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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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University of Florida
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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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THE HEART ATTACK RISK ASSESSMENT ITS FREE.ITS PRICELESS. S E E T A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A T A A T A A A S 561.625.5070pbgmc.com/heartscreenings www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 Vol. II, No. 26  FREE OPINION A4HEALTHY LIVING A11 PETS A6 ANTIQUES B4 BUSINESS A22REAL ESTATE A25ARTS B1ROGER WILLIAMS A2 EVENTS B6-7 FILM B9 SOCIETY B10-11,17-18PUZZLES B8 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. X Rocco’s rocksLocation in the Gardens offers great food, service. B19X NetworkingSee who’s out and about in Palm Beach County. A23-24 XCool beansOceana Coffee in Tequesta roasts right in its cafe. A22 X Roadside iconThe Shell Factory on Florida’s west coast turns 75. B1 XFIVE YEARS AGO THIS WEEK, WE ROLLED out our very first edition in Fort Myers. Since then weve launched Florida Weekly in other markets. Weve seen circulation and advertis-ing grow. Weve been among the first publications to launch a tablet edition and won a few awards along the way. We thank you, our readers, for your loyalty. See A18-19. XFlorida Weekly celebrates fiveGasoline prices are racing, and so are sales of scooters. On April 1 the national average for gasoline was $3.925, according to AAA, and in 10 states the average was more than $4 a gallon. Price experts predict it will stay high through the summer. At Surfside Scooters in North Palm Beach, sales are up 30 percent to 40 percent over last year, says Joe Costa-bile, business manager and technician. March was a stellar monthŽ for sales, he says „ as of the 20th, the shop had doubled our sales from last month.Ž Mr. Costabile, whose brands include Vespa, says there was a similar jump when gas skyrocketed in 2008. People lined up Shifting downthe high priceof filling upScooter sales are skyrocketing along with fuel prices. BY CHRIS FELKERcfelker@floridaweekly.comSEE SCOOTERS, A8 XRACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY Joe Costabile, business manager and technician at Surfside Scooters in North Palm Beach, says sales are up 30 percent to 40 percent over last year.

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WHY DOOR TO BALLOON TIME MATTERS DURING A HEART ATTACK. 561.625.5070THE HEART ATTACK RISK ASSESSMENT ITS FREE.ITS PRICELESS.pbgmc.com/heartscreenings Door to balloon time measures the time it takes for a hospital to get a heart attack patient from its ER to its cath lab to open blocked arteries. The goal is 90 minutes. More is bad. Less is good. One team in this region is consistently doing it in less than 60 minutes. This is what it takes to deliver our kind of heart care. This is what it takes to get the job done. The way we do it. A2 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYApril, what a month. From the Latin aperire,Ž to open. To open the earth, to open our eyes and hearts, to open up the possibilities. To open our wallets (for the IRS, of course). A month said by modernists to be the cruelest. Thats not true for Mitt Romney, not this April. But for Rick Santorum, perhaps it is. Now hell have to steer hard to port (left) if he wants to help another man reach the White House. And that must seem extraordinarily cruel to a starboard-steering soul so rightly certain of himself and everybody else. But never mind them now. Let me review what April has brought or wrought historically. In April, Ponce de Leon discovered Florida (probably in 151 3) and claimed it for himself and his ilk (the Spanish). Anyone would have, although sugar-sand beaches swarming with frolicking youth „ thats you, I take it, because its sure not me „ seem significantly more claimable than what he found. Why would you want a sugar-sand beach swarming with mos-quitoes, extremely hostile Native Ameri-cans and mangroves? In April, the United States Marines attacked Okinawa in the ferocious last Pacific battle of World War II (1945). In April, Jackie Robinson first entered the Major Leagues (1947, the same month Tru-man kicked off the Marshall Plan to help our former enemies), and Hank Aaron tied and then surpassed Babe Ruths homerun record of 714 (1974). In April, Robert Perry became the first human to reached the North Pole (1909), the Civil War ended with Lees surrender to Grant at Appomattox (1865), Thomas Jefferson was born (1748) and decades later made the Louisiana Purchase (1803). He bought that vast tract from the French under Napoleon „ all or parts of 15 contemporary states stretching from Louisiana to the Canadian border with Montana. Total acquisition: 828,000 square miles. Total cost: about 3 cents per acre, or $15 million. What a great month for T.J., but not so much for Napoleon. In April a few years later (1814), the Emperor of France had to abdicate his position, not surprisingly. Births and deaths, triumphs and tragedies, the great exodus of the Jews out of Egypt and into Liberation celebrated by Passover this year from April 6 to April 14 „ theyve all played a part in this. The Titanic sank in April, which wasnt so cool, but Apollo 13 took off and (some-how) splashed down safely, which was. Abe Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr. were both assassinated in April. Franklin Roosevelt died, William Shakespeare was born and died on the same day 52 years later (April 23), the first Social Security checks were sent out in 1937 (talk about a spring bloom), and Hitler was married and committed suicide all in about 24 hours (1945). And dont forget that President James Buchanan was born this month, along with Booker T. Washington, Betty Ford, Edward R. Murrow and Samuel Morse, to name a few. Paul Revere made his midnight ride and the shot heard round the worldŽ was fired in Lexington, Mass., to start the Revolutionary War, both in April. George Washington took office as the first American president „ not king, not conqueror, not general, but president „ on April 30, 1789, 14 y ears aft er that shot. So what does it all mean? It means that spring has sprung. Both my oldest and my youngest sons were born in April within one day of each other, although 22 years apart (1980 and 2002), and if that isnt glo-rious spring, I dont know what is. For me and Geoffrey Chaucer, the 14thcentury poet, this is a month of pilgrim-age, of storytelling, of celebration. Chaucers famous Canterbury TalesŽ describes a winner-take-all storytelling contest between 30 men and women trav-eling from London about 60 miles to the Canterbury Cathedral, each storyteller aiming to win free lodging and food for the best story. He begins with these lines: Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote The droghte of March hath perced to the rooteƒ. Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimagesƒ.Of course, my dad died in April too young. After that for a while, I thought the modernists were right. T. S. Eliot puts it like this, in the first lines of his most famous poem, The WastelandŽ (1922), right under the Section I title, The burial of the dead:ŽApril is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain.But I say, Horsepucky.I can do all that memory and desire nonsense in any month, except for the lilacs, but we dont have them here at my place, anyway. Instead, we have a clutch of softly purple impatiens, a butt ery yellow orchid with a red center, a luscious single peri-winkle in a near-pink hue, and a scatter of blue lobelia „ all of it improbably beautiful. Still, the faint scent of orange blossoms, mostly a March phenomenon, drifts across our senses like distant perfume, an April nod to November fruit. And at night fireflies dance through woods like tiny emissaries from the stars, as buzzed with hopeful kinesis as anything. Go out and see, pilgrim. Open yourself to the world. Q Go out and see, pilgrim. Open yourself to the world.COMMENTARY roger WILLIAMSrwilliams@floridaweekly.com ROGER WILLIAMS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Impatiens, an orchid, a periwinkle and lobelia remind us of April’s bounties.

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GOLD COINS We buy and sell all types of U.S. and foreign gold coins, Krugerrands, Maple Leaf, Eagles, etc. Call for latest pricing. SILVER DOLLARSUNITED STATES 1794 to 1803 .............................$325.00 and UP1836 to 1839 ..........................$4,000.00 and UP1840 to 1873 ...............................$85.00 and UPTrade Dollars ..............................$35.00 and UP 1878 to 1904 ...............................$20.00 and UP1921 to 1935 ...............................$20.00 and UP COINS U.S. SILVER COINS DATED 1964 AND EARLIER STERLING SILVER )ODWZDUH6HWV‡7UD\V‡7HD6HWV‡6WHUOLQJ3LHFHV & Jewelry by Tiffany, Cartier & George Jensen 999 Silver Bars All Sizes ALSO BUYING rr'(17$/*2/'rr‡*ROG1XJJHWV *ROG%DUV‡,QGLDQ+HDG3HQQLHV‡3ODWLQXP 3DOODGLXP$QWLTXHV&ROOHFWLEOHV‡3DSHU Money: US & Foreign Proof Sets & Mint Sets PAPER MONEY 1929 AND OLDER &RQIHGHUDWH‡)RUHLJQ‡)UDFWLRQDO&XUUHQF\863DSHU0RQH\6PDOO‡&XUUHQF\Z%DQN1DPHV2EVROHWH3DSHU0RQH\‡0LOLWDU\0HPRUDELOLD JEWELRY ‡.‡.‡.‡3ODWLQXP BUYING YOUR JEWELRY, DIAMONDS, COINS, GOLD & SILVER ,167$17&$6+)25*2/'‡6,/9(5‡3/$7,180 RECHANT PRECIOUS METALS, COINS & JEWELRY Established coin shop serving the Palm Beaches. In the same location since 1977. Professional Coin Grading Service Authorized Dealer. Member American Numismatic Association & Florida United NumismatistOPEN MON-FRI 9-5 / SAT 10-21730 South Congress Avenue, West Palm Beach Just north of Forest Hill Blvd.561-964-8180www.rechantpreciousmetals.com IMPORTANT: DO NOT CLEAN YOUR COINS!!! $OOSULFHVDUHIRUFRLQVLQQHFRQGLWLRQ &OHDQHGRUGDPDJHGFRLQVZLOOEULQJVLJQLFDQWO\OHVV35,&(6*22'7+58 6,/9(5&/$'+$/)'2//$56 DATES 1965-1970 .......................$2.50 and UP +$/)6 ..................................$9 QUARTERS ................... DIMES ............................

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A4 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY PublisherMichelle Nogamnoga@floridaweekly.comEditor Betty Wellsbwells@floridaweekly.comAssociate Publisher Sara Burnssburns@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsScott Simmons Athena Ponushis Tim Norris Jan Norris Mary Jane Fine Artis Henderson Chris Felker Linda Lipshutz Roger Williams Jim McCrackenPhotographerRachel HickeyPresentation Editor Eric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comPrincipal DesignerScott Simmons ssimmons@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersCJ Gray Paul Heinrich Natalie Zellers Nick Bear Hannah Arnone Chris AndruskiewiczCirculation Supervisor Kelly Lamons klamons@floridaweekly.comCirculationShawn Sterling Rachel HickeyAccount ExecutiveBarbara Shafer bshafer@floridaweekly.comBusiness Office ManagerKelli Caricokcarico@floridaweekly.comPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: FLORIDA WEEKLY 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470  Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions: $31.95 in-county$52.95 in-state  $59.95 out-of-state Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2011 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC. rich LOWRYSpecial to Florida Weekly OPINIONMadison’s last stand amy GOODMANSpecial to Florida Weekly The shade of James Madison hovers over the ObamaCare argument at the Supreme Court. It is the system of limited and carefully divided government powers that he had a large hand in crafting „ and defended so ably in The Federalist Papers „ that is at stake in the contest over the constitutionality of the indi-vidual mandate. If the mandate stands, it will be the latest blow to Madisons scheme, which is the best architecture for self-govern-ment yet devised by man, but has been steadily worn down over time. It is a damning indictment of contemporary Washington that, overall, it is so hostile to the Madisonian ethos. He is a most inconvenient Founding Father since he tells us: No, the federal government cant do whatever it wants; no, we cant just all get along; no, we cant rush to pass whatever legislation deemed a cant waitŽ priority by the president. Now, grow up. In the mind of contemporary progressivism, these words of Madison from The Federalist Papers simply dont compute: The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State gov-ernments are numerous and indefinite.Ž They are an antiquated 18th-century sentiment unsuited to our more com-plex and more sophisticated time, to be ignored when not actively scorned. So, as he famously wrote, “ambition must be made to counteract ambition.”But this division of power is meant to maximize accountability and competi-tion in the belief that the undue accu-mulation of power in any one source is, in Madisons words, the very definition of tyranny.Ž Madison concerned him-self with limits on government because there is a degree of depravity in man-kind, which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust.Ž So, as he famously wrote, ambition must be made to counteract ambition.Ž He would have no patience for gooey discussions on the Sunday shows about the divisiveness of our political life. The latent causes of faction,Ž for Madi-son, are sown in the nature of man.Ž He was a pioneer in fighting the sort of partisan battles we now look down upon and rue. Nor would Madison be moved by the lamentations that Congress isnt passing enough legislation quickly enough. He wanted a Senate „ that balky, frustrat-ing upper body „ to check the rush to enshrine momentary causes into law. In a passage that could have been written as commentary on the handiwork of Nancy Pelosis Congress, he argued it will be of little avail to the people that the laws are made by men of their own choice if the laws be so voluminous that they cannot be read, or so incoherent that they cannot be understood.Ž In his book on Madisons political thought, American Compact,Ž Gary Rosen notes that as Madison feared, utility rather than constitutionality has become the ultimate test for public pol-icy.Ž The debate over ObamaCare at the time of its passage focused on its cost, its workability and its aggrandizing ten-dency more than its constitutionality. For Madison, Rosen continues, consti-tutional limits were the deepest source of republican dignity, the bulwarks that he expected citizens to defend in order to remind themselves of their sover-eignty.Ž Would that they were once again. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.Forget fear of flying; fear airport screeningThere was terror in the skies this week over Texas, caused not by a ter-rorist but by a pilot „ a Flight Standards captain, no less. JetBlue Airways Capt. Clay Osbon, flying Flight 191 from New Yorks John F. Kennedy International Airport to Las Vegas, began moving up and down the aisle after the jet was airborne, ranting, according to several passengers, about Iraq, Israel, al-Qaida and bombs, calling on passengers to recite the Lords Prayer, saying that they were all going down.Ž An off-duty pilot in the cabin went to the cockpit to help the co-pilot with the emergency land-ing, while passengers and crew subdued Osbon. Osbon, whod been with JetBlue almost since its founding, was taken to the hospital, suspended with pay, then criminally charged with interfering with a flight crew. Thats enough to inspire a fear of flying in anyone. But just getting to your airplane these days may present a greater risk to your health than the actual flight. New airport security screening technology, primarily backscatter X-ray devices, have come under increased scrutiny, as their effectiveness is ques-tioned amid concerns that the radia-tion exposure may cause cancer. Add-ing to health concerns are both the graphic nature of the images captured, essentially nude photos of every person passing through the machine, and the aggressive „ and for some, humiliat-ing „ nature of the alternative to the scans, the enhanced pat-downŽ by a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agent. Republican Sen. Susan Collins introduced a bill that would require inde-pendent laboratory testing of the X-ray backscatter machines, exactly what a group of University of California, San Francisco scientists called on the Obama administration to do in April 2010. Responding to the TSA claim (provided by the manufacturer, Rapiscan) that the radiation dose is less than the dose one receives from eating one banana,Ž professor John Sedat and others wrote: While the dose would be safe if it were distributed throughout the volume of the entire body, the dose to the skin may be dangerously high. ... There is good reason to believe that these scan-ners will increase the risk of cancer to children and other vulnerable popu-lations (including pregnant women).Ž When this risk is multiplied over 700 million annual travelers, Michael L ove, Ph.D., the manager of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine X-ray facility, told Discover magazine, someone is going to get skin cancer.Ž The European Union has banned the machines. While flying the past few weekends, I refused to go through the scan-ners, which is every passengers right, although the option is almost never indicated anywhere (the Collins bill also requires clear signage). I was made to wait while TSA employees were clearly available to conduct what is euphemisti-cally called an enhanced pat-down.Ž The agents aggressive questioning of my decision to opt outŽ was matched only by her aggressive pat-down when I would not give in. Arriving back in New York, a friend who had just flown in from Chicagos OHare International Airport recounted how the TSA agent had her hands down the front of my friends pants and said, Feels like youve lost some weightŽ! Who gains? The two manufacturers of the full-body scanners have powerful friends. As reported in The Hill and The Washington Post, L-3 Communications, maker of the millimeter wave scanner, hired lobbyist Linda Daschle, wife of former Sen. Tom Daschle. Rapiscan, the maker of the X-ray backscatter machine, reportedly paid $1 million to the Cher-toff Group, run by former Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secre-tary Michael Chertoff, while Chertoff appeared in the media touting the value of the machines. Each machine costs the taxpayer about $150,000, but that is only the purchase; installation, then staffing, costs much more.TSA agents themselves may face the greatest risks. A recent TSA inspector generals report acknowledged that wing shields be installed to further reduce radia-tion exposure levels for backscatter opera-tors.Ž It also noted that TSA employees reported insufficient time for training on the machines. Michael Grabell, a reporter with ProPublica who has written extensive-ly on full-body scanners, told me: Radia-tion technicians have told some of the TSA screeners that If I were on these machines, Id be wearing a radiation badge. But the TSA has refused to let them.Ž All these concerns have led the nonprofit Electronic Privacy Information Center to sue the TSA and DHS, seeking a halt to the use of the scanners, at least until indepen-dent testing of the risks is performed, and the results made public. Until we know that these full-body scanners are safe, Im opting out. Q „ Denis Moynihan contributed research to this column. „ Amy Goodman is the host of Democracy Now!,Ž a daily international TV/radio news hour airing on more than 1,000 stations in North America. She is the author of Breaking the Sound Barrier.Ž

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Pucci & CatanaLuxury Pet Boutique DESIGNERS 3USAN,ANCIs,OLA3ANTOROs"OW(AUS.9# ,OU,UXIE0ARISs%MRE.EW9ORK 5NLEASHED,IFEs/SCAR.EWMAN#OUTURE $EAN4YLERs(ARTMAN2OSE Open 7 days a week/10am-10pm &IFTH!VENUE3OUTH.APLESsrr 6IA-IZNER7ORTH!VENUE0ALM"EACHsrrShop Online www.pucciandcatana.com SHOP ONLINE 3!6% Use Code: DOG10SHOP ONLINE pucciandcatana.com A6 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Pets of the WeekTo adopt a pet>> Bessie is a 1-year-old spayed Boxer mix. She was born with a crooked front leg, but can walk and run comfortably. She would do best in a home with no small children. >> Joey is a 2-year old neutered domestic. He likes to sleep sprawled out on his back with his hind legs off to the sides, head curled under, and one of his front paws draped over his face. He’s a happy guy and gets along with everyone, even other cats. The Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Hu-mane Society of the Palm Beaches, was founded in 1925 and is a limited admission non-pro t humane society providing services to more than 10,000 animals each year. It is located at 3100/3200 Military Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at hspb.org. For adoption information, call 686-6656. BY GINA SPADAFORI Universal UclickWhen Easter draws near, you can be sure of an increase in sales of chocolate and rabbits. And while it wont hurt you much to buy chocolate on a whim, Id rather you pass on buying a bunny on impulse. But if youre ready for a surprisingly special pet, wait a few weeks, check the shelters and pick a pair. They do well in multiples „ after theyre altered, of course „ and youll find wonderful rab-bits ready for re-homing in the weeks after Easter. Never thought of a rabbit as an indoor pet for adults? Youre missing out! Once liberated from the confinement of a back-yard hutchŽ and provided with a safe and secure indoor environment, bunnies really shine as pets. Theyre playful and adorably willful, trainable and even ame-nable to using a litter box. Care is surprisingly easy, and very affordable. Heres how to keep your rab-bit healthy: Q Housing. Your rabbit will need a home base of a small pen or large cage with food, water and a litter box. Rabbits do well with a plain cat box filled with a shallow layer of recycled paper pellets, covered with a layer of fresh grass hay. You dont scoop a rabbit box „ you change it com-pletely, every day. (The ingredients you toss are great for your compost pile.) Q Nutrition. Fresh water needs to be available at all times. For food, skip the store-bought pellet route and feed your rabbit a vari-ety of fresh leafy veggies and an unlimited supply of fresh grass hay. If you do go with pellets, your rabbit should still get as much fresh grass hay as he wants. Treat your rabbit, too: Bunnies love little bits of fruits, roots and leafy greens. (If you have storage space, hay is cheaper by the bale and lasts for many weeks in a cool, dry location.) Q Health care. Check with your local rabbit rescue group for the names of veterinarians who are known to be good with rabbits. Get your rabbit spayed or neutered. In addition to keeping your rabbit from reproducing, youll have a better pet. Unaltered rabbits can have behavior problems such as aggression and urine-spraying. Your rabbit will need a wellness check, just as a cat or dog would, and a good rabbit vet will help you catch little health problems before they become big ones. Q Exercise and play. Make sure your rabbit is allowed time outside the cage or pen every day. If you cant manage letting your rabbit roam at will indoors, block off a single rabbit-proofed room. A secure, supervised area outside is fine as well, but dont leave your rabbit unattended. Rab-bits can be scared literally to death by cats, dogs and even jays and crows. Because some rabbits can be chewers, youll want to make sure that any rabbit-friendly area has electrical cords tucked away, and deny access to the legs of nice furniture and the corners of good carpets. Q Rabbits love toys. Cat toys, dog toys, hard-plastic baby toys and even the cardboard tubes from inside toilet paper and paper towel rolls are fun for rabbits. Cardboard boxes stuffed with hay and treats are also fun for bunnies. I had a trio of pet rabbits for a few years „ Turbo, Annie and Velocity. I still miss them, and will be looking to adopt a pair later this spring. I encourage you to join me, and make this spring a good one for former Easter bunnies. Q PET TALESPick a pairCheck the shelter for perfect pets: two indoor rabbits A pair of rabbits are good indoor pets: quiet, playful, affectionate and easy to care for.

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A8 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYout the door when gas went over $4 a gallon.Ž But he and partner Don Swartwood III, who says he has the same title „ we both do the same thingsŽ „ were able to manage along with one helper. The three of us got it down to a science, just in and out „ as quickly as you can give me your money, I can have you on a scooter,Ž Mr. Costabile says. Mr. Cosabile has had the store at 524A Northlake Blvd. for five years. Previously he had a location on Dixie Highway for seven years. Mr. Costabile, 36, of Juno Beach, says that many of his customers are sea-sonal residents. They live on the island in Jupiter or Palm Beach; sometimes they have (a scooter) for entertainment reasons, or maybe they want to have only one car and they only need to go to the store, the post office or the beach club. A lot of people from FPL drive them also.Ž But his clientele has become more diverse: Ive been noticing every walk of life, from people who make 30 grand a year to those who make $30 million a year, coming in. Since gas has been around $3.95 a gallon, my sales have increased 30 to 40 percent.Ž Gianni Giacche of North Palm Beach would be closer to the former group; hes a manager at Car-mines restaurant who moved to the area from New York in December and recently bought a new Vespa GTS 300 from Surfside, the official Vespa dealer for the area. The native of Italy says that in his homeland, everybody rides a scooter.Ž Ive been riding Vespas since I was 14 years old. Its one of the oldest and best brands of scooter in the world,Ž says Mr. Giacche, 54. So it was natural for him to get one for his short commute; he lives near the shop and takes it daily to the market and restau-rant on PGA Boulevard. For me it is quick with my Vespa to get to work.Ž Mr. Giacche already owns one that he uses to get around when he visits Italy for a few months each year. Its very useful for the gas mileage. Its very simple, comfortable to ride; you can park it any-where. Particularly here in Florida, with the weather, I mean, its perfect.Ž Plus, he says, a $10 spot goes a long way. With two gallons, which is the full tank, I can go 110 to 120 miles. Its perfect,Ž Mr. Giacche says. Mr. Costabile agrees that, Gas mileage is huge, 100-plus miles per gallon on some bikes.Ž That, of course, is mostly whats driving higher sales „ but scooters also are just much more economical to own and maintain. Mr. Costabile says his most popular brand is Vespa. The Italian bikes are number one here just because of the demographic. Also Genuines are very popular. I also carry the Taiwanese product, the Hard Work-ing Man bike. The Vespa is more toward the Bentley driver, and the Genuine is toward the Honda Civic driver.Ž His price range for new scooters starts at $1,799 and tops out around $8,000. A 125cc bike will start at about $2,199, and the Vespa starts at $3,199, or $4,399 for a 150cc,Ž Mr. Costabile says. Hard Working Man scooters cost $1,799 for a 50cc and top out around $4,000, for a 150cc or above. Surfside also carries used scooters; their prices range from $2,000 and up for Vespas, and $1,500 and up for other brands. Many of his customers come in having educated themselves on their choices through the Internet and know exactly what they want. Surfside has a com-prehensive website at surfsidescooters.com. Others come in multiple times, and it might take them four or five visits,Ž he says. Some finance, but many pay cash. Some customers balk at buying a scooter with an engine more powerful than 50cc because then theyd have to take a state-required course to get the states motorcycle endorsement on their drivers license, so, Mr. Costabile tells them, Ill take it off the price of the scooter „ $250 for the motorcycle course.Ž Surfside also offers servicing for every scooter it sells. Store hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Call 842-3004 for more information. Power & Play Warehouse in Lake Worth also is seeing a run on scooters. Manager Robin McCombs attributes it to reasonable deals being offered and depressed economic conditions locally. Power & Play patrons mostly are working people who are serious about finding less costly transporta-tion than a car, says Ms. McCombs. Nigel Sutherland, 40, of Lake Worth was having his QLINK 49cc scooter serviced to give him a bit of a power boost. He doesnt like to be late to work; liv-ing in Indian Pines, he rides to Yamato Road in Boca Raton every day and has already put 75,000 miles on his year-old bike. But sometimes traffic delays him. He spent $1,600 on the scooter and swears by the incredible mileage he gets, as well as the service he receives at Power & Play. Mr. Sutherland says he fills up every other day or so „ for $3 or $4 (the gas tank holds only a gallon). I used to have a Honda Sonata, SCOOTERSFrom page A1“With two gallons, which is the full tank, I can go 110 to 120 miles. It’s perfect.” – Gianni Giacche PHOTOS BY RACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY Joe Costabile of Surfside Scooters says Vespas tend to be top sellers these days. Prices for Vespas start at $3,199, or $4,399 for a 150cc bike. A Vespa is parked in front of Surfside Scooters on Northlake Boulevard in North Palm Beach.

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but I gave it to my girlfriend to drive,Ž he says. Ms. McCombs, 28, of Pompano Beach, says the Lake Worth location has been open more than three years; the owner, Tom McMann, has a store in Pompano Beach. We grew up together and have been friends for about 13 years,Ž she says. She says the store has been very busy almost since it opened, especially recently, when 10-15 scooters per week have been going out the door. Just since gas prices have been going up, what is it, 5 cents a week, the sales have increased tremendously,Ž Ms. McCombs says. As for the top sellers „ theyre all top sellers,Ž Ms. McCombs says. We carry something from every price range, starting at $1,199. So obviously, right now, people buying cash-price bikes, your $1,199 scooters are gener-ally the most popular.Ž Thats for a 49cc scooter like Mr. Sutherlands, she says. And, she adds, 90 percent of her buyers do pay cash, because if they own the scooter outright, no insurance is required, although she still recom-mends they purchase a basic policy to protect against theft. One recent buyer at Power & Play Warehouse, Deborah OByrne of Boyn-ton Beach, came in with three friends after they all decided together that theyd buy scooters with their tax refunds, and she says Ms. McCombs gave them a great deal. Ms. OByrne says the particular bike she bought was exactly what I was looking for, with really wide motorcycle-style handle-bars. The front of it looks like a Vespa, but the bike itself resembles a motor-cycle a little bit more.Ž She and her friends use their scooters for errands and also take rides together on weekends in downtown Lake Worth or Delray Beach, and Ms. OByrne says, We just love them.Ž Power & Play Warehouse is located at 1828 N. Dixie Highway; call 459-5747 for more information, or see powerand-playwarehouse.com. Q FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 NEWS A9 Something to “COO” about in West Palm BeachIn 1972, Jack Nicklaus designed his rst, and what many believe his best, course in Florida. Home to championship golf, including The Honda Classic Quali er, the South Florida PGA Championship, U.S. Amateur Quali ers, and two State Opens, Mayacoo still lives up to its original Golf Digest Top 100Ž status. Incomparable golf and full-service country club amenities, coupled with the nest cuisine and social events in the area. Celebrating 40 years of excellence! A limited number of 40th Anniversary memberships are available. MAYACOO LAKES COUNTRY CLUB 9697 MAYACOO CLUB DRIVE WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33411 (561) 793-1703 MAYACOOLAKESCC.COM PHOTO: ARTHUR CICCONI, GOLF SHOTS CHRIS FELKER / FLORIDA WEEKLY Robin McCombs, manager of Power & Play Warehouse in Lake Worth, says her most popular sellers tend to the $1,199 scooters. “Gas mileage is huge, 100-plus miles per gallon on some bikes.” – Joe Costabile, Surfside Scooters

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WHY DO I HEARƒ BUT NOT UNDERSTAND? Study by Cambridge University in England Reveals Key Answer Until recently, there was no practical way to identify dead regions of hearing cells in the ear. However, a new British-developed procedure using standard test equipment now allows for identi“ -cation of dead hearing cell regions. The study suggests that the presence or absence of dead regions may have serious implica-tions in the “ tting of hearing aids.This research reveals that amplifying dead cells is a mistake which will result in poorer speech understanding in noise. A new type of digital programmable microcircuit is now available using nanoScience technology that can be programmed to bypass the dead cells. As a result, the patients usable hearing cells receive ampli“ cation, thereby improving speech understanding in noise.We are employing a like method in our diagnostic sound booths using a sound “ eld speech in noise procedure,Ž said Dr. Mel Grant of Audiology & Speech Pathology. This test simulates hearing in a noisy crowd. We are able to determine maximum speech understanding by frequency shaping this new hearing aid.ŽThe results have been phenomenal. For the “ rst time, a patient is able to actually realize the exact percentage of speech under-standing improvement in noisy listening environments. These new products come in all shell sizes, including the smallest digital models, with the prices starting as low as $750. During its release, Starkey is offering the new frequency-shaping hearing instrument on a 30-day satisfaction trial.Call Audiology & Speech Pathologys of“ ce nearest to you for your no-obligation appointment. Imagine a hearing aid that automatically adapts to your surroundings and re” ects your speci“ c lifestyle. Imagine a hearing aid that is so pleasant to wear that it gives a new meaning to the phrase customer satisfaction.Ž Well, imagine no more. With this breakthrough technology from STARKEY, the worlds largest hearing aid manufac-turer. Now comes the “ rst hearing aid ever developed to address your most important needs. Not only does it “ t your individual hearing loss, it “ ts the way you live. If you hear, but are having trouble under-standing conversation, you owe it to yourself to take advantage of the free demonstrations of-fered this week. Call Audiology & Speech Pathology today for a no-obligation appointment. “I’ve got good news!” – Dr. Mel Grant, Au.D. Hearing ComputerUnnoticed in Ears FREE Demonstration This Week 0% Financing AvailableT o quali“ ed buyers Low Price GuaranteeIf you “ nd a lower advertised price on an identical hearing aid at any local retail competitor, we will beat their price by 10% when you buy from us. just bring in the competitors current ad, or well call to verify the items price that you have found. Competitors remanufactured, discontinued and used hearing aids are excluded from this offer. AUDIOLOGY & SPEECH PATHOLOGY DR. MEL GRANT, CLINICAL DIRECTOR 1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOTt+VQJUFSt1BMN#FBDI8FTU1BMN#FBDIt8FMMJOHUPO CALL TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT649-4006 COMPUTER-ASSISTED FITTING ALLOWS PATIENTS TO SEE THEIR HEARING POPŽ INTO FOCUS Trial of the new S Series iQ! Call for Appointment Expires 4/30/12 In-House Repairs (Parts Available) Expires 4/30/12 Lifetime Circuit Warranty W/purchase by April 2012 Expires 4/30/12 FREE FREE FREE %S,BUISZO8JMEFSt%S"SUIVS;JOBNBO %S$IFSZM#SPPLTr Doctors of Audiology

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 A11 The torrential rains wouldnt let up. Gary Walker looked out the window and knew his golf game would be canceled. He knew Thursday was the day his wife, Marge, had Zumba and bridge, he was reluctant to ask her to cancel her plans. Shed gotten huffy, almost belligerent, the last time when he had asked her to give up her plans to spend the day with him. She would once again recite how shed been on her own all the years while he was absorbed in his career or perfecting his golf game. Shed always add how shed had to develop friendships and activities because he was never around, and she wasnt about to give up what was important to her now, just because it was convenient for him. Since Garys retirement two years ago, and their move to South Florida, the two of them had been at odds. Although theyd excitedly anticipated the move for many years, they had never imagined that it would be so stressful to balance their activities and time. At first they felt like pinching themselves: they were in love with their new home and the country club community they had selected. The other residents were friendly, and the Walkers had more invitations than they could possibly accept. But as the days passed he had the distinct feeling that Marge was becoming increasingly annoyed that he was underfoot. Clearly, they each had habits that were getting under the others skin. He had envisioned relaxed home cooked dinners. They had a spiffy grill and he looked forward to throwing on some steaks. So, it really annoyed him when Marge strolled in after six, assuming theyd go out for dinner. Frankly, he had never noticed the clutter around the house when he was working. But now, the piles of paper irritated him and he had trouble keeping his mouth shut. Although theyd planned their finances carefully, he was still a worrier. He knew he shouldnt pore over every credit card receipt, but he couldnt turn off his inner accountant. Marge indignantly insisted that she only bought items on sale, but it rankled him when she bought a new pair of shoes. She w ould m utter under her breath that she had managed a company, raised three children and ran a household without much input from Gary and she didnt need his supervision now.Although retirement provides the opportunity to leave the exertions and stress of employment behind, for some families it can bring unex-pected challenges and irritations. Although couples may have assumed they had a shared vision of how to map out their retired lives, and how much time they will share with each other, their differences may have turned out to be more pronounced than theyd anticipated. Despite active planning, individuals may not have considered the emotional toll of making a major life transition. After the novelty has worn off, they may look at each other and ask Now what?Ž People who have spent a lifetime defining themselves by their career identities may become quite distressed to lose the roles theyve always known. It may be difficult to shake the feeling theyve lost their importance and prestige and that their opinionsŽ are no longer of value. When people have lost a sense of purpose and worth, they may be prone to anger or depression. There may be resentment felt towards a spouse who has adapted with greater ease, and has assimilated more read-ily into a different routine. There may be worries about ones health, mortality or financial security that keep them up at night. It will make a huge difference if both parties are sensitive to the stresses and make a concerted effort to support each other. When couples are immersed in raising a family and earning a living, they often sweep issues of incompat-ibility under the rug. They may deny or overlook differences, avoid each other or distract themselves from facing unpleasantries. They may never have learned how to respect each others point of view, or find ways to problem solve and come up with mutually acceptable solutions. They may have lived side by side for decades, sadly, without maintain-ing a relationship nourished with sufficient affection or admiration. When they finally have the time and opportunity to spend quality time with each other, they may not have a solid basis of friendship and support. It may still not be too late for them to develop a relationship based on mutual respect. There are steps each person can take to not only meet their own emotional needs, but to value the wishes of their partner. Demonstrating a sincere interest in what the other has to say and listen-ing without judgment can create an atmosphere of mutual respect and camaraderie. Modifying expecta-tions and being open to their partner making choices that they wouldnt have previously agreed to will go a long way in smoothing conflicts. Let-ting go of the small things, but not letting the big things fester, requires diplomacy and care. Holding back sarcastic remarks and criticism obvi-ously makes a difference. If retirees view this next chapter in their lives with a spirit of adven-ture, they may open themselves up to challenging new possibilities. They may have an opportunity to try on new roles and commit to projects that can offer a sense of purpose and esteem. And finally, they may have the time and access to endeavors previously out of their reach. Q „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., LCSW, is a psychotherapist serving individuals, couples and families. A Palm Beach Gardens resident, she holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia and trained at the Ackerman Institute for Family Therapy in Manhattan. She can be reached in her Gardens office at 630-2827, or at palmbeachfamilytherapy.com. HEALTHY LIVINGDon’t tarnish golden years: Compromise and listen linda LIPSHUTZllipshutz@floridaweekly.com

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A12 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY 1210 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Jupiter, FL 33458 € 5 61-263-2628 € jupitermed.com/events Jupiter Medical Center € April, 2012 Lectures, Healthy Advice, & Events You Can Live By.Space is limited. Online registration is required for all events at www.jupitermed.com/events For additional information or directions, please call 561-263-2628 Diabetes Awareness Day Join us for a half-day of diabetes education and informational exhibits, including wellness and rehabilitation services, sleep disorders, wound care and more. Information will be provided on diabetes testing equipment, insulin pumps and medication. Free screenings include blood glucose, blood pressure, foot, memory and visual acuity. Wednesday, April 4, 2012 | 8:00 am … 1:00pm | Pavilion at Jupiter Medical Center, 1230 S. Old Dixie Hwy. Jupiter, FL Are Your Feet Tingling? Peripheral neuropathy often causes numbness, pain, tingling, and burning in your hands and feet. Join us for an informative discussion about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Featuring Virginio Vena, MD, Board Certi“ed, Podiatric Orthopedics and Podiatric Surgery. Tuesday, April 10, 2012 | 5:30 pm … 6:30 pm | Ahlbin Building, 2nd ”oor, Esselen Room 3 Cardiac CT Angiography: Results in a Heartbeat Did you know that “ve million people visit the emergency room with chest pain each year in the United States? Learn how a coronary angiogram can identify and rule out three-life threatening causes of chest pain within 5 heartbeats. Featuring Lee Fox, MD, Board Certi“ed, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Chief of Radiology. Tuesday April 17, 2012 | 5:30 pm … 6:30 pm | Ahlbin Building, 2nd ”oor, Esselen Room 3 Your Active, Healthy Heart Make a pledge to yourself to get heart healthy in 2012! Join us for an opportunity to ask the expert about the bene“ts of physical activity in maintaining heart health. Featuring Z. Jacob Litwinczuk, MD, Board Certi“ed, Cardiovascular Disease and Interventional Cardiology. Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | 5:30 pm … 6:30 pm | PGA National, Congressional Conference Room Thyroid Disorders Did you know that thyroid disorders affect 20 million people in the U.S., many of which remain undiagnosed? Join us for an interactive discussion and learn about thyroid function, diseases, signs and symptoms, and available treatment options including minimally invasive surgical intervention. Featuring Kathryn Reynolds, MD, Board Certi“ed, Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, and Raul Arroyo, MD, Board Certi“ed, General Surgery. Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | 5:30 pm … 7:00 pm | Ahlbin Building, 2nd ”oor, Esselen Room 3 Spa Nights Take a break from your busy schedule and take care of yourself. Schedule your annual screening mammogram during one of our special Spa Nights and receive a complimentary chair massage and light appetizers in a calm, comfortable atmo sphere, complete with plush robes and relaxing music. Receive a breast cancer risk assessment and breast health education goody bag wit h each appointment. A physician prescription is required. Regular insurance coverage applies. Cash prices available for the uninsured. Please call 561-263-4414 to schedule your appointment. Each Wednesday in April | 4:30 pm … 6:30 pm | Margaret W. Niedland Breast Center, 1025 Military Trail, Suite 200, Jupiter Y a F W T o si F a W Ibis Golf and Country Club recently hosted 224 women golfers, and 112 men golfers for the Play for P.I.N.K.Ž golf tournament to support breast cancer research. Play for P.I.N.K. (prevention, immediate diagnosis, new technology and knowl-edge) is an independent, grassroots organization that now has more than 200 clubs raising funds through tournaments. Thanks to the underwriting of the Este Lauder Foundation, Bloomberg Foun-dation and Wilson Sporting Goods, 100 percent of the funds raised at Ibis will go directly to breast cancer research in Florida. There were shotgun starts for both the male and female participants, with a luncheon and awards presentation following play, attended by West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio. Palm Beach County Sherriff Ric Bradshaw was also on hand with his pink Ford Explorer patrol vehicle. We are extremely proud of our membership and the community here at Ibis,Ž said Brad McCollum, PGA director of golf at Ibis. Great things can happen when everyone comes together to support a cause, and our membership has been a leader in South Florida when it comes to con-tributing to breast cancer research. We look for-ward to continuing the Ibis tradition of support-ing the Play for P.I.N.K. foundation.Ž Q COURTESY PHOTO West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio poses with the pink Palm Beach County Sherriff patrol vehicle at the Ibis Golf & Country Club “Play for P.I.N.K.” tournament. Ibis tourney raises breast-cancer funds SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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www.truetreasuresinc.com1201 US Hwy 1, North Palm Beach (561) 625-9569 3926 Northlake Blvd, Palm Beach Gardens (561) 694-2812ou will have fun shopping with us!Y ou will have fun shopping with us!Y Follow us on Shop with us at now in progress through April 7th. DonÂ’t miss this opportunity to save.

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Your Window Into Palm Beach Real Estate www.FITESHAVELL.com 561.655.6570 101 N. County Rd., Palm Beach 561.694.6550 11237 US Hwy 1, North Palm Beach 324 VIZCAYA DRIVE MIRASOL COUNTRY CLUB3BR/3BA popular Malago model with beautiful waterviews and screened pool. Recently updated and inexcellent condition. Web ID 1075 $549,900 13260 MARSH LANDING OLD MARSH GOLF CLUBTotally renovated & beautifully furnished 3BR/3.5BAcourtyard home with guesthou se. Spectacular golf & water views in award-winning Private Club. $1.295M Craig Bretzla561.601.7557 cbretzla@“teshavell.com Heather PuruckerBretzla 561.722.6136 hbretzla@“teshavell.com 13340 MARSH LANDING OLD MARSH GOLF CLUBExquisite custom built 4BR/5.2BA home on 1/2 acrewith superior “nishes. 5,485 SF, media room, guest houseplus golf and water views. Web ID 1008 $2.395M 136 VIA CATALUNHA PASEOSBeautiful 5BR/3.5BA home overlooking private preservearea. The largest model in Paseos with versatile ”oorplanand many upgraded “nishes. Web ID 1090 $639,900 Elena Felipa Thibault 561.309.2467 ethibault@“teshavell.com2727 N. ROSEMARY AVENUE 3 WEST PALM BEACHRare condo warehouse. Equipped with a 9,000 lb.direct lift, 1 ton and 3 ton electric hoist. Gated, alarmed& air-conditioned. Web ID 1027 $199,9002427 PRESIDENTIAL WAY 1104 WEST PALM BEACHDramatic city & golf views from 3BR/2BA convertible condoin gated community. Turn key furnished, ”oor-to-ceiling hurricane windows & doors. 55+ building. Web ID 1076 $219,500 11724 CARDENA COURT OLD PALM GOLF CLUBAward-winning 5BR/7.5BA custom built estate on almostan acre overlooking the 7th hole. Built in 2008 with fullattention to every detail. Web ID 1048 $6.75M Furnished 517-519 SOUTH BEACH ROAD JUPITER ISLANDMagni“cent Oceanfront opportunity. 3.26 acres. Thelargest available parcel on Jupiter Island with 206 of oceanfrontage. Rare 17 elevation. Web ID 205 $10.995M 279 COLONIAL LANE PALM BEACHNew 3BR/4.5BA home. Spacious ”oorplan and “nest“nishes. Beautiful pool and patio area. On very privatePalm Beach street. Web ID 99 $2.795M JUST LISTED

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Acupuncture & Custom Herbs ARTHRITIS FIBROMYALGIA GOLFERS ELBOW M.S. SCIATICA HEADACHES ALLERGIES STRESS ANXIETY DEPRESSION MENOPAUSE PMS INFERTILITY IMPOTENCE PARALYSIS KIDNEY PROBLEMS EXCESS WEIGHT IMMUNE SYSTEM ANTI-AGING BALANCE Shudong WangLicensed Acupuncture Physician with 30 years experience and 8 years training in China10800 N. Military Trail, Suite 220Palm Beach Gardens561.775.85004522 N. Federal HighwayFt. Lauderdale954.772.9696www.nacupuncture.com Mention this ad for a FREE CONSULTATION (an $80 value!) PLUS receive $10 off your “ rst two weekly visits FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 A17 Loft SalonGEORGE RYAN Open Tuesday thru Saturday by Appointment Only t Hair t Nails t Facials t Eyelash Extensions t Waxing t Color Corrections Serving Palm Beach County for Over 15 Years Full Service Salon Located in the Abbey Road Plaza10800 N. Military Trail, Suite 212, Palm Beach Gardens Call 561.444.2680 Today to Schedule. OF PALM BEACH 1210 Northlake Blvd., Lake Park Body Shop: 561.868.2358email: MullinaxFordBody@gmail.com Quality Work performed by Certi“ ed Craftsmen!LL-AKESAND-ODELSs&REE%STIMATES BODY SHOP Proudly using PPG products www.PPG.com MULLINAX 20 % OFFRetail Labor in our Body ShopMention Promo Code: &LORIDA7EEKLYsOffer Expires: 4/26/2012Discount NOT Available on Insurance ClaimsNEW YEAR SPECIAL! Here are Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center lectures and events: Q Heart to Heart Club April 10 „ 7 p.m.First Presbyterian Church Fellowship hall. Call Terry Brady for more informa-tion, 627-0478. Q Free Heart Attack Risk AssessmentApril 25 „ 7:30 a.m.-noon Conference Room 3, at the center. Free screening includes blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, body mass index.To register call 625-5070 or see pbgmc.com. Q Free Bone Density Screening April 26Outpatient entrance at the center.Free screening consists of a heel scan to measure bone density levels. Space is limited.To register, call 625-5070 or see the Web site. Q High Blood Pressure April 27Noon-1 p.m., Classroom 3, at the medi-cal center.Dr. Jaideep Puri, Nephrologist will speak on high blood pressure and will answer questions. Q Free CPR/AED Training CourseMay 22 „ 6 p.m. Palm Beach Gardens Fire Station 5.In partnership with Palm Beach Gar-dens Fire Rescue. Space is limited. Call 625-5070. Q Free Heart Healthy CookbookFor a free heart healthy cookbook, call 625-5070. Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center is at 3360 Burns Road in Palm Beach Gardens. For more information on these events call 625-5070 or see the medical centers Web site, pbgmc.com. Q Gardens Medical Center offers free lectures, screeningsSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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A18 NEWS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY JIM DICKERSON AND VANDY MAJOR/FLORDIA WEEKLY ROGER WILLIAMS A2 OPINION A4 15 MINUTES A6BUSINESS A23 REAL ESTATE A29ARTS B1BOOK REVIEW B3EVENTS B6 NANCY STETSON B8FILM REVIEW B11SOCIETY B16 & 17CUISINE B19 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. I, No. 1 U FREE WEEK OF JULY 2-9, 2009 Waterfront living Charlotte Harbors Vivante is unique and affordable. A29 u POSTAL CUSTOMER Sheraton grand opening And other society events in Charlotte County. B16 &17 u SEE PUNTA GORDA, A8 u Million-dollar view Sunloft Center takes harbor life to new heights. A23 u PuntaGorda: The ever-changing New World worth exploring Fabric of our lives Southwest Florida quilters stitch stories, give all for art and community. B1 u BY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.com he irony, perhaps, is that Ponce de Leon once stood on the treasure without knowing it. Unaware though the sculpted conquistador appears to be as he points to a distant horizon from his vantage point in Gil-christ Park downtown, he had landed smack in the money when he made landfall in Charlotte Harbor „ argu-ably the harbinger and first citizen of contemporary Punta Gorda. Who are we now as the first decade of the 21st century rolls toward its con-clusion, almost 500 years after theBubbles, the chimpanzee who was Michael Jacksons constant companion for years, has been living at the Center for Great Apes, a sanctuary for chimpanzees and orangutans in Wauchula, about 40 miles north of Char-lotte County, since 2005. Hes a wonderful chimpanzee,Ž said Patti Ragan, founder and director of the ape center. Ms. Ragan said the 26-year-old chimp spends his days playing with fellow chim-panzees, running around the centers "Its better now, with tremendous improvement after the 2004 hurricanes. Its growing as a destination resort, as it should and must." „ Vernon Peeples TJackson’s chimp living the good life in SWFLBY E.I. ROTTERSMANnews@” oridaweekly.com SEE BUBBLES, A15 uBubbles at Wauchula ape sanctuaryGETTY IMAGES BY GAB ARCHIVE/REDFERNS Michael Jackson with Bubbles in 1984. Fort Myers Florida Weekly hits the stands April 5, 2007 ARTSSpamalotŽ headlines 2007-2008 Broadway series at BB Mann Hall. C1 u BUSINESSDon Paight talks about downtown Fort Myers. A33 u SEE MILLIONS, A6 u Florida has $17 million in cash to give back to Lee County resi-dents and businesses „ all you have to do is ask the state for it. A list of unclaimed property obtained by Florida Weekly shows more than 60,000 names in Lee County alone. And nearly all of them dont know it. Some are for small amounts „ $30 or $40 from an old util-ity deposit or forgotten bank account. The biggest single unclaimed account in Lee County: $86,537. And there are more than 6,500 accounts for county residents valued at more than $500. Local plastic surgeon Dr. Jeffrey Lang had more than $300,000 sitting in 29 unclaimed accounts. When contacted by Florida Weekly, Lang said he didnt realize it was so much. I dont know why these accounts were turned over to the state,Ž he said. I dont know why they cant find me. I havent moved. Ive been in the same office for 10 years.Ž Lang said the money was from stock holdings and bank accounts that had been merged into other banks. He contacted the state, received the forms via email and is well on his way to collecting. They were spectacularly helpful,Ž Lang said of the people in the Bureau of Unclaimed Property. Florida is holding more than $1 billion mostly from unclaimed insurance benefits, utility deposits, dormant bank accounts or uncashed pay-checks, said Rick Sweet, assis-tant bureau chief for unclaimed property, a division of the Flori-da Department of Financial Ser-vices. And the pots been build-ing for a long time. Were still paying claims from the 1960s,Ž Sweet said. But that money doesnt just sit in a vault. In fact, only about $15 million is ready cash, Sweet said. The rest goes to the Principal State School Trust Fund to benefit education. The education fund is expected to use $238 million from unclaimed property this year to pay for school opera-tions, class size reduction, teacher recognition and reading programs. Last year the state took in $354 million in unclaimed cash and paid a record $101 million to 225,000 people. This year its on pace to return about $150 million, Sweet said. Most of the payments are in the $70 to $80 INSIDE Millions in cash unclaimedState has $17 million for thousands in Lee OPINION A4BUSINESS PLANS A28NETWORKING A31REAL ESTATE B1 MARKET REPORT B2ARTS C1THEATRE C7EVENTS C8 SOCIETY C17MILESTONES C11OUTDOORS C15CUISINE C18 County still growing at top speedAbout 75 people moved to Lee County every single day last year according to esti-mates recently released by the U.S. Census Bureau. Thats 27,142 new residents adding fuel to the economic engine that researchers call the fastest growing large county in Florida. Growth, measured by Census estimates slowed slightly from the previous year „ down to 5 percent from a record high of 5.8 percent in 2005. But University of Florida estimates show Lees growth at 6.6 percent in 2006, a record high. Its all very good news,Ž said Michael Reitmann, executive director of Lee BIA, the building industry association. We still have a dynamic economy. The trend of people moving here will continue.Ž Census estimates put Lee County as the eighth largest in the state, just behind Jacksonvilles Duval County. Since 2004, Lee has jumped from tenth place, bypass-ing Brevard County on Floridas east coast and Polk County in central Florida. Its really the fastest growing large county,Ž said Scott Cody, a demographer with the University of Floridas Bureau of Economic and Business Research. Lees growing pretty fast for its size.Ž Since 2000, Lee has grown by one-third with most of that growth in Cape Coral and Lehigh Acres. The Feds say migration still strong www.Florida-Weekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2007 Vol. 1, No. 1SEE GROWTH, A6 uATTRACTIONSNew dinosaur park at the Shell Factory & Nature Park. A13 u COMMENTARYColumnist Roger Williams goes NATIVE. A2 u REAL ESTATEGulf Coast Town Center growing. B1 u BY JEFF CULLjcull@florida-weekly.com PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715POSTAL CUSTOMER Q Go to page A6 to see the names of accounts in Lee Coun-ty worth more than $2,000. On the Web To access the states unclaimed prop-erty database go to www.florida-week-ly.com and click on the link marked Search Unclaimed property.Ž Or call toll-free 888-258-2253The biggest single unclaimed account in Lee County is $86,537. BY JEFF CULLjcull@florida-weekly.com Lees changing population 2006 2005 change %changeLee County 585,608 549,442 36,166 6.6%Bonita Springs 43,518 42,300 1,218 2.9%Cape Coral 154,499 140,195 14,304 10.2%Fort Myers 65,729 61,412 4,317 7.0%Ft. Myers Beach 6,874 6,849 25 0.4%Sanibel 6,321 6,272 49 0.8%Unincorporated 308,667 292,414 16,253 5.6%Source: Population estimates from the University of Florida However, with the bulk of baby boomers reaching retirement age in the next 10 years, experts expect the growth to continue, albeit not at the breakneck pace of 2004 and 2005. COLUMN A2 OPINION A415 MINUTES A6NAPLES' HISTORY A13 HEALTHY LIVING A18BUSINESS B1NETWORKING B12 & 13REAL ESTATE B14 ARTS C1EVENTS C6 & 7SOCIETY C17, 19 & 21CUISINE C23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. I, No. 1 € FREE WEEK OF OCTOBER 2-8, 2008 Artistic calling Artist Joan Sonnenberg is still happily ahead of her time. C1 X Are you recycling? It's the law for businesses in Naples now. B1 XFabulous DorothyCelebrity designer Dorothy Draper decorated Naples' first hospital back in 1956. A13 X POSTAL CUSTOMER SEE CITRUS, A8 XBY ROGER WILLIAMSrwilliams@” oridaweekly.com RANGES, IT SEEMS, WERE ESPEcially designed for Ameri-can tastes and production talents, but that might not be enough to save the citrus industry from a complete collapse within roughly 10 years. Americans have the right farmers with the right agricultural science, the right mechanical and engineering capaci-ties, the right labor force and the right corporate sensibilities, all firmly established in the right cli-mates and soils „ roughly 33,000 acres of them in Collier County alone. They have the right fuel supply, too, not only to run the factories and the vast fleet of farm and transportation vehicles, but also to produce massive quantities of petroleum-based insecticides or herbi-cides. And they have the right markets. But what Americans dont have is a clue about how to eradicate greening,Ž the most dangerous disease ever encoun-tered by citrus growers in the United States or abroad, say farmers and scien-tists. This is the greatest threat weve everFDSF SD FS SAASFA DSsdf asfads asfasddasas fsdaasdfsdfsdf asfda w w w w w it it it it it h h h h h h h h h h h h h h t t t t t t t t oo oo oo oo , , t t t t >>Inside: A8Detailed map showing orange infestation Obattling a diseaseFlorida isthat could destroy its citrus industry This is the greatest threat weve ever faced in our industry, and it will be the end of our industry if we dont solve it.Ž „ Paul Meador Jr., vice president of Everglades Harvesting and HaulingHandbag designer Judy Nelson has a thing for France. I think I was French in another life,Ž she says. So when it came time to choose a name for her functional chicŽ purses, its no surprise Nelson took a lesson from the French language. Chouette (pronounced shwet) means fantastic or wonderful, and thats exactly the reaction shes gotten from her line of utilitarian luxury handbags. Chouettes appeal? Each bag is reversible and convertible into 18 styles. One Chouette bag trans-forms from a tote to a hobo to a messenger bag, then becomes a clutch, an evening bag or a wristlet, among others. Nelson acknowledges that the mechanics of con-verting the bags can be intimidating, but she assures that the process is easier than people first imagine. Naples-based Chouette handbags live up to nameBY ARTIS HENDERSONnews@” oridaweekly.com SEE HANDBAGS, A10 X COURTESY PHOTOChouette handbags are reversible and convertible into 18 different styles. 40 Under 40 And other to-dos around town. C17, 19 & 21 X Nelson Circulation hits 50,000 – Jan 13, 2010 ROGER WILLIAMS A2 OPINION A4HEALTHY LIVING A18BUSINESS B1 MONEY & INVESTING B2NETWORKING B 8REAL ESTATE B9 ARTS C1 EVENTS C6 & 7THEATER REVIEW C8SOCIETY C18-21CUISINE C23 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 Monster mashYoung FrankensteinŽ opens at the King Center March 24. C1 XHealth care Local center helps patients deal with multiple sclerosis. A18 X Barbaras Friends And other society events in Brevard County. C27-29 X Business tips How to avoid an investment scam. B1 X Virtual college tours help low-income students DATED MATERIAL REQUESTED IN-HOME DELIVERY DATE: FEB. 10, 2010 q q q q q n | n | n | n | n | n | n | n | n | S) S ) S ) S) A tla nt i c Oc ea n Ta m p a N a p le s S ar a s ot a O rl a n do P a lmd a l e L a ke l an d F t .M y e r s Mo o r e Ha v e n La B e l le W in te r Ha ve n Im mo k a le e P ort C h a r l o t t e B r aden t on V e r oB e a c h M a r c o Cl ew i s to n F lo rid a 's T u rnpi k e M e lb o u rn e C a p e Ca n a v er a l T it u s v i l l e Sa n fo r d E dg ew at er Da yt o na B e ac h S t .Au g u s ti n e P a l at ka Ja ck s o n vi ll e L iv e Oa k A l ach ua G a i ne sv il le Cr y s ta l Riv e r L a d y La ke M i am i Ft .L a u de r d a l e P a lm Be a c h F t P i e r c e O ke ec h o be e S e b r in g L ak e Pl a c i d F e rn a n di n a Be ach De b a r y Oc a l a No rth Po rt P un ta Go r d a V e ni c e A r c ad i a B o n i t aS p r i n g s P ort S t. Luc i e L ak eC ity Ta ll a ha s s e e P an a ma C it y P O R T OF P A L M B E A CH PO R T EV E R GLA DE S P O RT O F M IA M I P ORT OF C A P E CAN A V E RA L PO R T OF J A C K SON V I L LE POR T ST J OE PO R T OF P A N A M AC IT Y § ¨ ¦ 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 5 95 § ¨ ¦ 4 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 2 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 2 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 2 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 4 § ¨ ¦ 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 2 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 9 5 § ¨ ¦ 1 0 § ¨ ¦ 1 0 § ¨ ¦ 75 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 7 5 § ¨ ¦ 7 5£ ¤4 4 1 £ ¤2 7 £ ¤4 4 1 £ ¤441 £ ¤44 1 £ ¤98 £ ¤2 7 £ ¤2 7 £ ¤19 2 £ ¤41 £ ¤2 7 £ ¤9 8 £ ¤98 £ ¤1 7 £ ¤4 41 £ ¤9 8 £ ¤98 £ ¤17 £ ¤41 £ ¤98 £ ¤1 £ ¤4 1 £ ¤1 9 £ ¤98 £ ¤3 0 1 £ ¤4 1 £ ¤9 8 £ ¤9 2 £ ¤1 £ ¤9 8 £ ¤4 1 £ ¤41 £ ¤1 £ ¤41 £ ¤3 0 1 £ ¤1 £ ¤17 £ ¤1 £ ¤1 £ ¤1 7 £ ¤4 41 £ ¤1 £ ¤4 41 £ ¤1 7 £ ¤98 £ ¤98 £ ¤27 £ ¤27 £ ¤3 0 1 £ ¤4 4 1 £ ¤17 £ ¤17 £ ¤9 2 4 5 6 7 7 4 4 5 6 7 7 31 4 5 6 7 6 8 4 5 6 7 33 4 5 6 7 7 22 4 5 6 7 31 4 5 6 7 7 21 4 5 6 7 7 20 I @ 80 I @ 6 0 I @ 7 2 I @ 82 I @ 60 I @ 7 0 I @ 64 I @ 6 6 I @ 60 I @ 7 8 I @ 6 4 I @ 7 0 I @ 80 I @ 60 I @ 6 2 I @ 2 9 I @ 7 6 I @ 2 9 I @ 2 4 P alm B e a c h C oll ier H ar dee H e ndr y D e S oto G l a des O k e ec h ob ee H i ghl a nd s B r ow a rd D a de Mon roe S aras o ta C h ar l o tt e L e e M a nate e Polk In d ia n R ive r S t. Luc ie M ar tin SO UT H W E ST F L ORI D A IN TE RN A T I ON A L AI R P OR T MI A MI I NT E R N A T I ON A L A IR P OR T O R LA N D O IN TE RN A TI O N AL A I RPOR T T A M PA I NTE R N A T I O NA L AI RPOR T J AC K S ON V I L L E I N T E R N A TI ON A L A I R P O R T I 0 1 0 2 0 Mi le s Cr e at e d: S o ur c e: D RA F T : S EP T EM BE R 14, 2 0 09CO N C EP T U AL S TA T ECO M PR EH EN S IV ESU P PL Y CH AI N& CO M M U T ER R AI LP LAN Cr e at e d : A p r i l 5 2 009 S o u r c e : T :\ P ro j e c t s \ 0 44 9 8 Ly k e s\ 00 5 In l an d P or t \ MX D\ CS X\ 04 49 8 _B ase Ma p In l a n d P o r t_ 20 09 0 4 0 5_ v 01 2 2 0 8.m xd For In f or ma t io n C on t act: Ma r k M o r t o n ( 2 39 ) 43 4-891 1 Ra i l F r e ig h t Co m m u t er Co m mu te r Wi th So me Frei g h t n | Se ap o r ts qIn te r n a t io n a lAir por ts S) IL C (I n t e g r a t e d L o gi s tic s Ce nt e r s) I nt e rs ta te s US Hig h w a ys St a te Ro a d s Co u n t y Ro a d s Pu b li cO wn e d C o n se rv a t io n L a n d D D D R R RA A AF F T F T : S EP TEM BE R T ECO CO M M P MP R PR RE REH EH H H E H E N EN N SI SI V E SU PP LY C I I 0 1 0 2 0 Mi le s CO N CE PT U AL ST AT Ra i l F r e ig h t Co m m u t er Co m mu te r Wi th So me Frei g h t n n n Se ap o r ts q In te r n a t io n a lAir por ts S ) S S S IL C (I n t e g r a t e d L o gi s tic s Ce nt e r s) I nt e rs ta te s US Hig h w a ys St a te Ro a d s Co u n t y Ro a d s Pu b li cO wn e d Co n s e rv a tio n L a n d AT E What the expanded canal could mean to Brevard County.A8 >>inside: COURTESY PHOTO/ PANAMA CANAL AUTHORITYThe Panama Canal at dusk. A $5.25 billion expansion project will allow much larger ships to use the canal when finished in 2014.HASSHIP FLORIDASCOME IN? HASSHIP FLORIDASCOME IN? BY OSVALDO PADILLASpecial to Florida Weekly Theres a scenario being advanced right now in Florida that sounds something like this: Its the future and times are good. The Panama Canal has expanded and so has commerce. From Duval to Brevard to Palm Beach and Dade counties, materi-als arrive at processing plants, trucked in from a relatively short ride from places like Port Manatee in Tampa Bay or Port Everglades in Fort Lauder-dale. Workers assemble or otherwise handleSEE SHIP, A8 XA new collection of virtual tours of Floridas most popular colleges has been launched by Take Stock in Children, a state-wide nonprofit organization with a 16-year history of helping low-income and at-risk youth break the cycle of poverty by provid-ing scholarships, mentors and hope. With funding provided by the Helios Education Foundation, this free online service gives students who do not have the means to travel and tour schools the chance to visitŽ them online, and consequently eliminates the financial burden and costs associated with individual campus visits.Available exclusively through Take Stock in Childrens website, www.TakeStockIn-Children.org, the virtual tours highlight key aspects of various state college campuses in order to assist students during the college selection process. Students can visit 15 of the most-attended state colleges throughoutSEE VIRTUAL, A14 X BY EVAN WILLIAMSewilliams@” oridaweekly.com HOW PANAMA CANALS WIDENING PROJECT COULD OPEN PORTS OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FOR BREVARD COUNTY HOW PANAMA CANALS W IDENING PROJECT COULD OPEN PORTS OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FOR BREVARD COUNTY www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. I, No. 1 € FREEWEEK OF MARCH 19-25, 2012 INSIDE EDITORS NOTE THIS COPY OF FLORIDA WEEKLY IS A PROTOTYPE EDITION FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. IT IS NOT A CURRENT EDITION OF THE NEWSPAPER. LOOK FOR THE FIRST EDITION OF FLORIDA WEEKLY IN NEWSSTANDS ON THURSDAY, MAY 3. ollection of vi t popular c ake Sto organ nglow oridaweekly.com MS colleg ual tours of s has ena w e tours h travel and tour sc them online, an efinancial elp l he w-inco s usi CELEB Naples Florida Weekly launches Oct. 1, 2008 Punta Gorda/Port Charlotte Florida Weekly publishes July 1, 2009 Palm Beach Gardens/Jupi-ter Florida Weekly hits the stands Oct. 14, 2010

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5 YEARS OF IN THE KNOW, IN THE NOW Space Coast Florida Weekly opens its office in Brevard County March 23, 2012 January 2011Florida Weekly becomes the first newspaper in South Florida to use a special UV coating on its newsprint that keeps the ink from coming off on your hands when you read. Circulation hits 80,000 – March 21, 2012 Physicians Directory 2012 Southwest Florida Y our guide to Southwest Florida Physicians: L ee County 12 Collier County 64 Charlotte County 82 DISTRIBUTED IN LEE, COLLIER AND CHAR LOTTE COUN TIES ROGER WILLIAMS A2 EXCURSIONS A6PETS A11HEALTHY LIVING A16 BUSINESS A19MOTLEY FOOL A21REAL ESTATE A24ARTS B1 EVENTS B6 FILM B11SOCIETY B12&13 CUISINE B15 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. I, No. 1 € FREEWEEK OF NOVEMBER 3-9, 2011Naples International Film FestivalCelebrating artistry on the silver screen. B1 XHalloween in the ParkAnd other Society events in Bonita Springs. B12 & 13 XCommunity fabricThe Community Foundation of Southwest Florida turns 35. A12 X Download our FREE App todayAvailable on the iTunes App Store. X Better business booksWhat local leaders keep on their shelves and tablets. A19 X Blueway Fest attracts outdoors enthusiasts from near and far Southwest Floridas annual kayak festival may be marking its sixth year when it opens Thursday, Nov. 3, but there are enough changes that it may seem to eco-tourists and paddlers like a new event. The festival for the first time has a centralized hub „ the sandy shores on Sanibel Causeways Island A, which is the first island after the big bridge. Dozens of kayaks and Stand-Up Paddle-boards will be on hand for people to try out Nov. 4-6. A trolley will bring people to the causeway „ and help them avoid the $6 toll „ from three nearby stops just off Summerlin Road, including Tanger Outlets. Also new: A signature sponsor. Seattlebased Canoe & Kayak magazine brings to the festival its first film festival „ an outdoor evening event on the lawn of the Residence Inn by Marriott near the causeway Nov. 4 „ as well as two new races, the Calusa Classic and Calusa Dash. The 10-mile race and 4-mile race, respectively, both start at noon off Island T WAS AN INTENSE PASSION FOR FISHING that brought Dennis Hill to South-west Florida nearly 40 years ago, but his love of music is what has kept him here. Dr. Hill, who directs the muchacclaimed Bonita Springs Concert Band, cannot suppress a laugh when he admits that Floridas sport fishing is what compelled to him to pack up and leave his native Ohio. Im not kidding. It was the fishing that drew me here,Ž he says. But music had been a defining part of my life since my youth, so there was no way I was going to abandon that.Ž The Bonita Springs Concert Band begins its fourth season this Sunday at the band shell in Riverside Park on LEE COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATIONKayak parkingŽ is provided at most festival sites so people can paddle to the events.SEE BLUEWAY, A10 X SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY_________________________COURTESY PHOTO VANDY MAJOR / FLORIDA WEEKLYV Above: conductor Dennis Hill. W Below: Music lovers pack the area around the Bonita band shell for a Sunday concert last year.Sunday concert tradition starts season by honoring veteransBY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@” oridaweekly.com STRIKEBANDUPthe SEE BAND, A8 XI ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO FLORIDA WEEKLY beautiful body Florida Weekly’s monthly guide for healthy people inside and outFEB 2011REACHING CHARLOTTE COUNTYS MOST AFFLUENT READERS STOTT PILATES PHOTOGRAPHY MERRITHEW CORPORATION / COURTESY PHOTO Pilates offers inside-out training Fit for life: P unta Gorda resident Kate Albers already exercised regularly. She went to the Punta Gorda Club five days a week and attended BodyStep and BodyPump classes. Away from the gym, she biked and walked. But she wanted more. I was looking for something new, challenging, and obviously rewarding,Ž she says. More sculpting and toning.Ž She has found those qualities in Pilates at The Pilates Loft of Punta Gorda. The downtown studio owned and operated by Darcie Allen has been open a year. A personal trainer of 18 years, Mrs. Allen is a certified Stott Pilates instructor who teaches private lessons and group classes. Her clients, some of whom are competitive athletes, range in age from 10 to 75 years. She has been teaching Pilates, a mind-body exercise system, for six years. Stott Pilates is a contemporary approach to the original method. Its exercises improve strength, flexibility, balance, endurance and posture. Pilates also relieves stress and is effective in injury prevention. Pilates uses resistance exercise machines rarely found in traditional workout facilities. The machines bear equally distinctive names: the reformer, trapeze table and spine corrector. Accessories such as resistance bands, balls and mats are used, too. By Barbara BoxleitnerFLORIDA WEEKLY CORRESPONDENT SEE PILATES, C8 X INSIDE: Healthy changes: commonsense and expert advice / 2 Cosmetic surgery: all gain, no pain / 6 Belly dance: iron abs and serious fun / 12 RATING IN THE KNOW. IN THE NOW. Named best weekly newspaper in Florida by the Flor-ida Press Associa-ton – June 2010; In addition, Florida Weekly won 19 individual writing and design awards. May 2011 Florida Weekly becomes the first publisher in South Florida to offer its complete newspaper in an easy-to-read iPad application. June 2011 For the second consecutive year named best weekly newspa-per in Florida by the Florida Press Associaton. Bonita Springs Florida Weekly launches Nov. 3, 2011 FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 NEWS A19

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Views, views and more views!!! Unobstructed panoramic ocean, intracoastal and city views in this stunning 3 bedroom and 3 bathroom condo. Private elevator access which takes you to your condo. Luxury beachfront living at its best in an elegant concierge building. Luxury Condo on Singer Island Rosemary EliasCell 561-373-9845Do not miss this one! Ocean Properties A20 WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 FLORIDA WEEKLY AFFORDABLE PLANTATION SHUTTERS Before you buy… call and get the facts!We offer Professional Installation and Honest, Fair Pricing Not valid with any other discounts, prior purchases or work in progress. Exclusions may apply. Expires /2012. Any Purchase of $1500 or MoreOn Select Hunter Douglas Products $100 OFFALL SHUTTERS ARE NOT THE SAME! All About Blinds 17 Years Serving Palm Beach County Visit our Showroom: MON…FRI 8:30AM … 4:30PM, SAT by Appointment CALL 561-844-0019 FOR YOUR FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE /LD$IXIE(IGHWAY3UITE,AKE0ARKsrr www.allaboutblindspb.com ‡&XVWRP'RRU+DUGZDUH‡ ‡&DELQHW)XUQLWXUH+DUGZDUH‡ ‡%DWK)L[WXUHV$FFHVVRULHV‡ ‡0DLOER[HV+RXVH1XPEHUV‡ ‡:HDWKHUYDQHV*DUGHQ)DXFHWV‡ ‡'RRU.QRFNHUV(QJUDYHG6LJQV‡ 6RXWK2OLYH$YHQXH‡'RZQWRZQ:HVW3DOP%HDFK 561.655.3109 ZZZ$QGHUVRQV+DUGZDUHFRP$1'(56216&ODVVLF+DUGZDUHSince 1935 It is our mission... The goal of the Best of the Best networking group is to bring together a group of Palm Beach local business owners and professionals who are truly best-in-class in their respective industries, and create a sense of responsibility for each member’s growth and success. bestofthebestnetwork.com of the Palm Beaches Wednesday North Palm Beach Breakfast: 7:30 to 9:00 North Palm Beach Lunch: 11:30 to 1:00 North Palm Beach Country Club 951 US Highway 1 North Palm Beach, FL 33408 $IOLDWH*URXSV Thursday J XSLWHU%UHDNIDVW 7:30 to 9:00 $EDFRD*ROI&OXE‡%DUEDGRV'ULYH‡-XSLWHU)/ -XSLWHU/XQFK WR‡Out of the Blue Restaurant at the Loggerhead Marina in Jonathans Landing3238 Casseekey Island Rd, Jupiter, FL 33477 :HVW3DOP%HDFK&LW\3ODFH/XQFK 11:30 to 1:00 McCormick & Schmick’s Restaurant 2NHHFKREHH%OYG6WH‡:HVW3DOP%HDFK)/Jupiter Medical Center is implementing a tobacco free policy effective May 1, the medical center announced in a prepared statement. JMC said, as a healthcare leader in the community, Jupiter Medical Center is committed to providing the safest and healthiest environment for all its team members, patients, visitors, physicians and physi-cian office staff.Ž According to the Florida Hospital Association, tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths; an esti-mated 440,000 deaths per year, or 1,200 people each day in the United States, the statement said. The majority of the hospitals in Palm Beach and Mar-tin counties have voluntarily adopted 100 percent tobacco free policies in an effort to promote the health and safety of their communities. The Tobacco Free Policy applies to all team members, patients, physicians and visitors. JMC reports. John Couris, JMC president and CEO, said in the statement, Its important that we follow in the footsteps of other healthcare facilities and stop the use of tobacco prod-ucts on our campus to promote a safe and healthy environment. The new Tobacco Free Policy helps us carry out our mission of delivering excellent, compassionate health care and advancing the well-being of the people we serve.Ž As of May 1, use of tobacco products is prohibited on Jupiter Medical Cen-ters campus, including parking lots (and inside vehicles), surrounding side-walks, the 1000, 1002, 1004 buildings, Foshay Cancer Center and Pavilion. JMC staff members are not permitted to use tobacco at any JMC workplace or offsite locations, i.e., the GE Building, 3000 building, Sleep Center, Niedland Breast Center, Outpatient Imaging, and all Outpatient Rehab Facilities. JMC sponsors smoking cessation classes for any interested staff member and the community. The next seven-week series of cessation classes begins April 30. For more details or to sing up, contact Lorraine Brokaw atlbrokaw@jupitermed.com or call 263-4351.. Q Jupiter Medical Center goes tobacco free on May 1SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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BUSINESS FLORIDA WEEKLY A GUIDE TO THE PALM BEACH COUNTY BUSINESS INDUSTRY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 A22 Scott Angelo pulls a sample scoop from the 15 pounds of Kenyan coffee beans hes roasting at Oceana Coffee in Tequesta and inhales deeply. Its just between wet grass and hay right now,Ž he says. Next is baked bread.Ž Not smells most people associate with coffee, these are three of the stages that coffee beans pass through during the roasting process as they go from their raw green state to the smooth, consistent shade of brown that marks properly roasted coffee. To the untrained nose, though, the smell is reminiscent of well-popped popcorn. Mr. Angelo suggests waiting a bit and then taking a deeper sniff. At this point,Ž he says, offering a sample a bit later, you can begin to pick out the complexities. Were at the baked bread stage, but Im getting strawberries in this.Ž Sure enough, there it is: a warm sweetness like baking bread with subtle notes of fruit. An unexpect-ed and fascinating surprise from a bean that many people know only in its most common forms: ground and bagged months before making it to a kitchen counter, or over-roasted and served in cups that hold close to a quart of liquid. Its an eye-opening experience that challenges even a coffee addicts idea of what coffee is, elevating it to something with the sort of depth and complexity most associate with crystal goblets, not porcelain mugs. Mr. Angelo and his wife Amy, who opened Oceana Coffee together late last year, discovered they both had a passion for those complexities a few years ago after purchasing fresh-roasted coffee from a supplier on the west coast. It was some Sumatran that did it,Ž says Mr. Angelo. One sip, and it was like: Now, how do we do THAT?Ž It was the first time I really, really got it,Ž adds Ms. Angelo. I tasted apples in the coffee. You might think that wouldnt work, apples and coffee, but it was amazing.Ž So the Angelos began their own roasting journey, starting with a popcorn popper that Mr. Angelo, a naval engineer, converted to roast beans a quarter-cup at a time. But those sorts of quantities couldnt supply the friends and family that started making requests, so the Angelos upgraded to a Weber grill that he modified. Friends and family became friends of friends and other referrals, and after three years of honing their art and building a loyal customer base, it was time to take the next logical step: they would open a retail location and share their passion, by the cup as well as by the pound. Their love of coffee and roasting is apparent the moment you walk in. The bright green Diedrich roaster (yes, theyve retired the popcorn maker and Weber) sits prominently in the front of house just feet from one of the tables. A beautiful espresso machine and pour-over equipment sits behind a counter dotted with locally made baked goods and snacks. The couple is warm and welcoming; both love to share their knowledge with customers and will hap-pily explain things like bean selection, brewing tech-niques, or the differences between arabica (good) and robusta (not so good) beans. Oceana uses the former exclusively. But its one thing to hear about how regions or brewing techniques differ, and quite another to expe-rience it. Each bean, for example, will yield a differ-ent cup of coffee depending on how its brewed. To demonstrate, Ms. Angelo prepares a cup of Kenyan coffee using the pour-over technique, in which a filter is placed in a cone-shaped holder and suspended above an individual cup. Water is then carefully poured over the grounds in a fine stream, filtering through at a controlled rate that is monitored with a stopwatch. She then takes the same roast and prepares a shot in the espresso machine, espresso is a brewing tech-nique, not a roast,Ž she says, and uses it for an Ameri-cano, adding hot water after the pull to create a cup of comparable strength. The two techniques are now offered for a back-toback tasting, and the experience is revelatory „ the resulting cups are tremendously different, though both are delicious. Ms. Angelo is clearly pleased to be sharing this experience. The flavors will change as the coffee cools, tooŽ she says smiling, and youll find other notes in there that you hadnt noticed.Ž While the couple occasionally disagree about their favorite brewing method (hes currently leaning towards pour-over, while shes enjoying espresso), they are in lockstep on the question of quality con-trol. They learned early on that theirs are the only palates they can trust after being stuck with 150 pounds of beans that they found unacceptable and refused to sell. They now have private cupping, or tasting, sessions of every variety theyre considering before committing to a purchase, the primary criterion for selection being a great cup of coffee. We buy some fair trade, we buy some organics,Ž says Mr. Angelo, but in the end what matters is the quality of the coffee. Any of our coffees, pour-over or espresso, will each be uniquely delicious.Ž Mr. Angelo pulls another sample of beans from the roaster and examines them closely. Not quite there,Ž he says. What were looking for is a smooth finish and consistent color across the whole bean. Another 90 seconds or so.Ž He deposits the sample back into the roaster, waits a bit, then checks one last time. Theyre done,Ž he says opening the door, the freshly roasted beans, smooth and perfectly brown, cascading onto the cooling tray where fans draw the heat away as arms sl owly rotate and stir. He watches them for a moment then looks up, distilling the couples goals into a simple sentence. A coffee expert from anywhere in the world should be able to walk in to Oceana, order a cup of coffee, and say wow.Ž He looks back at his most recent batch for a moment, pleased with what he sees and smells, then heads to the back to select more beans for the next roast. Q ROASTED PURE AT OCEANA BY BRADFORD SCHMIDTbschmidt@floridaweekly.comTequesta coffee caf owners passionate about roasting their own beans. >>Oceana Coffee is located at 221 Old Dixie Highway, Tequesta. Hours of operation are 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday; Saturday 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. After Easter, they’ll be open on Sundays from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Their coffee is also served at Coolinary Caf. in the know PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOANNA SCHMIDT Amy and Scott Angelo stand near the coffee roaster at Oceana Coffee in Tequesta. Equipment sifts freshly roasted beans. Scott Angelo checks the aroma of freshly ground coffee beans.Lightand dark-roast beans at Oceana Coffee.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 BUSINESS A23NETWORKING Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County Beacon of Light Awards dinner at Lake Pavilion in West PalmWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.James Schearer, Dana Romanelli, Michele Jacobs and Bob Jacobs James Schearer Dana R omanell i, Michele Jacobs and Bob Jacobs 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 Rick Morgan, Old Port Cove, winner for Marine Project of the Year, and Efram Zimbalast III 2 Dawn Pardo, Marine Advocate of the Year; Greg Reynolds, Lagoon Keepers, and Amy Tolderlund, Sea Tow 3 Tamra Fitzgerald and Jay Cashmere 4. Mike Antheil and Jay Cashmere 5. Tracie Graziotto and Ray Graziotto 6. Alyssa Freeman and Jim Bronstien, winner of Member of the Year awardCOURTESY PHOTOS

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A24 BUSINESS WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WEEKLY NETWORKING Quantum 15th anniversary awards breakfast at the Kravis CenterWe take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com .WCOURTESY PHOTOS 6 3 15 8 2 47 1. Stephen Moore and Kerry Diaz2. Liz Henderson, Carolyn Carter, Ronald J. Wiewora, Anne L. Hedges, Jos A. Rodriguez, Tanya Greer, Maureen Agnello and Robin Kish3. Richard Sussman, Ethel Isaacs Williams, Anthony McNicholas III, Jeannette Corbett, James Kintz, Donna Mulholland, William Meyer, Stephen Moore, Kerry Diaz and Stephen Levin4. Darlene Kostrub, Gayle Howden and Cheryl Crowley.5. Judith Goodman and Lew Crampton6. Stephen Moore, Darlene Kostrub, Anne Hedges, Pam McIver and Kerry Diaz7. Richard Sussman and Tomas Boiton8. Keith James, Kathy Adams and Bob Bertisch9. Ethel Isaacs Williams, William Meyer and Jeri Muoio 9

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 REAL ESTATE A25A GUIDE TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRYREAL ESTATE WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 A25 With 265 feet on the Intracoastal Waterway, this elegant 9,746 square-foot, five-bedroom estate with a two-bedroom guesthouse is set on a beautifully landscaped lot with truly unparalleled water views. The estate is at 69 Curlew Road in Manalapan. The entry foyer features marble floors with a mosaic inset, a two-story ovoid rotunda and a grand stair-case embellished with wrought iron. A step down and across the main gallery is the elegant living room with a marble floor, massive fireplace, wain-scoting, a coffered ceiling and French doors in archways that open to the pool. The media/theater room has a coffered ceiling, parquet floors, paneled wainscoting, built-in cabinetry and a full-service wet bar. The formal dining room includes white wainscoting, a vaulted ceiling, an alcove and deco-rative molding, and a large arched window „ all of which overlook the front courtyard with a fountain. The large open family room features walnut floors, a piano niche and a beamed tray ceiling. The entire west wall is glass, offering views of the loggia, water and pool. The professionally equipped gour-met kitchen has granite countertops, center island, double sinks, double dishwashers and antiqued custom cabinetry which opens up to the breakfast room that is crowned with a lattice-vaulted ceiling. Point Manalapan, part of a ribbon of land once owned by the Vanderbilts, is located on the south-ernmost tip of Hypoluxo Island between the Atlan-tic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway in central Palm Beach County. On 66 acres, with a population of 320, Manalapan offers its residents the opportu-nity to live an exclusive luxury waterfront lifestyle in an ultra-private and tranquil enclave, close to pristine beaches, entertainment, cultural venues and boating activities. Residents of Manalapan enjoy private club privileges to the Ritz Carlton Hotels La Coquille Club, with state-of-the-art spa and fitness center, tennis courts, pool and beach facilities. Within short driving distances are worldrenowned Palm Beach, the resort towns of Delray Beach and Boca Raton, as well as international polo in Wellington and golf courses around the county. The West Palm Beach International Airport is con-veniently located just eight miles away. This estate is listed at $6,795,000 by Fite Shavell & Associates. Listing agents are Jack Elkins, 561-373-2198, jelkins@fiteshavell.com, and Bunny Hiatt, 561-818-6044, bhi-att@fiteshavell.com. Q Magnificent Manalapan estate SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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A26 WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 FLORIDA WEEKLY rrrsrsGARDENS LANGREALTYCOM www.langrealty.com 0'!"OULEVARD3UITEs0ALM"EACH'ARDENS Spectacular waterfront 2/2 single family home in very desirable neighborhood. Great indoor & outdoor entertaining areas. Updated kitchen with all the amenities you desire … granite counters, maple cabinets and SS appliances. $599,000 CALL FRANK LEO 561-603-0224 BOCA HARBOUR FRENCHMANS RESERVE NEW ) 34) NEW ) 34) 'Long golf views from this light, bright well-maintained townhome in Riverbend Country Club. This two bed, two and one-half bath with two screened covered porches is offered furnished and move-in ready. $89,500 CALL HELEN GOLISCH 561-371-7433 TEQUESTA … RIVERBEND NEW ) 34) 'Located in Eastern Palm Beach Gardens, the luxury at Frenchmans Reserve starts at the entrance of this Toll Brothers development and never ends. Five bedroom home with Saturnia ”ooring, 2 master suites, granite, SS appliances, upper loft area, a bonus room and much more! $1,399,000 CALL ANN MELENDEZ 561-252-6343 CALL CAROL FALCIANO 561-758-5869 Three bedroom/two bath charming home in world renowned PGA National. Completely renovated home with light and bright gourmet kitchen. This is a rare “nd in PGA. Furniture is negotiable. $260,000 CALL KAREN CARA 561-676-1655 PGA NATIONAL-BARCLAY CLUB NEW ) 34) NEW ) 34) THG is available throughANDERSON’S CLASSIC HARDWAREFine Decorative Hardware and Plumbing Fixtures for the Discriminating Home Owner since 1935 605 South Olive Avenue West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 655-3109 fax (561) 655-3162 www.andersonshardware.com Spectacular 4000 sq. feet 6 Bed 5 Bath with Guest House On Large Corner Lot. Completely Remodeled Kitchen. New Wood Cabs Quartz Countertops. 36Žeach side Sub Zero Refrigeration. Double Oven, But-lers Pantry. Impact Windows. Plantation Shutters. 500 sq Lania. Heated Pool & Spa. Synthetic Turf. Putting Green. e list is Endless. Call Chris Now For A Private Showing. n…ˆn>>}…>JŽVœ “U"vw Vix£{"£ U n…ˆn>>}…>iTaking you all the way home… Chris Callaghan 561.818.2120REDEFINED MARTELLO MODEL WITH GUEST HOUSE IN MALLORY CREEK JUPITER Deborah Malone Marchant 561.346.0690 Dee Dee Milliken 561.398.0908 THE CARLYLE Conveniently located 35 minutes from the Palm Beach International $LUSRUWDQGLQWKHFHQWHURIZRUOGFODVVJROIVKLQJDQGFXOWXUDODWWUDFWLRQV7KLV/X[XULRXVEHGURRPEDWKQGRRUUHVLGHQFHhas the feeling of a beachfront home. Enjoy Ocean to Intracoastal sunrise to sunset views. Your private elevator brings you to 5,365 sq. ft. of total living space including 990 sq. ft. of tiled terraces. The Carlyle features 24 hour manned security, health and WQHVVIDFLOLW\guest suite, on-site licensed manager, your private 2 car air-conditioned garage and much more. $2,495,000 For information regarding this and other listings contact REALTOR 7HTXHVWD'ULYH6XLWH'7HTXHVWD)/‡ CELEBRATING 52 YEARS OF PERSONAL SERVICE ON JUPITER ISLAND JUPITER ISLANDS PREMIER OCEANFRONT LIFESTYLE!The U.S. real estate market has been under pressure since the downturn in 2005, but a national research survey shows a market recovery may be under-way and the bottom may have been reached in 2011 for bargain-seeking investors. The 2012 Cotton Report is the fourth annual survey focusing on buyer con-fidence and attitudes about market recovery of roughly 1,400 individuals pursuing a real estate purchase. The survey was conducted in February by Cotton & Company. The 2012 data indicates that 54 percent of the respondents in the market are seeking a primary residence, with 67 percent of these buyers requiring mortgage financing,Ž Laurie Andrews, COO of Cotton & Company, said in a prepared statement. Over the past several years, the prima-ry market has been relatively stagnant throughout the country, and the lack of mortgage availability was outweighed by a pessimistic buyer sentiment.Ž The company said the three-year trend of the survey reflects a more optimistic viewpoint on non-controllable political and economic factors, with a substan-tial increase of personal choice as the primary factor in their decision. The data also reflects a decrease in respon-dents who are waiting for better pric-ing, demonstrating the stabilization of pricing throughout many markets. 2012 Cotton Report Findings 54 percent of the market is seeking primary housing, rising sharply from 38 percent a year ago. Q 3 percent of the primary market is upsizing, Ž r eversing the trend for smaller residences. Q 66 percent of vacation homebuyers are mo ving for geographic relocation,Ž with 68 percent of this market ages 45-64 years old. Q 33 percent must sell their current home to mak e a m ove, a r eduction from 42 percent a year ago. Q Only 12 percent of survey participants stat e investment/rental incomeŽ as their motivation, continuing a four-year steady decline from 23 percent in 2009. Q 53 percent of the respondents with mor e than $1 00,000 household income believe we have reached the bottom of the market. For the first time, the Cotton Report also analyzed the impact of technology on the real estate sales environment. Although the Internet captures 70 per-cent of the market as the initial research tool for available homes, newspapers rebounded from 3 percent share in 2009 to 8 percent in 2011, a further indicator of the primary market return. Social networks have reached critical mass with Facebook interaction now encompassing 66 percent of overall respondents. Moreover, 78 percent of the Facebook respondents were over age 45, indi-cating the significant penetration into the mainstream residential real estate market. For more, see thecottonsolution.com. Q 2012 Cotton Report: Market bottomed in 2011SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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For more information on these Great Buys and Next Seasons Rentals, email us at Info@WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 561.889.6734 www.WalkerRealEstateGroup.com 3INGER)SLANDs0ALM"EACH'ARDENSs*UPITERs.ORTH0ALM"EACHs*UNO"EA CH See all Brokers listings on our website at: Jim Walker III Broker Jeannie Walker Luxury Homes Specialist Oasis 14A 3BR/3.5BA … Panoramic ocean to ICW views. World Class estate fully furnished. Turnkey$1,775,000 HUGE REDUCTION! Martinique ET 2201 2BR/3.5BA High NE corner unit with beautiful ocean and intracoastal views. $690,000 Ocean Tree 1201 2BR/2.5BA Fabulous ocean and intracoastal views. $475,000 Beachfront 1601 DIRECT OCEAN3BR/3.5BA. Outstanding views. Marble ” oo rs. $1,499,000 REDUCED! $1,995,000 Oasis 12B DIRECT OCEAN-1 unit/” oor. 3BR/3.5BA 4000+ sq. ft. PRICED TO SELL! Beachfront PH03 3BR/3.5BA Spectacular views from every room with pooside cabana! $1,395,000 NEW! $899,000 Oasis 2A PRICED TO SELL. 3BR/3.5BA 4000+ sq. ft. REDUCED! Ritz Carlton 601A DIRECT OCEAN-Designers unit with Ritz services. 3BR/3.5 BA 3,600 sq. ft. $1,925,000 NEW! Martinique WT 803 RARE 3BR/4.5BA. Gorgeous views of ocean & intracoastal. 2 parking spaces and cabana $751,000 NEW! $1,050,000 Beach Front 1402 2BR/3BA + Den … One of the most beautifully “ nished and furnished residences on Singer Island. Turnkey! NEW! $625,000 Martinique WT 2604 Penthouse with beautiful views of the ocean and intracoastal. High demand for this SW view! 2BR/3.5BA is nicely decorated with new wood ” oors and appliances. Storm shutters included. PRICED TO SELL! REDUCED! Martinique PH WT 2601 Penthouse 2BR/3.5BA with beautiful views of ocean and intracoastal. $599,000 REDUCED! Via Del“ no 1801 RARE 4BR/5.5BA DIRECT OCEAN with Poolside Cabana. $1,590,000 PRICED TO SELL! Marina Grande 2006 3BR/3.5BA. 20th ” oor. Direct intracoastal with ocean views. Fully furnished, turnkey. $595,000

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FLORIDA WEEKLY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B1 Critters collectibleAntique garden bunnies, dogs and deer can have value. B4 X INSIDE Bad egg on menuIf only it would be easy to not choose the wrong man. B2XHideously creative“Wrath of the Titans” has great monsters. B9X WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 SocietySee who’s out and about in Palm Beach County.B10-11, 17-18 X Celebrating 75 f abulous years at the ... B Y EVAN WILLIAMSe williams@” oridaw eekly .c om A SURVIV OR FR OM FLORID AS ROADSIDE-ATTRAC TION ERA,Ž SAY S Fodors tr av el g uide, the Shell Fact ory & Na tur e Park on U .S. Rou te 41 in North Fort M y er s is 75 years old this y ear. Its hist ory is the ongoing st ory of Lee C ount y itself and that of c oastal counties north and sou th of her e: ho w the tourist tr ade and real-estate deals shape the plac e we li ve; and the people who migr a t e her e and per sist because of it, with the sunshine, beaches, g org eous wint er s and palm trees. Dianne DeBoest, SEE SHELL, B12 XCOURTESY PHOTOSThe original Shell F actory in Bonita Springs opened in 1938. A group portrait in front of the original gift store. Owner Harold Crant is top right.The f actory’s sign on U.S. 41 in North Fort Myers was built in the 1950s. The video arcade in the f actory today. gro u o re. A A s t o s h e Fo r Th F Factory Shell Its just like when they played stickball back in their old neighborhoods of the Bronx and Boston, when they formed teams with kids living down the street and played the traditional baseball-like game in the street. Except its not.Now everybodys 50 years older; theyve worked all their lives, retired and are enjoying the Florida sun-shine at Wycliffe Golf & Coun-try Club in Wellington with their spouses, if theyre lucky enough to have them still. And the guys play in a parking lot that the village set aside for them, even putting up covered bleach-ers, fences and a Stickball Blvd.Ž sign. But they get almost as giddy as they did back then, the Wycliffe Stiffs do, when game day comes during their November-through-March regular sea-son. Marty Ross is known as the CommishŽ to his neighbors and friends in the Wycliffe Stiffs Stickball League because he so energetically keeps his fellow players motivated and in shape to play, ready to have fun. The Stiffs, a bunch of geezer jocksŽ who now prefer to be called forever young,Ž just completed their 10th season. They still root for the underdog and love a good pennant race. This year a 75-year-old perennial also-ran came from behind to win his first championship in nine tries. A league of their ownStickball keeps this group of a certain age forever young BY CHRIS FELKERcfelker@floridaweekly.comCOURTESY PHOTO Sheldon Nierman bats with the Egg Cream Trophy in the foreground.SEE STICKBALL, B14 X

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B2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY midtownpga.com | 561.630.6110 4801 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418On PGA Blvd., just west of Military Trail, between I-95 and the FL Turnpike. MAINSTREET AT The Legendary JCs It all started with some sharkskin suits and Otis Redding tunes. Since then, The Legendary JCs (commonly, The Joint Chiefs) brand of soulful rocking blues and sweaty grooves will have you ready for lift-off. Uproot HootenannyUproot Hootenanny is one of the most unique and sought-after bands in Florida with its blend of Folk, Classic and Modern Rock, Pop, Celtic, Bluegrass, and Country music … a hootenannyŽ of such diversity its a sound you could work up a sweat just listening to.Mainstreet at Midtown has your Thursdays covered. Block off 6:00 until 8:00 P.M. every Thursday through April 26th. Food from CHUCK BURGER JOINT available for delivery call 561-629-5191. Music on the Plaza … its a heart full of soul.Free Concerts | Free Parking | Lawn Chairs Welcome April 5April 12 I recently bought an $8 carton of eggs. Read that again. Eight dollars. I asked the man at the farmers market for a dozen and handed him a twenty without asking the price. He handed me back $12. It wasnt until I walked away and counted my change that I realized „ hot damn „ I just bought a carton of eggs for the price of a movie ticket. And the worst part? I wasnt even upset. They were free-range and organic, after all. Heres the thing: Ive cleaned up my eating in the last few years. I eat more fruits and vegetables, I cook at home when I can, and I buy organic when the prices dont give me cardiac arrest (eggs excluded). I stopped drinking coffee and stocked my cupboards with green tea. I cut out a lot of sugar and flour, and I eat fewer processed foods. Ive learned to make good decisions when it comes to the way I eat. If only my choices in men could be so healthy. Like a lot of us, when Im confronted with a bad-for-me partner I feel powerless to resist. Its like facing down a double cheeseburger: deli-cious for a little while, but destined to corrode my arteries. I wish I could walk away from these men the way I can now walk away from a box of Twinkies. It turns out I can, says author Katherine Woodward Thomas in her book Calling in The One: 7 weeks to Attract the Love of Your LifeŽ (a feng shui-meditation-psychotherapy-decl uttering-karmic guide to relationships). On the most funda-mental level,Ž she writes, keeping your life free of the messes and entanglements that unwise choices create is actually one of the best things you can do to prepare yourself for love.Ž Yes, but how? I always seem to reel in the same self-centered types. Ms. Woodward Thomas says that we all have a fantasy that once we see our unhealthy patterns „ double cheeseburgers, Twinkies, men who dont listen „ and commit to doing things differently, we believe that only good things will come into our path. Our lives will be filled with microgreens and supportive partners. This is rarely the case,Ž she says in her book. What is more likely to happen is that, instead of immediately attracting a whole new kind of per-son into our lives, we find ourselves attracting exactly the same kind of person.Ž The difference? Were wiser now, she says. This time we know exactly where a particular path will lead. We must make the more difficult choice by say-ing no to the enticement of doing the exact same thing while hoping for different results. Lets learn to value the making of the right choice not because its the right choice for others, not because its the expected choice, the easiest one, or the path of least resistance. No, lets instead learn to value the making of the right choice because it is the right choice for us.Ž If I can choose to buy outrageously priced eggs because I know theyre better for me, then perhaps I can learn to choose a man who is equally healthy. Maybe hell even have his own organic farm. Q SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSMaking wise choices in food and relationships f f d c t w I artis HENDERSONsandydays@floridaweekly.com

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Try our amazing Introductory Special 2 Private Lessons + 1 Group Lesson only $60 Join us every Thursday night in Lake Park for a Latin & Ballroom Mix Party nPM'ROUP,ESSONs n PM0ARTY Admission: $15 per person for the entire evening 0ARK!VE,AKE0ARK&,s 561-844-0255 12773 W. Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 1203 7ELLINGTON&,s www.dancetonightflorida.com Learn Todayƒ FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 B3This is a favorite story of George B. Coffin, for many years a well-known author and publisher. The bidding went as shown, but after East bid seven dia-monds, West quickly passed, not waiting for South to bid. Not only that, but East-West then improperly exchanged hands, a common practice in some games. South, a stickler for the rules named John Lawman, who by nature was inclined to exact his pound of flesh when an irregularity occurred, now said: Just a second, please. I havent passed. In fact, Ill bid seven notrump!Ž West doubled, and, after two passes, South redoubled! West then led the king of spades. Just a second,Ž said South again. Both of your hands are exposed because youve seen each others cards, and Im entitled to call your plays in any way I see fit.Ž So Mr. Lawman directed West to lead the ten of spades instead. He took the ten with the jack, continued with the nine, calling for Wests eight, then cashed the seven of spades, calling for Wests six. As the spades were being led, declarer forced East to discard the A-K-Q of clubs! Mr. Lawman then cashed the J-9-7 of clubs, compelling West to play the 10-8-6 in that order, and East to discard the A-K-Q of hearts. The same process was then repeated in hearts, declarer cashing the J-9-7 of that suit. On the hearts, East, who at this point was nearing a state of apoplexy, was forced to discard the A-K-Q of dia-monds. Mr. Lawman next cashed his heart and club fives, collecting Easts J-10 of diamonds. Dummys 9-8 of diamonds then scored the last two tricks to make the redoubled grand slam! Q CONTRACT BRIDGEBY STEVE BECKER Famous hand April 8th Dinner Menu Available Noon until 9 p.m. Feature Entree: Roasted Leg of Lamb with herbed potatoes, carrots and parsnips $25.75 per person 4610 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 Call 561-776-5778 to make your priority seating request. www.waterbargrill.com Easter Sunday

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B4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY If you dont already have rabbits hopping around your garden, you might want to buy an antique garden rabbit to fool your friends. The wealthy English and French of the 17th century liked formal gardens with paths, fences and planned flower beds. They put urns, statues, fountains, sundials, gates, furniture and odd pieces such as fini-als and wall sculptures into their gardens. In America, ornaments and furniture were being used in gardens by the 1600s. A brass sundial from 1630 is the earliest American garden piece that still exists. A wooden bench from the 1700s is the earliest known wooden piece. Gardens first had wrought-iron furniture and gates in the 18th and early 19th centuries. By the mid-19th cen-tury, most garden pieces were made of cast iron, not wrought iron, because cast iron was stronger. Gardens were filled with iron ornaments and fences. Full-size deer, dogs and other animals, tiered fountains, iron benches made to look like twining vines or tree branches, obelisks and sundials were all made of cast iron. So were armillary spheres that help map the movementŽ of the stars around the Earth. In the 1930s, there was even more interest in cast-iron objects. Inside houses you could find cast-iron doorstops, bookends, planters, hard-ware and toys. And in todays gardens, life-size rabbits, squirrels, frogs and even alligators and tall birds are among the many iron guests. Many of these figures were made years ago and have survived with just a little loss of paint. A vintage rabbit or squirrel can cost from $50 to $200 today. A full-size deer or dog sells for $500 to $2,000, and a three-tier iron fountain with a bird pedestal and leafy edges costs $3,000. Look in back yards when you go to a house sale. You might find a garden figure no one noticed.Q: I have four cafestyle chairs, each marked with a paper label that says Jacob Josef Kohn & Mundus.Ž The chair-backs have a bentwood frame with three horizontal splats. Can you tell me age and value?A: Your chairs were made after 1914, the year Mundus, a German chair-manufac-turing conglomerate, merged with Jacob & Josef Kohn, a competitor based in Vien-na. And they probably were made before 1923. Thonet, the company whose founder invented the bentwood chair in the 1830s, merged with Mundus in 1923. Many differ-ent styles of bentwood chair-backs have been made. If yours are in excellent condi-tion, each one would sell for about $100. Q: I own a square porcelain platter with flowers painted around the border and a central scene of two young girls playing in a grassy field. Its marked PMŽ on the bottom. I was able to do enough research to learn that it was ma de between 1895 and 1910 by the Moschendorf Porcelain Factory of Hof-Moschendorf, Bavaria, Germany. But I cant find another platter like it online, and Im hoping its rare and worth a lot. Is it? A: No. Your platter is in a traditional Victorian style popular at the turn of the 20th century. Assuming it was made by the factory you identified, the dish is not by a famous manufacturer and its probably not part of a set that can be matched with other dishes. It would sell today for $25 to $50. But do take another look at the mark. Other German companies used marks that ended in PM.Ž One of those was the Royal Porce-lain Manufacturing Co., which marked its wares KPM.Ž Q: I have a small collection of vintage molded glass religious figurines. Theres one thats a mystery to me. Its a 7-inch light-blue glass sculpture of a standing Madonna and Child. Its signed P. dAvesn.Ž I have learned that Pierre dAvesn once worked at Lalique, but I also found his name connected with Daum art glass. So Im confused. Can you help?A: Pierre dAvesn designed for Lalique in the early 1920s, then later that decade became a designer and manager at Daum. He managed Daums factory at Croismare, near Luneville, France, from 1927 until 1932. The factory specialized in making decorative but affordable glass pieces that were marked in various ways. One of the marks is the P. dAvesnŽ signature on your figurine. Pieces made at the Croismare factory do not sell for as much as other prewar Daum designs. Your Madonna and Child figurine, if perfect, could be worth $100 to $150.Q: I have a set of dishes marked Losol Ware, Chusan, Keeling & Co. Ltd., Burslem, England.Ž I would like to know more about them and if they are valuable. They are in perfect condition with no chips. A: Keeling & Co. was one of many potteries that once operated in Staffordshire, a county in England. Keeling was in busi-ness from 1886 to 1936. Pottery marked Losol WareŽ was made from about 1912 until the pottery closed in 1936. ChusanŽ is the pattern name. Not all Keeling marks include the pattern name. Sets of dishes dont sell well. Serving pieces do better. A few show up at auctions. A 7‡8-inch Losol Ware pitcher sold for $59 last year, and a 5 7‡8-inch milk jug sold for $150. Tip: Silver saltshakers should be emptied after every use or lined with gold plat-ing to avoid corrosion. Q „ Terry Kovel answers as many questions as possible through the column. By sending a letter with a question, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or e-mail addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of any photograph, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The volume of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels (Florida Weekly), King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019. KOVELS: ANTIQUES Garden critters still popular after four centuries s t M a p c d terry KOVELnews@floridaweekly.com BECOME A SUBSCRIBER TODAY AND SAVE 10% TO 15% OFF OF SINGLE TICKET PRICES! &ORTICKETSrs&ORGROUPSALESr WWWJUPITERTHEATREORG%AST)NDIANTOWN2OAD*UPITER&, Sponsored in part by the Stateof Florida, Department of State,Division of Cultural Affairs, theFlorida Council on Arts and Culture OCT. 30 NOV. 11, 2012NOV. 27 DEC. 16, 2012JANUARY 8 27, 2013FEBRUARY 5 17, 2013MARCH 5 24, 2013 L@=E9DLRBMHAL=JL@=9LJ=K 10th Anniversary Season PRISCILLA HEUBLEINSPONSORED BY SPONSORED BYPEGGY AND RICK KATZSPONSORED BYPEGGY AND RICK KATZ ANDSPONSORED BY ANDSPONSORED BY AND AN D KATHY AND JOE SAVARESESPONSORED BY R IL DN ER AN AND ALLEN BILD JO JO ANANDALLENB J LLENBIL J R A A A B O OANANDALLENBILD R B O JOAN AND ALLEN BILDNER

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 B5 PUZZLE ANSWERS The Loxahatchee River Historical Society is looking for friendly folks to volunteer for various positions on weekdays or weekends at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum. Volun-teers should have a friendly smile, will-ingness to work with the public, and have an interest in local history. Stu-dents 15 or older may also volunteer year-round and receive community ser-vice hours for school. Volunteer positions include: Lighthouse tour guides, nature tour guides, school group tours, gift shop and admis-sions, museum front desk, Tindall Pio-neer Homestead, Bessies Sweet Shop, weddings, moonrise tours and special events. Meet folks from every part of the world while volunteering at the nations first eastern Outstanding Natural Area. Volunteers interested in any positions should stop by and pick up an applica-tion, download one from the website or call 747-8380 ext. 101 to have one mailed. Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum offers climbing tours of the landmark 1860 lighthouse. The lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is part of the 120-acre federally designated, Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area. The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum is open Tuesday-Sunday year-round and seven days a week from January-April, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., with the last light-house tour leaving at 4 p.m. For infor-mation, see jupiterlighthouse.org. Q Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum seeking volunteers for various jobsSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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B6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYWHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Q “Hello, Dolly!” — Jerry Hermans show stars Vicki Lewis and Gary Beach. Marcia Milgrom Dodge directs. Show-times vary; through April 1. Tickets start at $43. At the Mos’Art The MosArt Theatre is at 700 Park Ave., Lake Park. Call 337-OPOD (6763) or visit www.mosarttheatre.com. Q Films — April 5: DetachmentŽ and We Need to Talk About Kevin.Ž April 6-12: A SeparationŽ and The Match-maker.Ž Various times. Thursday, April 5 Q Story time session at the Loxahatchee River Center — 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123; or visit www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter. Q Sailfish Marina Sunset Celebration — 6 p.m. Thursdays. Shop for arts and crafts made by artists from around the country. Sailfish Marina, east of the Intracoastal, just south of Blue Heron Boulevard, Palm Beach Shores; 842-8449. Q Mainstreet at Midtown Music on the Plaza — 6-8 p.m. Thursdays. Beer, wine and food from Chuck Burger Joints kitchen; prices under $10; free parking; 629-5191. Near Military Trail and PGA Boulevard. Q Dance Tonight — Open Latin/ ballroom mix party features live music by Jimmy Falzone every Thursday. Group lesson 8-9 p.m.; party 9-10:30 p.m.; admission $15 for entire evening, includes light buffet; 914 Park Ave., Lake Park; 844-0255. Q Clematis by Night — Live music 6-9 p.m. Thursdays, Clematis Street at the Waterfront, downtown West Palm Beach. April 5: Solid Gold. April 12: Big Al & the Heavyweights. April 19: Chad Hollister. April 26: Boss Groove. Free; 822-1515 or visit www.clematisbynight. net. Friday, April 6 Q Lake Park “Super” Market — 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Fridays through October; Kelsey Park, 725 Lake Shore Drive, Lake Please send calendar listings to pbnews@floridaweekly.com. At the Borland Center The Borland Center for Performing Arts is at Midtown, 4885 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Call 904-3130 or visit www.theborlandcenter.org. At the Eissey The Eissey Campus Theatre is at Palm Beach State College, PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens. Unless otherwise noted, call 207-5900 or visit www.palm-beachstate.edu/eisseycampustheatre. Q Treasure Coast Youth Symphony presents From The Soul — The music of Schubert, Dvorak, Rimsky-Korsakov and Bach, and spe-cial guest Hannah Geisinger performs a viola concerto by Walton at 7 p.m. April 9. Tickets: $18, students $7. Q Ballet Folklorico — The music, performed live on authentic stringed instruments, punctuates the meticulous movement, colorful costumes and per-fect pulse established by these dancers from Mexico at 8 p.m. April 11 Tickets: $25-$30. Q The Benjamin School presents Spring Music Festival — Features the Band, Chorus and more from the Upper & Middle School at 7 p.m. April 12. Tickets: $5; 472-3476 or visit The Nook, 11000 Ellison Wilson Road. At the Kravis The Kravis Center is at 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. For tickets, call 832-7469 or log on to www.kravis.org. Q African American Film Festival — Something the Lord Made,Ž with host AnEta Sewell, 7 p.m. April 5 in Helen K. Persson Hall. Tickets: $10. Q “South Pacific” — Based on the 2008 Tony Award-winning Lincoln Center Theater production, directed by Bartlett Sher. 7 p.m. April 5, Dreyfoos Hall. Tickets: $25 and up. Q FestOval of Dance, 2O12 — West Palm Beachs cutting-edge con-temporary dance company, O Dance, founded and directed by internationally known choreographer Jerry Opdenaker, performs at 7:30 p.m. April 6, 2 and 7:30 p.m. April 7 and 3 p.m. April 8, Rinker Playhouse. Tickets: $35. Q Bill O’Reilly — 8 p.m. April 6, Dreyfoos Hall. Tickets: $25 and up. Q Pink Martini — 8 p.m. April 7, Dreyfoos Hall. Tickets: $20 and up. Q Palm Beach Symphony, Gala Benefit Concert — 8 p.m. April 10, Dreyfoos Hall. Program includes Tchaikovskys Piano Concerto No. 1Ž and Dvoraks Symphony No. 8.Ž Jahja Ling is guest conductor and Russian pianist Lola Astanova is soloist. Tickets: $30 and up. Q Sergio Mendez with special guest Jon Secada — 8 p.m. April 11, Dreyfoos Hall. Tickets: $25. At the Maltz The Maltz Jupiter Theatre is at 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Call 575-2223 or visit www.jupitertheatre.org. Park; 881-3319. Q “Friday Night Dance Party” — 8-10 p.m. Fridays, Alexanders Ballroom, 651 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Cost: $15 per person; 747-0030 or alexanders-ballroom.com. Q Downtown’s Weekend Kickoff — Singers perform 6-10 p.m. Fridays. April 6: Sound Proof. April 13: Groove Merchant Band. April 20: The Party Dogs. April 27: Samantha Russell Band. Downtown at the Gardens Cen-tre Court, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; 340-1600. Saturday, April 7 Q Town of Jupiter Annual Easter Egg Hunt — Children are separated into age groups to frolic through the grass and find treasures, treats and more. Bring your basket and bonnet. There also will be face painting, bounce houses, arts and crafts and a special toddler play area. Its 9:30 a.m. April 7 on the lawn of the Jupiter Community Center at 200 Mili-tary Trail. Call 741-2400 or visit www.jupiter.fl.us. Q West Palm Beach Greenmarket — 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays through April 14 at the Waterfront Commons, 101 S. Flagler Drive, downtown West Palm Beach; free parking in Banyan Street garage until 2 p.m.; call 82 2-1515. Q The 3rd Annual Pirate’s Well Pirate Fest — Shop arts and crafts and merchandise vendors, see pirate costume contests, play games for the young and the young at heart, including an Easter Treasure Hunt, Water Battle, Live Mermaid, Dunk Tank and Black-beards Pirate Ship. Its noon-2 a.m. April 7, Pirates Well, 9477 Alternate A1A, Lake Park; www.pirateswellpiratefest.com Q Documentary films — The Sierra Club will present two documentaries on environmental hazards, End CIVŽ and BAG IT!,Ž Green Cay Nature Cen-ter, 12800 Hagen Ranch Road, Boynton Beach. Showtime is 11 a.m.-2 p.m. April 7. Information: 907-2329> or jaynenote@yahoo.com. Q Kids Story Time — 11:30 a.m. Saturdays, Loggerhead Marinelife Cen-ter, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; free. Visit www.marinelife.org. Q Ginger’s Dance Party — 8-10 p.m., first Saturday of the month: April 7. Enjoy free-style dancing and easy-to-learn line dancing; free; visit www.wpb.org/waterfront. Outdoors at the Centen-nial Square, West Palm Beach. Q Public Fish Feedings at the Loxahatchee River Center — 2 p.m. Saturdays at the Wild & Scenic and Deep Marine Tanks, Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter; 743-7123; or visit www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter. Q Celebrate Saturdays at Downtown — Singers perform 6-10 p.m. Saturdays. April 7: On the Roxx. April 14: Raquel Williams. April 21: Noel Lorica. April 28: Jason Colannino and 4 Peace Band Downtown at the Gardens Cen-tre Court, 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; 340-1600. Sunday, April 8 Q Palm Beach Gardens GreenMarket, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sundays through May 6; City Complex, 4301 Burns Road; 756-3600. Monday, April 9 Q Newplicate Bridge — Informative lesson, 1-1:30 p.m.; games 1:30-4:30 p.m. Sanctioned duplicate bridge games for new players with fewer than 100 master points. Fee: residents, $6; non-residents, $7; call Jennifer Nelli, 630-1146 or go to www.pbgfl.com. Lakeside Cen-ter, 10410 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Q Timely Topics Discussion Group — Lively discussion group covers the most up-to-date topics faced by our local community, including nation-al affairs and foreign relations as they relate to Israel and the United States; free/Friends of the J; $18 annual fee/guests; call 712-5233. JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Tuesday, April 10 Q Pirate’s Cove Resort Marketplace — Visit the Dockside Marketplace Vendors the second Tuesday of each month. Next event: 5-9 p.m. April 10. At Pirates Cove Resort 4307 SE Bay-view St., Stuart; 792-9260.. Q Mah Jongg & Canasta Play Sessions — Tables grouped by game preference (mah jongg or canasta) and level of skill. Coffee, cold beverages and a variety of goodies provided. 12:15-3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gar-dens. Price: Free/Friends of the J; $5/guest; 712-5233. Q Stayman Memorial Bridge — Supervised play sessions with Sam Brams, 10 a.m.-noon Tuesdays; JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gar-dens. Play party bridge in a friendly atmosphere while benefiting from expert advice with judgment calls and hand rul-ings; no partner necessary; coffee and light refreshments provided. Price: Free/Friends of the J; $6/guests; 712-5233. Q Zumba class — 7:15-8:15 p.m. Tuesdays and 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Drop-in fee, $12; resident discount, $10. Call 630-1100 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Wednesday, April 11 Q “Break Up Support Group” — COURTESY PHOTO Pink Martini performs at 8 p.m. April 7 in Dreyfoos Hall at the Kravis Center. Tickets are $20 and up.

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WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO 10 a.m. Wednesdays, various locations in Palm Beach Gardens. Sponsored by The Counseling Group, which provides free Christian counseling, classes and sup-port groups; 624-4358. Q Hatchling Tales — 10:30-11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, Loggerhead Marinelife Center, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach. Free; www.marinelife.org. Q Bridge Classes with Sam Brams — 10-noon Wednesdays „ JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Six-week session $72 or $15/class. Pre-registration appre-ciated. Call Rhonda Gordon, 712-5233. Q “Sing Out!-Kidz” Group Singing Lessons for Kids — This program is a series of group singing lessons that will help kids build self-con-fidence. Class includes a book/CD. Ses-sion will conclude with a mini-concert for parents, family and friends. Held Wednesdays from 4:15-5:15 p.m. Wednes-days through April 18, at the Burns Road Community Center, 4440 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Ages: 8-13. Cost: $112 RDF/ $134. Instructor: Sandi Russell. For more information or to register, call 630-1100 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Ongoing Q The Bamboo Room — Jon Zeeman Band, 8:30 p.m. April 5. Locos Por Juana, 9 p.m. April 6. David Shelley & Bluestone, 9 p.m. April 7. Tim Reynolds & TR3, with Sons of Bill, 8:30 p.m. April 11. Albert Cummings, 9 p.m. April 12. The Bamboo Room is at 25 S. J St., downtown Lake Worth. Tickets: Various prices; 585-BLUE, www.eventbrite.com or www.bamboorm.com. Q The Colony’s Royal Room — Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr. per-form through April 7 and April 10-14 at The Colonys Royal Room, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Tickets: $60 for show and $50 for prix fixe dinner (Tuesday-Thursday) / $70 for show and $50 for prix fixe dinner (Friday-Saturday); 659-8100. Q Palm Beach Photographic Centre — Insights & SurprisesŽ „ Color Light AbstractionsŽ by mid-20th-century photographer Wynn Bullock. Show runs through June 9. The Pho-tographic Centre is in the City Center, 415 Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; call 253.2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org. Q Palm Beach Improv — April 5-7: Dov Davidoff, various times. April 10: Poppy Champlin Presents: The Queer Queens of Qomedy, 8 p.m. At City-Place, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach; 833-1812 or www.palmbeachimprov.com. Q Lighthouse ArtCenter — March 29-April 25: Member show and sale. Museum is at Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays. Cost: Members free, $10 non-members ages 12 and up. Free admission Saturdays; 746-3101 or www.lighthousearts.org. Q Norton Museum of Art — Through April 15: Cocktail Culture.Ž Through May 27: Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation.Ž Through May 6: Taci-ta Dean.Ž Through June 24: Decoding Messages in Chinese Art.Ž Through May 27: Studio Glass: Works from the Muse-um Collection.Ž Art After Dark, with music, art demonstrations, is 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. Admission: $12 adults, $5 vis-itors 13-21; free for members and children under 13. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. second Thursday of the month. Closed Mondays and major holidays; 832-5196. Q Society of the Four Arts — Art Exhibition: Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch,Ž through April 29. Admission: $5; free for members and children 14 and under. Tickets: $15; free for members. Complex is at 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach; 655-7227 or fourarts.org. Q Broadway Stress Busters — Teaches introductory vocal techniques to maximize power and range; group, solo and duet. Thursdays, 10-11 a.m., through April 12. $144 residents/$173 non-residents. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road. Register at www.pbgfl.com or call 630-1100. Q Confident Comfortable Public Speaking and Presentation — Teaches methods of understanding and conquering public speaking anxiety. Thursdays, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., through April 12. $144 residents/$173 non-resi-dents. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road. Register at www.pbgfl.com or call 630-1100. Q Palm Beach’s Living Room Jazz Series — Presented by JAMS and The Four Seasons. $25 JAMS mem-bers/$35 non-members/$15 students. Concerts start at 8 p.m.; doors open at 7. Four Seasons Resort Palm Beach, 2800 S. Ocean Blvd. Tickets 877-722-2820 or www.jamsociety.org/MOREJAZZ. Q Flagler Museum — Museum is housed in Henry Flaglers 1902 beaux-arts mansion, Whitehall; at 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Through April 22: A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls.Ž The Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-18) accompanied by adult; $3 child (6-12) accompanied by adult; and free for children under 6. 655-2833. Q Fitness classes for women — Classes are sponsored by the Jupiter Recreation Department. Aerobic Dance is 8:30 a.m. Mondays, Total Body Ton-ing is 8:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Zumba Latin Fitness Workout is 9:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. First class is free to new students. Cost of a five-class fitness card that allows for flexible attendance is $26.50 for Jupiter residents and $33 for non-residents. A five-class Zumba card is $31.50 for Jupiter residents and $39.50 for non-residents; 10-class cards also are available. Classes meet in the community center, behind the Police Department on Military Trail, Jupiter. For information, contact instruc-tor Kathy Andio at 236-4298 or www.empoweringsolutionswithkathy.com. Q “Five Thousand Years on the Loxahatchee” — Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org. Q Children’s Research Station — Childrens Research Station „ Loggerhead Marinelife Center program is designed to exercise childrens science skills through an experimental lab. Each child receives a lab coat, veterinary instruments, a worksheet and their own sea turtle replica to name and study. Kids take their sea turtles straight and curved measurements with a measur-ing tape and calipers. Based on the measurements, Dr. Logger helps the group place their turtles into a size classification to determine age and spe-cies. They role-play taking blood with a syringe and learn about the different things a blood sample can reveal. The children look at X-rays, locate a hook in the turtles throat and learn more about the steps necessary during sea turtle rehabilitation. Then, the group tags their turtles with a unique num-ber and mimics a successful sea turtle release into the ocean. To be held at 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, and at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is free; 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280 April events Q River Totters Arts n’ Crafts — 9 a.m., second Wednesday of each month (next session is April 11). Arts and crafts for kids. Loxahatchee River Center, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Cost $3; call 743-7123. Q Jupiter-Tequesta Orchid Society — 7 p.m., second Wednesday of the month (next meeting is April 11). Jupiter Community Center, 200 Mili-tary Trail, Jupiter. Call 746-7363. Q Silent Art Auction — Benefit for Denali Botolinos family and The Pancreatic Cancer Foundation. At age 8, Denali was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Artists donating works of art are: Jesse LaPierre; Sarah LaPierre; Joseph LaPierre (embellished giclee); Phil Fung; AJ Brockman; Devin Howell; Michael Plunkett; Michael Metzner (donating a photography ses-sion with him); Janine Barcewicz and others. Its 5:30-7:30 p.m. April 12 at 51 Supper Club, Downtown at the Gar-dens; Contact Devin Howell at 906-0254 or devinmhowell@gmail.com. Q Tax Day Tea Party — Palm Beach County Tea Party presents Con-gressman Allen West and other speak-ers, live music, kids activities, food and beverage concessions; April 15 at 1:30 p.m.-5 p.m.; bring chairs; Wellington Ampitheater, 12100 Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington. Q Bridge Classes with Liz Dennis — Third Thursday of the month (April 19, May 18) through May. Pre-registration required. $25 admission. Call Rhonda Gordon 712-5233. JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Q Riviera Beach High Reunion — Third Thursday of the month (April 19, May 18) through May. Pre-regis-tration required. $25 admission. Call Rhonda Gordon 712-5233. JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Q Jazz on the Palm — West Palm Beachs free outdoor Jazz concert series 8-10 p.m. the third Friday of the month on the Palm Stage on the Waterfront Commons, downtown near Clematis Street. Q Angela Hagenbach — The Kansas City singer/songwriter per-forms at the Jazz Arts Music Societys final concert of the season, 8 p.m. April 24, Harriet Himmel Theater, CityPlace, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $35; $15 with valid student ID; (877) 722-2820 or jam-society.org. Q FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 L M BEACH INTERN A FILM FESTIVAL APRIL 12-19, 2012 Best Little Whorehouse in RochdaleFriday, April 13 € 7:00 pm Cobb Downtown Joan, hits upon the idea of forming a brothel.Broadways FinestSaturday, April 14 € 6:45 pm Muvico Parisian Three men impersonate New York City cops.Zombie HamletSaturday, April 14 € 7:00 pm Cobb Downtown Desperate filmmaker films a civil war Hamlet.Closing Night: Sassy PantsThursday, April 19 € 7:00pm Cobb After Party: 51 Supper Club A family gets caught in a tornado in Kansas.. Opening Night Film & PartyThursday, April 12, 2012 “Robot & Frank” • 7:00 pm Muvico Parisian 20 CityPlaceAfter Party • 9:00 pm Two City Plaza, West Palm ‘Robot and Frank” is about an elderly ex-jewel thief. Thank you to our sponsors! Meet the lmmakers!

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WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO 10 a.m. Wednesdays, various locations in Palm Beach Gardens. Sponsored by The Counseling Group, which provides free Christian counseling, classes and sup-port groups; 624-4358. Q Hatchling Tales — 10:30-11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, Loggerhead Marinelife Center, 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach. Free; www.marinelife.org. Q Bridge Classes with Sam Brams — 10-noon Wednesdays „ JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Six-week session $72 or $15/class. Pre-registration appre-ciated. Call Rhonda Gordon, 712-5233. Q “Sing Out!-Kidz” Group Singing Lessons for Kids — This program is a series of group singing lessons that will help kids build self-con-fidence. Class includes a book/CD. Ses-sion will conclude with a mini-concert for parents, family and friends. Held Wednesdays from 4:15-5:15 p.m. Wednes-days through April 18, at the Burns Road Community Center, 4440 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Ages: 8-13. Cost: $112 RDF/ $134. Instructor: Sandi Russell. For more information or to register, call 630-1100 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Ongoing Q The Bamboo Room — Jon Zeeman Band, 8:30 p.m. April 5. Locos Por Juana, 9 p.m. April 6. David Shelley & Bluestone, 9 p.m. April 7. Tim Reynolds & TR3, with Sons of Bill, 8:30 p.m. April 11. Albert Cummings, 9 p.m. April 12. The Bamboo Room is at 25 S. J St., downtown Lake Worth. Tickets: Various prices; 585-BLUE, www.eventbrite.com or www.bamboorm.com. Q The Colony’s Royal Room — Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr. per-form through April 7 and April 10-14 at The Colonys Royal Room, 155 Hammon Ave., Palm Beach. Tickets: $60 for show and $50 for prix fixe dinner (Tuesday-Thursday) / $70 for show and $50 for prix fixe dinner (Friday-Saturday); 659-8100. Q Palm Beach Photographic Centre — Insights & SurprisesŽ „ Color Light AbstractionsŽ by mid-20th-century photographer Wynn Bullock. Show runs through June 9. The Pho-tographic Centre is in the City Center, 415 Clematis St., downtown West Palm Beach. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Thursday, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; call 253.2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org. Q Palm Beach Improv — April 5-7: Dov Davidoff, various times. April 10: Poppy Champlin Presents: The Queer Queens of Qomedy, 8 p.m. At City-Place, 550 S. Rosemary Ave., Suite 250, West Palm Beach; 833-1812 or www.palmbeachimprov.com. Q Lighthouse ArtCenter — March 29-April 25: Member show and sale. Museum is at Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta. Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays. Cost: Members free, $10 non-members ages 12 and up. Free admission Saturdays; 746-3101 or www.lighthousearts.org. Q Norton Museum of Art — Through April 15: Cocktail Culture.Ž Through May 27: Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation.Ž Through May 6: Taci-ta Dean.Ž Through June 24: Decoding Messages in Chinese Art.Ž Through May 27: Studio Glass: Works from the Muse-um Collection.Ž Art After Dark, with music, art demonstrations, is 5-9 p.m. Thursdays. Admission: $12 adults, $5 vis-itors 13-21; free for members and children under 13. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 1-5 p.m. Sunday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. second Thursday of the month. Closed Mondays and major holidays; 832-5196. Q Society of the Four Arts — Art Exhibition: Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch,Ž through April 29. Admission: $5; free for members and children 14 and under. Tickets: $15; free for members. Complex is at 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach; 655-7227 or fourarts.org. Q Broadway Stress Busters — Teaches introductory vocal techniques to maximize power and range; group, solo and duet. Thursdays, 10-11 a.m., through April 12. $144 residents/$173 non-residents. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road. Register at www.pbgfl.com or call 630-1100. Q Confident Comfortable Public Speaking and Presentation — Teaches methods of understanding and conquering public speaking anxiety. Thursdays, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., through April 12. $144 residents/$173 non-resi-dents. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road. Register at www.pbgfl.com or call 630-1100. Q Palm Beach’s Living Room Jazz Series — Presented by JAMS and The Four Seasons. $25 JAMS mem-bers/$35 non-members/$15 students. Concerts start at 8 p.m.; doors open at 7. Four Seasons Resort Palm Beach, 2800 S. Ocean Blvd. Tickets 877-722-2820 or www.jamsociety.org/MOREJAZZ. Q Flagler Museum — Museum is housed in Henry Flaglers 1902 beaux-arts mansion, Whitehall; at 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Through April 22: A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls.Ž The Flagler Museum, 1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach. Tickets: free for members; $18 adults, $10 youth (13-18) accompanied by adult; $3 child (6-12) accompanied by adult; and free for children under 6. 655-2833. Q Fitness classes for women — Classes are sponsored by the Jupiter Recreation Department. Aerobic Dance is 8:30 a.m. Mondays, Total Body Ton-ing is 8:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and Zumba Latin Fitness Workout is 9:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. First class is free to new students. Cost of a five-class fitness card that allows for flexible attendance is $26.50 for Jupiter residents and $33 for non-residents. A five-class Zumba card is $31.50 for Jupiter residents and $39.50 for non-residents; 10-class cards also are available. Classes meet in the community center, behind the Police Department on Military Trail, Jupiter. For information, contact instruc-tor Kathy Andio at 236-4298 or www.empoweringsolutionswithkathy.com. Q “Five Thousand Years on the Loxahatchee” — Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 747-8380, Ext. 101; www.jupiterlighthouse.org. Q Children’s Research Station — Childrens Research Station „ Loggerhead Marinelife Center program is designed to exercise childrens science skills through an experimental lab. Each child receives a lab coat, veterinary instruments, a worksheet and their own sea turtle replica to name and study. Kids take their sea turtles straight and curved measurements with a measur-ing tape and calipers. Based on the measurements, Dr. Logger helps the group place their turtles into a size classification to determine age and spe-cies. They role-play taking blood with a syringe and learn about the different things a blood sample can reveal. The children look at X-rays, locate a hook in the turtles throat and learn more about the steps necessary during sea turtle rehabilitation. Then, the group tags their turtles with a unique num-ber and mimics a successful sea turtle release into the ocean. To be held at 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, and at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is free; 14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach; 627-8280 April events Q River Totters Arts n’ Crafts — 9 a.m., second Wednesday of each month (next session is April 11). Arts and crafts for kids. Loxahatchee River Center, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Cost $3; call 743-7123. Q Jupiter-Tequesta Orchid Society — 7 p.m., second Wednesday of the month (next meeting is April 11). Jupiter Community Center, 200 Mili-tary Trail, Jupiter. Call 746-7363. Q Silent Art Auction — Benefit for Denali Botolinos family and The Pancreatic Cancer Foundation. At age 8, Denali was diagnosed with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Artists donating works of art are: Jesse LaPierre; Sarah LaPierre; Joseph LaPierre (embellished giclee); Phil Fung; AJ Brockman; Devin Howell; Michael Plunkett; Michael Metzner (donating a photography ses-sion with him); Janine Barcewicz and others. Its 5:30-7:30 p.m. April 12 at 51 Supper Club, Downtown at the Gar-dens; Contact Devin Howell at 906-0254 or devinmhowell@gmail.com. Q Tax Day Tea Party — Palm Beach County Tea Party presents Con-gressman Allen West and other speak-ers, live music, kids activities, food and beverage concessions; April 15 at 1:30 p.m.-5 p.m.; bring chairs; Wellington Ampitheater, 12100 Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington. Q Bridge Classes with Liz Dennis — Third Thursday of the month (April 19, May 18) through May. Pre-registration required. $25 admission. Call Rhonda Gordon 712-5233. JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Q Riviera Beach High Reunion — Third Thursday of the month (April 19, May 18) through May. Pre-regis-tration required. $25 admission. Call Rhonda Gordon 712-5233. JCC North, 4803 PGA Blvd. Q Jazz on the Palm — West Palm Beachs free outdoor Jazz concert series 8-10 p.m. the third Friday of the month on the Palm Stage on the Waterfront Commons, downtown near Clematis Street. Q Angela Hagenbach — The Kansas City singer/songwriter per-forms at the Jazz Arts Music Societys final concert of the season, 8 p.m. April 24, Harriet Himmel Theater, CityPlace, West Palm Beach. Tickets: $35; $15 with valid student ID; (877) 722-2820 or jam-society.org. Q FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B7 L M BEACH INTERN A FILM FESTIVAL APRIL 12-19, 2012 Best Little Whorehouse in RochdaleFriday, April 13 € 7:00 pm Cobb Downtown Joan, hits upon the idea of forming a brothel.Broadways FinestSaturday, April 14 € 6:45 pm Muvico Parisian Three men impersonate New York City cops.Zombie HamletSaturday, April 14 € 7:00 pm Cobb Downtown Desperate filmmaker films a civil war Hamlet.Closing Night: Sassy PantsThursday, April 19 € 7:00pm Cobb After Party: 51 Supper Club A family gets caught in a tornado in Kansas.. Opening Night Film & PartyThursday, April 12, 2012 “Robot & Frank” • 7:00 pm Muvico Parisian 20 CityPlaceAfter Party • 9:00 pm Two City Plaza, West Palm ‘Robot and Frank” is about an elderly ex-jewel thief. Thank you to our sponsors! Meet the lmmakers!

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B8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY Visit our Facebook page for our Calendar of Events: Join Us the Last Tuesday of Every Month for Yappy Hou r and Training Sessions from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Healthy Natural Pet Food Toys, Leashes, and More! Delivery Service Available facebook.com/woofgangbakeryabacoa 5500 Military Trail, Suite 12 ‡ Jupiter, FL 33458 Phone: 561.630.5800 ‡ www.WoofGangBakery.com ) Visit us in Abacoa ) Q ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The Lamb loves to be surrounded by flocks of admirers. But be careful that someone doesnt take his or her admira-tion too far. Use your persuasive skills to let him or her down easily. Q TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) This is a good time to begin setting far-reaching goals and connecting with new contacts. Aspects also favor strengthen-ing old relationships „ personal and/or professional. Q GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A personal disappointment should be viewed as a valuable learning experi-ence. Go over what went wrong and see where a change in tactics might have led to a more positi ve outcome. Q CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Dont leave projects unfinished or per-sonal obligations unresolved, or you might find yourself tripping over all those loose ends later on. A relative has important news. Q LEO (July 23 to August 22) Expect a challenge to the usual way you do things. Although you might prefer the tried-and-true, once you take a good look at this new idea, you might feel more receptive to it. Q VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Much work has yet to be done to polish a still-rough idea into something with significant potential. Expect to encounter some initial rejection, but stay with it nonetheless. Q LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) There still might be some communication problems in the workplace, but they should be resolved soon. Mean-while, that tipŽ from a friend should be checked out. Q SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A new relationship appears to need more from you than you might be willing to give right now. Best advice: Resist making promises you might not be able to keep. Q SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) That restless feeling encourages you to gallop off into a new venture. But remember to keep hold of the reins so you can switch paths when necessary. Q CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A demanding work schedule keeps the high-spirited Goat from kicking up his or her heels. But playtime beckons by the weeks end. Have fun. You earned it. Q AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Youre beginning to come out from under those heavy responsibilities you took on. Use this freed-up time to enjoy some much-deserved fun with people close to you. Q PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Before you get swept away by a tidal wave of conflicting priorities, take time to come up for air, and reassess the situ-ation. You might be surprised by what youll find. Q BORN THIS WEEK: Your leadership qualities are enhanced by a prac-tical sense of purpose that keeps you focused on your goals.W SEE ANSWERS, B5 W SEE ANSWERS, B52012 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLES HOROSCOPES TEA PARTY By Linda Thistle + Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week:

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Design r Accessories Home FurnishingsDelray Beach North Palm Beach1400 Old Dixie Hwy. 561.845.3250 117 NE 5th Avenue 561.278.0886West Palm Beach1810 South Dixie Hwy. 561.249.6000 Westhampton Beach 631.288.0258 Ma rc h 12th-April 12t h LEE UPHOLSTERY30% OF FSpecial Order s www.excentricities.com FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 B9 +++ Is it worth $14 (3D)? YesWrathŽ means revenge driven by anger,Ž but when it appears in a movie title, good things happen. The Grapes of WrathŽ (1940) is an all-time classic. Star Trek II: The Wrath of KhanŽ is the best of that fran-chise and a darn good movie. Wrath of the TitansŽ joins that company; its a solid action film with a decent enough premise and visual effects that are stunning for a very specific reason (more on that later). The sequel to 2012s Clash of the Titans,Ž it picks up with demigod (half man/half god) Perseus (Sam Worthington) 10 years later. Living among men, he is a single father of Helius (John Bell) and works as a fisherman. But with the gods losing their power due to lack of human prayer, Per-seus finds himself having to rescue his father, Zeus (Liam Neeson), from the capture of Hades (Ralph Fiennes) and Ares (Edgar Ramirez). Helping Perseus are Queen Andromeda (Rosamund Pike) and Poseidons (Danny Huston) son Agenor (Toby Kebbell), who has a dubious reputation. OK, so the story is just serviceable. Thats all its supposed to be. Give credit to scribes Dan Mazeau and David Johnson for not having any hideously stupid dialog, and to the actors for not letting any potentially stupid dialog come through in the deliv-ery. Also give credit to the actors for working so well while knowing half the visual effects-filled picture (if not more) would be added in post-production. If you think acting is easy, try being scared to death or screaming at a blue screen, hoping the monsters created by design gurus six months later will warrant your fear. In this case, warrant they do.But its not just the creativity of the monsters „ which include a two-head-ed wolf-like animal with a bad attitude, giant Cyclopes and demonic soldiers with two front sides and no rear. Its the details in the visual effects that make them great. Note the way our first descent into the underworld is an unbroken shot that takes us from ground level all the way down to Hades realm. Note the individual hairs on Zeus beard as they go from brown to gray, and the destruction of the fire-spewing, mega-monster Kronos as it spreads every-where. This is detailed, time-consuming work at its finest. Best of all „ and this is whats really impressive „director Jonathan Liebes-man is able to hold on extensive visual effects shots for longer than normal. Whereas some directors edit action scenes so quickly that its all a blur, Liebesman patiently moves the camera with Perseus as he evades and then encounters the two-headed monster. Specifically because of this lack of overediting, other moments palpably regis-ter as well. Wrath of the TitansŽ has everything you want in this type of sequel: Its big-ger and louder, but also more visually dynamic and, therefore, better than its predecessor. Q The Hunger Games +++ (Jennifer Lawrence, Liam Hemsworth, Josh Hutcherson) Set in the future, Katniss (Lawrence) leaves her friend Gale (Hemsworth) behind to fight to the death with Peeta (Hutcherson) and 22 other young adults in the titular Hunger Games.Ž It takes too long to get to the games, but once there, its sufficiently exciting and suspenseful. Based on the Suzanne Collins novel. Rated PG-13. 21 Jump Street +++ (Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, Ice Cube) Youthful police officers Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Tatum) go undercover at a high school to infiltrate a drug ring. Off-the-wall funny and with great spirit, this serves as proof that cruddy old TV shows can make darn good movies. Rated R. Seeking Justice +++ (Nicolas Cage, January Jones, Guy Pearce) After his wife (Jones) is savagely attacked, Will (Cage) makes a deal with a stranger named Simon (Pearce) to take care ofŽ the assailant. But when Will has to return the favor, trouble ensues. Its a good, tense thriller thatll have you questioning your own morality when its over. Rated R. Q LATEST FILMS‘Wrath of the Titans’ >> As it did in the 2010 lm the mechanical owl Bubo from the original 1981 version of “Clash of the Titans” makes an appearance. t m f u l N a dan HUDAKwww.hudakonhollywood.com CAPSULES

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B10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Jupiter Seafood Festival at Abacoa Town Center1. Captain Unknown and Captain RedBeard2. Derek Schwartz and Christina Drossis3. George Douma and Louise Douma4. Michelle Foti and Emily Foti5. Leeta Martin, Chris Martin and baby Julianna Martin 6. Nicole Handy and Kristi Wilson7. Scott Rowe, Sarah Rowe and Katie Doyle8. Tiffany Puhlman and Mike Rendes 1 2 5 4 3 6 7 8 KELLY LAMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Š '7*):&DURXVHONLGVHYHQW$GLQGG 30

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B11FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Downtown in Bloom at Downtown at the Gardens1. Alex Castro and Melanie Maestre2. Ashley Mudd3. David Denton, Josie Jackson and Stewart Jackson 4. Karin Haligas and Cheryl Karlo5. Pat Rogell, Marsha Langbart and Andrea Ham lon 6. Pauline Zaros, Mara Hoeffer and David Hoeffer7. Rick Warren and Amy Warren 1 2 5 4 3 6 7 RACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY Š Bring this ad for a FR EE ri d e o n our T r ai n F W0405 For more info, please call 561.404.8133April 7, 3-5pmCandles by Mimi’s Daughter Kids Craft Day Take the kiddies to Downtown for a free special morning out on the last Wednesday of the month for active learning and creative play at all your favorite stores! This month’s theme is “Go Green Kids.” Receive special offers from our tenants, take a free ride on The Downtown Carousel and The Downtown Express, arts & crafts, prizes and more! April 25, 11am-1pm Carousel Courtyard Mommy & Me Welcome Crazy 8 to Downtown at the Gardens with a weekend of fun and prizes, including iPod Shufes, $88 gift cards, Frosty Bags, a $500 and $88 grand prize gift card and much more! April 13-15 Crazy 8 Crazy 8’s Grand Opening Celebration Spring Into Family Fun at Downtown! '7*):&DURXVHONLGVHYHQW$GLQGG 30

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Coffee Roasted Exclusively for You Come Visit Us!221 Old Dixie Hwy Suite 1Tequesta, FL 334691.561.401.24534-HTWT‹:H[WT& Sunday at the Garden’s Green Market To keep up with what’s roasting now...follow us online facebook.com/OceanaCoffee twitter.com/OceanaCoffee www.oceanacoffee.com B12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYthe daughter of the Shell Factorys founders, Harold and Mildred Crant, lives with her husband in Alva (east of Fort Myers). When she was a toddler, her parents left Niagara Falls, Canada, by car and settled in Bonita Springs. Her father had sold his sightseeing business in Niagara Falls. Thats most likely where he got the money to buy all four cornersŽ of Terry Street and Old 41 in Bonita, she said. The late Mr. Crant was born in Nova Scotia, the oldest of 10 children, Ms. DeBoest said. And all those siblings ended up moving to Lee County and went into the shell business.Ž Her dad ran the Shell Factory on that corner until the end of 1952, along with other attractions, including an Indian Vil-lageŽ and a restaurant. He was quite friendly with the Seminole Indians,Ž Ms. DeBoest recalls. He hired some to work at the village „ an authentic touch for tourists. Probably totally politically incorrect these days.Ž Mr. Crant was a major employer in Bonita until his Shell Factory burned down in the early morning on New Years Eve, 1952, the same year Ms. DeBoest graduated from high school (early, at age 16, she said). He rebuilt in North Fort Myers, where the Shell Factory has remained, its internationally recognized 1950s-era roadside sign a beacon „ or tour-ist trapŽ „ for traffic on the Tamiami Trail. Mr. Crants decision to leave Bonita was not without consequence. In Bonita Springs, it was the star attraction,Ž remembers long-time Lee County Commissioner Frank Mann. (Some Bonita residents at the time) were very saddened about it because it was a landmark there and it was a big tourist attraction and it provided jobs.Ž Ms. DeBoest has an old picture of herself under her fathers sign, which still features a 52-foot-tall arch and a giant pink conch sculpture underneath. In it shes young, sitting in a convert-ible. Ms. DeBoests first husband, the late Richmond Powell, worked for her father. They eventually bought the Shell Factory, and had five children before divorcing in the 1960s. Her father thought hed get more traffic at the North Fort Myers spot, she said. But later Interstate 75 diverted travelers and sent business into a tailspin. Ms. DeBoest hasnt been involved in the business since she and Mr. Powell went their separate ways. The business changed hands a number of times, then fell into the hands of Martin Beitler, who owned an insurance company. I was b.s.d into buying (the Shell Factory) by this attorney,Ž Mr. Beitler said over the telephone. He was going to flip it and all that baloneyƒ What can I tell you? It was not a good expe-rience. I finally unloaded the place to some bankers who had their eye on the property, and we worked out some terms that made some sense for both parties and I was gone.Ž Mr. Beitler complains that a slick, dishonest lawyer had initially urged him to buy the Shell Factory, with the promise that he could flipŽ it for a profit. Now 85, the lifetime New Jersey resident still lives there, in Edgewater with his wife. They are predominantly retired. The current owner, Tom Cronin, bought the Shell Factory from Mr. Beitler in 1997 for 50 cents on the dol-larŽ (about $1.5 million). It was practically bankrupt. Mr. Beitler was only too glad to get rid of the property to Mr. Cronins real-estate company (or as he remembers them, some bankersŽ), even at a loss. Lots of capital investment brought it back,Ž said Mr. Cronin, who invested millions. It was all personal equity, no bank support.ŽThe great American retailerToday, the Shell Factory is experiencing something of a comeback, offering bumper boats and a petting zoo; min-iature golf and hermit crab races; an Iguana named Iggy PopŽ and even a church service „ for dogs „ on Sun-day. But the Shell Factorys giant retail gift store is its lifeblood, the Grande Dame of Kitsch in her many-splen-dored glory. Every attraction has a gift store,Ž Mr. Cronin said proudly, noting that at 68,000 square feet its bigger than your average Walmart. We have the largest gift store under one roof as far as we know in the world.Ž The jellyfish encased under glass is a hot item, as is the Ass Kickin Hot Sauce. Need flip flops, suntan lotion, jewelry, wooden surfboard postcards, or a selection of thousands of shells and coral from all over the world? Check. An entire sprawling section is dedicated to Christmas items, year round. Theres a fudge and ice cream shop, a Subway, a video arcade, a Pirate Grotto with life-size sculptures, and an old Volkswagen Beetle painted up in full hippie regalia, including the slogan Make l ove, not war.Ž Anne Sheridan is general manager and buyer for the gift store. SHELLFrom page B1 Bumper boats are one of the factory’ s modern-day attractions. COURTESY PHOTOThe Shell Factory’s float in The Edison Festival of Light Grande Parade sometime before 1953, when the business moved to North Fort Myers. Tom Cronin has a huge collection of exotic taxidermied animals, including a number of lions, on display in the gift shop. (QWLUHVWRFNRIRXUIDEXORXVVLONRUDODUUDQJHPHQWVAll at 20% DISCOUNT!2 Weeks Only! Sale Starts April 5th ‘til April 19th Midtown Plaza3*$%OYG3DOP%HDFK*DUGHQV 2 blocks west of Military Trail Mon-Sat 10AM-6PM Sun 11AM-4PM Call: 561.691.5884 Just in time for Mother’s Day!

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B allet F olklorico Mexicos Premiere Folk Dance Ensemble With Live Musical Accompaniment QuetzalliŽ de Veracruz www.EisseyCampusTheatre.org Wednesday, April 11 at 8:00 p.m GGFKGYwƒ†‹‰ZˆŒ{fw‚ƒX{wy~]wˆz{„‰ TICKETS: $25 & $30Call the Ticket Of“ce at: 561.207.5900 ( c…„¤\ˆPGFwDƒD¤K†Dƒ? FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 B13Its not just shells here, its everything,Ž she said, sitting in her office. Theres nothing we dont have „ unless I dont like itƒTheres something for everybody here.Ž There are also rooms full of taxidermied animals, a kingdom of exotic creatures near the video arcade, frozen in various poses. Its not politically correct,Ž Mr. Cronin admits of taxidermy, the process of carefully preserving and mounting dead animals. Its a lost art.Ž A number of lions and a musk ox dont begin to describe the giant collec-tion, which Mr. Cronin said was mostly inherited from friends who were hunt-ers. Its out of fashion these days, but visitors who see it look on in wonder and take digital photos of themselves with the once-living beasts. Tom CroninMr. Cronin is originally from Hartford City, Ind. He moved to Lee County with his family in the late 1940s, he said. His mother was a homemaker and his father a taxidermist, believe it or not.Ž The family had a little fishing business on the city pierŽ in Fort Myers when they arrived. Mr. Cronin guided fishing boats as a teenager. Women would scream and yell before they got on the boat, Im not getting in with a 13-year-old,Ž he said. His family also worked for years in the wholesale beer business, he said, selling brands such as Regal and Pabst Blue Ribbon. Mr. Cronin took up buying and selling real estate as a side business. Thats the source of the familys wealth, he said, not the beer industry. But it kept us in bread and beer,Ž Mr. Cronin said. We drank a lot of beer.Ž At 73, Mr. Cronin is still a work-a-day manager, spry and energetic. It doesnt hurt, he notes, that I have a 53-year-old wife.Ž Thats Pam Cronin, who went to hospitality school and now manages the Shell Factorys restaurant, Captn Fish-bones Seafood and Steaks. Mr. Cronin intended to buy, renovate, then sell the Shell Factory, but has now owned it for 15 years. The truth of the matter is there are not a lot of buyers out there,Ž he said. Theres so much property out there thats undervalued. Im not going to give it away; (instead, Ill) wait for the right person to come along.ŽAt the parkThe dog park and agility course is one of the newest features at the Shell Factory, and there are plans to con-struct a rain forest attraction by this summer. One of those things to keep up, something new,Ž says Rick Tupper, the factorys marketing director. To that end, Mr. Tupper handles more than 150 events every year at the Shell Factory, updated the website in March, and added a Facebook page. He took a reporter on a tour of the 18-acre property via golf cart last week. When you step out of your car in the parking lot, you hear nostalgic doo-wop songs and other tunes. The place even has its own funny theme song, written by late Fort Myers musician Gary Link in 1980: Shell Factory Billboard Blues.Ž You can hear that on YouTube. In the Nature Park, goats are expecting babies, and there are already two baby lambs. Elsewhere, lemurs jumped around in their cages. In a separate aviary were leopard geckos, sea urchins, hermit crabs and a bearded dragon. Down the path, a large holding area contained a camel standing next to a miniature horse and a llama. Near a giant waterfall that spilled into a pool with giant koi, a tame pea-cock was chilling out by the brick path. Soothing piano music was coming from somewhere. In another area, a far corner, there was a Day of the Dinosaur Exhibit. I havent ever been back here,Ž Mr. Tupper said. I dont know where Tom got all this stuff.Ž There were plaster mold dinosaurs, including a Tyrannosaurus rex, looming over the path and a soundtrack with roars and Jurassic park-type noises. Millions of memoriesFrommers Florida 2011 travel guide ignores the Shell Factory & Nature Park completely, but seemingly takes a dismissive swipe at the place by writ-ing that the Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum of Sanibel is for hard-core shell fanatic(s)ƒŽ and that The muse-um is a far cry from the tourist-trap shell factories youll see throughout the state.Ž That hasnt kept the Shell Factory from being visited millions of times over the years. To me, what makes it so special is its that step back in time a bit,Ž said Tamara Pigott, executive director of the Lee County Visitor & Convention Bureau. I think about those trips we took as a kidƒ and coming across these places (roadside attractions like the Shell Factory.) To me its an almost magical part of my childhood.Ž Ms. Pigott suggests many like her have had similar childhood experienc-es. Last year, says the Lee County VCB, 11 percent of Lee County visitors said they went to the Shell Factory. The VCBs poll represents the countys 4.8 million visitors in 2011, which means roughly half a million people experi-enced the Shell Factory & Nature Park that year. Brooklyn, N.Y.-based blogger Debra Jane Seltzer has taken special note of the Shell Factory on her travels. Shes docu-mented an extensive cross-section of Americas roadside signs for her website, www.roadsidearchitecture.com. (The Shell Factory sign) is an important survivor for several reasons,Ž she wrote in an e-mail. The business itself is an iconic and rare representa-tive of Florida roadside tourism. Most of these businesses are long gone. The size of this sign is remarkable. I doubt that local ordinances would permit something so huge and garish these days. It is also a good and early exam-ple of transitional signs which mix plastic and neon.Ž Politicians also like to visit the Shell Factory. Senator John McCain was there on his 2008 campaign tour, for example. Many local reps have also visited, including Congressman Tom Rooney (FL-16), who issued a statement through his press office: Visiting the Shell Factory brings me back to my childhood. I remember stopping there with my family while we were driving around Florida, and I cant wait to bring my kids to get a taste of the old Americana at the Shell Factory. Its a great asset to the community.Ž Its also a marker in time for Lee County Commissioner Mann. It was the essence of what the tourist trade began as 75 years ago around here,Ž he said. They sold rubber alliga-tors and T-shirts and hats and Kodak film: thats what tourism was 75 years ago here in Southwest Florida.Ž And is. Ms. DeBoest occasionally revisits the place her father founded. When the children come „ well, most of em are 50 and older, I do have one son that just turned 46 I think „ when they come they always want to go out there and just see what its like,Ž she said. They all have fond memories of it when they were growing up hereƒ The grandchildren, the last time the little ones were here we went to the animal park and did the thing with the boatsƒŽ For more information, visit www. shellfactory.com. Q

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B14 WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 FLORIDA WEEKLYAl Chaikin led his Bronx Bombers to a 6-3 come-from-behind win against the regular season pennant-winning Boston Diehards. Ten years, and hes been a captain for nine years,Ž Mr. Ross said of Mr. Chaikin, and he went from down in fourth place and came back and won it. We had our best season in terms of no one getting hurt, everyone having a great time together, friendships being built, renewed, extended.Ž Now in his 70s, Mr. Ross founded the league in 2002 after an old friend from the Bronx, Alan Halpern, mailed him a stickball bat and pink Spaldeen ball that hed found in a hardware store in Harlem, just like the ones they had used in the old neighborhood. (Marty graduated in 58 from DeWitt Clinton High School, and Alan in 55 from Taft H.S.) When Mr. Ross received those icons of his youthful games on the Bronx streets, he started showing them to friends and acquaintances here and asking, What do you know about this?Ž He said he realized from the smiles, memories and stories that people in the 52-to-85 age group showed me that there was a mystique about this and I had a winner.Ž So he started on my mission to Keep Stickball a Tradition and Not Just a Game (the leagues motto) by creating the Wycliffe Stiffs Stickball League with 106 players and six teams.Ž The league now has four teams and only about 80 players, but Mr. Ross said a lot of work goes into running it, which he describes as a labor of loveŽ for himself and Harry Klaff, 64, direc-tor of operations. In 2009, they pro-duced a hardcover book detailing the leagues first few seasons and estab-lished a hall of fame. During the off-season months, league members have a benefit stickball golf tournament and take outings to Florida Panthers games. The game is secondary to what were doing,Ž Mr. Ross said. Its really about socialization and keeping every-body active, he said. This was a game played in the streets of inner cities on the East Coast back in the 20s, 30s, 40s; and in the 50s, when cars came in, it started dissipating. There are still people playing in inner cities, because STICKBALLFrom page B1“The game is secondary to what we’re doing. This was a game played in the streets of inner cities on the East Coast back in the ’20s, ’30s, ’40s; and in the ’50s, when cars came in, it started dissipating. There are still people playing in inner cities, because it’s inexpensive – a ball and a bat.” – Marty Ross Present this Coupon for One Free Appetizer at the Club* See Things Our WayMarina/Service/Fuel Clubhouse/Pool Sauna/Fitness Center Transient Slips Social Memberships Luxury Waterfront Vacation Rentals Restaurant/Jacks Havana Bar *Free appetizer with the purchase of two entrees. No photocopies. Valid December 8, 2011 January 12, 2012Key West Harbour 6000 Peninsular Avenue Key West, FL 33040 at Key West Harbour nformation Valid March 22nd April 30th, 2012

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B15its inexpensive „ a ball and a bat.Ž The parking lot at Village Park where the league plays, Mr. Klaff said, is perfect. The field is roughly 75 feet wide, roughly 200 feet long. Since there is no running involved, whether a hit is a single, double, triple or home run is determined by where a ball lands. The ball is pitched on a bounce from the pitchers mound, which is about 55 feet. The team at bat has their own pitcher. We have a continuous batting order. We have maybe 15-16 players show up on any given day.Ž Mr. Ross noted that the Wellington Parks and Recreation Department has been very helpful in setting up the field. He added that when they originated the league, we made the rules to fit the forever young age group.Ž So the game is generally pretty easy on aging bodies. Weve taken 79 people that are part of our league, from Wycliffe, and given them enjoyment that far surpasses the other things that theyre doing,Ž said Mr. Ross. First of all, when youre on the field, playing other sports, you cant talk.Ž Mr. Klaff interjected: One thing that weve been able to do, is that we force people who dont want to have fun, to have fun. We take all these sourpusses and put them out there, and ƒ they have fun.Ž It certainly works for Norman Graff, who is the leagues oldest player. He was on the winning Congressional Bar-ons last spring and said after that vic-tory: This feels so good. I am 84, but it feels like I am 14 right now. Thats how all of the guys feel right now. It takes you back to when you were in the schoolyard.Ž Q COURTESY PHOTOS ABOVE: Captain Al Chaikin of the Bronx Bomb-ers holds the Egg Cream Trophy after the Wycliffe Stiffs’ championship game March 22. Players are (from left): Ronnie Halperin; Marty Billick (in sunglasses); Angelo Comachia (front); Ben Pezzino (back); Harvey Glicker (back); Co-Captian Elliot Tuckel (in sunglasses); Mr. Chai-kin; Mel Burstein; Bob Male; Norm Primost; Don Berkowitz (in front of Mr. Burstein); Jon Rahan; Bob Feld; Alan Zinberg; and Paul Eidelkind.LEFT: Brooklyn historian Ron Schweiger (right) presented “The Commish,” Marty Ross (left), with a proclamation lauding him on the Wycliffe Stiffs’ 10th anniversary from Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz. 2012 SUMMER CAMPS GRADES K – 12ENROLLMENT CRITERIA BASED ON GRADES COMPLETED PRE-CARE AND AFTER-CARE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PAUL AND SANDRA GOLDNER CONSERVATORY OF PERFORMING ARTS GRADES K 5 Students Perform Bye Bye Birdie onstage June 29-30 -/.n&2)s9 am … 3 pmThree Week Camp JUNE 11 … 29 Grades 6 12 Senior Conservatory Students Perform Willy Wonka Jr. onstage July 27-28 -/.n&2)s9 am … 3 pmThree Week Camp Grades 3 5 Junior Conservatory JULY 9 … 27 FOUR DAY CAMP: Grades K … 5 JULY 2 … 6 s9 am 3 pm Magic! K … 5 3 FOU JULY 30 … AUGUST 10 s 9 am 3 pm Dance Intensive TWO WEEK CAMP: Grades 6 … 12 Ballet s jazz s tap ONE-WEEK CAMP: Grades K … 5 JULY 30 … AUG 3 sAMrPM Clowning, Improv andSketch Comedy UNDER THE SEA AUGUST 6 … 10 s 9 am 3 pmONE-WEEK CAMP: Grades K … 5 GRADES 6 12 Y 30 AUGUST 10 9 am 3 pm REGIST ER TOD A Y! (561) 575-2672www.jupitertheatre.org/education1001 East Indiantown Road, Jupiter, FL 33477 Sponsored in part by the Stateof Florida, Department of State,Division of Cultural Affairs, theFlorida Council on Arts and Culture TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL

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B16 WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 FLORIDA WEEKLYThe Kravis Center has the fifth anniversary series of Kravis On Broadway, which will present six hit musicals. The 2012-2013 5th Anniversary Kravis On Broadway season is a powerful lineup that includes four hit Broadway shows that were also award-winning films: Catch Me if You Can, Mary Poppins, Billy Elliot The Musical and Priscilla Queen of the Desert. The upcoming Kravis On Broadway season will also present the return of Jersey Boys, an audience favorite in West Palm Beach and around the world, and the musical Jekyll & Hyde, starring American Idol standout Constantine Maroulis and Grammy nominee and R&B superstar Deborah Cox, now on its pre-Broadway tour,Ž said Lee Bell, the Kravis Centers senior director of programming. The 2012-2013 series includes:CATCH ME IF YOU CAN „ Nov. 13-18. Based on the hit DreamWorks film and the incredible true story that inspired it, Catch Me if You CanŽ is the new Broadway musical that tells the story of Frank W. Abagnale Jr., a teenager who, with nothing more than his boyish charm, a big imagination and millions of dollars in forged checks, successfully poses as a pilot, a doctor and a lawyer. JERSEY BOYS „ Dec. 19-Jan. 6 Jersey BoysŽ is Working Its Way BackŽ to West Palm Beach. Close to 50,000 theatergoers cheered when it made its sell-out premiere at the Kravis Center in March 2010. This is the story about Rock and Roll Hall of Famers The Four Seasons. MARY POPPINS „ Jan. 29-Feb. 3 Mary PoppinsŽ is bringing its own brand of Broadway magic to theaters across the country. BILLY ELLIOT THE MUSICAL „ March 5-10 Billy Elliott the MusicalŽ is the joyous celebration of one boys journey to make his dreams come true. Set in a small town, the story follows Billy as he stumbles out of the boxing ring and into a ballet class, discovering a talent that inspires his family and his whole community and changes his life forever. JEKYLL & HYDE „ March 26-31 American IdolŽ star Constantine Maroulis is Dr. Henry Jekyll and Mr. Edward Hyde, and Grammy nominee and R&B Superstar Deborah Cox is Lucy. After four years on Broadway this dark love story returns in a new pre-Broadway production. PRISCILLA QUEEN OF THE DESERT „ April 23-28 Bette Midler presents this story of a trio of friends who hop aboard a bat-tered old bus searching for love and friendship in the middle of the Austra-lian outback and end up finding more than they could ever have dreamed. Subscribers for the Kravis On Broadway series will receive their renewals in the beginning of April. At that time, Kravis Center donors also will receive information on becoming a Kravis On Broadway subscriber for the 2012-13 series. Subscriptions for all six productions are $175 to $505 and go on sale July 13 at 10 a.m. to the general public. Call 832-7469 or (800) 572-8471, or see Kravis.org/broadway. Q Kravis Broadway series offers 6 smash musicals MARKETPLACE 1201 N. U.S. Highway 1, North Palm Beach (Crystal Tree Plaza) 561-622-0994 www.codandcapers.comMonday…Saturday 10am…6pm WE HAVE MOVED TO: FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALS FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALS s&2%3(,OCAL$OLPHIN #AUGHTOFF0ALM"EACH .............................. LB s8r,ARGE+EY7EST0INK3HRIMP CT3WEET4ASTY ............................. LB s&RESH!LASKAN(ALIBUT&ILLET -3##ERTIlED3USTAINABLE ............................ LB s-EDIUM3TONE#RAB#LAWS /NLYWEEKSLEFT .................................... LB 4HESEPRICESVALID!PRILTHTHROUGHTH#ANNOTBECOMBINEDWITHANYOTHEROFFER C AF now open during market hours classicalsouth”orida.orgClassical Music.Its In Our Nature. Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. Its in your nature.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B17 Le Posh Pup Doggie Easter Parade at PGA Commons 1. Asha Elias and adoptable dog 2. Annette Nayman and Napoleon 3. Brygida Trzaska and Snuggles 4. Laura Couza with Gianna and Leonardo 5. Neely Waring with Kanga and Roo 6. Sandee Rogers, Jeremy Rogers and Arianna Rogers 7. An adoptable dog 8. Nicole Crane and Luna 9. Terry St. Angelo and Aspen 1 2 3 6 5 4 7 9 8 KELLY LAMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY

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B18 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Palm Beach Dramaworks “Hot Night in Havana” gala at the Kravis Center 1 2 3 4 7 5 6 1 Lee Spiegelman, Linda Binder, Marilyn Meyerhoff and Sam Feldman 2 Ed Ricci and Judge Mary Lupo 3 Sue Ellen Beryl and William Hayes 4. Dr. Sidney A. Lesowitz and Peter Rogers 5. Honorary Chairs Ralph Guild and Calla Guild 6. Tomacito Cruz 7. Co-chairs Jan Willinger, Don Silpe and Linda Silpe 8. Brian McIver and Pamela McIver 9. Steven Caras and Susan Bloom10. Selma Sitrick and Joe Sitrick11. Ann Brown and Don Brown12. Diane Perlberg and Mark Perlberg13. Nancy Parker and Jay Parker14. Glenn Glazer and Tasha Glazer15. Tim Harris and Michael Bakst West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio and Charles Muoio 14 12 13 15 10 8 9 11

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2012 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT B19FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Sit back and savor: scott SIMMONS ssimmons@floridaweekly.com Rocco’s infuses tacos and other foodswith South of the Border flavor Rocco’s Tacos& Tequila Bar>> Hours: 11:30 a.m.-midnight SundayWednesday, 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m. Thursday-Saturday>> Reservations: Accepted >> Credit cards: Major cards accepted >> Price range: Moderate. Small plates, $3$13; salads, $12-$13; sandwiches, $10-$12; tacos, $2.95-$4.25; combinations, $14-$18; molcajetes, $22>> Beverages: Full bar, with more than 225 tequilas, fresh sangria, margaritas>> Seating: Booths and tables indoors, tables outside>> Specialties of the house: Tacos and guacamole>> Volume: It’s noisy when it’s busy. >> Parking: Free lot, plus valetRatings:Food: ++++ Service: +++++ Atmosphere: ++++ PGA Commons Central5090 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens623-0127 +++++ Superb ++++ Noteworthy +++ Good ++ Fair + Poor in the know O Its more Tex than Mex.But Rocco Mangel has brought a winner to Palm Beach Gardens with the fourth incarnation of his popular Roc-cos Tacos. And, so it would seem, half of the citys population would agree. The place is packed nightly, with revelers stopping in for margaritas made from some 225 varieties of tequila, san-gria and that oh-so-tasty guacamole that is created tableside. Outside, theres a large courtyard. A metal sculpture of a Day of the Dead figure dominates one area. Theres a bar and a fire pit near the edge of the space, at PGA Commons. Inside, the space is reminiscent of Roccos original restaurant on Clematis Street in downtown West Palm Beach. Punched-tin fixtures light the space, which has decorative tin on the ceilings and brick on the walls. Booths surround the perimeter and give way to a large bar and French doors that open onto the patio. Masks on the walls add a hint of mystery. But theres no mystery as to why Roccos continues to draw crowds. Its the food, pure and simple.Take the guacamole, for example.The servers make it tableside, coring and mashing the avocado, then mixing in diced tomato, cilantro and a dash of Roccos secret spice blend. Its perfect for dipping with Roccos chips. The translucent flakes of fried corn batter seem lighter than what we remember tossing back in border towns of Arizona and Mexico. Theyre topped with a tangy variety of seasonings, too „ we tasted cumin, a touch of cin-namon and cayenne. If you dont feel like guacamole, order the chips with tomato salsa ($3). Its so fresh it tastes like summer. Its the perfect setup for an entre. A woman from Mexico makes the tortillas by hand for Roccos. She told a fellow journalist much of the food there is very close to what she has dined on in Yucatn. That would not surprise us, even with the few north-of-the-border and Carib-bean touches on the menu. The enchiladas verdes ($13) have been a mainstay for us at Roccos on Clematis Street, and they did not disap-point in Palm Beach Gardens. The tender bits of pulled chicken were lightly seasoned and served in corn tortillas and topped with a slightly sweet tomatillo sauce, then baked with Chihuahua cheese. The mole also satisfies.The tangy adobo-marinated chicken in our enchiladas mole poblano ($14) offered a wonderful counterpoint to the thick, sweet mole. It was served with refried beans and spiced red rice „ bad for you, but oh, so good. And the flautas ($9 „ wonderful tortilla tubes filled with beef or chicken „ were loaded with spicy ground beef and queso fresco. The piquant avocado sauce made them perfect for dipping. The only disappointment was the Chimichanga Nationale ($12). It is a burrito that is stuffed then deep-fried, but the burrito seemed doughy and slightly underdone. The spicy chicken cried out for more spice, though the presentation was beautiful. That said, you cannot visit a place like Roccos and not try the tacos. The carne asada tacos ($4.25 each) were filled with tender skirt steak, and the pollo ($2.95 each) had plenty of pulled adobo chicken, greens and cheese. They were a real value, and perfect for enjoying as a meal or sampling as an appetizer with a pitcher of margaritas (which start at around $20). During visits four years ago to Roccos in downtown West Palm Beach, service ran the gamut from indifferent to excellent. Roccos staff has gotten itself in order in West Palm. Manage-ment appears to have found a solid wait staff in the Gardens. Over the course of four lunch visits, service has been uniformly attentive and caring. Knowledgeable servers made good menu suggestions and checked in regu-larly. By all accounts, staff has gotten a baptism by fire „ Roccos is a busy place at night. But lunch is more leisurely, and this is food and service to be savored. Q PHOTOS BY SCOTT SIMMONS / FLORIDA WEEKLY Rocco’s Tacos offers roomy booths for seating indoors, with brick on the walls and punched-tin fixtures for lighting. Masks add a touch of mystery to the space. Tacos are perfect for snacking or they can make a meal. Pictured are the skirt steak and chicken tacos. Eat, drink and help the American Lung Association at Legacy Place Food & Wine Experience. The tasting, set for 7-9 p.m. April 26 at Legacy Place in Palm Beach Gar-dens, will offer pairings of food from local restaurants with wines from Total Wine. Restaurants that have signed on so far range from Bagel Boyz to PGA Nation-als Ironwood Steak & Seafood. Also watch for fare from Russells Blue Water Grill and Cod & Capers, among others. Tickets are $50, or $75 for VIP tickets, which offer extended hours (6:30-9:30 p.m.) in an exclusive lounge with open bar from Grey Goose, special food sam-pling from The Capital Grille and goody bag. Phone: 659-7644 or visitlegacyplace foodandwine.com. Supper Club serves lunch: 51 Supper Club resumed its lunch menu. The restaurant, which lends a retro-swank tone to Downtown at the Gardens, will offer regular menu items and lunchtime-only specials, with soups, sandwiches and flat-breads from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Its at 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave., No. 3102, Palm Beach Gardens. Phone: 622-3500. On the Web at51supperclub.com. Gone from CityPlace: After months of rumors that it would close, McCor-mick & Schmicks has done just that. The restaurant, owned by Landrys Inc. of Houston, which had sparred with the owners of CityPlace to get a rent reduction, apparently closed down after business on Saturday. Signs have been removed and the windows have been covered. The location has been removed from the Landrys website. Its the second McCormick & Schmicks to close in Palm Beach County; the location at University Commons in Boca Raton closed last year. Landrys completed a tender offer for the McCormick & Schmicks chain in January, and the industry trade web-site Nations Restaurant News (www.nrn.com) reported that the company had closed McCor-mick & Schmicks locations in Birmingham, Ala.; Phoenix and Scottsdale, Ariz.; Burbank and Santa Ana Calif.; and Beachwood, Ohio. At the former location in West Palm Beach, a sign in the front window refers patrons to another Landrys restaurant, Charleys Crab in Palm Beach. It is the second vacant restaurant space fac-ing Okeechobee Boulevard at CityPlace; Kona Grille closed last year. Farm-to-table tasting: GULP Food and Libations, Bx Beer Depot and Bed-ners Farm invite you to DIG IN! from noon to 5 p.m. April 22 at Bedners Farm west of Boynton Beach. This will be Bedners Farms first farm-to-table event,Ž Coreen Gott-schalk, partner in GULP Food and Liba-tions, said in a statement. Come learn, eat, drink, support your local farmers/purveyors and listen to great music.Ž Guests will be given a wine glass at registration, and there will be tasting stations designed for savoring farm-fresh recipes, local vegetables and ingredients each paired with a hand-crafted beer, a fine wine or an infused vodka spirit. The food and alcohol are carefully paired to bring out the subtle nuances and range of flavors in each,Ž Ms. Gott-schalk said. Tickets: $55 before the event or $65 on the day of the event walk-up. Tickets available at Bedners Farm, 10066 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, or Bx Beer Depot, 2964 Second Ave. N., Lake Worth, or online at localwineevents.com. Q Drink up at Legacy event, or have lunch at supper club BY SCOTT SIMMONSssimmons@floridaweekly.com