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Florida weekly

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Florida weekly
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Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
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Florida Media Group, LLC
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English
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Periodicals -- Palm Beach Gardens (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Palm Beach (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach County -- Palm Beach

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Began with: Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 14-20, 2010)

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Copyright, Florida Media Group, LLC. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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on1038532305
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PAGE 1

THE RACE FOR YOUR NEXT GOVERNOR IS STILL ...ALEX SINK AND RICK SCOTT FIGHT TO DEFINE THEMSELVES AND FLORIDA’S FUTURE BY BILL CORNWELLbcornwell@” oridaweekly.com Claude Kirk remembers when Floridas Republican Party was little more than a collection of hoity-toity, cuff link-wearing fat cats who caucused at the coun-try club and cared more about the cocktail party than the Tea Party. Now 84 years old and living a contented and cantankerous retirement in West Palm Beach, Mr. Kirk remains a voluble observer of all things political in the Sunshine State, including this years race for governor. In 1966, he won election as Floridas first Republican gover-nor since Reconstruction. Abrasive, unpredictable and often con-founding, Mr. Kirk was notable primarily for his flamboyance and for a rock-ribbed conSEE GOVERNOR, A8 X N N N a a a c c re re re M M M er er er sh sh sh i i i fo fo fo o r r r go go g i i i Fl Fl Fl F id id id d i  ELEC TION ’10N E W S A N A LY S I SAds from both sides continue to saturate the media. Alex Sink, left, and Rick Scott battle for votes Nov. 2. Term limits, the city budget and potential cuts in services are among the issues for Palm Beach Gardens residents in the Nov. 2 special election for Seat 5 on the city council. None of the three candidates „ Gary Gomoll, Ken Menard and Marcie Tinsley „ has previously served in elected office, but each offers varied involvement on city concerns. The election is required to complete the three-year term of Jody Barnett, who left in July following her sudden resignation. For a full term, which pays $25,270 a year, the winner would face voters again in the citys regular March election. Retired banker Gomoll stressed that he has lived in Palm Beach Gardens for 27 years, is not tied to any political faction, developer or special interest group and is not taking contributions. I am funding this all by myself because I want to serve the community,Ž he said. Similarly, I think I have the most experience,Ž said computer business owner Menard, vice chairman of the budget oversight committee, a council advisory board. Ive been volunteering with the city of Palm Beach Gardens for the past two and a half years. This is my third budget that Ive done with the city. Ive been involved with the civilian police acad-emy with the city. Ive attended every city council meeting for the past two years, with the exception of when Jody Barnett accused the city man-ager of wrongdoing for the affair he was havingŽ with an employee. Tinsley emphasized her knowledge of ordinances and resolutions, which will help me understand many of the issues City budget main issue for Gardens council candidatesBY C.B. HANIF cbhanif@” oridaweekly.com SEE COUNCIL, A11 X C.B. HANIF A2 OPINION A4TRAVEL A14PETS A20 BUSINESS B1NETWORKING B6-9REAL ESTATE B10ARTS C1 FILM REVIEW C11EVENTS C6SOCIETY C13 & 14 CUISINE C15 PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT MYERS, FL PERMIT NO. 715 INSIDE www.FloridaWeekly.com Vol. I, No. 3 • FREE WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010POSTAL CUSTOMER DATED MATERIAL REQUESTED IN-HOME DELIVERY DATE: OCTOBER 28, 2010 Hot properties On Jupiter Island, it's not just the house — it's the lifestyle. B1 X MusingsFlorida Weekly's pirate muses on affairs of the heart. A15 XEpic dramaThe world premiere of "Cane" is Oct. 29 at the Kravis. C1 X Gardens Society See who's out and about in Palm Beach County. C13 &14 X GOMOLL MENARD TINSLEY

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA2 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 Our post 9/11 invasion of that sovereign nation? I opposed it. Strongly. Iraq had done nothing worse to us than tolerate the dictator we propped up for them, unlike the Iranians who had evicted the shah we gave them. Each case started another cycle for which our citizens „ and theirs „ are still paying. But in Iraq, we senselessly have sacrificed countless innocents „ in order to save them „ and arrogantly ordered our own dear servicemen and women into harms way. Like most good, brave sol-diers, they obeyed. So did Pat Tillman. Yet to say that he was different is the height of understate-ment. Tillman had been a charismatic 25-year-old professional football defensive back with a reputation as a bruising tackler. Upon completing his Arizona Cardinals contract with its half-million dollar salary, he passed up a nearly $4 million extension to join the Army Rangers, with his brother Kevin, and fight in the Middle East. Disillusioned upon seeing more clearly through the fog of war in Iraq, he could have opted out. A back-channel deal would have returned him to his football life, with fame and other trappings rivaling Elvis Presleys.Instead he chose to fulfill the remaining half of his three-year military commit-ment. Because thats who he was. By now most people know of Cpl. Pat Tillmans April 22, 2004 death after his redeployment to Afghanistan „ and of the subsequent cover-up of the friendly fire tragedy. And the official attempts to turn it all into a propaganda coup. It hit too close for me. From ballyhooed enlistment, to the admission of his death by fratricide, to the cover-up revelations, I had tried to tune it out. I didnt trust the hype and counter-hype from our news organizations that had helped cheerlead our nation into the immoral, economy wrecking, dehumanizing Iraq disaster. Thankfully, Tillmans family couldnt tune it out. So it was hard to miss his mothers painstaking push for the truth. Or his fathers outrage at the efforts to deceive not only them, but a whole nation. Thus it was in quest of a reliable picture that I reported to the PGA Cinemas the other day, for a screening of The Pat Tillman story.Ž I came away with admira-tion for this All-American family, and its elder son.This was a man who had requested to be seen like any other soldier; who despite being hounded for media interviews had refused to speak publicly about his choice to leave football. His military colleagues said they expected Tillman to be your general depiction of your jock, your meathead, not very intelligent.Ž One wondered, Why the hell is somebody leaving an NFL contract to come to this hellhole and deal with this kind of nonsense?ŽWhat they found was the real deal: an outgoing, family oriented human being, looking to do good. Who once was found reading the Book of Mormon, but said he wasnt religious, but was a respecter of all religions.Pat had that something,Ž said one of his Army buddies. He wasnt at all what I expect-ed to find. He didnt seem like this tough, knucklehead guy. He was interested in Emer-son and Chomsky, and he seemed very just, open. It didnt matter who you were, where you were from or what you were into. Pat always wanted to find what you were about. And he would ask a million questions.ŽThis was a man who married his high school sweetheart, Marie, who he first met in the same soccer league at age 4. Soon after he was killed, casualty assistance offi-cers tried to compel her to sign off on a funeral at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors „ which was not what his wishes were,Ž said the films nar-rator. During basic training, Pat had a pre-monition that if he died, he might be used as a public relations stunt. So hed smuggled a copy of his final wishes home to Marie.ŽI really had to kind of push back on them,Ž she said. They were just sort of proceeding as if this was the way things were going to happen, probably thinking that I was so grief-stricken that I would just go along with it.ŽThis all was rendered more ironic given the name on a campaign sign I had seen on the way to the movie, at the corner of PGA and RCA boulevards. And worse, another I saw on a van upon leaving, over on Military Trail, proclaiming A True American Hero.Ž The ads were for Allen West, GOP candidate for the Palm Beach-Broward congressional District 22. It is he you may have seen on incumbent Ron Kleins TV spots, saying: You must be well-informed and well-armed because this government that we have now is a tyrannical govern-ment.Ž The former Lt. Col. West avoided a court-martial, but was fined $5,000, fol-lowing a military hearing over abusing an Iraqi detainee. In a sign that one persons right-wing extremist is anothers war hero, Wests campaign is the better financed, evidenced by ƒ his ubiquitous signs. So rather than a Pat Tillman, we have one of the best heroes money can buy, proving that eternal vigilance still is part of the price of our liberty. Said Mary DannieŽ Tillman, mother of the er, otherŽ hero: I think they just thought if they spun the story and we found out, wed just keep it quiet, because we wouldnt want to diminish his hero-ism or anything like that. But, you know, nobody questions Pats heroics. He was always heroic. What they said happened didnt happen. They made up a story. And so, you have to set the record straight.Ž Again, this hits real close for me. But we cant let such abuses destroy our faith in authority, any more than those Bible-totin cross burning fellers should destroy a sincere Christians faith. The agnostic Pat Tillman lived as proof that our nations founders got it more right than many folks in other nations even dream. Q „ My gratitude for all the kindness from those of you who were readers of more than two decades of my editorials and columns for The Palm Beach Post. Im still rooting for my friends there. But for those who have wanted more of my offerings, welcome. Im going to love sharing on the issues and goings-on in our community, if not our galaxy. Thanks for joining me on this latest journey.COMMENTARY Tillman was real American hero c.b. 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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA4 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 PublisherMichelle Nogamnoga@floridaweekly.comManaging EditorBetty Wellsbwells@floridaweekly.com Reporters & ColumnistsC.B. HanifJan Norris Hap Erstein Dan Hudak Tim Norris Mary Jane Fine Scott Simmons Bradford Schmidt Artis Henderson Jeannette Showalter Bill CornwellPhotographersScott B. Smith Rachel Hickey Jose CasadoPresentation EditorEric Raddatz eraddatz@floridaweekly.comProduction ManagerKim Carmell kcarmell@floridaweekly.comGraphic DesignersJon Colvin Paul Heinrich Hope Jason Natalie Zellers Dave AndersonCirculation ManagerClara Edwards clara.edwards@floridaweekly.comCirculationSteve West Jessica Irwin Jim ArnoldAccount ExecutivesBarbara Shafer bshafer@floridaweekly.com Diana De Paola Nardy dnardy@floridaweekly.com Sarah Martin smartin@floridaweekly.comSales & Marketing Asst.Maureen GreggPublished by Florida Media Group LLCPason Gaddis pgaddis@floridaweekly.com Jeffrey Cull jcull@floridaweekly.com Jim Dickerson jdickerson@floridaweekly.com Street Address: FLORIDA WEEKLY 11380 Prosperity Farms Road, Suite 103 Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410 Phone 561.904.6470 • Fax: 561.904.6456 Subscriptions:Copyright: The contents of the Florida Weekly are copyright 2010 by Florida Media Group, LLC. No portion may be reproduced without the express written consent of Florida Media Group, LLC.Call 561.904.6470 or visit us on the web at www.floridaweekly.com and click on subscribe today.One-year mailed subscriptions are available for $29.95. OPINION The big banks that caused the collapse of the global finance market, and received tens of billions of dollars in taxpayer-funded bailouts, have like-ly been engaging in wholesale fraud against homeowners and the courts. But in a promising development this week, attorneys general from all 50 states announced a bipartisan joint investiga-tion into foreclosure fraud.Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, GMAC and other big mortgage lend-ers recently suspended most foreclosure proceedings, following revelations that thousands of their foreclosures were being conducted like foreclosure mills,Ž with tens of thousands of legal docu-ments signed by low-level staffers with little or no knowledge of what they were signing.Then the Obama administration signaled that it was not supporting a fore-closure moratorium. Not long after, Bank of America announced it was restarting its foreclosure operations. GMAC fol-lowed suit, and others will likely join in. So much for the voluntary moratorium. GMAC Mortgage engaged in mass document processing, dubbed robo-signing.Ž In several cases, GMAC Mort-gage filed documents with courts that were signed by Jeffrey Stephan. Mr. Stephan presided over a staff of 12 in suburban Philadelphia. Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray filed a law-suit against GMAC Mortgage, Stephan and the bank that owns GMAC, Ally Financial (itself a subsidiary of General Motors). According to one report, Mr. Stephan received 10,000 mortgage foreclosure documents to process in one month. Based on an eight-hour workday, he would have had to read, verify and sign, in the presence of a notary, about one document per minute. He admitted to signing documents without reading them or checking the facts about hom-eowners said to be in default. And Mr. Stephan was just one of many robo-signers.Ž Recall that GM received $51 billion in taxpayer bailouts; its subsidiary, GMAC, received $16.3 billion; and Ally Financial subsidiary GMAC Mortgage received $1.5 billion as an incentive payment for home loan modification.ŽSo you as a taxpayer may have bailed out a bank that is fraudulently foreclos-ing on you. What recourse do you have?Back in February 2009, Ohio Rep. Marcy Kaptur advised homeowners to force lenders to produce the note.Ž Peo-ple facing foreclosure were being taken to court while the bank alleging default couldnt even prove it owned the mort-gage. The mortgage document often had been lost in the tangled web of financial wheeling and dealing. Rep. Kaptur told me: Millions and millions of families are getting foreclosure notices. They dont have proper legal representation ... possession is nine-tenths of the law; therefore, stay in your property.Ž If you stay in your home, your mortgage lender may break in. Nancy Jaco-bini of Orange County, Fla., was inside her home when she heard an intruder. Thinking she was being burglarized, she called 911. Police determined the intrud-er was actually someone sent by JPMor-gan Chase to change the locks. And Ms. Jacobini wasnt even in foreclosure! Most banks that suspended foreclosure efforts only did so in 23 states „ because it is only in those 23 states that courts actually adjudicate over foreclosure proceedings. One judge who oversees foreclosures is New York State Supreme Court Justice Arthur Schack. He has made national headlines for rejecting dozens of foreclosure filings. He told Democracy Now!Ž news hour, My job is to do justice ... we run into numerous problems with assignments of mortgages, questionable affidavits of merit and just sloppy paperwork in gen-eral.Ž Bruce Marks runs NACA, a national nonprofit that helps people avoid fore-closure. He told me: When President Obama was running for president, he said one of the first things hell do is put a moratorium on foreclosures. He never did. He never backed bankruptcy reform so people could have the right to go in front of a bankruptcy judge.Ž He went on: And where is President Obama? When he says, Well, you know, we dont want to upset the market, what is good about a market when someone is foreclosed on and ... youve got a vacant building? We have to have a national moratorium to give ourselves a window of opportunity to restructure mortgages ... to look at homeowners as people, not as a commodity to make money.Ž According to RealtyTrac, banks repossessed 102,134 properties in September, a home roughly every 30 seconds. Every 30 seconds, banks „ many that received funds from the Bush administrations TARP, and that may be using fraudulent practices „ foreclose on an Ameri-can familys dream of home owner-ship. Meanwhile, GMAC Mortgage has reported increased profits for the first half of 2010. Q „ Amy Goodman is host of Democracy Now!,Ž a daily TV/radio news hour. She is author of Breaking the Sound Barrier,Ž recently released in paperback and now a New York Times best-seller.When banks are the robbersTexas already looms large in its own imagination. Its elevated self-image didnt need this: More than half of the net new jobs in the U.S. during the past 12 months were created in the Lone Star State. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 214,000 net new jobs were created in the United States from August 2009 to August 2010. Texas created 119,000 jobs during the same period. If every state in the country performed as well, wed have created about 1.5 million jobs nationally during the past year, and maybe stimu-lusŽ wouldnt be such a dirty word. What does Austin know that Washington doesnt? At its simplest: Dont overtax and spend, keep regulations to a minimum, avoid letting unions and trial lawyers run riot, and display an enormous neon sign saying, Open for Business.Ž At bottom, the struggle between national Republicans and Democrats is over whether the country will adopt a version of the Texas model, or of the Michigan, New York or California model. Will government allow the pri-vate sector to thrive, or stifle growth with its hyperactivity and favoritism for anti-business interests? Its not as though Texas has been exempt from the Great Recession. Its unemployment rate is 8.3 percent „ high, if beneath the national rate of 9.6. It faces a recession-driven shortfall of roughly $15 billion for its next two-year budget, a significant challenge to its low-tax ways. But it has weathered the storm better than the nation and its mammoth competitor to the West. During the past 12 months, California nearly canceled out Texas job creation all by itself, los-ing 112,000 net jobs. Its unemployment rate is above 12 percent. Texas is a model of governmental restraint. In 2008, state and local expen-ditures were 25.5 percent of GDP in California, 22.8 in the U.S., and 17.3 in Texas. Back in 1987, levels of spending were roughly similar in these places. The recessions of 1991 and 2001 spiked spend-ing everywhere, but each time Texas fought to bring it down to pre-recession levels. Less spending means fewer taxes. Texas doesnt have an income tax „ in contrast to Californias highly progres-sive income tax „ and it is among the 10 lowest tax states in the country. Its regu-latory burden is low across the board, and its a right-to-work state that enacted significant tort reform. It is true that Texas enjoys bountiful oil and natural gas reserves, but its atti-tude toward those resources is whats most important „ if you got em, use em.Ž If only the Obama administrations Department of the Interior agreed. In Texas in recent decades, the watchwords have been prudence and stabil-ity in the course of nurturing a pro-business environment, while California has undergone a self-immolation that President Barack Obama wants to replay nationally. Joel Kotkin writes of Cali-fornia in the City Journal, During the second half of the 20th century, the state shifted from an older progressiv-ism, which emphasized infrastructure investment and business growth, to a newer version, which views the private sector much the way the Huns viewed a city „ as something to be sacked and plundered.Ž With predictable results. For policymakers wanting to restart the American jobs machine, forget the Alamo. Keep in mind the Texas model. Q „ Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.The Texas model amy GOODMAN Special to Florida Weekly O rich LOWRY Special to Florida Weekly O GUEST OPINION

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PAGE 6

Into the woods, shadows are reaching, crossing, blending. The creature is in there. Moving. Or waiting. Near dusk in Frenchmans Forest, a quick left off Prosperity Farms north of PGA Boulevard, another world unfolds. It is not a realm of supermarkets or strip malls or schools or laptops or ear buds or the buzz and bleat and drone of traffic, driving to-and-from. This might be the world of the Brothers Grimm. The haunted woods. Their fairy tales, all too often, do not turn out well. It might also be, more immediately for those jaded by the repetition of the every day, a place to explore. A place to dis-cover. To be surprised. To step away. To change attitude by changing latitude. Shed the grid. Embrace the carapace. Near dusk, the last hard rays of sun are tangling and fading in the cabbage palms and saw palmetto and slash pine. Just beyond, in strand swamp, sunlight will linger last on the crowns of pond cypress, more than 100 feet high. Around the cypress knees, knobs on spreading roots that support the tree, are swamp things lurking in shadows? The creature... There is a lagoon, but it is not the Black one from the 50s hor-ror movie. Its a salton pool first dug by a developer, now husbanding mangrove along the shoreline, emceed by a pier and gazebo where visitors can stand and gaze. Maybe something is gazing back. Maybe several hundred somethings. Hey, over there! Whats tha...? Ah, a mourning dove. Is it mourning the last visitor? Frenchmans Forest Natural Area invites, first of all, attention. A fresh look. Eyes blurred by plasma screens and traf-fic streams must refocus. No signs here, beyond a warn-and-welcome display at the parking lot and a few trail markers. No directional arrows or turn lanes, no bright lights or loud music. No gas pedal. No brake. No gotta.Ž Getcha? Something might. The landscape on view is not a bland backdrop. Each tree, each flower, each tuft of scrub along a sinuous concrete path invites a closer view. Deer moss, cactus, gall berry, fetterbush and morn-ing glory start low, and the eye follows up to large leather ferns and the giant airplant and higher pines above. This is the real old Florida, the way the area looked before settlers brought in alien cityscapes and foreign plants. Alien? A cabbage palm, scorched, bent in a U from root to tomb, looks for all the ersatz world like the neck of another mysterious creature in a scene from The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (Warner Brothers, 1953), when the monster is first viewed from the deck of a ship it is about to swamp. That monster neck was rubber. The creature here lives and breathes, and it doesnt need 20,000 fathoms, or water; it burrows from a few feet to 10 under the sand, and then it plows as far as 50 feet lengthwise underground, creating, among other things, homes for some 250 kinds of cold-blooded slithery and feathery things (toads, frogs, snakes, burrowing owls) and warm furry ones (mice, fox, rabbits). It is, as a brochure and a sign out front say, a champion dig-ger.Ž Maybe it was Floridas first devel-oper. It is also endangered, on the international list. Its numbers are dwindling, thanks mostly to habitat lost to devel-opers of the human kind. Dont beasts, when cornered, fight to the death? Usu-ally, these days, its their own. Like many cinematic monsters, this one is ancient, latest of a line going back 60 million years. Burrowing into a broad, dry swale between the coastal sand ridges of the Atlantic and pine flat-wood ridges holding off the Loxahatchee Slough, this creature has outlasted eons of geologic upheaval, outlasted a hun-dred hurricanes, a thousand land devel-opment schemes, the coming of cattle ranches and dairy farms, canals and roadways, the arrival of rail and highway and housing and all-terrain vehicles, out-lasted litter-dumpers and poachers and oh-lets-take-one-homers. Survived by the skin of its beak. Fewer and fewer show up for viewing. There! No...thats a gray squirrel. Leaves rustle in a rhythmic line. Green snake? Eastern racer? Then, nearby, the rhythm changes, something four-footed. A Virginia possum? A southeastern five-lined skink? Not the creatures in ques-tion. Frenchmans Forest is here, newcomers can learn, because the public said yes and government acted. It had been the headwaters of a blackwater creek, former sawgrass and tidal marsh and hammock and then pasture and developments con-jured by farmer-developer John Maheu (who called his planned development Prosperity Farms) and then John D. Mac-Arthur, whose holdings were passed to the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. To buy just more than 149 acres from the foundation along Prosperity Farms road north of PGA Boulevard, between the Cabana Colony Canal and the French-mans Landing development, Palm Beach County dipped into funds from its Envi-ronmentally Sensitive Lands Bond Issue Referendum of 1991 (voters said yesŽ) and then partnered with the City of Palm Beach Gardens to apply for matching funds through the Florida Communi-ties Trusts Preservation 2000 Program. They were shepherded by the Nature Conservancy, who knew in detail how to do it. The price, in 1995, was $5,676,987. Creatures living in and Homo sapiens wandering into the forest, now, might consider it priceless. Around a curve, more cabbage palms show scorched trunks. Is this creature the fire-breathing kind? No, but fire helps save it. Palm Beach Countys Department of Environmental Resources Management conducts con-trolled burns, here and across a network of urban islands,Ž parcels of land in the countys 31 natural areas. Burn-offs give the creature, give many creatures, the cycle of soil nutrients, proper plant growth and seed spread that they need to survive. Pine needles crunch underfoot, and, finally....is it? Right there. There! Its moving! Not far off the path, over sand carpeted in pine needles, a boxy terrapin is haul-ing tail. Thats not typical turtle slo-mo! This one scrambles, its wide front feet, flipper-like, pulling its boxy back like a 4-by-4 hauling a double-wide. Gopherus polyphemus. The gopher tortoise. People used to pluck them up, take them home and stage races with them. Too often they forgot to bring them back. Some meant well and kept them, unhappily, as pets. Some tried them for food, or target practice. Some ran over them on roads. Seeing an intruder, this tortoise stops still. It might as well be sculpture. If humans dont take care, dont protect its surroundings, environmentalists warn, its whole species will be pottery. The visitor looks into the eyes of age, takes out a camera, flashes a flash. The gopher tortoise stares, from the archives. It might be young; it could be as old as 60 years. When the visitor moves a respectful distance, the tortoise heads off, due west amid underbrush, gone in 160 seconds. On the way out, other animals bid the human an enthused goodbye. They whine near the ear, sneak-attack the flesh. Do gopher tortoises eat mosqui-toes? Bats do, and maybe theyre here, too. But, please, one rarely seen animal at a time. The visitor starts up the loud engine and steers from the parking alcove onto Prosperity Farms Road, leaving behind the creature. Who is already home. Q www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA6 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 15 MINUTES Secluded forest bestows respite to humans, home to ancient creatureBY TIM NORRIS_________________________tnorris@” oridaweekly.com CALL TODAY (561) 630-6800MOST EXPERIENCED TEAM. GET RID OF VARICOSE VEINS WITH SOUTH FLORIDAS THOMAS ASHTON, M.D., FACPHBOARD CERTIFIED SUSAN COLLINS, RN Visit us at: www.ashtonveincenter.com TREATING ALL PHASES OF VEIN DISEASEWHICH CAN MANIFEST AS:s"5,').'6%).3 s,%'0!).!.$!#().' s,%'37%,,).' s3+).#(!.'%3 s,%'5,#%23 s.)'(4#2!-0 s.%52/0!4(9 s2%34,%33,%'39.$2/-% At Ashton Vein Center, we specialize in phlebology, the medical discipline devoted to the advanced, effective treatment for varicose and spider veins. In addition, no other team in all of South Florida is as experienced with these disorders … or their resolution … as Thomas Ashton, MD, FACPH, and Susan Collins, RN. In fact, together they have some of the highest volume of experience with state-of-the-art varicose vein procedures in the nation. They have also trained hundreds of other medical professionals in advanced treatment methods. And they are known for achieving consistently excellent outcomesƒ which is just what you expect from leaders in the “ eld.THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAVE THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR ANY SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENTS FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.Thomas Ashton, M.D., FACPh $IPLOMATEOFTHE!MERICAN"OARDOF0HLEBOLOGY (Board Certi“ ed) 'ARDENS#OSMETIC#ENTER 0'!"LVDs3UITE0ALM"EACH'ARDENS&, www.ashtonveincenter.com -EDICAL)NSURANCE-EDICARE!CCEPTED CALL FOR YOUR FREE CONSUL TATION & SCREENING A $200 V ALUE! TIM NORRIS / FLORIDA WEEKLYIt’s the creature from Frenchman’s Forest ... the endangered gopher tortoise.

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA8 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 servatism that would find a comfort-able home in the Tea Party of today. On matters of personal style, Mr. Kirk was the sort of politician who would have made Sarah Palin look like a shrinking violet. That he often referred to himself as one tree-shakin son of a bitchŽ gives you some idea of how he approached the fine art of gov-ernance. Mr. Kirks rollicking run as governor ended after just one term when he was defeated in 1970 by Reubin Askew. Mr. Kirk entered the General Election against Mr. Askew, weakened by his lackluster record and a contentious primary challenge mounted at great expense by Jack Eckerd, the drugstore magnate turned politician who died in 2004. Jack Eckerd was a precursor of a lot of things,Ž Mr. Kirk recalls with no trace of affection evident in his voice. He was convinced that if you had enough money you could buy the governors office. Some people think anythings for sale, I suppose.Ž (This evaluation of Mr. Eckerd conveniently sidesteps that Mr. Kirk him-self was a wealthy businessman when he ran successfully in 1966. But lets not quibble; fact-checking Mr. Kirks wonderfully baroque yarns is a job best left to someone in need of full-time employment.) Mr. Kirks recollection regarding Mr. Eckerds belief in the power of the almighty dollar in the political arena is both timely and instructive as the Gen-eral Election of 2010 draws nigh. While it is beyond dispute that the evolving Tea Party movement has seized the right wing of the Republican Party and introduced a grass-roots element that was missing in Mr. Kirks time, big money still rules in Floridas GOP, which seems a bit strange since roust-ing the elitesŽ is a mantra of many Tea Partiers. Exhibit A in this regard is Rick Scott, the Republican gubernatorial candi-date who already has spent some $55 million of his vast personal fortune (and hes not through writing checks to his campaign, either) in pursuit of a job that pays about $130,000 annu-ally. (Consider this: Should Mr. Scott prevail, he must serve roughly 105 four-year terms if he is to recoup his campaign investment.) Mr. Scott rose not only from obscurity but from downright infamy on the strength of support from the Tea Party faithful, who continually stress the importance of placing government in the hands of regular folk. Yet Mr. Scott is an interesting brand of regular folk. This is a man who amassed much of his wealth „ at least $300 million of it „ by so screwing up and embar-rassing Columbia/HCA „ the hospital company he founded and ran „ that the board of directors heaved baskets full of cash at him just to get him out the door with a minimum of fuss. After Mr. Scotts departure, Columbia/HCA was hit with a record $1.7 billion fine for Medicare and Medicaid fraud that took place under his leadership. Tea Party ardor and an unlimited bank account have propelled the high-rolling, take-no-prisoners health-care executive with a slippery past to a six-point lead in the latest Rasmussen Poll over Alex Sink, Floridas elected chief financial officer and the Democratic Partys steady if somnolent standard bearer. Other polls show a race far too close to call at this point. It has been a curious contest thus far, involving two candidates who were virtually anonymous just a few years back and whose rhetoric rarely rises above pedestrian. Both Mr. Scott and Ms. Sink have unleashed pointed, blatantly personal attacks on one another and have further fouled the airwaves with a seemingly unending string of extraordinarily vicious and petty television advertisements. The basic theme of Mr. Scotts ads is that Ms. Sink is a dangerous liberal who has mismanaged the states pen-sion fund and is joined at the hip polit-ically with President Obama. Ms. Sink, meanwhile, portrays Mr. Scott as a shady businessman who, if there were any justice at all in this world, should be working the rock pile at a federal prison for his role in the Columbia/HCA affair. The candidates have taken their opponents best shots and both remain standing, leaving one to wonder what it will take to decide this contest.Sink’s battle for recognitionALEX SINKS FIRST BID FOR elective office in 2006, when she ran for the post of CFO, an important but relatively obscure state cabinet post. Four years ago, most voters couldnt distinguish an Alex Sink from a Kohler faucet, and during her CFO campaign, she regularly received mail addressed to Mr. Sink.Ž Incredibly, one of her earliest challenges was to establish gender identity. Ms. Sink, a North Carolina native, had spent 26 years fashioning a career in banking. She had risen to become president of Florida operations for Bank of America. Her husband, Bill McBride, ran for governor in 2002, los-ing his bid to Jeb Bush. Despite her accomplishments, the 62-year-old Ms. Sink remained some-thing of a mystery to those outside of the inner circles of states Democratic Party. Prim and punctilious, Ms. Sink has shown in her debates with Mr. Scott that she is not afraid to mix it up with her opponent. But she is a far cry from the assertive Mama Griz-zliesŽ (women such as former Alaska Gov. Palin, Sharron Angle, the Repub-lican candidate for U.S. Senate in Nevada, and Michele Bachmann, the fiery Minnesota congresswoman) of the Republican Party who often out-machoŽ their male counterparts. When slapped with a tough question or a damning charge from her opponent, Ms. Sink often responds with a tight smile and a nervous giggle „ manner-isms that seem strangely at odds with the moment at hand. And while she displays an adequate command of the facts, she sometimes struggles to ver-balize her thoughts. The words Alex SinkŽ and charismaŽ rarely occupy the same sentence. The job of chief financial officer is a relatively new position, having been created in 2002, and Ms. Sink is only the second person to hold the post. As CFO, Ms. Sink is responsible for some 3,000 employees and an annual budget of $300 million in the Depart-ment of Financial Services. The CFOs job encompasses a dizzying array of responsibilities that range from serv-ing as the state fire marshal to manag-ing the states $24 billion in Treasury funds. In truth, few Floridians have much of a clue as to what the CFO actually does, and Ms. Sink has not done a particularly good job over the course of the campaign of explaining her work. Mr. Scott has seized on the electorates ignorance toward Ms. Sink, and this has allowed him to define her in the most unflattering of terms. One line of attack that has proved to be effective is Mr. Scotts repeated asser-tion that Ms. Sink has been inept in handling the states pension fund. The pension fund has gone from 7 percent overfunded to 13 percent underfunded (during Ms. Sinks ten-ure),Ž Mr. Scott said last week in a debate at Nova Southeastern Univer-sity in Broward County. Mr. Scott is correct; the pension fund has diminished under Ms. Sinks direction, but Ms. Sink responds that the funds losses were inevitable, given the economic meltdown that has gripped the entire United States. She also points out that she dismissed a bumbling minion who was involved in the administra-tion of the fund. In a normal election year, Alex Sink would be an incred-ibly strong candi-date,Ž says State Sen. Dave Aronberg, a Democrat from Greenacres. But, as Mr. Aronberg readily concedes, 2010 is not a normal election year. It is a midterm election, of course, which usually spells trouble for the party in power in Washington, which happens to be the Democrats this time around. Also, President Obamas stunning fall in popularity has further complicated the races of Dem-ocratic candidates „ especially those who trend moderate to liberal in their views, as is the case with Ms. Sink. The biggest challenges (Ms. Sink) faces really have little to do with her personally or what she stands on the issue,Ž Mr. Aronberg says. Her biggest challenge is fighting the headwind that all Democrats are running into this year.Ž Mr. Aronbergs observation is astute. Mr. Scott accuses Ms. Sink of using Obama mathŽ to justify the pension fund decline and never passes on a chance to hurl the dreaded word lib-eralŽ in her direction. For her part, Ms. Sink gamely seeks to take control of her own image as best she can. Im still that girl who grew up on that family farm (in North Carolina),Ž said Ms. Sink last week in her debate with Mr. Scott. Shes not the sort of person who pounds the desk or gets right in your face,Ž says Steven Hemping, chair of the Collier County Democratic Party. Shes very analytical, and shes very decisive.Ž Mr. Hemping has no illusions that Ms. Sink will carry Collier County, which not only is solidly Republican but also home to Mr. Scott, who lives in Naples. But he says Ms. Sink does enjoy surprising strength within the countys financial community. There is some bipartisan support for her among business leaders in Col-lier County who have known her for years,Ž he says. These people, many of whom are Republican, dealt with her during her banking days, and they know that she is a socially moderate, fiscally conservative person.Ž Mark Alan Siegel, the Democratic Party chairman in Palm Beach County, believes Ms. Sink has done very wellŽ as a candidate and has substantial sup-port across the board in his county. Of course, Im looking at this from a Palm Beach perspective,Ž says Mr. Siegel. The Republicans we have here tend to believe in things like science, so they are not a likely constituency for someone like Rick Scott. For the most part, our Republicans tend to be sensible.Ž While Mr. Scott is still viewed with suspicion by many Republicans who are not allied with far-right branch of the party (Jeb Bush, for example, grudgingly jumped on board), his cam-paign has staked out claims against Ms. Sink that resonate with those outside the Tea Party. Mr. Scott insists that Ms. Sinks proposals involving educating, health care and jobs would cost the state some $12 billion. Mr. Scott points out that Senate President-to-be Mike Haridopo-los, a Scott supporter, sent Ms. Sink a letter to this effect and that she chose not to respond. When Mr. Scott raised the Haridopolos letter during the most recent debate, Ms. Sink replied: Im going to GOVERNORFrom page 1FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVEClaude Kirk, Florida’s governor from 1966-1971, believes Rick Scott and the Tea Parties’ influ-ence are extensions of the same Republican party he helped put in power in Tallahassee. ARONBERG “Why in the hell are you trying to get me to say something bad about (Mr. Scott)? ... I’ve got nothing bad at all to say about him, so stop trying.” — Claude Kirk, former governor

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WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 NEWS A9 FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.comstand here and be Ronald Reagan „ there you go again. Youre just throw-ing mudƒ.Theres no number like that in any of my plans. Thats why we cant trust Rick Scott.Ž Mr. Scott further portrays Ms. Sink as a failed fiscal watchdogŽ who has become a part of the ruling class in the state capital. She clearly is a Tallahassee insider,Ž says Mr. Scott. Shes been there for years. Shes had her shot. And in her time there, the state has lost more than 800,000 jobsƒ Shes had a lot of issues.Ž Lets be honest,Ž says one Democratic official who speaks on the condi-tion of anonymity. This is not a good year to be running as a Democrat. It doesnt matter who you are, really, or what youre running for. Alex is smart and competent, but she isnt dynamic, and she hasnt done the greatest job defining who she is. Shes had trouble getting separation from the president and his policies and that hurts. Most of all, shes facing a guy with almost unlimited financial resources. Thats really tough. I mean, (Mr. Scott) spent millions and millions in the Republican primary alone. That is truly amazing. I dont believe (Ms. Sink) expected it to be this tough. Im not sure any of us did. We all thought Rick Scott would implode or self-destruct in some way. We couldnt believe a guy with a record like his could keep going. He hasnt imploded, and it looks like hes going to be there, going strong, right to the bitter end.ŽScott’s business acumen both blessing and curseLEE COUNTY SHERIFF MIKE SCOTT, a Republican, also believes that Democrats greatly underestimated the resources that Rick Scott could bring to bear. The sheriff is a fervent supporter of Mr. Scott but is not related to the gubernatorial can-didate. Spending $40 million or $50 mil-lion for Rick Scott is like me spending a thousand or so dollars,Ž he says. So, Im not sur-prised at all that his campaign has been so successful. But its not just money. Hes a very impressive person. I didnt know him prior to this (campaign), but Ive met and spent time with him and his wife. Hes a very good family man.Ž The sheriffs depiction of Mr. Scott as a charming and charismatic figure is both interesting and perplexing. Few candidates in recent memory have remained as aloof and removed from both the public and the news media as has Mr. Scott. His campaign has been conducted through an avalanche of television commercials. Mr. Scott dis-dains meetings with editorial boards and his personal appearances are rationed and scripted. His performance in debates reveals a man who seems uneasy when called upon to think on his feet, which is surprising given the fact that he once earned his keep as a lawyer at one of the largest firms in Dallas, Texas. Under even mild questioning, Mr. Scott often appears stunned, displaying the wide-eyed look of a man who has happened upon an intruder in his bed-room in the dead of the night. Mr. Scott, in his television ads, plays strongly on his image as a self-made man. And indeed, this image is rooted in fact. At first blush, the 57-year-old Mr. Scott seems to be the very embodiment of the American Dream. He grew up as part of a working-class family in North Kansas City, Mo. Mr. Scotts father was a trucker and his mother (who features prominently in some of his television ads) worked at JCPenney and took in ironing on the side. Following high school and a year at a community college, Mr. Scott enlisted in the Navy and served 29 months on active duty. After the Navy, Mr. Scott bought two doughnut shops, consoli-dated them, and pursued an under-graduate degree (which he earned in just 2 years) at the University of Mis-souri-Kansas City. Upon graduation, Mr. Scott sold his doughnut shop and married his high-school sweetheart. He then enrolled in the school at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. After law school, Mr. Scott was hired by the Johnson & Swanson, one of Dallas largest and most prestigious firms. Mr. Scott specialized in health care and energy issues, and he quickly gained notice as one of the firms brightest minds. By his early 30s, Mr. Scott was a star in Texas legal circles. Mr. Scott might have remained a highly successful but relatively obscure Texas lawyer had he not crossed paths with Richard Rainwater. Mr. Rainwater was a billionaire from Fort Worth who boasted an outsized reputation as a swashbuckling corpo-rate raider. Mr. Rainwater took note of Mr. Scotts talents and approached him about a business venture, which turned out to be the 1987 attempt to take over of the Hospital Corp. of America. HCA rejected the offer put forth by Mr. Scott and Mr. Rainwater, but the pair went on to buy three dilapidated hospitals in El Paso. Mr. Scott used his lifes savings „ $125,000 „ to help finance the first hospitals. These El Paso holdings eventually grew into the Columbia Healthcare Corp. Columbia, under Mr. Scotts aggressive leader-ship, became a giant in the health-care field. In 1993, Mr. Scott merged Columbia with HCA, and Columbia/HCA became the countrys largest hospital chain. At one point, Columbia/HCA, which was headquartered in Kentucky, was Floridas largest private employer „ surpassing even Disney. In less than five years, Mr. Scotts company includ-ed 341 hospitals nationwide. Mr. Scott became known as an aggressive cutter of costs at his hospitals, which gener-ally operated squarely in the black. By 1995, Rick Scotts initial investment of $125,000 was worth $250 million. Columbia/HCA also became the target of federal investigations involving Medicare and Medicaid fraud during its period of rapid growth. In 1997, just months before the federal investigations were revealed, Mr. Scott was eased out of his job by the companys board of directors. Details of the parting are murky, but it is reported that Mr. Scott left with some $10 million in cash and $300 million in stock. The investigations continued, despite Mr. Scotts departure, and eventually resulted in fines totaling $1.7 billion, which is a record that still stands. The fines were paid in 2000 and 2003 „ years after Mr. Scott had stepped down „ but it was made clear that the irregularities occurred while he ran the show. It was the most mas-sive Medicare and Medicaid fraud in history. Mr. Scott laid low until last year, when he unexpectedly appeared in a series of television ads as a spokesman for a nonprofit group called Conserva-tives for Patients Rights. Mr. Scott had founded CPR and funded the outfit with $5 million paid out of his own pocket. He used the commercials as a forum to criticize President Obamas health-care proposals. Mr. Scott identi-fied himself as a former health-care executive, but there was no mention made of Medicare fraud or fines total-ing $1.7 billion. In hindsight, it seems clear that Mr. Scott was laying the groundwork for his gubernatorial bid. If nothing else, the CPR campaign allowed Mr. Scott to begin crafting the image that he would carry into this years campaign. In essence, this early exposure helped soften the later rev-elations regarding his business activi-ties. Bill McCollum, Floridas attorney general and Mr. Scotts vanquished opponent in the Republican primary, went after Mr. Scott for his role in the scandal. Ms. Sink has echoed and amplified Mr. McCollums attacks over the course of her campaign. Ms. Sink has said that if Scott proposes the same accountability mea-sures for Florida government that he used at Columbia/HCA, well have to back up the paddy wagon at the front door.Ž Ms. Sink notes that Mr. Scott invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination 75 times during a lawsuit involving Columbia/HCA. She also has called upon him to release a deposition given just days before he entered the governors race involving Solantic Corp., the health-clinic company he founded in 2001. According to its website, Solantic operates some 30 urgent-care facilities across Florida and has served more than 1.5 million patients. Mr. Scott says he accepts responsibility for Columbia/HCAs problems. He says he did not pay close enough attention to some of the companys business operations because he was fixated on ensuring that patients received the best possible care at his hospitals. In essence, Mr. Scott says that any mistakes he made were those of the heart, not the head. Focusing on patient care left him insufficient time to oversee the nuts and bolts of his complex corporation, he says. Mr. Scotts self-characterization does not exactly square with how he was perceived during his high-flying days as a health-care mogul. His reputation was that of a hard-eyed, bottom line-obsessed executive who kept costs at a minimum. He was seen as the Gordon (greed is goodŽ) Gekko of the hospital industry. In 1995, the Healthcare Forum JournalŽ described Mr. Scott as an icon of greed and heartlessness, of all thats wrong with American health care.Ž ForbesŽ magazine once observed that Mr. Scott bought hospitals by the bucketful and promised to squeeze blood from each one.Ž I take responsibility, and I learned from it,Ž Mr. Scott says now of his hos-pital career. He also pledges that he will not repeat any earlier mistakes if he is elected. In businessƒ if something goes wrong, you focus on it,Ž Mr. Scott says. You get better, and thats what Ive done.Ž Mr. Scott also notes that he never has faced a criminal charge as a result of his actions, a circumstance that flummoxes his detractors. The Sink campaign seems frustrated by its inability to turn Mr. Scotts past business dealings into the overriding theme of this contest. Republicans say this inability is a clear indication that Ms. Sink and other Democrats have sorely misjudged the temper of the times. Voters are very frosted by the direction of this country under the Democrats,Ž says Gary A. Lee, chair-man of the Lee County Republican Executive Committee. Any concerns that voters might have (concerning Mr. Scotts business career) are trumped by their concern over where this coun-try is headed.Ž Mr. Lee, who served as a congressman from upstate New York before moving to Florida, says that Mr. Scotts financial resources allow the candidate to hammer homeŽ his message of lim-ited government, almost to the exclu-sion of all else. Mr. Scott pledges to reduce property taxes by 19 percent, but he has yet to say how this could be accomplished without a significant reduction in financial support for public education. He also proposes an Arizona-styleŽ immigration law for the state and wants to institute drug testing for wel-fare recipients. Mr. Siegel, the Palm Beach Democratic chairman, says he believes that the Tea Party message „ which Mr. Scott embraces fully „ is too radical to prevail in Florida. In the end, he predicts, the states voters will have second thoughts about electing some-one so closely allied with the far right wing of the Republican Party. Lets face it,Ž Mr. Siegel says, these (Tea Party supporters) are borderline crazy, and it will be hard to elect a person who appeals to that segment.Ž Mr. Siegel envisions numbers of sensible RepublicansŽ abandoning their party to cast their votes for Ms. Sink on Nov. 2. Should that occur, Claude Kirk will be taken by surprise. Mr. Kirk sees the Tea Party not as a radical offshoot of the Republican Party, but rather as a natural extension of the movement he helped get off the ground more than 45 years ago. The Republican Party has always stood for conservative ideals,Ž he says. That hasnt changed in all these years. You can call it the Tea Party or what-ever you want. Its still the same.Ž Mr. Kirk speaks in broad generalities about the upcoming election and the candidates involved. He bristles when asked if he sees parallels between Mr. Scott and his old political nemesis, Jack Eckerd. Both possessed extreme wealth, it is pointed out, and both sought to use that wealth to become governor. Why in the hell are you trying to get me to say something bad about (Mr. Scott)?Ž he asks. Ive got nothing bad at all to say about him, so stop try-ing. Dont play games with me. What is it with you?Ž Ah, yes, we are seeing tantalizing glimpses of the Claude Kirk of old „ the man once called the Salvador Dali of Florida politicsŽ because his public pronouncements often were the ver-bal approximations of (Dalis) droop-ing, surreal watches.Ž Growing testier by the moment, Mr. Kirk lets it be known that he has no critical comments to voice about any Republican and that questions about the Tea Party are starting to wear thin. He thinks all of the GOPs candidates are just fine, the Tea Partys just fine and Floridas Republican Party, which he, of course, was instrumental in building, is really, really fine. Now, how many more of these damn-fool questions do you have?Ž he wants to know. Told there are several more queries in the offing, Mr. Kirk goes silent for a second and then hangs up the tele-phone without a word. No goodbye. No nothing. Just a click from the other end of the line. Apparently Mr. Kirk has grown tired of contemplating the 2010 Florida gubernatorial contest. Understandable. The campaign has become a dismal, dispiriting affair filled with a sound and a fury that signify very little. It feels as if it has dragged on for years, not mere months. Enough is enough, Mr. Kirk seems to be saying, and in that regard, the old tree-shakin son of a bitchŽ from West Palm is right on. Q SHERIFF MIKE SCOTT

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA10 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 Some of the amendments on Novembers ballot have been as contentious this election cycle as the races for office. Nevertheless, the amendments are often cited as a vexing part of the ballot for vot-ers. Here, Florida Weekly presents each amendment with its title as it will read on the ballot, and a brief explanation of what your vote will mean. NO. 1 : CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE VI, SECTION 7 Repeal of Public Campaign Financing Requirement YES: Eliminates public financing of campaigns. NO: Preserves Floridas system of campaign finance. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Currently, the state of Florida spends millions of dollars on helping to finance political campaigns. During 2006, for instance, the state paid out $11 million to help subsidize campaigns for various political offices. Supporters of the measure say the tax money should be used for other priorities. Opponents of the measure say the amendment favors corporate interests. They maintain that public financing is necessary to allow can-didates who may not have as much access to money, a fair shot at public office. NO. 2CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE VII, SECTION 3ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31 Homestead Ad Valorem Tax Credit For Deployed Military Personnel YES: Gives deployed military a break on property taxes. NO: No tax break given. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: There is little to no organized opposition to this mea-sure. The amount of the tax break will depend on how many days the member of the military spends deployed. NO. 4CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE II, SECTION 7 Referenda Required For Adoption And Amendment Of Local Government Comprehensive Land Use Plans YES: Gives the public a vote on land use changes within their city or municipalities. NO: Keeps the system the way it is. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Builders and developers often have to ask city coun-cils or county commissions for Land use changes in order to construct their projects. Currently, the system requires testimony before public boards and usually, public votes by the local governing body. The amendment would create another layer of oversight, where the measure would have to be put to a public vote. Sup-porters call the amendment the Home-town Democracy Act and argue that it gives regular citizens a seat at the table regarding land issues. Opponents argue that it would increase the cost of development considerably and cripple an industry that is already struggling. The amendment would undoubtedly cost local municipalities more money. NO. 5CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE III, SECTION 21 Standards For Legislature To Follow In Legislative Redistricting YES: Aims to create voting districts that dont favor any party. NO: Keeps districting as it is. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The amendment intends to do away with gerryman-dering the states legislative districts. Every 10 years, legislators redraw the boundary lines for voting districts. Gerrymandering is when the party in power draws those lines to favor its candidates. The result is often sprawling districts that can stretch across the state. The new district lines would use existing political and geographical boundaries that are supposed to be party-neutral. Lead-ers of the Florida Legislature oppose the measure, saying that the new districts will result in court battles. Another argument against it is that the new districts could water-down minority representation. NO. 6CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE III, SECTION 20 Standards For Legislature To Follow In Congressional Redistricting YES: Aims to create voting districts that dont favor any party NO: Keeps districting as it is. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The same as Amendment 5, except this pertains to U.S. Congressional districts. NO. 8CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTARTICLE IX, SECTION 1ARTICLE XII, SECTION 31 Revision Of The Class Size Requirements For Public Schools YES: Would ease the class-size requirements for public schools. NO: Would keep class-size requirements approved by voters in 2002. WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Voters approved a classsize amendment in 2002 that set manda-tory caps on the number of students in classrooms. K through three, for exam-ple, were supposed to have no more than 18 students per classroom. The changes were to take effect this school year, but supporters of this amendment say the state and school districts cant afford the billions of dollars it would take to follow the law. The amendment would allow some leeway in how the rules are applied, letting some classes have a few more students above the mandated caps. The FEA, the largest teachers union in the state, opposes the measure. Q „ Compiled by Osvaldo Padilla opadilla@floridaweekly.comPALM BEACH COUNTY QREQUIRING COUNTY CODE OF ETHICS, INDEPENDENT ETHICS COMMIS-SION AND INDEPENDENT INSPECTOR GENERALShall the Palm Beach County Charter be amended to require the Board of County Commissioners to establish by ordinances applicable to Palm Beach County and all municipalities approv-ing this amendment: a Code of Ethics, an independent Commission on Ethics funded by the County Commission, and an independent Inspector General funded by the County Commission and all other governmental entities subject to the authority of the Inspector General?SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PALM BEACH COUNTY QREFERENDUM TO CONTINUE AN AD VALOREM LEVY FOR SCHOOL OPERA-TIONAL NEEDSShall the School Board of Palm Beach County have the authority to continue to levy 0.25 mills of ad valorem mill-age dedicated for school operational needs to fund teachers, as well as arts, music, physical education, career and academic programs for the fiscal years beginning July 1, 2011, and ending June 30, 2015, with oversight by an indepen-dent finance committee of citizens and experts?CITY OF RIVIERA BEACH QAMENDMENT TO CITY MARINA PROPERTY Shall The City Of Riviera Beach Charter Be Amended To Provide That The Use Of Dedicated Submerged Public Lands At The City Marina Remain Limited To Municipal Park And Recreational Purposes According To Florida Dedication No. 24438-A; (2725) the Municipal Marina Proper-ties, Newcomb Hall, Bicentennial Park, And Spanish Court Shall Be Owned, Managed, And Operated Solely By The City Of Riviera Beach; The Municipal Marina Properties Shall Not Permit Industrial Commercial Boat Repair Operations?VILLAGE OF WELLINGTONQREFERENDUM QUESTION NO. 1: WELLINGTON CHARTER AMEND-MENT TERM OF OFFICE FOR MAYOR Shall Wellingtons Municipal Charter be amended to provide that the mayor shall be elected to a four year term thus making the mayors term equal in length to that of the other council members and providing the four year term would begin with the election of the mayor during the 2012 municipal elections?QREFERENDUM QUESTION NO. 2: WELLINGTON CHARTER AMENDMENT CLARIFICATION OF TERM LIMIT PROVISIONSShall Wellingtons Municipal Charter be amended to clarify that the prohi-bition against serving more than two consecutive terms of office should not include time in office spent as a result of a mayor or a councilmember having either been appointed to or elected to a partial term to fill a vacancy that existed in the office of mayor or councilmem-ber?QREFERENDUM QUESTION NO. 3: WELLINGTON CHARTER AMENDMENT ELIMINATION OF RUNOFF ELEC-TIONSShall Wellingtons Charter be amended to provide that runoff elections shall not be necessary if the candidate with the highest number of votes for any office during the first election gets 35% or more of the votes cast for that office?QREFERENDUM QUESTION NO. 4: WELLINGTON CHARTER AMENDMENT FILLING VACANCY IN MAYOR’S OFFICEShall Wellingtons Municipal Charter be amended to provide that in the event of a vacancy in the office of mayor, the vice mayor may serve as the mayor for up to 180 days and that if there is more than 180 days remaining in the term of the mayor, then a special election shall be held in 90 to 180 days to fill such a vacancy?TOWN OF HIGHLAND BEACHShall the Town of Highland Beach, Florida, purchase an aerial fire truck at a cost which is in excess of the Charter limit of $350,000.00 and which is esti-mated to be $810,000.00?TOWN OF JUNO BEACHQQUESTION 1:An amendment to article III of the town charter providing a residency requirement for town council candi-dates. This amendment would require candidates for town council to be continu-ous residents of the town for at least one year immediately preceding the filing of a notice of candidacy, require candidates to submit an affidavit that they meet the residency requirement at the time of qualification for office; and prescribe the requirements for establishing residency. QQUESTION 2:An amendment to article III of the town charter governing the terms of council members. This amendment would extend the term of office for council members from two to three years commencing with the 2011 general election and stag-ger the terms to ensure that at least one seat on the council expires each year.Voting day questions? Here are all of the amendments made easy A look at Palm Beach County, local referenda

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 NEWS A11 because of my land planning back-ground. Im running for the city coun-cil to bring new ideas and new energy to the city leadership.Ž In some cases voters may carry to the polls sour memories of the 4-1 votes that had Barnett at odds with her fellow council members. Or Ms. Barnetts call a year ago for City Manager Ron Ferris to resign, alleg-ing he was having an affair with a city growth management employee. The departments administrator, Kara Irwin, resigned in April. She and Fer-ris married in July. Part of the fallout is the proposed city charter amendment to prohibit romantic relationships between city supervisors and employees. Other-wise the candidates say they are look-ing ahead and promise to be more effective than Ms. Barnett. Jody Barnett could not or would not work with the other council members,Ž said Mr. Gomoll. That didnt accomplish anything. I want to accomplish something.Ž As for Mr. Ferris: Ive never worked with him,Ž said Mr. Gomoll. Maybe if I get on the council and I didnt like what he was doing, then Id say fire him. But I cant say I would fire Ron Ferris. He may be doing a great job. I dont know. My issues are the bud-get, the cost of public safety and the pensions. Thats what Im focused on. And in order to do anything about it I have work with the existing council.Ž Mr. Ferris has done very, very well financially for the city,Ž said Mr. Menard. On the other hand the relationship with the subordinate of his showed me he had used very, very poor judgment. So I think theres good points with Ron, but theres also bad points with Ron. And it really is up to the city council to be policing that.Ž Regarding Ms. Barnett, Some ideas Jody had were valid,Ž said Mr. Menard. However there are certain ways of getting your point across without offending somebody else. Once you go over the boundary, youre going to have a long way to earn those peoples trust back again. Youve go to work with the existing city council members. Thats just the way it is. Like with my small business here, you have to learn how to com-municate with people. You dont want to be bullied around, and you dont want to be stamped as being with the good old boys club.Ž Its the approach you take when you work with people,Ž said Ms. Tin-sley. I feel with my business back-ground I am able to work with many people.Ž Mr. Ferris, she added, has done a great job for the city, including finding a lot of creative ways to cut costs. We can do even better. The city needs be run more like a business.Ž The elections big-ticket item is the budget and proposed service cuts. Looming large in that context are the business spinoffs hoped from an economic engine based in a long planned north county biotech hub, to include the existing Scripps Florida and Max Planck institutes, and „ approved by the council in April „ the square-mile Briger property between Donald Ross and Hood roads off of I-95. Like a business,Ž said Ms. Tinsley, I think we have to be efficient and look for tax savings while maintaining our quality of life for our residents.Ž She supports more incentives to keep businesses here in Palm Beach Gardens, and I also think that we need to create incentives to bring new businesses to Palm Beach Gardens. I think we have the building blocks to achieve that with Max Planck, Scripps and the Briger property. Now is the time to take the approvals that have already been put in place, and bring the bioscience to our north end of the county.Ž Said Mr. Gomoll: I think its vital to broaden the tax base to bring that kind of business in to the community. There are not that many Scripps or Max Plancks or other kind of busi-nesses out there. So if you can get that, get them. I would be very much in favor. I would give incentives and if they can create enough jobs, I would ease the planning process and zoning and permits, stand on my head and spit wooden nickels if I could.Ž As the new spinoffs start coming in, cautioned Mr. Menard, Were really going to have take a good look at how thats going to change Palm Beach Gardens, and not allow too many strange things to go up.Ž He cited some decisions done in the past that make me think the idea has been the biggest bang for buck. We have Downtown at the Gardens, which is a horrible, horrible layout for a mall. And its right alongside of the big Gardens Mall.Ž He added nearby Legacy Place as another example of the complicated layouts to navigate through that are a direct fault of our city council that exists right now.Ž Said Mr. Gomoll: I look at the budget, I see 60 percent of that budget is public safety. That was 40-some percent a few years back, and by 2015 it will be 72 percent. That has to be addressed. Its not an easy thing to do. Youre not going to fire the police or the fire (fighters). But there are effi-ciencies that can be done.Ž Mr. Gomoll said he wants to focus his 37 years in banking on his big-gest concern,Ž the pensions for city, fire and police employees. Theyre too expensive. The plans as they exist right now cannot be sustained.Ž Mr. Menard said, A reason why the pension fund is around 58 per-cent funded right now, is one of all, because the investments that are made on this pool of money havent been as good as they have in the past. But we also had the fire department receive a huge increase several years ago in their pay, and part of your sal-ary goes into your pension. It kind of put the fund behind a little bit.Ž Menard and Tinsley also emphasized garnering tax income by annex-ing county pockets. I had done a study about two years ago on the budget oversight com-mittee,Ž said Menard, that just on Northlake Boulevard we had four major pockets. And if we took those four pockets, it would have increased another $1.5 million into our budget. That would have been a huge savings in just this past millage rate that was raised: They wanted to do 8.2, and ended up with a 6.5 percent increase.Ž He said his favorite example is Keating Drive which is off Northlake Boulevard. You head up north on Keating Drive, and youre in the coun-ty. But as you continue driving down that road, all of a sudden now youre in the city again. Theres no rhyme or reason for some of these pockets. But there are whole areas throughout the city that are like this. If we were to just square off our borders, we would have plenty of money. But we have to be careful about these annexations,Ž he added. Some of them dont even have city water, so the city might have to pay an inordinate amount to get them up to standard.Ž All three candidates support some form of council term limits. Q COUNCILFrom page 1 GARY GOMOLLQPERSONAL: 65; single; B.A., business, Western Michigan University; law degree, University of Detroit; MBA, estate planning, University of Miami; lives in Ironwood.QPROFESSIONAL: Attorney; retired estate administrator, JP Morgan Chase bank; service on various charitable boards.Q POLITICAL BACKGROUND: Unsuccessfully ran for Michigan state senate in 1978.QPOSITION ON ISSUES: Wants to focus on cost of public safety and pensions, supports reductions in re and police budgets, a proposed health clinic for city employees, charter amendment to prohibit romances between city supervisors and employees, term limits for council members.QQUOTE: "My community involvement, my education, the fact that I am a military veteran, all these things I think add up to somebody who can be trusted." KEN MENARDQ PERSONAL: 44; single; attended Manchester Community College, Connecticut; lives in Garden Oaks.Q PROFESSIONAL: Owner, Easy Computing computer repair and software business.QPOLITICAL BACKGROUND: Vice chair, city budget review committee; rst run for elected of ce.QPOSITION ON ISSUES: Supports incentives to encourage small businesses, greater administrative ef ciencies rather than cuts in services, a proposed health clinic for city employees, charter amendment to prohibit romances between city supervisors and employees, annexing county pockets and term limits for council members.QQUOTE: "I'll always remember that I am a public servant. I'm elected by the voters, and the special interest groups just don't have any ties on me. The voters elect me to do a job. I answer to them, I don't answer to anybody else." MARCIE TINSLEYQPERSONAL: 41; married; three children; Associate degree in arts, Palm Beach State College; attended FAU; lives in EvergreeneQPROFESSIONAL: Property manager for 500 Clearlake Suites in West Palm Beach.QPOLITICAL BACKGROUND: First run for elected of ce.QPOSITION ON ISSUES: Supports a comprehensive solution of three objectives: jobs, economic recovery and education. Wants to partner businesses and schools to create innovative and state-of-the-art programs. Supports annexing county pockets, term limits and the proposed health clinic for city employees.QQUOTE: "The biggest investment of my life is in Palm Beach Gardens, and for that reason I have served my community my entire life by volunteer work. I have the experience, the knowledge, I'm dedicated and I have the commitment. I want to do what's best for the residents, which I am one of them." O in the know Packages & special room rates available: (888) 529-6588 October 29 „ November 7, 2010 GOMOLL MENARD TINSLEY

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Jane (not her real name) came into my office last week in tears, furious and hurt after an explosive argument with her married daughter Emily. I have always been there for Emily. I drop everything to babysit for her and loan her money when I cant afford it. In return, shes always hurting me and saying vicious things that cut me to the core. She usually calls me a few days later to tell me that shes sorry and how much she loves me, but Im still reeling from the assault of her words. I am so disappointed by the choices that shes made in her life. I know that I can be critical and get upset with her when she doesnt listen to me, but its only because I care so much. Why do we hurt each other, over and over even though we dont want to?Ž I must emphasize that Jane is a sophisticated, well-educated woman, who prid-ed herself on being able to balance a full-time career, a long-term marriage and to raise her two children to adulthood. She will confide with a rueful grin that perhaps her biggest parenting fault is that too often, she jumped in to solve Emilys problems, without giving her the opportunity to struggle through dilemmas and come up with her own answers. From the time Emily was a little girl, the two locked horns. Emily was often needy and dependent, counting on her mother to rescue her when the going got tough. As she got older, Emily began to resent depending on her mother and blamed her for many of her problems. Jane would find herself offering unsolicited advice, but couldnt stop herself because she had come to believe that Emily would screw up, if she was left to her own devices. Emily sensed that her mother had little confidence in her abili-ties, and began to doubt herself as well. Intuitively, we all know that when we are threatened and insecure in our most important relationships, we often lose our ability to think clearly and to approach our loved ones in a way that will be listened to and heard. When we are hurting, most of us show a defensive, self-protective side that often only makes things worse. These two women pay a huge personal price when they remain in a relationship that is so demoralizing. Although it will not be easy to reconfigure the entrenched way that they relate to each other, if both are committed they can take steps to make significant changes. Looking underneath their ugly interactions might help them to understand what fuels the conflict. Research has shown that humans are wired to crave relationships that offer comfort and security; a place where they can feel good about themselves. And when important relationships become stressed and uncertain, people have a tendency to either freeze up or to become angry and critical. Invariably, this can lead to a vicious, escalating cycle of accusation and hurt, leaving the parties frustrated and depleted. This premise can become a valuable roadmap to help Jane and Emily reach out to each other in a more caring way. If Jane can curb her caustic, critical tongue, and withhold her urge to offer advice, while at the same time offering positive encouragement, she might be instrumen-tal in helping her daughter gain more self-assurance. It will be a challenge for Emily to resist the urge to call her mother when she is stuck, but it will become easier with time. Understanding that her self-esteem takes a beating each time she lashes out at her mother in a volatile way can be the impe-tus for her to show restraint. Q „ Linda Lipshutz, M.S., ACSW is a psychotherapist serving individuals, couples and families. A Palm Beach Gardens resident, she holds degrees from Cornell and Columbia. She can be reached at her Gardens office at 561 630 2827, and online at www.palmbeachfamilytherapy.com. www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA12 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 Experience the #1 Teeth Whitening System Complete Your Look 7EDDINGs0ROMs%VERYDAY Come See Our New Showrooms7HITENING4OOTHPASTE s7HITENING3TRIPS s7HITENING-OUTHWASHSAFE, EFFECTIVE LITTLE OR NO SENSITIVITY.Summit White Smiles 4EETH7HITENING4HAT7ORKS TEETH WHITENING3HADES,IGHTERIN/NLY-IN $79 Serving Northern Palm Beach County!.ORTHLAKE"OULEVARD 561-729-0630 SUMMITWHITESMILESCOM2EG #OUPON%XPIRESrrWalk-Ins Welcome HEALTHY LIVINGGardens hospital receives excellence designationTenet Healthcare Corporation has announced that 43 of its 49 hospitals „ including Palm Beach Medical Center „ received 205 quality designations from CIGNA, including 71 Center of Excel-lence designations. CIGNA uses its excellence designations to recognize hospitals for meeting CIGNA Health-Cares standards for quality and cost efficien-cy for procedures and diagnosis. In addition, CIGNA has developed quality designations to indicate superior patient outcomes based on treatment effectiveness for 29 different surgical procedures and medical conditions. The patient outcomes data use hospitals Cen-ters for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare measures, Leapfrog Patient Safety Measures, mortality and complication rates in addition to other evidence-based protocol metrics. Tenet hospitals receiving quality and COE designations for 2010 are Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center; Good Samaritan Medical Center, West Palm Beach; St. Marys Medical Center, West Palm Beach; and West Boca Medical Center, Boca Raton. Q Survey: Younger men fail to see doctors for check-ups, screenings linda LIPSHUTZ O llipshutz@floridaweekly.comWhy do the people we love have the power to hurt us?Open up and say ahŽ might not be words heard often by men, particu-larly those younger than 30. Accord-ing to a new mens health survey by the American Osteopathic Asso-ciation (AOA), less than 63% of men ages 18 to 29 say they have visited a primary care physician in the past year, compared to more than 85% of men ages 60 or older. While older men may have more reasons to see a physician, young-er, healthy men who wait too long between routine physicals and who pass on screenings, such as blood pressure or diabetes, miss the oppor-tunity to detect precursors to heart disease and other illnesses,Ž says Joseph A. Giaimo, DO, an AOA Trust-ee and a board-certified internist and pulmonologist in private practice in Palm Beach Gardens. Addressing these early warning signs is often the easiest and most cost-effective way to stop illness before it starts.Ž The most common reasons for not going to the doctor given by male survey respondents who had not seen a primary care physician in the last two years were that it was not needed at this time or that they had no health insurance. The survey notes, however, that the number of men who say they have a designated primary care physician only slightly drops from approxi-mately nine in 10 (88.3%) in men ages 60 or older to seven in 10 (70.1%) among men ages 18 to 29. Giaimo notes that the benefits of men visiting a primary care physician on a regular basis include: X Routine physicals that can detect high blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well as problems with kidney and liver function early so that appro-priate lifestyle changes can be made. X Having the opportunity to address warning signs of heart dis-ease and other illnesses that can help prevent chronic illness in the future. X Recommending screenings for conditions such as prostate, colon and testicular cancer at certain age markers. X Recommending immunizations appropriate for the patients age group. X Having the ability to make simple lifestyle changes that alone, or with the aid of prescrip-tions or over-the-counter medications, can help reduce the risk of chronic illness or the chances of needing surgery later in life. Other survey results of note: X Less than one-third (31.6%) of men ages 18 to 29 indicate they visit a physician more than once a year. X Over half of all men surveyed (51.5%) visited a physician specialist at least one time or more every two years, while about one-quarter (24.8%) of men have never visited a specialist. X Older respondents (men and women) were more likely to have vis-ited a physician specialist in the past year, with 55.9% of those 60 or older reporting visits to a specialist in the past year compared to about 30% of those ages 18 to 29 years old. The survey was conducted from Oct. 12 to Oct. 15, 2010. A total of 1,027 respondents completed the online survey. A sample size of 1,027 has a margin of error of approximately +/3.0 percent at the 95 percent confi-dence level. Q SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 A13 ABACOA600 University Blvd Suite 102WEST PALM BEACH1515 N. Flagler Drive Suite 3407%340!,-"%!#(s 45TH & CONGRESS4601 Congress Ave Suite 104PALM BEACH GARDENS3385 Burns Rd.JUPITER2151 Alt A1A, Suite 1500WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR LAB TESTS Q Walk-In, Fast Service Q Painless Blood Draws Q All Lab Orders Accepted Q Medicare & All Major PPOs Accepted You Have A Choice! “It’s All About ACCESS !”Toll Free 866-720-8386 At Access Medical Laboratories, we provide both patients and doctors with fast, accurate, diagnostically meaningful results. Patients are treated with care, kindness, and the type of professionalism that has made Access Medical Laboratories a leader in the “ eld of diagnostic testing.Get your lab work done in a relaxed and professional environment. Visit one of our “ ve convenient locations in Jupiter, West Palm Beach, Palm Beach Gardens, or Abacoa and get ACCESSŽ to great Service!Modern mummiesNew York City artist Sally Davies offered in October the latest evidence of how unattractive todays fast foods are to bacteria and maggots. Davies bought a McDonalds Happy Meal in April, has photographed it daily, and has noted periodically the lack even of the slight-est sign of decomposition. Her dog, who circled restlessly nearby for the first two days the vittles were out, since then has ignored it. (Several bloggers, and filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, have made discoveries similar to Davies.) Food sci-entists creditedŽ a heavy use (though likely still within FDA guidelines) of the preservative sodium propionate but also the predominance of fat and lack of moisture and nutrients „ all of which contribute to merely shrinking and hard-ening the burger and fries. Q Compelling explanations Maybe Just Safekeeping It for a Friend: Raymond Roberts, 25, was arrested in Manatee County in Septem-ber after an ordinary traffic stop turned up a strong smell of marijuana. At depu-ties behest, Mr. Roberts removed a bag-gie of marijuana from his buttocks, but when the deputies saw another plastic bag right behind it (containing a white substance believed to be cocaine), Mr. Roberts said, The weed is (mine),Ž but (t)he white stuff is not ....Ž Firefighter Richard Gawlik Jr. was terminated by Allentown, Pa., in August for abusing sick leave after he posted his daily golf scores on a public website during three days in which he had called off from work. Mr. Gawliks union pres-ident said the union would appeal and that playing golf was well within the guidelines of Gawliks illness.Ž Woody Will Smith, 33, was convicted in September of murdering his wife after a jury in Dayton, Ky., delib-eratedŽ about 90 minutes before reject-ing his defense of caffeine intoxication. Mr. Smith claimed that his daily intake of sodas, energy drinks and diet pills had made him temporarily insane when he strangled his two-timing wife with an extension cord in 2009, and made him again not responsible when he con-fessed the crime to police. (In May 2010, a judge in Pullman, Wash., ordered a hit-and-run driver to treatment instead of jail, based on the drivers caffeine psychosis.Ž Some doc-tors believe the condition can kick in with as little as 400 mg of caffeine daily „ an amount that, given Americas cof-fee consumption, potentially portends a sky-high murder rate.) An Iowa administrative law judge ruled in September that former police officer William Bowker of Fort Madison deserved workers compensation even though he had not been laid offŽ but rather fired „ for having an affair with the wife of the chief of police. Although the city Civil Service Commission had denied him cover-age (based in part on other derelic-tions, such as sleeping and drinking on duty and refusing to attend a class on search warrants), the judge ruled that Mr. Bowkers dismissal seemed too much like improper retaliation for the affair. Q Demanding one’s rights A lawyer in Xian, China, filed a lawsuit in September against a movie house and film distributor for wasting her time „ because she was exposed to 20 minutes of advertisements that began at the posted time for the actu-al movie to begin. Ms. Chen Xiaomei is requesting a refund (equivalent of about $5.20) plus damages of an equal amount, plus the equivalent of about 15 cents for emotionalŽ damages „ plus an apology. In an April journal article, University of East Anglia professor Brett Mills denounced the 2009 British TV docu-mentary series Natures Great EventsŽ on the ground that the programs omnipresent and intrusive video cam-eras violated animals privacy. (The animals) often do engage in forms of behavior which suggest theyd rather not encounter humans,Ž he wrote, and we might want to think about equating this with a desire for privacy.Ž Q NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERDDISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATELeast-competent criminals Xavier Ross, 19, passing by a piano at an art exhibit in front of the Grand Rapids, Mich., police station in October, could not resist sitting down to play a few notes „ and was arrested when officers recognized him from a recent home invasion case. Selma Elmore, 44, was arrested in Lockland, Ohio, in October when she flagged down a police car to ask if there was an arrest warrant out on her. (Offi-cers checked; there was; she ran; the warrant was minor; resisting arrestŽ was more serious.) Jason Williams, 38, was convicted in Maidenhead, England, in October of stealing a neighbors window curtains, which he had immediately installed on his own windows „ in plain view of the neighbors window. Q Bright ideas British entrepreneur Howard James, who runs several online dat-ing sites, opened another in August to worldwide attention (and, allegedly, thousands of sign-ups in the first five days): dates for ugly people. Mr. James said new members (accepted from the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia and Ireland) will have their photos vetted to keep out attractiveŽ people. Keith Jefferys book on the British intelligence service MI6, published in September and serialized in The Times of London, revealed that the first chief of the SIS (Secret Intelligence Service) during World War I recommended, as the best invisible ink, semen, in that it would not react to (ink-detecting) iodine vaporŽ and was, of course, read-ily available.Ž Q

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYA14 NEWS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 954-617-2583 • ADVANCESOLAR.COM lic #CVC056664 Get Solar Pool Heating & Save $ 1,000’s a Year! Advance Solar proudly uses Sunstar Solar Panels that come with the BEST warranty available. From the same manufacturer that installed solar panels on the Governor’s Mansion here in Florida (2007) and the swimming facilities for the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta (1996) and Athens (2004).Learn more at AdvanceSolar.com S $100 OFF & FREE Underwater Light ShowMust purchase by November 30, 2010 has this extra cleanŽ odor he cant abide. Start with the basics: a large box with unscented clumping-style litter.Q Location. Your cats box should be away from his food and water, in a place he can get to easily and feel safe in. Con-sider a location from a cats point of view: Choose a quiet spot where he can see whats coming at him. A cat doesnt want any surprises while hes in the box. Make the area where your cat has had mistakes less attractive by cleaning it thoroughly with a pet-odor neutralizer (available from pet-supply retailers). Dis-courage re-use by covering the area with foil, plastic sheeting or plastic carpet run-ners with the points up. If changing things around doesnt clear up the problem in a healthy cat, you may need to retrain him by keeping your pet in a small area, such as a guest bathroom, for a couple of weeks. Make sure the area you choose has no good options besides the litter box „ no carpet, no pile of dirty laundry. Block off the bathtub or keep an inch of water in it to discourage its use as a place to go. After your cat is reliably using the litter box, let him slowly expand his territory again. As long as you keep up your end of the bargain and keep the litter box clean and safe, you have a good chance the good behavior will become permanent.If you just cant seem to get the problem resolved, ask your veterinar-ian for a referral to a veterinary behav-iorist. These veterinarians are skilled in behavioral problem-solving and are able to prescribe medications that may make the difference during the retrain-ing period. Q BY DR. MARTY BECKER & GINA SPADAFORI_______________________________Universal UclickCat potty problems seem worse during the winterIf your cat checks out fine, you need to make sure that everything about the box is to your cats liking. The second rule of solving a litter box problem: If the cat isnt happy, no one will be happy. Heres what to look for:Q Cleanliness. Cats are fastidious animals, and if the litter box is dirty, they look elsewhere for a place to go. Clean the box frequently „ twice a day at least „ and make sure its completely scrubbed clean and aired out on a weekly basis. Having an additional litter box may help, too. (Multiple litter boxes are recommended for multicat households, since many cats simply will not share.) Q Box type and filler. Many choices people make to suit their own tastes con-flict with the cats sense of whats agreeable. A covered box may seem more pleasing to you, but your cat may think its pretty rank inside, or scary. Likewise, scented litters may make you think the box smells fine, but your cat may dis-agree „ not only is the box dirty, he reasons, but it also When the weather turns colder and houses close up for warmth, every little thing starts to annoy us. Like the smell of the litter box, or (worse) the smell of a cat whos not using the litter box at all. But dont blame the cat. If your cat is hit-or-miss where the litter box is concerned, chances are the choices youve made factor into the prob-lem. After all, your cat really isnt asking for anything more than you would when it comes to a bathroom. All thats required for most cats is that the litter box be clean, quiet and offer no surprises. The first step in solving a litter box problem is to make sure its not a medi-cal condition „ and that means a trip to your veterinarian for a complete work-up. Urinary-tract infections and diseases such as diabetes make consistent litter box use impossible for even the most well-intentioned cat. You cannot hope to get your cat using the box again until any health issues have been resolved.PET TALES Hitting the box O Pets of the Week To adopt a petThe Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League, Humane Society of the Palm Beaches, was founded in 1925 and is a limited-admission non-pro t humane society providing services to more than 10,000 animals each year. It is located at 3100/3200 Mili-tary Trail in West Palm Beach. Adoptable pets and other information can be seen at www.hspb.org. For adoption information call 686-6656.>>Amber is a 2-year-old spayed female Beauceron mix. She weighs 64 pounds and is a hard working dog with high energy. She needs to be in a home with no young children. She would bene t from structured obedience lessons. Lessons are offered at Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League; the rst one is free. >>Patches is a 5-year-old neutered male shorthair cat. He may be a one-eyed kitty, but it hasn't affected his abilities. He has a big meow and loves attention. To protect his limited vision and ensure he gets all the attention, Patches has to be the only pet. He is available for the Senior to Senior adoption program. For an animal 5 years and older, placed with someone 55 years and older, the adoption fee is waived. The adopter will be responsible only for the cost of the county license/tag.

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WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE PLANS GIFT CERTIFICATE COMPLIMENTARY CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINATION & CONSULTATION $150 VALUE This certi cate applies to consultation and examination and must be presented on the date of the rst visit. This certi cate will also cover a prevention evaluation for Medicare recipients. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Expires 11-14-2010 Get back in the game with Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Treat Neck Pain, Back Pain and Sciatica caused by t BULGING/HERNIATED DISCS t DEGENERATIVE DISC DISEASE t FACET SYNDROME t FAILED BACK SURGERYWITHOUT THE USE OF DRUGS, INJECTIONS OR SURGERY Wouldnt you think Im the girl, the girl who has everything? Look at this trove: Treasures untold.... How many wonders can one cavern hold? ...Ready to know what the people know Ask em my questions and get some answers... Whats a fire and why does it „ whats the word „ Burn? Wouldnt I love, love to explore, that world up above? „ Part of Your World,Ž The Little MermaidMUSINGS Rx rx@floridaweekly.com Can of Worms sus poisons once attributed to unicorn horns to be true of narwhal horns. No loss of the baby in this bath water. There is another sort of transition: This is the shortest but most difficult phase of the first stage of labor. The stronger and longer contractions of this birthing phase function to complete the dilation of the cervix. The mother experiences increased body heat, trembling, belching and disorien-tation. But most importantly, she must consciously struggle against the desire to push prematurely. The urge to push the baby out at this point, to hurry the process to completion, is overwhelm-ing. But the womb is not completely open and clear; and, she must pant her way through the waiting. After the waiting there is emergence of treasure. If pirates know little of babies, they know much about treasure, buried, like fetuses, in the depths of the sea, in chests locked and loaded. Waiting for finding in earths under waters, transitionally guarded, perhaps, by mischievous rainbow serpents. Perhaps the Christian New Testament says it best: For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6: 21).Ž In Egyptian mythology, at the time of the birth that is death the heart of soul is weighed in the balance against the unbearably light truth feather of Maat. It is not clear from the Egyptian Book of the Dead whether it is better for the heart to be heavier or lighter than the feather. Aristotle chose the heart as heavier than the brain as the seat of thought, reason and emotion. The shape we associate with heart has little correspondence with the actual shape of the human heart. Instead we find this shape in the seed of the selphium plant, an herb used by the ancients as a contraceptive. And we also find the heart shape in a body organ of 0.1 percent of women in America: The bicornate uterus is a genetic anom-aly in which the uterus has two upper horns, causing it to look like a perfect Valentine heart. Transitions are treasures. Transitions are cans of worms. Good bait; good switch. And impossible to re-close. The matter of the heart: Pandoras Box is yaw and maw. Q „ Rx is the FloridaWeekly muse who hopes to inspire profound mutiny in all those who care to read. Our Rx may be wearing a pirate cloak of invisibility, but emanating from within this shadow is hope that readers will feel free to respond. Who knows: You may even inspire the muse. Make contact if you dare.In the time of the labor pains of the modern world „ some might call this the Renaissance „ there came into being an amazing phenomenon, the Wunderkammer, or Wonder-Room. It could be as big as a breadbox or as large as a room. Tiny or big, it was a collection of curiosities. One might find preserved animals, horns, skeletons, minerals or man-made objects either very small or very fine. And true to its transitional nature between Medieval and Modern, one might also find mythical objects, either posited or debunked. In the early 17th century BCE, a physician specializing in embryology named Ole Worm created his own cabinet of curiosities. You might be familiar with him as Olaus Wormius, the name used by H.P. Lovecraft as the author of the fictional grimoire Necronomicon. Love-craft was so convincing in his citation of this text that the spoof spread to rare book listings, the Yale card catalogue, and the knockoff books published later with that title. The real Ole Worm is an excellent example of transition, straddling the line between pre-modern and modern. In an efficiently modern manner, he rebutted the existence of unicorns, and said that the de facto horns were those of narwhal. But then he proceeded to prove the magical healing powers ver-

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1@n1A><%nr3%&nnnr%nr3(134/61<-=<4746-;:-B718=< %"$!"'%&*n%"$!"'%&* n%"$!"'%&* 1@n1A><%nr%&rrrn%nr(134/61<-=<4746-;:-B718=< %"$!"'%&*n%"$!"'%&* n%"$!"'%&* 1@n1A><%r%&n%r(134/61<-=<4746-;:-B718=< n %"$!"'%&*%"$!"'%&* n%"$!"'%&* 1@n1A><$*r%&r$*r(134/61<-=<4746-;:-B718=< %"$!"'%&*%"$!"'%&* %"$!"'%&* %"$!"'%&*%"$!"'%&* %"$!"'%&* "$#(!''-"#('%!)'(, &'(%-"#(('!&#$+#%-"#($'#)(' # #" !'%&-&#'!("$!'+ (%%&$*& ( nn % & .##&'$#$($" # 1@n1A><%nr%&nrn%r(134/61<-=<4746-;:-B718=< For a limited time, save on select new Lexus models with low 1.9% APR Financing* or these attractive lease offers: 61-;-8/1 r $$' -$)&,)' $$' -$)&%-"#( )*'%!!) "+ &n!) "+ &!) "+ & $1 0 ,0 0 0!% & n *'%! %'" &! 7 DayService Now open Sundays toService your vehicle. LexusofPalmBeach.com SmartChoiceSM Everything you want to know including prices and payments upfront. Find us. Friend us.facebook.com/ AutoNation twitter.com/ AutoNation !"!" !$ !!r! !& n# !%! !!$!#! "!%! !&! !# !" !!" &'n"!r!%&!$!'$%! +$+"%&'$+"%' +r"%$ (! +$+"%&'$+r"%' +r" r!511/39.119>61?-;0)1<="-671-/3C><=1 -<=92=31= >;8:451 1-866-258-0030 Shop Online The Largest selectionof new and usedLexus vehicles. LexusofPalmBeach.com D(!%) &&%"!$&+!%&nD !!"$' $ & %"!$&%$n%&& r D$%%n! ($&%($$+&$n%&nD,*%($&$! !) $%&nnn D'$)&)%!' %& D(!%) !%! ($&' &%' %&( D! $(*&$! !) $nn%%&nnD$%r)'*'$+% r%&n nD+'! (n $!)"$%()%&nrrnD'% ($&)& )%& nD'$*$!! & ((&" )&$%%&rnnD*'%%$&'*'$+%"!$&% (%&rrD*'%*$&$+ ($(%&r rrD($!&!$(&&! ($&$&'$+&$ ('&!%&r D)nr! ($&%($$+$&n%&"*rrnnD%$&$ %"!$&)&'*'$+%"!$&%$%&nnn $& #'&+"$!) (%

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WEEK at-a-glanceGo Blue award luncheon And other business social events in Palm Beach County. B6-9 X Real EstateToll Brothers launches a new model at Frenchman’s Reserve. B10 XMoney & InvestingHunting for travel deals puts extra money in your pocket. B2 X Palm Beach County was one of only four areas in Florida to report an increase in sales of single-family homes in Sep-tember. Sales climbed 7 percent over the same month last year, according to data released by Florida Realtors. Statewide, sales were down 8 percent in September and in the Treasure Coast sales dropped 27 percent over last year. In the year-to-year comparison for existing home sales, a total of 13,536 single-family existing homes sold statewide in September compared to 14,781 homes sold in September 2009. Floridas median existing-home sales price in Sep-tember was $133,400; a year earlier, it was $141,700 for a decrease of 6 percent. The median is the midpoint; half the homes sold for more, half for less. Like the rest of the nation, Floridas housing market is feeling pressure from an uncertain economy,Ž said 2010 Flor-ida Realtors President Wendell Davis, a broker with Watson Realty Corp. in Jacksonville, in a statement. Easing foreclosures and increasing job growth would go a long way in stabilizing the market and strengthening the economic recovery. However, current record low mortgage rates along with available and affordable inventory continue to offer a rare opportunity for consumers who are ready to buy a home.Ž The national median sales price for existing single-family homes in August was $179,300, up 1.2 percent from a year earlier, according to the National Asso-ciation of Realtors. In Massachusetts, the statewide median re-sales price was $330,000 in August; in California, it was $318,660; in Maryland, it was $262,339; and in New York, it was $240,000. NARs latest industry outlook calls for a gradual improvement in home sales in upcoming months. Attractive affordability conditions from very low mortgage interest rates appear to be bringing buyers back to the market,Ž said NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun, in a statement. How-ever, the pace of a home sales recovery still depends more on job creation and an accompanying rise in consumer con-fidence. The housing market is trying to recover on its own power without thePalm Beach County one of just four areas to see jump in home salesBUSINESS & REAL ESTATE FLORIDA WEEKLY A GUIDE TO THE PALM BEACH COUNTY BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE INDUSTRIES B SECTION OCT 28-NOV. 3, 2010Jupiter Island.It has attracted the likes of Burt Reynolds, Olivia Newton-John and Celine Dion. Golfers love it, too. Think Tiger Woods, Greg Norman and Nick Price. It could attract you, too, if you can afford to pony up millions for an ocean-front estate on South Beach Road. Why do celebrities choose the island?It doesnt have the hustle-bustle of Fort Lauderdale or Boca Raton,Ž said Rob Thomson, managing partner of Water-front Properties and Club Communities in Jupiter. Its very down-to-earth here,Ž agreed Ken Meierling, broker and owner of Engel & Vlkers Jupiter office. I try not to go south of PGA myself because of the traffic.Ž Any given day, theres no telling who is looking at property in that area, Mr. Thomson says. It could be a celebrity, could be a sports guy,Ž Mr. Thomson said. Not a week goes by that youre not showing somebody something.Ž And what are these celebrities and athletes seeing? Mr. Thomson points to a $29 million estate, called Somerset. It has 427 feet of ocean frontage, nine bedrooms and 12 baths in 17,584 square feet of living space. The property also boasts a cabana and a two-story leisure house,Ž in which there is an exercise room with wet bar, sun deck and ocean porch, perfect for the celebrity who wants to escape the pres-sures of stardom. Whoever buys this house is likely to pay cash, too. Were seeing a lot of cash buyers,Ž Mr. Thomson said. People are investing their money in real estate, for sure,Ž add-ing, I cant remember the last mortgage I did.Ž Mr. Meierling echoes that.He says his office sees a lot of international buyers, and most people we deal with are cash buyers over here.Ž The euro-dollar ratio is very favorable, Mr. Meierling said. Its still a great opportunity for exchanging euros into dollars.Ž But these potential buyers are not all from Europe.Hot properties, big price tagsBY SCOTT SIMMONSSpecial to Florida Weekly COURTESY PHOTOS “Somerset” on Jupiter Island has 17,584 square feet, nine bedrooms, a cabana and a ”leisure house.” The vaulted hall at “Somerset.” SEE JUPITER, B4 XSPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY On Jupiter Island, it’s not just the house — it’s the lifestyle SEE JUMP, B3 X

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYB2 BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 4000 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach Family Owned & Operated AWARDED Best of the BestŽ Dealer in 2009! ./*'/12'/,/,1))'.-+'0,+)www.MercedesPalmBeach.comPictures for illustration only. MERCEDES-BENZ of Palm Beach MON-FRI: 8:30AM-7PMSATURDAY: 8:30AM-5PM 2011 MERCEDES-BENZC300 SPORT SEDAN 2011 MERCEDES-BENZE350 SEDAN 2011 MERCEDES-BENZML-Class SUV Choose from: Mercedes-Benz ML350 ML550 ML350 Diesel ML 400 Hybrid ML63AMG Choose from: Mercedes-Benz L^]Zg 
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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF OCT. 28-NOV. 3, 2010 BUSINESS B3 homebuyer tax credit.Ž In September, the interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.35 percent, significantly lower than the 5.06 percent average during the same month a year earlier, according to Fred-die Mac. Florida Realtors sales figures reflect closings, which typically occur 30 to 90 days after sales contracts are written. Sales of existing condominiums in Florida rose 10 percent in September, with a total of 5,675 condos sold state-wide compared to 5,140 units sold in September 2009. Ten of Floridas metropolitan statistical areas reported higher existing condo sales in September. The statewide exist-ing condo median sales price last month was $83,400; in September 2009 it was $102,300 for an 18 percent decrease. However, Septembers statewide exist-ing condo median price was 2.2 per-cent higher than the statewide existing condo median of $81,600 in August. The national median existing condo price was $174,000 in August, according to NAR. NAR President Vicki Cox Golder said opportunities abound in the current market. A decade ago, mortgage rates were almost double what they are today, and theyre about one-and-a-half percentage points lower than the peak of the hous-ing boom in 2005,Ž she said. In addition, home prices are running about 22 percent less than five years ago when they were bid up by the biggest housing rush on record.Ž To illustrate the jump in housing affordability, the median monthly mort-gage payment for a recently purchased home is several hundred dollars less than it was five years ago. In fact, the median monthly mortgage payment in many areas is less than people are paying for rent,Ž Golder said. Housing affordability conditions today are 60 percentage points higher than during the housing boom, so it has become a very strong buyers market, especially for families with long-term plans. The savings todays buyers are receiving are not a one-time benefit. Buyers with fixed-rate mortgages will save money every year they are liv-ing in their home „ this is truly an example of how homeownership builds wealth over the long term,Ž Golder added. Total housing inventory at the end of September fell 1.9 percent to 4.04 mil-lion existing homes available for sale, which represents a 10.7-month supply at the current sales pace, down from a 12.0-month supply in August. Raw unsold inventory is 11.7 percent below the record of 4.58 million in July 2008. Vacant homes and homes where mortgages have not been paid for an extended number of months need to be cleared from the market as quickly as possible, with a new set of buyers help-ing the recovery along a healthy path,Ž Yun said. Inventory remains elevated and continues to favor buyers over sell-ers. A normal seasonal decline in inven-tory is expected through the upcoming months.Ž Q JUMPFrom page 1Veterans to eat free at Applebee’sApplebees plans to thank the nations veterans and active duty military by a free meal on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. Last year, Applebees served more than 1 million military men and women, and lines formed before the doors opened. This years, the company says it expects that number to grow. Veterans and active duty military will need to provide proof of service, which includes U.S. Uniform Services Iden-tification Card, U.S. Uniform Services Retired Identification Card, Current Leave and Earnings Statement, Veterans Organization Card, photograph in uni-form or wearing uniform, DD214, cita-tion or commendation. All Applebees will be open 11 a.m.midnight, and the offer is valid for dine-in only. For locations, visit www.applebees.com Q BankAtlantic teams with Place of Hope for walkBankAtlantic employees have volunteered to team up with the Place of Hope as a co-sponsor of Place of Hopes Sec-ond Annual Hope Walk. Place of Hope is a faith-based, state-li-censed child welfare organization provid-ing family-style foster care (emergency and long-term); family out-reach and intervention; transitional housing and support services; adoption and foster care recruitment and support; hope and healing opportunities for children and families who have been traumatized by abuse and neglect. Place of Hope pro-vides homes and support for foster chil-dren (and their family members) while the children are in state custody. The program also includes family reunifica-tion, pre-adoptive placement, and post-emancipation from care. Place of Hope strives to foster and support healthy and productive lives, free of fear, endangerment, and most of all abuse,Ž said Jarett Levan, CEO of BankAtlantic. Place of Hope restores dignity and provides guidance and hope through various programs and efforts and we are very happy to co-sponsor and support this event for these deserving children in our com-munity,Ž he added. The second annual walk is Saturday, Nov. 6. Registration begins at 8 a.m. The two-mile walk begins 9:30 a.m. At noon there will be family events and prizes awarded for games. The event is at Carlin Park, 400 South State Road A1A in Jupiter. Activities currently scheduled include a live DJ by World Class Entertainment, a Bounce House, and specialty units from the Palm Beach County Sheriffs Department, a display of custom race-cars provided by Ricks Rods, and the Hope Market. Q BUSINESS BRIEFS

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYB4 BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 What were seeing now is more traffic from the Northeast,Ž Mr. Meierling said, adding that Engel & Vlkers has 75 offices up North that refer clients to South Florida agents. And people in those higher-end markets seemingly are not as affected by the economic down-turn as other people. Last quarter saw more sales than any quarter in the past 25 years, Mr. Thom-son said. The finer properties still sell,Ž he said. Anybodys house thats not in great condition takes a hit.Ž In general, Im not that worried about Jupiter,Ž said Mr. Meierling. Its a destination where people want to be.Ž While prices in the luxury markets have corrected, the general markets are the ones that cause the bad press,Ž Mr. Thomson said. There are no short sales at Jupiter Island, Jonathans Landing, Admirals Cove or The Bears Club or the Ritz-Carlton.Ž But there arent a lot of newer houses on the market, either. Somerset, for example, was built in 1997. When the market took a dip, builders stopped building,Ž Mr. Thomson said. And one of Mr. Meierlings listings bears that out. His firm is offering a $4.95 million home on Jupiter Island. That home, which is about 70 years old, has more that 330 feet of ocean frontage. I havent seen anything with this kind of old Florida charm,Ž he said of the house, which he sees as a beach home for a family. It has cypress throughout. Back then they built things differently. They built things to last.Ž The six-bedroom house, which has 3,665 square feet of living space on 1.26 acres, has been owned by the same fam-ily for half a century. The house is built of hardy Dade County pine with cypress paneling, and has many upgrades, includ-ing zoned air-conditioning systems and a newer cedar shingle roof. But heres the real bonus: The setting is protected because the house is grandafatheredŽ in its location and no new houses will be allowed to be built along the beach on either side, Mr. Meierling said. In comparison, Mr. Meierlings office is at Jupiter Yacht Club & Marina, where condominium units sell for $800,000 and up. Condos are two and three bedrooms, with a phenomenal view,Ž he said. Engel & Vlkers has a listing for a three-bedroom unit at the yacht club, which is on the Intracoastal Waterway, in the heart of the town of Jupiter. It has never been lived in and has wooden floors. The building has luxurious ame-nities. Asking price: $999,000. But have prices stabilized?I think the bottom of the market is finally here,Ž Thomson said. I havent seen anything selling for less in quite sometime.Ž Interest in the bigger houses has been really active in the past 60 days. Odd time for that to be happening,Ž Mr. Thomson said. Buyers of those large estates in northern Palm Beach and southern Mar-tin counties typically do their hunting in January and February. I think people are thinking its time to put their money back into real estate,Ž he said. Mr. Thomson said that Waterfront Properties has grown as a result. The firm has doubled its size, he said, and now has 40 agents at offices in Sewalls Point (near Stuart), Jupiter, North Palm Beach and Weston. And we have plans to open in Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Boca,Ž he said. Regardless of markets, people still come back to Florida, Mr. Meierling said. Engel & Vlkers, based in Hamburg, Germany, has offices in southern Palm Beach County, including Manalapan, and he says the company plans to open a branch at Sewalls Point. And why not?Were selling a lifestyle,Ž said Mr. Meierling, who came here three years ago from Germany. Prices are lower and people want to be in Florida, he said. Florida hasnt changed,Ž he said, and despite the current economic situation, we still have beaches, equestrian activi-ties and the sun.Ž Q JUPITERFrom page 1COURTESY PHOTOListed by Engel & Vlkers, this beach house on Jupiter Island is priced at $4.95 million. COURTESY PHOTOS “Somerset,” listed at $29 million, has 427 feet of ocean frontage on Jupiter Island.

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Be In the Know. In the Now.Subscribe now and youll get comprehensive local news coverage, investigative articles, business happenings as well as the latest in real estate trends, dining, social events and much more. Visit us online at www.FloridaWeekly.com New Subscribers: Please allow 2-4 weeks for delivery of first issue. *Rates are based on standard rate postage. TYes, I want a one-year (52 issue) in-county subscription to Florida Weekly for only: IN-COUNTY T$2995* IN-STATE T$4995* OUT-OF-STATE T$5495* MAIL TO: Florida Weekly Circulation Department 11380 Prosperity Farms Rd., #103 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410Seasonal Residents: Please provide your alternate address along with the dates you reside there. Street Address: __________________________________________________________City: ________________________________________ State: _______ Zip: _________Date From: _____________ Date To: _________________ Name: __________________________________________________________________Street Address: __________________________________________________________City: ________________________________________ State: _______ Zip: _________Email: _____________________________ Phone Number: ( _____ ) ______________T VISA T MC T AMEX T Payment Enclosed T Bill Me Credit Card #: ____________________________________ Exp. Date: ____________Signature: ______________________________________________________________ Palm Beach Gardens/Jupiter Florida Weekly1. Fill out the information below and mail. 2. Go to www.FloridaWeekly.com and click on subscribe. 3. Call 561.904.6470 THREE WAYS TO SUBSCRIBE: Get Florida Weekly delivered to your mailbox for onlyOROR$2995*PER YEAR$4995*PER YEAR$5495*PER YEAR

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYB6 BUSINESS WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 NETWORKING JOSE CASADO / FLORIDA WEEKLY1. Caesar and Olympia Cora2. Emilio and Suzanne Petti3. Joy and Mike Miltenberger4. Ferd and Lucia Maggiordi5. Virginia Pacelli, Phyllis Verducci, Virginia Longo6. Vera and Fred A. Princiotta7. Robert Silvani, Nan Paterniti, Carmen PaternitiThe Italian Cultural Society of the Palm Beaches at Cafe Chardonnay 124 5 7 6 3 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 BUSINESS B7 NETWORKING We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com.RACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY1. David McClymont and Beth Neuhoff2. Caela Bickly-Hayek, Karen Bell and Nichole Buccini3. Lisa Wade and Jennifer Patterson4. Fletch and Lynne Wells5. Michael Bresette, Wanda Bregette and Rick Herren6. Lisa Rawe, Linda Barnette, Debbie Spruill and Erica Verk7. Melissa Ranly and Tash GlazerSecond Annual Go Blue Award Luncheon at PGA National 1 6 7 4 5 3

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYB8 REAL ESTATE WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 NETWORKING MAUREEN GREGG AND CLARA EDWARDS / FLORIDA WEEKLY1. Monique Comfort and Tracey Miller2. Carey Chen, Diane Jenkins, Norm Isaac, Dr. Ray Waldner and John Jenkins3. Geraldine Napolitano, Lisa Watson and Brendan Schilling4. Clifford Lame and Elena Caffray5. Gary Lavallee, Molly Wilson and Rick Wilson6. Kristy Grant, Kim Grant and Jenny Grant7. Jeff and Alyssa FreemanThe Captain’s Club Marine Kickoff Bash at Sugar Cane Island Bistro We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. The Captains Club Marine Kickoff Bash at Su g T h h h h h h h h h h h h h e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C 1 34 2 567

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 BUSINESS B9 NETWORKING Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches mixer at McCormick and Schmick’s Seafood RestaurantRACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY1. Gabriele Bowen and Laurie Albert2. Teri Edgar and Becky Reincke3. Alan Kessman4. Courtney Kennedy and Ellen Maringione5. Karen Everitt and Steve Everitt6. Barry Gilliland, Dana Wilson and Klara Novotna RA C HEL HI C KEY / FL O RIDA WEEKL Y e N ovotn a We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. 1 4 6 3 2 5

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REAL ESTATEA GUIDE TO THE PALM BEACH COUNTY REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 FLORIDA WEEKLYB10 L uxury homebuyers get one more option in northern Palm Beach County, as Toll Brothers has opened a new model home in its Heritage Collection at Frenchmans Reserve. Our gorgeous Largo Mar model is a magnificent addition to this spectacular resort community,Ž said Jason Snyder, senior project manager, in a statement. Frenchmans Reserve offers world-class amenities, including an Arnold Palmer-designed golf course.Ž The Largo Mar, situated on a waterfront site and designer-decorated by Decorators Unlimited, is a Palm Beach-style home with three bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths and 3,664 square feet of living space. Guests enter a two-story foyer that flows to separate living and din-ing rooms, a study and a family room adjacent to the kitchen. The covered lanai overlooks the pool. There is a large master suite with master bath on the first floor. Upstairs are two additional bedrooms, each with its own bath, and a flexible loft space. The Heritage Collection offers seven home designs, ranging from 3,400 square feet to more than 4,500 square feet of living space. Each home is situated on a lot that offers golf course or lake views. Homes also have such features as oversized ceramic tile in the main living areas and pool packages with brick paver pool decks. Homes are priced from the mid-$900,000s. Frenchmans Reserve offers a country club lifestyle. In addition to the golf course, amenities include a 45,000-square-foot Grande Clubhouse that offers casual and formal dining, a library, a boardroom, rooms for television and cards, locker rooms and golf pro shop. The Spa at Frenchmans Reserve includes a fullservice spa, state-of-the-art fitness center, six lighted Hydrogrid clay tennis courts, tennis pro shop, locker rooms and an outdoor pool and spa. Frenchmans Reserve is off Alternate A1A, north of PGA Boulevard. The sales center, at 703 Cote Azur Drive, is open 10 a.m.8 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Call (561) 799-5660 or visit www.frenchmansreserve.com. Q Toll Brothers launches new model atFrenchman’s ReserveCOURTESY PHOTO A view of the pool of the new Largo Mar model, built at Frenchman’s Reserve.

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KOLTERhomes .com Let’s Make a DEAL! WITH SIX STUNNING COMMUNITIES YOURE SURE TO FIND THE DEAL FOR YOU! VERANO Treasure Coast888.815.3058Gated country club living within your reach, single-family homes and club villas THE OAKS Hobe Sound888.701.6740Gated single-familyhomes on naturepreserve homesites TRES BELLE ESTATES Stuart888.701.6740Gated community of estate homes on acre homesites LOST RIVER Stuart888.701.6740Single-family homes with backyard ocean accessPalm City888.701.6740Exclusive gated community of estate homes on acre homesites From the High $200sFrom the Low $200sFrom the High $200sFrom the High $300sFrom the Mid $400sFrom the Mid $500s Were giving you every reason to ownthe home of your dreams NOW!s).#2%$)",%"59%2).#%.4)6%3s!$$)4)/.!,).#%.4)6%3/. 30-DAY CLOSINGS*s).r(/53%&).!.#).'#2%$)4s.%7(/-%7!22!.49*INVENTORY IS LIMITED, CALL NOW FOR DETAILS. PRICES AND AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. CANOPY CREEK PALOMA Palm Beach Gardens888.536.2560Gated single-family homesand townhomes featuringresort style pool and spa rrrsrsGARDENS LANGREALTYCOM www.langrealty.com 0'!"OULEVARD3UITEs0ALM"EACH'ARDENS Magni“cent describes this estate home in Playa Rienta. Situated on a wide water lot, this 5800 sq. foot Mediterranean inspired residence features 4 bedroom suites, library, state-of-the-art theatre, 3 car garage. Come enjoy the best of Country Club living! CAROL FALCIANO 561-758-5869 Desirable “rst ”oor lake view condo with private garage, in Emerald Isle, West Palm Beach. One bed/one bath. The commu-nity has a pool, clubhouse, “tness center, billiards, racquetball, volleyball, basketball, tennis courts and a conference center. -ONTH !..-%,%.$%:rr 11556 Villa Vasari Dr. Tremendous value in Villa Vasari. Fantastic golf course views from this 3 bed/2 bath, professionally decorated home within walking distance to the Club! Absolutely beautiful coach home! Available fully furnished for $464,000. $%"")%!2#!2/rr Make this your home away from home! Available for seasonal or annual rental. Full golf membership included. Fantastic views of water and 4th Fairway of Fazio Course. Turnkey. -ONTHr!NNUAL -ONTHr3EASONAL $%"")%!2#!2/rr NEW LISTING NEW LISTING MIRASOL EMERALD ISLE~WPB MIRASOL MIRASOL OPEN HOUSE NOV 14, 2-4PMFULL GOLF MEMBERSHIP LEIBOWITZREALTY GROUP Falling home prices Low mortgage rates Before the market changes, Be Smart...MAKE AN OFFER! 149 Orchid Cay Drive $599,000Tastefully decorated home with beautiful golf and water views offers bright, open ”oor plan2,890 sf A/C home features 3BR./3BA + of“ce with warm wood built-in & plantation shutters. 2CG + separate golf cart garage. Light wood kitchen cabinets, double ovens & island breakfast bar. Screened in pool and spa.Marsha Grass“I know the community. I live the lifestyle.”561. 512. 7709 marshag@leibowitzrealty.com211 Grand Pointe Drive $2,695,000Stunning estate home w/lavish details. 8,200 of A/C, 5BR/7.5BA/4CG.Master suite has his/her BAs, custom walk-in closets, NEW gourmet kitchen with top-of-the-line stainless appliances. Media, Billiards & Music rooms + Wet Bar, “replaces, summer kitchen, pool. rock waterfalls and more. BALLENISLESBALLENISLES

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,r-r /Un"r,nU181,9"r-6-" M T Jn, FL rr.. M D VIntracoastal Waterfront Gated Condo in well managed bldg w/pool. 5th Floor End Unit with 2 BR/2 B has full balcony and waterviews from every room. WPB Lynne Rifkin, 561.906.7500 UPDA TED Sn N SSpectacular Pool for Spectacular 4 bedrm. home on a half acre+ located just minutes to Indiantown Rd. Owner says sell this 3,900 sq.ft. home/w 2300 sq.ft. screened patio, pronto. Take a look, make a deal. r, JUPITER Bonnie Burke, 561.379.8665 Cnr Cn Enn+5600 sq ft luxury home, 5BR/4B/3 Car includiing 2 Master Bedroom Suites. Cherry cabinetry, granite, 6-burner gas stove. 2.5 acre lot. No expense has been spared, a truly gorgeous property and home. Call to schedule a showing. PBG Sharon Gunther, 561.723.3093 A r PO n Mn CrSingle family villa. Volume ceilings, eat-in kitchen, family room plus living room/dining room combination. Private, pavered patio. Conveniently located next to beautiful community pool., PBG Sharon Gunther, 561.723.3093 I P G A N n NPB M Hr PMobile Home Park has 19 pads on 2.62 acres in unincorporated North Palm Beach, Florida.Park has been approved for twenty townhomes if you desire to develop. All mobile homes are owned by the seller with each unit having separate electric meters and sewer connection.This is being sold for less then what the sellers paid for it and would be a great deal for an investor or developer., NORTH PALM BEACH iœ}i,ˆV…iiˆx£‡£{‡nnœˆV…>iœœx£‡""‡{™{ I T Hn O ADivosta Built Tuscany Townhome in the heart of Abacoa. Home boasts Double Master Suites upstairs and third bedroom on the “rst ”oor. Granite countertops, Large screened patio and 2 car garage. Take advantage of the Live, Work, Play Lifestlye. Walking distance to Abacoa Golf Club and Downtown Abacoa. Great buy! JUPITER George Richetelli 561-714-8386 or ˆV…>iœœx£‡""‡{™{F G MrBreathtaking Builders Model w/unbelievable outdoor paradise screened pool area overlooks Greg Norman Golf Course & water. 3 Beds, Study, Gourmet Open Kitchen + Designer features. Upscale Super Buy. ,. JUPITER Ron Jangaard, 561.358.6001 r r Updated unit with tile ”oors, Minutes to main rds. great resturants, Perfect condition, not a short sale. Dir. Indiantown Rd. to S.Central Blvd. S.Chasewood bear right building on left. JUPITER Bonnie Burke, 561.379.8665 O P E N SUN 1 3 Wn Pr BTerracina 4 Bedroom 2 1/2 Bath 2 Car Garage Built in 2005 3024 square feet. Large Home in newer gated community. Ammenities include pool, Tennis, Exercise Room, Clubhouse, Security and more. Corporate Owned, get a response right away!, WPB iœ}i,ˆV…iiˆx£‡£{‡nnœˆV…>iœœx£‡""‡{™{ L R2/2 Recently remodeled condo on the Island of Palm Beach. Get the Palm Beach Address without the Palm Beach Price tag. Perfect second home and ready to use this season! Building located on the Ocean with easy beach access community pool and entertainment room. Corporate Owned Priced to sell quickly!, PALM BEACH iœ}i,ˆV…iiˆx£‡£{‡nnœˆV…>iœœx£‡""‡{™{

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FLORIDA WEEKLY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENTA GUIDE TO THE PALM BEACH COUNTY ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT SCENE C SECTION OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010WEEK at-a-glanceSandy Days, Salty NightsMen divide women into two categories: sports fish and keepers. C2 XCuisine newsNew restaurants are popping up all over the north county. C15 X Mashing it upEssential tools for out-of-this-world grilling. C8 XA fall festival and a food and wine fest are set for Oct. 30 in the Gardens. The second annual Boos N Brews Food & Wine Festival, organized by Whole Foods to benefit Autism Speaks, is 6 p.m. to 10 p.m at Down-town at the Gardens. The Halloween-themed fund-raiser will combine more than 100 varieties of craft beer and wine tastings, a Halloween costume contest, performance artists, food vendors, and shop-ping. There will be a live performance by The Feeder Band, and WRMF 97.9 FM will be on-site covering live, as well as signing autographs, introducing the band and judging a Halloween costume contest with prizes totaling $500. Tickets to participate in beer and wine tastings are $20. Whole Foods says 100 percent of the ticket sales will be donated to Autism Speaks South Florida. The Palm Beach Gardens Fall Festival, sponsored by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Recreation Division, is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. It will include games and activities, including a flashlight egg haunt,Ž a Trick or Treat Street and a costume contest. Bring lawn chairs or blankets for seating, as well as flashlights for the haunt.Ž The event is at Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens. Q Get spooky at fall festival and wine, food fest SPECIAL TO FLORIDA WEEKLY CANEEPIC PLAY LAUNCHES SERIES ABOUT FLORIDA COURTESY PHOTOS Gregg Weiner and David Nail in “Cane” Ca ne c a n m e a n a hurric a ne suga r or a bibl ic a l ta l eC 4 >>in s id e: BY HAP ERSTEINherstein@” oridaweekly.com As Florida Stage, a large professional theater producing exclusive-ly new and developing American plays, completes its first quarter century of existence, producing artistic director Lou Tyrrell pon-ders its legacy. Wanting to leave something lasting behind, he has initiated The Florida Cycle, a series of new scripts on the life and history of The Sunshine State. All the plays we do are stories that audiences can relate to, no SEE CANE, C4 X Taking foreverOur reviewer says “Hereafter” feels like an eternity. C11 X

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I once had a colleague, Hannah, who unnerved me in a way Im not used to. She had pretty green eyes and a mess of curly hair that she wore piled casually on top of her head. She was petite and slim, but with a curve to her hips that made her distinctively feminine. There was something very womanly about her but in an old-fashioned sort of way, so that I could imagine her in gingham, traipsing across the plains like a character out of O Pioneers!Ž We were both in our mid-20s when we met, and while I aimed far and wide „ in my career, in my love life „ Hannah kept her head tucked. She was destined for marriage and babies in quick succes-sion „ anyone could see that, and a small part of me envied her. She carried none of my restlessness and possessed not a smidge of ambition. I treated her coolly, with a vague dislike that took me years to identify as jealousy. While most of the women I knew cast about for direction, Hannah hunkered down. I just need a husband,Ž she would say. Not long after I met her, she began dating a man we all knew. He was handsome, smart, solid and kind. The type of man The marrying kind Artis HENDERSON sandydays@floridaweekly.com who would make a good husband and father. He recognized in Hannah a simi-lar spirit, and he identified with her goodness and lack of complexity. He must have known that the rest of us were still figuring things out, that we were not yet right with ourselves, because he passed us over and chose Hannah with-out a second thought. She was clearly the marrying kind. Comedian Steve Harvey, who did an excellent job of transforming himself into a love guru with the publication of his advice book, Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man,Ž says all men divide women into two categories: sports fish and keepers. Sports fish are the kind you play around with, Mr. Harvey says. He labels them throwbacks.Ž These are the women destined for catch-and-release, ladies with low standards whom guys meet in bars and on the dance floor. The women who havent learned to respect them-selves. SANDY DAYS, SALTY NIGHTSgorize the women they meet. Sarah ran down a list of her friends and asked which ones Sam would consider keepers. He dismissed them all. Are any of my friends the kind a man would want to marry?Ž Sarah asked. Sam said yes, and he said my name. Sarah reported this information back to me, laughing and askance. But I smiled to myself on the other end of the phone line, secretly pleased. Somewhere along the way I must have discovered that reservoir of calm domestication that Hannah knew so well. Turns out, it was in me all along. Q “...all men divide women into two categories: sports fish and keepers...”Keepers, though, are just that: the women men want for the duration. The kind of woman a man can envision set-tling down with,Ž Harvey calls them. My friend Sarah told me recently that she discussed the concept of sports fish and keepers with her twin brother, Sam, and he agreed thats how men cateH anna h w h o not used to a nd a mess o f d casua ll y on t ite and slim p s t h at ma d e There wa s bout her but w ay, so that I a m, traipsin g racter out o f 20 s wh en w e and wide „ f e „ Hannah w as destined q uick succes a t, an d a sma l l carried non e s sessed not a e d her coolly o o k me year s e most of the f or direction she would h er, she knew olid a n p asse d us over an d c h ose H anna h w ithout a secon d t h o ug h t. S h e was c l ear l y t h e m arryin g k in d C omedian Steve Harve y who did an excellent job of transformi ng himself into a love gu ru with the p ublication o f his advice book, Act L ike a Lad y Think Like a Man,Ž s a y s all men divide women into two cate go ries: sp orts fish and ke ep ers. Sp orts fish are the kind y ou p la y aroun d wit h Mr. Harve y sa y s. He la be l s th e m thr o w b a c k s .Ž Th ese ar e th e w o m e n d es tin e d f or catch-and-release, ladies wi th l ow stan d ar d s w h om g uys meet i n bars and on the dance f loor. Th e w o m e n wh o hav e nt l e arn e d to res pe ct t h em se lv es g orize t he d o wn a l which on e He d is mi s Are an y would w a Sam sa i Sarah r to me, s mil e t h e S o h a n d he e e e a a a a a a a a a a gr gr gr gr gr r gr gr gr gr gr r gr gr gr g gr gr g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee e ee ee ee ee e ee e ee e ee ee ee e e ee ee ee e e e e e e e ee ee e e e e e e e ee e d d d d d d d th th th th th th th th h h h h th th th h th h h h th h th h t th th h h h t t th h th t h h t t at at at at a a at at a a a a a a a a s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h ow men ca t ewww.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC2 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 Save this coupon! FREE VACUUM CHECK-UP7ˆ……ˆ7Vœ'œUrˆi£££{"£ FREE CENTRAL VACUUM SERVICE CALL7ˆ…>i>ˆU“>Ži>`“œ`i 7ˆ……ˆ7Vœ'œUrˆi£££{"£ CLEAN SWEEP VACUUMS848-3387 208 US Highway 1 North Palm BeachJust south of Northlake Blvd. on US 1Teresa, The Vacuum QueeniU>}UVViœˆi ,i>ˆ>ŽiEœ`i />`i‡7iVœ“i œ'\ Mon-Fri 9AM-6PMU->™AM-4PM ELECTROLUX ULTRA ONE s Sealed Hepa Filtration s Adjustable suction for deep clean to light work s Powerful performance s From ”oors to carpets s Quick wand release for tool use We carry Miele, Oreck, Electrolux,Dyson, Hoover and many moreRated Best CanisterŽ by Good Housekeeping ELECTROLUX ULTRA ONE Starting at $149.99 CLEAN SWEEP VACUUMS #&--"7*5"1*;;"$"'c8*OEJBOUPXO3PBEr4UF…+VQJUFSr'-… 2 Large 1-Topping Pizzas $1599 Must present ad. There are many Pizzas...But Only One BELLA PIZZAOPEN NOW.. Small Cheese Pizza & 10 Wings $1199 /P W Q N CHEESE SLICE & SODA $ 1 99 / / / / P P W ! ! Q N 6 Mozzarella Stix & 6 Chicken Fingers $999

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&ENVOE+BNFT4BMPO%BZ4QB 1("#MWEr4VJUFr1BMN#FBDI(BSEFOT$POWFOJFOUMZMPDBUFEPOUIFXBUFSGSPOUBUUIF)BSCPVS'JOBODJBM$FOUFS OFYUUP$BSNJOFTNBSLFUn XXXFENVOEKBNFTTBMPOOFU v>ViLœœŽVœ“r`“'`>“i->œUˆiVœ“r`“'`>“i.POEBZBNQN5VFTEBZBNQN 8FEOFTEBZBNQN 5IVSTEBZBNQN'SJEBZBNQN4BUVSEBZBNQN ,BUIMFFO1BMNFS GPSNFSMZPG5SFWBOB4BMPO-PPLJOHGPSXBSEUPTFFJOHZPVBUNZOFXMPDBUJPO1MFBTFUBLF 0'' BOZCFBVUZTFSWJDFZPVCPPLXJUINFis proud to welcome FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 C3 r-BSHFTUJOEPPSCPBUTUPSBHFGBDJMJUZJO.BSUJOBOE1BMN#FBDI$PVOUJFTr'VMM4FSWJDF.BSJOBJODMVEJOH&OHJOF3FQBJS.BJOUFOBODFr$BOWBT$VTIJPO4IPQr'VFMEPDLTBOE#BS(SJMMr888+61*5&310*/5&$0. 561-744-7400 YEARLY & SEASONAL MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE 4UPQ#ZUPUBLFB5PVSPG0VS #SBOE/FX'BDJMJUZ0VS/FX#PBUT"SF8BJUJOH'PS:PV 063.&.#&34)*11307*%&4 5)&#&458":50&/+0:#0"5*/( 4&'FEFSBM)JHIXBZr5FRVFTUB .JMF/PSUIPG$PVOUZ-JOF3En 561-575-6001r4"7&5)064"/%4 r0/-:"-*.*5&%/6.#&30'.&.#&34)*14"7"*-"#-& r#&45-0$"5*0/0/5)&53&"463&$0"45 r#3"/%/&8."3*/" ‘Heart Transplant’Sean is a pudgy 9-year-old kid whose turbulent home life par-allels the heartless bullying he faces daily at school. One after-noon, he returns home to find his neglectful, drunk mother and her boyfriend-of-the-month murdered. While police and social workers debate what to do, an older man walks in, claiming Sean as his grandson. Though Sean knows this isnt true, hes aware of his choices, and he decides to leave with the man he comes to call Pop.Ž Pop teaches Sean what love means „ not emotion, but behavior „ in an incredible sacrifice. In the hallmark of the story, Pop performs the life-changing heart transplantŽ that Sean, like every bullied child, needs. Written by child-protection attorney Andrew Vachss and illustrated by art-ist Frank Caruso, Heart TransplantŽ is more than a graphic novel. Author and artist are in sync, each never overpower-ing the other but delivering the message „ that bullying can be overcome only by changing culture from within „ with images somehow both elegant and coarse, images that mirror the works stark, hardhitting story. Zak Mucha, LCSW, pro-vides explanations of what Sean „ and the reader „ has experienced. The result is a response to bullying rooted not in dogma, but in reality, not hammering home the textbook answers that fail kids from Columbine to Vir-ginia Tech, but whispering the truth, on a human level that appeals to kids and their caretakers.Before publication, Heart TransplantŽ was recognized and lauded by experts from educators and psycholo-gists to journalists and policemen. After its release, it will surely receive fur-ther acknowledgment, as well as prime real estate in bookstores, libraries and classrooms. But at its heart, the work is simply about the life-transforming and unalterable relationship between love and self-respect Q By Andrew Vachss and Frank Caruso, with Zak Mucha, LCSW (Dark Horse Books, $24.99)REVIEWED BY KATY B. OLSON________________________Special to Florida Weekly BEACH READING

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC4 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 matter where they are set,Ž notes Tyr-rell. But Florida is so interesting in its eccentricities and its extremes. As a company whose name represents the state, making a cultural contribution to the state, and from the state to the country, wouldnt it be fun if years later we had 12 or 15 or 20 plays that told various Florida stories?Ž To inaugurate the ambitious project, Tyrrell turned to the companys playwright-in-residence, 29-year-old Andrew Rosendorf, and suggested he investigate the dramatic potential in the states uneasy history with water. At the time, Palm Beach County was in a severe drought situation, with only a 21-day supply of water. Rosendorf, born and raised in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., jumped at the assignment, even though he did not have the foggiest idea how to turn the issue into a play. What was interesting about that whole process and overwhelming as well was I didnt know what story I wanted to tell, I didnt know the time period and I didnt know anything about South Florida his-tory,Ž concedes Rosendorf. Oh, my god, I had so much to learn.Ž He became a sponge, soaking up information about the region and spe-cifically the Everglades. And slowly I started to land on things that resonated with me,Ž Rosendorf says. That led me to look at the time right before the 1928 hurricane and to the present day.Ž In the early years of the 20th century, South Florida was essentially a swamp. The problem then was too much water. Rosendorf became intrigued by how the situation became reversed, from one extreme to the other, in just 80 years. And it occurred to him to tell the story of a fictional Belle Glade farmer just before the devastating Okeechobee hur-ricane of 1928 and, in the second act, the consequences of his actions on his descendants today. That is the premise of Cane,Ž which has its world premiere Oct. 29 at the Kravis Centers Rinker Playhouse, Florida Stages new permanent home. The epic drama looks at the connec-tions between the past and the present in a story of betrayal and bloodshed, water and wind, family and fortune. If Ive done my job right, youre watching a human story and then the issues are coming out of that,Ž says Rosendorf. The play begins in a time when efforts were first made to control the water flow from Lake Okeechobee with a dike. They were thinking that if they could drain the water away, they could use the fine muck that was underneath for agricultural soil. They wanted to use the soil and the favorable temperature here to get off the foreign dependency of sugar.Ž In that context, the title CaneŽ has three meanings „ hurricane, sugar cane and the Biblical implications of Cain and Abel,Ž the playwright points out. When Rosendorf started his research in May of last year, Florida Stage was still in Manalapan, in a theater that had a low stage ceiling. Yet it soon became clear that CaneŽ would be a play of epic proportions, as Tyrrell „ who would direct the production „ envi-sioned a towering dike that loomed over the landscape. When Lou read the script, he quickly had the idea that maybe the dike had some height, when my initial thought to make sure it would be producible, was that the dike could well be just the front of the stage,Ž says Rosendorf. Im very drawn to theatricality and theres the-atricality in this play, but I also had in mind that Florida Stage was asking me to write this, so I knew I had to keep a certain producibility aspect in mind.Ž The move to the Kravis is ideal for a play like Cane,Ž allowing scenic designer Richard Crowell to think on a massive scale. It was great good for-tune that we moved to the Rinker Play-house and gained all this height,Ž says Tyrrell. CaneŽ allows Florida Stage to show our audience, very specifically, scenically and storytelling-wise, why it is better for us to be here.Ž But putting the Herbert Hoover Dike onstage was not the only challenge Rosendorf gave his director. He also calls for the torrential rains and gale force winds of a major destructive hurricane. Growing up in New York, I am used to the kind of stagecraft that you can see on Broadway. But almost every time you have to solve a creative issue through your imagination, its always bigger and more exciting, I think,Ž says Tyrrell. Ultimately, we are going to suggest water through sound and light. So slickers need not be provided to the front row.Ž CaneŽ has gone through a rigorous, time-consuming developmental process of readings and revisions over the past 18 months. Clearly, Florida Stage would not make such an effort if it did not feel that the play „ like subsequent works in The Florida Cycle „ will be of inter-est beyond the state line. I think its a very universal story of what was going on 80 years ago,Ž says Rosendorf. As I learned from my research, water shortage is a huge issue, not just in Florida, but around the coun-try, especially with the Great Lakes and Lake Michigan. Experts believe that the next world war wont be fought over oil, but will be fought over water. We like to call Florida the canary in the mineshaft, that what happens here is a microcosm of what is happening elsewhere. If were emotionally invested in the human story, it may be set in Belle Glade, but it should take on a greater, wider resonance.Ž Although CaneŽ is a cautionary tale of mans attempts to harness nature, Tyrrell and Rosendorf also wanted to be sure that it was an entertaining ride. It is epic, because it covers personal issues of the people, and deals with global issues that we should all care about,Ž says Tyrrell. And for people who just love a great read, this play is a real page-turner.Ž Q CANEFrom page 1 Trenell Mooring, left, fight choreographer Joe Isenberg and Gregg Weiner on the set of ‘Cane’ >> CANE, Florida Stage at the Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Fri., Oct. 29 through Sun., Nov. 28. Tickets: $47-$50. Call: (561) 585-3433 or (800) 514-3837. O in the know COURTESY PHOTOSGregg Weiner and Trenell Mooring —rehearsing on the set in the scene shop.

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WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 A&E C5 FLORIDA WEEKLY BOB LAPPIN & THE PALM BEACH POPS Performances at 8pm. All sales nal. No refunds or exchanges. Artists, dates, performances and prices subject to change. TICKETS NOW ON SALE • LET IT BE…THE BEATLES KRAVIS: NOV 5-6 – EISSEY: NOV 7 A tribute to The Beatles with special guest The Nylons, world-famous recording group best known for their Top 40 hit “Kiss Him Goodbye.” A musical journey with “All You Need Is Love,” “Yesterday,” “Hey Jude,” Eleanor Rigby” & more! featuring The Nylons • THE BEST OF BROADWAY KRAVIS: NOV 29-30 – EISSEY: DEC 6 A South Florida tradition, delight in your favorite songs from a variety of popular musicals including Fiddler on the Roof, La Cage Aux Folles and Jeckyll & Hyde. Featuring Broadway stars David Burnham of Wicked and Chrisine Andreas of La Cage Aux Folles! David Burnham & Christine Andreas • RODGERS & HART/JOHN PIZZARELLI QUARTET EISSEY: FEB 8 – KRAVIS: FEB 9-10 Internationally acclaimed singer & guitarist John Pizzarelli puts his own spin on these light-hearted classics by Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart, “My Heart Stood Still,” “The Lady Is A Tramp” “With A Song In My Heart” & “Blue Moon.” An Evening of • THE STREISAND SONGBOOK EISSEY: JAN 9 – KRAVIS: JAN 10-11 Featuring actress/singer Gloria Loring with the #1 hit “Friends and Lovers” and of Days of Our Lives. Showcasing the music of Barbra Streisand with “Somewhere,” “The Way We Were,” “Evergreen” and music from Funny Girl, Hello Dolly, Yentl and more! with Gloria Loring • CLINT HOLMES: CELEBRATING SAMMY DAVIS, JR. EISSEY: MAR 13 – KRAVIS: MAR 14-15 By popular demand, superstar Vegas entertainer Clint Holmes returns to honor the great Sammy Davis, Jr. with “What Kind of Fool Am I,” “Candy Man” & other nostalgic favorites. Don’t miss this high energy concert! • MICHAEL CAVANAUGH: THE MUSIC OF BILLY JOEL & MORE KRAVIS: APR 4-5 – EISSEY: APR 10 Handpicked by Billy Joel to star in the hit Broadway musical Movin’ Out, Tonyand Grammy-nominated Michael Cavanaugh is a gifted pianist & vocalist. Spotlighting the hits of Billy Joel and other legends for an amazing concert! Order Your Tickets Today! Tickets $29-$89Call 561.832.7677 – www.PalmBeachPops.orgKRAVIS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS West Palm BeachEISSEY CAMPUS THEATRE (Palm Beach State College) Palm Beach Gardens(Sun 10am to 2pm & Mon-Fri 9am to 5pm) MAESTRO LAPPIN PUZZLE ANSWERS There will be a classic Who-doneit?Ž at The Gardens Mall and it will benefit the Burt Reynolds Insitute for Film and Theatre. The murder mystery-themed fundraiser will take place from 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6, at Saks Fifth Ave-nue. Participants will form teams to solve the mystery or just enjoy the fun. There also will be drinks, appetizers and raffles. Honorary chairs are Burt Reynolds and Loreen Farish. Event chairs are Karen Chimato and Sandy Mast Tickets are $40 and can be purchased by calling BRIFT at (561) 743-9955. Tickets also will be available at the door. Saks is on the north side of The Gardens Mall, 3109 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens Q Burt Reynolds Institute to host murder mysteryInternationally acclaimed pianist Heather Coltman will perform her Romance of the Piano on Friday, Oct. 29, at the Lighthouse ArtCenter in Teques-ta, presenting a selection of passionate piano pieces from history. She will offer a glimpse into the minds of such piano greats as Mozart, Mendelssohn, Hensel and Gershwin. Were very much looking forward to hosting Dr. Coltmans performance in Tequesta,Ž said Lighthouse ArtCenter Executive Director Katie Deits. The pianists performance is one in a series of concerts throughout venues in South Florida, aside from Coltmans regular performance schedule as a solo and chamber musician. She also is chair of the Department of Music at Florida Atlantic University. The performance is scheduled to take place from 7 to 8 p.m. and is preceded by an hour of wine tasting and hors doeuvres beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for members and $15 for non-members. Purchase tickets by phone at 746-3101 or online at Light-housearts.org under Exhibitions and Events.Ž All proceeds benefit the programs of the Lighthouse ArtCenter, at Gal-lery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta, a half-mile west of U.S. 1. Museum hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m.4 p.m. with admission free for members and $5 for non-mem-bers ages 12 and up. Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. with free admission. Q Pianist Coltman to play at Lighthouse ArtCenterThe Lighthouse ArtCenter presented several awards to artists with works in its exhibition Landscapes 2010.Ž Katie Deits, executive director of the Tequesta museum, presented awards to several artists who received top hon-ors for their work in exhibition, open through Nov. 2 and juried by Clay Surovek of the Surovek Gallery in Palm Beach: John Allen, who received Best of Show for the hand-dyed metal, Dream-scapeŽ (priced at $2,500); Gwen Eye-ington, who received First Place for the oil on canvas, Everglades ReflectionŽ (priced at $4,300); Barbara Carswell, who received Second Place for the watercolor, Oak Island, NCŽ (priced at $950); AJ Brockman, who received Third Place for the Digital Painting on canvas, NozriderŽ (priced at $1,050). Honorable Mentions went to: John Bowen, for the watercolor, Seawall and Boat ReflectionŽ (priced at $850); Peter Debe, for the photograph, Ode to Florida (priced at $900); Durga Garcia for the photograph, Lunar Celebra-tionŽ (priced at $250); Duane Hatfield for the oil on canvas, Storm ComingŽ (priced at $400); Dr. Elise Hillmann for the acrylic on canvas, Sunset Over Loch LomandŽ (priced at $1,500); Ann Lawtey, for the oil on canvas, Mon-hegan LighthouseŽ (priced at $2,700); Tess Lindsay for the acrylic on canvas, Old Florida (priced at $850); Nancy Sloane for the digital print, Sunset at DawnŽ (priced at $300); Kit Snider for the archival digital print, Land-scapeŽ (priced at $750); Sue Traber for the photograph, Cinnamon SurpriseŽ (priced at $350). Im very happy with the turn-out of this show,Ž Deits says, and I know Clay Surovek found his role as judge no easy task.Ž The Lighthouse ArtCenter is in Gallery Square North, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta, Florida, a half-mile west of U.S. 1. Hours are Monday through Fri-day 10 a.m.4 p.m. with admission free for members and $5 for non-members ages 12 and up. Saturday hours are 10 a.m.2 p.m. with free admission. Call 746-3101 or log on to www.lighthouse-arts.org. Q Museum show highlights landscapes

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 WHAT TO DO, WHERE TO GO Thursday, Oct. 28 Q Starfish & Coffee Storytime Session – at the Loxahatchee River Center: 9:30 a.m. Oct. 28, Burt Reynolds Park, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter. Call (561) 743-7123 or visit www.loxahatcheeriver.org/rivercenter. Q Turtle Tots – Loggerhead Marinelife Center of Juno Beach, Loggerhead Park, 14200 S. U.S. 1, Juno Beach, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Oct. 28; $5-$8. marinelife.org. Q Robb & Stucky Design Seminar – Material World „ Fabric Transformations;Ž with consultant Wanda Robbins; 11 a.m., Oct. 28; Robb & Stucky Interiors, 3801 Design Center Drive, Palm Beach Gardens. Reservations required. 904-7200, option 5. Q Business After Hours – with the Cultural Alliance, sponsored by the Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce, 5-7 p.m. Oct. 28 at The Borland Center, MidTown, 4901 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. This event will showcase the many cultural groups in Northern Palm Beach County with presentations from nearly 20 cultural groups „ from the fine arts, performing arts, museums and wildlife attractions. The event also will feature drawings for many cultural prizes, including theater tickets, classes, books and other items. Guests will receive gift bags with souve-nirs. Call 746-7111. Friday, Oct. 29 Q Art Exhibition by Justin Rabideau – 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29-Nov. 29, Eissey Campus Theatre Lobby Gallery, Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive (off PGA Boulevard), Palm Beach Gardens. Call 207-5905. Q “Giving Back Is Always in Fashion” – Presented by Maltz Jupiter Theatre for Conservatory of Perform-ing Arts; Frenchmans Reserve Country Club, Palm Beach Gardens. 11:30 a.m.2 p.m., Oct. 29. Call 972-6124 or go to www.jupitertheatre.org. Q Scripps Virtual Exploration – Learn about Scripps Florida. Scripps Research Institute, 120 Scripps Way, Building B, Jupiter, 1:30 p.m., Oct. 29. Teens+. RSVP: 228-2015; scripps.edu/florida/events/specialseminars.html. Also: 1:30 p.m., Nov. 19, Dec. 14, Feb. 11, March 11, April 15. Q Halloween Party – Haunted Hammock Kids. Games, crafts, trick-or-treating, hay ride at local aquarium. River Center, 805 N. U.S. 1, Jupiter, 2-7 p.m., Oct. 29. $5. 743-7123; or email: RiverCenter@Loxa-hatcheeriver.org. Q Trick or Treat – Enjoy a Halloween celebration for children at 4:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29, at the Keller-Williams Realty Jupiter, Tequesta, Hobe Sound building, 4455 Military Trail, Jupiter. All local children are invited to attend. Q “The Woman in Black” – 8 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays; 6 p.m., Sun-days; 3 p.m., Saturdays; Oct. 29-Nov. 7; $20 ($15 for those in costume); The Atlantic Theater, 6743 W. Indiantown Road, Suite 34, Jupiter. $15; 575-4942; the-atlantictheater.com. Saturday, Oct. 30 Q Palm Beach Gardens Chess Club – 9 a.m.-4 p.m., North Palm Beach Parks and Recreation Center, 603 Anchorage Drive, art building. $2 per player per Saturday. USCF membership required. Call John Dockery, president/tournament director, at 762-3377. Q Boot Camp – 9-10 a.m., Saturdays; West Jupiter Recreation Center, 6401 Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Adults (13-17 years must be accompanied by an adult); $5. Call Constonsa Alexander at 694-5430. Q Saturday Kids Camp – weekly camp sponsored by Jupiter Outdoor Center; Session 1 „ 9 a.m.-noon; Session 2 „ 1-4 p.m., weekly; ages 7-13. $35 per session; advanced registration required. 747-0063; jupiteroutdoorcenter.com. Q Yogaboarding with Cora – 9:30 a.m., weekly; yoga and guided meditation, while Stand Up Paddling on the waters of the Jupiter River. Jupiter Outdoor Center; call 747-0063. Q Pumpkin Dive – 2:30 p.m. Oct. 30, Dive into the pool for your pump-kin, decorate your pumpkin and take it home. Activities will include music, hay fun, and a costume contest. Refresh-ments will be available for purchase. Bring your lawn chairs or blankets. At Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Garden, 630-1100; pbgfl.com. Q Boos And Brews – Food and wine festival/tasting, music, Halloween costume contests. Whole Foods Market, Downtown at the Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens, 6-10 p.m., Oct. 30. $20; benefits Autism Speaks of South Florida. acteva/go/palmbeachgardens. Q Fall Festival – Games, activities, costume contest, flashlight egg haunt,Ž trick or treat. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, 6-8 p.m., Oct. 30. pbgfl.com; (561) 630-1100. Sunday, Oct. 31 Q Trunk Or Treat – Safe, family friendly environment. Covenant Cen-tre International, 9153 Roan Lane, Palm Beach Gardens, 6 p.m., Oct. 31. 627-8138; covcentre.org. Q Taste in the Gardens Green Market Gardens Park, 4301 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens; 8 a.m. -1 p.m. Live entertainment, produce, plants, flowers, handmade crafts and prepared food and drink items. Free; no pets. For vendor information, call 772-6435. Q Dave & Aaron’s Workout on Stand Up Paddleboarding 9:30 a.m., Jupiter Outdoor Center. For reservations, call 747-0063; visit www.jupiteroutdoorcenter.com. Tuesday, Nov. 2 Q Twelve Angry Men – The court drama, Nov. 2-14, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Tickets: $39-$57. Call 575-2223; jupitertheatre.org Q “Five Thousand Years on the Loxahatchee” – Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, 500 Captain Armours Way, Jupiter, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday-Sunday. 747-8380, ext. 101; jupi-terlighthouse.org. Ongoing Q “Land-Escape” Art Exhibition – Features work by Jupiter artists Bruce Bain and Sonya Gaskell and Palm Beach Gardens artists Esther Gordon, Melinda Moore, and Ok-Hee Kay Nam; Palm Beach International Airport, Con-cession Level 2, West Palm Beach; on display through Dec. 15. www.pbcgov.com/fdo/art/registry.htm. Q Active Adult Getaway/ Morikami Museum – 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Nov. 4; Cost: $20 per person; ages 45 and older; register through West Jupiter Recreation Center, 6401 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter by Oct. 29. Call (561) 694-5430. Q Free Lighthouse History Lecture Series – Juno Beach Town Center, 340 Ocean Drive, 6-7 p.m., Nov. 4, Jan. 20, Feb. 17, March 17, 747-8380, ext. 101; jupiterlighthouse.org. Q San Jose Taiko – 7 p.m. Nov. 5, Kravis Centers Gosman Amphitheatre, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets: $10. 832-7469; kravis.org. Q Gardens Community Outdoor Yard Sale – Sell old treasures or buy new ones. Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, 7:30-11:30 a.m., Nov. 6. Also: Pre-register to sell, 15x10 space $20. Reg-ister: 630-1100; pbgfl.com. Q Hope Walk – Carlin Park, 400 A1A, Jupiter, 8 a.m., Nov. 6. Benefits Place of Hope. Register: 775-7195; placeofhope.com. Q Hibiscus Show & Sale – 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6, and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 7. More than 80 vendors will sell plants and supplies. The American Hibis-cus Sunrise-Conrad Chapter will be having their hibiscus show featuring many of the states best blooms. Hibiscus plants will be available at their booth. The PBC Wood-turners will be selling a large selection of their beautiful woodturnings. Palms, orchids, bamboo, begonias, bromeliads, fruit trees and many other types of plants will be for sale at the Mounts Botanical Garden, 531 N. Military Trail, West Palm Beach. Cost: $5 per person. Call 233-1757 or visit www.mounts.org. Q Palm Beach Pops – Let It Be „ The Beatles with The Nylons. Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach Gardens, 8 p.m., Nov. 7. $75-$85. 832-7677; palm-beachpops.org. Q Lighthouse Sunset Tour – Jupiter Lighthouse, call for times, Nov. 10 & 24; $15. RSVP: 747-8380, ext. 101. Q United States Army Signal Corps Band, “Signal Distor-tion” – Concert 11 a.m. Nov. 11, Veterans Plaza, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Free. 630-1100; pbgfl.com. Q Parents Night Out – For ages 6-11; West Jupiter Recreation Center, 6401 W. Indiantown Road, Jupiter; 5:30-9 p.m., Nov. 12; Dec. 10; $5. Call 694-5430. Q Middle School Lock-In – A sleepover event sponsored by the Jew-ish Federaltion of Palm Beach Countys Jewish Teen Initiative, 8 p.m. Satur-day, Nov. 13, at the Doubletree Hotel, 4431 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Snacks, a DJ, games, transportation to and from the event, and a light breakfast on Sunday, Nov. 14, will be included. Cost is $20 if registered and paid for by Monday, Nov. 8. The cost increases to $25 after Nov. 8. Registration and transportation schedule is available at www.JTIPalmBeach.org. Call 242-6630 or e-mail Adrienne.Winton@Jewish-PalmBeach.org. Q Doobie Brothers – 8 p.m. Nov. 13, Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets: $25-$100. 832-7469; kravis.org. Q Girls Night Out – Food and cocktails. PGA National Resort and Spa, 400 Avenue of Champions, Jupiter, 5:30-8 p.m. Nov. 17. Ages 21+. pgaresort.com. Q Art & Music in the Gardens – With Faces, Figures & FantasyŽ by Susan Megur, 6-8 p.m. Nov. 19, City Hall Lobby and Veterans Plaza, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Free. pbgfl.com. Q A Journey Through Italy –With tenor Franco Corso, 8 p.m. Nov. 19, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indian-town Road, Jupiter. Tickets: $45 orches-tra, $40 mezzanine. Fund-raiser for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Guild. Phone: 575-2223; jupitertheatre.org. Q The Ugly Duckling – Starring Pinky Flamingo in this production with giant puppets, 2 p.m. Nov. 20, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Tickets: $12. 575-2223; jupitertheatre.org. Q Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Fall Sundowner – An evening of beachside with music, food, drink, live auction. Benefits Loxahatchee River Historical Society, 5:30-8 p.m., Nov. 20. 747-8380, ext. 10; jupiterlighthouse.org. Q Art in the Gardens – Two-day art festival. Midtown, 4801 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 20-21. 748-3946; npbchamber.com. Q Dreamgirls – Nov. 23-28, Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Tickets: $25 and up. 832-7469; kravis.org. Q 29th Annual Citrus Nationals – Nov. 27-28, Palm Beach International Raceway, 17047 Beeline Highway, Jupiter. Country singer Josh Thompson sings at 9 p.m. Nov. 27. Adult reserved seat, full event tickets are $40 and junior (12 and under) admission is $20. Gen-eral admission full event adult tickets are $30 and juniors are free. Concert only tickets can be purchased at $20 for adults and $5 for juniors. 622-1400; racepbir.com.„ Send calendar listings to events@ floridaweekly.com.Boos And Brews: Food and wine festival/ tasting, music, Halloween costume contests. Whole Foods Market, Downtown at the Gardens, Palm Beach Gardens, 6-10 p.m., Oct. 30. $20; benefits Autism Speaks of South Florida. Al so: 1 : 30 p .m., N ov. 1 Feb. 11, March 11, A p Q H a ll owee n – H a un te d H K ids. Game s trick-or-trea t F win e f t ast i n g si c, Ha cos te F $ ef S pe Sou Coming up

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C7 >>What: The Rocky Horror Show >>When: Through Sat., Oct. 30 >>Where: Slow Burn Theatre Co., at West Boca Community High School, 12811 West Glades Rd., Boca Raton>>Cost: $30 >>Info: (866) 811-4111 in the know Boca Ratons Slow Burn Theatre Company, now beginning its second season, prides itself on producing musicals with a dark edginess, as its inaugural attractions, Bat BoyŽ and AssassinsŽ can attest. But edge and danger are exactly the qualities that are missing from its version of The Rocky Horror Show,Ž playing through this weekend with a midnight show on Hal-loween eve. Rocky HorrorŽ is, of course, a spoof of B-level horror flicks mixed with an allego-ry of sexual liberation. But ever since the show gained cult status „ and audience interaction „ with the wildly successful 1975 movie adaptation, it has been hard to wrest it from parody mode. Written by songsmith Richard OBrien, who insinuated his way into the shows original cast as well as the movie, Rocky HorrorŽ is hardly textbook tidy with its dramaturgy. Instead, it comes off as an occasional storyline on which 15 or so musical numbers are haphazardly hung. And if the show was ever shocking, you would never know it from the squeaky-clean production at Slow Burn. For what it is worth, the show follows the dilemma of nerdy Brad and virginal Janet „ engaged to each other, but deter-mined to save themselves for marriage. Alas, they get a flat tire on a remote, rainy road and decide to walk to the nearby foreboding castle to phone for assistance. Little do they know what a journey of dis-covery this will be, for the castle belongs to fishnet-stockinged, high-heeled Dr. Frank N Furter, a sweet transvestite, transsexu-al from Transylvania,Ž as he will introduce himself in song. Anyway, before this, matters begin quite promisingly with the opening number, Sci-ence Fiction Double Fea-ture,Ž sung with gusto by Renata Eastlick. She returns later as one of Furters minions, Magenta, stealing most of the scenes she is in. She commands a lot more attention than Noah Levine (Brad) and Alexa Cappiello (Janet), who are fine in the early going, but neither one makes much of a transition when liberat-ed by Furters sexual prowess. Rick Pena designs some nicely abbreviated costumes for them, but one gets the impression that the wardrobe is doing more character work than the two performers. Larry Buzzeo (Frank N Furter) fills out a bustier well enough, but he misses much of the characters menace. Director Pat-rick Fitzwater wisely tries to avoid com-parisons with the movie in his casting, though trading in Tim Curry for a Charles Busch type only sends us further into camp. Matthew Korinko, the companys co-artistic director, takes on the thankless role of the shows narrator and manages not to earn a single laugh with it. Since it was probably unavoidable, Slow Burn encourages Rocky HorrorŽ group-ies with their audience shout-outs, and allows newbies to play along by selling them packets of participatory props and instruction sheets. But at an early perfor-mance, the cast seemed a bit unnerved by these interruptions. I am not convinced there is a dark show lurking inside The Rocky Horror Show,Ž but Slow Burn certainly never found it. The results of this dubious exercise are decidedly rocky. Q THEATER REVIEW ‘Rocky Horror Show’ lacks danger, dark edginess p w hap ERSTEIN herstein@floridaweekly.com O COURTESY PHOTOAlexa Cappiello and Noah Levine play Janet and Brad in the Slow Burn Theatre Company’s “The Rocky Horror Show.” YOUR VOTE CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE! MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE www.jupitertheatre.orgNOVEMBER 2-14 alk to the nearby e h e i at o h e o f ntastealingmost

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C8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYFLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.com WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C9 Apparel and Accessories IZOD StoragLF9VFER3YXXXIVW>SI];MPPS[ Entertainment 'SFF8LIEXVIWCSN MEDIA Eyewear 'SYXYVI3TXMUYI Health & Beauty /ISPE,IEPXLERH;IPPRIWW2I[6EHMERGI8VIZERE%ZIHE7EPSR Home Furnishings & Dcor 'ERHPIWF]1MQMW(EYKLXIV'EWEFPERGE,MPHE*PEGO(IWMKRW4EXMS;SVPH6S]EPX](IWMKR>+EPPIVMI Restaurants 'EFS*PEXW'LIIWIGEOI*EGXSV]1.W*VIWL6%7YWLM8SS.E]W=EVH,SYWI Services %0EXXI*YR'LEFEHSJ4EPQ&IEGL+EVHIRW.SLR'LYXIV4LSXSKVETL] Specialty Food 'EJJI(YSQS*VS]SXSTME COMING SOON! 7PSERW-GI'VIEQ;LSPI*SSHW1EVOIX Specialty Retail %ZMH8EGOPI'VIEXMZI7SPI&SYXMUYI1]+MJX%ZIRYI4EPQ&IEGL%YXSKVETLW4EPQ&IEGL8SXW COMING SOON! 7YV0E8EFPI7[SS^MIW9VFER/SYXYVI;LSPI4IX)WWIRXMEPW COMING SOON! ;MVIPIWWXS+S:IVM^SR;MVIPIWW 8LIVIMWRSWYGLXLMRKEWEJVIIPYRGLFYX=396OMHWGERIEXHMRRIVJSV*6))IZIV]8LYVWHE]at A Latte Fun -RHSSV4PE] KVSYRHn'EJIJVSQXSTQ6IGIMZIEJVIIOMHWQIEP[MXLIEGLEHYPXQIEPTYVGLEWI%RHHSRXJSVKIXSYVHVSTSJJTVSKVEQJSVTEVIRXW[ERXMRKXSXEOIEHZERXEKISJ(S[RXS[REXXLI+EVHIRWWLSTTMRK Fall Sidewalk Sale 7EXYVHE]3GXSFIVXLEQYRXMPTQ :MWMXXLIWLSTWSJ(S[RXS[RJSVXLIPEXIWX MRJEWLMSRWEGGIWWSVMIWERHWTIGMEPXMIW 'SQTPMQIRXEV]ZEPIXTEVOMRK .SMRYWSR;IHRIWHE]2SZIQFIVJSV The Lexus Taste at Downtown at the Gardens. 8LMWJYRPPIHEZSVJYPIZIRMRKJIEXYVIWGYPMREV]HIPMKLXWERHXEWX]PMFE XMSRWWIVZIH F]WSQISJXLIRIWXVIWXEYVERXWERHFIZIVEKIKVSYTWMRXLI4EPQ&IEGLIW )RNS]PMZIQYWMG WXIPPEVJSSHERHHVMROGSSOMRKI\LMFMXMSRWERHEFPE^MRKVI[SVOW HMWTPE] 8LMWIZIRXWIVZIWEWXLITVMQEV]JYRHVEMWMRKMRMXMEXMZIJSVXLI&M K,IEVX&VMKEHIW8LEROWKMZMRK(MRRIV(VMZI :MWMX[[[&MK,IEVX&VMKEHIGSQJSVQSVIMRJSVQEXMSR 8EWXI4EWWIWEXXLIIZIRXrˆ,SWTMXEPMX]0SYRKIEXXLIIZIRX MJEZEMPEFPIr *VIIZEPIXTEVOMRKJSVEPP0I\YWZILMGPIW Visit www.tasteatdowntown.com What’s Going On Downtown? At 4:40 p.m. on Nov. 1, assuming no weather or technical issues crop up, the space shuttle Discovery will lift off from launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on its way to its 39th and final spaceflight. During its 4.5 million mile, 11-day trip, Discovery will dock at the International Space Center to deliver equipment that includes Robonaut 2, the first space-bound humanoid robot (didn’t we learn anything from Blade Runner?) and the crew will make two spacewalks before returning to KSC. I grew up watching the Apollo launches, though I only really remember the later ones, and they always generated the kind of excitement I usually reserved for days I got new toys, like Christmas or my birthday. Even so, I doubt that I under-stood the full ramifications of what I was watching; my 6-year-old self was prob-ably less thrilled by Neil Armstrong’s stroll on the moon than by flames and fury of the launch itself (which may well have contributed to my obsession with blowing stuff up with firecrackers). This week, as she does once or twice a year, my mother is flying down for a visit that will include a trip to KSC for Discovery’s launch, something we only dreamed of doing back when she and I sat glued to Walter Cronkite’s coverage of the space program. Those early launches pointed us both towards space-geekdom, and shuttle launches have become events around which many of my mother’s vis-its are scheduled; we get together, have some hearty family meals, engage in a bit of holiday-style debate, and then head north to watch the launch and relive those simple, rare, Beaver Cleaver-like moments we spent sitting on an avocado-green rug, in front an old RCA television, watching our heroes leave Earth and head into space. Now you may not consider a space shuttle launch worthy of a family reunion, but the family get-together holiday sea-son is just around the corner, like it or not. And if you want to keep your major family get-togethers from turning into disasters of poor-ly cooked proteins (disasters due to unresolved family issues like the time you pulled the head off your sister’s Barbie are beyond my purview, sorry), I strongly advise that you get your meat-cooking toolbox in order right now. First up: an accurate meat thermometer, which probably doesn’t describe the one in your junk drawer. This can be a critically important and easily over-looked cooking tool. Working with an inaccurate meat thermometer is like play-ing a game of blindfolded catch with handfuls of pudding: unless you’re pretty lucky, you’re going to have a mess to deal with. More importantly: why would you even try? The good news is that it’s easy to find out if your meat thermometer is worth keeping by using it to check the tem-perature of boiling water: it should read 212, give or take a couple of degrees. The bad news is that it probably won’t. I like to see readings within two degrees; five degrees off and you’re push-ing your luck, 10 degrees off and you might as well consult your Magic 8 Ball for cooking times. If yours is more random number generator than thermometer, ditch it and get a new one. Believe me when I tell you it’s money well spent: you don’t want to spend this Thanks-giving watching your great aunt Mabel throw an elbow to your daughter’s throat when they both dive for the gravy boat, which will probably be near-empty any-way since your guests have been doing shots of gravy all night just to be able to choke down a few bites of your over-cooked bird. For a simple all-purpose unit, a digital instant-read thermometer is your best bet. More accurate and much quicker than the mechanical dial versions (three of which I just tested and found to be off by a minimum of 10 degrees: the difference between a delightfully juicy meat dish and a roast-shaped doorstop), digitals like the Taylor Weekend Warrior can be bought for under 20 bucks. Make sure the one you purchase can be calibrated and you’ll have something well worth the dosh. For pure accuracy and dependability, take a look at an old-school alcohol leave-in thermometer. Commonly called roast/yeast thermometers, you probably remember them from your grandmother’s kitchen. They look like creepy oral ther-mometers with thin metal plates attached to the back, on which are screened tem-peratures and meat-doneness ranges. They take a while to get to temp, but they’re extremely accurate, reliable and cheap, and hipsters can revel in their pleasingly retro look while checking to see if the lamb is done. Finally, you’ve got remote probe thermometers. These are leave-in units as well, but have a thin wire leading to a remote display allowing you to monitor meat temperatures without opening the oven or grill. The more full-featured units THE MASHUP Essential tools for out-of-this-world grillinginclude dual probes: one to monitor food temp, and one to monitor oven or grill temp, which is hugely use-ful if you’re cooking low and slow. Also avail-able: wireless remote units, though acceptable uses for these are limited. Sitting in front of the TV and ignoring your food: not acceptable. Setting a low temperature alert that wakes you up at 3 a.m. to add char-coal to the smoker: definitely acceptable, and extremely cool. Next up: a meat tenderizer. I went without one of these for far too long, resorting to using the edge of a plate to tenderize chick-en breasts or tough cuts of meat. But plates won’t pound your meat to braciole thickness, and they tend to leave fur-rows in chicken breasts that make them look like freshly raked Zen gardens. Dandy if you’re looking to meditate over poultry, not so much if you want to cook it consistently. For a long time I was a fan of the hammer style tenderizer I grew up with, but I’ve come to love one I picked up recently at a local culinary shop. It’s a contoured vertical handle that screws into a heavy, reversible circular base. On one side is a simple flat surface, and on the other is a field of sharp, cone-shaped spikes suitable for spouse discipline. It’s heavy, controllable, works great on any cut of meat, and can be used for oddball jobs like breaking down dry stuffing (which is soaked in milk and used in my meatloaf, the subject of a future column). This last essential tool capitalizes on a great reason to live in Florida even if you don’t love space shut-tles: the Fall-to-Spring grilling weather. Summer as grill season in South Florida must be a marketing ploy; it’s already hotter than any rea-sonable person could ever wish for, and adding the heat of a grill seems nuts. For anyone who sweats as much as I do, grilling season starts in September and ends in May. And when I grill, I go charcoal. Grilling is about flavor, and nothing starts building flavor bet-ter than cooking with charcoal, whether or not you use wood chips. And when it comes to charcoal grilling I have yet to find a better product than the standard Weber kettle grill. You can get them with huge tables attached or with hidden propane tanks used to light your charcoal, but skip all that noise and go with the basic Weber One-Touch Silver or Gold. The Weber Gold adds a hinged grate (to add coals on the fly) and an ash catcher, which is convenient during windy days, but costs an additional 60 dollars. For that cash you can pick up the Silver, a separate hinged grate, a charcoal lighting chimney, a big MASHUPFrom page C8 SEE MASHUP, C9 X Maverick ET-73 Taylor Roast & Yeast Thermometer Taylor Week-end Warrior Thermom-eter Reversible Meat Tenderizer from Williams Sonomabag of Kingsford briquettes (yes, there is a difference, I’ve tested them), a couple of pounds of ground chuck and a six pack of Dogfish Head 60 minute IPA. They work identically, so if the ash catcher is a deal breaker, go Gold, otherwise the Silver is a great choice, and reasonably at under 100 bucks. So this weekend, as my family gets together for a few (hopefully) well cooked-meals, there will be little need for the technology that space program advocates sometimes use to justify our forays into space. But neither is there need for such simplistic justifications; to us, at least, the space program has already given more than enough. Q — The Mashup is Bradford Schmidt’s weekly column on meat, technology, music and mashups thereof. His meat adventures are also detailed on his blog, The Meatist, at meatist.com. He can be followed on Twitter @BradfordSchmidt and welcomes suggestions, comments, questions, and offerings of prime beef IHOP restaurants in Florida is offering kids 12 and under a free Scary Face Pancake as part of a national No Tricks — Just Treats program designed to pro-vide kids with a safe and fun Halloween event. It’s Friday, Oct. 29 from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Children’s Miracle Network “bal-loons” are available for purchase for $1 and will be personalized and displayed through Oct. 31. The proceeds from balloon sales will benefit a local Children’s Miracle Network hospital. Q IHOP offering free “scary” hotcakesThe Lighthouse ArtCenter held an opening reception on Oct. 7 its spooky exhibition, “Hocus Pocus.” During the evening, Katie Deits, executive director of the Tequesta museum, awarded artists for exceptional work in “Hocus Pocus,” which is open through Nov. 2: Judith Coffman, who received Best in Show for the oil painting, “A Time for Crows” (priced at $350); Linda Mathison, who received First Place for the photo-graph, “They’re Here” (priced at $150); Durga Garcia, who received Second Place for the photograph on panel, “Toth’s Bird” (priced at $200); Camille Babusik, who received Third Place for the oil painting, “Bring in the Clowns.” Honorable Mentions went to: Jo Chamness, for the mixed media, “Peacock Mask” (priced at $600); Steven Goodman, for the photograph, “Crying” (priced at $400); Tess Lindsay, for the acrylic paint-ing, “Birdman” (priced at $500). The Lighthouse ArtCenter is located in Gallery Square North, 373 Teques-ta Drive, Tequesta, Florida, a half-mile west of U.S. 1. Museum hours are Mon-day through Friday 10 a.m.4 p.m. with admission free for members and $5 for non-members ages 12 and up. Saturday hours are 10 a.m.2 p.m. with free admis-sion. Call 746-3101 or log on to www.lighthousearts.org. Q Lighthouse ArtCenter hosts spooky show bradford SCHMIDT bschmidt@floridaweekly.com O

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www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYC10 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 W SEE ANSWERS, C5 W SEE ANSWERS, C52010 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. 2010 King Features Synd., Inc. World rights reserved. Freshest Fajitas in Town 6390 Indiantown Rd. Ste. 45 6390 Indiantown Rd. Ste. 45 6390 Indiantown Rd. Ste. 45 FLORIDA WEEKLY PUZZLES HOROSCOPES BIOPICS By Linda Thistle ++ Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine. + Moderate ++ Challenging +++ ExpertPuzzle Difficulty this week: Q SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Rely on your keen instincts as well as the facts at hand when dealing with a troubling situa-tion. Be patient. Take things one step at a time as you work through it. Q SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your curiosity leads you to ask questions. How-ever, the answers might not be what you hoped to hear. Dont reject them without checking them out. Q CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Be careful not to tackle a problem without sufficient facts. Even sure-footed Goats need to know where theyll land before leaping off a mountain path. Q AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Appearances can be deceiving. You need to do more inves-tigating before investing your time, let alone your money, in something that might have some hidden flaws. Q PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your recent stand on an issue could make you the focus of more attention than you would like. But youll regain your privacy, as well as more time with loved ones, by weeks end. Q ARIES (March 21 to April 19 ) Your honesty continues to impress everyone who needs reassurance about a project. But be careful you dont lose patience with those who are still not ready to act. Q TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Pushing others too hard to do things your way could cause resentment and raise more doubts. Instead, take more time to explain why your methods will work. Q GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be more considerate of those close to you before making a decision that could have a serious effect on their lives. Explain your intentions and ask for their advice. Q CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might have to defend a work-place decision you plan to make. Col-leagues might back you up on this, but its the facts that will ultimately win the day for you. Good luck. Q LEO (July 23 to August 22) The Big Cats co-workers might not be doing enough to help get that proj-ect finished. Your roars might stir things up, but gentle purrr-suasion will prove to be more effective. Q VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone you care for needs help with a problem. Give it lovingly and without judging the situation. Whatever you feel you should know will be revealed later. Q LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) While youre to be admired for how you handled recent work-place problems, be careful not to react the same way to a new situation until all the facts are in. Q BORN THIS WEEK: Youre a good friend and a trusted confi-dante. You would be a wonderful teacher and a respected member of the clergy.

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FLORIDA WEEKLY WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 C11 1/2 PRICE SALE To celebrate the FIRST ANNIVERSARY of our great new larger location, we are reducing our sale shoes to 50% OFFPLUS BUY 3 and get a 4th FREE Donald Pliner U Naot U MBT U "iUii U ˆ' U V…i >œ U BeautiFeel U œUVœ U Kork-Ease U *>'>i Rieker U -> U Think U /…ˆi,>Lœˆ U /i> U Ugg and more Men’s & Women’s Luxury Comfort Footwear In the Gardens Square ShoppesMilitary Trail and PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens x£‡x‡££U…œi>'>Vœ“ OPEN 10-7 MONDAY THRU SATURDAY, 11-5 SUNDAYWhats amazing about HereafterŽ is that in 129 minutes, nothing happens. Three separate storylines, location shoot-ing in London, Paris and San Francisco, and nothing. For a movie that aspires to explore what happens after we die, all it really explores is what happens when you focus on pathetically boring people with nothing to do. Youd think with Clint Eastwood directing a script by Peter Morgan (Frost/NixonŽ) thered be some original, bold things to say about life and mortality. But no. Not even close. What we do get are three disparate storylines that barely connect.George (Matt Damon) is a blue-collar American who has a special connection to the afterlife. On the other side of the world, French journalist Marie (Ccile de France) has a near-death experience that shakes her reality. And when Marcus (George McLaren and Frankie McLaren), a London schoolboy, loses the person clos-est to him, he desperately needs answers.The biggest problem with Mr. Morgans script isnt that the characters dont physically intersect more, its that the-matically the stories dont connect. The whole point of exploring mortality issues from three perspectives is to allow the actions in one storyline to reflect and/or enhance the other storylines. But that never happens here; its as if each charac-ter is in his/her own movie that has noth-ing to do with the others until the very end, and by then its too late. If each individual journey were interesting, this might be forgivable, but really only Georges plotline is compelling. He views his ability to communicate with the dead as a curse, which is fascinating, especially with his avaricious brother (Jay Mohr) trying to exploit his gift for profit. When George meets Melanie (Bryce Dal-las Howard) at a cooking class and they strike up a flirtation, he knows his ability is both the most interesting thing about him and the one surefire way to ruin any future they might have. More focus on George would have been welcome, especially since so little is offered with Marie and Marcus. Mr. East-wood uses catastrophic events to try to drive home some emotion, and both the Indonesian tsunami that Marie survives and the London subway bombing that Marcus avoids are nicely done. But other than that, the characters never approach being interesting. That HereafterŽ will go down as the most boring and directionless film of 2010 goes without saying. That it couldve been something great might be an over-statement, but the truth is its a big tease: It never really delves into what happens in the afterlife; its only about people who are curious about what happens after we die. And when they dont find answers, were all left scratching our heads. Q „ Dan Hudak is the chairman of the Florida Film Critics Circle and a nationally syndicated film critic. You can e-mail him at dan@hudakonhollywood.com and read more of his work at www.hudakonhollywood.com.LATEST FILMS ‘Hereafter’ ++ Is it worth $10? No >> Peter Morgan wrote the screenplay shortly after losing a friend in an accident. “He died so suddenly, so violently,” he said. “It made no sense. His spirit was still so alive around us, at his funeral I was probably thinking what everyone else was: ‘Where has he gone?’” in the know dan HUDAK O www.hudakonhollywood.com #&--"7*5"1*;;"$"'c8*OEJBOUPXO3PBEr4UF…+VQJUFSr'-… 2 Large 1-Topping Pizzas $1599 Must present ad. There are many Pizzas...But Only One BELLA PIZZAOPEN NOW.. Small Cheese Pizza & 10 Wings $1199 /P W Q N CHEESE SLICE & SODA $ 1 99 / / / / P P W ! ! Q N 6 Mozzarella Stix & 6 Chicken Fingers $999

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C12 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLY 8 2010 Madison Square Garden, L.P. All rights reserved. Radio City, Radio City Music Hall, Radio City Christmas Spectacular and Rockettes are trademarks of Radio City Trademarks, LLC. GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY OPENS NOVEMBER 11! Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall € (239) 481-4849 € www.bbmannpah.comFor Groups of 20 or more, call Lois Soscia at (239) 489-3033 x3122 or email lsoscia@bbmannpah.com Thur Nov. 11 … … … 8:00Fri Nov. 12 … … 5:00 8:00 Sat Nov. 13 11:00 2:00 5:00 8:00 Sun Nov. 14 … 1:00 4:00 7:00 Tues Nov. 16 … … … 8:00 Wed Nov. 17 … 2:00 … 8:00Thur Nov. 18 … 2:00 … 8:00Fri Nov. 19 … 2:00 5:00 8:00 Sat Nov. 20 11:00 2:00 5:00 8:00Sun Nov. 21 … 1:00 4:00 7:00Tues Nov. 23 … … … 8:00Wed Nov. 24 … 2:00 … 8:00 38 Dazzling Performances! FIFTH THIRD BANK IS THE OFFICIAL BANK OF THE 2010-2011 BROADWAY SERIES G arden, L.P. All rights reserved. Radio City, Radio City Music Hall, Radio City Christmas Spectacular and Rockettes are tra de ov. 14 … 1:00 4:00 7:00 Fri 6XSSRUWHGLQSDUWE\ AMERICAS FAVORITE HOLIDAY SHOW ART BRIEFS Q Bob Lappin and The Palm Beach Pops will launch their 19th concert season for 2010-2011, on Nov. 1, with Let It Beƒ The Beatles.Ž Q Shows, with The Nylons as guest artists, are 8 p.m. Nov. 1-3 at Florida Atlantic Uni-versity in Boca Raton, Nov. 5-6 at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach and Nov. 7 at the Eissey Campus Theatre at Palm Beach State College in North Palm Beach. Q Next up, the Pops will perform The Best of Broadway,Ž with stage veterans David Burnham and Christine Andreas. Shows are 8 p.m. Nov. 29-30 at the Kravis Center, Dec. 1, 3 and 5 at FAU and Dec. 6 at Eissey. Q In January, the Pops will perform The Streisand Songbook,Ž with singer/actress Glo-ria Loring. Shows are 8 p.m. Jan. 4-6 at FAU, Jan. 9 at Eissey and Jan. 10-11 at the Kravis. Q In February, the John Pizzarelli Quartet joins the Pops for An Evening of Rodgers & Hart.Ž Shows are 8 p.m. Feb. 8 at Eissey, Feb. 9-10 at the Kravis and Feb. 11, 12 and 14 at FAU. Q Las Vegas entertainer Clint Holmes honors a legend in March by Celebrating the Great Sammy Davis Jr.Ž Shows are 8 p.m. March 9, 11 and 12 at FAU, March 13 at Eissey and March 14-15 at the Kravis. Q In April, The Music of Billy Joel and MoreŽ features the vocal and piano stylings of Michael Cavanaugh, a Grammy and Tony award-nominated artist handpicked by Joel himself to star in Movin On.Ž Shows are 8 p.m. April 4-5, April 7-9 at FAU and April 10 at the Kravis. Tickets are $29-$89 and are available by calling 832-7677 or visiting www.palmbeachpops.org/tickets. Q Palm Beach Pops season set to open The city of Palm Beach Gardens will present a Veterans Day cer-emony and concert with the U.S. Signal Corps Band, Signal Distor-tion. The concert is scheduled for 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 11, at Veter-ans Plaza, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens. Based at Fort Gordon, Ga., Signal Distortion performs for audiences through-out the United States. The groups nine members will perform a vari-ety of popular tunes from singers and groups. The event is free and open to the public. Call 630-1100 or visit www.pbgfl.com. Q U.S. Signal Corps band to play Veterans Day concert COURTESY PHOTO

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.comWEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C13 FLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. Key to the Cure 2010 — Kickoff reception at Saks Fifth Avenue1. Megan Detwiter and Angela Prochazka2. Stacey Brandt, Cathy Bush, Lynn Stockford, Jill Kamla and Marie Baker3. Kim Nuchereno, Jessica Arcari and Piel Barnard4. Kristin Esper and Ellen Rondinelli5. Maria Dattolo, Casey Nicklaus and Madisyn Deleo6. Lesley Vestrich and Georgette Pressler7. Debbi Hager8. Nancy Smith and Cathy KopitnikRACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 36 78 5 4 2

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C14 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 www.FloridaWeekly.com FLORIDA WEEKLYFLORIDA WEEKLY SOCIETY Wines of the World at PGA National Resort1. Jeff Alexander and Jim O’Brien2. Dave Nelson, Judy Nelson, Jeff Willis and Sherry Willis3. Toni Forbs, Rodney Forbs, Valorie Fischbach and Kathleen O’Sullivan-Petcoff4. Howard Routman, Brenda Morgan and Sean Hockman5. Zolena Brown, Jennifer Smitko and Tricey Ward6. Chuck Desiderio and Simone Desiderio 5 RACHEL HICKEY / FLORIDA WEEKLY 1 2 3 4 5 6 We take more society and networking photos at area events than we can “ t in the newspaper. So, if you think we missed you or one of your friends, go to www.” oridaweekly.com and view the photo albums from the many events we cover. You can purchase any of the photos too. Send us your society and networking photos. Include the names of everyone in the picture. E-mail them to society@” oridaweekly.com. 13 6 4 5 2

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FLORIDA WEEKLY www.FloridaWeekly.comWEEK OF OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2010 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C15 FLORIDA WEEKLY CUISINE Several new restaurants have opened in the north county area recently, many from veteran restaurateurs. In North Palm Beach, Kubo, featuring Asiatic cuisine, opened in the Crystal Tree Plaza. Its been four years in the making, says chef/owner Roy Villacru-sis. The chef brought sushi to CityPlace when Marks at CityPlace opened. The name refers to both a Japanese house, and a family name meaning long life, he said. I want to welcome guests as they might be welcomed into my house,Ž Villacrusis said. Kubo is not just sushi „ its Asiatic cuisine. It started with the question, What would sushi be like if it had not started in Japan? The menu has many influences from the Philippines, Japan, China, Vietnamese „ with my interpre-tations,Ž he said. Trips to those countries, tasting foods and exploring cooking methods has helped him put together the menu of small plates in a casual setting. An example is a mashup of a bahn mi „ a Vietnamese barbecued pork sand-wich, served inside the Chinese baozi, or cha siu baau „ the steamed pork bun. The bun is a soft, pillowy foldover, encasing tender roast pork, with cilantro and a special barbecue sauce. A nod to the popularity of street foods is on the menu, with Filippino skewered foods cooked over a grill „ including isaws (pork and chicken), atay (chicken liver) and balan-balunan „ grilled chick-en liver. Appropriate dipping sauces are served with each. Kubo is loosely based on Japanese izkayas, which literally translates to Jap-anese pub,Ž he said. The red-walled and white-tiled restaurant, punctuated with black accents, features a long counter where diners can watch the foods being prepared, chairs and tables with a corner bar, plus an outdoor patio where tables and chairs are protected from the elements by canvas curtains. The courtyard on the plazas end, with a fountain, is ideal,Ž Villacrusis said, for live music and partiesŽ that are planned, as well as lunch service. Kubo, 1201 U.S. Highway 1 (Crystal Tree Plaza), North Palm Beach; (776) 7248, open Tuesday-Thursday, 5-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5-11 p.m.Carmine replaces Nochewith fish grillCarmine Giardini, owner of Palm Beach Gardens gourmet market bearing his name, as well as CG Burger (a new one opens soon at PGA Boulevard and U.S. 1) and Carmines Coal Fired Pizza, plans to open Umi Fish Bar and Grill in the old Noche nightclub space within the next two months. The concept will return Giardini to fish restaurants „ he started the popular Ocean Grill, now closed, across from the gourmet market. Coming aboard as a partner and to help create the menu is Chef John Bel-leme, most recently of Henrys in Delray Beach, and before that, Zemi in Boca Raton. Its going to be a very exciting project,Ž Belleme said. Its going to be wild, but not too wild. Im excited to be getting back to Asian fusion „ its what I do best,Ž he said. There will be an extensive sushi menu, and the former bar at Noche is going to be dedicated to the sushi and raw bar „ well have a large raw bar menu, too,Ž Belleme said. A lot of sharing, tapas-style plates is on the main menu. People can come in and order two or three to share and have that be their dining experience, or they can order ala carte from the robata menu „ salmon and fish, grilled lamb chops by the piece, or vegetables „ you could put together a whole vegetarian dinner from the grill.Ž Some will be based on Asian street foods like satay with sauces, he said. For the traditional diner, a list of entrees also is on the list. Carmine isnt sure this area is ready for a tapas or small-plates menu exclu-sively,Ž he said. Were going to offer both.Ž Karen Hanlon, who designed Noche, will return to redesign the restaurant. The whole back area of the restaurant, opening on to the waterfront, will be an indoor-outdoor bar,Ž Belleme said, similar to the one at Giardinis other res-taurant, Cabo Flats in Palm Beach Gardens Downtown at the Gardens. Were on the water „ it would be nuts not to capitalize on it.Ž Mock dinners will be served until the grand opening in December, Belleme said, then the restaurant will be open for dinner daily. Umi Fish Bar and Grill, 2401 PGA Blvd., (in the Harborside Plaza), Palm Beach Gardens. (Phone and web site coming soon.)Holy Smokes! replaces Shorty’s BBQThe smoker is still on the premises, but Shortys BBQ in the PGA Plaza (behind Anthonys Coal Fired Pizza) is no more. After I wanted to put in a full bar, and they didnt want me to, we parted ways,Ž says Solomon Kedmi, who part-nered with the long-time Shortys to open their first non-Dade branch. We wanted to do something dif-ferent,Ž he said, of Holy Smokes! His pre-teen daughter gave it the unique name, he said. She came up with it riding in the car one day.Ž The menu is casual, but with upscale touches; a mix of American grill foods „ burgers, ribs and barbe-cue „ including the signature pulled pork taco with cole slaw „ and pizza. I put in pizza ovens here and brought my crew from Portofino,Ž he said. At that Singer Island spot, late-night after-work crowds kept him busy. We have a following for that pizza. The same guy who has been making it 30 years is here with me again.Ž An inside-outside bar, punctuated with a car grill coming through the wall overhead the patio, is popular again with the late-night hospitality workers and sports fans who come for the games on the plasma TVs around the bar. Families come early, because of the good values, then the clientele gets younger as the night is later.Ž Its moderately priced with few items over $15. Holy Smokes, 2650 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, 561-624-7427. Serving from 11:30 a.m. to late night daily.Gulfstream Caf from NY Prime ownersIn the old Tavern of Jupiter space, the Gulfstream Caf has opened. Its from the same owners of the Tavern, but with a new concept and management team. The menu is seafood-based, with touches of Southern cooking adding a spin. Steaks and pasta round out the menu. Crab cakes, she crab soup and several fried seafood platters are on the entre and appetizer menus, along with shrimp and grits done New Orleans style with blackened shrimp, andouille sausage and creamy cheese grits. In season, oyster roasts will take place, but for now, Sunday Brunch is a big deal, with a special Bloody Mary bar „ patrons get the spicy glass of toma-to juice and vodka and add in their own gar-nishes and flavorings from offerings such as olives, celery stalks and anchovies. The parent group is CentraArchy Restaurant Group, which also owns NY Prime in Boca Raton. Jerry Greenbaum, CEO, says consistencyŽ is the key to restaurants success „ he believes a new management team will ensure that, after noting trouble with a former team at the Tavern. A full bar is available, as is patio dining. Gulfstream Caf, 1352 S. U.S. Highway 1, Jupiter, (561) 744-5144, www.centraar-chy.com; open Monday-Saturday, 3-11 p.m., Sunday, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. „ Jan Norris covers food and dining for Florida Weekly. Write to her at jnorris@floridaweekly.com and read more at her website, www.JanNorris.com. Q jan NORRIS jnorris@floridaweekly.com Veteran restaurateurs open north Palm Beach County eateries SCOTT B. SMITH/FLORIDA WEEKLYHoly Smokes! opened recently in Palm Beach Gardens. In addition to American grill foods, it offers a pulled pork taco, and pizz as. COURTESY PHOTOChef John Belleme

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Our new $13.6 million ER expansion is here, with more than triple the space asbefore, allowing the hospital to meet theneeds of our growing communities. ER NEW FACE. SAME GREAT CARE. PALM BEACH GARDENS MEDICAL CENTER moreknowledge€ Ranked as One of Americas 50 Best Hospitals for the past four years ina row. € Ranked in the Top 5% of Hospitals in theNation for OverallCardiac Services € To date, nearly 15,000 Open-heart Surgeries. *Rating by HealthGrades, a leading healthcare ratings company. 3360 burns road, palm beach gardens | pbgmc.com more space € An additional 9,537 sq. ft., triple our current ER space. € 20 private exam rooms with flat screen TVs. € Expanded convenient parking, and complimentary valet. more technology € Bedside Registration & Triage to help reduce waiting time. € Digital Picture Communications System provides access to related medical data immediately. more care Advanced technology and a specially trained team of dedicatedhealthcare professionals, the new ER continues a long tradition ofproviding high-quality, personalized medical services to our community.