members; $20 nonmembers. Day of event: $15 members; $30 nonmembers. Fresh Markets QSailfish Marina Sunset Celebration — 6 p.m. Thursdays. Shop for arts and crafts made by artists from around the country. Sailfish Marina, east of the Intracoastal, just south of Blue Heron Boulevard, Palm Beach Shores; 842-8449.QJupiter Green & Artisan Market — 5-9 p.m. Fridays, Riverwalk Events Plaza, 150 S. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Free. Includes baked goods, fresh produce, arts and crafts, jewelry, pet products and more. Vendors welcome. Contact Harry Welsh at (203) 222-3574 or visit www.harrysmarkets.com.Q Abacoa Green Market — 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays at Abacoa Town Center, 1200 Town Center Drive, Jupiter. Info: reggie.chasethesun@gmail.com.QThe West Palm Beach Antique & Flea Market — 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays on Narcissus Avenue, north of Banyan Boulevard. West Palm Beach green market vendors also will be there. Resumes Oct. 6. For information, search Facebook or call 670-7473.QPalm Beach Gardens Green Market — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays through September. Under a roof, and partly indoors, at STORE Self Storage, 11010 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gar-dens; 630-1146 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Thursday, Sept. 19 Q“Women on the Run Palm Beach” — The Junior League of the Palm Beaches Inc., in conjunction with the Womens Foundation of Palm Beach County and the Political Institute for Women, will host a series of training initiatives to help women take the first steps toward running for elected office or a public service leadership position to be held 1-5 p.m. Sept. 19, Oct. 24 and Nov. 21 at Junior League of the Palm Beaches headquarters, 470 Columbia Drive, Building F, West Palm Beach. Cost: $60 per course, or $175 for all four dates. www.jlpb.org/our-events/wom-en-on-the-run-palm-beach/QStory time session at the Loxahatchee River Center — 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123; or visit www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter.QClematis by Night — Live music 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Clematis Street at the Waterfront, downtown West Palm Beach, 8221515 or visit www.clematisbynight.net. Sept. 19: Blue Audio. Sept. 26: The Brass Evolution. Oct. 3: Impulse. Oct. 10: Big Sky. Oct. 17: Jerry Waynes Private Party Band. Oct. 24: Cover Up. Oct. 31: Clematis by Fright.QLe Cercle Francais — Francophiles and Francophones can join for a monthly gathering at 6:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month (next session Sept. 12), in members homes. Call 744-0016.QPalm Beach Chamber Music Fall Festival — 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 19, Oct. 10 and Nov. 14 at Lynn Universitys Wold Performing Arts Center in Boca Raton and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20, Oct. 11 and Nov. 15 at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in downtown Lake Worth. Tick-ets: $20 per concert or $45 for three-concert subscription. Free admission for students (with ID). For Lynn tickets, call 237-9000 or visit www.lynn.edu/tickets. For Lake Worth tickets, call 800-330-6874 or visit www.pbcmf.orgQAdult Discussion Group — Contemporary topics of philosophical, political, socio-economic and moral implications. 6:30-8:30 p.m. the first Thursday of each month (next meet-ing is Oct. 3) in the conference room of the Palm Beach Gardens Library, 11303 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; call Irene Garbo at 561-715-7571.QBingo — Noon every Thursday at the Moose Lodge, 3600 RCA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Lunch available at 11 a.m. Packs start at $15. $250 games. 626-4417.QStudio Parties — Free group lesson at 7 p.m., followed by parties 8-10 p.m. Thursdays, Alexanders Ballroom, 51 W. WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO

PAGE 29

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A&E A29 561-557-2881Live Oak Plaza 9249 Alt A1A, North Palm Beach )GPVN[7UGF(WTPKVWTG#EEGUUQTKGUHTQO #PVKSWGUVQ/KF%GPVWT[%QPVGORQTCT[ Buying single items to entire estates 7 Days A WeekSTORE WIDE SALE 20% OFF STORE WIDE SALE 20% OFF 20% OFF WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GOIndiantown Road, Jupiter. Cost: $15 per per-son; 747-0030 or alexandersballroom.com.QDance Tonight — Open Latin/ Ballroom Mix Party Thursdays. Group Lesson 7:15-8 p.m.; Party 8-10 p.m.; Admission: $20 (theme $25) for entire evening, includes light buffet. 914 Park Ave., Lake Park; 844-0255.QThe Great Books Reading and Discussion Group meets at 10 a.m. the first and third Thursday of each month. Barnes & Noble coffee shop, 11380 Legacy Ave., Palm Beach Gardens. Free; 624-4358. Friday, Sept. 20 QDowntown Live — 7 p.m. Fridays, Downtown at the Gardens Centre Court, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Sept. 20: Pam & Dave. Sept. 27: Maurice Frank & Friends. Free; 340-1600. Saturday, Sept. 21 QDowntown Live — 7-10 p.m. Saturdays, Downtown at the Gar dens Centre Court, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Sept. 21: Samantha Russell. Sept. 28: Treebo. Free; 340-1600.QKids Story Time — 11:30 a.m. Saturdays, Loggerhead Marinelife Cen-ter, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; free. Visit www.marinelife.org. Monday, Sept. 23 QAmerican Needlepoint Guild — 10 a.m. every second and fourth Monday (next meeting is Sept. 13), 110 Man-grove Bay Way, Jupiter. Call 747-7104 or email mbusler@comcast.net. Tuesday, Sept. 24 QBirthday luncheon for Countess — Luncheon to honor Henrietta, Countess de Hoernle, on her 101st birth-day, 12:30 p.m. Sept. 24. Hosted by St. Jude Parish. Carmelite Community St. Jude Church, Mt. Carmel Banquet Hall. 21689 Toledo Road, Boca Raton. Ticket: $50; marie@stjudeboca.org or regina@stjudeboca.org or 314-1250.Q“Sing Out-Kidz!” — Singing classes for kids ages 7-13, 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays through Oct. 22, Burns Road Commu-nity Center, Palm Beach Gardens. Cost: $112 residents, $128 non-residents. Mate-rials included. To register, call -630-1100 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Wednesday, Sept. 25 QThe Dori Slosberg Foundation’s Fall Networking Party — 5:30-7:30 p.m. Sept. 25, Tanzy Restaurant, Mizner Park, 301 Plaza Real, Boca Raton. An evening of networking and safe driving advocation while supporting the Dori Slos-berg Foundations road safety programs. Your $20 tax deductible donation at the door includes food and a raffle ticket for great prizes; 488-7900 or dorislosberg.org.QHatchling Tales — 10:30 a.m.-11 a.m. Wednesday. Loggerhead Marinelife Center, 14200 U.S. Highway 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280 or info@marinelife.org.QNonprofits Day Celebration — 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Sept. 25, Palm Beach Airport Hilton, 150 Australian Ave., West Palm Beach. The Chamber of Nonprofit Health and Human Services Providers in Palm Beach County will host the first of what is planned as an annual event: The Nonprofits Day Cel-ebration. The purpose is to recognize someone who goes above and beyond for many of us nonprofits in Palm Beach County. Legal Aid Attorney John Foley will be honored for his work with non-profits in Palm Beach County. Cost: $50 per person. Make checks payable to Nonprofit Chamber and mail to The Arc of Palm Beach County, 1201 Australian Ave., Riviera Beach, 33404. Ongoing Events QArmory Art Center — Through Oct. 26: Red Morgan: Witness: Gospel by the Cane Fields.Ž Through Oct. 19: Mark Cohen: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.Ž Sept. 21-Nov. 9: Collabora-tion: African Diaspora.Ž Armory Art Center is at 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach. 832-1776 or armoryart.org.QPalm Beach Photographic Centre — Through Nov. 16: Kadir Lopez, two exhibitions; The Conflux of EternitiesŽ and An American Pres-ence in Cuba.Ž The Photographic Centre is in the City Center, 415 Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; call 253-2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org.QLighthouse ArtCenter — Through Oct. 22: Photo Now!Ž and Arty Bras.Ž 3rd Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Museum admission: $5 ages 12 and above. Under 12 free. Saturdays, free admission. Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; 746-3101 or lighthousearts.org.Q“No Boundaries” — Exhibition of works by 10 artists, through Oct. 11, Art Gallery at Palm Beach State College, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Free; 207-5015.QChildren’s Research Station — Loggerhead Marinelife Center program is designed to exercise childrens science skills through an experimental lab. 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays. Free. 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280.QThe Loxahatchee River Environmental Center — Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123; or www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter. QPalm Beach Zoo — Zoo Safari Nights are 5:30-9 p.m. Fridays through September with a different family-friend-ly theme. Dress to match the themes to be entered to win a Palm Beach Zoo $150 value prize pack. Members free; non-members $15.95 adults/$9.95 chil-dren (3-12). Zoo is at 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach; 547-9453.Wings Over WaterŽ Bird Show: 11 a.m. weekdays; 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. weekends. Wild Things Show,Ž 1 p.m. weekdays; noon weekends. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. everyday. 1301 Sum-mit Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets: Adults $18.95; seniors, $16.95; children 3-12, $12.95; free toddlers. 533-0887 or www.palmbeachzoo.org.QArtists of Palm Beach County Art on Park Summer Exhib-it — Mondays-Saturdays noon-6 p.m. Through Sept 27. Free. Everyone wel-comed. Art on Park Gallery, 800 Park Ave. Lake Park. 345-2842, www.artistsof-PalmBeachCounty.org.QPalm Beach State College Art Gallery — Gallery hours: Monday, Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tues-day, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Palm Beach State Col-lege, BB Building, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 207-5015. QFlagler Museum — Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Museum is housed in Henry Flaglers 1902 beaux-arts man-sion, Whitehall; at 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tickets: members free; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-17) with adult; $3 child (6-12) with adult; under 6 free. 655-2833; www.flaglermuseum.us Q Breakfast Lunch Dinner Great Steak “ Blondies does a beautiful thing, that being, they serve breakfast all day” ~Jeffeats.com “The food is LEGIT.” ~Katy T.,YELP “Yumm... this is my favorite restaurant in Tequesta.” ~John D., TripAdvisor WHERE THE GIRLS KNOW GOOD FOOD! 181 N. US Highway 1 TequestaLocated in Steinmart & Beall’s Outlet Plaza561-744-0806 www.blondiesgoodfood.comMonday-Saturday 7am-9pm Sunday 7am-3pm

PAGE 30

A30 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY QVIRGO (August 23 to September 22) A health problem should not be ignored. The sooner you check it out, the sooner you can deal with it and then move on. Some job advice comes from an unlikely source.QLIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A relationship takes an unexpected shift that could leave you puzzled and hurt. Asking for an explanation could help uncover the reason for this sudden turn of events.QSCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your busy schedule has drawn down much of your energy lev-els. Restore them by spending a well-earned time out enjoying the arts -per-haps with that special someone.QSAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Make that presentation with confidence. Remember: When you show you believe in yourself, it helps persuade others that you truly know what you re doing.QCAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Although you usually prefer doing things on your own, a group effort might be advisable at this time. Try to keep an open mind about sugges-tions from colleagues.QAQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) This could be a good time to reassess some of your recent decisions and see if any adjustments should be made based on facts that you might have just uncovered.QPISCES (February 19 to March 20) An emotionally charged situation creates uncertainty about the future of your relationship. Best advice: Talk things out while theres still time to reach a new understanding.QARIES (March 21 to April 19) You might need to get more facts to help you work out those problems with your new project. As always, a friendly approach shows the charming Arian at his or her persuasive best.QTAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Information is what energizes ambition, and this is a good time for the ambitious Bovine to expand his or her range of knowledge and to be ready for the chal-lenges that lie ahead.QGEMINI (May 21 to June 20) This is a good time to consider making some long-overdue decorating changes at home or in your workplace. A splash of color can help raise spirits, even on the grayest day.QCANCER (June 21 to July 22) Learn more. Earn more. Thats the for-mula for Moon Children looking to expand their career horizons. Investi-gate the best places to get those training courses youll need.QLEO (July 23 to August 22) Your creative side helps gain attention for many of your ideas. But dont neglect the practical aspects involved in imple-menting their move from paper to pro-duction. Good luck. BORN THIS WEEK: You tend to act on matters of principle despite what others might advise. Q PUZZLES HOROSCOPES CREEPY MOVIE By Linda Thistle ++ Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: W SEE ANSWERS, A27 W SEE ANSWERS, A27

PAGE 31

Buying a car at the best of times is a stress-ful and often frustrating experience. Even with tools like CarFax and AutoCheck, the used car customer may not really have the informa-tion needed to make an informed deci-sion. One business is out to change that. North Palm Beach resident Bill McLaughlin has come up with an alternative — one he hopes changes the way all of America shops for cars and trucks. Mr. McLaughlin, the former president and CEO of Starwood Vacation Resorts, was looking for something post retirement to “get him out of the house” when he hit on a way to not only make money but help others. “I’ve always been a car guy,” he said. Setting himself up as an auto manufacturer’s representative, he began to attend closed auctions, buying as many as 15 off-lease vehicles at a time, mostly for Northeast dealerships looking for rust-free Florida cars. His client list grew to include new car deal-ers from New York to Georgia — dealers sold on Mr. McLaughlin’s stringent testing and practice of charging the dealerships only $500 over his cost. He started AutoMax of America in 1992, scouring the country for luxury brands, trans-porting them to Florida then shipping them out as soon as possible “AutoMax doesn’t look like your typical car lot,” he said of the 5401 North Haver-hill Rd #105 in West Palm Beach. “It looks more like a maintenance place with 30-50 cars set up to ship to different parts of the country. Through word of mouth and friends of friends we started getting requests direct from the consumer and so we set up a web-site.” A car buyer can log on to automax ofamerica.com and enter in exactly the type of car he or she is looking for from color, make, options, model to mileage. “I put in an order last Monday and we just picked up two trucks from Bill in less than a week,” said Buddy Wittmann of Wittmann Building Corporation in Palm Beach. “There were only five of these trucks in the U.S. You couldn’t ask for a more reliable and honest salesperson. “It takes about a week for Mr. McLaughlin to find the requested car. He charges consum-ers the same $500 over wholesale fee he charges dealerships and if you are a veteran or in the military, the price is reduced to $250.“I have access to 100,000 to 150,000 cars every week,” Mr. McLaughlin said. “I can find the exact car you are looking for. I charge less than what the dealerships charge in dealer’s fees.” Mr. McLaughlin, who served four years in the military, was born in West Point. His father was an instructor there. He says he has been around the military his whole life and is committed to helping active service men and women, and veterans, find affordable cars. “I don’t make any money on those cars,” he said. “It’s hard to find a quality car for less than $2,000. People don’t realize how much work goes into what we do.” Mr. McLaughlin’s cars come with the CarFax and AutoCheck reports in addition to his own condition report and post-sale inven-tory. He recommends all car buyers purchase extended service warranties because the cars he specializes in — BMW, Acura, Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, Lexus — can be expensive to service. If your warranty is about to expire or you don’t have one call and ask about our extended warranty service. For informa-tion, call 632-9093 Q Not your typical car dealer SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYCOURTESY PHOTO Bill McLaughlin started Automax in Lake Park. Advertorial This article appeared in Florida Weekly on 10/11/2012. FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 A31 which really comes up in Modernism.Ž Ms. Brutvan said she was impressed by a mural Ms. Thomas created last year for her retrospective exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. The current work, as yet untitled, includes a collage of photographs and other media on a painted vinyl back-ground that forms a landscape of sorts. Lily pads float on one side, and large trees scale the wall throughout. Bold strokes of color pop through. A spot of camouflage is thick with texture. During the visit, Ms. T homas assistants were placing pieces of printed vinyl on the mural, following a scale mock-up. In keeping with the theme, they even installed wood-grained Con-tact Paper on the information desk. She took a break from supervising the installation to talk about the piece. Ms. Thomas seemed nonplussed that the art would exist for a year, then be replaced with something else the next. For me, I want these to be very sitespecific to that space and very tem-poral, in a sense, where its about that experience,Ž she said. Installations such as this are very different for Ms. Thomas. A lot of it is meant to be around for a very long time, and so I think as a studio artist, this is another way to get me out of the studio and interacting with viewers on a different level,Ž she said. She has always done collage work but its only recently that the work has been seen by a wider audience. Ms. Brutvan also weighed in.Its so interesting, because I think a collage, especially the ones that you make, theyre intimate, theyre on a small scale, and now you go to this other mural size. And I think its also the sense that youre capable. Not every artist can do something on this scale successfully but that you can do something so intimate and use ele-ments of that idea and use it on a scale like this,Ž she said. The Norton also has reconfigured its collection of American works of art to display works that have not been on view in awhile, and added a new espresso bar near the main entrance. Here are other events at the Norton:Q Masterpiece of the Month „ The re-opening will feature the final work in the Masterpiece of the Month series, the 300-year-old Chinese mas-terpiece, Court Portrait of Yinli, Prince Guo.Ž It will be on view through Oct. 20. Curator Laurie Barnes will dis-cuss the work at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 19. Q The Eighth Annual Chinese Moon Festival Celebration „ This event is set for noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 21. This celebration of Chinese art and culture is filled with childrens activi-ties and art projects, tours of the Chi-nese collections, moon cakes and tea. There also will be a concert of Music of the Qing Court by the Ann Yao Trio. Free with museum admission. Q Smithsonian magazines 9th Annual Museum Day Live „ This annual event is set for 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 28. Download a free Museum Day Live ticket from the Smithsonian magazine website, present it to Norton Visitor Services, and receive two free admissions per ticket, valid Sept. 28. Q „ The Norton Museum is at 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach. Admission is $12 for adults, $5 for students with a valid ID, and free for members and children ages 12 and under. Call 832-5196, or visit www.norton.orgNORTONFrom page A25 2013 Hilton Worldwide Book the Best of Waldorf Astoria and receive a $50 resort reward for every night of your stay. When you arrive at Waldorf Astoria Naples you can expect exceptional restaurants, a luxurious spa and unparalleled service. What may surprise you are the amazing activities that will either awaken your sense of adventure, or give you the relaxation you are longing for. Escape the everyday, from $139 per night. Book today by calling 888.722.1269, or visiting WaldorAstoriaNaples.com.*Visit WaldorfAstoriaNaples.com for complete terms and conditio ns. TRANQUILITY AWAITS ON YOUR COAST. “GOOD FOR YOU. GOOD FOR EVERYONE.” ADVANCE SOLAR & SPA $3,495.00 DreamMaker Spa The Big EZŽ On Sale TODAY! $SZTUBM%SJWFt'PSU.ZFSTr'239-939-7446

PAGE 32

A32 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY England. Her love of teaching expand-ed to choreography, for which she was mentored by Charles Russell, a former member of the Joffrey Ballet. But even she admits that she wasn t as prepared as some of her ArtStage students. At one point she remem-bered she was called on to sing. Well, dancing was no sweat, but singing? That was another matter altogether, she said. ArtStage students are encouraged to explore all of the performing arts. They teach poise and coordination and give students the confidence they need to excel in all areas of life, Ms. White said. She recalled one former student who landed a lead role in a college play and credited it to her training at ArtStage. We take a holistic approach, learning to go out into the world,Ž Ms. White said. Today at ArtStage, which became a nonprofit organization in 1999, between 150 and 200 students will study dance, including ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop, lyrical and creative move-ment, as well as acting, voice and musical theater this year. There is also a performing group for students ages 8 and up, who perform at Disney World, for the Miami Heat bas-ketball team, on cruise ships, in com-petitions in Orlando and locally, such as at the Jupiter Jubilee, Turtlefest in Juno Beach and Tequesta Fest, which is coming up in November. The performing arts center caters mainly to school-age children, but there are some adult classes offered, as well, White said. Any child can try any class free by paying a one-time registration fee of $55. Its valid for one ArtStage year, which typically runs from August to June, she said. There are about 25 to 30 classes taught by 13 instructors held each week, from 3:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Mon-day to Thursday and Saturdays, White said. The center is located at 304 Tequesta Drive, just over the railroad tracks. Students pay $70 per month to take one class a week, $125 to take two classes, $160 to take three classes and $210 for unlimited classes. About 30 to 35 percent of ArtStage students are on scholarships, so no student who wants to join the company will be turned away. That includes students with dis-abilities. In fact, one of Whites former students, a girl with Down syndrome, was able to perform a dance solo at her high-school graduation. Another Spanish-speaking student, a little boy who was so shy and reluctant to come out of his shell, is now so outgoing, its just thrilling, Ms. White said. His mother joined the ArtStage board and continues to act as a cheerleader for the organization, bridging the language barrier by firing up volunteers and other parents in Spanish. These are the kinds of success stories Ms. White relishes. Of course shes also proud of the success of former students who went on to have Broadway careers, or who sang a duet with Rolling Stone front man, Mick Jagger or who graduated from prestigious college performance programs. In fact, her daughter, Lindsay Arella White, a teacher at ArtStage, headed to London Sept. 5 to earn her masters degree in voice studies at the Universi-ty of Londons Royal Center School of Speech and Drama. Lindsay is a gradu-ate of Bak Middle School and Dreyfoos School of the Arts in West Palm Beach and has a bachelor of fine arts from Florida State University. A fundraiser, which sold out, was held Aug. 24 at the center to help defray some of the costs. We care about each individual child and the success they have in life, not just in the performing arts,Ž Ms. White said. And then there are the students from the local Mayan and Guatemalan com-munities, whom Ms. White has spent considerable time coaxing to ArtStage. This is a huge step for these kids, Ms. White said. With parents who often dont speak English, the students are extremely shy at first, but ArtStage has helped them find their voices, she said. With a bigger budget, ArtStage could do so much more, however, the ratio of paying versus non-paying clients has gotten out of proportion since the recession hit, Ms. White said. Donations are gratefully accepted and ArtStage is also always looking for volunteers, whether it be joining the board or helping at the center itself. ArtStage also provides community ser-vice hours for those looking for a way to give back. Were open to anyone whod like to help,Ž Ms. White said. Robert Carter, who was previously involved with arts programs for stu-dents in the Chicago area and is now executive director of ArtStage, believes that the arts can be positive agents for change, especially for troubled youth. See what the arts can do for these kids,Ž he said. And thats just the aim of ArtStage.We give you the foundation, the teaching ability, the tools to be a suc-cess in any career in life,Ž Ms. White said. Q „ For more on ArtStage, go to www. artstageperformingarts.com, call 7477409 or email artstage@artstageperformingarts.com.ARTSTAGEFrom page A25 COURTESY PHOTOS/LEE DEARLOVE The student company at ArtStage poses for a group shot onstage at a performance. A group of young dancers stands en pointe at ArtStage in Tequesta. ArtStage founder Linda White (right) em-braces former student Marianna Babiolakis. “We take a holistic approach, learning to go out into the world.” – Linda White, founder of ArtStage

PAGE 34

A34 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYSOCIETY Arthur R. Marshall Foundation for the Everglades hosts graduation celebration for summer interns at the National Croquet Club LikeŽ us on Facebook.com/PalmBeachGardensFloridaWeekly to see more photos. We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.COURTESY PHOTOSBarbara Wymer, Stan Bronson and Gisele Weisman Casey Hickcox and Julia Hickcox Jaimie Goodman, John Marshall, Norm Gitzen, Ray Russo and Al Malefatto Nancy Marshall, Irma Anapol and Ali DiNovo Sylvia Pelizza and Charlie Pelizza Benjamin Shenkman and Pat Gleason Bill Denison, Sarah Denison and Lori Denison Dottie Carson, Joseph Schweigart and Diana Wilson Elizabeth Baldwin, Kelsie Timpe and Mike Timpe Michael Davis and Leslie Lilly Nancy Heins and Peggy VanArman Paul Suschek and Jimmy Cates Phyllis Verducci and Martha Musgrove Tomena Scholze and Arthur Clauter

PAGE 35

FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2013 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT A35The Dish: Mediterranean Cobb The Place: Figs by T odd English, Macys, The Gardens Mall, 3107 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gar-dens; 775-2384 or cheftoddenglish.com The Price: $12.50 The Details: Our server joked that this salad packed the protein wed need to see us through a busy day, and she wasnt kidding. The combination of mixed greens, Gorgonzola, grilled chicken, bacon and egg is tossed with toma-to and olive and artichoke-avocado guacamole made a substantial lunch. The chicken was tender, with a slightly smoky fla-vor, and the crispy bacon paired perfectly with the Gorgonzola for a savory treat. We also enjoyed the hearty dollop of guacamole, with its unusual pairing of arti-choke and avocado. Rich ingredients call for a simple dressing. The white balsamic was all this salad needed to carry it to perfection. Q „ Sc ott Simmons FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE THE DISH Highlights from local menus Flavor Palm Beach continues dining deals through Sept. 30SCOTT SIMMONS/FLORIDA WEEKLY Heres an opportunity to sample the fare at A-list restaurants for B-list prices. Flavor Palm Beach continues through the end of September. You can visit participating restaurants and dine on a selection of spe-cially priced three-course meals for lunch and dinner. Lunch is $20, and dinner is $30 or $35. Diners can choose from three choices for each course. Prices are per person and exclude beverages, tax and gratuity. Participants include some of the top eateries in Palm Beach County, including restaurants at The Break-ers, as well as Ironwood Steak and Seafood at PGA National, Charleys Crab, Caf Chardonnay and Texas de Brazil. For information, visit flavorpb.com.Progressive dinner in Hobe Sound: The Hobe Sound Chamber of Commerce is selling tickets for its fundraiser, Dine Around Hobe Sound Progressive Dinner Party on Oct. 5. The event committee promises guests will enjoy a meal at celebrity cham-ber members homes. Dine Around Hobe Sound, presented by Gary and Carmen Uber, begins at 6 p.m. at Taste Casual Dining with cocktails, hors doeuvres and a silent auction. For the main course, guests will separate and progress to one of the nine homes where the local celeb-rityŽ chefs host a themed dinner party. The hosts have chosen themed menus consisting of traditional dishes from around the world. Guests can choose to attend one of the following locations: Shane and Jennifer Ahern „ Chef Ahern will be preparing a cuisine much like one you would find in one of Emerils Restaurants with his sig-nature BBQ Shrimp and other New Orleans Delicacies. Trent Steele and Wayne Lewis „ Chef Lewis will take guests on an Arabian Nights adventure, featuring elegant Middle Eastern cuisine. Jason and Angela Hoffman with Wayne Klick „ Chef Klick is an accomplished Italian chef and prom-ises that guests will leave full and happy after an Italian, Frank Sinatra-themed dinner. Rich and Jan Otten with Jef Otten and George Kleine „ Chefs Otten and Kleine request that you pack your bags for a trip to New England in the fall as they prepare traditional New England comfort foods. Buddy and Jennifer Ferrari „ Chef Ferrari will take guests to Chicago. Blake and Robin Capps „ Join the Capps for Indian cuisine prepared by popular Jupiter Island chef Paulette Winn. Dan and Jeanne Mackin „ Chef Jeanne Mackin will prepare gourmet Hungarian cuisine for guests. Dan and Amy Hulen „ Enjoy the Presidents Bistro at the Hulen house. Nadia and Joseph Utto with Cindy Cooper „ Taste of Germany with Chef Joseph Utto while enjoying an artful atmosphere. After dinner, guests will head to Scooters for dessert and a nightcap. Scooters will play host to the official after-party as well. Tickets are $50 per person and will include drinks, all three courses and should be purchased at the Chamber office. Sponsorship levels range from $150-$750. Contact Angela Hoffman at 772-546-4724 to sponsor or to pur-chase tickets. Science with foam: The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium will host the 3rd annual Science of Beer & Wine event on Oct. 10. The evening will include food, music, giveaways, trivia and special demonstrations „ including a liquid nitrogen beer ice cream demon-stration. Established local brewers including Brewzzi and PRP Wine will guide guests through the beer „ and wine-making process, while offering samples, of course. Additionally, this is the perfect after-hours venue to experience all of the new exhibits the Science Center has to offer „ includ-ing the new aquarium, Science on a Sphere and the latest traveling exhibit „ Savage Ancient Seas. Guests can sample bites and brews from Bistro Ten Zero One, Leila Res-taurant, Mojito Latin Cuisine and Pampas Grille. Its 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Oct. 10 at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium (formerly the South Florida Science Museum), 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach. Advance Tick-ets: $15 members; $20 nonmembers. Day of event: $15 members; $30 non-members. For information, call Kris-tina Holt at 370-7740 or visit www.sfsciencecenter.org. Q SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLYIts hard to say which came first „ drinking wine or dreaming up witty comments about doing so. Pithy remarks come from all manner of peo-ple „ spiritual leaders, playwrights, comedians, politicians and, of course, the ubiquitous Anonymous, who seems to have had the most to say on the subject. Clearly, wine is a topic that has fascinated through the ages, from ancient philosophers such as Plato, who wrote In vino veritasŽ (In wine is truthŽ), to well-known 20th-century author/imbiber Ernest Hemingway, who wrote, Wine is the most civilized thing in the world.Ž More recently, actor Johnny Depp is reported to have altered one of his tattoos from Winona ForeverŽ to Wino Forever.Ž So here are some of the more interesting things said about our favorite topic in the past few centuries. Philosophy/Rules for living:Q Wine and wenches empty mens purses.Ž English Proverb Q In victory, you deserve Champagne. In defeat you need it.Ž Napo-leon Bonaparte Q Wine improves with age. The older I get, the better I like it.Ž Anony-mous Q Men are like wine … some turn to vinegar, but the best improve with age.Ž Pope John XXIII Q Accept what life offers you and try to drink from every cup. All wines should be tasted; some should only be sipped, but with others, drink the whole bottle.Ž Paulo Coelho Q When Wine enters, out goes the Truth.Ž Benjamin Franklin Q Wine „ how classy people get wasted.Ž Anonymous Q One should always be drunk. Thats all that mattersƒBut with what? With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you chose. But get drunk.Ž Charles Baudelaire Q Drink wine, and you will sleep well. Sleep, and you will not sin. Avoid sin, and you will be saved. Ergo, drink wine and be saved. Medieval German saying Medicinal:Q The wine had such ill effects on Noahs health that it was all he could do to live 950 years. Just 19 years short of Methuselah. Show me a total abstainer that ever lived that long. Will Rogers Q If a life of wine, women and song becomes too much, give up the singing. Anonymous Q Wine is the most healthful and most hygienic of beverages. Louis Pas-teur Food/Dining:Q I cook with wine. sometimes I even add it to the food.Ž W.C. Fields Q What wine goes with Captain Crunch?Ž George Carlin Q What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?Ž W. C. Fields Q This wine should be eaten, it is too good to be drunk.Ž Jonathan Swift Q In wine there is wisdom, in beer there is freedom, and in water there is bacteria.Ž David Auerbach Q A meal without wine is called breakfast.Ž Anonymous Q Coffee keeps me busy until it is time to drink wine. Anonymous Etiquette:Q A wine is ready when you cant bear to wait for it any longer.Ž Karen MacNeil, The Wine Bible Q The secret to enjoying a good wine: 1. Open the bottle to let it breathe. 2. If it does not look like it is breathing give it mouth-to-mouth.Ž Anonymous Q jim McCRACKENvino@floridaweekly.com Let’s raise a glass to the well-crafted wine quote

PAGE 36

Recipients of the 2012 Ritz Carlton Residences Singer Island Power Broker Award For more information on these Great Buys and Next Sea son’s Rentals, email us at Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 7MRKIV-WPERHˆ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRWˆ.YTMXIVˆ2SVXL4EPQ&IEGLˆ.YRS&IEGL www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com561.328.7536www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com Representing The Palm Beaches Finest Properties Ritz 2003A 3Delight in the lifestyle of the Ritz Carlton Residences. One of only a few highly sought after 03Ž residences on the market. The utmost attention to detail from the custom crafted plaster moldings and casings, generously sized windows and expansive glass balconies with striking panoramas of the breathtaking oceanfront surroundings. Over 4,500 square feet, 3BR/3.5BA, separate oceanfront study/library, den, kitchen, state of the art appliances, wine cooler for 50 bottles. Five star quality. $3,700,000 For a private tour, please call Jeannie Walker 561-889-6734 PB Shores 606 2BR/2BA top ” oor Co-op. New hurricane windows & shut-ters, stove, dishwasher & dryer. View from every room. NOW $312,500Sylvia Jeannin 561-926-0234 Cote D Azur 2-1403 2BR/2BA Remodeled with new kitchen,granite,appliances Views of ocean & ICW. NOW $285,000 Joan Tucker 561-531-9647 REDUCED Beach Front 1601 3BR/3.5BA Direct ocean with magni“ cent views and marble ” oors through-out. $1,499,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front PH 2002 4BR/4.5BA Penthouse with over 4,000 Sq ft. of living space. Upgrades plus poolside Cabana. $2,150,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Beach Front PH 1903 3BR/3BA Spectacular views. This unit has 10FT Ceilings, marble ” oors and a private poolside cabana. $ 1,595,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Frenchmans Reserve 2BR/2.5BARolls Royce of Cham-bord with luxurious upgrades including elevator. $789,000 Kathy Miller … 561-601-9927 Martinique WT2304 2BR/3.5BA Amazing Views of ocean & ICW. Coveted SE corner on 23rd ” oor. $585,000Jeannie Walker 561-889-6734 Beach Front 703 3BR/3BA Spectacular direct ocean and ICW views. 2700+SF w/marble ” oors throughout, over $12K in window treatments. Best buy at Beach Front. $899,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Martinique WT201 2BR/3.5BA Unique completely renovated unit with spectacular large private terrace. A must see! $399,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 Ritz 1904B 2BR/2.5BA One of a kind South Beach style retreat. Stunning views and top of the line upgrades. fully furnished, Turnkey. $1,499,000Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 REDUCED Martinique WT2302 3BR/4BA Coveted SE corner unit with impact glass. Beautiful views of ocean and ICW. fully furnished, Immediate availability Turnkey. $849,000 Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 One Singer 601 3BR/3BA W Penthouse. Spectacular views of the Intracoastal & City. One of only 15 exquisite residences with gated entrance. Private elevator foyer. $1,600,000. Jeannie Walker … 561-889-6734 LUXURY RENTALS AVAILABLE……RITZ CARLTON, RESORT, BEACHFRONT FEATURED RESIDENCE

PAGE 37

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY REACHING NORTHERN PALM BEACH COUNTY’S MOST SOPHISTICATED READERSFlorida Weekly’s monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living BetterhealthySEPTEMBER 2013 living INSIDEThe debate about prostate screening/ B2 A healthy diet is the right lifestyle choice/ B3 Celebrate National Yoga Month/ B5 Cycling and socializing can help reduce stress/ B6 HEALING MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT EVERY YEAR, MILLIONS OF PEOPLE SEE A HEALTHCARE professional for symptoms that diagnostic tests can t explain. In many of these patients, the cause of ill-ness is underlying stress, particularly stress that isnt fully recognized. Managing stress „ as well as any health condition „ is all about taking charge of your thoughts, emotions and the way you deal with prob-lems. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program combines the best of conventional and integra-tive therapies, taking a holistic approach to wellness to help patients achieve a healthy mind, body and spirit. SEE MORE, PAGE B4 X Integrative Medicine at Jupiter Medical Center

PAGE 38

B2 healthy living SEPTEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYFamily history, ethnicity play a role in deciding the right age for prostate screening T here has been significant recent debate regarding prostate cancer screening and treatment. In 2012, a total of 241,740 men were diagnosed with prostate can-cer, making it the most commonly diag-nosed cancer of men in the United States today. In large part, due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening, the number of men diagnosed with early stage disease has increased from 30 percent in 1989 to 1992 to 45 per-cent from 1999 to 2001. Additionally, because of screen-ing and early detection, death rates from pros-tate cancer have decreased by 4.1 percent annually from 1994 to 2001. Despite these advances, in 2012, a total of 28,170 men passed away from prostate cancer and many more men are living with metastatic prostate cancer that is affecting their overall quality of life and may ultimately take their lives. The debate in prostate cancer stems from the notion that PSA screening has been too successfulŽ in diagnosing prostate cancer. Some men are being diagnosed with very slow grow-ing prostate cancers that are unlikely to lead to urinary or bowel problems, bone pain, paralysis, or death. For these men with nonlethalŽ prostate cancer, prostate screening may lead to unneces-sary biopsies, worry, and treat-ment with hormonal therapy, surgery or radiation therapy. These concerns have led to a national debate over whether PSA screening should be per-formed on all men and in what age groups it is most appropri-ate for. The American Urology Association has issued guidelines on PSA screening. These guidelines state that the greatest benefit for PSA screening appears to be for men between the ages of 55 and 69. However, very importantly, this does not mean that PSA screening should not be per-formed in men younger than 55 or older than 69. Younger men with higher risk factors such as family his-tory or being of the African-American race, and men older than 69 who are in good health, should make PSA testing decisions based on individual discus-sions with their physician. In our practice, we see many men younger than 55 and older than 69 who are diagnosed, because of PSA screen-ing, with prostate cancers that have a very high risk of spreading and causing local/regional problems or death. Without PSA screening, these men would likely have presented to their doctors with advanced, incurable disease. PSA screen-ing definitely saves many of these men s lives. For men diagnosed with prostate cancer, treatment options include observation, surgery and radiation therapy. The treatment decision is a shared one between the patient and his primary care physician, urologist and radiation oncolo-gist. Radiation therapy involves the usage of high-energy X-ray beams precisely focused onto the prostate gland. Hormon-al therapy and brachytherapy (internal radiation treatment) may be added for men with higher risk disease. Treatment is generally very well tolerated, with lim-ited short and long term side effects. Men are able to con-tinue to work and enjoy their daily activities. At South Florida Radiation Oncology, we have a caring and highly skilled team of physi-cians, nurses, and therapists utilizing the latest in technologies such as the Varian TrueBeam, Cyberknife, intensity modulated radia-tion therapy (IMRT) and RapidArc to maximize cure rates and minimize side effects. To learn more, please contact us at (877) 930-7376. Q Dr. Eugene ShiehBOARD CERTIFIED RADIATION ONCOLOGIST SOUTH FLORIDA RADIATION ONCOLOGY(877) 930-7376website: sfrollc.com #VSOT3PBEr1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt pbgmc.com UnE-* r-1,r,9U/"/" /-1,r,9U-*",/-rn rU",/"*rn,r Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to enjoy the course, the game, and be the healthiest you can be. Our team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS have trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. If you take care of your game on the course, we will take care of your orthopedic needs off the course.Call 561-625-5070 for a referral to an orthopedic surgeon or visit pbgmc.com. -iˆ}…i œ`->`>` ˆ "…œi`ˆV n >i ',œ>`U*>“i>V…>`iUL}“VVœ“ Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center ORTHOPEDIC CARE

PAGE 39

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com SEPTEMBER 2013 healthy living B3 Palm Beach1800 Corporate Blvd., N.W.Suite 302Boca Raton, FL 33431561.665.4738 Fort Lauderdale200 East Las Olas Boulevard19th FloorFort Lauderdale, FL 33301954.522.2200 (telephone)954.522.9123 (facsimile)Healthy diet, chiropractic care are lifestyle choices for a healthy life C onsuming a healthy diet on a regular basis is an important lifestyle choice. Such a diet, in combination with regular vigorous exercise and a suf-ficient amount of rest, will help you and your family achieve good health in the short-term and in the years to come. Chiropractic care is an additional life-style choice that helps you and your loved ones get the most benefit out of all your other health-ful activities. By helping ensure that your body's master system, your nerve system, is functioning at its best, regular chiro-practic care helps your digestive system, cardiovascular sys-tem, and musculoskeletal system do their jobs properly. As a result, the food you eat is put to the best possible use, the exercise you do builds stronger muscles and bones, and the rest you're getting provides maximum relaxation. Regular chiropractic care makes all the difference in achieving your goals of long-term, vibrant good health. Most people are aware of the worldwide epidemics of diabetes and obesity. The World Health Organization definition of overweight is a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI equal to or greater than 30. Worldwide obesity has doubled since 1980. In 2008, 35 percent of adults 20 and older throughout the world were overweight and an additional 11 percent were obese. Further, more than 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. In other words, one out of every 20 persons has diabetes. What's going on? Why be concerned? These conditions do not exist by themselves. Both contribute to additional severe health issues. Obesity is the leading cause of pediatric high blood pressure and increases the risk of coronary heart disease. Uncontrolled diabetes, over time, can lead to kidney disease, heart disease, dis-orders of the nerve system, and blindness. In the face of these life-threatening epidemics it's important to look for any good news. The good news is that both obesity and diabetes can be addressed with life-style-related changes. A suboptimal diet and lack of exercise are causes of both conditions. This is well-known. It is also well-known that maintaining a healthy diet and get-ting regular exercise prevents obesity and prevents or delays the most common type diabetes (type 2 diabetes). A healthy diet consists of regularly consuming food from all major food groups and consistently eating only that amount of food necessary for your daily energy requirements. If you're interested in losing weight and then maintaining the best weight for your body, a daily calorie intake between 1800 and 2100 calories is good for most men, and a daily calorie intake between 1700 and 1800 calories is good for most women. There is a third component of healthy eating that regulates how your body uses the food you eat. This additional component is known as food combining. Food combining involves combining protein and complex carbohydrates at each meal. This important step is the key to a healthy, optimally functioning metabolism. When your metabolic processes are working efficiently, youre burning carbohy-drates for energy. Your blood insulin levels are steady throughout the day. In contrast, without food combining, your digestive processes send unregulated amounts of glucose into the blood stream every time you eat a meal. The result is frequent swings in insulin levels and storage of these glucose mol-ecules (broken-down carbohydrates) as fat. Long-term, over months and years, such eating patterns can lead to being overweight, obesity, and diabetes. Putting the dietary principle of food combining into practice is easy. All that's required is paying attention to meal plan-ning. The result of this simple series of steps is better health for you and your fam-ily, now and in the future. Q Sources: WHO Fact Sheet No. 311 (March 2013): http://www.who.int/mediacentre/ factsheets/fs311/en/; Danaei G, et al: National, regional, and global trends in fasting plasma glucose and diabetes prevalence since 1980. Systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 370 country-years and 2.7 million participants. Lancet 378(9785):31…40. 2011; Campbell KL, et al: J Clin Oncol ReducedCalorie Dietary Weight Loss, Exercise, and Sex Hormones in Postmenopausal Women: Randomized Controlled Trial. J Clin Oncol 30(19):2314-2326, 2012 Dr. Michael PapaCHIROPRACTOR(561) 744-7373www.papachiro.com

PAGE 40

B4 SEPTEMBER 2013 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYHealing mind, body and spirit: Integrative Medicine at Jupiter Medical Center BY MARK GOCKE, MDBoard Certi“ ed, Internal Medicine E very year, millions of people see a healthcare professional for symptoms that diagnostic tests can t explain. In many of these patients, the cause of illness is underlying stress, particu-larly stress that isnt fully recognized. Managing stress „ as well as any health condition „ is all about taking charge of your thoughts, emotions and the way you deal with problems. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program combines the best of conventional and integrative thera-pies, taking a holistic approach to well-ness to help patients achieve a healthy mind, body and spirit. We focus on the whole person with the goal of improv-ing quality of life. Integrative Medicine is used as an added form of treat-ment for many con-ditions, including: € Heart Disease € Diabetes€ Weight control € Management of symptoms associated with cancer treatment € Back, neck and joint pain€ Those seeking a healthier lifestyle € Integrative therapies can help patients manage chronic conditions or major medical events, as well as main-tain a long-term state of well-being. Medical research has shown health ben-efits from many of these therapies, and ongoing clinical trials continue to study the potential benefits. € Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program includes classes and lectures to the community such as: € Mindful Living Stress Reduction (modeled after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center) is an eight-week course that will teach you new ways to cope with stress and improve your quality of life. € Yoga and Tai Chi can help you relax and reconnect your mind, body and spirit. They are proven to lessen the effects of stress, reduce anxiety and alleviate pain. € Massage therapy can help relieve stress and help you achieve a healthier lifestyle. It encourages relax-ation, improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, and improves flexibility and range of motion by relaxing tense muscles. € Aquatic therapy reduces stressful effects of gravity on the body by offering little or no weight bearing to help improve range of motion and func-tion quickly and safely. € Integrative Medicine Lecture Series offers you an opportunity to meet the experts and learn more about a variety of topics, including acupunc-ture, herbal supplements, nutrition and food therapy, and achieving optimal health and longevity. Acupuncture is also offered at Jupiter Medical Centers Wellness Center by appointment. Acupuncture is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for patients around the world. It is used to treat pain, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, weight control and more. Treatments are customized to each person and their desired results. Its important to remember that these integrative therapies are not meant to replace conventional medicine „ but rather work along with it. The goal of integrative medicine is to help patients achieve optimal health, even in situations where they simply dont feel well. Achieve a sound mind, body and spirit with Jupiter Medical Centers Inte-grative Medicine Program. For more information, call (561) 263-5775 or visit www.jupitermed.com/IM. Q JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER 1210 S OLD DIXIE HWY. JUPITER FLA. 33458 GOCKE <:=-*-)5‘+A*-:361.-:)81,):+‘*:)+0A<0-:)8A ?Q\P\PM5W[\)L^IVKML
PAGE 41

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com SEPTEMBER 2013 healthy living B5Confessions of a Sweaty Yogi: Celebrate National Yoga Month S eptember is National Yoga Month, and to celebrate, studios across the U.S. are offering free „ repeat FREE „ classes and events.If you need a refresher course on the benefits of yoga „ it helps relieve stress, find balance both mentally and physi-cally, increase flexibility and depending on what type of yoga you do, can also get your heart pumping and sweat dripping. So what are you wait-ing for? Here are a couple of ways you can help celebrate the month of yoga with Bodhi Hot Yoga: € #Yogarockster Challenge on Ins-tagram Follow Bodhi Hot Yoga (@bodhihotyoga) on Instragram and play along in our daily pose challenge. See others post and stay connected as we have some fun in this 30-day challenge. All in an effort to establish a daily practice. € Friends with Benefits Who doesn t love yoga, especially with Friends? And then double reward dollars?? Its a match made in heaven. Every Saturday in September, bring your friends to yoga for a free yoga class and if they sign up for any class package after YOU will receive $10 rewards to use in studio. € Enjoy a free class at Lululemon€ Free mini private sessions in the studio € The staff at Bodhi Hot Yoga is donating their time and their exper-tise for free mini (15 minute) private sessions. Have a question on a cer-tain pose, alignment, modification or advanced trickŽ „ ask the experts in this one on one opportunity. Call the studio for availability and times. € Beach Bliss Finish off the month with this OM-azing event! Join us on Sunday, Sept. 29, for a free class on the beach led by Jennifer Martin, and then stay all day and enjoy the hotels ameni-ties, including discount-ed spa packages. € No excuses left! Free yoga, fun events, studio rewards ƒ all we need is you to celebrate! € Bodhi Hot Yoga is the perfect sanctuary for mind and body transfor-mation. To see more studio informa-tion or class times visit our website. See you on the mat! Q To see more studio information or clas s times visit our w ebsite. Bodhi Hot Yoga9920 Alt A1A #801Palm Beach Gardens, 33410(561) 835-1577www.bodhihotyoga.com „ For more information on Hot Vinyasa yoga as well as local class times visit Bodhi Hot Yoga, 9920 Alt A1A, Suite 80, Palm Beach Gardens, 561-835-1577, www.BodhiHotYoga. com. Jennifer MartinBODHI HOT YOGA 9920 ALT A1A, SUITE 801 PALM BEACH GARDENS(561) 835-1577www.BodhiHotYoga.com All in one, state-of-the-art office. 3*$1DWLRQDO/$)LWQHVV3OD]D‡3*$%OYG %HDXWLIXOVPLOHV'HQWDOLPSODQWV 6HGDWLRQFRPIRUW PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry is where patients from all over South Florida Have been seeking outstanding care since 1987.'U-D\$MPRLVXQLTXHO\TXDOLHGDPRQJPRGHUQGD\GHQWLVWEHFDXVHKHVQRWRQO\DQDFFRPSOLVKHGFRVPHWLFDQGUHVWRUDWLYHGHQWLVWKHVDOVR&HUWLHG'HQWDO,PSODQW6XUJHRQ%RDUG&HUWLHGLQ,96HGDWLRQHis State-of-the-art facility in Palm Beach Gardens is equipped with the most modern technology for optimum treatment and superior patient satisfaction. This unique concept in advance dentistry offers patients satisfaction. This unique concept LQDGYDQFHGHQWLVWU\RIIHUVSDWLHQWVWKHEHQHWVDQGFRQYHQLHQFHRIKDYLQJDOOWKHlatest forms of dental implant, cosmetic and restorative procedures completed with WRWDOFRPIRUWLQRQHH[FHSWLRQDORIFH )RUDFRPSOLPHQWDU\ FRQVXOWDWLRQRUQGRSLQLRQ call 6HHPRUHDW3*$GHQWLVWU\FRP

PAGE 42

B6 healthy living SEPTEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY All Varieties of Bicycles Triathlon Recreational Racing Repair Service Group Triathlon Training Personalized Coaching Professional Bike Fittings Accessories and Clothing Transportation Racks Indoor Cycling 819 N Federal Highway, Lake Park 561.842.BIKE (2453)NEWLY EXPANDED SHOWROOM FREE PICKUP & DELIVERYCall for details $2 5 TUNE-UPAdjustments-lube & polish Reg $59 OYMbike.com $/7$$68,7(‡3$/0%($&+*$5'(16)/‡ 6(,1',$167‡678$57)/‡ZZZ%2'+,+27<2*$FRP $25One Week of Unlimited Yoga New clients only, not valid w/ any other offers. HOT DEAL Awaken. Socialize (and cycle) your way to less stress BY ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL Green Treehouse Media, LLC Y ou know that healthy habits such as eating right, getting enough sleep, and exercising are great tools in helping to combat stress. Maybe you have also learned the hard way that good time management skills and seeking out opportunities to bring a bit more laughter and joy into your day are also essential in manag-ing the detrimental eff ects of stress on your physical body. But have you given much thought to the important role that opportuni-ties for social-ization within a supportive group of others might play in your over-all health? What if a way existed to combine all of these stress-bust-ing tools into a single, fun activ-ity you could do a couple of times a week with some great folks and new friends? Would you try it? The On Your Mark Performance Center Cycling Club welcomes both recreational and racing members of all skill levels. The OYM Club is a program where members are required to support cycling through racing and volunteer efforts. In turn, participants are eli-gible for incentives, discounts, spon-sorships, and good old-fashioned fun. Best of all, the benefits of socializing with club members (both on and off the road) combined with cycling out-doors in the fresh Florida air is an awesome prescription for managing stress. Social contact with others helps provide a distraction from the many ups and downs of life. While you might be tempted to crawl into a cave in order to hide from interaction with others when you are feeling over-whelmed and irritable, doing so over and over can be very unhealthy both mentally and physically. Establishing a support group of friends and family who enjoy the same interests can put you back on the road to fun, fellow-ship and health. We ride every first and third Sunday of the month. We meet at the shop and start at 8 a.m. except from Memo-rial Day through Labor Day when we ride at 7 a.m. to beat the heat,Ž says Matt Goforth, of the On Your Mark Performance Center team of profes-sionals. Application forms for both the OYM Performance Center Club and Team are downloadable directly from the www.oymbike.com website. Interested individuals are asked to fill in some basic contact info, their athletic interests and accomplishments as well as other activities they are interested in doing through the Club. After choosing your level of commitment and submitting your pay-ment, simply mail in your application. Better yet, bring it directly to the shop. We will review it and get right back to you to get you plugged into the Club,Ž says Julie Goforth. Club members get special perks like a Club T-shirt and jersey, a 10 percent discount on store merchandise and training plans, an annual bike tune-up and more. Many opportunities for celebrating life off the road exist, too. However, the best benefit of all is the stress-free camaraderie and support you ll experience as a member of the OYM Performance Center Club. Q Robin Bradley HanselGreen Treehouse Media, LLCwww.oymbike.com(561) 842-2453 ON YOUR MARK PERFORMANCE 819 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY LAKE PARK Matt Goforth and Julie Goforth own On Your Mark Performance Center

PAGE 43

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY SEPTEMBER 2013 B7 Get Back in the Game Full Chiropractic & Physical Therapy FacilityTreat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t#6-(*/()&3/*"5&%%*4$4t%&(&/&3"5*7&%*4$%*4&"4& t'"$&54:/%30.&t'"*-&%#"$,463(&3: WITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY #BDL1BJO DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director Over 20 years in Palm Beach County DR. BRUCE GOLDBERGChiropractor, Acupuncture GIFT CERTIFICATE$0.1-*.&/5"3:$)*3013"$5*$ &9".*/"5*0/$0/46-5"5*0/ This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 10/11/2013. $150VALUE $150VALUE ~ Chiropractic & Physical Therapy Insurance List ~ AARP, Medicaid – 21 y/o and younger, Aetna, Medicare, Alignetworks, MedRisk, Allstate, Mercury Auto, Ameriprise Metropolitan Casualty, Avmed, Network Synergy, BCBS Multiplan, Beechstreet, Nationwide, Cigna, Neighborhood Health Partnership, Corvel, PHCS, Coventry, Prime Health Services, Dairyland Auto, Progressive Auto, Department of Labor, Providian, Fara, Rockport, FirstHealth, State Farm, Focus, Summit, Gainsco Auto, Tech Health, Geico, Three Rivers, GHI Travelers, GoldenR ule, Tricare, GreatWest, UHC/Optum Health, Heartland Therapy, UMR, Healthy Palm Beaches, Universal Smart Comp, Humana, Vista, Liberty Mutual, Wellmed 2632 Indiantown RoadJupiter561-744.73739089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37Palm Beach Gardens561-630-9598www.PapaChiro.com (FU IFMQ toda y " P S EBCMF c ash rat es Modern techniques quell fear of dentistry for patients T he fears that many people have of the dentist are a thing of the past, as advances in mod-ern technology have allowed patients to undergo full dental make-overs or necessary dental work without the anxiety and discomfort they may have experienced in the past. One way to eliminate this anxiety is to seek care by a sedation dentist. However, before you choose a sedation dentist, or a relaxation dentist, there are a few questions you should ask during the initial consulta-tion. What is sedation dentistry? There are different levels of sedation avail-able based on your needs and the pro-cedures you may undergo. One form of sedation is Oral Sedation which merely refers to the practice of admin-istering oral sedatives for the purpose of patient relax-ation. In most cases, the patient will be able to stay awake and respond to visual and verbal cues, but will be in a state of relaxation that will make the dental experience far more pleasant. Another form of Sedation is IV Sedation, which can only be administered by a Board Certified IV Sedation Dentist. IV Sedation can last longer and is more effective in highly anxious patients and for surgical procedures like dental implants, or longer procedures like cos-metic dentistry or dental reconstruc-tion. Am I a good candidate for oral sedation dentistry? Although people may be interested in oral sedation for a variety of different reasons, some of the best candidates for this type of procedure are those who have a slight to moderate anxiety level in relation to dentistry. If you have a fear of the dentist that has been keeping you away from receiv-ing the care you need, you may be a good candidate. Your oral sedation dentist may also be able to help you if you have a severe gag reflex, back or neck problems, dif-ficulty getting numb with regular medi-cation, or time constraints. Am I a good candidate for IV sedation? The majority of adults are good candidates for IV sedation. IV sedation is much more effective for patients who are fearful of the dentist or who simply don't want to have any memory of the procedure. IV sedation can be increased rapidly if necessary and can be administered for longer periods of time. Analgesics (pain relievers) can also be administered through the IV line, which is not an option with oral sedation. Are there any side effects to either form of sedation? As with any medications, some individuals may experience side effects to their sedatives. Dry mouth is a common one, for example, because these oral medications reduce salivary flow dur-ing the dental procedure. Most patients will simply be sleepy after the procedure and may take a rest-ful nap. Its a good idea to ask your seda-tion dentist about how the medications may affect you. Is it possible to remain fully conscious during the procedure? This will depend on the oral sedation dentist you are seeing, and a few other factors. Some types of oral sedation may require that you are fully unconscious, but there are methods that allow the patient to be conscious during the pro-cedure, although sedated. Be sure to ask your oral sedation dentist about these different possibilities so that you know what to expect when you go in. What experiences have you had administering sedation? When you are choosing a sedation dentist or painless dentist, you will want to ask about their background with the specific procedure that youre going in for. A sedation dentist should have passed the proper exams and have the qualifi-cations before helping his patients with sedation. You will want to feel secure in the knowledge that you are in experi-enced, professional hands. Q „ Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He is an active member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists. Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. He focuses his practice on complete dental restoration, surgical placement of dental implants, cosmetic smile design and sedation dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been serving patients in his Palm Beach Gardens office since 1987. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A.PGA CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY 7100 FAIRWAY DR. SUITE 59 PALM BEACH GARDENS561-627-8666PGADENTISTRY.COM

PAGE 44

Stress Less, Live More Mindful Living A Stress Reduction Program Only that day dawns to which we are awake.… Henry David Thoreau 1 210 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Jupiter, FL 33458 € jupitermed.com/IMModeled after the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, this comprehensive course is now available at Jupiter Medical Center. Thousands have bene“ tted from this eight-week course in stress reduction. Learn new ways of coping with: t cancer t heart disease t chronic pain tHSJFG t eating disorders t anxiety/depression t autoimmune disease t diabetes t work/family stress t many other conditions For more information, please call Cyndi Drake at (561) 263-5775 Tune in to WJNO 1290AM each Saturday at 10 a.m. for Jupiter Medical Centers Maximum HealthŽ with Dr. Ken Grey, AP, DOM .Mindful Living Program *ODMVEFT$%BOEPOFBMMEBZTFTTJPO Location: +VQJUFS.FEJDBM$FOUFSr40ME%JYJF)JHIXBZr+VQJUFS Featuring Mimi Bailey, RN t5VFTEBZTr0DUPCFSrUP/PWFNCFSrt QNUPQN 3FTFSWBUJPOTBSFSFRVJSFE4QBDFJTMJNJUFEUPQBSUJDJQBOUTQFSTFTTJPO 1MFBTFDBMM (561) 263-5775 FLORIDA WEEKLY run 9-19-13 1 Pg [10" x 15.5"] 4c, send pdf JMC3152 IntegMed Fl Wkly 1pg 22-07a-13 Recipient of the HealthGrades Americas 50 Best Award’ for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013)

PAGE 45

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY REACHING NORTHERN PALM BEACH COUNTY’S MOST SOPHISTICATED READERSFlorida Weekly’s monthly guide to Looking, Feeling and Living BetterhealthySEPTEMBER 2013 living INSIDEThe debate about prostate screening/ B2 A healthy diet is the right lifestyle choice/ B3 Celebrate National Yoga Month/ B5 Cycling and socializing can help reduce stress/ B6 HEALING MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT EVERY YEAR, MILLIONS OF PEOPLE SEE A HEALTHCARE professional for symptoms that diagnostic tests can t explain. In many of these patients, the cause of ill-ness is underlying stress, particularly stress that isnt fully recognized. Managing stress „ as well as any health condition „ is all about taking charge of your thoughts, emotions and the way you deal with prob-lems. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program combines the best of conventional and integra-tive therapies, taking a holistic approach to wellness to help patients achieve a healthy mind, body and spirit. SEE MORE, PAGE B4 X Integrative Medicine at Jupiter Medical Center

PAGE 46

B2 healthy living SEPTEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYFamily history, ethnicity play a role in deciding the right age for prostate screening T here has been significant recent debate regarding prostate cancer screening and treatment. In 2012, a total of 241,740 men were diagnosed with prostate can-cer, making it the most commonly diag-nosed cancer of men in the United States today. In large part, due to prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening, the number of men diagnosed with early stage disease has increased from 30 percent in 1989 to 1992 to 45 per-cent from 1999 to 2001. Additionally, because of screen-ing and early detection, death rates from pros-tate cancer have decreased by 4.1 percent annually from 1994 to 2001. Despite these advances, in 2012, a total of 28,170 men passed away from prostate cancer and many more men are living with metastatic prostate cancer that is affecting their overall quality of life and may ultimately take their lives. The debate in prostate cancer stems from the notion that PSA screening has been too successfulŽ in diagnosing prostate cancer. Some men are being diagnosed with very slow grow-ing prostate cancers that are unlikely to lead to urinary or bowel problems, bone pain, paralysis, or death. For these men with nonlethalŽ prostate cancer, prostate screening may lead to unneces-sary biopsies, worry, and treat-ment with hormonal therapy, surgery or radiation therapy. These concerns have led to a national debate over whether PSA screening should be per-formed on all men and in what age groups it is most appropri-ate for. The American Urology Association has issued guidelines on PSA screening. These guidelines state that the greatest benefit for PSA screening appears to be for men between the ages of 55 and 69. However, very importantly, this does not mean that PSA screening should not be per-formed in men younger than 55 or older than 69. Younger men with higher risk factors such as family his-tory or being of the African-American race, and men older than 69 who are in good health, should make PSA testing decisions based on individual discus-sions with their physician. In our practice, we see many men younger than 55 and older than 69 who are diagnosed, because of PSA screen-ing, with prostate cancers that have a very high risk of spreading and causing local/regional problems or death. Without PSA screening, these men would likely have presented to their doctors with advanced, incurable disease. PSA screen-ing definitely saves many of these men s lives. For men diagnosed with prostate cancer, treatment options include observation, surgery and radiation therapy. The treatment decision is a shared one between the patient and his primary care physician, urologist and radiation oncolo-gist. Radiation therapy involves the usage of high-energy X-ray beams precisely focused onto the prostate gland. Hormon-al therapy and brachytherapy (internal radiation treatment) may be added for men with higher risk disease. Treatment is generally very well tolerated, with lim-ited short and long term side effects. Men are able to con-tinue to work and enjoy their daily activities. At South Florida Radiation Oncology, we have a caring and highly skilled team of physi-cians, nurses, and therapists utilizing the latest in technologies such as the Varian TrueBeam, Cyberknife, intensity modulated radia-tion therapy (IMRT) and RapidArc to maximize cure rates and minimize side effects. To learn more, please contact us at (877) 930-7376. Q Dr. Eugene ShiehBOARD CERTIFIED RADIATION ONCOLOGIST SOUTH FLORIDA RADIATION ONCOLOGY(877) 930-7376website: sfrollc.com #VSOT3PBEr1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt pbgmc.com UnE-* r-1,r,9U/"/" /-1,r,9U-*",/-rn rU",/"*rn,r Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center wants you to enjoy the course, the game, and be the healthiest you can be. Our team of ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS have trained at some of the most prestigious medical schools in the nation. If you take care of your game on the course, we will take care of your orthopedic needs off the course.Call 561-625-5070 for a referral to an orthopedic surgeon or visit pbgmc.com. -iˆ}…i œ`->`>` ˆ "…œi`ˆV n >i ',œ>`U*>“i>V…>`iUL}“VVœ“ Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center ORTHOPEDIC CARE

PAGE 47

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com SEPTEMBER 2013 healthy living B3 Palm Beach1800 Corporate Blvd., N.W.Suite 302Boca Raton, FL 33431561.665.4738 Fort Lauderdale200 East Las Olas Boulevard19th FloorFort Lauderdale, FL 33301954.522.2200 (telephone)954.522.9123 (facsimile)Healthy diet, chiropractic care are lifestyle choices for a healthy life C onsuming a healthy diet on a regular basis is an important lifestyle choice. Such a diet, in combination with regular vigorous exercise and a suf-ficient amount of rest, will help you and your family achieve good health in the short-term and in the years to come. Chiropractic care is an additional life-style choice that helps you and your loved ones get the most benefit out of all your other health-ful activities. By helping ensure that your body's master system, your nerve system, is functioning at its best, regular chiro-practic care helps your digestive system, cardiovascular sys-tem, and musculoskeletal system do their jobs properly. As a result, the food you eat is put to the best possible use, the exercise you do builds stronger muscles and bones, and the rest you're getting provides maximum relaxation. Regular chiropractic care makes all the difference in achieving your goals of long-term, vibrant good health. Most people are aware of the worldwide epidemics of diabetes and obesity. The World Health Organization definition of overweight is a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI equal to or greater than 30. Worldwide obesity has doubled since 1980. In 2008, 35 percent of adults 20 and older throughout the world were overweight and an additional 11 percent were obese. Further, more than 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. In other words, one out of every 20 persons has diabetes. What's going on? Why be concerned? These conditions do not exist by themselves. Both contribute to additional severe health issues. Obesity is the leading cause of pediatric high blood pressure and increases the risk of coronary heart disease. Uncontrolled diabetes, over time, can lead to kidney disease, heart disease, dis-orders of the nerve system, and blindness. In the face of these life-threatening epidemics it's important to look for any good news. The good news is that both obesity and diabetes can be addressed with life-style-related changes. A suboptimal diet and lack of exercise are causes of both conditions. This is well-known. It is also well-known that maintaining a healthy diet and get-ting regular exercise prevents obesity and prevents or delays the most common type diabetes (type 2 diabetes). A healthy diet consists of regularly consuming food from all major food groups and consistently eating only that amount of food necessary for your daily energy requirements. If you're interested in losing weight and then maintaining the best weight for your body, a daily calorie intake between 1800 and 2100 calories is good for most men, and a daily calorie intake between 1700 and 1800 calories is good for most women. There is a third component of healthy eating that regulates how your body uses the food you eat. This additional component is known as food combining. Food combining involves combining protein and complex carbohydrates at each meal. This important step is the key to a healthy, optimally functioning metabolism. When your metabolic processes are working efficiently, youre burning carbohy-drates for energy. Your blood insulin levels are steady throughout the day. In contrast, without food combining, your digestive processes send unregulated amounts of glucose into the blood stream every time you eat a meal. The result is frequent swings in insulin levels and storage of these glucose mol-ecules (broken-down carbohydrates) as fat. Long-term, over months and years, such eating patterns can lead to being overweight, obesity, and diabetes. Putting the dietary principle of food combining into practice is easy. All that's required is paying attention to meal plan-ning. The result of this simple series of steps is better health for you and your fam-ily, now and in the future. Q Sources: WHO Fact Sheet No. 311 (March 2013): http://www.who.int/mediacentre/ factsheets/fs311/en/; Danaei G, et al: National, regional, and global trends in fasting plasma glucose and diabetes prevalence since 1980. Systematic analysis of health examination surveys and epidemiological studies with 370 country-years and 2.7 million participants. Lancet 378(9785):31…40. 2011; Campbell KL, et al: J Clin Oncol ReducedCalorie Dietary Weight Loss, Exercise, and Sex Hormones in Postmenopausal Women: Randomized Controlled Trial. J Clin Oncol 30(19):2314-2326, 2012 Dr. Michael PapaCHIROPRACTOR(561) 744-7373www.papachiro.com

PAGE 48

B4 SEPTEMBER 2013 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLYHealing mind, body and spirit: Integrative Medicine at Jupiter Medical Center BY MARK GOCKE, MDBoard Certi“ ed, Internal Medicine E very year, millions of people see a healthcare professional for symptoms that diagnostic tests can t explain. In many of these patients, the cause of illness is underlying stress, particu-larly stress that isnt fully recognized. Managing stress „ as well as any health condition „ is all about taking charge of your thoughts, emotions and the way you deal with problems. Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program combines the best of conventional and integrative thera-pies, taking a holistic approach to well-ness to help patients achieve a healthy mind, body and spirit. We focus on the whole person with the goal of improv-ing quality of life. Integrative Medicine is used as an added form of treat-ment for many con-ditions, including: € Heart Disease € Diabetes€ Weight control € Management of symptoms associated with cancer treatment € Back, neck and joint pain€ Those seeking a healthier lifestyle € Integrative therapies can help patients manage chronic conditions or major medical events, as well as main-tain a long-term state of well-being. Medical research has shown health ben-efits from many of these therapies, and ongoing clinical trials continue to study the potential benefits. € Jupiter Medical Centers Integrative Medicine Program includes classes and lectures to the community such as: € Mindful Living Stress Reduction (modeled after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center) is an eight-week course that will teach you new ways to cope with stress and improve your quality of life. € Yoga and Tai Chi can help you relax and reconnect your mind, body and spirit. They are proven to lessen the effects of stress, reduce anxiety and alleviate pain. € Massage therapy can help relieve stress and help you achieve a healthier lifestyle. It encourages relax-ation, improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, and improves flexibility and range of motion by relaxing tense muscles. € Aquatic therapy reduces stressful effects of gravity on the body by offering little or no weight bearing to help improve range of motion and func-tion quickly and safely. € Integrative Medicine Lecture Series offers you an opportunity to meet the experts and learn more about a variety of topics, including acupunc-ture, herbal supplements, nutrition and food therapy, and achieving optimal health and longevity. Acupuncture is also offered at Jupiter Medical Centers Wellness Center by appointment. Acupuncture is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for patients around the world. It is used to treat pain, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, weight control and more. Treatments are customized to each person and their desired results. Its important to remember that these integrative therapies are not meant to replace conventional medicine „ but rather work along with it. The goal of integrative medicine is to help patients achieve optimal health, even in situations where they simply dont feel well. Achieve a sound mind, body and spirit with Jupiter Medical Centers Inte-grative Medicine Program. For more information, call (561) 263-5775 or visit www.jupitermed.com/IM. Q JUPITER MEDICAL CENTER 1210 S OLD DIXIE HWY. JUPITER FLA. 33458 GOCKE <:=-*-)5‘+A*-:361.-:)81,):+‘*:)+0A<0-:)8A ?Q\P\PM5W[\)L^IVKML
PAGE 49

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com SEPTEMBER 2013 healthy living B5Confessions of a Sweaty Yogi: Celebrate National Yoga Month S eptember is National Yoga Month, and to celebrate, studios across the U.S. are offering free „ repeat FREE „ classes and events.If you need a refresher course on the benefits of yoga „ it helps relieve stress, find balance both mentally and physi-cally, increase flexibility and depending on what type of yoga you do, can also get your heart pumping and sweat dripping. So what are you wait-ing for? Here are a couple of ways you can help celebrate the month of yoga with Bodhi Hot Yoga: € #Yogarockster Challenge on Ins-tagram Follow Bodhi Hot Yoga (@bodhihotyoga) on Instragram and play along in our daily pose challenge. See others post and stay connected as we have some fun in this 30-day challenge. All in an effort to establish a daily practice. € Friends with Benefits Who doesn t love yoga, especially with Friends? And then double reward dollars?? Its a match made in heaven. Every Saturday in September, bring your friends to yoga for a free yoga class and if they sign up for any class package after YOU will receive $10 rewards to use in studio. € Enjoy a free class at Lululemon€ Free mini private sessions in the studio € The staff at Bodhi Hot Yoga is donating their time and their exper-tise for free mini (15 minute) private sessions. Have a question on a cer-tain pose, alignment, modification or advanced trickŽ „ ask the experts in this one on one opportunity. Call the studio for availability and times. € Beach Bliss Finish off the month with this OM-azing event! Join us on Sunday, Sept. 29, for a free class on the beach led by Jennifer Martin, and then stay all day and enjoy the hotels ameni-ties, including discount-ed spa packages. € No excuses left! Free yoga, fun events, studio rewards ƒ all we need is you to celebrate! € Bodhi Hot Yoga is the perfect sanctuary for mind and body transfor-mation. To see more studio informa-tion or class times visit our website. See you on the mat! Q To see more studio information or clas s times visit our websit e. Bodhi Hot Yoga9920 Alt A1A #801Palm Beach Gardens, 33410(561) 835-1577www.bodhihotyoga.com „ For more information on Hot Vinyasa yoga as well as local class times visit Bodhi Hot Yoga, 9920 Alt A1A, Suite 80, Palm Beach Gardens, 561-835-1577, www.BodhiHotYoga. com. Jennifer MartinBODHI HOT YOGA 9920 ALT A1A, SUITE 801 PALM BEACH GARDENS(561) 835-1577www.BodhiHotYoga.com All in one, state-of-the-art office. 3*$1DWLRQDO/$)LWQHVV3OD]D‡3*$%OYG %HDXWLIXOVPLOHV'HQWDOLPSODQWV 6HGDWLRQFRPIRUW PGA Center for Advanced Dentistry is where patients from all over South Florida Have been seeking outstanding care since 1987.'U-D\$MPRLVXQLTXHO\TXDOLHGDPRQJPRGHUQGD\GHQWLVWEHFDXVHKHVQRWRQO\DQDFFRPSOLVKHGFRVPHWLFDQGUHVWRUDWLYHGHQWLVWKHVDOVR&HUWLHG'HQWDO,PSODQW6XUJHRQ%RDUG&HUWLHGLQ,96HGDWLRQHis State-of-the-art facility in Palm Beach Gardens is equipped with the most modern technology for optimum treatment and superior patient satisfaction. This unique concept in advance dentistry offers patients satisfaction. This unique concept LQDGYDQFHGHQWLVWU\RIIHUVSDWLHQWVWKHEHQHWVDQGFRQYHQLHQFHRIKDYLQJDOOWKHlatest forms of dental implant, cosmetic and restorative procedures completed with WRWDOFRPIRUWLQRQHH[FHSWLRQDORIFH )RUDFRPSOLPHQWDU\ FRQVXOWDWLRQRUQGRSLQLRQ call 6HHPRUHDW3*$GHQWLVWU\FRP

PAGE 50

B6 healthy living SEPTEMBER 2013 www.FloridaWeekly.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY All Varieties of Bicycles Triathlon Recreational Racing Repair Service Group Triathlon Training Personalized Coaching Professional Bike Fittings Accessories and Clothing Transportation Racks Indoor Cycling 819 N Federal Highway, Lake Park 561.842.BIKE (2453)NEWLY EXPANDED SHOWROOM FREE PICKUP & DELIVERYCall for details $2 5 TUNE-UPAdjustments-lube & polish Reg $59 OYMbike.com $/7$$68,7(‡3$/0%($&+*$5'(16)/‡ 6(,1',$167‡678$57)/‡ZZZ%2'+,+27<2*$FRP $25One Week of Unlimited Yoga New clients only, not valid w/ any other offers. HOT DEAL Awaken. Socialize (and cycle) your way to less stress BY ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL Green Treehouse Media, LLC Y ou know that healthy habits such as eating right, getting enough sleep, and exercising are great tools in helping to combat stress. Maybe you have also learned the hard way that good time management skills and seeking out opportunities to bring a bit more laughter and joy into your day are also essential in manag-ing the detrimental eff ects of stress on your physical body. But have you given much thought to the important role that opportuni-ties for social-ization within a supportive group of others might play in your over-all health? What if a way existed to combine all of these stress-bust-ing tools into a single, fun activ-ity you could do a couple of times a week with some great folks and new friends? Would you try it? The On Your Mark Performance Center Cycling Club welcomes both recreational and racing members of all skill levels. The OYM Club is a program where members are required to support cycling through racing and volunteer efforts. In turn, participants are eli-gible for incentives, discounts, spon-sorships, and good old-fashioned fun. Best of all, the benefits of socializing with club members (both on and off the road) combined with cycling out-doors in the fresh Florida air is an awesome prescription for managing stress. Social contact with others helps provide a distraction from the many ups and downs of life. While you might be tempted to crawl into a cave in order to hide from interaction with others when you are feeling over-whelmed and irritable, doing so over and over can be very unhealthy both mentally and physically. Establishing a support group of friends and family who enjoy the same interests can put you back on the road to fun, fellow-ship and health. We ride every first and third Sunday of the month. We meet at the shop and start at 8 a.m. except from Memo-rial Day through Labor Day when we ride at 7 a.m. to beat the heat,Ž says Matt Goforth, of the On Your Mark Performance Center team of profes-sionals. Application forms for both the OYM Performance Center Club and Team are downloadable directly from the www.oymbike.com website. Interested individuals are asked to fill in some basic contact info, their athletic interests and accomplishments as well as other activities they are interested in doing through the Club. After choosing your level of commitment and submitting your pay-ment, simply mail in your application. Better yet, bring it directly to the shop. We will review it and get right back to you to get you plugged into the Club,Ž says Julie Goforth. Club members get special perks like a Club T-shirt and jersey, a 10 percent discount on store merchandise and training plans, an annual bike tune-up and more. Many opportunities for celebrating life off the road exist, too. However, the best benefit of all is the stress-free camaraderie and support you ll experience as a member of the OYM Performance Center Club. Q Robin Bradley HanselGreen Treehouse Media, LLCwww.oymbike.com(561) 842-2453 ON YOUR MARK PERFORMANCE 819 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY LAKE PARK Matt Goforth and Julie Goforth own On Your Mark Performance Center

PAGE 51

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY SEPTEMBER 2013 B7 Get Back in the Game Full Chiropractic & Physical Therapy FacilityTreat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t#6-(*/()&3/*"5&%%*4$4t%&(&/&3"5*7&%*4$%*4&"4& t'"$&54:/%30.&t'"*-&%#"$,463(&3: WITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY #BDL1BJO DR. MICHAEL PAPA Chiropractor Clinic Director Over 20 years in Palm Beach County DR. BRUCE GOLDBERGChiropractor, Acupuncture GIFT CERTIFICATE$0.1-*.&/5"3:$)*3013"$5*$ &9".*/"5*0/$0/46-5"5*0/ This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 10/11/2013. $150VALUE $150VALUE ~ Chiropractic & Physical Therapy Insurance List ~ AARP, Medicaid – 21 y/o and younger, Aetna, Medicare, Alignetworks, MedRisk, Allstate, Mercury Auto, Ameriprise Metropolitan Casualty, Avmed, Network Synergy, BCBS Multiplan, Beechstreet, Nationwide, Cigna, Neighborhood Health Partnership, Corvel, PHCS, Coventry, Prime Health Services, Dairyland Auto, Progressive Auto, Department of Labor, Providian, Fara, Rockport, FirstHealth, State Farm, Focus, Summit, Gainsco Auto, Tech Health, Geico, Three Rivers, GHI Travelers, GoldenR ule, Tricare, GreatWest, UHC/Optum Health, Heartland Therapy, UMR, Healthy Palm Beaches, Universal Smart Comp, Humana, Vista, Liberty Mutual, Wellmed 2632 Indiantown RoadJupiter561-744.73739089 N. Military Trail, Suite 37Palm Beach Gardens561-630-9598www.PapaChiro.com (FU IFMQ toda y " P S EBCMF c ash rat es Modern techniques quell fear of dentistry for patients T he fears that many people have of the dentist are a thing of the past, as advances in mod-ern technology have allowed patients to undergo full dental make-overs or necessary dental work without the anxiety and discomfort they may have experienced in the past. One way to eliminate this anxiety is to seek care by a sedation dentist. However, before you choose a sedation dentist, or a relaxation dentist, there are a few questions you should ask during the initial consulta-tion. What is sedation dentistry? There are different levels of sedation avail-able based on your needs and the pro-cedures you may undergo. One form of sedation is Oral Sedation which merely refers to the practice of admin-istering oral sedatives for the purpose of patient relax-ation. In most cases, the patient will be able to stay awake and respond to visual and verbal cues, but will be in a state of relaxation that will make the dental experience far more pleasant. Another form of Sedation is IV Sedation, which can only be administered by a Board Certified IV Sedation Dentist. IV Sedation can last longer and is more effective in highly anxious patients and for surgical procedures like dental implants, or longer procedures like cos-metic dentistry or dental reconstruc-tion. Am I a good candidate for oral sedation dentistry? Although people may be interested in oral sedation for a variety of different reasons, some of the best candidates for this type of procedure are those who have a slight to moderate anxiety level in relation to dentistry. If you have a fear of the dentist that has been keeping you away from receiv-ing the care you need, you may be a good candidate. Your oral sedation dentist may also be able to help you if you have a severe gag reflex, back or neck problems, dif-ficulty getting numb with regular medi-cation, or time constraints. Am I a good candidate for IV sedation? The majority of adults are good candidates for IV sedation. IV sedation is much more effective for patients who are fearful of the dentist or who simply don't want to have any memory of the procedure. IV sedation can be increased rapidly if necessary and can be administered for longer periods of time. Analgesics (pain relievers) can also be administered through the IV line, which is not an option with oral sedation. Are there any side effects to either form of sedation? As with any medications, some individuals may experience side effects to their sedatives. Dry mouth is a common one, for example, because these oral medications reduce salivary flow dur-ing the dental procedure. Most patients will simply be sleepy after the procedure and may take a rest-ful nap. Its a good idea to ask your seda-tion dentist about how the medications may affect you. Is it possible to remain fully conscious during the procedure? This will depend on the oral sedation dentist you are seeing, and a few other factors. Some types of oral sedation may require that you are fully unconscious, but there are methods that allow the patient to be conscious during the pro-cedure, although sedated. Be sure to ask your oral sedation dentist about these different possibilities so that you know what to expect when you go in. What experiences have you had administering sedation? When you are choosing a sedation dentist or painless dentist, you will want to ask about their background with the specific procedure that youre going in for. A sedation dentist should have passed the proper exams and have the qualifi-cations before helping his patients with sedation. You will want to feel secure in the knowledge that you are in experi-enced, professional hands. Q „ Dr. Jay Ajmo earned his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from Emory University School of Dentistry in 1986. He is an active member of The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and designated Master Cosmetic Dentist by the Rosenthal Institute for Aesthetic Dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been awarded Diplomate Certification from the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, Diplomate from the American Dental Implant Association and a Mastership from the Misch International Implant Institute. He is an active member of The American Academy of Oral Implantologists. Dr. Ajmo is Board Certified in IV sedation and maintains an active membership with the American Society of Dental Anesthesiology. He focuses his practice on complete dental restoration, surgical placement of dental implants, cosmetic smile design and sedation dentistry. Dr. Ajmo has been serving patients in his Palm Beach Gardens office since 1987. Jay L. Ajmo D.D.S., P.A.PGA CENTER FOR ADVANCED DENTISTRY 7100 FAIRWAY DR. SUITE 59 PALM BEACH GARDENS561-627-8666PGADENTISTRY.COM

PAGE 52

Stress Less, Live More Mindful Living A Stress Reduction Program Only that day dawns to which we are awake.… Henry David Thoreau 1 210 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Jupiter, FL 33458 € jupitermed.com/IMModeled after the acclaimed Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, this comprehensive course is now available at Jupiter Medical Center. Thousands have bene“ tted from this eight-week course in stress reduction. Learn new ways of coping with: t cancer t heart disease t chronic pain tHSJFG t eating disorders t anxiety/depression t autoimmune disease t diabetes t work/family stress t many other conditions For more information, please call Cyndi Drake at (561) 263-5775 Tune in to WJNO 1290AM each Saturday at 10 a.m. for Jupiter Medical Centers Maximum HealthŽ with Dr. Ken Grey, AP, DOM .Mindful Living Program *ODMVEFT$%BOEPOFBMMEBZTFTTJPO Location: +VQJUFS.FEJDBM$FOUFSr40ME%JYJF)JHIXBZr+VQJUFS Featuring Mimi Bailey, RN t5VFTEBZTr0DUPCFSrUP/PWFNCFSrt QNUPQN 3FTFSWBUJPOTBSFSFRVJSFE4QBDFJTMJNJUFEUPQBSUJDJQBOUTQFSTFTTJPO 1MFBTFDBMM (561) 263-5775 FLORIDA WEEKLY run 9-19-13 1 Pg [10" x 15.5"] 4c, send pdf JMC3152 IntegMed Fl Wkly 1pg 22-07a-13 Recipient of the HealthGrades Americas 50 Best Award’ for 3 Years in a Row (2011-2013)